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Sample records for 2h nmr spectroscopy

  1. Short hydrogen bonds in salts of dicarboxylic acids; structural correlations from solid-state 13C and 2H NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsbeek, Nicoline; Schaumburg, Kjeld; Larsen, Sine

    1993-10-01

    Solid-state 13C and 2H NMR spectra are found to very suitable for characterizing the short Osbnd H...O hydrogen bonds observed in acid salts of dicarboxylic acids. The majority of the investigated compounds are acid salts of malonic, succinic and tartaric acid with monovalent cations derived from alkali metals and small aliphatic amines. They include systems with symmetric and asymmetric hydrogen bonds. Accurate structural information about their geometry is available from low-temperature X-ray diffraction data. The 13C chemical shifts of the C atoms in the different carboxy groups display a linear variation with the absolute difference between the two Csbnd O bond lengths. Theoretical ab initio calculations for model systems showed that the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant NQCC for 2H increases with increasing asymmetry of the hydrogen-bonded system. NQCC values for 2H in the short symmetric hydrogen-bonded systems are in the range 53-59 kHz compared with the larger values of up to 166kHz found in systems with longer asymmetric hydrogen bonds. The 2H NQCC values display a perfect linear dependence on the asymmetry of the hydrogen bond. 2H NQCC decreases with decreasing temperature in the symmetric hydrogen bonds showing that the corresponding potential has a single well.

  2. 2H NMR studies of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, R.; Nowaczyk, A.; Geil, B.; Bohmer, R.

    2007-11-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid, deuterated at the methyl group, was investigated using 2H-NMR in its supercooled and glassy states. Just above the glass transition temperature the molecular reorientations were studied using stimulated-echo spectroscopy and demonstrated a large degree of similarity with other glass formers. Deep in the glassy phase the NMR spectra look similar to those reported for the crystal [A. Detken, P. Focke, H. Zimmermann, U. Haeberlen, Z. Olejniczak, Z. T. Lalowicz, Z. Naturforsch. A 50 (1995) 95] and below 20 K they are indicative for rotational tunneling with a relatively large tunneling frequency. Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation times for temperatures below 150 K reveal a broad distribution of correlation times in the glass. The dominant energy barrier characterizing the slow-down of the methyl group is significantly smaller than the well defined barrier in the crystal.

  3. Effect of Saturated Very Long-Chain Fatty Acids on the Organization of Lipid Membranes: A Study Combining (2)H NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz Ramos, Adrian; Lagüe, Patrick; Lamoureux, Guillaume; Lafleur, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Little is known about the interaction of very long-chain saturated fatty acids (VLCFAs) with biological membranes. However, this could play an important role on interleaflet interactions and signal transduction mechanisms in cells. The aim of this work is to determine how VLCFA structurally adapts in fluid phospholipid bilayers, since both species must exhibit a significant hydrophobic mismatch. The membrane organization has been described by means of (2)H NMR and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the protonation state affects the position and order of free fatty acids (FFAs) in phospholipid membranes. It was shown that the protonated FFA-C24 carboxyl group is located slightly under the POPC head group and therefore its acyl chain can interact with the lipids of the opposite leaflet. This interdigitation of the end of the acyl chain causes a second plateau observed in SC-D profiles, a very unusual feature in lipid systems. PMID:27351151

  4. International symposium on NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication consists of 32 papers and presentations from the field of NMR spectroscopy applications submitted to the International Symposium on NMR Spectroscopy held at Smolenice between 29 Sep and 3 Oct, 1980. (B.S.)

  5. Annual reports on NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Graham A; McCarthy, M J

    1995-01-01

    Over recent years, no other technique has grown to such importance as that of NMR spectroscopy. It is used in all branches of science where precise structural determination is required and where the nature of interactions and reactions in solution is being studied. Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy has established itself as a means for the specialist and non-specialist alike to become familiar with new applications of the technique in all branches of chemistry, including biochemistry, and pharmaceutics. This volume focuses on theoretical aspects of NMR nuclear shielding and on applications of

  6. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rule, Gordon S

    2006-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy is a comprehensive textbook that guides the reader from a basic understanding of the phenomenological properties of magnetic resonance to the application and interpretation of modern multi-dimensional NMR experiments on 15N/13C-labeled proteins. Beginning with elementary quantum mechanics, a set of practical rules is presented and used to describe many commonly employed multi-dimensional, multi-nuclear NMR pulse sequences. A modular analysis of NMR pulse sequence building blocks also provides a basis for understanding and developing novel pulse programs. This text not only covers topics from chemical shift assignment to protein structure refinement, as well as the analysis of protein dynamics and chemical kinetics, but also provides a practical guide to many aspects of modern spectrometer hardware, sample preparation, experimental set-up, and data pr...

  7. Determination of muscle protein synthesis rates in fish using (2)H2O and (2)H NMR analysis of alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Cátia; Viegas, Filipa; Rito, João; Jones, John; Viegas, Ivan

    2016-09-15

    Following administration of deuterated water ((2)H2O), the fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of a given endogenous protein can be estimated by (2)H-enrichment quantification of its alanine residues. Currently, this is measured by mass spectrometry following a derivatization procedure. Muscle FSR was measured by (1)H/(2)H NMR analysis of alanine from seabass kept for 6 days in 5% (2)H-enriched saltwater, following acid hydrolysis and amino acid isolation by cation-exchange chromatography of muscle tissue. The analysis is simple and robust, and provides precise measurements of excess alanine (2)H-enrichment in the 0.1-0.4% range from 50 mmol of alanine recovered from muscle protein. PMID:27418547

  8. Sepsis does not alter red blood cell glucose metabolism or Na+ concentration: A 2H-, 23Na-NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of sepsis on intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+]i) and glucose metabolism were examined in rat red blood cells (RBCs) by using 23Na- and 2H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Sepsis was induced in 15 halothane-anesthetized female Sprague-Dawley rats by using the cecal ligation and perforation technique; 14 control rats underwent cecal manipulation without ligation. The animals were fasted for 36 h, but allowed free access to water. At 36 h postsurgery, RBCs were examined by 23Na-NMR by using dysprosium tripolyphosphate as a chemical shift reagent. Human RBCs from 17 critically ill nonseptic patients and from 7 patients who were diagnosed as septic were also examined for [Na+]i. Five rat RBC specimens had [Na+]i determined by both 23Na-NMR and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). For glucose metabolism studies, RBCs from septic and control rats were suspended in modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing [6,6-2H2]glucose and examined by 2H-NMR. No significant differences in [Na+]i or glucose utilization were found in RBCs from control or septic rats. There were no differences in [Na+]i in the two groups of patients. The [Na+]i determined by NMR spectroscopy agreed closely with measurements using ICP-AES and establish that 100% of the [Na+]i of the RBC is visible by NMR. Glucose measurements determined by 2H-NMR correlated closely (correlation coefficient = 0.93) with enzymatic analysis. These studies showed no evidence that sepsis disturbed RBC membrane function or metabolism

  9. Sepsis does not alter red blood cell glucose metabolism or Na+ concentration: A 2H-, 23Na-NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotchkiss, R.S.; Song, S.K.; Ling, C.S.; Ackerman, J.J.; Karl, I.E. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The effects of sepsis on intracellular Na+ concentration ((Na+)i) and glucose metabolism were examined in rat red blood cells (RBCs) by using 23Na- and 2H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Sepsis was induced in 15 halothane-anesthetized female Sprague-Dawley rats by using the cecal ligation and perforation technique; 14 control rats underwent cecal manipulation without ligation. The animals were fasted for 36 h, but allowed free access to water. At 36 h postsurgery, RBCs were examined by 23Na-NMR by using dysprosium tripolyphosphate as a chemical shift reagent. Human RBCs from 17 critically ill nonseptic patients and from 7 patients who were diagnosed as septic were also examined for (Na+)i. Five rat RBC specimens had (Na+)i determined by both 23Na-NMR and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). For glucose metabolism studies, RBCs from septic and control rats were suspended in modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing (6,6-2H2)glucose and examined by 2H-NMR. No significant differences in (Na+)i or glucose utilization were found in RBCs from control or septic rats. There were no differences in (Na+)i in the two groups of patients. The (Na+)i determined by NMR spectroscopy agreed closely with measurements using ICP-AES and establish that 100% of the (Na+)i of the RBC is visible by NMR. Glucose measurements determined by 2H-NMR correlated closely (correlation coefficient = 0.93) with enzymatic analysis. These studies showed no evidence that sepsis disturbed RBC membrane function or metabolism.

  10. Synthesis, structural characterization, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of [Ga(phen)(H1.5PO4)2].H2O and [Ga(phen)(HPO4)(H2PO4)].1.5H2O (phen=1, 10-phenanthroline), two organic-inorganic hybrid compounds with 1-D chain structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two new organic-inorganic hybrid compounds, [Ga(phen)(H1.5PO4)2].H2O (1) and [Ga(phen)(HPO4)(H2PO4)].1.5H2O (2) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline), have been synthesized by hydrothermal methods and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Their structures consist of 1-D chains of strictly alternating GaO4N2 octahedra and phosphate tetrahedra. The phen ligands in both compounds bind in a bidentate fashion to the gallium atoms and the 1-D structures extend into 3-D supramolecular arrays via π-π stacking interactions of phen ligands and hydrogen bonds. 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy was applied to study the deuterated sample of 1 which contains very short hydrogen bonds with an O-O distance of 2.406(2) A. Crystal data for 1: monoclinic, space group C2/c (No. 15), a=11.077(1) A, b=21.496(2) A, c=7.9989(7) A, β=127.211(2)o, and Z=4. The crystal symmetry is the same for 2 as for 1 except a=27.555(2) A, b=6.3501(5) A, c=21.327(2) A, β=122.498(1)o, and Z=8

  11. 2H-NMR CHARACTERIZATION OF CLAY DISPERSION AND CONFINEMENT EFFECT ON PROBE MOLECULES IN RUBBER/CLAY NANOCOMPOSITE-GELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping-chuan Sun; Jian-jun Zhu; Tie-hong Chen

    2009-01-01

    2H-NMR spectroscopy of the probe molecule,deuterated benzene,was applied to characterize organo-clay dispersion and confinement effect on the local motion of benzene in rubber/clay nanocomposite-gels.The observed 2H line shapes of benzene in intercalated and exfoliated nanocomposites were obviously different,which can be used to estimate clay-dispersion quality.2H-NMR line shapes also reflect the different influence of intercalated or exfoliated layered-silicates on local motions of benzene,implying that probe molecules exhibit different local motions depending on different confined geometry in these nanocomposites.Viscosity measurements further confirmed these NMR results.

  12. Insight into the local magnetic environments and deuteron mobility in jarosite (AFe3(SO4)2(OD)6, A = K, Na, D3O) and hydronium alunite ((D3O)Al3(SO4)2(OD,OD2)6), from variable temperature 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Heinmaa, Ivo; Samoson, Ago;

    2011-01-01

    to the different temperature dependence of their isotropic shifts. An activation energy of 6.3(4) kJ/mol is determined for the D3O+ motion in the isostructural compound D3OAl3(SO4)2(OD)6. Our NMR results support theories that ascribes the spin glass behavior of (H3O)Fe3(SO4)2(OD)6 is to disorder of the D3O+ ion......Detailed insight into the magnetic properties and mobility of the different deuteron species in jarosites (AFe3(SO4)2(OD)6, A = K, Na, D3O) is obtained from variable temperature 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy from 40 K to 300 K. Fast MAS results in high resolution spectra of these paramagnetic compounds...... susceptibility and follows a Curie-Weiss law above 150 K. ii) Fe-OD2 and D2O near Fe vacancies. The Fe near these vacancies shows strong local anti-ferromagnetic couplings even high above the Néel temperature (ca. 65 K). 2H NMR can discriminate between D2O and D3O+ ions substituted on the A site due...

  13. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  14. NMR spectroscopy assists synthetic fuels research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cookson, D.J.; Smith, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proved to be a useful and versatile technique for the study of synthetic fuels feedstocks, catalysts, process intermediates and final products. Some applications of the technique to coal and gas conversion research are illustrated and discussed.

  15. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively.

  16. Ethylene glycol causes acyl chain disordering in liquid-crystalline, unsaturated phospholipid model membranes, as measured by 2H NMR

    OpenAIRE

    NICOLAY K; Smaal, E B; de Kruijff, B.

    1986-01-01

    2H NMR has been used to probe the effects of ethylene glycol at the level of the acyl chains in liposomes prepared from dioleoylphosphatidic acid or dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, labeled with 2H at the 11-position of both oleic acid chains. Increasing concentrations of ethylene glycol lead to a proportional and substantial decrease in the quadrupolar splittings, measured from the 2H NMR spectra of both liposomal systems, indicative of acyl chain disordering.

  17. Ethylene glycol causes acyl chain disordering in liquid-crystalline, unsaturated phospholipid model membranes, as measured by 2H NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2H NMR has been used to probe the effects of ethylene glycol at the level of the acyl chains in liposomes prepared from dioleoylphosphatidic acid or dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, labeled with 2H at the 11-position of both oleic acid chains. Increasing concentrations of ethylene glycol lead to a proportional and substantial decrease in the quadrupolar splittings, measured from the 2H NMR spectra of both liposomal system, indicative of acyl chain disordering. (Auth.)

  18. Slow recrystallization of tripalmitoylglycerol from MCT oil observed by 2H NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin W; Smith, Paul R; Furó, István; Pettersson, Erik Thyboll; Cain, Fred W; Favre, Loek; Talbot, Geoff

    2007-10-17

    The crystallization and recrystallization of fats have a significant impact on the properties and quality of many food products. While crystallization has been the subject of a number of studies using pure triacylglycerols (TAG), recrystallization in similarly pure systems is rarely studied. In this work, perdeuterated tripalmitoylglycerol ( (2)H-PPP) was dissolved in medium chain triacylglycerol oil (MCT) to yield a saturated solution. The solution was heated to cause partial melting of the solid and dissolution of the molten fraction of (2)H-PPP in MCT and was then cooled to the original temperature to induce recrystallization from the supersaturated solution. (2)H NMR was used to monitor the disappearance of (2)H-PPP from the solution and showed that recrystallization occurred in two steps. The first step was rapid, taking place over a few minutes, and accounted for more than two-thirds of the total recrystallization. The second step was much slower, taking place over a remarkably long timescale of hours to days. It is proposed that dissolution occurs from all parts of the crystals, leaving an etched and pitted surface. The first step of crystallization is the infilling of these pits, while the second step is the continued growth on the smoothed crystal faces.

  19. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs

  1. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). (authors)

  2. Protein dynamics in the solid state from 2H NMR line shape analysis: a consistent perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirovitch, Eva; Liang, Zhichun; Freed, Jack H

    2015-02-19

    Deuterium line shape analysis of CD3 groups has emerged as a particularly useful tool for studying microsecond-millisecond protein motions in the solid state. The models devised so far consist of several independently conceived simple jump-type motions. They are comprised of physical quantities encoded in their simplest form; improvements are only possible by adding yet another simple motion, thereby changing the model. The various treatments developed are case-specific; hence comparison among the different systems is not possible. Here we develop a new methodology for (2)H NMR line shape analysis free of these limitations. It is based on the microscopic-order-macroscopic-disorder (MOMD) approach. In MOMD motions are described by diffusion tensors, spatial restrictions by potentials/ordering tensors, and geometric features by relative tensor orientations. Jump-type motions are recovered in the limit of large orientational potentials. Model improvement is accomplished by monitoring the magnitude, symmetry, and orientation of the various tensors. The generality of MOMD makes possible comparison among different scenarios. CD3 line shapes from the Chicken Villin Headpiece Subdomain and the Streptomyces Subtilisin Inhibitor are used as experimental examples. All of these spectra are reproduced by using rhombic local potentials constrained for simplicity to be given by the L = 2 spherical harmonics, and by axial diffusion tensors. Potential strength and rhombicity are found to be ca. 2-3 k(B)T. The diffusion tensor is tilted at 120° from the C-CD3 axis. The perpendicular (parallel) correlation times for local motion are 0.1-1.0 ms (3.3-30 μs). Activation energies in the 1.1-8.0 kcal/mol range are estimated. Future prospects include extension to the (2)H relaxation limit, application to the (15)N and (13)C NMR nuclei, and accounting for collective motions and anisotropic media. PMID:25594631

  3. Local structure and molecular motions in imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal as studied by 2H and 13C NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The local structure and molecular motion of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal were investigated using solid-state 2H and 13C NMR. The imidazolium ion undergoes isotropic rotation, which is correlated with a defect in the crystal, as observed by 2H NMR broadline spectra above 263 K. A 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in the regular site was observed from 2H NMR quadrupole Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra. The Grotthuss mechanism was accompanied by a 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in regular sites. Moreover, the proton transfer associated with the imidazolium ion of the defective crystal is important for proton conductivity of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal

  4. Study of the ferroelastic phase transition in the tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H54]2ZnBr4 by magic-angle spinning and static NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ae Ran Lim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ferroelastic phase transition of tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H54]2ZnBr4 at the phase transition temperature (TC = 283 K was characterized by magic-angle spinning (MAS and static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, and confirmed by optical polarizing spectroscopy. The structural geometry near TC was studied in terms of the chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation times T1ρ in the rotating frame for 1H MAS NMR and 13C cross-polarization (CP/MAS NMR. The two inequivalent ethyl groups were distinguishable in the 13C NMR spectrum, and the T1ρ results indicate that they undergo tumbling motion above TC in a coupled manner. From the 14N NMR results, the two nitrogen nuclei in the N(C2H54+ ions were distinguishable above TC, and the splitting in the spectra below TC was related to the ferroelastic domains with different orientations.

  5. In vivo NMR spectroscopy of ripening avocado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripening of avocado fruit is associated with a dramatic increase in respiration. Previous studies have indicated that the increase in respiration is brought about by activation of the glycolytic reaction catalyzing the conversion of fructose-6-phosphate to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The authors reinvestigated the proposed role of glycolytic regulation in the respiratory increase using in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using an external surface coil and analysis of phosphofructokinase (PFK), phosphofructophosphotransferase (PFP), and fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (fru 2,6-P2) levels in ripening avocado fruit. In vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy revealed large increases in ATP levels accompanying the increase in respiration. Both glycolytic enzymes, PFK and PFP, were present in avocado fruit, with the latter activity being highly stimulated by fru 2,6-P2. Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate levels increased approximately 90% at the onset of ripening, indicating that the respiratory increase in ripening avocado may be regulated by the activation of PFP brought about by an increase in fru 2,6-P2

  6. Rapid solid-state NMR of deuterated proteins by interleaved cross-polarization from 1H and 2H nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerring, Morten; Paaske, Berit; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Akbey, Ümit; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel sampling strategy, interleaving acquisition of multiple NMR spectra by exploiting initial polarization subsequently from 1H and 2H spins, taking advantage of their different T1 relaxation times. Different 1H- and 2H-polarization based spectra are in this way simultaneously recorded improving either information content or sensitivity by adding spectra. The so-called Relaxation-optimized Acquisition of Proton Interleaved with Deuterium (RAPID) 1H → 13C/ 2H → 13C CP/MAS multiple-acquisition method is demonstrated by 1D and 2D experiments using a uniformly 2H, 15N, 13C-labeled α-spectrin SH3 domain sample with all or 30% back-exchanged labile 2H to 1H. It is demonstrated how 1D 13C CP/MAS or 2D 13C- 13C correlation spectra initialized with polarization from either 1H or 2H may be recorded simultaneously with flexibility to be added or used individually for spectral editing. It is also shown how 2D 13C- 13C correlation spectra may be recorded interleaved with 2H- 13C correlation spectra to obtain 13C- 13C correlations along with information about dynamics from 2H sideband patterns.

  7. Selective photochemistry at stereogenic metal and ligand centers of cis-[Ru(diphosphine)2(H)2]: preparative, NMR, solid state, and laser flash studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Câmpian, Marius V; Perutz, Robin N; Procacci, Barbara; Thatcher, Robert J; Torres, Olga; Whitwood, Adrian C

    2012-02-22

    Three ruthenium complexes Λ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-BPE)(2)(H)(2)] Λ-R,R-Ru1H(2), Δ-[cis-Ru((S,S)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(H)(2)] Δ-S,S-Ru2H(2), and Λ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(H)(2)] Λ-R,R-Ru2H(2) (1 = (Me-BPE)(2), 2 = (Me-DuPHOS)(2)) were characterized by multinuclear NMR and CD spectroscopy in solution and by X-ray crystallography. The chiral ligands allow the full control of stereochemistry and enable mechanistic studies not otherwise available. Oxidative addition of E-H bonds (E = H, B, Si, C) was studied by steady state and laser flash photolysis in the presence of substrates. Steady state photolysis shows formation of single products with one stereoisomer. Solid state structures and circular dichroism spectra reveal a change in configuration at ruthenium for some Δ-S,S-Ru2H(2)/Λ-R,R-Ru2H(2) photoproducts from Λ to Δ (or vice versa) while the configuration for Λ-R,R-Ru1H(2) products remains unchanged as Λ. The X-ray structure of silyl hydride photoproducts suggests a residual H(1)···Si(1) interaction for Δ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(Et(2)SiH)(H)] and Δ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(PhSiH(2))(H)] but not for their Ru(R,R-BPE)(2) analogues. Molecular structures were also determined for Λ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-BPE)(2)(Bpin)(H)], Λ-[Ru((S,S)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(η(2)-C(2)H(4))], Δ-[Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(η(2)-C(2)H(4))], and trans-[Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(C(6)F(5))(H)]. In situ laser photolysis in the presence of p-H(2) generates hyperpolarized NMR spectra because of magnetically inequivalent hydrides; these experiments and low temperature photolysis with D(2) reveal that the loss of hydride ligands is concerted. The reaction intermediates [Ru(DuPHOS)(2)] and [Ru(BPE)(2)] were detected by laser flash photolysis and have spectra consistent with approximate square-planar Ru(0) structures. The rates of their reactions with H(2), D(2), HBpin, and PhSiH(3) were measured by transient kinetics. Rate constants are significantly faster for [Ru(BPE)(2)] than for [Ru(DuPHOS)(2

  8. Local environments and lithium adsorption on the iron oxyhydroxides lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) and goethite (alpha-FeOOH): A 2H-2 and 7Li solid-state MAS NMR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Grey, Clare P.; Paik, Jonkim

    2008-01-01

    2H and 7LiMAS NMR spectroscopy techniques were applied to study the local surface and bulk environments of iron oxyhydroxide lepiclocrocite (gamma-FeOOH). 2H variable-temperature (VT) MAS NMR experiments were performed, showing the presence of short-range, strong antiferromagnetic correlations......) on the concentrations of Li+ inner- and outer-sphere complexes was then explored, the concentration of the inner sphere complex increasing rapidly above the point of zero charge and with decreasing RH. Possible local environments of the adsorbed Li+ were identified by comparison with other layer-structured iron oxides...

  9. Studies on metabolic regulation using NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, H; Badar-Goffer, R; Ben-Yoseph, O; Morris, P; Thatcher, N

    1993-01-01

    The effects of hypoxia and hypoglycaemia on cerebral metabolism and calcium have been studied using multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. 13C MRS showed that severe hypoxia did not cause any further increase in metabolic flux into lactate seen in mild hypoxia, but there was a further increase in 13C labelling of alanine and glycerol 3-phosphate. These results are discussed in terms of the ability of lactate dehydrogenase to maintain normal levels of NADH in mild hypoxia, but not in severe hypoxia. We conclude that glycerol 3-phosphate and alanine may provide novel means of monitoring severe hypoxia whereas lactate is a reliable indicator only of mild hypoxia. 19F- and 31P NMR spectroscopy showed that neither hypoxia nor hypoglycaemia alone caused any significant change in [Ca2+]i. Combined sequential insults (hypoxia, followed by hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia), or vice versa, produced a 100% increase in [Ca2+]i, whereas immediate exposure to the combined insult (hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia) resulted in a large 5-fold increase in [Ca2+]i, with severe irreversible effects on the energy state. These results are discussed in terms of metabolic adaptation to the single type of insult, which renders the tissue less vulnerable to the combined insult. The effects of this combined insult are far more severe than those caused by glutamate or NMDA, which throws doubt on the current excitoxic hypothesis of cell damage.

  10. The Doppler effect in NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéron, Maurice

    2003-02-01

    An NMR sample may be subject to motions, such as those due to sample spinning or to liquid flow. Is the spectrum of such a sample affected by the Doppler effect? The question arises because, instrumental dimensions being much shorter than the wavelength, it is the near-field of the precessing magnetic moment which couples to the receiver coil, rather than the radiated far-field. We expand the near-field into plane propagating waves. For each such wave there is another one with the same amplitude, propagating in the opposite direction. The Doppler shifts are therefore equal and opposite. In the model case of a small fluid sample moving with constant velocity, this leads to a distribution of Doppler shifts which is symmetrical with respect to the unshifted frequency: there is no net spectral shift. We examine the possibility of observing the Doppler distribution in this case. We also consider the case of thermal motion of a gas. We draw attention to the resolved Doppler splitting of molecular rotational transitions in a supersonic burst as observed in a microwave resonator. We also mention briefly the Doppler effect in molecular beam spectroscopy.

  11. NMR spectroscopy and imaging of hyperpolarized gases

    OpenAIRE

    Zänker, Paul-Philipp

    2007-01-01

    Since the discovery of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phenomenon, countless NMR techniques have been developed that are today indispensable tools in physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. As one of the main obstacles in NMR is its notorious lack of sensitivity, different hyperpolarization (HP) methods have been established to increase signals up to several orders of magnitude. In this work, different aspects of magnetic resonance, using HP noble gases, are studied, hereby combining ...

  12. Double and zero quantum filtered 2H NMR analysis of D2O in intervertebral disc tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Kristopher J.; Vega, Alexander J.; Polenova, Tatyana; Cannella, Marco; Marcolongo, Michele

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of double and zero quantum filtered 2H NMR spectra obtained from D2O perfused in the nucleus pulposus of human intervertebral disc tissue samples is reported. Fitting the spectra with a three-site model allows for residual quadrupolar couplings and T2 relaxation times to be measured. The analysis reveals changes in both the couplings and relaxation times as the tissue begins to show signs of degradation. The full analysis demonstrates that information about tissue hydration, water collagen interactions, and sample heterogeneity can be obtained and used to better understand the biochemical differences between healthy and degraded tissue.

  13. 1H and 2H NMR study in paramagnetic solutions of Eu3+ nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dependence of the spin-lattice rate(1/T1) of 1H and 2H nuclei for the 2.1 T magnetic field of the concentration (from 0.1 to 2.75 mol) of Eu3+ paramagnetic ions in the range from 263 K to 373 K is presented . Also the NMRD profield for the frecuency range from 0.1 to 500 Mhz is showed

  14. Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy of biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Nicolau

    1995-01-01

    This book is intended to provide an in-depth understanding of 13C NMR as a tool in biological research. 13C NMR has provided unique information concerning complex biological systems, from proteins and nucleic acids to animals and humans. The subjects addressed include multidimensional heteronuclear techniques for structural studies of molecules in the liquid and solid states, the investigation of interactions in model membranes, the elucidation of metabolic pathwaysin vitro and in vivo on animals, and noninvasive metabolic studies performed on humans. The book is a unique mix of NMR methods and biological applications which makes it a convenient reference for those interested in research in this interdisciplinary area of physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine.Key Features* An interdisciplinary text with emphasis on both 13C NMR methodology and the relevant biological and biomedical issues* State-of-the-art 13C NMR techniques are described; Whenever possible, their advantages over other approaches are empha...

  15. Developments of RF Coil for P in vivo NMR Spectroscopy .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khushu

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available RF receiver coils are very important parts of an NMR System. The design of these coils is very critical and has a dramatic effect on the SNR of the NMR signal and are generally developed in TRA/REC mode. This paper reports the developments of a 3.5 cm TRA/REC 26 MHz RF coil for P spectroscopy of small organs like thyroid. The coil is small in size, fits well in the neck for thyroid spectroscopy and is successfully working with the 1.5 tesla whole body Superconducting NMR System available at INMAS.

  16. Developments of RF Coil for P in vivo NMR Spectroscopy .

    OpenAIRE

    S. Khushu; S.B. Mehta; Sushil Chandra; A Jena

    1993-01-01

    RF receiver coils are very important parts of an NMR System. The design of these coils is very critical and has a dramatic effect on the SNR of the NMR signal and are generally developed in TRA/REC mode. This paper reports the developments of a 3.5 cm TRA/REC 26 MHz RF coil for P spectroscopy of small organs like thyroid. The coil is small in size, fits well in the neck for thyroid spectroscopy and is successfully working with the 1.5 tesla whole body Superconducting NMR System availab...

  17. Effect of Sterol Structure on Chain Ordering of an Unsaturated Phospholipid: A 2H-NMR Study of POPC/Sterol Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaghaghi, Mehran; Thewalt, Jenifer; Zuckermann, Martin

    2012-10-01

    The physical properties of biological membranes are considerably altered by the presence of sterols. In particular, sterols help to maintain the integrity of the cell by adjusting the fluidity of the plasma membrane. Cholesterol is in addition an important component of lipid rafts which are hypothesized to compartmentalize the cell membrane surface thereby making it possible for certain proteins to function. Using 2H-NMR spectroscopy, we studied the effect of a series of different sterols on the chain ordering of POPC, an unsaturated phospholipid present in eukaryotic cell membranes. We were able to assigned specific roles to the structural differences between the sterols by comparing the manner in which they affect the average lipid chain conformation of POPC.

  18. Crystal structure, NMR study, dc-conductivity and dielectric relaxation studies of a new compound [C2H10N2]Cd(SCN)2Cl2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, K.; Kamoun, S.; Ayedi, H. F.; Gargouri, M.

    2012-06-01

    The crystal structure, the solid NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance study have been carried out on [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN)2. Characterization by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows that the cadmium atoms have à 2N2S2Cl hexa-coordination sphere, exhibiting pseudo-octahedral geometry. The cadmium atoms are bridged by two thiocyanate ions generating 1-D polymeric-chains. These chains are themselves interconnected by means of N-H…Cl(NCS) hydrogen bonds originating from the organic cation [(NH3)2(CH2)2]2+. 111Cd isotropic chemical shifts span a range of 268ppm. The cadmium atom exhibits multiplets that result from 111Cd-14N spin-spin coupling. Examination of 111Cd and 13C MAS line shapes shows direct measurement of the indirect spin-spin coupling constant 2J(111Cd, 14N) = 105Hz and the dipolar coupling constant of 1381Hz . Impedance spectroscopy measurements of [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN)2 have been studied from 209Hz to 5 MHz over the temperature range 300-370 K. The Cole-Cole (Z" versus Z') plots are fitted to two equivalent circuits models. The formalism of complex permittivity and impedance were employed to analyze the experimental data. The dc conductivity follows the Arrhenius relation with an activation energy Ea = 0.54 (3) eV.

  19. Crystal structure, NMR study, dc-conductivity and dielectric relaxation studies of a new compound [C2H10N2]Cd(SCN2Cl2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargouri M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure, the solid NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance study have been carried out on [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN2. Characterization by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows that the cadmium atoms have à 2N2S2Cl hexa-coordination sphere, exhibiting pseudo-octahedral geometry. The cadmium atoms are bridged by two thiocyanate ions generating 1-D polymeric-chains. These chains are themselves interconnected by means of N-H…Cl(NCS hydrogen bonds originating from the organic cation [(NH32(CH22]2+. 111Cd isotropic chemical shifts span a range of 268ppm. The cadmium atom exhibits multiplets that result from 111Cd-14N spin-spin coupling. Examination of 111Cd and 13C MAS line shapes shows direct measurement of the indirect spin-spin coupling constant 2J(111Cd, 14N = 105Hz and the dipolar coupling constant of 1381Hz . Impedance spectroscopy measurements of [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN2 have been studied from 209Hz to 5 MHz over the temperature range 300-370 K. The Cole-Cole (Z” versus Z’ plots are fitted to two equivalent circuits models. The formalism of complex permittivity and impedance were employed to analyze the experimental data. The dc conductivity follows the Arrhenius relation with an activation energy Ea = 0.54 (3 eV.

  20. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnun, Jacob J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Brown, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy finds growing application to inorganic and organic materials, biological samples, polymers, proteins, and cellular membranes. However, this technique is often neither included in laboratory curricula nor typically covered in undergraduate courses. On the other hand, spectroscopy and…

  1. NMR Spectroscopy: Processing Strategies (by Peter Bigler)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Nancy S.

    1998-06-01

    Peter Bigler. VCH: New York, 1997. 249 pp. ISBN 3-527-28812-0. $99.00. This book, part of a four-volume series planned to deal with all aspects of a standard NMR experiment, is almost the exact book I have been hoping to find. My department has acquired, as have hundreds of other undergraduate institutions, high-field NMR instrumentation and the capability of doing extremely sophisticated experiments. However, the training is often a one- or two-day experience in which the material retained by the faculty trained is garbled and filled with holes, not unlike the information our students seem to retain. This text, and the accompanying exercises based on data contained on a CD-ROM, goes a long way to fill in the gaps and clarify misunderstandings about NMR processing.

  2. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeMaster, D.M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  3. Molecular orientation of hydrogen-bonded liquid crystal (6BA)2-(BPy)x as Studied by 2H NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal properties of hydrogen-bonded liquid crystal (6BA)2-(BPy)x (6BA: 4-n-hexylbenzoicacid, BPy: 4,4’-bipyridine) were investigated by DSC. Two liquid crystal phases (LCI, LCII) were found for (6BA)2-(BPy)0.5. In LCII, the distribution of the orientation of molecules was larger than in LCI. The order parameter S of molecular orientation in the liquid crystal phase was estimated from a 2H NMR spectrum. S decreased rapidly around the LCI-LCII phase transition. The increase in orientational fluctuation of the 6BA dimer with an open dimer structure is predicted to cause the rapid decrease of S

  4. Tracing bacterial metabolism using multi-nuclear (1H, 2H, and 13C) Solid State NMR: Realizing an Idea Initiated by James Scott

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, G.; Fogel, M. L.; Jin, K.; Griffen, P.; Steele, A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Approximately 6 years ago, while at the Geophysical Laboratory, James Scott became interested in the application of Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to study bacterial metabolism. As often happens, other experiments intervened and the NMR experiments were not pursued. We have revisited Jame's question and find that using a multi-nuclear approach (1H, 2H, and 13C Solid State NMR) on laboratory cell culture has some distinct advantages. Our experiments involved batch cultures of E. coli (MG1655) harvested at stationary phase. In all experiments the growth medium consisted of MOPS medium for enterobacteria, where the substrate is glucose. In one set of experiments, 10 % of the water was D2O; in another 10 % of the glucose was per-deuterated. The control experiment used both water and glucose at natural isotopic abundance. A kill control of dead E. coli immersed in pure D2O for an extended period exhibited no deuterium incorporation. In both deuterium enriched experiments, considerable incorporation of deuterium into E. coli's biomolecular constituents was detected via 2H Solid State NMR. In the case of the D2O enriched experiment, 58 % of the incorporated deuterium is observed in a sharp peak at a frequency of 0.31 ppm, consistent with D incorporation in the cell membrane lipids, the remainder is observed in a broad peak at a higher frequency (centered at 5.4 ppm, but spanning out to beyond 10 ppm) that is consistent with D incorporation into predominantly DNA and RNA. In the case of the D-glucose experiments, 61 % of the deuterium is observed in a sharp resonance peak at 0.34 ppm, also consistent with D incorporation into membrane lipids, the remainder of the D is observed at a broad resonance peak centered at 4.3 ppm, consistent with D enrichment in glycogen. Deuterium abundance in the E. coli cells grown in 10 % D2O is nearly 2X greater than that grown with 10 % D-glucose. Very subtle differences are observed in both the 1H and 13C solid

  5. Room temperature chiral discrimination in paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Soncini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    A recently proposed theory of chiral discrimination in NMR spectroscopy based on the detection of a molecular electric polarization $\\mathbf{P}$ rotating in a plane perpendicular to the NMR magnetic field [A. D. Buckingham, J. Chem. Phys. $\\mathbf{140}$, 011103 (2014)], is here generalized to paramagnetic systems. Our theory predicts new contributions to $\\mathbf{P}$, varying as the square of the inverse temperature. Ab initio calculations for ten Dy$^{3+}$ complexes, at 293K, show that in strongly anisotropic paramagnetic molecules $\\mathbf{P}$ can be more than 1000 times larger than in diamagnetic molecules, making paramagnetic NMR chiral discrimination amenable to room temperature detection.

  6. Carbon-deuterium rotational-echo double-resonance NMR spectroscopy of lyophilized aspartame formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Suman A; Utz, Marcel; Gorman, Eric M; Pikal, Michael J; Munson, Eric J; Lubach, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    In this study, changes in the local conformation of aspartame were observed in annealed lyophilized glasses by monitoring changes in the distance between two labeled sites using C-(2)H rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Confirmation that the REDOR experiments were producing accurate distance measurement was ensured by measuring the (13)C-(15)N distance in glycine. The experiment was further verified by measuring the REDOR dephasing curve on (13)C-(2)H methionine. (13)C-(2)H REDOR dephasing curves were then measured on lyophilized aspartame-disaccharide formulations. In aspartame-sucrose formulation, the internuclear distances increased upon annealing, which correlated with decreased chemical reactivity. By contrast, annealing had only a minimal effect on the dephasing curve in aspartame-trehalose formulation. The results show that stability is a function of both mobility and local structure (conformation), even in a small molecule system such as lyophilized aspartame-sucrose.

  7. NMR spectroscopy applied to the eye: Drugs and metabolic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saether, Oddbjoern

    2005-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy has been extensively applied in biomedical research during the last decades. It has proved to be an analytical tool of great value. From being mainly used in chemistry, technological developments have expanded the application of NMR spectroscopy to a great wealth of disciplines. With this method, biochemical information can be obtained by analysing tissue extracts. Moreover, NMR spectroscopy is increasingly employed for pharmacokinetic studies and analysis of biofluids. Technological progress has provided increased sensitivity and resolution in the spectra, which enable even more of the complexity of biological samples to be elucidated. With the implementation of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy in biomedicine, intact tissue samples or biopsies can be investigated. Thus, NMR spectroscopy has an ever-increasing impact in metabolic screening of human samples and in animal models, and methods are also increasingly realised in vivo. The present work, NMR spectroscopy applied to eye research, consists of two main parts. Firstly, the feasibility to monitor fluorinated ophthalmic drugs directly in the eye was assessed. Secondly, HR-MAS H1 NMR spectroscopy was applied for metabolic profiling of the anterior eye segment, specifically to analyse metabolic changes in intact corneal and lenticular samples after cataractogenic insults. This work included metabonomics with the application of pattern recognition methods to analyse HR-MAS spectra of eye tissues. Optimisation strategies were explored for F19 NMR detection of fluorinated drugs in a phantom eye. S/N gains in F19 NMR spectroscopy were achieved by implementing time-share H1 decoupling at 2.35 T. The method is advantageous for compounds displaying broad spectral coupling patterns, though detection of drugs at concentrations encountered in the anterior eye segment after topical application was not feasible. Higher magnetic fields and technological improvements could enable

  8. Local structure and molecular motions in imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal as studied by {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, M., E-mail: mizuno@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Chizuwa, M.; Umiyama, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Miyatou, T.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T. [Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Natural Science & Technology (Japan); Tansho, M.; Shimizu, T. [National Institute for Materials Science (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    The local structure and molecular motion of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal were investigated using solid-state {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C NMR. The imidazolium ion undergoes isotropic rotation, which is correlated with a defect in the crystal, as observed by {sup 2}H NMR broadline spectra above 263 K. A 180{sup ∘} flip of the imidazolium ion in the regular site was observed from {sup 2}H NMR quadrupole Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra. The Grotthuss mechanism was accompanied by a 180{sup ∘} flip of the imidazolium ion in regular sites. Moreover, the proton transfer associated with the imidazolium ion of the defective crystal is important for proton conductivity of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal.

  9. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy under the fume hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küster, Simon K; Danieli, Ernesto; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2011-08-01

    This work reports the possibility to acquire high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra with a fist-sized NMR magnet directly installed under the fume hood. The small NMR sensor based on permanent magnets was used to monitor the trimerization of propionaldehyde catalyzed by indium trichloride in real time by continuously circulating the reaction mixture through the magnet bore in a closed loop with the help of a peristaltic pump. Thanks to the chemical selectivity of NMR spectroscopy the progress of the reaction can be monitored on-line by determining the concentrations of both reactant and product from the area under their respective lines in the NMR spectra as a function of time. This in situ measurement demonstrates that NMR probes can be used in chemistry laboratories, e.g. for reaction optimization, or installed at specific points of interest along industrial process lines. Therefore, it will open the door for the implementation of feedback control based on spectroscopic NMR data. PMID:21698335

  10. Dynamics in photosynthetic transient complexes studied by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scanu, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis focuses on fundamental aspects of protein-protein interactions. A multidisciplinary methodology for the detection and visualization of transient, lowly-populated encounter protein complexes is described. The new methodology combined paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy with computational me

  11. Dual-laser absorption spectroscopy of C2H2 at 1.4 μ m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasci, E.; Odintsova, T. A.; Castrillo, A.; De Vizia, M. D.; Merlone, A.; Bertiglia, F.; Moretti, L.; Gianfrani, L.

    2016-04-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (line intensity factor, pressure self-broadening, and shifting coefficients) of C2H2 at 1.4 μ m were accurately measured using a dual-laser approach, based upon the technique of optical phase locking. This generated an absolute frequency scale underneath the absorption spectra. A pair of extended-cavity diode lasers was used. One of them, the probe laser, is forced to maintain a precise frequency offset from a reference laser, which is an optical frequency standard based on noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy. Laser-gas interaction takes place inside an isothermal multipass cell that is stabilized at the temperature of the triple point of water. The fidelity in the observation of the shape associated to the Pe(14) line of the 2 ν3+ν5 band allowed us to measure the spectroscopic parameters, with a global uncertainty for the line strength of 0.22%.

  12. Recovering Invisible Signals by Two-Field NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, Samuel F; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Haddou, Baptiste; Charlier, Cyril; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Tyburn, Jean-Max; Bovier, Pierre-Alain; Engelke, Frank; Maas, Werner; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-08-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have benefited tremendously from the steady increase in the strength of magnetic fields. Spectacular improvements in both sensitivity and resolution have enabled the investigation of molecular systems of rising complexity. At very high fields, this progress may be jeopardized by line broadening, which is due to chemical exchange or relaxation by chemical shift anisotropy. In this work, we introduce a two-field NMR spectrometer designed for both excitation and observation of nuclear spins in two distinct magnetic fields in a single experiment. NMR spectra of several small molecules as well as a protein were obtained, with two dimensions acquired at vastly different magnetic fields. Resonances of exchanging groups that are broadened beyond recognition at high field can be sharpened to narrow peaks in the low-field dimension. Two-field NMR spectroscopy enables the measurement of chemical shifts at optimal fields and the study of molecular systems that suffer from internal dynamics, and opens new avenues for NMR spectroscopy at very high magnetic fields.

  13. Ultrafast 2D NMR: An Emerging Tool in Analytical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry—from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications.

  14. Mobile sensor for high resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, Ernesto; Mauler, Jörg; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2009-05-01

    In this work we describe the construction of a mobile NMR tomograph with a highly homogeneous magnetic field. Fast MRI techniques as well as NMR spectroscopy measurements were carried out. The magnet is based on a Halbach array built from identical permanent magnet blocks generating a magnetic field of 0.22 T. To shim the field inhomogeneities inherent to magnet arrays constructed from these materials, a shim strategy based on the use of movable magnet blocks is employed. With this approach a reduction of the line-width from ˜20 kHz to less than 0.1 kHz was achieved, that is by more than two orders of magnitude, in a volume of 21 cm 3. Implementing a RARE sequence, 3D images of different objects placed in this volume were obtained in short experimental times. Moreover, by reducing the sample size to 1 cm 3, sub ppm resolution is obtained in 1H NMR spectra.

  15. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  16. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  17. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens

  18. Optical emission spectroscopy study of premixed C2H4/O2 and C2H4/C2H2/O2 flames for diamond growth with and without CO2 laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X. N.; Gebre, T.; Shen, X. K.; Xie, Z. Q.; Zhou, Y. S.; Lu, Y. F.

    2010-02-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements were carried out to study premixed C2H4/O2 and C2H4/C2H2/O2 combustion flame for diamond deposition with and without a CO2 laser excitation. Strong emissions from radicals C2 and CH were observed in the visible range in all the OES spectra acquired. By adding a continuous-wave CO2 laser to irradiate the flame at a wavelength of 10.591 μm, the common CO2 laser wavelength, it was discovered that the emission intensities of the C2 and CH radicals were increased due to the laser beam induced excitation. OES measurements of the C2 and CH radicals were performed using different gas combinations and laser powers. The rotational temperatures in the flame were determined by analyzing the spectra of the R-branch of the A2Δ-->X2Π (0, 0) electronic transition near 430 nm (CH band head). Information obtained from the OES spectra, including the emission intensities of the C2 and CH radicals, the intensity ratios, and the rotational temperatures, was integrated into the study of diamond deposition on tungsten carbide substrates for mechanism analysis of the laser induced vibrational excitation and laser-assisted diamond deposition.

  19. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    prevent dendrite formation. The in situ method was also applied to monitor (by (11)B NMR) electrochemical double-layer formation in supercapacitors in real time. Though this method is useful, it comes with challenges. The separation of the contributions from the different cell components in the NMR spectra is not trivial because of overlapping resonances. In addition, orientation-dependent NMR interactions, including the spatial- and orientation-dependent bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) effects, can lead to resonance broadening. Efforts to understand and mitigate these BMS effects are discussed in this Account. The in situ NMR investigation of fuel cells initially focused on the surface electrochemistry at the electrodes and the electrochemical oxidation of methanol and CO to CO2 on the Pt cathode. On the basis of the (13)C and (195)Pt NMR spectra of the adsorbates and electrodes, CO adsorbed on Pt and other reaction intermediates and complete oxidation products were detected and their mode of binding to the electrodes investigated. Appropriate design and engineering of the NMR hardware has allowed researchers to integrate intact direct methanol fuel cells into NMR probes. Chemical transformations of the circulating methanol could be followed and reaction intermediates could be detected in real time by either (2)H or (13)C NMR spectroscopy. By use of the in situ NMR approach, factors that control fuel cell performance, such as methanol cross over and catalyst performance, were identified.

  20. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    prevent dendrite formation. The in situ method was also applied to monitor (by (11)B NMR) electrochemical double-layer formation in supercapacitors in real time. Though this method is useful, it comes with challenges. The separation of the contributions from the different cell components in the NMR spectra is not trivial because of overlapping resonances. In addition, orientation-dependent NMR interactions, including the spatial- and orientation-dependent bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) effects, can lead to resonance broadening. Efforts to understand and mitigate these BMS effects are discussed in this Account. The in situ NMR investigation of fuel cells initially focused on the surface electrochemistry at the electrodes and the electrochemical oxidation of methanol and CO to CO2 on the Pt cathode. On the basis of the (13)C and (195)Pt NMR spectra of the adsorbates and electrodes, CO adsorbed on Pt and other reaction intermediates and complete oxidation products were detected and their mode of binding to the electrodes investigated. Appropriate design and engineering of the NMR hardware has allowed researchers to integrate intact direct methanol fuel cells into NMR probes. Chemical transformations of the circulating methanol could be followed and reaction intermediates could be detected in real time by either (2)H or (13)C NMR spectroscopy. By use of the in situ NMR approach, factors that control fuel cell performance, such as methanol cross over and catalyst performance, were identified. PMID:24041242

  1. Advancements in waste water characterization through NMR spectroscopy: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Filho, Elenilson G; Alexandre e Silva, Lorena M; Ferreira, Antonio G

    2015-09-01

    There are numerous organic pollutants that lead to several types of ecosystem damage and threaten human health. Wastewater treatment plants are responsible for the removal of natural and anthropogenic pollutants from the sewage, and because of this function, they play an important role in the protection of human health and the environment. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has proven to be a valuable analytical tool as a result of its versatility in characterizing both overall chemical composition as well as individual species in a wide range of mixtures. In addition, NMR can provide physical information (rigidity, dynamics, etc.) as well as permit in depth quantification. Hyphenation with other techniques such as liquid chromatography, solid phase extraction and mass spectrometry creates unprecedented capabilities for the identification of novel and unknown chemical species. Thus, NMR is widely used in the study of different components of wastewater, such as complex organic matter (fulvic and humic acids), sludge and wastewater. This review article summarizes the NMR spectroscopy methods applied in studies of organic pollutants from wastewater to provide an exhaustive review of the literature as well as a guide for readers interested in this topic. PMID:25280056

  2. NMR spectroscopy of proteins encapsulated in a positively charged surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Brian G; Liu, Weixia; Peterson, Ronald W; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua

    2005-07-01

    Traditionally, large proteins, aggregation-prone proteins, and membrane proteins have been difficult to examine by modern multinuclear and multidimensional solution NMR spectroscopy. A major limitation presented by these protein systems is that their slow molecular reorientation compromises many aspects of the more powerful solution NMR methods. Several approaches have emerged to deal with the various spectroscopic difficulties arising from slow molecular reorientation. One of these takes the approach of actively seeking to increase the effective rate of molecular reorientation by encapsulating the protein of interest within the protective shell of a reverse micelle and dissolving the resulting particle in a low viscosity fluid. Since the encapsulation is largely driven by electrostatic interactions, the preparation of samples of acidic proteins suitable for NMR spectroscopy has been problematic owing to the paucity of suitable cationic surfactants. Here, it is shown that the cationic surfactant CTAB may be used to prepare samples of encapsulated anionic proteins dissolved in low viscosity solvents. In a more subtle application, it is further shown that this surfactant can be employed to encapsulate a highly basic protein, which is completely denatured upon encapsulation using an anionic surfactant. PMID:15949753

  3. Extracting protein dynamics information from overlapped NMR signals using relaxation dispersion difference NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konuma, Tsuyoshi [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Department of Structural and Chemical Biology (United States); Harada, Erisa [Suntory Foundation for Life Sciences, Bioorganic Research Institute (Japan); Sugase, Kenji, E-mail: sugase@sunbor.or.jp, E-mail: sugase@moleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Department of Molecular Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Protein dynamics plays important roles in many biological events, such as ligand binding and enzyme reactions. NMR is mostly used for investigating such protein dynamics in a site-specific manner. Recently, NMR has been actively applied to large proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins, which are attractive research targets. However, signal overlap, which is often observed for such proteins, hampers accurate analysis of NMR data. In this study, we have developed a new methodology called relaxation dispersion difference that can extract conformational exchange parameters from overlapped NMR signals measured using relaxation dispersion spectroscopy. In relaxation dispersion measurements, the signal intensities of fluctuating residues vary according to the Carr-Purcell-Meiboon-Gill pulsing interval, whereas those of non-fluctuating residues are constant. Therefore, subtraction of each relaxation dispersion spectrum from that with the highest signal intensities, measured at the shortest pulsing interval, leaves only the signals of the fluctuating residues. This is the principle of the relaxation dispersion difference method. This new method enabled us to extract exchange parameters from overlapped signals of heme oxygenase-1, which is a relatively large protein. The results indicate that the structural flexibility of a kink in the heme-binding site is important for efficient heme binding. Relaxation dispersion difference requires neither selectively labeled samples nor modification of pulse programs; thus it will have wide applications in protein dynamics analysis.

  4. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  5. Determination and Quantification of the Local Environments in Stoichiometric and Defect Jarosite by Solid-State 2H NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Grey, Clare P.; Majzlan, Juraj

    2008-01-01

    The nature and concentrations of the local environments in a series of deuterated jarosite (nominally AFe3(SO4)2(OD)6 with A = K, Na, and D3O) samples with different levels of iron and cation vacancies have been determined by 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy at ambient temperatures. Three different local ...

  6. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoacetica metabolic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrei V; Sears, Jesse A; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R; Ahring, Birgitte K; Majors, Paul D

    2014-10-01

    An in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600-MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol, and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process, enabling identification of intermediate and endpoint metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  7. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoacetica metabolic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrei V; Sears, Jesse A; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R; Ahring, Birgitte K; Majors, Paul D

    2014-10-01

    An in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600-MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol, and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process, enabling identification of intermediate and endpoint metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts. PMID:24946863

  8. Report on neptunium speciation by NMR and optical spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tait, C.D.; Palmer, P.D.; Ekberg, S.A.; Clark, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    Hydrolysis and carbonate complexation reactions were examined for NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and NpO{sub 2}{sup +} ions by a variety of techniques including potentiometric titration, UV-Vis-NIR and NMR spectroscopy. The equilibrium constant for the reaction 3NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} + 3H{sup +} {rightleftharpoons} (NpO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} + 3HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} was determined to be logK = 19.7 ({plus_minus} 0.8) (I = 2.5 m). {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy of NpO{sub 2}{sup n+} ions (n = 1,2) reveals a readily observable {sup 17}O resonance for n = 2, but not for n = 1. The first hydrolysis constant for NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was studied as a function of temperature, and the functional form for the temperature-dependent equilibrium constant for the reaction written as NpO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} NpO{sub 2}OH + H{sup +} was found to be logK = 2.28 {minus} 3780/T, where T is in {degree}K. Finally, the temperature dependence of neptunium(V) carbonate complexation constants was studied. For the first carbonate complexation constant, the appropriate functional form was found to be log{beta}{sub 01} = 1.47 + 786/T.

  9. NMR spectroscopy study of agar-based polymers electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, R.I.; Tambelli, C.E. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Pirassununga, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Zootecnia e Engenharia de Alimentos; Raphael, E. [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao del-Rey (UFSJ), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Naturais; Silva, I.D.A.; Magon, C.J.; Donoso, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: This communication presents the results of preparation and characterization of transparent films obtained from agar and acetic acid. The films were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The film formed by agar (Sigma Aldrich) was dispersed in water and kept under stirring and heating at 100 deg C. Next, glycerol, formaldehyde and different quantities of acetic acid (25 and 50 wt%) were added to this solution. The obtained solution was placed on a glass plate and left to dry for 48 hours in oven at 50 deg C to obtain the films, which were kept under vacuum before characterization. The ionic conductivity of the films display an Arrhenius behavior with activation energy E{sub a} = 78 (25 wt% of acetic acid) and E{sub a} = 87 kJ/mol (50 wt% of acetic acid). The conductivity values were 3:0 X 10{sup -6} and 1:2 X 10{sup -4} S/cm at room temperature and 4:4 X 10{sup -4} and 1:5 X 10{sup -3}S/cm at 70 deg C, for the 25 and 50 wt% of acetic acid respectively. To investigate the mechanism of protonic conduction in the polymer proton conductor proton NMR measurements were performed in the temperature range 200-370 K. The {sup 1}H-NMR results exhibit the qualitative feature associated with the proton mobility, namely the presence of well defined {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation maxima at 300 K. Activation energy of the order of 40 kJ/mol was obtained from the {sup 1}H-NMR line narrowing data. The ionic conductivity of the film combined with their transparency, flexibility, homogeneity and good adhesion to the glasses or metals indicate that agar-based SPEs are promising materials for used on optoelectronic applications. (author)

  10. Synthesis, structure and NMR characterization of a new monomeric aluminophosphate [ dl-Co(en) 3] 2[Al(HPO 4) 2(H 1.5PO 4) 2(H 2PO 4) 2](H 3PO 4) 4 containing four different types of monophosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Li, Jiyang; Xu, Jun; Duan, Fangzheng; Deng, Feng; Xu, Ruren

    2009-03-01

    A new zero-dimensional (0D) aluminophosphate monomer [ dl-Co(en) 3] 2[Al(HPO 4) 2(H 1.5PO 4) 2(H 2PO 4) 2](H 3PO 4) 4 (designated AlPO-CJ38) with Al/P ratio of 1/6 has been solvothermally prepared by using racemic cobalt complex dl-Co(en) 3Cl 3 as the template. The Al atom is octahedrally linked to six P atoms via bridging oxygen atoms, forming a unique [Al(HPO 4) 2(H 1.5PO 4) 2(H 2PO 4) 2] 6- monomer. Notably, there exists intramolecular symmetrical O⋯H⋯O bonds, which results in pseudo-4-rings stabilized by the strong H-bonding interactions. The structure is also featured by the existence of four different types of monophosphates that have been confirmed by 31P NMR and 1H NMR spectra. The crystal data are as follows: AlPO-CJ38, [ dl-Co(en) 3] 2[Al(HPO 4) 2(H 1.5PO 4) 2(H 2PO 4) 2](H 3PO 4) 4, M = 1476.33, monoclinic, C2/ c (No. 15), a = 36.028(7) Å, b = 8.9877(18) Å, c = 16.006(3) Å, β = 100.68(3)°, U = 5093.2(18) Å 3,Z = 4, R1 = 0.0509 ( I > 2 σ( I)) and wR2 = 0.1074 (all data). CCDC number 689491.

  11. Intramolecular hydrogen-bonding studies by NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cantalapiedra, N A

    2000-01-01

    o-methoxybenzamide and N-methyl-o-methylbenzamide, using the pseudo-contact shifts calculated from the sup 1 H and sup 1 sup 3 C NMR spectra. The main conformation present in solution for o-fluorobenzamide was the one held by an intramolecular N-H...F hydrogen bond. Ab-initio calculations (at the RHF/6-31G* level) have provided additional data for the geometry of the individual molecules. A conformational equilibrium study of some nipecotic acid derivatives (3-substituted piperidines: CO sub 2 H, CO sub 2 Et, CONH sub 2 , CONHMe, CONEt sub 2) and cis-1,3-disubstituted cyclohexane derivatives (NHCOMe/CO sub 2 Me, NHCOMe/CONHMe, NH sub 2 /CO sub 2 H) has been undertaken in a variety of solvents, in order to predict the intramolecular hydrogen-bonding energies involved in the systems. The conformer populations were obtained by direct integration of proton peaks corresponding to the equatorial and axial conformations at low temperature (-80 deg), and by geometrically dependent coupling constants ( sup 3 J sub H s...

  12. Terahertz Spectroscopy of the Bending Vibrations of Acetylene 12C2H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shanshan; Drouin, Brian J.; Pearson, John C.

    2009-11-01

    Twenty P-branch transitions of 12C2H2 have been measured in the 0.8-1.6 THz region of its bending vibrational difference band. The accuracy of these measurements is estimated to be 100 kHz. The 12C2H2 molecules were generated under room temperature by passing 150 mTorr H2O vapor through calcium carbide (CaC2) powder. The observed transitions were modeled together with prior far-infrared data involving the bending levels with ∑\

  13. Multiplicative or t1 Noise in NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granwehr, Josef

    2005-01-25

    The signal in an NMR experiment is highly sensitive to fluctuations of the environment of the sample. If, for example, the static magnetic field B{sub 0}, the amplitude and phase of radio frequency (rf) pulses, or the resonant frequency of the detection circuit are not perfectly stable and reproducible, the magnetic moment of the spins is altered and becomes a noisy quantity itself. This kind of noise not only depends on the presence of a signal, it is in fact proportional to it. Since all the spins at a particular location in a sample experience the same environment at any given time, this noise primarily affects the reproducibility of an experiment, which is mainly of importance in the indirect dimensions of a multidimensional experiment, when intense lines are suppressed with a phase cycle, or for difference spectroscopy techniques. Equivalently, experiments which are known to be problematic with regard to their reproducibility, like flow experiments or experiments with a mobile target, tend to be affected stronger by multiplicative noise. In this article it is demonstrated how multiplicative noise can be identified and characterized using very simple, repetitive experiments. An error estimation approach is developed to give an intuitive, yet quantitative understanding of its properties. The consequences for multidimensional NMR experiments are outlined, implications for data analysis are shown, and strategies for the optimization of experiments are summarized.

  14. Saturation in Deuteron Hadamard NMR Spectroscopy of Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greferath, M.; Blumich, B.; Griffith, W. M.; Hoatson, G. L.

    Hadamard NMR was investigated for wide-line solid-state deuteron spectroscopy by numerical simulations and experiments on hexamethylbenzene. Similar signal-to-noise ratios were obtained at large filter bandwidths (500 kHz) by both the quadrupolar echo and the Hadamard methods, although the excitation power differs by up to four orders in magnitude. Increasing the excitation power leads to systematic, noise-like features in Hadamard spectra. In contrast to phase modulation, simulations indicate that for amplitude modulation of the pseudorandom excitation, the pulse sequence burns a saturation hole into the lineshape at the carrier frequency. Violation of the cyclicity requirement by introduction of a recycle delay between successive Hadamard scans results in a high-frequency noise contribution. Finite pulse widths are shown not to cause significant spectral distortions.

  15. A survey on quantitative analysis of organic compounds by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is known as a powerful analytical technique, which is used to determine the structure of small and macro organic compounds. In recent years, 1H NMR is being recognized more and more as a quantitative analytical method, which is based on the principle where the area under a 1H NMR signal peak in solution state is proportional to the number of nuclei contributing to the peak. In this report, the basic concepts, developmental history and current state of the quantitative 1H NMR (qNMR) method are described. Furthermore, future prospect of the qNMR method is presented. (author)

  16. Determination of gluconeogenesis in man by the use of deuterium-NMR-spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rosian, E

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation is the quantification of the deuterium--distribution in human glucose by the use of the deuterium NMR spectroscopy of deuteriated water. The glucose production in human organism is composed of gluconeogenesis and glycolysis. The quantification of the part of gluconeogenesis on the total glucose production was determined by the use of deuterium NMR spectroscopy. (boteke)

  17. An Oil Spill in a Tube: An Accessible Approach for Teaching Environmental NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Andre´ J.; Mitchell, Perry J.; Masoom, Hussain; Mobarhan, Yalda Liaghati; Adamo, Antonio; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has great potential as an instrumental method for environmental chemistry research and monitoring but may be underused in teaching laboratories because of its complexity and the level of expertise required in operating the instrument and interpreting data. This laboratory experiment introduces environmental NMR spectroscopy to…

  18. Applications of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy in food science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertocchi, Fabio; Paci, Maurizio

    2008-10-22

    The principal applications of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy, in the field of food science, are reviewed, after a short general introduction, mainly focusing on the potential of these investigations, which are, today, routine tools for resolving technological problems. Selected examples of the applications in the field of food science of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy both in (13)C and in (1)H NMR particularly illustrative of the results obtainable are reported in some detail.

  19. Zero-field NMR study on a spin glass: iron-doped 2H-niobium diselenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spin echoes are used to study the 93Nb NQR in 2H-NbSe2Fe/sub x/. Measured are (intensity) x (temperature), and T/sub 1P/ (spin-lattice relaxation parameter) and T2 (spin-spin relaxation time) as a function of temperature. Data reveal dramatic differences between non-spin glass samples (x = 0, 0.25%, 1% and 5%) and spin glass samples (x = 8%, 10% and 12%). All of the NQR results and the model calculation of the correlation times of Fe spins are best described by the phase transition picture of spin glasses

  20. Spin–spin coupling in the HD molecule determined from {sup 1}H and {sup 2}H NMR experiments in the gas-phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbacz, Piotr, E-mail: pgarbacz@chem.uw.edu.pl

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • The spin–spin coupling constant of the HD molecule is equal to 43.136(7) Hz at 300 K. • Peak-to-peak separations between HD multiplet peaks, J{sub eff}, are smaller than J (D, H). • Nuclear relaxation and intermolecular interactions have an influence on J{sub eff}. • J{sub eff} determined from the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is smaller than from the {sup 2}H NMR spectrum. - Abstract: The indirect spin–spin coupling of hydrogen deuteride, J(D, H), was determined from a series of {sup 1}H and {sup 2}H NMR spectra acquired at various densities of gaseous solvents (He, Ar, CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O). The analysis of these spectra shows that accurate determination of J(D, H) from this experimental data requires careful examination of the effects of nuclear relaxation and of HD–solvent gas interactions on hydrogen deuteride line shapes. Particularly, it was found that the first-order corrections of the peak-to-peak separations between HD multiplet peaks due to weak van der Waals interactions are proportional to solvent gas density, while these corrections for nuclear relaxation of the proton and the deuteron are proportional to the second power of the inverse of the gas density. Analysis of the data indicates that J(D, H), obtained by correcting for the effects of nuclear relaxation and intermolecular interactions, is 43.136(7) Hz at 300 K.

  1. Ion counting in supercapacitor electrodes using NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Wang, Hao; Trease, Nicole M; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2014-01-01

    (19)F NMR spectroscopy has been used to study the local environments of anions in supercapacitor electrodes and to quantify changes in the populations of adsorbed species during charging. In the absence of an applied potential, anionic species adsorbed within carbon micropores (in-pore) are distinguished from those in large mesopores and spaces between particles (ex-pore) by a characteristic nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS). Adsorption experiments and two-dimensional exchange experiments confirm that anions are in dynamic equilibrium between the in- and ex-pore environments with an exchange rate in the order of tens of Hz. (19)F in situ NMR spectra recorded at different charge states reveal changes in the intensity and NICS of the in-pore resonances, which are interpreted in term of changes in the population and local environments of the adsorbed anions that arise due to the charge-storage process. A comparison of the results obtained for a range of electrolytes reveals that several factors influence the charging mechanism. For a tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte, positive polarisation of the electrode is found to proceed by anion adsorption at a low concentration, whereas increased ion exchange plays a more important role for a high concentration electrolyte. In contrast, negative polarization of the electrode proceeds by cation adsorption for both concentrations. For a tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte, anion expulsion is observed in the negative charging regime; this is attributed to the reduced mobility and/or access of the larger cations inside the pores, which forces the expulsion of anions in order to build up ionic charge. Significant anion expulsion is also observed in the negative charging regime for alkali metal bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide electrolytes, suggesting that more subtle factors also affect the charging mechanism.

  2. Phase equilibria and molecular packing in the N,N-dimethyldodecylamine oxide/gramicidin D/water system studied by 2H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Orädd, G; Lindblom, G; Arvidson, G; Gunnarsson, K.

    1995-01-01

    A partial phase diagram of the system N,N-dimethyldodecylamine oxide (DDAO)/water/gramicidin D was determined by 2H-NMR. Both 2H2O and perdeuterated DDAO (DDAO-d31) were studied by solid state NMR techniques. Addition of gramicidin D to the micellar (L1), normal hexagonal (HI) and cubic (I) phases of DDAO induces phase separations, giving two-phase regions, which all contain a lamellar (L alpha) phase. The L alpha phase containing gramicidin is characterized by larger order parameters for DDA...

  3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy For Metabolic Profiling of Medicinal Plants and Their Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy has multidisciplinary applications, including excellent impact in metabolomics. The analytical capacity of NMR spectroscopy provides information for easy qualitative and quantitative assessment of both endogenous and exogenous metabolites present in biological samples. The complexity of a particular metabolite and its contribution in a biological system are critically important for understanding the functional state that governs the organism's phenotypes. This review covers historical aspects of developments in the NMR field, its applications in chemical profiling, metabolomics, and quality control of plants and their derived medicines, foods, and other products. The bottlenecks of NMR in metabolic profiling are also discussed, keeping in view the future scope and further technological interventions. PMID:26575437

  4. Detection of Taurine in Biological Tissues by 33S NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2001-12-01

    The potential of 33S NMR spectroscopy for biochemical investigations on taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is explored. It is demonstrated that 33S NMR spectroscopy allows the selective and unequivocal identification of taurine in biological samples. 33S NMR spectra of homogenated and intact tissues are reported for the first time, together with the spectrum of a living mollusc. Emphasis is placed on the importance of choosing appropriate signal processing methods to improve the quality of the 33S NMR spectra of biological tissues.

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy For Metabolic Profiling of Medicinal Plants and Their Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy has multidisciplinary applications, including excellent impact in metabolomics. The analytical capacity of NMR spectroscopy provides information for easy qualitative and quantitative assessment of both endogenous and exogenous metabolites present in biological samples. The complexity of a particular metabolite and its contribution in a biological system are critically important for understanding the functional state that governs the organism's phenotypes. This review covers historical aspects of developments in the NMR field, its applications in chemical profiling, metabolomics, and quality control of plants and their derived medicines, foods, and other products. The bottlenecks of NMR in metabolic profiling are also discussed, keeping in view the future scope and further technological interventions.

  6. Water vapor δ2H and δ18O measurements using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Knohl

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a detailed assessment of a commercially available water vapor isotope analyzer (WVIA, Los Gatos Research, Inc. for simultaneous in-situ measurements of δ2H and δ18O in water vapor. This method, based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy, is an alternative to the conventional water trap/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS techniques. We evaluate the analyzer in terms of precision, memory effects, concentration dependence, temperature sensitivity and long-term stability. A calibration system based on ink jet technology is used to characterize the performance and to calibrate the analyzer. Our results show that the precision at an averaging time of 15 s is 0.16‰ for δ2H and 0.08‰ for δ18O. The isotope ratios are strongly dependent on the water mixing ratio of the air. Taking into account this concentration dependence as well as the temperature sensitivity of the instrument we obtained a long-term stability of the water isotope measurements of 0.38‰ for δ2H and 0.25‰ for δ18O. The accuracy of the WVIA was further assessed by comparative measurements using IRMS and a dew point generator indicating a linear response in isotopic composition and H2O concentrations. The WVIA combined with a calibration system provides accurate high resolution water vapor isotope measurements and opens new possibilities for hydrological and ecological applications.

  7. Proton NMR spectroscopy of cytochrome c-554 from Alcaligenes faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timkovich, R; Cork, M S

    1984-02-28

    Cytochrome c-554 from the bacterium Alcaligenes faecalis (ATCC 8750) is a respiratory electron-transport protein homologous to other members of the cytochrome c family. Its structure has been studied by 1H NMR spectroscopy in both the ferric and ferrous states. The ferric spectrum is characterized by downfield hyperfine-shifted heme methyl resonances at 46.25, 43.60, 38.40, and 36.73 ppm (25 degrees C, pH 7.1). Chemical shifts of these resonances change with temperature opposite to expectations derived from Curie's law. The pH behavior of the hyperfine-shifted resonances titrates with a pK of 6.3 that has been interpreted as due to ionization of a heme propionate. In the ferrous state, heme methyl, meso, and thioether bridge resonances have been observed and assigned. All aromatic proteins have been assigned according to the side chain of origin, and the structural environment about the sole tryptophan residue has been examined. The electron-transfer rate between ferric and ferrous forms has been estimated to be on the order of 3 X 10(8) M-1 s-1, which is the largest such self-exchange rate yet observed for a cytochrome. PMID:6324856

  8. Molecular orientation of hydrogen-bonded liquid crystal (6BA){sub 2}-(BPy){sub x} as Studied by {sup 2}H NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, M., E-mail: mizuno@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Higashima, Y.; Yamashita, A.; Ishida, Y.; Miyatou, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T. [Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Natural Science & Technology (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    The thermal properties of hydrogen-bonded liquid crystal (6BA){sub 2}-(BPy){sub x} (6BA: 4-n-hexylbenzoicacid, BPy: 4,4’-bipyridine) were investigated by DSC. Two liquid crystal phases (LC{sub I}, LC{sub II}) were found for (6BA){sub 2}-(BPy){sub 0.5}. In LC{sub II}, the distribution of the orientation of molecules was larger than in LC{sub I}. The order parameter S of molecular orientation in the liquid crystal phase was estimated from a {sup 2}H NMR spectrum. S decreased rapidly around the LC{sub I}-LC{sub II} phase transition. The increase in orientational fluctuation of the 6BA dimer with an open dimer structure is predicted to cause the rapid decrease of S.

  9. Characterizations of Some N-Substituted-salicylhydrazide in Mixtures by NMR Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张芳; 于贤勇; 陈忠; 林深; 刘世雄

    2003-01-01

    Several novel N-substituted-salicylhydrazide ligands, most of which are difficult to be purified or recrystallized so that their chemical configurations can not be confirmed by conventional NMR and/or X-ray diffraction techniques, were synthesized in this experiment, and their chemical configurations in mixture were analyzed and characterized by 2D NMR diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), a labor-saving virtual separation based on diffusion properties,together with several routine NMR techniques.

  10. Integration of screening and identifying ligand(s) from medicinal plant extracts based on target recognition by using NMR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Yalin Tang, Qian Shang, Junfeng Xiang, Qianfan Yang, Qiuju Zhou, Lin Li, Hong Zhang, Qian Li, Hongxia Sun, Aijiao Guan, Wei Jiang & Wei Gai ### Abstract This protocol presents the screening of ligand(s) from medicinal plant extracts based on target recognition by using NMR spectroscopy. A detailed description of sample preparation and analysis process is provided. NMR spectroscopies described here are 1H NMR, diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), relaxation-edited NMR, ...

  11. Development of a micro flow-through cell for high field NMR spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd Michael; McIntyre, Sarah K.

    2011-05-01

    A highly transportable micro flow-through detection cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been designed, fabricated and tested. This flow-through cell allows for the direct coupling between liquid chromatography (LC) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) resulting in the possibility of hyphenated LC-NMR and GPC-NMR. The advantage of the present flow cell design is that it is independent and unconnected to the detection probe electronics, is compatible with existing commercial high resolution NMR probes, and as such can be easily implemented at any NMR facility. Two different volumes were fabricated corresponding to between {approx}3.8 and 10 {micro}L detection volume. Examples of the performance of the cell on different NMR instruments, and using different NMR detection probes were demonstrated.

  12. A primer to nutritional metabolomics by NMR spectroscopy and chemometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savorani, Francesco; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Mikkelsen, Mette Skau;

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines the advantages and disadvantages of using high throughput NMR metabolomics for nutritional studies with emphasis on the workflow and data analytical methods for generation of new knowledge. The paper describes one-by-one the major research activities in the interdisciplinary...... metabolomics platform and highlights the opportunities that NMR spectra can provide in future nutrition studies. Three areas are emphasized: (1) NMR as an unbiased and non-destructive platform for providing an overview of the metabolome under investigation, (2) NMR for providing versatile information and data...

  13. Measurement of Solution Viscosity via Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy (DOSY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weibin; Kagan, Gerald; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, the undergraduate chemistry curriculum includes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques are often taught including two-dimensional gradient-based experiments. An investigation of intermolecular forces including viscosity, by a variety of methods, is often integrated in the undergraduate physical and…

  14. Stereochemistry Determination by Powder X-ray Diffraction Analysis and NMR Spectroscopy Residual Dipolar Couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M.; Pagola, S; Navarro-Vasquez, A; Phillips, D; Gayathri, C; Krakauer, H; Stephens, P; Nicotra, V; Gil, R

    2009-01-01

    A matter of technique: For a new steroidal lactol, jaborosalactol 24 (1), isolated from Jaborosa parviflora, NMR spectroscopy residual dipolar couplings and powder X-ray diffraction analysis independently gave the same stereochemistry at C23-C26. Conventional NMR spectroscopic techniques, such as NOE and {sup 3}J coupling-constant analysis failed to unambiguously determine this stereochemistry.

  15. Temperature-induced transitions in disordered proteins probed by NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming Martin; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are abundant in nature and perform many important physiological functions. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy has been crucial for the understanding of the conformational properties of disordered proteins and is increasingly used to probe their conformational ense...

  16. An economical method for production of (2H, (13CH3-threonine for solution NMR studies of large protein complexes: application to the 670 kDa proteasome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algirdas Velyvis

    Full Text Available NMR studies of very high molecular weight protein complexes have been greatly facilitated through the development of labeling strategies whereby (13CH(3 methyl groups are introduced into highly deuterated proteins. Robust and cost-effective labeling methods are well established for all methyl containing amino acids with the exception of Thr. Here we describe an inexpensive biosynthetic strategy for the production of L-[α-(2H; β-(2H;γ-(13C]-Thr that can then be directly added during protein expression to produce highly deuterated proteins with Thr methyl group probes of structure and dynamics. These reporters are particularly valuable, because unlike other methyl containing amino acids, Thr residues are localized predominantly to the surfaces of proteins, have unique hydrogen bonding capabilities, have a higher propensity to be found at protein nucleic acid interfaces and can play important roles in signaling pathways through phosphorylation. The utility of the labeling methodology is demonstrated with an application to the 670 kDa proteasome core particle, where high quality Thr (13C,(1H correlation spectra are obtained that could not be generated from samples prepared with commercially available U-[(13C,(1H]-Thr.

  17. 2H NMR study of dynamics of benzene-d6 interacting with humic and fulvic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Margaret A; Brothers, Lucinda A; Nanny, Mark A

    2011-05-01

    Samples of three humic acids and one fulvic acid with 1% loading of benzene-d(6) in sealed glass tubes have been studied with solid-state deuterium quadrupole-echo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Calculated spectra combining three motional models, two isotropic models and a third more restricted small-angle wobble (SAW) motional model, are fit to the experimental spectra. One isotropic motion (ISO(v)) is assigned to vaporous benzene-d(6) due to the small line width, short T(1), and the loss of this component by about -25 °C when the temperature is lowered. The remaining two motional components, ISO(s) and SAW, are sorbed by the humic or fulvic acid. Benzene-d(6) slowly interacts with the humic substances, progressively filling SAW sites as ISO(s) motion diminishes. Both the sorption and increase in percentage of SAW motion are for the most part complete within 200 days but continue to a lesser extent over a period of a few years. For the SAW motion there are at least two and most likely a series of T(1) values, indicating more than one adsorption environment. Enthalpies of sorption, obtained from application of the van't Hoff equation to the percentages of the different motional models derived from a series of variable temperature spectra, are comparable in magnitude to the enthalpy of vaporization of benzene. In Leonardite humic acid, ΔH and ΔS for the ISO(s) to SAW transition change from positive to negative values with age, implying a transition in the driving force from an entropic effect associated with expansion and deformation in the molecular structure of the humic substance to accommodate benzene-d(6) to an enthalpic effect of strong benzene-d(6)-humic substance interactions. In contrast, at advanced ages, Suwannee River humic and fulvic acids have small positive or near zero ΔH and positive ΔS for the ISO(s) to SAW transition. PMID:21456559

  18. The mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c strongly influences the order of the headgroup and acyl chains of phosphatidylserine dispersions. A 2H and 31P NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to study the interaction of the mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c with headgroup-deuterated (dioleoylphosphatidyl-L-[2-2H1]serine) and acyl chain deuterated (1,2-[11,11-2H2]dioleoylphosphatidylserine) dispersions. Binding of the protein to dioleoylphosphatidylserine liposomes results in phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectra typical of phospholipids undergoing fast axial rotation in extended liquid-crystalline bilayers with a reduced residual chemical shift anisotropy and an increased line width. 2H NMR spectra on headgroup-deuterated dioleoylphosphatidylserine dispersions showed a decrease in quadrupolar splitting and a broadening of the signal on interaction with apocytochrome c. Addition of increasing amounts of apocytochrome c to the acyl chain deuterated dioleoylphosphatidylserine dispersions results in the gradual appearance of a second component in the spectra with a 44% reduced quadrupolar splitting. Such large reduction of the quadrupolar splitting has never been observed for any protein studied yet. The induction of a new spectral component with a well-defined reduced quadrupolar splitting seems to be confined to the N-terminus since addition of a small hydrophilic amino-terminal peptide (residues 1-38) also induces a second component with a strongly reduced quadrupolar splitting. A chemically synthesized peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 2-17 of the presequence of the mitochondrial protein cytochrome oxidase subunit IV also has a large perturbing effect on the order of the acyl chains, indicating that the observed effects may be a property shared by many mitochondrial precursor proteins. Implications of these data for the import of apocytochrome c into mitochondria will be discussed

  19. Facing and Overcoming Sensitivity Challenges in Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Boebinger, Gregory S.; Comment, Arnaud;

    2015-01-01

    In the Spring of 2013, NMR spectroscopists convened at the Weizmann Institute in Israel to brainstorm on approaches to improve the sensitivity of NMR experiments, particularly when applied in biomolecular settings. This multi‐author interdisciplinary Review presents a state‐of‐the‐art description...

  20. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Aaron J.; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (∼100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance 1H-2H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance 2H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2 h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the 2H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of 1H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques.

  1. Multiband superconductivity in 2 H -NbSe2 probed by Doppler-modulated scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, I.; Kloc, C.; Petrovic, C.; Wei, J. Y. T.

    Cooper pairing in multiband superconductors can involve carriers from bands having different dimensionalities, and the interband coupling can provide for novel pairing interactions. In addition to MgB2, recent experiments on 2 H -NbSe2 have studied the Fermi surface topology using angle- and temperature-dependent scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We present another novel method for probing multiband pairing: using a field-induced diamagnetic supercurrent, applied along different crystal axes, to perturb the quasiparticle density-of-states spectrum. By measuring the evolution of the quasiparticle spectrum under finite superfluid momentum, we characterize the pairing gaps and gap anisotropies. This approach is demonstrated on 2 H -NbSe2 at 300 mK with a magnetic field of up to 9 T applied in the ab -plane. The STM measurements revealed unambiguous evidence for multiband pairing, and evidence for a novel transition of the in-plane vortex lattice. We discuss the characteristics of this transition in light of data from other probes Work supported by NSERC, CFI/OIT, CIFAR, U.S. DOE and Brookhaven Science Associates (No. DE-AC02-98CH10886).

  2. Fluxionality and Isomerism of the Bis(dihydrogen) Complex RuH(2)(H(2))(2)(PCy(3))(2): INS, NMR, and Theoretical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Venancio; Sabo-Etienne, Sylviane; Chaudret, Bruno; Thoburn, John; Ulrich, Stefan; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Eckert, Juergen; Barthelat, Jean-Claude; Hussein, Khansaa; Marsden, Colin J.

    1998-07-13

    To study the fluxionality of the bis(dihydrogen) complex RuH(2)(H(2))(2)(PCy(3))(2) (1), NMR spectra were recorded in Freons (mixture of CDCl(3), CDFCl(2), and CDF(2)Cl). 1 was found to remain fluxional at all temperatures, but the presence of CDCl(3) necessary for its solubilization induces its transformation into, first, RuHCl(H(2))(2)(PCy(3))(2) (3) and the new ruthenium(IV) dihydride RuH(2)Cl(2)(PCy(3))(2) (4). 4 is produced selectively in pure CDCl(3) but reacts further to give a mixture of chloro complexes. 4 was isolated from the reaction of 1 with aqueous HCl in Et(2)O and shows a fluxional process attributed to the interconversion between two symmetrical isomers. The activation parameters of this process were obtained by (1)H NMR line shape analysis, as well as those corresponding to the exchange between 3 and free dihydrogen. The fluxionality of the dihydrogen-hydride system is also evident at a much faster time scale than that of NMR studies in the inelastic neutron scattering observations of the rotation of the dihydrogen ligands. The geometries and relative energies of several isomers of complexes 1, 3, and 4 were studied using density functional theory (DFT) and MP2 methods, together with a few coupled-cluster (CCSD(T)) calculations. In contrast to what might have been expected, the two hydrides and the two H(2) units of 1 lie in the same plane, due to the attractive "cis effect" created by the hydrides. The two H(2) ligands adopt cis positions in the lowest-energy isomer. Rotation of the two dihydrogen ligands has been analyzed using DFT calculations. A slight preference for a C(2) conrotatory pathway has been found with a calculated barrier in good agreement with the experimental INS value. Two low-energy isomers of 4 have been characterized computationally, both of which have C(2)(v)() symmetry, consistent with the solution NMR spectra. PMID:11670430

  3. (17)O NMR and Raman Spectroscopies of Green Tea Infusion with Nanomaterial to Investigate Their Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changyan; Zhang, Huiping; Yan, Ying; Zhang, Xinya

    2016-09-01

    (17)O NMR and Raman spectrograms of green tea infusions with nanomaterial were investigated. Different green tea infusions were prepared by steeping tea powder with different concentrations of nanomaterial aqueous solution. The tea infusions were tested with (17)O NMR and Raman spectroscopies. The (17)O NMR results showed that line width increased to 90 in the tea infusions after nanomaterial was added as a result of the effects of the self-association of Ca(2+) and tea polyphenol. The results of Raman spectroscopy showed that, in tea infusions, the enhancement of C─C and C─O stretching vibrations suggest an increase in the number of effective components in water.

  4. Organic structure determination using 2-D NMR spectroscopy a problem-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, Jeffrey H

    2011-01-01

    Organic Structure Determination Using 2-D NMR Spectroscopy: A Problem-Based Approach, Second Edition, provides an introduction to the use of two-dimensional (2-D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine organic structure. The book begins with a discussion of the NMR technique, while subsequent chapters cover instrumental considerations; data collection, processing, and plotting; chemical shifts; symmetry and topicity; through-bond effects; and through-space effects. The book also covers molecular dynamics; strategies for assigning resonances to atoms within a molecule; s

  5. Ultra fast magic angle spinning solid - state NMR spectroscopy of intact bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandan; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Kayastha, Arvind M; Sinha, Neeraj

    2016-02-01

    Ultra fast magic angle spinning (MAS) has been a potent method to significantly average out homogeneous/inhomogeneous line broadening in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) spectroscopy. It has given a new direction to ssNMR spectroscopy with its different applications. We present here the first and foremost application of ultra fast MAS (~60 kHz) for ssNMR spectroscopy of intact bone. This methodology helps to comprehend and elucidate the organic content in the intact bone matrix with resolution and sensitivity enhancement. At this MAS speed, amino protons from organic part of intact bone start to appear in (1) H NMR spectra. The experimental protocol of ultra-high speed MAS for intact bone has been entailed with an additional insight achieved at 60 kHz.

  6. Application of NMR Spectroscopy in the Analysis of Petroleum Derivatives and Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parlov Vuković, J.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Complex chemical composition and physical properties of oil and fuel make their complete cha racterization very difficult. Components present in oil and oil products differ in structure, size, po larity and functionality. The presence and structure of specific hydrocarbons in final products depend on the processing procedure and type of the fuel. In order to predict or improve fuel pro perties it is necessary to determine its composition. Thus, new and more sophisticated analytical methods and procedures are constantly being developed. NMR spectroscopy plays a significant role in analysis and identification of complex hydrocarbon mixtures of petroleum and petroleum products. In this review, we describe the application of NMR spectroscopy for analyzing gasoline and diesel fuels. Hence, by using NMR spectroscopy it is possible to determine gasoline composition and presence of benzene and oxygenates, as well as some important physical characteristics of gasoli ne such as the research octane number. An application of different NMR techniques made it pos sible to characterize diesel fuels and middle oil distillates from various refineries. Data so obtained can be used in combination with statistical methods to predict fuel properties and to monitor pro- duction processes in the petroleum industry. NMR spectroscopy has proven useful in analysis of FAME which has recently been used as an ecologically acceptable alternative fuel. Furthermore, techniques such as CP/MAS for characterization of solid state oil-geochemical samples are inclu- ded. Also, possibilities of using NMR spectroscopy in the analysis of polymeric additives are di- scussed.

  7. Analysis of human urine metabolites using SPE and NMR spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis of metabonome/metabolome has widespread applications in biomedical science researches. However, most of NMR resonances for urinary metabolites remain to be fully assigned. In the present study, human urine samples from two healthy volunteers were pre-treated with C18 solid-phase extraction and the resultant 5 sub-fractions were subjected to one- and two-dimensional NMR studies, including 1H J-Resolved, 1H-1H COSY, 1H-1H TOCSY, 1H-13C HSQC, and HMBC 2D NMR. More than 70 low molecular weight metabolites were identified, and complete assignments of 1H and 13C resonances including many complex coupled spin systems were obtained.

  8. Rapid characterization of molecular diffusion by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudakalakatti, Shivanand M; Chandra, Kousik; Thirupathi, Ravula; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2014-11-24

    An NMR-based approach for rapid characterization of translational diffusion of molecules has been developed. Unlike the conventional method of acquiring a series of 2D (13)C and (1)H spectra, the proposed approach involves a single 2D NMR spectrum, which can be acquired in minutes. Using this method, it was possible to detect the presence of intermediate oligomeric species of diphenylalanine in solution during the process of its self-assembly to form nanotubular structures. PMID:25331210

  9. Determination of Dihydrobenzoacridinone Structures by NMR, IR, and UV Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, N. G.; Zhiharko, Yu. D.; Skakovsky, E. D.; Baranovsky, A. V.; Ogorodnikova, M. M.; Basalaeva, L. I.

    2016-01-01

    Condensation of 2-naphthylamine, aromatic aldehydes, and dimedone was found to produce 9,10-dihydrobenzo[a] acridin-11-one derivatives according to PMR, 13C NMR, and IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Correlation spectroscopy showed that the carbonyl in the synthesized dihydrobenzoacridinone derivatives was located on C11.

  10. GFT projection NMR spectroscopy for proteins in the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recording of four-dimensional (4D) spectra for proteins in the solid state has opened new avenues to obtain virtually complete resonance assignments and three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins. As in solution state NMR, the sampling of three indirect dimensions leads per se to long minimal measurement time. Furthermore, artifact suppression in solid state NMR relies primarily on radio-frequency pulse phase cycling. For an n-step phase cycle, the minimal measurement times of both 3D and 4D spectra are increased n times. To tackle the associated 'sampling problem' and to avoid sampling limited data acquisition, solid state G-Matrix Fourier Transform (SS GFT) projection NMR is introduced to rapidly acquire 3D and 4D spectral information. Specifically, (4,3)D (HA)CANCOCX and (3,2)D (HACA)NCOCX were implemented and recorded for the 6 kDa protein GB1 within about 10% of the time required for acquiring the conventional congeners with the same maximal evolution times and spectral widths in the indirect dimensions. Spectral analysis was complemented by comparative analysis of expected spectral congestion in conventional and GFT NMR experiments, demonstrating that high spectral resolution of the GFT NMR experiments enables one to efficiently obtain nearly complete resonance assignments even for large proteins.

  11. Conditions affecting the re-alignment of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa in membranes as monitored by solid state 2H-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremouilhac, Pierre; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2006-09-01

    The cationic antimicrobial peptide PGLa is electrostatically attracted to bacterial membranes, binds as an amphiphilic alpha-helix, and is thus able to permeabilize the lipid bilayer. Using solid state (2)H-NMR of non-perturbing Ala-d(3) labels on the peptide, we have characterized the helix alignment under a range of different conditions. Even at a very high peptide-to-lipid ratio (1:20) and in the presence of negatively charged lipids, there was no indication of a toroidal wormhole structure. Instead, PGLa re-aligns from a surface-bound S-state to an obliquely tilted T-state, which is presumably dimeric. An intermediate structure half-way between the S- and T-state was observed in fully hydrated multilamellar DMPC vesicles at 1:50, suggesting a fast exchange between the two states on the time scale of >50 kHz. We demonstrate that this equilibrium is shifted from the S- towards the T-state either upon (i) increasing the peptide concentration, (ii) adding negatively charged DMPG, or (iii) decreasing the level of hydration. The threshold concentration for re-alignment in DMPC is found to be between 1:200 and 1:100 in oriented samples at 96% humidity. In fully hydrated multilamellar DMPC vesicles, it shifts to an effective peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1:50 as some peptides are able to escape into the bulk water phase. PMID:16716250

  12. Ligand screening by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, V V

    2005-04-26

    NMR based methods to screen for high-affinity ligands have become an indispensable tool for designing rationalized drugs, as these offer a combination of good experimental design of the screening process and data interpretation methods, which together provide unprecedented information on the complex nature of protein-ligand interactions. These methods rely on measuring direct changes in the spectral parameters, that are often simpler than the complex experimental procedures used to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The goal of this review article is to provide the basic details of NMR based ligand-screening methods, with particular focus on the saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment. In addition, we provide an overview of other NMR experimental methods and a practical guide on how to go about designing and implementing them.

  13. Localized double-quantum-filtered 1H NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M. A.; Hetherington, H. P.; Meyerhoff, D. J.; Twieg, D. B.

    The image-guided in vivo spectroscopic (ISIS) pulse sequence has been combined with a double-quantum-filter scheme in order to obtain localized and water-suppressed 1H NMR spectra of J-coupled metabolites. The coherence-transfer efficiency associated with the DQ filter for AX and A 3X spin systems is described. Phantom results of carnosine, alanine, and ethanol in aqueous solution are presented. For comparison, the 1H NMR spectrum of alanine in aqueous solution with the binomial (1331, 2662) spin-echo sequence is also shown.

  14. Insights into the metabolic response to traumatic brain injury as revealed by 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda eBartnik-Olson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review highlights critical issues related to cerebral metabolism following traumatic brain injury (TBI and the use of 13C labeled substrates and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy to study these changes. First we address some pathophysiologic factors contributing to metabolic dysfunction following TBI. We then examine how 13C NMR spectroscopy strategies have been used to investigate energy metabolism, neurotransmission, the intracellular redox state, and neuroglial compartmentation following injury. 13C NMR spectroscopy studies of brain extracts from animal models of TBI have revealed enhanced glycolytic production of lactate, evidence of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP activation, and alterations in neuronal and astrocyte oxidative metabolism that are dependent on injury severity. Differential incorporation of label into glutamate and glutamine from 13C labeled glucose or acetate also suggest TBI-induced adaptations to the glutamate-glutamine cycle.

  15. 2H NMR and 13C-IRMS analyses of acetic acid from vinegar, 18O-IRMS analysis of water in vinegar: International collaborative study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international collaborative study of isotopic methods applied to control the authenticity of vinegar was organized in order to support the recognition of these procedures as official methods. The determination of the 2H/1H ratio of the methyl site of acetic acid by SNIF-NMR (site-specific natural isotopic fractionation-nuclear magnetic resonance) and the determination of the 13C/12C ratio, by IRMS (isotope ratio mass spectrometry) provide complementary information to characterize the botanical origin of acetic acid and to detect adulterations of vinegar using synthetic acetic acid. Both methods use the same initial steps to recover pure acetic acid from vinegar. In the case of wine vinegar, the determination of the 18O/16O ratio of water by IRMS allows to differentiate wine vinegar from vinegars made from dried grapes. The same set of vinegar samples was used to validate these three determinations. The precision parameters of the method for measuring δ13C (carbon isotopic deviation) were found to be similar to the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or sugars extracted from fruit juices: the average repeatability (r) was 0.45 per mille , and the average reproducibility (R) was 0.91 per mille . As expected from previous in-house study of the uncertainties, the precision parameters of the method for measuring the 2H/1H ratio of the methyl site were found to be slightly higher than the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or fermentation ethanol in fruit juices: the average repeatability was 1.34 ppm, and the average reproducibility was 1.62 ppm. This precision is still significantly smaller than the differences between various acetic acid sources (δ13C and δ18O) and allows a satisfactory discrimination of vinegar types. The precision parameters of the method for measuring δ18O were found to be similar to the values previously obtained for other methods applied to wine and fruit juices: the

  16. Genetic algorithm optimized triply compensated pulses in NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manu, V S; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-11-01

    Sensitivity and resolution in NMR experiments are affected by magnetic field inhomogeneities (of both external and RF), errors in pulse calibration, and offset effects due to finite length of RF pulses. To remedy these problems, built-in compensation mechanisms for these experimental imperfections are often necessary. Here, we propose a new family of phase-modulated constant-amplitude broadband pulses with high compensation for RF inhomogeneity and heteronuclear coupling evolution. These pulses were optimized using a genetic algorithm (GA), which consists in a global optimization method inspired by Nature's evolutionary processes. The newly designed π and π/2 pulses belong to the 'type A' (or general rotors) symmetric composite pulses. These GA-optimized pulses are relatively short compared to other general rotors and can be used for excitation and inversion, as well as refocusing pulses in spin-echo experiments. The performance of the GA-optimized pulses was assessed in Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments using a crystalline U-(13)C, (15)N NAVL peptide as well as U-(13)C, (15)N microcrystalline ubiquitin. GA optimization of NMR pulse sequences opens a window for improving current experiments and designing new robust pulse sequences. PMID:26473327

  17. Computational Analysis of Solvent Effects in NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dračínský, Martin; Bouř, Petr

    2010-01-12

    Solvent modeling became a standard part of first principles computations of molecular properties. However, a universal solvent approach is particularly difficult for the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding and spin-spin coupling constants that in part result from collective delocalized properties of the solute and the environment. In this work, bulk and specific solvent effects are discussed on experimental and theoretical model systems comprising solvated alanine zwitterion and chloroform molecules. Density functional theory computations performed on larger clusters indicate that standard dielectric continuum solvent models may not be sufficiently accurate. In some cases, more reasonable NMR parameters were obtained by approximation of the solvent with partial atomic charges. Combined cluster/continuum models yielded the most reasonable values of the spectroscopic parameters, provided that they are dynamically averaged. The roles of solvent polarizability, solvent shell structure, and bulk permeability were investigated. NMR shielding values caused by the macroscopic solvent magnetizability exhibited the slowest convergence with respect to the cluster size. For practical computations, however, inclusion of the first solvation sphere provided satisfactory corrections of the vacuum values. The simulations of chloroform chemical shifts and CH J-coupling constants were found to be very sensitive to the molecular dynamics model used to generate the cluster geometries. The results show that computationally efficient solvent modeling is possible and can reveal fine details of molecular structure, solvation, and dynamics. PMID:26614339

  18. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Metal–Organic Framework Compounds (MOFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kaskel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy is a well-established method for the investigation of various types of porous materials. During the past decade, metal–organic frameworks have attracted increasing research interest. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has rapidly evolved into an important tool for the study of the structure, dynamics and flexibility of these materials, as well as for the characterization of host–guest interactions with adsorbed species such as xenon, carbon dioxide, water, and many others. The present review introduces and highlights recent developments in this rapidly growing field.

  19. 2D-Cosy NMR Spectroscopy as a Quantitative Tool in Biological Matrix: Application to Cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Gilles; Evrard, Brigitte; de Tullio, Pascal

    2015-11-01

    Classical analytical quantifications in biological matrices require time-consuming sample pre-treatments and extractions. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis does not require heavy sample treatments or extractions which therefore increases its accuracy in quantification. In this study, even if quantitative (q)NMR could not be applied to 2D spectra, we demonstrated that cross-correlations and diagonal peak intensities have a linear relationship with the analyzed pharmaceutical compound concentration. This work presents the validation process of a 2D-correlation spectroscopy (COSY) NMR quantification of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in plasma. Specificity, linearity, precision (repeatability and intermediate precision), trueness, limits of quantification (LOQs), and accuracy were used as validation criteria. 2D-NMR could therefore be used as a valuable and accurate analytical technique for the quantification of pharmaceutical compounds, including hardly detectable compounds such as cyclodextrins or poloxamers, in complex biological matrices based on a calibration curve approach.

  20. Structural studies of PCU-hydrazones: NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractions, and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veljković, Jelena; Šekutor, Marina; Molčanov, Krešimir; Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata

    2011-06-01

    In this article we present a detailed structural investigation for the configurational isomers of PCU-hydrazones. The structural characterization of these hydrazones was performed using NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and theoretical calculations. The single crystal X-ray structures of PCU-hydrazones 6B and 6C have been solved and used to conclusively confirm the characterization obtained via NMR spectra of a particular isomer. Nuclear magnetic shielding values calculated for 6A-C using DFT calculations were correlated with the experimentally determined chemical shifts. The computed results were found to be in good agreement with the observed 13C NMR values. The computed NMR results helped to ascertain the isomers of PCU-hydrazones 4A-C.

  1. Online T5 learning model to enhance chemistry students’ understanding of NMR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saksri Supasorn

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Regular lecture-based teaching approaches sometimes fail to enhance students’ understanding of some practice-based chemistry topics such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy. A new task-based approach called the T5 learning model was introduced for 48 students studying NMR in the Spectroscopic Methods for Chemical Identification course in 2011. Four different NMR learning environments based on T5 learning models were developed. The students were requested to participate in the following online processes in each environment: 1 complete an individual task, 2 provide feedback and evaluate three anonymous peer tasks, 3 adjust their individual task and evaluate peer feedback, 4 complete a team task and evaluate the effort of each group member, and 5 get feedback from instructor to fulfill understanding. The result showed that the students obtained post-achievement NMR score (mean 24.25, SD 4.80 statistically significantly higher than pre- achievement score (mean 12.29, SD 1.69 at p-value of 0.05. In addition, the implementation of T5-D4LP NMR course in each year during 2010-2012 showed that the students achieved high score (about 70% in the NMR topics. The student evaluation of the T5 NMR learning environments revealed that they agreed that peer feedback with instructor facilitation engaged them in deep learning and effectively promoted their conceptual understanding.

  2. Surface Binding of TOTAPOL Assists Structural Investigations of Amyloid Fibrils by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Madhu; Franks, Trent W; Saeidpour, Siavash; Schubeis, Tobias; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Ritter, Christiane; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2016-07-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR can enhance sensitivity but often comes at the price of a substantial loss of resolution. Two major factors affect spectral quality: low-temperature heterogeneous line broadening and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effects. Investigations by NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and EPR revealed a new substantial affinity of TOTAPOL to amyloid surfaces, very similar to that shown by the fluorescent dye thioflavin-T (ThT). As a consequence, DNP spectra with remarkably good resolution and still reasonable enhancement could be obtained at very low TOTAPOL concentrations, typically 400 times lower than commonly employed. These spectra yielded several long-range constraints that were difficult to obtain without DNP. Our findings open up new strategies for structural studies with DNP NMR spectroscopy on amyloids that can bind the biradical with affinity similar to that shown towards ThT. PMID:27147408

  3. Structural investigation of bistrifluron using x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, J K; Rhee, S K; Kim, G B; Yun, H S; Chung, B J; Lee, S S; Lim, Y H

    2002-01-01

    A new insecticide, bistrifluron acts as an inhibitor of insect development and interferes with the cuticle formation of insects. Since it shows low acute oral and dermal toxicities, it can be one of potent insecticides. Based on X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling, the structural studies of bistrifluron have been carried out.

  4. NMR imaging and spectroscopy of the mammalian central nervous system after heavy ion radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, T.

    1984-09-01

    NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopic, and histopathologic techniques were used to study the proton relaxation time and related biochemical changes in the central nervous system after helium beam in vivo irradiation of the rodent brain. The spectroscopic observations reported in this dissertation were made possible by development of methods for measuring the NMR parameters of the rodent brain in vivo and in vitro. The methods include (1) depth selective spectroscopy using an optimization of rf pulse energy based on a priori knowledge of N-acetyl aspartate and lipid spectra of the normal brain, (2) phase-encoded proton spectroscopy of the living rodent using a surface coil, and (3) dual aqueous and organic tissue extraction technique for spectroscopy. Radiation induced increases were observed in lipid and p-choline peaks of the proton spectrum, in vivo. Proton NMR spectroscopy measurements on brain extracts (aqueous and organic solvents) were made to observe chemical changes that could not be seen in vivo. Radiation-induced changes were observed in lactate, GABA, glutamate, and p-choline peak areas of the aqueous fraction spectra. In the organic fraction, decreases were observed in peak area ratios of the terminal-methyl peaks, the N-methyl groups of choline, and at a peak at 2.84 ppM (phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine resonances) relative to TMS. With histology and Evans blue injections, blood-brain barrier alternations were seen as early as 4 days after irradiation. 83 references, 53 figures.

  5. Structure and Dynamics Studies of Cytolytic Peptides in Lipid Bilayers using NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara Krogh

    2015-01-01

    different and cytolytic peptides were investigated in this work. The peptides were SPF-5506-A4 from Trichoderma sp, Conolysin-Mt1 from Conus mustelinus, and Alamethicin from Trichoderma viride. The studies employed solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy in combination with different biophysical methods...

  6. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  7. NMR imaging and spectroscopy of the mammalian central nervous system after heavy ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopic, and histopathologic techniques were used to study the proton relaxation time and related biochemical changes in the central nervous system after helium beam in vivo irradiation of the rodent brain. The spectroscopic observations reported in this dissertation were made possible by development of methods for measuring the NMR parameters of the rodent brain in vivo and in vitro. The methods include (1) depth selective spectroscopy using an optimization of rf pulse energy based on a priori knowledge of N-acetyl aspartate and lipid spectra of the normal brain, (2) phase-encoded proton spectroscopy of the living rodent using a surface coil, and (3) dual aqueous and organic tissue extraction technique for spectroscopy. Radiation induced increases were observed in lipid and p-choline peaks of the proton spectrum, in vivo. Proton NMR spectroscopy measurements on brain extracts (aqueous and organic solvents) were made to observe chemical changes that could not be seen in vivo. Radiation-induced changes were observed in lactate, GABA, glutamate, and p-choline peak areas of the aqueous fraction spectra. In the organic fraction, decreases were observed in peak area ratios of the terminal-methyl peaks, the N-methyl groups of choline, and at a peak at 2.84 ppM (phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine resonances) relative to TMS. With histology and Evans blue injections, blood-brain barrier alternations were seen as early as 4 days after irradiation. 83 references, 53 figures

  8. Simultaneous 31P NMR spectroscopy and EMG in exercising and recovering human skeletal muscle: technical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Thomsen, C; Sinkjaer, T;

    1994-01-01

    The bioenergetics of human skeletal muscle can be studied by 31P NMR spectroscopy (31P-MRS) and by surface electromyography (SEMG). Simultaneous 31P-MRS and SEMG permit accurate and noninvasive studies of the correlation between metabolic and electrical changes in exercising and recovering human...

  9. Structural analysis of the carbohydrate chains of glycoproteins by 500-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with the structural analysis by 500-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy of carbohydrate chains obtained from glycoproteins. In the chapters 1 to 6 the structural analysis of N-glycosidically linked carbohydrate chains is described. The chapters 7 to 10 describe the structural analysis of O-glycosidically linked carbohydrate chains. 381 refs.; 44 figs.; 24 tabs.; 7 schemes

  10. Structural rearrangements of membrane proteins probed by water-edited solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ader, C.; Schneider, R.; Seidel, K.; Etzkorn, M.; Becker, S.; Baldus, M.

    2009-01-01

    We show that water-edited solid-state NMR spectroscopy allows for probing global protein conformation and residue-specific solvent accessibility in a lipid bilayer environment. The transfer dynamics can be well described by a general time constant, irrespective of protein topology and lipid environm

  11. The Validity of High Temperature Approximation in NMR Spectroscopy and Its Related Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ A large body of conspicuous publications [1] in recent years asserts that the high temperature approximation (HTA), a mostly tested and most widely used assumption in NMR spectroscopy and MRI technology, is invalid for concentrated samples in high magnetic fields such as for a proton COSY spectrum of water [1].

  12. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  13. (13)C NMR assignments of regenerated cellulose from solid-state 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idström, Alexander; Schantz, Staffan; Sundberg, Johan; Chmelka, Bradley F; Gatenholm, Paul; Nordstierna, Lars

    2016-10-20

    From the assignment of the solid-state (13)C NMR signals in the C4 region, distinct types of crystalline cellulose, cellulose at crystalline surfaces, and disordered cellulose can be identified and quantified. For regenerated cellulose, complete (13)C assignments of the other carbon regions have not previously been attainable, due to signal overlap. In this study, two-dimensional (2D) NMR correlation methods were used to resolve and assign (13)C signals for all carbon atoms in regenerated cellulose. (13)C-enriched bacterial nanocellulose was biosynthesized, dissolved, and coagulated as highly crystalline cellulose II. Specifically, four distinct (13)C signals were observed corresponding to conformationally different anhydroglucose units: two signals assigned to crystalline moieties and two signals assigned to non-crystalline species. The C1, C4 and C6 regions for cellulose II were fully examined by global spectral deconvolution, which yielded qualitative trends of the relative populations of the different cellulose moieties, as a function of wetting and drying treatments. PMID:27474592

  14. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a new approach to study humic material?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knicker, Heike; Lange, Sascha; van Rossum, Barth; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Compared to solution NMR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectra suffer from broad resonance lines and low resolution. This could be overcome by the use of 2-dimenstional solid-state NMR pulse sequences. Until recently, this approach has been unfeasible as a routine tool in soil chemistry, mainly because of the low NMR sensitivity of the respective samples. A possibility to circumvent those sensitivity problems represents high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy (Barnes et al., 2008), allowing considerable signal enhancements (Akbey et al., 2010). This is achieved by a microwave-driven transfer of polarization from a paramagnetic center to nuclear spins. Application of DNP to MAS spectra of biological systems (frozen solutions) showed enhancements of the factor 40 to 50 (Hall et al., 1997). Enhancements of this magnitude, thus may enable the use of at least some of the 2D solid-state NMR techniques that are presently already applied for pure proteins but are difficult to apply to soil peptides in their complex matrix. After adjusting the required acquisition parameters to the system "soil organic matter", lower but still promising enhancement factors were achieved. Additional optimization was performed and allowed the acquisition of 2D 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra of humified 13C and 15N enriched plant residues. Within the present contribution, the first solid-state DNP NMR spectra of humic material are presented. Those data demonstrate the great potential of this approach which certainly opens new doors for a better understanding of biochemical processes in soils, sediments and water. Akbey, Ü., Franks, W.T., Linden, A., Lange, S., Griffin, R.G., van Rossum, B.-J., Oschkinat, H., 2010. Dynamic nuclear polarization of deuterated proteins. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49, 7803-7806. Barnes, A.B., De Paëpe, G., van der Wel, P.C.A., Hu, K.N., Joo, C.G., Bajaj, V.S., Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L., Sirigiri, J.R., Herzfeld, J

  15. Complex Mixture Analysis of Organic Compounds in Yogurt by NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    NMR measurements do not require separation and chemical modification of samples and therefore rapidly and directly provide non-targeted information on chemical components in complex mixtures. In this study, one-dimensional (¹H, (13)C, and (31)P) and two-dimensional (¹H-(13)C and ¹H-(31)P) NMR spectroscopy were conducted to analyze yogurt without any pretreatment. ¹H, (13)C, and (31)P NMR signals were assigned to 10 types of compounds. The signals of α/β-lactose and α/β-galactose were separately observed in the ¹H NMR spectra. In addition, the signals from the acyl chains of milk fats were also successfully identified but overlapped with many other signals. Quantitative difference spectra were obtained by subtracting the diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra from the quantitative ¹H NMR spectra. This method allowed us to eliminate interference on the overlaps; therefore, the correct intensities of signals overlapped with those from the acyl chains of milk fat could be determined directly without separation. Moreover, the ¹H-(31)P HMBC spectra revealed for the first time that N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-1-phosphate is contained in yogurt. PMID:27322339

  16. Grape juice quality control by means of ¹H nmr spectroscopy and chemometric analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Werner Pereira da Silva Grandizoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the application of ¹H NMR spectroscopy and chemometrics for quality control of grape juice. A wide range of quality assurance parameters were assessed by single ¹H NMR experiments acquired directly from juice. The investigation revealed that conditions and time of storage should be revised and indicated on all labels. The sterilization process of homemade grape juices was efficient, making it possible to store them for long periods without additives. Furthermore, chemometric analysis classified the best commercial grape juices to be similar to homemade grape juices, indicating that this approach can be used to determine the authenticity after adulteration.

  17. Synthesis and proton NMR spectroscopy of intra-vesicular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luke Y-J; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under (1)H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall.

  18. Quantitative analysis of water heavy by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance has been applied to a wide variety of quantitative problems. A typical example has been the determination of isotopic composition. In this paper two different analytical methods for the determination of water in deuterium oxide are described. The first one, employs acetonitril as an internal standard compound and in the second one calibration curve of signal integral curve versus amount of D2O is constructed. Both methods give results comparable to those of mass spectrometry of IR spectroscopy. (Author) 5 refs

  19. 31P NMR spectroscopy of tumors in the evaluation of response to therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the effects of different kinds of therapy on tumour metabolism were investigated by in vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy. From the first five chapters (laboratory-animal studies) it turns out that after radiotherapy as well as after hyperthermy or chemoterapy changes can be observed in the 31P NMR spectra of tumours. In a number of cases a durable decline occurred in the ratio of the high-energetic adenosinephosphate (ATP) and the low-energeic anorganic phosphate, cuased by the mortification of tumourcells. On the other hand, tumour regression after effective chemotherapy resulted in a growth of the ATP/Pi ratio. In one case a temporary drop occurred which could be related to a temporary decrease in tumour perfusion. In anoter case a temporary drop of the ATP/Pi ratio correlated with resistence against treatment with cis-diaminodichoroplatina. In contrast with the changes in ATP/Pi ratio, the changes, after (chemo)therapy, in tumour pH do not seem to be related with the respons of the tumour. The results of the laboratory-animal experiments indicate that in vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy could be applied in the clinic in order to establish betime the response of tumours on therapy. In ch. 6 initial experiences with clinical NMR spectroscopy of human breast cancer are described. The results indicate that by 31P NMR spectroscopy malignant breast tissues can be discerned from normal breast tissues, following radiotherapy and subsequent tumour regression, in the spectrum of the tumorous region an intense PCr signal developed which appeared to reflect a metabolic change in the tumous itself. 177 refs.; 27 figs.; 6 tabs

  20. 15N NMR spectroscopy of Pseudomonas cytochrome c-551

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    15N-1H correlation spectroscopy with detection at the 1H frequency has been used at natural abundance to detect nitrogen nuclei bonded to protons in the ferrocytochrome c-551 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 19429). Side-chain aromatic nitrogen, main-chain amides, and side-chain amides have been assigned to specific residues by comparison to previous proton assignments. Assignment ambiguities arising from overlap in the proton dimension have been resolved by examining spectra as a function of temperature and pH. Nitrogen chemical shifts are reported at pH 4.6 and 9.4 and three temperatures, 32, 50, and 60 degree C. Significant differences arise from the observed protein shifts and expected shifts in the random coil polypeptide

  1. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  2. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium: An investigation of weak interactions in solution using multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, D.J.

    1995-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy is ideal for studying weak interactions (formation enthalpy {le}20 kcal/mol) in solution. The metallocene bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium, Cp*{sub 2}Yb, is ideal for this purpose. cis-P{sub 2}PtH{sub 2}complexes (P = phosphine) were used to produce slow-exchange Cp*{sub 2}YbL adducts for NMR study. Reversible formation of (P{sub 2}PtH){sub 2} complexes from cis-P{sub 2}PtH{sub 2} complexes were also studied, followed by interactions of Cp*{sub 2}Yb with phosphines, R{sub 3}PX complexes. A NMR study was done on the interactions of Cp*{sub 2}Yb with H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, Xe, CO, silanes, stannanes, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, and toluene.

  3. Chemical-shift-resolved ¹⁹F NMR spectroscopy between 13.5 and 135 MHz: Overhauser-DNP-enhanced diagonal suppressed correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Christy; Chandrakumar, Narayanan

    2014-08-01

    Overhauser-DNP-enhanced homonuclear 2D (19)F correlation spectroscopy with diagonal suppression is presented for small molecules in the solution state at moderate fields. Multi-frequency, multi-radical studies demonstrate that these relatively low-field experiments may be operated with sensitivity rivalling that of standard 200-1000 MHz NMR spectroscopy. Structural information is accessible without a sensitivity penalty, and diagonal suppressed 2D NMR correlations emerge despite the general lack of multiplet resolution in the 1D ODNP spectra. This powerful general approach avoids the rather stiff excitation, detection, and other special requirements of high-field (19)F NMR spectroscopy.

  4. Evidence for a dipolar-coupled AM system in carnosine in human calf muscle from in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Leif; Bachert, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Spin systems with residual dipolar couplings such as creatine, taurine, and lactate in skeletal muscle tissue exhibit first-order spectra in in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy at 1.5 T because the coupled protons are represented by (nearly) symmetrized eigenfunctions. The imidazole ring protons (H2, H4) of carnosine are suspected to form also a coupled system. The ring's stiffness could enable a connectivity between these anisochronous protons with the consequence of second-order spectra at low field strength. Our purpose was to study whether this deviation from the Paschen-Back condition can be used to detect the H2-H4 coupling in localized 1D 1H NMR spectra obtained at 1.5 T (64 MHz) from the human calf in a conventional whole-body scanner. As for the hydrogen hyperfine interaction, a Breit-Rabi equation was derived to describe the transition from Zeeman to Paschen-Back regime for two dipolar-coupled protons. The ratio of the measurable coupling strength ( Sk) and the difference in resonance frequencies of the coupled spins (Δ ω) induces quantum-state mixing of various degree upon definition of an appropriate eigenbase of the coupled spin system. The corresponding Clebsch-Gordan coefficients manifest in characteristic energy corrections in the Breit-Rabi formula. These additional terms were used to define an asymmetry parameter of the line positions as a function of Sk and Δ ω. The observed frequency shifts of the resonances were found to be consistent with this parameter within the accuracy achievable in in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Thus it was possible to identify the origin of satellite peaks of H2, H4 and to describe this so far not investigated type of residual dipolar coupling in vivo.

  5. Protolytic properties of polyamine wasp toxin analogues studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Piazzi, Lorna; Olsen, Christian A;

    2006-01-01

    Acid-base properties of the natural polyamine wasp toxin PhTX-433 (1) and seven synthetic analogues [PhTX-343 (2), PhTX-334 (3), PhTX-443 (4), PhTX-434 (5), PhTX-344 (6), PhTX-444 (7), and PhTX-333 (8)], each having four protolytic sites, were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Nonlinear, mul...

  6. Analysis of metabolic disorders of dairy cows employing multidimensional and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Matthias S.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, metabolism profiles of different diseases were measured in body fluids and tissues using high-resolution one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) proton (1H) and carbon-13 (13C) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy at natural 13C abundance. Protocols for measuring and quantifying low-molecular weight organic molecules in urine, milk, plasma, serum and tissue extracts were established and validated by comparison with established analytical techniques such as gas c...

  7. Biosynthetic studies on mycotoxins using multiple stable isotope labelling and NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biosynthesis of terretonin and mevinolin, polyketide metabolites from mycotoxin-producing Aspergillus terreus strains, have been examined by incorporation of precursors multiply-labelled with 13C, 18O, and 2H. A variety of one and two dimensional NMR techniques permit facile spectral assignment and location of labelled sites. The results show that the polyketide parts of both metabolites, terretonin and mevinolin, are assembled by enzymes similar to those of fatty acid biosynthesis and that extensive oxidative transformation occurs in the later stages of biosynthesis. 25 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 table

  8. 1H to 13C Energy Transfer in Solid State NMR Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Anne E.; Conte, Pellegrino

    2010-05-01

    Cross polarization (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) 13C-NMR spectroscopy is a solid state NMR technique widely used to study chemical composition of organic materials with low or no solubility in the common deuterated solvents used to run liquid state NMR experiments. Based on the magnetization transfer from abundant nuclei (with spin of 1 -2) having a high gyromagnetic ratio (γ), such as protons, to the less abundant 13C nuclei with low γ values, 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy is often applied in environmental chemistry to obtain quantitative information on the chemical composition of natural organic matter (NOM) (Conte et al., 2004), although its quantitative assessment is still matter of heavy debates. Many authors (Baldock et al., 1997; Conte et al., 1997, 2002; Dria et al., 2002; Kiem et al., 2000; Kögel-Knabner, 2000; Preston, 2001), reported that the application of appropriate instrument setup as well as the use of special pulse sequences and correct spectra elaboration may provide signal intensities that are directly proportional to the amount of nuclei creating a NMR signal. However, many other papers dealt with the quantitative unsuitability of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Among those, Mao et al. (2000), Smernik and Oades (2000 a,b), and Preston (2001) reported that cross-polarized NMR techniques may fail in a complete excitation of the 13C nuclei. In fact, the amount of observable carbons via 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy appeared, in many cases, lower than that measured by a direct observation of the 13C nuclei. As a consequence, cross-polarized NMR techniques may provide spectra where signal distribution may not be representative of the quantitative distribution of the different natural organic matter components. Cross-polarization is obtained after application of an initial 90° x pulse on protons and a further spin lock pulse (along the y axis) having a fixed length (contact time) for both nuclei (1H and 13C) once the Hartmann-Hahn condition is matched

  9. Self-Assembled Ionophores from Isoguanosine: Diffusion NMR Spectroscopy Clarifies Cation's and Anion's Influence on Supramolecular Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evan-Salem, Tamar; Frish, Limor; Leeuwen, van Fijs W.B.; Reinhoudt, David N.; Verboom, Willem; Kaucher, Mark S.; Davis, Jeffery T.; Cohen, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    Cation-templated self-assembly of the lipophilic isoguanosine (isoG 1) with different monovalent cations (M+=Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, and Cs+) was studied in solvents of different polarity by using diffusion NMR spectroscopy. Previous studies that did not use diffusion NMR techniques concluded that isoG

  10. The vacuum UV photoabsorption spectroscopy of vinyl fluoride (C 2H 3F): The vibrational fine structure and its analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locht, R.; Leyh, B.; Dehareng, D.; Jochims, H. W.; Baumgärtel, H.

    2009-08-01

    The vacuum UV photoabsorption spectrum of C 2H 3F has been examined in detail between 6 eV and 25 eV photon energy by using synchrotron radiation. The analysis of the data is supported by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations applied to valence and Rydberg excited states of C 2H 3F. At 7.6 eV the π → π ∗ and the 2a″ → 3s transitions are observed. An analysis is proposed and applied to the mixed fine structure belonging to these transitions. For the π → π ∗ transition one single long vibrational progression is observed with hcω e = 95 ± 7 meV (766 ± 56 cm -1) and its adiabatic excitation energy is 6.892 eV (55 588 cm -1). The 2a″ → 3s transition is characterized by a single short progression with hcω e = 167 ± 10 meV (1350 ± 80 cm -1) starting at 6.974 eV (56 249 cm -1). From the present ab initio calculations these two wavenumbers best correspond to the vibrational modes v9 (CH 2 rock in-plane, FCC-bend) and v6 (CH 2 rock in-plane, CF stretch) calculated at 615 cm -1 in the π ∗ state and 1315 cm -1 in the ( 2A″)3s Rydberg state respectively. The C dbnd C stretching could not be excluded. The dense structured spectrum observed between 8.0 eV and 10.5 eV has been analyzed in terms of vibronic transitions to Rydberg states all converging to the CHF(X˜A) ionic ground state. An analysis of the associated complex fine structure of the individual Rydberg states has been attempted providing average values of the wavenumbers, e.g., for the ( 2A″)3p Rydberg state hcω9 = 60 ± 1 meV (or 484 ± 8 cm -1), hcω7 = 151 ± 7 meV (or 1218 ± 60 cm -1), hcω4 = 191 ± 3 meV (or 1540 ± 24 cm -1). The assignment of hcω = 105 ± 5 meV (or 823 ± 40 cm -1) is discussed. These experimental values are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions for C 2H 3F + [R. Locht, B. Leyh, D. Dehareng, K. Hottmann, H. Baumgärtel, Chem. Phys. (in press)]. Above 10.5 eV and up to 25 eV several broad and strong bands are tentatively assigned to

  11. Interaction Study of an Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Cyclosporin A in Poly-Alpha-Cyclodextrin with Model Membranes by 1H-, 2H-, 31P-NMR and Electron Spin Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Debouzy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of an amorphous solid dispersion of cyclosporine A (ASD prepared with the copolymer alpha cyclodextrin (POLYA and cyclosporine A (CYSP were investigated by 1H-NMR in solution and its membrane interactions were studied by 1H-NMR in small unilamellar vesicles and by 31P 2H NMR in phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine in comparison with those of POLYA and CYSP alone. 1H-NMR chemical shift variations showed that CYSP really interacts with POLYA, with possible adduct formation, dispersion in the solid matrix of the POLYA, and also complex formation. A coarse approach to the latter mechanism was tested using the continuous variations method, indicating an apparent 1 : 1 stoichiometry. Calculations gave an apparent association constant of log Ka = 4.5. A study of the interactions with phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC showed that only limited interactions occurred at the polar head group level (31P. Conversely, by comparison with the expected chain rigidification induced by CYSP, POLYA induced an increase in the fluidity of the layer while ASD formation led to these effects almost being overcome at 298 K. At higher temperature, while the effect of CYSP seems to vanish, a resulting global increase in chain fluidity was found in the presence of ASD.

  12. Characterization of the insertase BamA in three different membrane mimetics by solution NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgado, Leonor; Zeth, Kornelius; Burmann, Björn M.; Maier, Timm; Hiller, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.hiller@unibas.ch [University of Basel, Biozentrum (Switzerland)

    2015-04-15

    The insertase BamA is the central protein of the Bam complex responsible for outer membrane protein biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria. BamA features a 16-stranded transmembrane β-barrel and five periplasmic POTRA domains, with a total molecular weight of 88 kDa. Whereas the structure of BamA has recently been determined by X-ray crystallography, its functional mechanism is not well understood. This mechanism comprises the insertion of substrates from a dynamic, chaperone-bound state into the bacterial outer membrane, and NMR spectroscopy is thus a method of choice for its elucidation. Here, we report solution NMR studies of different BamA constructs in three different membrane mimetic systems: LDAO micelles, DMPC:DiC{sub 7}PC bicelles and MSP1D1:DMPC nanodiscs. The impact of biochemical parameters on the spectral quality was investigated, including the total protein concentration and the detergent:protein ratio. The barrel of BamA is folded in micelles, bicelles and nanodiscs, but the N-terminal POTRA5 domain is flexibly unfolded in the absence of POTRA4. Measurements of backbone dynamics show that the variable insertion region of BamA, located in the extracellular lid loop L6, features high local flexibility. Our work establishes biochemical preparation schemes for BamA, which will serve as a platform for structural and functional studies of BamA and its role within the Bam complex by solution NMR spectroscopy.

  13. NMR Spectroscopy of Human Eye Tissues: A New Insight into Ocular Biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kryczka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The human eye is a complex organ whose anatomy and functions has been described very well to date. Unfortunately, the knowledge of the biochemistry and metabolic properties of eye tissues varies. Our objective was to reveal the biochemical differences between main tissue components of human eyes. Methods. Corneas, irises, ciliary bodies, lenses, and retinas were obtained from cadaver globes 0-1/2 hours postmortem of 6 male donors (age: 44–61 years. The metabolic profile of tissues was investigated with HR MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. Results. A total of 29 metabolites were assigned in the NMR spectra of the eye tissues. Significant differences between tissues were revealed in contents of the most distant eye-tissues, while irises and ciliary bodies showed minimal biochemical differences. ATP, acetate, choline, glutamate, lactate, myoinositol, and taurine were identified as the primary biochemical compounds responsible for differentiation of the eye tissues. Conclusions. In this study we showed for the first time the results of the analysis of the main human eye tissues with NMR spectroscopy. The biochemical contents of the selected tissues seemed to correspond to their primary anatomical and functional attributes, the way of the delivery of the nutrients, and the location of the tissues in the eye.

  14. Ultrafast double-quantum NMR spectroscopy with optimized sensitivity for the analysis of mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, Laetitia; Gouilleux, Boris; Pourchet-Gellez, Mariane; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast (UF) 2D NMR enables the acquisition of 2D spectra within a single-scan. This methodology has become a powerful analytical tool, used in a large array of applications. However, UF NMR spectroscopy still suffers from the need to compromise between sensitivity, spectral width and resolution. With the commonly used UF-COSY pulse sequence, resolution issues are compounded by the presence of strong auto-correlation signals, particularly in the case of samples with high dynamic ranges. The recently proposed concept of UF Double Quantum Spectroscopy (DQS) allows a better peak separation as it provides a lower spectral peak density. This paper presents the detailed investigation of this new NMR tool in an analytical chemistry context. Theoretical calculations and numerical simulations are used to characterize the modulation of peak intensities as a function of pulse-sequence parameters, and thus enable a significant enhancement of the sensitivity. The analytical comparison of UF-COSY and UF-DQS shows similar performances, however the ultrafast implementation of the DQS approach is found to have some sensitivity advantages over its conventional counterpart. The analytical performance of the pulse sequence is illustrated by the quantification of taurine in complex mixtures (homemade and commercial energy drinks). The results demonstrate the high potential of this experiment, which forms a valuable alternative to UF-COSY spectra when the latter are characterized by strong overlaps and high dynamic ranges. PMID:26865359

  15. Stereochemistry of 16a-Hydroxyfriedelin and 3-Oxo-16-methylfriedel-16-ene Established by 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Fernandes Knupp

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Friedelin (1, 3b-friedelinol (2, 28-hydroxyfriedelin (3, 16a-hydroxyfriedelin (4, 30-hydroxyfriedelin (5 and 16a,28-dihydroxyfriedelin (6 were isolated through fractionation of the hexane extract obtained from branches of Salacia elliptica. After a week in CDCl3 solution, 16a-hydroxyfriedelin (4 reacted turning into 3-oxo-16-methylfriedel-16-ene (7. This is the first report of a dehydration followed by a Nametkin rearrangement of a pentacyclic triterpene in CDCl3 solution occurring in the NMR tube. These seven pentacyclic triterpenes was identified through NMR spectroscopy and the stereochemistry of compound 4 and 7 was established by 2D NMR (NOESY spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (GC-MS. It is also the first time that all the 13C-NMR and 2D NMR spectral data are reported for compounds 4 and 7.

  16. Complementary low energy ion scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of polystyrene submitted to N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonatto, F., E-mail: bonatto02@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul 91509-900 (Brazil); Rovani, S. [Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul 95070-560 (Brazil); Kaufmann, I.R.; Soares, G.V. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul 91509-900 (Brazil); Baumvol, I.J.R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul 91509-900 (Brazil); Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul 95070-560 (Brazil); Krug, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul 91509-900 (Brazil)

    2012-02-15

    Low energy ion scattering (LEIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to access the elemental composition and chemical bonding characteristics of polystyrene (PS) surfaces sequentially treated by corona and glow discharge (plasma) processing in N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} ambient. The latter has shown activity as suppressor of pathogenic Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms. LEIS indicated that oxygen from the corona discharge process is progressively replaced by nitrogen at the PS surface. XPS shows C=N and N-C=O chemical groups as significant inhibitors of bacterial adhesion, suggesting application in medical devices.

  17. Determination of the biogenic secondary organic aerosol fraction in the boreal forest by NMR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Finessi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the sources of fine organic aerosol (OA in the boreal forest, based on measurements including both filter sampling (PM1 and online methods and carried out during a one-month campaign held in Hyytiälä, Finland, in spring 2007. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, ToF-AMS were employed to measure on-line concentrations of major non-refractory aerosol species, while the water extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy for organic functional group characterization of the polar organic fraction of the aerosol. AMS and NMR spectra were processed separately by non-negative factorization algorithms, in order to apportion the main components underlying the submicrometer organic aerosol composition and depict them in terms of both mass fragmentation patterns and functional group compositions.

    The NMR results supported the AMS speciation of oxidized organic aerosol (OOA into two main fractions, which could be generally labelled as more and less oxidized organics. The more oxidized component was characterized by a mass spectrum dominated by the m/z 44 peak, and in parallel by a NMR spectrum showing aromatic and aliphatic backbones highly substituted with oxygenated functional groups (carbonyls/carboxyls and hydroxyls. Such component, contributing on average 50% of the OA mass throughout the observing period, was associated with pollution outbreaks from the Central Europe. The less oxidized component was enhanced in concomitance with air masses originating from the North-to-West sector, in agreement with previous investigations conducted at this site. NMR factor analysis was able to separate two distinct components under the less oxidized fraction of OA. One of these NMR-factors was associated with the formation of terrestrial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA, based on the comparison with spectral profiles obtained from laboratory experiments of

  18. Determination of the biogenic secondary organic aerosol fraction in the boreal forest by NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finessi, E.; Decesari, S.; Paglione, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Gilardoni, S.; Fuzzi, S.; Saarikoski, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Hillamo, R.; Allan, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Tiitta, P.; Laaksonen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Facchini, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    The study investigates the sources of fine organic aerosol (OA) in the boreal forest, based on measurements including both filter sampling (PM1) and online methods and carried out during a one-month campaign held in Hyytiälä, Finland, in spring 2007. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, ToF-AMS) were employed to measure on-line concentrations of major non-refractory aerosol species, while the water extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for organic functional group characterization of the polar organic fraction of the aerosol. AMS and NMR spectra were processed separately by non-negative factorization algorithms, in order to apportion the main components underlying the submicrometer organic aerosol composition and depict them in terms of both mass fragmentation patterns and functional group compositions. The NMR results supported the AMS speciation of oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) into two main fractions, which could be generally labelled as more and less oxidized organics. The more oxidized component was characterized by a mass spectrum dominated by the m/z 44 peak, and in parallel by a NMR spectrum showing aromatic and aliphatic backbones highly substituted with oxygenated functional groups (carbonyls/carboxyls and hydroxyls). Such component, contributing on average 50% of the OA mass throughout the observing period, was associated with pollution outbreaks from the Central Europe. The less oxidized component was enhanced in concomitance with air masses originating from the North-to-West sector, in agreement with previous investigations conducted at this site. NMR factor analysis was able to separate two distinct components under the less oxidized fraction of OA. One of these NMR-factors was associated with the formation of terrestrial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA), based on the comparison with spectral profiles obtained from laboratory experiments of terpenes photo-oxidation. The second NMR

  19. Refolding of ribonuclease A monitored by real-time photo-CIDNP NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, Iain J. [University of Sussex, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences (United Kingdom); Maeda, Kiminori; Paisley, Howard J. [University of Oxford, Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory (United Kingdom); Mok, K. Hun [University of Dublin, Trinity College, School of Biochemistry and Immunology (Ireland)], E-mail: mok1@tcd.ie; Hore, P. J. [University of Oxford, Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory (United Kingdom)], E-mail: peter.hore@chem.ox.ac.uk

    2009-06-15

    Photo-CIDNP NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating the solvent accessibility of histidine, tyrosine and tryptophan residues in a protein. When coupled to real-time NMR, this technique allows changes in the environments of these residues to be used as a probe of protein folding. In this paper we describe experiments performed to monitor the refolding of ribonuclease A following dilution from a high concentration of chemical denaturant. These experiments provide a good example of the utility of this technique which provides information that is difficult to obtain by other biophysical methods. Real-time photo-CIDNP measurements yield residue-specific kinetic data pertaining to the folding reaction, interpreted in terms of current knowledge of the folding of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A.

  20. Methyl labeling and TROSY NMR spectroscopy of proteins expressed in the eukaryote Pichia pastoris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Lindsay; Zahm, Jacob A.; Ali, Rustam [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Biophysics (United States); Kukula, Maciej; Bian, Liangqiao [University of Texas at Arlington, Shimadzu Center for Advanced Analytical Chemistry (United States); Patrie, Steven M. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Pathology (United States); Gardner, Kevin H. [CUNY Advanced Science Research Center, Structural Biology Initiative (United States); Rosen, Michael K.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M., E-mail: dan.rosenbaum@utsouthwestern.edu [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Biophysics (United States)

    2015-07-15

    {sup 13}C Methyl TROSY NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful method for studying the dynamics of large systems such as macromolecular assemblies and membrane proteins. Specific {sup 13}C labeling of aliphatic methyl groups and perdeuteration has been limited primarily to proteins expressed in E. coli, preventing studies of many eukaryotic proteins of physiological and biomedical significance. We demonstrate the feasibility of efficient {sup 13}C isoleucine δ1-methyl labeling in a deuterated background in an established eukaryotic expression host, Pichia pastoris, and show that this method can be used to label the eukaryotic protein actin, which cannot be expressed in bacteria. This approach will enable NMR studies of previously intractable targets.

  1. Structure of the inactivating gate from the Shaker voltage gated K+ channel analyzed by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid inactivation of voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels is mediated by an N-terminal domain (inactivating ball domain) which blocks the open channel from the cytoplasmic side. Inactivating ball domains of various KV channels are also biologically active when synthesized separately and added as a peptide to the solution. Synthetic inactivating ball domains from different KV channels with hardly any sequence homology mediate quite similar effects even on unrelated KV channel subtypes whose inactivation domain has been deleted. The solution structure of the inactivating ball peptide from Shaker (Sh-P22) was analyzed with NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data indicate a non-random structure in an aqueous environment. However, while other inactivating ball peptides showed well-defined three-dimensional structures under these conditions, Sh-P22 does not have a unique, compactly folded structure in solution. (orig.)

  2. Remeasuring HEWL pKa values by NMR spectroscopy 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, Helen; Tynan-Connolly, Barbara Mary; Lee, Gregory M;

    2011-01-01

    field effects, and conformational changes. We have re-measured titration curves for all carboxylates and His 15 in Hen Egg White Lysozyme (HEWL) by recording the pH-dependent chemical shifts of all backbone amide nitrogens and protons, Asp/Glu side chain protons and carboxyl carbons, and imidazole......Site-specific pK(a) values measured by NMR spectroscopy provide essential information on protein electrostatics, the pH-dependence of protein structure, dynamics and function, and constitute an important benchmark for protein pK(a) calculation algorithms. Titration curves can be measured...... protonated carbons and protons in this protein. We extracted pK(a) values from the resulting titration curves using standard fitting methods, and compared these values to each other, and with those measured previously by ¹H NMR (Bartik et al., Biophys J 1994;66:1180–1184). This analysis gives insights...

  3. Classification of Wines Based on Combination of 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Principal Component Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU, Yuan-Yuan; BAI, Guo-Yun; ZHANG, Xu; LIU, Mai-Li

    2007-01-01

    A combination of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and principal component analysis (PCA)has shown the potential for being a useful method for classification of type, production origin or geographic origin of wines. In this preliminary study, twenty-one bottled wines were classified/separated for their location of production in Shacheng, Changli and Yantai, and the types of the blended, medium dry, dry white and dry red wines, using the NMR-PCA method. The wines were produced by three subsidiary companies of an enterprise according to the same national standard. The separation was believed to be mainly due to the fermentation process for different wines and environmental variations, such as local climate, soil, underground water, sunlight and rainfall. The major chemicals associated with the separation were identified.

  4. Uncovering the triggers for GPCR activation using solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Naoki; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2015-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) span cell membranes with seven transmembrane helices and respond to a diverse array of extracellular signals. Crystal structures of GPCRs have provided key insights into the architecture of these receptors and the role of conserved residues. However, the question of how ligand binding induces the conformational changes that are essential for activation remains largely unanswered. Since the extracellular sequences and structures of GPCRs are not conserved between receptor subfamilies, it is likely that the initial molecular triggers for activation vary depending on the specific type of ligand and receptor. In this article, we describe NMR studies on the rhodopsin subfamily of GPCRs and propose a mechanism for how retinal isomerization switches the receptor to the active conformation. These results suggest a general approach for determining the triggers for activation in other GPCR subfamilies using NMR spectroscopy.

  5. An instrument control and data analysis program for NMR imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a software environment created to support real-time instrument control and signal acquisition as well as array-processor based signal and image processing in up to five dimensions. The environment is configured for NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. It is designed to provide flexible tools for implementing novel NMR experiments in the research laboratory. Data acquisition and processing operations are programmed in macros which are loaded in assembled from to minimize instruction overhead. Data arrays are dynamically allocated for efficient use of memory and can be mapped directly into disk files. The command set includes primitives for real-time control of data acquisition, scalar arithmetic, string manipulation, branching, a file system and vector operations carried out by an array processor. 6 figs

  6. Microfabricated inserts for magic angle coil spinning (MACS wireless NMR spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Badilita

    Full Text Available This article describes the development and testing of the first automatically microfabricated probes to be used in conjunction with the magic angle coil spinning (MACS NMR technique. NMR spectroscopy is a versatile technique for a large range of applications, but its intrinsically low sensitivity poses significant difficulties in analyzing mass- and volume-limited samples. The combination of microfabrication technology and MACS addresses several well-known NMR issues in a concerted manner for the first time: (i reproducible wafer-scale fabrication of the first-in-kind on-chip LC microresonator for inductive coupling of the NMR signal and reliable exploitation of MACS capabilities; (ii improving the sensitivity and the spectral resolution by simultaneous spinning the detection microcoil together with the sample at the "magic angle" of 54.74° with respect to the direction of the magnetic field (magic angle spinning - MAS, accompanied by the wireless signal transmission between the microcoil and the primary circuit of the NMR spectrometer; (iii given the high spinning rates (tens of kHz involved in the MAS methodology, the microfabricated inserts exhibit a clear kinematic advantage over their previously demonstrated counterparts due to the inherent capability to produce small radius cylindrical geometries, thus tremendously reducing the mechanical stress and tearing forces on the sample. In order to demonstrate the versatility of the microfabrication technology, we have designed MACS probes for various Larmor frequencies (194, 500 and 700 MHz testing several samples such as water, Drosophila pupae, adamantane solid and LiCl at different magic angle spinning speeds.

  7. Structural comparison of oligoribonucleotides and their 2 -Deoxy-2 -fluoro analogs by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Reif, Bernd; Wittmann, Valentin; Schwalbe, Harald; Griesinger, Christian; Wörner, Karlheinz; Jahn-Hofmann, Kerstin; Engels, Joachim W.; Bermel, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    1-(2-Deoxy-2-fluororibofuranosyl)pyrimidines were synthesized and incorporated into an RNA oligonucleotide to give 5-r[CfGCf(UfUfCfG)GCfG]-3 (Cf: short form of Cd2f2 = 2-deoxy-2-fluorocytidine; Uf: short form of Ud2f2 = 2-deoxy-2-fluorouridine). The oligomer was investigated by means of UV, CD, and NMR spectroscopy to address the question of how F-labels can substitute 13C-labels in the ribose ring. Through-space (NOE) and through-bond (scalar couplings) experiments were performed that make u...

  8. Characterization of the major nutritional components of Caryocar brasiliense fruit pulp by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Genetica e Morfologia; Resck, Ines Sabioni; Mendonca, Marcio Antonio [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Pequi (Caryocar brasiliense Camb.), a typical fruit of Brazilian Cerrado, is well known in regional cookery and used in folk medicine to treat various illnesses. Mass spectrometry and chromatographic methods have identified the organic composition of pequi fruit pulp; however, NMR spectroscopy is used for the first time to characterize the nutritional components of organic and aqueous-ethanolic extracts. This spectroscopic technique determined the triacylglycerols in the pequi organic fraction, which is constituted mainly by oleate and palmitate esters, and detected the carbohydrate mixtures as the major components of aqueous and ethanolic fractions, respectively. In this study, presence of phenolic compounds was only evidenced in the ethanolic fraction. (author)

  9. Metabolic response to exogenous ethanol in yeast: An in vivo statistical total correlation NMR spectroscopy approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maso Ricci; Marianna Aggravi; Claudia Bonechi; Silvia Martini; Anna Maria; Claudio Rossi

    2012-09-01

    In vivo NMR spectroscopy, together with selectively 13C-labelled substrates and ‘statistical total correlation spectroscopy’ analysis (STOCSY), are valuable tools to collect and interpret the metabolic responses of a living organism to external stimuli. In this study, we applied this approach to evaluate the effects of increasing concentration of exogenous ethanol on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentative metabolism. We show that the STOCSY analysis correctly identifies the different types of correlations among the enriched metabolites involved in the fermentation, and that these correlations are quite stable even in presence of a stressing factor such as the exogenous ethanol.

  10. Silica sol assisted chromatographic NMR spectroscopy for resolution of trans- and cis-isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Wu, Rui; Huang, Shaohua; Bai, Zhengwu

    2016-04-01

    Chromatographic NMR spectroscopy can separate the mixtures of species with significantly different molecular size, but generally fails for isomeric species. Herein, we reported the resolution of trans- and cis-isomers and their structural analogue, which are different in molecular shapes, but similar in mass, were greatly enhanced in the presence of silica sol. The mixtures of maleic acid, fumaric acid and succinic acid, and the mixtures of trans- and cis-1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acids, were distinguished by virtue of their different degrees of interaction with silica sol. Moreover, we found mixed solvents could improve the spectral resolution of DOSY spectra of mixtures.

  11. Characterization of the major nutritional components of Caryocar brasiliense fruit pulp by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pequi (Caryocar brasiliense Camb.), a typical fruit of Brazilian Cerrado, is well known in regional cookery and used in folk medicine to treat various illnesses. Mass spectrometry and chromatographic methods have identified the organic composition of pequi fruit pulp; however, NMR spectroscopy is used for the first time to characterize the nutritional components of organic and aqueous-ethanolic extracts. This spectroscopic technique determined the triacylglycerols in the pequi organic fraction, which is constituted mainly by oleate and palmitate esters, and detected the carbohydrate mixtures as the major components of aqueous and ethanolic fractions, respectively. In this study, presence of phenolic compounds was only evidenced in the ethanolic fraction. (author)

  12. Stereochemical investigations on the diketopiperazine derivatives of enalapril and lisinopril by NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeter, Ádám; Fodor, Tamás; Fischer, János

    1998-11-01

    Stereochemical analysis of epimeric diketopiperazine (DKP) derivatives of enalapril and lisinopril has been performed by NMR spectroscopy. The present study focuses on the configurational assignment and conformational characteristics of the epimeric DKPs obtained from cyclization and subsequent base-catalyzed hydrolysis. We report full 1H and 13C assignments as obtained by a concerted use of 1D and 2D methods. The configuration of the respective stereogenic centres and the main conformational features were derived from the measured scalar and NOE connections. One conspicuous conformational feature of the sidechain is its tendency to bend over the piperazinedione ring.

  13. Probing the Pu4 + magnetic moment in PuF4 with 19F NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capan, Cigdem; Dempsey, Richard J.; Sinkov, Sergey; McNamara, Bruce K.; Cho, Herman

    2016-06-01

    The magnetic fields produced by Pu4 + centers have been measured by 19F NMR spectroscopy to elucidate the Pu-F electronic interactions in polycrystalline PuF4. Spectra acquired at applied fields of 2.35 and 7.05 T reveal a linear scaling of the 19F line shape. A model is presented that treats the line broadening and shifts as due to dipolar fields produced by Pu valence electrons in localized noninteracting orbitals. Alternative explanations for the observed line shape involving covalent Pu-F bonding, superexchange interactions, and electronic configurations with enhanced magnetic moments are considered.

  14. C-13 NMR spectroscopy of plasma reduces interference of hypertriglyceridemia in the H-1 NMR detection of malignancy; Application in patients with breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fossell, E.T.; Hall, F.M. (Beth Israel Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charles E. Dana Research Institute, Boston (USA). Department of Radiology); McDonagh, J. (Beth Israel Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charles E. Dana Research Institute, Boston (USA). Department of Pathology)

    1991-05-01

    The authors have previously described the application of water-suppressed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-1 NMR) spectroscopy of plasma for detection of malignancy. Subsequently, hypertriglyceridemia has been identified as a source of false positive results. Here is described a confirmatory, adjunctive technique -analysis of the carbon-13 (C-13) NMR spectrum of plasma- which also identifies the presence of malignancy but is not sensitive to the plasma triglyceride level. Blinded plasma samples from 480 normal donors and 208 patients scheduled for breast biopsy were analyzed by water-suppressed H-1 and C-13 NMR spectroscopy. Triglyceride levels were also measured. Among the normal donors, there were 38 individuals with hypertriglyceridemia of whom 18 had results consistent with malignancy by H-1 NMR spectroscopy. However, the C-13 technique reduced the apparent H-1 false positive rate from 7.0 to 0.6 percent. Similarly, in the breast biopsy cohort, C-13 reduced the false positive rate from 2.8 to 0.9 percent. Furthermore, the accuracy of the combined H-1/C-13 test in this blinded study was greater than 96 percent in 208 patients studied. (author). 27 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs.

  15. Investigation of Oxidative Degradation in Polymers Using (17)O NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd M.; Celina, Mathew; Assink, Roger A.; Clough, Roger L.; Gillen, Kenneth T.; Wheeler David R.

    1999-07-20

    The thermal oxidation of pentacontane (C{sub 50}H{sub 102}), and of the homopolymer polyisoprene, has been investigated using {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy. By performing the oxidation using {sup 17}O labeled O{sub 2} gas, it is possible to easily identify degradation products, even at relatively low concentrations. It is demonstrated that details of the degradation mechanism can be obtained from analysis of the {sup 17}O NMR spectra as a function of total oxidation. Pentacontane reveals the widest variety of reaction products, and exhibits changes in the relative product distributions with increasing O{sub 2} consumption. At low levels of oxygen incorporation, peroxides are the major oxidation product, while at later stages of degradation these species are replaced by increasing concentrations of ketones, alcohols, carboxylic acids and esters. Analyzing the product distribution can help in identification of the different free-radical decomposition pathways of hydroperoxides, including recombination, proton abstraction and chain scission, as well as secondary reactions. The {sup 17}O NMR spectra of thermally oxidized polyisoprene reveal fewer degradation functionalities, but exhibit an increased complexity in the type of observed degradation species due to structural features such as unsaturation and methyl branching. Alcohols and ethers formed from hydrogen abstraction and free radical termination.

  16. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Metabolomic Characterization of Ovarian Epithelial Carcinomas by HRMAS-NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ben Sellem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objectives of the present study are to determine if a metabolomic study by HRMAS-NMR can (i discriminate between different histological types of epithelial ovarian carcinomas and healthy ovarian tissue, (ii generate statistical models capable of classifying borderline tumors and (iii establish a potential relationship with patient's survival or response to chemotherapy. Methods. 36 human epithelial ovarian tumor biopsies and 3 healthy ovarian tissues were studied using 1H HRMAS NMR spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis. Results. The results presented in this study demonstrate that the three histological types of epithelial ovarian carcinomas present an effective metabolic pattern difference. Furthermore, a metabolic signature specific of serous (N-acetyl-aspartate and mucinous (N-acetyl-lysine carcinomas was found. The statistical models generated in this study are able to predict borderline tumors characterized by an intermediate metabolic pattern similar to the normal ovarian tissue. Finally and importantly, the statistical model of serous carcinomas provided good predictions of both patient's survival rates and the patient's response to chemotherapy. Conclusions. Despite the small number of samples used in this study, the results indicate that metabolomic analysis of intact tissues by HRMAS-NMR is a promising technique which might be applicable to the therapeutic management of patients.

  18. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Advanced Structural Determination of Diterpene Esters Using Molecular Modeling and NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothias-Scaglia, Louis-Félix; Gallard, Jean-François; Dumontet, Vincent; Roussi, Fanny; Costa, Jean; Iorga, Bogdan I; Paolini, Julien; Litaudon, Marc

    2015-10-23

    Three new jatrophane esters (1-3) were isolated from Euphorbia amygdaloides ssp. semiperfoliata, including an unprecedented macrocyclic jatrophane ester bearing a hemiketal substructure, named jatrohemiketal (3). The chemical structures of compounds 1-3 and their relative configurations were determined by spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of compound 3 was determined unambiguously through an original strategy combining NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Conformational search calculations were performed for the four possible diastereomers 3a-3d differing in their C-6 and C-9 stereocenters, and the lowest energy conformer was used as input structure for geometry optimization. The prediction of NMR parameters ((1)H and (13)C chemical shifts and (1)H-(1)H coupling constants) by density functional theory (DFT) calculations allowed identifying the most plausible diastereomer. Finally, the stereostructure of 3 was solved by comparison of the structural features obtained by molecular modeling for 3a-3d with NMR-derived data (the values of dihedral angles deduced from the vicinal proton-proton coupling constants ((3)JHH) and interproton distances determined by ROESY). The methodology described herein provides an efficient way to solve or confirm structural elucidation of new macrocyclic diterpene esters, in particular when no crystal structure is available.

  20. Novel monosaccharide fermentation products in Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus identified using NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isern, Nancy G.; Xue, Junfeng; Rao, Jaya V.; Cort, John R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2013-04-03

    Profiles of metabolites produced by the thermophilic obligately anaerobic cellulose-degrading Gram-positive bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus DSM 8903 strain following growth on different monosaccharides (D-glucose, D-mannose, L-arabinose, D-arabinose, D-xylose, L-fucose, and D-fucose) as carbon sources revealed several unexpected fermentation products, suggesting novel metabolic capacities and unexplored metabolic pathways in this organism. Both 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to determine intracellular and extracellular metabolite profiles. Metabolite profiles were determined from 1-D 1H NMR spectra by curve fitting against spectral libraries provided in Chenomx software. To reduce uncertainties due to unassigned, overlapping, or poorly-resolved peaks, metabolite identifications were confirmed with 2-D homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR experiments. In addition to expected metabolites such as acetate, lactate, glycerol, and ethanol, several novel fermentation products were identified: ethylene glycol (from growth on D-arabinose, though not L-arabinose), acetoin and 2,3-butanediol (from D-glucose and L-arabinose), and hydroxyacetone (from D-mannose and L-arabinose). Production of ethylene glycol from D-arabinose was particularly notable, with around 10% of the substrate carbon converted into this uncommon fermentation product. The novel products have not previously been reported to be produced by C. saccharolyticus, nor would they be easily predicted from the current genome annotation, and show new potentials for using this strain for production of bioproducts.

  1. Rapid etiological classification of meningitis by NMR spectroscopy based on metabolite profiles and host response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Himmelreich

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis is an acute disease with high mortality that is reduced by early treatment. Identification of the causative microorganism by culture is sensitive but slow. Large volumes of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are required to maximise sensitivity and establish a provisional diagnosis. We have utilised nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy to rapidly characterise the biochemical profile of CSF from normal rats and animals with pneumococcal or cryptococcal meningitis. Use of a miniaturised capillary NMR system overcame limitations caused by small CSF volumes and low metabolite concentrations. The analysis of the complex NMR spectroscopic data by a supervised statistical classification strategy included major, minor and unidentified metabolites. Reproducible spectral profiles were generated within less than three minutes, and revealed differences in the relative amounts of glucose, lactate, citrate, amino acid residues, acetate and polyols in the three groups. Contributions from microbial metabolism and inflammatory cells were evident. The computerised statistical classification strategy is based on both major metabolites and minor, partially unidentified metabolites. This data analysis proved highly specific for diagnosis (100% specificity in the final validation set, provided those with visible blood contamination were excluded from analysis; 6-8% of samples were classified as indeterminate. This proof of principle study suggests that a rapid etiologic diagnosis of meningitis is possible without prior culture. The method can be fully automated and avoids delays due to processing and selective identification of specific pathogens that are inherent in DNA-based techniques.

  2. Structural Characterization of Lignins Isolated from Caragana sinica Using FT-IR and NMR Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAOLing-ping; SHIZheng-jun; XUFeng; SUN Run-cang; Amar Kmohanty

    2011-01-01

    In order to efficiently explore and use woody biomass,six lignin fractions were isolated from dewaxed Caragana sinica via successive extraction with organic.solvents and alkaline solutions.The lignin structures were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR).FT-IR spectra revealed that the “core” of the lignin structure did not significantly change during the treatment under the conditions given.The results of 1 H and 13C NMR demonstrated that the lignin fraction L2,isolated with 70% ethanol containing 1% NaOH,was mainly composed of β-O-4 ether bonds together with G and S units and trace p-hydroxyphenyl unit.Based on the 2D HSQC NMR spectrum,the ethanol organosolv lignin fraction L1,extracted with 70% ethanol,presents a predominance of β-O-4' arylether linkages (61% of total side chains),and a low abundance of condensed carbon-carbon linked structures (such as β-β',β-1',and β-5') and a lower S/G ratio.Furthermore,a small percentage (ca.9%) of the linkage side chain was found to be acylated at the γ-carbon.

  3. Study of aging in oil paintings by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyros, Apostolos; Anglos, Demetrios

    2004-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is proposed as an efficient analytical tool in the study of painted artworks. The binding medium from two original oil paintings, dated from the early 20th and the late 17th century, was studied via high-resolution 1D and 2D NMR, establishing the advanced state of hydrolysis and oxidation of the oil paint. Studies of the solvent-extractable component from model samples of various drying oils, raw oil paints, and aged oil paints allowed the definition of several markers based on the integral ratios of various chemical species present in the 1H and 13C NMR spectra. These markers are sensitive to hydrolytic and oxidative processes that reflect the extent of aging in oil paintings. The rapidity, simplicity, and nondestructive nature of the proposed analytical NMR methodology represents a great advantage, since the usually minute sample quantities available from original artwork can be subsequently analyzed further by other analytical techniques, if necessary. PMID:15373425

  4. Ground-state properties of K-isotopes from laser and $\\beta$-NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Lievens, P; Rajabali, M M; Krieger, A R

    By combining high-resolution laser spectroscopy with $\\beta$-NMR spectroscopy on polarized K-beams we aim to establish the ground-state spins and magnetic moments of the neutron-rich $^{48,49,50,51}$K isotopes from N=29 to N=32. Spins and magnetic moments of the odd-K isotopes up to N=28 reveal an inversion of the ground-state, from the normal $\\,{I}$=3/2 ($\\pi{d}_{3/2}^{-1}$) in $^{41-45}$K$\\to\\,{I}$=1/2 ($\\pi{s}_{1/2}^{-1}$) in $^{47}$K. This inversion of the proton single particle levels is related to the strong proton $d_{3/2}$ - neutron $f_{7/2}$ interaction which lowers the energy of the $\\pi{d}_{3/2}$ single particle state when filling the $\

  5. The Development of 460 GHz gyrotrons for 700 MHz DNP-NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idehara, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Khutoryan, E. M.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Ueda, K.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-07-01

    Two demountable gyrotrons with internal mode converters were developded as sub-THz radiation sources for 700 MHz DNP (Dynamic Nuclear Polarization) enhanced NMR spectroscopy. Experimental study on the DNP-NMR spectroscopy will be carried out in Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research, as a collaboration with FIR UF. Both gyrotrons operate near 460 GHz and the output CW power measured at the end of transmission system made by circular waveguides is typically 20 to 30 watts. One of them named Gyrotron FU CW GVI (we are using "Gyrotron FU CW GO-1" as an official name in Osaka University) is designed to have a special function of high speed frequency modulation δ f within 100 MHz band. This will expand excitable band width of ESR and increase the number of electron spins contributing to DNP. The other gyrotron, Gyrotron FU CW GVIA ("Gyrotron FU CW GO-II") has a function of frequency tunability Δ f in the range of wider than 1.5 GHz, which is achieved in steady state by changing magnetic field intensity. This function should be used for adjusting the output frequency at the optimal value to achieve the highest enhancement factor of DNP.

  6. Characterization of prednisolone in controlled porosity osmotic pump pellets using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotthivirat, S; Lubach, J W; Haslam, J L; Munson, E J; Stella, V J

    2007-05-01

    The overall objective of this study was to demonstrate the influence of formulation and processing variables on the physical state of prednisolone (PDL) in formulations consisting of PDL, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), and sulfobutylether-beta-cyclodextrin (CD). PDL was used as a model drug in controlled porosity osmotic pump pellet (CP-OPP) formulations, and was characterized using solid-state NMR spectroscopy and other complimentary analytical techniques. Dosage forms and the solid-state properties of drugs and excipients in a formulation may be influenced by the processing conditions used. Several processing parameters, such as amount of water used in wet granulation and subsequent drying conditions, were found to affect the solid-state transformation of PDL. In addition, the presence of excipients in the CP-OPP was observed to decrease the degree of PDL crystallinity, presumably by creating an inclusion complex with the CD. A hydrated form of PDL was created when PDL was ground with water alone; however, this form was not observed in formulated products. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy was shown to be a powerful technique for the analysis of drug formulations and investigations of the effects of processing conditions. PMID:17455361

  7. Structural investigation of aluminium doped ZnO nanoparticles by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avadhut, Yamini S; Weber, Johannes; Hammarberg, Elin; Feldmann, Claus; Schmedt auf der Günne, Jörn

    2012-09-01

    The electrical conductivity of aluminium doped zinc oxide (AZO, ZnO:Al) materials depends on doping induced defects and grain structure. This study aims at relating macroscopic electrical conductivity of AZO nanoparticles with their atomic structure, which is non-trivial because the derived materials are heavily disordered and heterogeneous in nature. For this purpose we synthesized AZO nanoparticles with different doping levels and narrow size distribution by a microwave assisted polyol method followed by drying and a reductive treatment with forming gas. From these particles electrically conductive, optically transparent films were obtained by spin-coating. Characterization involved energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, wet chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, which provided a basis for a detailed structural solid-state NMR study. A multinuclear ((27)Al, (13)C, (1)H) spectroscopic investigation required a number of 1D MAS NMR and 2D MAS NMR techniques (T(1)-measurements, (27)Al-MQMAS, (27)Al-(1)H 2D-PRESTO-III heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy), which were corroborated by quantum chemical calculations with an embedded cluster method (EEIM) at the DFT level. From the combined data we conclude that only a small part of the provided Al is incorporated into the ZnO structure by substitution of Zn. The related (27)Al NMR signal undergoes a Knight shift when the material is subjected to a reductive treatment with forming gas. At higher (formal) doping levels Al forms insulating (Al, H and C containing) side-phases, which cover the surface of the ZnO:Al particles and increase the sheet resistivity of spin-coated material. Moreover, calculated (27)Al quadrupole coupling constants serve as a spectroscopic fingerprint by which previously suggested point-defects can be identified and in their great majority be ruled out. PMID:22801707

  8. The stoichiometry of synthetic alunite as a function of hydrothermal aging investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grube, Elisabeth; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2015-01-01

    angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 1H MAS NMR spectra recorded at high magnetic field (21.1 T, 900 MHz) allowed for a clear separation of the different proton environments and for quantitative determination of the aluminum vacancy concentration as a function of time....... The concentration of structural defects determined from, i.e., aluminum vacancies was reduced from 4 to 1 %, as the reaction time was extended from one to 31 days based on 1H MAS NMR. This was further supported by an increase of the unit cell parameter c, which is indicative of the relative concentration...

  9. Laser deposition, vibrational spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy and STM imaging of C60 and C70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors of this paper demonstrated that C60 and C70, as well as other fullerenes, can be deposited and accumulated on surfaces using laser ablation of graphite in an inert gas atmosphere. Indicating the presence of C60 in carbon soot, the authors showed that samples consisting exclusively of C60 and C70 can be sublimed from such soot. Vibrational Raman spectra of C60 and C70 were obtained from these samples. The C60 spectrum is consistent with the calculated spectrum of Buckminsterfullerene, and the strongest three lines can be assigned on the basis of frequency and polarization. The NMR spectrum of dissolved C60 was then obtained, and found to consist of a single resonance, establishing the Icosahedral symmetry of this molecule. STM images of the C60 molecules on a Au(111) crystal face show that these clusters form hexagonal arrays with an intercluster spacing of 11.0 Angstrom and are mobile at ambient temperature. Distinctly taller species evident in the arrays are believed to be C70 clusters. Vibrational Raman and infrared spectra have also been obtained for separated C60 and C70

  10. In vivo NMR spectroscopy of the liver. Spectroscopie RMN du foie in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jehenson, P.; Cuenod, C.A.; Syrota, A. (CEA, 91 - Orsay (FR). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot)

    1989-01-01

    The application of in vivo MR spectroscopy to the study of the liver is currently an expanding field of research. Owing to technical difficulties, the results obtained thus far were mainly those of animal observations. Several nuclei have been considered: hydrogen, phosphorus, carbon or fluorine. This non-traumatic method allows following and quantifying the various metabolic pathways, especially during hepatic diseases. The major metabolic pathways, i.e. neoglycogenesis, glycogenolysis, Krebs' cycle, etc., are studied, as well as their alterations during diseases such as ischemia, diabetes or alcoholism. The development of this promising technique requires the cooperation of various clinical and fundamental disciplines.

  11. Unilateral NMR, 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy and micro-analytical techniques for studying the materials and state of conservation of an ancient Egyptian wooden sarcophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Noemi; Presciutti, Federica; Di Tullio, Valeria; Doherty, Brenda; Marinelli, Anna Maria; Provinciali, Barbara; Macchioni, Nicola; Capitani, Donatella; Miliani, Costanza

    2011-03-01

    A multi-technique approach was employed to study a decorated Egyptian wooden sarcophagus (XXV-XXVI dynasty, Third Intermediate Period), belonging to the Museo del Vicino Oriente of the Sapienza University of Rome. Portable non-invasive unilateral NMR was applied to evaluate the conservation state of the sarcophagus. Moreover, using unilateral NMR, a non-invasive analytical protocol was established to detect the presence of organic substances on the surface and/or embedded in the wooden matrix. This protocol allowed for an educated sampling campaign aimed at further investigating the state of degradation of the wood and the presence of organic substances by (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy. The composition of the painted layer was analysed by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), Raman and surface enhanced (resonance) Raman spectroscopy (SERS/SERRS), infrared and GC-MS techniques, evidencing original components such as clay minerals, Egyptian green, indigo, natural gums, and also highlighting restoration pigments and alteration compounds. The identification of the wood, of great value for the reconstruction of the history of the artwork, was achieved by means of optical microscopy.

  12. Heteronuclear 2D NMR studies on an engineered insulin monomer: Assignments and characterization of the receptor-binding surface by selective 2H and 13C labeling with application to protein design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin provides an important model for the application of genetic engineering to rational protein design and has been well characterized in the crystal state. However, self-association of insulin in solution has precluded complementary 2D NMR study under physiological conditions. The authors demonstrate here that such limitations may be circumvented by the use of a monomeric analogue that contains three amino acid substitutions on the protein surface (HisB10 → Asp, ProB28 → Lys, and LysB29 → Pro); this analogue (designated DKP-insulin) retains native receptor-binding potency. Comparative 1H NMR studies of native human insulin and a series of three related analogues-(i) the singly substituted analogue [HisB10→Asp], (ii) the doubly substituted analogue [ProB28→Lys; LysB29→Pro], and (iii) DKP-insulin-demonstrate progressive reduction in concentration-dependent line-broadening in accord with the results of analytical ultracentrifugation. Extensive nonlocal interactions are observed in the NOESY spectrum of DKP-insulin, indicating that this analogue adopts a compact and stably folded structure as a monomer in overall accord with crystal models. Site-specific 2H and 13C isotopic labels are introduced by semisynthesis as probes for the structure and dynamics of the receptor-binding surface. These studies confirm and extend under physiological conditions the results of a previous 2D NMR analysis of native insulin in 20% acetic acid. Implications for the role of protein flexibility in receptor recognition are discussed with application to the design of novel insulin analogues

  13. Measuring fast variations of δ^{18}O and δ^2H in atmospheric water vapour using laser spectroscopy: an instrument inter-comparison and characterisation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aemisegger, F.; Sturm, P.; Graf, P.; Sodemann, H.; Pfahl, S.; Knohl, A.; Wernli, H.

    2012-04-01

    Fast variations of stable water isotopes in water vapour have become measurable lately using novel laser spectroscopic techniques. This allows us to perform process-based investigations of the atmospheric water cycle at the time scales of significant weather events. An important prerequisite for such studies implying automatic field measurements lasting for several weeks or even months is a detailed knowledge about sources of uncertainty and instrument properties. We present a comprehensive characterisation and comparison study of two commercial laser spectroscopic systems based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro) and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Resarch). The old versions (L1115-i, WVIA) and the new versions (L2130-i, WVIA-EP) of both systems were tested. The uncertainty components of the measurements were assessed in laboratory experiments, focussing on effects of (i) water vapour mixing ratio, (ii) measurement stability, (iii) uncertainties due to calibration and (iv) response times of the isotope measurements due to adsorption-desorption processes on the tubing and measurement cavity walls. Knowledge from our laboratory experiments was used to setup a one-week field campaign for comparing measurements of the ambient isotope signals from the L1115-i and WVIA systems. The optimal calibration strategy determined for both instruments was applied as well as the correction functions for water vapour mixing ratio effects. Using this field measurement data we address the question of how well the deuterium excess (d=δ2H-8δ18O) of atmospheric water vapour can be determined with laser spectroscopy. The deuterium excess is an interesting parameter for process-based atmospheric water cycle studies, which depends on humidity and temperature conditions at source location of water vapour. Up to now only very few high-time-resolution measurements of deuterium excess exist. Our concurrent measurements of atmospheric isotopes in water vapour

  14. High-Resolution Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy and Analysis of ν_2 and ν_3 Bands of of 13C_2H_4 Using the D2h Top Data System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkadrou, Abdulsamee; Rotger, Maud; Bermejo, Dionisio; Domenech, Jose Luis; Boudon, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    High resolution stimulated Raman spectra of 13C_2H_4 in the regions of the ν_2 and ν_3 Raman active modes have been recorded at at two temperatures (145 and 296 K) based on the quasi continuous-wave (cw) stimulated Raman spectrometer at Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (CSIC) in Madrid. A tensorial formalism adapted to X2Y4 planar asymmetric tops with D2h symmetry has been developed in Dijon and a program suite called D2hTDS (now part of the XTDS/SPVIEW spectroscopic software was proposed to calculate their high-resolution spectra. The effective Hamiltonian operator, involving a polyad structure, and transition moment (dipole moment and polarizability) operators can be systematically expanded to carry out global analyses of many rovibrational bands. A total of 103 and 51 lines corresponding to ν_2 and ν_3 Raman active modes have been assigned and fitted in frequency with a global root mean square deviation of 0.54 × 10-3 cm-1 and 0.36 × 10-3 cm-1, respectively. The figures below shows the stimulated Raman spectrum of the ν_2 and ν_3 bands of 13C_2H_4, compared to the simulation at 296 K. Raballand W, Rotger M, Boudon V, Loëte M. J Mol Spectrosc 2003;217:239-48. Wenger Ch, Boudon V, Rotger M, Champion JP, Sanzharov M. J Mol Spectrosc 2008;251:102-13.

  15. (1)H NMR Spectroscopy of Fecal Extracts Enables Detection of Advanced Colorectal Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, Aurelien; Dona, Anthony C; Wijeyesekera, Anisha; Tournigand, Christophe; Baumgaertner, Isabelle; Lebaleur, Yann; Sobhani, Iradj; Holmes, Elaine

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a growing cause of mortality in developing countries, warranting investigation into its etiopathogenesis and earlier diagnosis. Here, we investigated the fecal metabolic phenotype of patients with advanced colorectal neoplasia and controls using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate modeling. The fecal microbiota composition was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR as well as Wif-1 methylation levels in stools, serum, and urine and correlated to the metabolic profile of each patient. The predictivity of the model was 0.507 (Q(2)Y), and the explained variance was 0.755 (R(2)Y). Patients with advanced colorectal neoplasia demonstrated increased fecal concentrations of four short-chain fatty acids (valerate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) and decreased signals relating to β-glucose, glutamine, and glutamate. The predictive accuracy of the multivariate (1)H NMR model was higher than that of the guaiac-fecal occult blood test and the Wif-1 methylation test for predicting advanced colorectal neoplasia. Correlation analysis between fecal metabolites and bacterial profiles revealed strong associations between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Clostridium leptum species with short-chain fatty acids concentration and inverse correlation between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and glucose. These preliminary results suggest that fecal metabonomics may potentially have a future role in a noninvasive colorectal screening program and may contribute to our understanding of the role of these dysregulated molecules in the cross-talk between the host and its bacterial microbiota. PMID:26211820

  16. In vivo 31P-NMR spectroscopy of chronically stimulated canine skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic stimulation converts skeletal muscle of mixed fiber type to a uniform muscle made up of type I, fatigue-resistant fibers. Here, the bioenergetic correlates of fatigue resistance in conditioned canine latissimus dorsi are assessed with in vivo phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy. After chronic electrical stimulation, five dogs underwent 31P-NMR spectroscopic and isometric tension measurements on conditioned and contralateral control muscle during stimulation for 200, 300, 500, and 800 ms of an 1,100-ms duty cycle. With stimulation, phosphocreatine (PCr) fell proportional to the degree of stimulation in both conditioned and control muscle but fell significantly less in conditioned muscle at all the least intense stimulation period (200 ms). Isometric tension, expressed as a tension time index per gram muscle, was significantly greater in the conditioned muscle at the two longest stimulation periods. The overall small change in PCr and the lack of a plateau in tension observed in the conditioned muscle are similar to that seen in cardiac muscle during increased energy demand. This study indicates that the conditioned muscle's markedly enhanced resistance to fatigue is in part the result of its increased capacity for oxidative phosphorylation

  17. Microstructure determination of 2-hydroxy ethyl methacrylate and methyl acrylate copolymers by NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, A. S.; Hooda, Sunita; Goyal, Ashok Kumar

    2007-02-01

    Copolymers of 2-Hydroxy ethyl methacrylate and methyl acrylate (H/M) of different compositions were synthesized by free radical bulk polymerization using azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator under nitrogen atmosphere. The copolymers compositions were calculated from 1H NMR spectra. The reactivity ratios for H/M copolymers obtained from a linear Kelen-Tudos method (KT) and nonlinear error-in-variables method (EVM) are rH = 3.31 ± 0.08, rM = 0.23 ± 0.00 and rH = 3.32, rM = 0.23, respectively. The complete spectral assignment of methine, methylene, methyl and carbonyl carbon regions in terms of compositional and configurational sequences of H/M copolymers was done with the help of 13C{ 1H} NMR, distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT), two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) along with total correlated spectroscopy (TOCSY). Further, the assignments of carbonyl region were made with the help of heteronuclear multiple bond coherence (HMBC) spectrum.

  18. Characterization of alkyl carbon in forest soils by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy and dipolar dephasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogel-Knabner, I.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    Samples obtained from forest soils at different stages of decomposition were treated sequentially with chloroform/methanol (extraction of lipids), sulfuric acid (hydrolysis), and sodium chlorite (delignification) to enrich them in refractory alkyl carbon. As revealed by NMR spectroscopy, this treatment yielded residues with high contents of alkyl carbon. In the NMR spectra of residues obtained from litter samples, resonances for carbohydrates are also present, indicating that these carbohydrates are tightly bound to the alkyl carbon structures. During decomposition in the soils this resistant carbohydrate fraction is lost almost completely. In the litter samples the alkyl carbon shows a dipolar dephasing behavior indicative of two structural components, a rigid and a more mobile component. As depth and decomposition increase, only the rigid component is observed. This fact could be due to selective degradation of the mobile component or to changes in molecular mobility during decomposition, e.g., because of an increase in cross linking or contact with the mineral matter of the soil.

  19. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy for differentiation of molecular configurations and solvent properties between acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yuan-Chun; Kuo, Hsiao-Ching; Jia, Hsi-Wei

    2016-04-01

    The differences in molecular configuration and solvent properties between acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were investigated using the developed technique of 1H, 13C, 17O, and 1H self-diffusion liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Acetone and DMSO samples in the forms of pure solution, ionic salt-added solution were used to deduce their active sites, relative dipole moments, dielectric constants, and charge separations. The NMR results suggest that acetone is a trigonal planar molecule with a polarized carbonyl double bond, whereas DMSO is a trigonal pyramidal-like molecule with a highly polarized S-O single bond. Both molecules use their oxygen atoms as the active sites to interact other molecules. These different molecular models explain the differences their physical and chemical properties between the two molecules and explain why DMSO is classified as an aprotic but highly dipolar solvent. The results are also in agreement with data obtained using X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and theoretical calculations.

  20. Low-field (1)H NMR spectroscopy for distinguishing between arabica and robusta ground roast coffees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defernez, Marianne; Wren, Ella; Watson, Andrew D; Gunning, Yvonne; Colquhoun, Ian J; Le Gall, Gwénaëlle; Williamson, David; Kemsley, E Kate

    2017-02-01

    This work reports a new screening protocol for addressing issues of coffee authenticity using low-field (60MHz) bench-top (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Using a simple chloroform-based extraction, useful spectra were obtained from the lipophilic fraction of ground roast coffees. It was found that 16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC, a recognized marker compound for robusta beans) gives rise to an isolated peak in the 60MHz spectrum, which can be used as an indicator of the presence of robusta beans in the sample. A total of 81 extracts from authenticated coffees and mixtures were analysed, from which the detection limit of robusta in arabica was estimated to be between 10% and 20% w/w. Using the established protocol, a surveillance exercise was conducted of 27 retail samples of ground roast coffees which were labelled as "100% arabica". None were found to contain undeclared robusta content above the estimated detection limit. PMID:27596398

  1. Recent applications of /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy to biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in conjunction with carbon-13 labelling, is a powerful new analytical technique for the study of metabolic pathways and structural components in intact organelles, cells, and tissues. The technique can provide, rapidly and non-destructively, unique information about: the architecture and dynamics of structural components; the nature of the intracellular environment; and metabolic pathways and relative fluxes of individual carbon atoms. With the aid of results recently obtained by us and those reported by a number of other laboratories, the problems and potentialities of the technique will be reviewed with emphasis on: the viscosities of intracellular fluids; the structure and dynamics of the components of membranes; and the primary and secondary metabolic pathways of carbon in microorganisms, plants, and mammalian cells in culture.

  2. Quantitative analysis of sesquiterpene lactones in extract of Arnica montana L. by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Jordanka; Denkova, Pavletta; Todorova, Milka; Evstatieva, Ljuba

    2011-01-01

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used as a method for quantitative analysis of sesquiterpene lactones present in a crude lactone fraction isolated from Arnica montana. Eight main components - tigloyl-, methacryloyl-, isobutyryl- and 2-methylbutyryl-esters of helenalin (H) and 11α,13-dihydrohelenalin (DH) were identified in the studied sample. The method allows the determination of the total amount of sesquiterpene lactones and the quantity of both type helenalin and 11α,13-dihydrohelenalin esters separately. Furthermore, 6-O-tigloylhelenalin (HT, 1), 6-O-methacryloylhelenalin (HM, 2), 6-O-tigloyl-11α,13-dihydrohelenalin (DHT, 5), and 6-O-methacryloyl-11α,13-dihydrohelenalin (DHM, 6) were quantified as individual components.

  3. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements in structure determination of proteins by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solution NMR spectroscopy is a versatile tool to study a variety of a biomolecular parameters such as its structural assembly, its dynamics and its interaction with other molecules. We used the methodological expansion of paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) to gain additional insights into spatial proximities and surface accessibility of a variety of proteins.The structure of Fst, a toxic, hydrophobic peptide was solved within a membrane mimicking environment. Using PREs, it was possible to show a transmembrane binding mode.Further, the structure of Cla h 8 was solved which is a eukaryotic homologue to prokaryotic cold shock proteins. We were using PREs to determine the high resolution structure and its mode of binding to DNA.Additionally, we solved the structure of Phl p 5a, a major grass pollen allergen. The determination of PREs displayed the dynamic behavior of different parts of the molecule. (author)

  4. Synthesis and Resolution of the Atropisomeric 1,1'-Bi-2-Naphthol: An Experiment in Organic Synthesis and 2-D NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Kendrew K. W.

    2004-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is presented. It is seen that the experiment regarding the synthesis and resolution of 1,1'-Bi-2-naphtol presents a good experiment for teaching organic synthesis and NMR spectroscopy and provides a strategy for obtaining enantiopure compounds from achiral starting materials.

  5. Novel solution conformation of DNA observed in d(GAATTCGAATTC) by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chary, K.V.R.; Hosur, R.V.; Govil, G.; Zu-kun, T.; Miles, H.T.

    1987-03-10

    Resonance assignments of nonexchangeable base and sugar protons of the self-complementary dodecanucleotide d(GAATTCGAATTC) have been obtained by using the two-dimensional Fourier transform NMR methods correlated spectroscopy and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy. Conformational details about the sugar pucker, the glycosidic dihedral angle, and the overall secondary structure of the molecule has been derived from the relative intensities of cross peaks in the two-dimensional NMR spectra in aqueous solution. It is observed that d(GAATTCGAATTC) assumes a novel double-helical structure. The solution conformations of the two complementary strands are identical, unlike those observed in a related sequence in the solid state. Most of the five-membered sugar rings adopt an unusual O1'-endo geometry. All the glycosidic dihedral angles are in the anti domain. The AATT segments A2-T5 and A8-T11 show better stacking compared to the rest of the molecule. These features fit into a right-handed DNA model for the above two segments, with the sugar geometries different from the conventional ones. There are important structural variations in the central TCG portion, which is known to show preferences for DNase I activity, and between G1-A2 and G7-A8, which are cleavage points in the EcoRI recognition sequence. The sugar puckers for G1 and G7 are significantly different from the rest of the molecule. Further, in the three segments mentioned above, the sugar phosphate geometry is such that the distances between protons on adjacent nucleotides are much larger than those expected for a right-handed DNA. The authors suggest that such crevices in the DNA structure may act as hot points in initiation of protein recognition.

  6. Novel solution conformation of DNA observed in d(GAATTCGAATTC) by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance assignments of nonexchangeable base and sugar protons of the self-complementary dodecanucleotide d(GAATTCGAATTC) have been obtained by using the two-dimensional Fourier transform NMR methods correlated spectroscopy and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy. Conformational details about the sugar pucker, the glycosidic dihedral angle, and the overall secondary structure of the molecule has been derived from the relative intensities of cross peaks in the two-dimensional NMR spectra in aqueous solution. It is observed that d(GAATTCGAATTC) assumes a novel double-helical structure. The solution conformations of the two complementary strands are identical, unlike those observed in a related sequence in the solid state. Most of the five-membered sugar rings adopt an unusual O1'-endo geometry. All the glycosidic dihedral angles are in the anti domain. The AATT segments A2-T5 and A8-T11 show better stacking compared to the rest of the molecule. These features fit into a right-handed DNA model for the above two segments, with the sugar geometries different from the conventional ones. There are important structural variations in the central TCG portion, which is known to show preferences for DNase I activity, and between G1-A2 and G7-A8, which are cleavage points in the EcoRI recognition sequence. The sugar puckers for G1 and G7 are significantly different from the rest of the molecule. Further, in the three segments mentioned above, the sugar phosphate geometry is such that the distances between protons on adjacent nucleotides are much larger than those expected for a right-handed DNA. The authors suggest that such crevices in the DNA structure may act as hot points in initiation of protein recognition

  7. Differentiation of enantiomers by 2D NMR spectroscopy at 1 T using residual dipolar couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Martin R M; Danieli, Ernesto; Casanova, Federico; Blümich, Bernhard; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-06-01

    Differentiating enantiomers using 2D bench-top NMR spectroscopy. Spectrometers working with permanent magnets at 1 T field strength allow the acquisition of 2D data sets. In conjunction with previously reported chiral alignment media, this setup allows the measurement of enantiomeric excess via residual dipolar couplings in stretched gelatine as a result of the reduced line width obtained by 2D J-resolved spectroscopy. PMID:25773020

  8. The mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c strongly influences the order of the headgroup and acyl chains of phosphatidylserine dispersions. A sup 2 H and sup 31 P NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordi, W.; de Kroon, A.I.P.M.; Killian, A.; de Kruijff, B. (State Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1990-03-06

    Deuterium and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to study the interaction of the mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c with headgroup-deuterated (dioleoylphosphatidyl-L-(2-{sup 2}H{sub 1})serine) and acyl chain deuterated (1,2-(11,11-{sup 2}H{sub 2})dioleoylphosphatidylserine) dispersions. Binding of the protein to dioleoylphosphatidylserine liposomes results in phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectra typical of phospholipids undergoing fast axial rotation in extended liquid-crystalline bilayers with a reduced residual chemical shift anisotropy and an increased line width. {sup 2}H NMR spectra on headgroup-deuterated dioleoylphosphatidylserine dispersions showed a decrease in quadrupolar splitting and a broadening of the signal on interaction with apocytochrome c. Addition of increasing amounts of apocytochrome c to the acyl chain deuterated dioleoylphosphatidylserine dispersions results in the gradual appearance of a second component in the spectra with a 44% reduced quadrupolar splitting. Such large reduction of the quadrupolar splitting has never been observed for any protein studied yet. The induction of a new spectral component with a well-defined reduced quadrupolar splitting seems to be confined to the N-terminus since addition of a small hydrophilic amino-terminal peptide (residues 1-38) also induces a second component with a strongly reduced quadrupolar splitting. A chemically synthesized peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 2-17 of the presequence of the mitochondrial protein cytochrome oxidase subunit IV also has a large perturbing effect on the order of the acyl chains, indicating that the observed effects may be a property shared by many mitochondrial precursor proteins. Implications of these data for the import of apocytochrome c into mitochondria will be discussed.

  9. Using an Interactive Web-Based Learning NMR Spectroscopy as a Means to Improve Problem Solving Skills for Undergraduates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Interactive Web-Based Learning NMR Spectroscopy course is developed to improve and facilitate student's learning as well as achievement of learning objectives in the concepts of multiplicity, chemical shift, and problem solving. This web-based learning course is emphasized on NMR problem solving, therefore, the concepts of multiplicity and chemical shift, basic concepts for practice problem solving, are also emphasized. Most of animations and pictures in this web-based learning are new created and simplified to explain processes and principles in NMR spectroscopy. With meaningful animations and pictures, simplified English language used, step-by-step problem solving, and interactive test, it can be self-learning web site and best on the student's convenience

  10. Thermal and solvent effects on NMR spectroscopy parameters of a prototypical Chagas disease drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Full text. Hydrogen bonds in liquids can be of crucial importance for solvent effects in spectroscopy. We have herein computed the nuclear magnetic spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) involving 15N and 1H nuclei motivated by the relevance of these couplings for the indirect detection of the 15N chemical shifts. Such nJ(N,H) couplings are now also taken as probes for obtaining structural information in proteins. In this work, we focus on the J-couplings; a complete analysis of the NMR spectral data for the compounds studied can be found in previous papers. Thermal and solvent effects on the SSCCs of metronidazole (1) were studied computationally with appropriate quantum-chemical methods. Metronidazole may serve as a model compound to investigate the influence of solvent molecules on the NMR spin-spin coupling constants in heterocyclic rings. We find a hydrogen bond between 1 and a solvent water molecule that is associated with a bond critical point between the imidazole N-3 atom and a water H atom. AIM analysis indicates this hydrogen bond to be mainly electrostatic in nature. Simple static SSCC calculations in vacuo underestimate the nJ(N-3,H) coupling constants because of the neglect of hydrogen bonding. PCM-based treatments perform reasonably well because of the electrostatic character of the hydrogen bond. For more reliable predictions, it is important to take into account the dynamics of the system and to include nearby solvent molecules explicitly. The reduction of the hyperconjugative interactions involving the sigma CH bond or the sigma {sup *}CH antibond (with the coupling nucleus H) that is found in solution appears to be correlated to the reduction of coupling pathways in the imidazole ring. Since nuclear spin orientation information is transferred electronically to the other nuclei in the molecule, experimentally determined J-couplings directly reflect the nature of the chemical bond involved.106,107 Unlike most other NMR properties, which can be

  11. TG/DTG, FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry, and NMR Spectroscopy Study of Heavy Fuel Oil

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2015-11-12

    There is an increasing interest in the comprehensive study of heavy fuel oil (HFO) due to its growing use in furnaces, boilers, marines, and recently in gas turbines. In this work, the thermal combustion characteristics and chemical composition of HFO were investigated using a range of techniques. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was conducted to study the nonisothermal HFO combustion behavior. Chemical characterization of HFO was accomplished using various standard methods in addition to direct infusion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (APCI-FTICR MS), high resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 13C NMR, and two-dimensional heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) spectroscopy. By analyzing thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) results, three different reaction regions were identified in the combustion of HFO with air, specifically, low temperature oxidation region (LTO), fuel deposition (FD), and high temperature oxidation (HTO) region. At the high end of the LTO region, a mass transfer resistance (skin effect) was evident. Kinetic analysis in LTO and HTO regions was conducted using two different kinetic models to calculate the apparent activation energy. In both models, HTO activation energies are higher than those for LTO. The FT-ICR MS technique resolved thousands of aromatic and sulfur containing compounds in the HFO sample and provided compositional details for individual molecules of three major class species. The major classes of compounds included species with one sulfur atom (S1), with two sulfur atoms (S2), and purely hydrocarbons (HC). The DBE (double bond equivalent) abundance plots established for S1 and HC provided additional information on their distributions in the HFO sample. The 1H NMR and 13C NMR results revealed that nearly 59% of the 1H nuclei were distributed as paraffinic CH2 and 5% were in aromatic groups. Nearly 21% of 13C nuclei were

  12. NATURAL CYCLOPENTANOID CYANOHYDRIN GLYCOSIDES .13. STRUCTURE DETERMINATION OF NATURAL EPOXYCYCLOPENTANES BY X-RAY CRYSTALLOGRAPHY AND NMR-SPECTROSCOPY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olafsdottir, E. S.; Sorensen, A. M.; Cornett, Claus;

    1991-01-01

    nonannellated cyclopentane derivatives. The new glucosides were shown, by NMR spectroscopy (including NOE measurements), X-ray crystallography, and enzymatic hydrolysis to the corresponding cyanohydrins, to be (1R,2R,3R,4R)- and (1S,2S,3S,4S)-1-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-2,3-epoxy-4-hydroxycyclopenta ne-1...

  13. High-resolution 1H-NMR spectroscopy of free and glycosidically linked O-acetylated sialic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Haverkamp, J.; Halbeek, H. van; Dorland, L.; Pfeil, R.; Schauer, R.

    1982-01-01

    A number of naturally occurring and synthetic, partially O-acetylated derivatives of N-acetylneuraminic and N-glycoloylneuraminic acids have been investigated by 360-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy. O-Acetylation causes strong downfield shifts for the resonances of neighbouring sugar-skeleton protons. The c

  14. Refocused continuous-wave decoupling: A new approach to heteronuclear dipolar decoupling in solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Joachim Møllesøe; Nielsen, Anders B.; Bjerring, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    A novel strategy for heteronuclear dipolar decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy is presented, which eliminates residual static high-order terms in the effective Hamiltonian originating from interactions between oscillating dipolar and anisotropic shielding tensors. The ...

  15. Functional dynamics of human FKBP12 revealed by methyl C-13 rotating frame relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brath, U; Akke, M; Yang, DW; Kay, LE; Mulder, FAA

    2006-01-01

    Transverse relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy can provide atom-specific information about time scales, populations, and the extent of structural reorganization in proteins under equilibrium conditions. A method is described that uses side-chain methyl groups as local reporters for conformational

  16. A multi-metabolite analysis of serum by H-1 NMR spectroscopy: Early systemic signs of Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tukiainen, T.; Tynkkynen, T.; Mäkinen, V.P.; Jylänki, P.P.; Kangas, A.J.; Hokkanen, J.; Vehtari, A.; Grohn, O.; Hallikainen, M.; Soininen, H.; Kivipelto, M.; Groop, P.H.; Kaski, K.; Laatikainen, R.; Soininen, P.; Pirttilä, T.; Ala-Korpela, M.

    2008-01-01

    A three-molecular-window approach for H-1 NMR spectroscopy of serum is presented to obtain specific molecular data on lipoproteins, Various low-molecular-weight metabolites, and individual lipid molecules together with their degree of (poly)(un)saturation. The multiple data were analysed with self-o

  17. NMR and IR Spectroscopy for the Structural Characterization of Edible Fats and Oils: An Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Molly W.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an upper-level instrumental laboratory for undergraduates that explores the complementary nature of IR and NMR spectroscopy for analysis of several edible fats and oils that are structurally similar but differ in physical properties and health implications. Five different fats and oils are analyzed for average chain length,…

  18. High sensitivity 1H-NMR spectroscopy of homeopathic remedies made in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anick David J

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of homeopathy is controversial. Homeopathic remedies are made via iterated shaking and dilution, in ethanol or in water, from a starting substance. Remedies of potency 12 C or higher are ultra-dilute (UD, i.e. contain zero molecules of the starting material. Various hypotheses have been advanced to explain how a UD remedy might be different from unprepared solvent. One such hypothesis posits that a remedy contains stable clusters, i.e. localized regions where one or more hydrogen bonds remain fixed on a long time scale. High sensitivity proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has not previously been used to look for evidence of differences between UD remedies and controls. Methods Homeopathic remedies made in water were studied via high sensitivity proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A total of 57 remedy samples representing six starting materials and spanning a variety of potencies from 6 C to 10 M were tested along with 46 controls. Results By presaturating on the water peak, signals could be reliably detected that represented H-containing species at concentrations as low as 5 μM. There were 35 positions where a discrete signal was seen in one or more of the 103 spectra, which should theoretically have been absent from the spectrum of pure water. Of these 35, fifteen were identified as machine-generated artifacts, eight were identified as trace levels of organic contaminants, and twelve were unexplained. Of the unexplained signals, six were seen in just one spectrum each. None of the artifacts or unexplained signals occurred more frequently in remedies than in controls, using a p Conclusion No discrete signals suggesting a difference between remedies and controls were seen, via high sensitivity 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The results failed to support a hypothesis that remedies made in water contain long-lived non-dynamic alterations of the H-bonding pattern of the solvent.

  19. A strategy for co-translational folding studies of ribosome-bound nascent chain complexes using NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassaignau, Anaïs M E; Launay, Hélène M M; Karyadi, Maria-Evangelia; Wang, Xiaolin; Waudby, Christopher A; Deckert, Annika; Robertson, Amy L; Christodoulou, John; Cabrita, Lisa D

    2016-08-01

    During biosynthesis on the ribosome, an elongating nascent polypeptide chain can begin to fold, in a process that is central to all living systems. Detailed structural studies of co-translational protein folding are now beginning to emerge; such studies were previously limited, at least in part, by the inherently dynamic nature of emerging nascent chains, which precluded most structural techniques. NMR spectroscopy is able to provide atomic-resolution information for ribosome-nascent chain complexes (RNCs), but it requires large quantities (≥10 mg) of homogeneous, isotopically labeled RNCs. Further challenges include limited sample working concentration and stability of the RNC sample (which contribute to weak NMR signals) and resonance broadening caused by attachment to the large (2.4-MDa) ribosomal complex. Here, we present a strategy to generate isotopically labeled RNCs in Escherichia coli that are suitable for NMR studies. Uniform translational arrest of the nascent chains is achieved using a stalling motif, and isotopically labeled RNCs are produced at high yield using high-cell-density E. coli growth conditions. Homogeneous RNCs are isolated by combining metal affinity chromatography (to isolate ribosome-bound species) with sucrose density centrifugation (to recover intact 70S monosomes). Sensitivity-optimized NMR spectroscopy is then applied to the RNCs, combined with a suite of parallel NMR and biochemical analyses to cross-validate their integrity, including RNC-optimized NMR diffusion measurements to report on ribosome attachment in situ. Comparative NMR studies of RNCs with the analogous isolated proteins permit a high-resolution description of the structure and dynamics of a nascent chain during its progressive biosynthesis on the ribosome. PMID:27466710

  20. "Pulse pair technique in high resolution NMR" a reprint of the historical 1971 lecture notes on two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeener, Jean; Alewaeters, Gerrit

    2016-05-01

    The review articles published in "Progress in NMR Spectroscopy" are usually invited treatments of topics of current interest, but occasionally the Editorial Board may take an initiative to publish important historical material that is not widely available. The present article represents just such a case. Jean Jeener gave a lecture in 1971 at a summer school in Basko Polje, in what was then called Yugoslavia. As is now widely known, Jean Jeener laid down the foundations in that lecture of two - and higher - dimensional NMR spectroscopy by proposing the homonuclear COSY experiment. Jeener realized that the new proposal would open the door towards protein NMR and molecular structure determinations, but he felt that useful versions of such experiments could not be achieved with the NMR, computer and electronics technology available at that time, so that copies of the lecture notes were circulated (the Basko Polje lecture notes by J. Jeener and G. Alewaeters), but no formal publication followed. Fortunately, Ernst, Freeman, Griffin, and many others were more far-sighted and optimistic. An early useful extension was Ernst's proposal to replace the original projection/reconstruction technique of MRI by the widely adopted Fourier transform method inspired by the Basko Polje lecture. Later, the pulse method spread over many fields of spectroscopy as soon as the required technology became available. Jean Jeener, Emeritus professor, Université Libre de Bruxelles. Geoffrey Bodenhausen, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris.

  1. Transport Properties of Ibuprofen Encapsulated in Cyclodextrin Nanosponge Hydrogels: A Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Monica; Castiglione, Franca; Punta, Carlo; Melone, Lucio; Panzeri, Walter; Rossi, Barbara; Trotta, Francesco; Mele, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The chemical cross-linking of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) with ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTA) led to branched polymers referred to as cyclodextrin nanosponges (CDNSEDTA). Two different preparations are described with 1:4 and 1:8 CD-EDTA molar ratios. The corresponding cross-linked polymers were contacted with 0.27 M aqueous solution of ibuprofen sodium salt (IP) leading to homogeneous, colorless, drug loaded hydrogels. The systems were characterized by high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Pulsed field gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the mean square displacement (MSD) of IP inside the polymeric gel at different observation times td. The data were further processed in order to study the time dependence of MSD: MSD = f(td). The proposed methodology is useful to characterize the different diffusion regimes that, in principle, the solute may experience inside the hydrogel, namely normal or anomalous diffusion. The full protocols including the polymer preparation and purification, the obtainment of drug-loaded hydrogels, the NMR sample preparation, the measurement of MSD by HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy and the final data processing to achieve the time dependence of MSD are here reported and discussed. The presented experiments represent a paradigmatic case and the data are discussed in terms of innovative approach to the characterization of the transport properties of an encapsulated guest within a polymeric host of potential application for drug delivery. PMID:27585291

  2. Characterization of plant-derived carbon and phosphorus in lakes by sequential fractionation and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; Meng, Wei; He, Zhongqi; Giesy, John P

    2016-10-01

    Although debris from aquatic macrophytes is one of the most important endogenous sources of organic matter (OM) and nutrients in lakes, its biogeochemical cycling and contribution to internal load of nutrients in eutrophic lakes are still poorly understood. In this study, sequential fractionation by H2O, 0.1M NaOH and 1.0M HCl, combined with (13)C and (31)P NMR spectroscopy, was developed and used to characterize organic carbon (C) and phosphorus (P) in six aquatic plants collected from Tai Lake (Ch: Taihu), China. Organic matter, determined by total organic carbon (TOC), was unequally distributed in H2O (21.2%), NaOH (29.9%), HCl (3.5%) and residual (45.3%) fractions. For P in debris of aquatic plants, 53.3% was extracted by H2O, 31.9% by NaOH, and 11% by HCl, with 3.8% in residual fractions. Predominant OM components extracted by H2O and NaOH were carbohydrates, proteins and aliphatic acids. Inorganic P (Pi) was the primary form of P in H2O fractions, whereas organic P (Po) was the primary form of P in NaOH fractions. The subsequent HCl fractions extracted fewer species of C and P. Some non-extractable carbohydrates, aromatics and metal phytate compounds remained in residual fractions. Based on sequential extraction and NMR analysis, it was proposed that those forms of C (54.7% of TOC) and P (96.2% of TP) in H2O, NaOH and HCl fractions are potentially released to overlying water as labile components, while those in residues are stable and likely preserved in sediments of lakes. These results will be helpful in understanding internal loading of nutrients from debris of aquatic macrophytes and their recycling in lakes. PMID:27282495

  3. Acid epimerization of 20-keto pregnane glycosides is determined by 2D-NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Victor P., E-mail: vpergarw@gobiernodecanarias.org [Instituto de Productos Naturales de Canarias, Departamento de Quimica de Productos Naturales y Biotecnologia (Spain)

    2011-05-15

    Carbohydrates influence many essential biological events such as apoptosis, differentiation, tumor metastasis, cancer, neurobiology, immunology, development, host-pathogen interactions, diabetes, signal transduction, protein folding, and many other contexts. We now report on the structure determination of pregnane glycosides isolated from the aerial parts of Ceropegia fusca Bolle (Asclepiadaceae). The observation of cicatrizant, vulnerary and cytostatic activities in some humans and animals of Ceropegia fusca Bolle, a species endemic to the Canary Islands, encouraged us to begin a pharmacological study to determine their exact therapeutic properties. High resolution {sup 1}H-NMR spectra of pregnane glycosides very often display well-resolved signals that can be used as starting points in several selective NMR experiments to study scalar (J coupling), and dipolar (NOE) interactions. ROESY is especially suited for molecules such that {omega}{tau}{sub c} {approx} 1, where {tau}{sub c} are the motional correlation times and {omega} is the angular frequency. In these cases the NOE is nearly zero, while the rotating-frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY) is always positive and increases monotonically for increasing values of {tau}{sub c}. The ROESY shows dipolar interactions cross peaks even in medium-sized molecules which are helpful in unambiguous assignment of all the interglycosidic linkages. Selective excitation was carried out using a double pulsed-field gradient spin-echo sequence (DPFGSE) in which 180 Degree-Sign Gaussian pulses are sandwiched between sine shaped z-gradients. Scalar interactions were studied by homonuclear DPFGSE-COSY and DPFGSE-TOCSY experiments, while DPFGSE-ROESY was used to monitor the spatial environment of the selectively excited proton. Dipolar interactions between nuclei close in space can be detected by the 1D GROESY experiment, which is a one-dimensional counterpart of the 2D ROESY method. The C-12 and C-17 configurations were

  4. Binding of phenol and differently halogenated phenols to dissolved humic matter as measured by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smejkalová, Daniela; Spaccini, Riccardo; Fontaine, Barbara; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2009-07-15

    1H- and 19F-NMR measurements of spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxationtimes and diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) were applied to investigate the association of nonsubstituted (phenol (P)) and halogen-substituted (2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP); 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP), and 2,4,6-trifluorophenol (TFP) phenols with a dissolved humic acid (HA). T1 and T2 values for both 1H and 19F in phenols decreased with enhancing HA concentration, indicating reduction in molecular mobility due to formation of noncovalent interactions. Moreover, correlation times (tau c) for different hydrogen and fluorine atoms in phenols showed that anisotropic mobility turned into isotropic motion with HA additions. Changes in relaxation times suggested that DCP and TCP were more extensively bound to HA than P and TFP. This was confirmed by diffusion measurements which showed full association of DCP and TCP to a less amount of HA than that required for entire complexation of P and TFP. Calculated values of binding constants (Ka) reflected the overall NMR behavior, being significantly larger for DCP- and TCP-HA (10.04 +/- 1.32 and 4.47 +/- 0.35 M(-1), respectively) than for P- and TFP-HA complexes (0.57 +/- 0.03 and 0.28 +/- 0.01 M(-1), respectively). Binding increased with decreasing solution pH, thus indicating a dependence on the fraction of protonated form (alpha) of phenols in solution. However, it was found that the hydrophobicity conferred to phenols by chlorine atoms on aromatic rings is a stronger drive than alpha for the phenols repartition within the HA hydrophobic domains.

  5. Field performance of a prototype compact YBCO “annulus” magnet for micro-NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Construction details of a compact annulus magnet (YP1070) were reported. ► This is the first report of the YP1070 operation in a bath of liquid helium at 4.2 K. ► Spatial and temporal trapped field behaviors of the YP1070 were characterized. ► Temporal enhancement of the trapped fields was discovered at 4.2 K. -- Abstract: A prototype compact annulus YBCO magnet (YP1070) for micro-NMR spectroscopy was constructed and tested at 77 K and 4.2 K. This paper, for the first time, presents comparison of the 77-K and 4.2-K test results of our annulus magnet. With a 26-mm cold bore, YP1070 was comprised of a stack of 1070 thin YBCO plates, 80-μm thick and either 40-mm or 46-mm square. After 1070 YBCO plates were stacked “optimally” in 214 groups of 5-plate modules, YP1070 was “field-cooled” at 77 K after being immersed in a bath of liquid nitrogen (LN2) with background fields of 0.3 and 1 T and also at 4.2 K in a bath of liquid helium (LHe) with background fields of 2.8 and 5 T. In each test, three key NMR magnet field-performance parameters—trapped field strength, spatial field homogeneity, and temporal stability—were measured. At 4.2 K, a maximum peak trapped field of 4.0 T, equivalent to 170 MHz 1H NMR frequency, was achieved with a field homogeneity, within a |z| < 2.5 mm axial space, of ∼3000 ppm. YP1070 achieved its best field homogeneity of 182 ppm, though at a reduced trapped field of 2.75 T (117 MHz). The peak trapped fields at 4.2 K were generally ∼10 times larger than those at 77 K, in direct proportion to ∼10-fold enhancement in superconducting current-carrying capacity of YBCO from 77 to 4.2 K. Temporal stabilities of ∼110 and ∼17,500 ppm/h measured at 77 K, with trapped fields respectively of 0.3 and 1 T, show that temporal stability deteriorates with trapped field strength. Also, temporal enhancement of trapped fields at 4.2 K was observed and reported here for the first time

  6. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy strongly enhances soil organic matter composition analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Erhagen, Björn; Öquist, Mats; Nilsson, Mats; Hedenström, Mattias; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is the largest terrestrial carbon pool and strongly affects soil properties. With climate change, understanding SOM processes and turnover and how they could be affected by increasing temperatures becomes critical. This is particularly key for organic soils as they represent a huge carbon pool in very sensitive ecosystems, like boreal ecosystems and peatlands. Nevertheless, characterization of SOM molecular composition, which is essential to elucidate soil carbon processes, is not easily achieved, and further advancements in that area are greatly needed. Solid-state one-dimensional (1D) 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is often used to characterize its molecular composition, but only provides data on a few major functional groups, which regroup many different molecular fragments. For instance, in the carbohydrates region, signals of all monosaccharides present in many different polymers overlap. This overlap thwarts attempts to identify molecular moieties, resulting in insufficient information to characterize SOM composition. Here we show that two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state 1H-13C NMR spectra provided much richer data on the composition of boreal plant litter and organic surface soil. The 2D spectra indeed resolved overlaps observed in 1D 13C spectra and displayed signals from hundreds of identifiable molecular groups. For example, in the aromatics region, signals from individual lignin units could be recognized. It was hence possible to follow the fate of specific structural moieties in soils. We observed differences between litter and soil samples, and were able to relate them to the decomposition of identifiable moieties. Sample preparation and data acquisition were both simple and fast. Further, using multivariate data analysis, we aimed at linking the detailed chemical fingerprints of SOM to turnover rates in a soil incubation experiment. With the multivariate models, we were able to identify specific molecular

  7. {beta}-Lactam antibiotics epitope mapping with STD NMR spectroscopy: a study of drug-human serum albumin interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milagre, Cintia D. F.; Cabeca, Luis F.; Almeida, Wanda P.; Marsaioli, Anita J., E-mail: cmilagre@rc.unesp.br [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Molecular recognition events are key issues in many biological processes. STD NMR (saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) is one of the techniques used to understand such biological interactions. Herein, we have investigated the interactions of four {beta}-lactam antibiotics belonging to two classes (cephalosporins and penicillins) with human serum albumin (HSA) by {sup 1}H STD NMR revealing that the interaction between the aromatic moiety and HSA is responsible for the binding efficiency. Thus, the structural differences from the five to six-membered thio ring in penicillins and cephalosporins do not seem to influence antibiotic albumin interactions. (author)

  8. Indirectly detected chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy in solids under fast magic angle spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Kanmi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The development of fast magic angle spinning (MAS) opened up an opportunity for the indirect detection of insensitive low-γ nuclei (e.g., 13C and 15N) via the sensitive high-{gamma} nuclei (e.g., 1H and 19F) in solid-state NMR, with advanced sensitivity and resolution. In this thesis, new methodology utilizing fast MAS is presented, including through-bond indirectly detected heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectroscopy, which is assisted by multiple RF pulse sequences for 1H-1H homonuclear decoupling. Also presented is a simple new strategy for optimization of 1H-1H homonuclear decoupling. As applications, various classes of materials, such as catalytic nanoscale materials, biomolecules, and organic complexes, are studied by combining indirect detection and other one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques. Indirectly detected through-bond HETCOR spectroscopy utilizing refocused INEPT (INEPTR) mixing was developed under fast MAS (Chapter 2). The time performance of this approach in 1H detected 2D 1H{l_brace}13C{r_brace} spectra was significantly improved, by a factor of almost 10, compared to the traditional 13C detected experiments, as demonstrated by measuring naturally abundant organic-inorganic mesoporous hybrid materials. The through-bond scheme was demonstrated as a new analytical tool, which provides complementary structural information in solid-state systems in addition to through-space correlation. To further benefit the sensitivity of the INEPT transfer in rigid solids, the combined rotation and multiple-pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) was implemented for homonuclear 1H decoupling under fast MAS (Chapter 3). Several decoupling schemes (PMLG5m$\\bar{x}$, PMLG5mm$\\bar{x}$x and SAM3) were analyzed to maximize the performance of through-bond transfer based

  9. Enhanced detection of aldehydes in Extra-Virgin Olive Oil by means of band selective NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugo, Giacomo; Rotondo, Archimede; Mallamace, Domenico; Cicero, Nicola; Salvo, Andrea; Rotondo, Enrico; Corsaro, Carmelo

    2015-02-01

    High resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a very powerful tool for comprehensive food analyses and especially for Extra-Virgin Olive Oils (EVOOs). We use the NMR technique to study the spectral region of aldehydes (8-10 ppm) for EVOOs coming from the south part of Italy. We perform novel experiments by using mono and bidimensional band selective spin-echo pulse sequences and identify four structural classes of aldehydes in EVOOs. For the first time such species are identified in EVOOs without any chemical treatment; only dilution with CDCl3 is employed. This would allow the discrimination of different EVOOs for the aldehydes content increasing the potentiality of the NMR technique in the screening of metabolites for geographical characterization of EVOOs.

  10. Characterization of Al30 in commercial poly-aluminum chlorohydrate by solid-state (27)Al NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brian L; Vaughn, John S; Smart, Scott; Pan, Long

    2016-08-15

    Investigation of commercially produced hydrolysis salts of aluminum by solid-state (27)Al NMR spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) reveals well-defined and distinct Al environments that can be related to physicochemical properties. (27)Al MAS and MQ-MAS NMR spectroscopic data show that the local structure of the solids is dominated by moieties that closely resemble the Al30 polyoxocation (Al30O8(OH)56(H2O)26(18+)), accounting for 72-85% of the total Al. These Al30-like clusters elute as several size fractions by SEC. Comparison of the SEC and NMR results indicates that the Al30-like clusters includes intact isolated clusters, moieties of larger polymers or aggregates, and possibly fragments resembling δ-Al13 Keggin clusters. The coagulation efficacy of the solids appears to correlate best with the abundance of intact Al30-like clusters and of smaller species available to promote condensation reactions. PMID:27232539

  11. Application of 13C NMR spectroscopy to characterize organic chemical components of decomposing coarse woody debris from different climatic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Hishinuma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy was applied to coarse woody debris (CWD in different stages of decomposition and collected from forest floor of a subtropical, a cool temperate, and a subalpine forest in Japan. The purpose was to test its applicability to characterize organic chemical composition of CWD of broad-leaved and coniferous trees from different climatic conditions. O-alkyl-C, mainly representing carbohydrates, was the predominant component of CWD at the three sites, accounting for 43.5-58.1% of the NMR spectra. Generally, the relative area under the signals for aromatic-C and phenolic-C, mainly representing lignin, increased, whereas the relative area for O-alkyl-C decreased, as the decay class advanced. The relative area under NMR chemical shift regions was significantly correlated with the chemical properties examined with proximate analyses. That is, O-alkyl-C and di-O-alkyl-C NMR signal areas were positively correlated with the volumetric density of CWD and the content of total carbohydrates. Methoxyl-C, aromatic-C, phenolic-C, carboxyl-C, and carbonyl-C were positively correlated with the contents of acid-unhydrolyzable residues (lignin, tannins, and cutin and nitrogen. Lignin-C calculated from NMR signals increased, and polysaccharide-C decreased, with the decay class of CWD at the three study sites. A review of previous studies on 13C NMR spectroscopy for decomposing CWD suggested further needs of its application to broad-leaved trees from tropical and subtropical regions.

  12. Lipid profiling of developing Jatropha curcas L. seeds using (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annarao, Sanjay; Sidhu, O P; Roy, Raja; Tuli, Rakesh; Khetrapal, C L

    2008-12-01

    Seed development in Jatropha curcas L. was studied with respect to phenology, oil content, lipid profile and concentration of sterols. Seeds were collected at various stages of development starting from one week after fertilization and in an interval of five days thereafter till maturity. These were classified as stage I to stage VII. Moisture content of the seeds ranged from 8.8 to 90.3%; the lowest in mature seeds in stage VII and highest in stage I. The seed area increased as the seed grew from stage I to stage VI (0.2-10.2mm(2) per seed), however, the seed area shrunk at stage VII. Increase in seed area corresponded to increase in fresh weight of the seeds. (1)H NMR spectroscopy of hexane extracts made at different stages of seed development revealed the presence of free fatty acids (FFA), methyl esters of fatty acids (FAME) and triglycerol esters (TAG), along with small quantity of sterols. The young seeds synthesized predominantly polar lipids. Lipid synthesis was noticed nearly three weeks after fertilization. From the fourth week the seeds actively synthesized TAG. Stage III is a turning point in seed development since at this stage, the concentration of sterols decreased to negligible, there was very little FAME formation, accumulation of TAG increased substantially, and there was a sudden decrease in FFA concentration. The findings can be helpful in understanding the biosynthesis and in efforts to improve biosynthesis of TAG and reduce FFA content in the mature seeds. PMID:18534845

  13. Utilizing NMR and EPR spectroscopy to probe the role of copper in prion diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.

    2013-02-24

    Copper is an essential nutrient for the normal development of the brain and nervous system, although the hallmark of several neurological diseases is a change in copper concentrations in the brain and central nervous system. Prion protein (PrP) is a copper-binding, cell-surface glycoprotein that exists in two alternatively folded conformations: a normal isoform (PrPC) and a disease-associated isoform (PrPSc). Prion diseases are a group of lethal neurodegenerative disorders that develop as a result of conformational conversion of PrPC into PrPSc. The pathogenic mechanism that triggers this conformational transformation with the subsequent development of prion diseases remains unclear. It has, however, been shown repeatedly that copper plays a significant functional role in the conformational conversion of prion proteins. In this review, we focus on current research that seeks to clarify the conformational changes associated with prion diseases and the role of copper in this mechanism, with emphasis on the latest applications of NMR and EPR spectroscopy to probe the interactions of copper with prion proteins. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Thermodynamic Study on the Protonation Reactions of Glyphosate in Aqueous Solution: Potentiometry, Calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bijun; Dong, Lan; Yu, Qianhong; Li, Xingliang; Wu, Fengchang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Luo, Shunzhong

    2016-03-10

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] has been described as the ideal herbicide because of its unique properties. There is some conflicting information concerning the structures and conformations involved in the protonation process of glyphosate. Protonation may influence the chemical and physical properties of glyphosate, modifying its structure and the chemical processes in which it is involved. To better understand the species in solution associated with changes in pH, thermodynamic study (potentiometry, calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy) about the protonation pathway of glyphosate is performed. Experimental results confirmed that the order of successive protonation sites of totally deprotonated glyphosate is phosphonate oxygen, amino nitrogen, and finally carboxylate oxygen. This trend is in agreement with the most recent theoretical work in the literature on the subject ( J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, , 119 , 5241 - 5249 ). The result is important because it confirms that the protonated site of glyphosate in pH range 7-8, is not on the amino but on the phosphonate group instead. This corrected information can improve the understanding of the glyphosate chemical and biochemical action. PMID:26862689

  15. Reconsidering the activation entropy for anomerization of glucose and mannose in water studied by NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Ami; Aida, Misako; Katsumoto, Yukiteru

    2015-08-01

    The anomerization of monosaccharides is a very important process to understand how their stereoisomers are stabilized in aqueous solutions. For glucose and mannose, it has been known that α- and β-anomers of hexopyranose exist as the major components. In order to examine the anomerization pathway for glucose and mannose in aqueous solutions, it is indispensable to determine the thermodynamic parameters such as the activation energy, the activation Gibbs free energy (ΔG‡), enthalpy (ΔH‡), and entropy (ΔS‡). Although several research groups reported these quantities in aqueous solution, they have still been controversial especially for ΔS‡. In this paper, we employ 1H NMR spectroscopy for monitoring the population of both α- and β-anomers of glucose and mannose. The contribution of ΔS‡ to ΔG‡ for glucose in water is estimated to be ca. 30%, while that for mannose is 8.0%. The large difference in ΔS‡ suggests that the anomerization pathway is not the same for glucose and mannose.

  16. Toroid cavity detectors for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and rotating frame imaging: capabilities and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momot, K I; Binesh, N; Kohlmann, O; Johnson, C S

    2000-02-01

    The capabilities of toroid cavity detectors for simultaneous rotating frame imaging and NMR spectroscopy have been investigated by means of experiments and computer simulations. The following problems are described: (a) magnetic field inhomogeneity and subsequent loss of chemical shift resolution resulting from bulk magnetic susceptibility effects, (b) image distortions resulting from off-resonance excitation and saturation effects, and (c) distortion of lineshapes and images resulting from radiation damping. Also, special features of signal analysis including truncation effects and the propagation of noise are discussed. B(0) inhomogeneity resulting from susceptibility mismatch is a serious problem for applications requiring high spectral resolution. Image distortions resulting from off-resonance excitation are not serious within the rather narrow spectral range permitted by the RF pulse lengths required to read out the image. Incomplete relaxation effects are easily recognized and can be avoided. Also, radiation damping produces unexpectedly small effects because of self-cancellation of magnetization and short free induction decay times. The results are encouraging, but with present designs only modest spectral resolution can be achieved. PMID:10648153

  17. Optimization of NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Marques, Bryan S.; Bedard, Sabrina; Dogan, Jakob; Gledhill, John M.; Moorman, Veronica R. [University of Pennsylvania, Graduate Group in Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics and Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 905 Stellar-Chance Laboratories (United States); Peterson, Ronald W. [LLC, Daedalus Innovations (United States); Valentine, Kathleen G.; Wand, Alison L.; Wand, A. Joshua, E-mail: wand@mail.med.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania, Graduate Group in Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics and Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 905 Stellar-Chance Laboratories (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Comprehensive application of solution NMR spectroscopy to studies of macromolecules remains fundamentally limited by the molecular rotational correlation time. For proteins, molecules larger than 30 kDa require complex experimental methods, such as TROSY in conjunction with isotopic labeling schemes that are often expensive and generally reduce the potential information available. We have developed the reverse micelle encapsulation strategy as an alternative approach. Encapsulation of proteins within the protective nano-scale water pool of a reverse micelle dissolved in ultra-low viscosity nonpolar solvents overcomes the slow tumbling problem presented by large proteins. Here, we characterize the contributions from the various components of the protein-containing reverse micelle system to the rotational correlation time of the encapsulated protein. Importantly, we demonstrate that the protein encapsulated in the reverse micelle maintains a hydration shell comparable in size to that seen in bulk solution. Using moderate pressures, encapsulation in ultra-low viscosity propane or ethane can be used to magnify this advantage. We show that encapsulation in liquid ethane can be used to reduce the tumbling time of the 43 kDa maltose binding protein from {approx}23 to {approx}10 ns. These conditions enable, for example, acquisition of TOCSY-type data resolved on the adjacent amide NH for the 43 kDa encapsulated maltose binding protein dissolved in liquid ethane, which is typically impossible for proteins of such size without use of extensive deuteration or the TROSY effect.

  18. Revealing the metabonomic variation of rosemary extracts using 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chaoni; Dai, Hui; Liu, Hongbing; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2008-11-12

    The molecular compositions of rosemary ( Rosmarinus officinalis L.) extracts and their dependence on extraction solvents, seasons, and drying processes were systematically characterized using NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis. The results showed that the rosemary metabonome was dominated by 33 metabolites including sugars, amino acids, organic acids, polyphenolic acids, and diterpenes, among which quinate, cis-4-glucosyloxycinnamic acid, and 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylmethanol were found in rosemary for the first time. Compared with water extracts, the 50% aqueous methanol extracts contained higher levels of sucrose, succinate, fumarate, malonate, shikimate, and phenolic acids, but lower levels of fructose, glucose, citrate, and quinate. Chloroform/methanol was an excellent solvent for selective extraction of diterpenes. From February to August, the levels of rosmarinate and quinate increased, whereas the sucrose level decreased. The sun-dried samples contained higher concentrations of rosmarinate, sucrose, and some amino acids but lower concentrations of glucose, fructose, malate, succinate, lactate, and quinate than freeze-dried ones. These findings will fill the gap in the understanding of rosemary composition and its variations.

  19. Thermodynamic Study on the Protonation Reactions of Glyphosate in Aqueous Solution: Potentiometry, Calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bijun; Dong, Lan; Yu, Qianhong; Li, Xingliang; Wu, Fengchang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Luo, Shunzhong

    2016-03-10

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] has been described as the ideal herbicide because of its unique properties. There is some conflicting information concerning the structures and conformations involved in the protonation process of glyphosate. Protonation may influence the chemical and physical properties of glyphosate, modifying its structure and the chemical processes in which it is involved. To better understand the species in solution associated with changes in pH, thermodynamic study (potentiometry, calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy) about the protonation pathway of glyphosate is performed. Experimental results confirmed that the order of successive protonation sites of totally deprotonated glyphosate is phosphonate oxygen, amino nitrogen, and finally carboxylate oxygen. This trend is in agreement with the most recent theoretical work in the literature on the subject (J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, 119, 5241-5249). The result is important because it confirms that the protonated site of glyphosate in pH range 7-8, is not on the amino but on the phosphonate group instead. This corrected information can improve the understanding of the glyphosate chemical and biochemical action.

  20. Quantification of Water-Soluble Metabolites in Medicinal Mushrooms Using Proton NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yu-Chang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Mishchuk, Darya O; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Mau, Jeng-Leun

    2016-01-01

    The water-soluble metabolites in 5 mushrooms were identified and quantified using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and software for targeted metabolite detection and quantification. In total, 35 compounds were found in Agaricus brasiliensis, 25 in Taiwanofungus camphoratus, 23 in Ganoderma lucidum (Taiwan) and Lentinus edodes, and 16 in G. lucidum (China). Total amounts of all identified metabolites in A. brasiliensis, T. camphoratus, G. lucidum, G. lucidum (China), and L. edodes were 149,950.51, 12,834.18, 9,549.09, 2,788.41, and 111,726.51 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. These metabolites were categorized into 4 groups: free amino acids and derivatives, carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and nucleosides. Carbohydrates were the most abundant metabolites among all 4 groups, with mannitol having the highest concentration among all analyzed metabolites (848-94,104 mg/kg dry weight). Principal components analysis (PCA) showed obvious distinction among the metabolites of the 5 different kinds of mushrooms analyzed in this study. Thus PCA could provide an optional analytical way of identifying and recognizing the compositions of flavor products. Furthermore, the results of this study demonstrate that NMRbased metabolomics is a powerful tool for differentiating between various medicinal mushrooms. PMID:27649603

  1. Optimization of NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensive application of solution NMR spectroscopy to studies of macromolecules remains fundamentally limited by the molecular rotational correlation time. For proteins, molecules larger than 30 kDa require complex experimental methods, such as TROSY in conjunction with isotopic labeling schemes that are often expensive and generally reduce the potential information available. We have developed the reverse micelle encapsulation strategy as an alternative approach. Encapsulation of proteins within the protective nano-scale water pool of a reverse micelle dissolved in ultra-low viscosity nonpolar solvents overcomes the slow tumbling problem presented by large proteins. Here, we characterize the contributions from the various components of the protein-containing reverse micelle system to the rotational correlation time of the encapsulated protein. Importantly, we demonstrate that the protein encapsulated in the reverse micelle maintains a hydration shell comparable in size to that seen in bulk solution. Using moderate pressures, encapsulation in ultra-low viscosity propane or ethane can be used to magnify this advantage. We show that encapsulation in liquid ethane can be used to reduce the tumbling time of the 43 kDa maltose binding protein from ∼23 to ∼10 ns. These conditions enable, for example, acquisition of TOCSY-type data resolved on the adjacent amide NH for the 43 kDa encapsulated maltose binding protein dissolved in liquid ethane, which is typically impossible for proteins of such size without use of extensive deuteration or the TROSY effect.

  2. The Stoichiometry of Synthetic Alunite as a Function of Hydrothermal Aging Investigated by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy, Powder X-ray Diffraction and Infrared Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grube, Elisabeth; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2015-05-01

    The stoichiometry of a series of synthetic alunite [nominally KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6] samples prepared by hydrothermal methods as a function of reaction time (1–31 days) has been investigated by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as well as solid-state 1H and 27Al magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 1H MAS NMR spectra recorded at high magnetic field (21.1 T, 900 MHz) allowed for a clear separation of the different proton environments and for quantitative determination of the aluminum vacancy concentration as a function of time. The concentration of structural defects determined from, i.e., aluminum vacancies was reduced from 4 to 1 %, as the reaction time was extended from one to 31 days based on 1H MAS NMR. This was further supported by an increase of the unit cell parameter c, which is indicative of the relative concentration of potassium defects present, from 17.261(1) to 17.324(5) Å. Solid-state 27Al MAS NMR revealed a decrease in the defect concentration as a function of time and showed the presence of 7–10 % impurities in the samples.

  3. Metabolic profiling for studying chemotype variations in Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal fruits using GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anil; Bharti, Santosh K; Tewari, Shri K; Sidhu, Om P; Roy, Raja

    2013-09-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal (Solanaceae), commonly known as Ashwagandha, is one of the most valued Indian medicinal plant with several pharmaceutical and nutraceutical applications. Metabolic profiling was performed by GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy on the fruits obtained from four chemotypes of W. somnifera. A combination of (1)H NMR spectroscopy and GC-MS identified 82 chemically diverse metabolites consisting of organic acids, fatty acids, aliphatic and aromatic amino acids, polyols, sugars, sterols, tocopherols, phenolic acids and withanamides in the fruits of W. somnifera. The range of metabolites identified by GC-MS and NMR of W. somnifera fruits showed various known and unknown metabolites. The primary and secondary metabolites observed in this study represent MVA, DOXP, shikimic acid and phenylpropanoid biosynthetic metabolic pathways. Squalene and tocopherol have been rated as the most potent naturally occurring compounds with antioxidant properties. These compounds have been identified by us for the first time in the fruits of W. somnifera. Multivariate principal component analysis (PCA) on GC-MS and NMR data revealed clear distinctions in the primary and secondary metabolites among the chemotypes. The variation in the metabolite concentration among different chemotypes of the fruits of W. somnifera suggest that specific chemovars can be used to obtain substantial amounts of bioactive ingredients for use as potential pharmacological and nutraceuticals agents.

  4. Residual methyl protonation in perdeuterated proteins for multi-dimensional correlation experiments in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vipin; Reif, Bernd

    2008-09-01

    NMR studies involving perdeuterated proteins focus in general on exchangeable amide protons. However, non-exchangeable sites contain as well a small amount of protons as the employed precursors for protein biosynthesis are not completely proton depleted. The degree of methyl group protonation is in the order of 9% for CD 2H using >97% deuterium enriched glucose. We show in this manuscript that this small amount of residual protonation is sufficient to perform 2D and 3D MAS solid-state NMR experiments. In particular, we suggest a HCCH-TOBSY type experiment which we successfully employ to assign the methyl resonances in aliphatic side chains in a perdeuterated sample of the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin.

  5. Determination of the H-2/H-1, O-17/O-16, and O-18/O-16 isotope ratios in water by means of tunable diode laser spectroscopy at 1.39 mu m

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstel, E.R.Th.; Gagliardi, G.; Gianfrani, L.; Meijer, H.A.J.; van Trigt, R.; Ramaker, R.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the accurate and simultaneous measurement of the H-2/H-1, O-17/O-16, and O-18/O-16 isotope ratios in water vapor by means of tunable diode laser spectroscopy. The absorptions are due to the nu(1) + nu(3) combination band, observed using a room temperature, distribut

  6. A detailed mechanistic investigation into the reaction of 3-methylpentanoic acid with Meldrum's acid utilizing online NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Anna L; Codina, Anna; Foley, David A; Marquez, Brian L; Zell, Mark T

    2016-06-01

    A thorough investigation into the mechanism of the reaction of 3-methylpentanoic acid and Meldrum's acid using online NMR spectroscopy is reported. This study is an expansion of a previous analysis of this chemical transformation in the synthesis of an active pharmaceutical ingredient imagabalin. The 3-methylpentanoic acid analogue reveals similar behavior under the reaction conditions. Online NMR spectroscopy and offline characterization experiments reveal new information about the mechanism, providing conclusive spectroscopic evidence for the previously hypothesized dimer anhydride intermediate species 3-methylpentanoic anhydride as a productive intermediate. The presence of an acyl chloride intermediate species, 3-methylpentanoyl chloride, is also revealed for the first time in this synthesis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26332370

  7. Characterizing mixed phosphonic acid ligand capping on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots using ligand exchange and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidowski, Stephen K; Lisowski, Carmen E; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2016-03-01

    The ligand capping of phosphonic acid functionalized CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) was investigated with a combination of solution and solid-state (31) P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Two phosphonic acid ligands were used in the synthesis of the QDs, tetradecylphosphonic acid and ethylphosphonic acid. Both alkyl phosphonic acids showed broad liquid and solid-state (31) P NMR resonances for the bound ligands, indicative of heterogeneous binding to the QD surface. In order to quantify the two ligand populations on the surface, ligand exchange facilitated by phenylphosphonic acid resulted in the displacement of the ethylphosphonic acid and tetradecylphosphonic acid and allowed for quantification of the free ligands using (31) P liquid-state NMR. After washing away the free ligand, two broad resonances were observed in the liquids' (31) P NMR corresponding to the alkyl and aromatic phosphonic acids. The washed samples were analyzed via solid-state (31) P NMR, which confirmed the ligand populations on the surface following the ligand exchange process. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26639792

  8. Human in vivo cardiac phosphorus NMR spectroscopy at 3.0 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Angela Properzio

    One of the newest methods with great potential for use in clinical diagnosis of heart disease is human, cardiac, phosphorus NMR spectroscopy (cardiac p 31 MRS). Cardiac p31 MRS is able to provide quantitative, non-invasive, functional information about the myocardial energy metabolites such as pH, phosphocreatine (PCr), and adenosinetriphosphate (ATP). In addition to the use of cardiac p3l MRS for other types of cardiac problems, studies have shown that the ratio of PCr/ATP and pH are sensitive and specific markers of ischemia at the myocardial level. In human studies, typically performed at 1.5 Tesla, PCr/ATP has been relatively easy to measure but often requires long scan times to provide adequate signal-to-noise (SNR). In addition, pH which relies on identification of inorganic phosphate (Pi), has rarely been obtained. Significant improvement in the quality of cardiac p31 MRS was achieved through the use of the General Electric SIGNATM 3.0 Tesla whole body magnet, improved coil designs and optimized pulse sequences. Phantom and human studies performed on many types of imaging and spectroscopy sequences, identified breathhold gradient-echo imaging and oblique DRESS p31 spectroscopy as the best compromises between SNR, flexibility and quality localization. Both single-turn and quadrature 10-cm diameter, p31 radiofrequency coils, were tested with the quadrature coil providing greater SNR, but at a greater depth to avoid skeletal muscle contamination. Cardiac p31 MRS obtained in just 6 to 8 minutes, gated, showed both improved SNR and discernment of Pi allowing for pH measurement. A handgrip, in-magnet exerciser was designed, created and tested at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla on volunteers and patients. In ischemic patients, this exercise was adequate to cause a repeated drop in PCr/ATP and pH with approximately eight minutes of isometric exercise at 30% maximum effort. As expected from literature, this exercise did not cause a drop in PCr/ATP for reference volunteers.

  9. Combined Reversed Phase HPLC, Mass Spectrometry, and NMR Spectroscopy for a Fast Separation and Efficient Identification of Phosphatidylcholines

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Willmann; Herbert Thiele; Dieter Leibfritz

    2011-01-01

    In respect of the manifold involvement of lipids in biochemical processes, the analysis of intact and underivatised lipids of body fluids as well as cell and tissue extracts is still a challenging task, if detailed molecular information is required. Therefore, the advantage of combined use of high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), mass spectrometry (MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy will be shown analyzing three different types of extracts of the ubiquitous membrane ...

  10. Chemically Methylated and Reduced Pectins: Preparation and Characterisation by 1H-NMR Spectroscopy, Enzymatic Degradation and Gelling Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbohm, Christoph; Lundt, Inge; Christensen, T.M.I.E.;

    2003-01-01

    The gelling properties of pectin are known to be closely related to the degree of methylation (DM) and the distribution of the ester groups. In order to investigate this dependency, a natural citrus pectin (DM=64%) has been methylated to pectins with higher DM’s or saponified to achieve pectins...... than with unmodified pectin. The new reduced pectins exhibit high gelling properties. Keywords: Pectin; Methylation; Deesterification; Reduction; DM and DR by 1H-NMR spectroscopy; Reduced Pectin; Pectinases; Gelling properties....

  11. Identification of Imitation Cheese and Imitation Ice Cream Based on Vegetable Fat Using NMR Spectroscopy and Chemometrics

    OpenAIRE

    Monakhova, Yulia B.; Rolf Godelmann; Claudia Andlauer; Thomas Kuballa; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2013-01-01

    Vegetable oils and fats may be used as cheap substitutes for milk fat to manufacture imitation cheese or imitation ice cream. In this study, 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the fat fraction of the products was used in the context of food surveillance to validate the labeling of milk-based products. For sample preparation, the fat was extracted using an automated Weibull-Stoldt methodology. Using principal component analysis (PCA), imitation products can be easily dete...

  12. Cis-trans isomerisation of azobenzenes studied by NMR spectroscopy with in situ laser irradiation and DFT calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Wazzan, Nuha

    2009-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy with in situ laser irradiation has been used to investigate the photo- and thermal isomerisation of eight azobenzene derivatives; diphenyldiazene (azobenzene), p-phenylazoaniline (p-aminoazobenzene), 4-(dimethylamino)azobenzene (Methyl Yellow), 4-dimethylamino-2-methylazobenzene (o-Methyl-Methyl Yellow), p-nitroazobenzene, 4-nitro-4’-dimethylaminoazobeneze (Dimethyl-nitroazobenzene), 4-(4-nitrophenylazo)aniline (Disperse Orange 3) and N-ethyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-(4-nitrophen...

  13. SHORT-RANGE ORDER IN AMORPHOUS Co-Sn ALLOYS THROUGH NMR AND MÖSSBAUER SPECTROSCOPIES

    OpenAIRE

    Nabli, H; Piecuch, M.; Durand, J.; Marchal, G.

    1985-01-01

    The hyperfine field distribution on 59Co obtained by NMR in ferromagnetic amorphous Co-Sn alloys is related to the distribution of Sn environment around the Co resonant nuclei. The mean values of the quadrupole splitting and of the isomershift for tin in paramagnetic Co-Sn alloys, as obtained by 119Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy, suggest that the tin atoms in these alloys are located at the center of trigonal prisms of cobalt atoms.

  14. Encoded loop-lanthanide-binding tags for long-range distance measurements in proteins by NMR and EPR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelmes, Dominic [Goethe University Frankfurt, Institute of Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany); Gränz, Markus [Goethe University Frankfurt, Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany); Barthelmes, Katja [Technical University Munich, Department of Chemistry, Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science and Chair Biomolecular NMR (Germany); Allen, Karen N. [Boston University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Imperiali, Barbara [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Departments of Chemistry and Biology (United States); Prisner, Thomas, E-mail: prisner@prisner.de [Goethe University Frankfurt, Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany); Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: Schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Frankfurt, Institute of Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    We recently engineered encodable lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) into proteins and demonstrated their applicability in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and luminescence studies. Here, we engineered two-loop-LBTs into the model protein interleukin-1β (IL1β) and measured {sup 1}H, {sup 15}N-pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) by NMR spectroscopy. We determined the Δχ-tensors associated with each Tm{sup 3+}-loaded loop-LBT and show that the experimental PCSs yield structural information at the interface between the two metal ion centers at atomic resolution. Such information is very valuable for the determination of the sites of interfaces in protein–protein-complexes. Combining the experimental PCSs of the two-loop-LBT construct IL1β-S2R2 and the respective single-loop-LBT constructs IL1β-S2, IL1β-R2 we additionally determined the distance between the metal ion centers. Further, we explore the use of two-loop LBTs loaded with Gd{sup 3+} as a novel tool for distance determination by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy and show the NMR-derived distances to be remarkably consistent with distances derived from Pulsed Electron–Electron Dipolar Resonance.

  15. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low-viscosity fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Valentine, Kathleen G.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution multi-dimensional solution NMR is unique as a biophysical and biochemical tool in its ability to examine both the structure and dynamics of macromolecules at atomic resolution. Conventional solution NMR approaches, however, are largely limited to examinations of relatively small (NMR methodologies may be applied. Recent advances in methodology have significantly broadened the utility of this approach in structural biology and molecular biophysics.

  16. Nuclear Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times from Continuous Wave NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Jan B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The experiment described, suitable for undergraduate physical chemistry laboratories, illustrates the general principles of relaxation and introduces the nmr concepts of saturation and spin-inversion. (BB)

  17. COVALENT BINDING OF REDUCED METABOLITES OF [15N3] TNT TO SOIL ORGANIC MATTER DURING A BIOREMEDIATION PROCESS ANALYZED BY 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY. (R826646)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding ofbiologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-15N3-trinitrotoluene(TNT) to different soil fractions (humic acids, fulvicacids, and humin) using liquid 15N NMR spectroscopy. Asilylation p...

  18. Prostate Cancer Diagnosis: experimental and Clinical Studies With HRMAS NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenman, Katarina

    2011-07-01

    approach using 1D and 2D high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy combined with histopathology on intact prostatectomy specimens was evaluated in this research project. The non-destructive nature of HRMAS NMR enables spectroscopic analysis of intact tissue samples with consecutive histological examinations under light microscope. Metabolomics aids in the unraveling and the discovery of organ-specific endogenous metabolites that have the potential to be reliable indicators of organ function and viability, extrinsic and intrinsic perturbations, as well as valuable markers for treatment response. The results may, therefore, be applied clinically to characterize an organ by utilizing bio-markers that have the capacity to distinguish between disease and health. The aim was to characterize the human and the rat prostate in terms of its intermediary metabolism, which is shown here to differ between species and anatomical regions. Furthermore, the aim is to seek the verification of HRMAS NMR derived metabolites which are known to be a part of the prostate metabolome such as, citrate, choline, and the polyamines which were performed, but also the identification of metabolites not previously identified as part of the local prostate metabolism, such as Omega-6, which was detected in tumors. The extended aim was to elucidate novel bio-markers with clinical potential. In this study, the common phyto-nutrient, inositol, which appears to possess protective properties, was identified as being a potentially important PCa bio-marker for the distinction between the more indolent Gleason score 6 and the more aggressive Gleason score 7 in non-malignant prostate tissues with tumors elsewhere in the organ. Further studies in this area of PCa research are therefore warranted

  19. {sup 2}H NMR and {sup 13}C-IRMS analyses of acetic acid from vinegar, {sup 18}O-IRMS analysis of water in vinegar: International collaborative study report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Freddy [Eurofins Scientific Analytics, BP42301, 44323 Nantes (France); Jamin, Eric, E-mail: ericjamin@eurofins.com [Eurofins Scientific Analytics, BP42301, 44323 Nantes (France)

    2009-09-01

    An international collaborative study of isotopic methods applied to control the authenticity of vinegar was organized in order to support the recognition of these procedures as official methods. The determination of the {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H ratio of the methyl site of acetic acid by SNIF-NMR (site-specific natural isotopic fractionation-nuclear magnetic resonance) and the determination of the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio, by IRMS (isotope ratio mass spectrometry) provide complementary information to characterize the botanical origin of acetic acid and to detect adulterations of vinegar using synthetic acetic acid. Both methods use the same initial steps to recover pure acetic acid from vinegar. In the case of wine vinegar, the determination of the {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O ratio of water by IRMS allows to differentiate wine vinegar from vinegars made from dried grapes. The same set of vinegar samples was used to validate these three determinations. The precision parameters of the method for measuring {delta}{sup 13}C (carbon isotopic deviation) were found to be similar to the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or sugars extracted from fruit juices: the average repeatability (r) was 0.45 per mille , and the average reproducibility (R) was 0.91 per mille . As expected from previous in-house study of the uncertainties, the precision parameters of the method for measuring the {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H ratio of the methyl site were found to be slightly higher than the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or fermentation ethanol in fruit juices: the average repeatability was 1.34 ppm, and the average reproducibility was 1.62 ppm. This precision is still significantly smaller than the differences between various acetic acid sources ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O) and allows a satisfactory discrimination of vinegar types. The precision parameters of the method for measuring {delta}{sup 18}O were found to be similar

  20. Distinguishing bicontinuous lipid cubic phases from isotropic membrane morphologies using (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Yao, Hongwei; Hong, Mei

    2015-04-16

    Nonlamellar lipid membranes are frequently induced by proteins that fuse, bend, and cut membranes. Understanding the mechanism of action of these proteins requires the elucidation of the membrane morphologies that they induce. While hexagonal phases and lamellar phases are readily identified by their characteristic solid-state NMR line shapes, bicontinuous lipid cubic phases are more difficult to discern, since the static NMR spectra of cubic-phase lipids consist of an isotropic (31)P or (2)H peak, indistinguishable from the spectra of isotropic membrane morphologies such as micelles and small vesicles. To date, small-angle X-ray scattering is the only method to identify bicontinuous lipid cubic phases. To explore unique NMR signatures of lipid cubic phases, we first describe the orientation distribution of lipid molecules in cubic phases and simulate the static (31)P chemical shift line shapes of oriented cubic-phase membranes in the limit of slow lateral diffusion. We then show that (31)P T2 relaxation times differ significantly between isotropic micelles and cubic-phase membranes: the latter exhibit 2 orders of magnitude shorter T2 relaxation times. These differences are explained by the different time scales of lipid lateral diffusion on the cubic-phase surface versus the time scales of micelle tumbling. Using this relaxation NMR approach, we investigated a DOPE membrane containing the transmembrane domain (TMD) of a viral fusion protein. The static (31)P spectrum of DOPE shows an isotropic peak, whose T2 relaxation times correspond to that of a cubic phase. Thus, the viral fusion protein TMD induces negative Gaussian curvature, which is an intrinsic characteristic of cubic phases, to the DOPE membrane. This curvature induction has important implications to the mechanism of virus-cell fusion. This study establishes a simple NMR diagnostic probe of lipid cubic phases, which is expected to be useful for studying many protein-induced membrane remodeling phenomena

  1. Characterization of partitioning relevant lanthanide and actinide complexes by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work the interaction of N-donor ligands, such as 2,6-Bis(5,6-dipropyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)pyridine (nPrBTP) and 2,6-Bis(5-(2,2-dimethylpropyl)1H-pyrazol)-3-yl-pyridine (C5-BPP), with trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions was studied. Ligands of this type show a high selectivity for the separation of trivalent actinide ions over lanthanides from nitric acid solutions. However, the reason for this selectivity, which is crucial for future partitioning and transmutation strategies for radioactive wastes, is still unknown. So far, the selectivity of some N-donor ligands is supposed to be an effect of an increased covalency in the actinide-ligand bond, compared to the lanthanide compounds. NMR spectroscopy on paramagnetic metal complexes is an excellent tool for the elucidation of bonding modes. The overall paramagnetic chemical shift consists of two contributions, the Fermi Contact Shift (FCS), due to electron spin delocalisation through covalent bonds, and the Pseudo Contact Shift (PCS), which describes the dipolar coupling of the electron magnetic moment and the nuclear spin. By assessing the FCS share in the paramagnetic shift, the degree of covalency in the metal-ligand bond can be gauged. Several methods to discriminate FCS and PCS have been used on the data of the nPrBTP- and C5-BPP-complexes and were evaluated regarding their applicability on lanthanide and actinide complexes with N-donor ligands. The study comprised the synthesis of all Ln(III) complexes with the exceptions of Pm(III) and Gd(III) as well as the Am(III) complex as a representative of the actinide series with both ligands. All complexes were fully characterised (1H, 13C and 15N spectra) using NMR spectroscopy. By isotope enrichment with the NMR-active 15N in positions 8 and 9 in both ligands, resonance signals of these nitrogen atoms were detected for all complexes. The Bleaneymethod relies on different temperature dependencies for FCS (T-1) and PCS (T-2) that occur upon description

  2. Compositional differences among Chinese soy sauce types studied by (13)C NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Ghulam Mustafa; Wang, Xiaohua; Bin Yuan; Wang, Jie; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili

    2016-09-01

    Soy sauce a well known seasoning all over the world, especially in Asia, is available in global market in a wide range of types based on its purpose and the processing methods. Its composition varies with respect to the fermentation processes and addition of additives, preservatives and flavor enhancers. A comprehensive (1)H NMR based study regarding the metabonomic variations of soy sauce to differentiate among different types of soy sauce available on the global market has been limited due to the complexity of the mixture. In present study, (13)C NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical data analysis like principle component analysis (PCA), and orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was applied to investigate metabonomic variations among different types of soy sauce, namely super light, super dark, red cooking and mushroom soy sauce. The main additives in soy sauce like glutamate, sucrose and glucose were easily distinguished and quantified using (13)C NMR spectroscopy which were otherwise difficult to be assigned and quantified due to serious signal overlaps in (1)H NMR spectra. The significantly higher concentration of sucrose in dark, red cooking and mushroom flavored soy sauce can directly be linked to the addition of caramel in soy sauce. Similarly, significantly higher level of glutamate in super light as compared to super dark and mushroom flavored soy sauce may come from the addition of monosodium glutamate. The study highlights the potentiality of (13)C NMR based metabonomics coupled with multivariate statistical data analysis in differentiating between the types of soy sauce on the basis of level of additives, raw materials and fermentation procedures. PMID:27343582

  3. Structures and unimolecular chemistry of M(Pro2-H)(+) (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) by IRMPD spectroscopy, SORI-CID, and theoretical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jami-Alahmadi, Yasaman; Fridgen, Travis D

    2016-01-21

    M(Pro2-H)(+) complexes were electrosprayed and isolated in an FTICR cell where their unimolecular chemistries and structures were explored using SORI-CID and IRMPD spectroscopy. These experiments were augmented by computational methods such as electronic structure, simulated annealing, and atoms in molecules (AIM) calculations. The unimolecular chemistries of the larger metal cation (Ca(2+), Sr(2+) and Ba(2+)) complexes predominantly involve loss of neutral proline whereas the complexes involving the smaller Mg(2+) and transition metal dications tend to lose small neutral molecules such as water and carbon dioxide. Interestingly, all complexes involving transition metal dications except for Cu(Pro2-H)(+) lose H2 upon collisional or IRMPD activation. IRMPD spectroscopy shows that the intact proline in the transition metal complexes and Cu(Pro2-H)(+) is predominantly canonical (charge solvated) while for the Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+) complexes, proline is in its zwitterionic form. The IRMPD spectra for both Mg(Pro2-H)(+) and Mn(Pro2-H)(+) are concluded to have contributions from both charge-solvated and canonical structures. PMID:26685890

  4. Impact of Adenovirus infection in host cell metabolism evaluated by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana Carina; P Teixeira, Ana; M Alves, Paula

    2016-08-10

    Adenovirus-based vectors are powerful vehicles for gene transfer applications in vaccination and gene therapy. Although highly exploited in the clinical setting, key aspects of the adenovirus biology are still not well understood, in particular the subversion of host cell metabolism during viral infection and replication. The aim of this work was to gain insights on the metabolism of two human cell lines (HEK293 and an amniocyte-derived cell line, 1G3) after infection with an adenovirus serotype 5 vector (AdV5). In order to profile metabolic alterations, we used (1)H-NMR spectroscopy, which allowed the quantification of 35 metabolites in cell culture supernatants with low sample preparation and in a relatively short time. Significant differences between both cell lines in non-infected cultures were identified, namely in glutamine and acetate metabolism, as well as by-product secretion. The main response to AdV5 infection was an increase in glucose consumption and lactate production rates. Moreover, cultures performed with or without glutamine supplementation confirmed the exhaustion of this amino acid as one of the main causes of lower AdV5 production at high cell densities (10- and 1.5-fold less specific yields in HEK293 and 1G3 cells, respectively), and highlighted different degrees of glutamine dependency of adenovirus replication in each cell line. The observed metabolic alterations associated with AdV5 infection and specificity of the host cell line can be useful for targeted bioprocess optimization. PMID:27215342

  5. 1020MHz single-channel proton fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Zhang, Rongchun; Hashi, Kenjiro; Ohki, Shinobu; Nishijima, Gen; Matsumoto, Shinji; Noguchi, Takashi; Deguchi, Kenzo; Goto, Atsushi; Shimizu, Tadashi; Maeda, Hideaki; Takahashi, Masato; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Yamazaki, Toshio; Iguchi, Seiya; Tanaka, Ryoji; Nemoto, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Tetsuo; Suematsu, Hiroto; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Miki, Takashi; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-12-01

    This study reports a first successful demonstration of a single channel proton 3D and 2D high-throughput ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR techniques in an ultra-high magnetic field (1020MHz) NMR spectrometer comprised of HTS/LTS magnet. High spectral resolution is well demonstrated.

  6. Structural characterization of homogalacturonan by NMR spectroscopy - assignment of reference compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bent O.; Meier, Sebastian; Duus, Jens Øllgaard;

    2008-01-01

    Complete assignment of 1H and 13C NMR of six hexagalactopyranuronic acids with varying degree and pattern of methyl esterification is reported. The NMR experiments were run at room temperature using approximately 2 mg of sample making this method convenient for studying the structure of homogalac...

  7. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan, E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: lylfj2005@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong, E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: lylfj2005@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Electronic Science, State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Smith, Pieter E. S. [Chemical Physics Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2015-12-28

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials’ structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences’ phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, “ultrafast” NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets.

  8. Organic Spectroscopy Laboratory: Utilizing IR and NMR in the Identification of an Unknown Substance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glagovich, Neil M.; Shine, Timothy D.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that emphasizes the interpretation of both infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra in the elucidation of the structure of an unknown compound was developed. The method helps students determine [to the first power]H- and [to the thirteenth power]C-NMR spectra from the structures of compounds and to…

  9. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Smith, Pieter E. S.; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials' structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences' phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, "ultrafast" NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets.

  10. Combining 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate regression techniques to quantitatively determine falsification of porcine heparin with bovine species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Diehl, Bernd W K

    2015-11-10

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to distinguish pure porcine heparin and porcine heparin blended with bovine species and to quantify the degree of such adulteration. For multivariate modelling several statistical methods such as partial least squares regression (PLS), ridge regression (RR), stepwise regression with variable selection (SR), stepwise principal component regression (SPCR) were utilized for modeling NMR data of in-house prepared blends (n=80). The models were exhaustively validated using independent test and prediction sets. PLS and RR showed the best performance for estimating heparin falsification regarding its animal origin with the limit of detection (LOD) and root mean square error of validation (RMSEV) below 2% w/w and 1% w/w, respectively. Reproducibility expressed in coefficients of variation was estimated to be below 10% starting from approximately 5% w/w of bovine adulteration. Acceptable calibration model was obtained by SPCR, by its application range was limited, whereas SR is least recommended for heparin matrix. The developed method was found to be applicable also to heparinoid matrix (not purified heparin). In this case root mean square of prediction (RMSEP) and LOD were approximately 7% w/w and 8% w/w, respectively. The simple and cheap NMR method is recommended for screening of heparin animal origin in parallel with official NMR test of heparin authenticity and purity.

  11. Analyzing the adsorption of blood plasma components by means of fullerene-containing silica gels and NMR spectroscopy in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenevskaya, E. Yu.; Mokeev, M. V.; Nasonova, K. V.; Podosenova, N. G.; Sharonova, L. V.; Gribanov, A. V.

    2012-10-01

    The results from studying the adsorption of blood plasma components (e.g., protein, triglycerides, cholesterol, and lipoproteins of low and high density) using silica gels modified with fullerene molecules (in the form of C60 or the hydroxylated form of C60(OH) x ) and subjected to hydration (or, alternatively, dehydration) are presented. The conditions for preparing adsorbents that allow us to control the adsorption capacity of silica gel and the selectivity of adsorption toward the components of blood plasma, are revealed. The nature and strength of the interactions of the introduced components (fullerene molecules and water) with functional groups on the silica surface are studied by means of solid state NMR spectroscopy (NMR-SS). Conclusions regarding the nature of the centers that control adsorption are drawn on the basis of NMR-SS spectra in combination with direct measurements of adsorption. The interaction of the oxygen of the hydroxyl group of silica gel with fullerene, leading to the formation of electron-donor complexes of C60-H, C60-OH, or C60-OSi type, is demonstrated by the observed changes in the NMR-SS spectra of silica gels in the presence of fullerene.

  12. 1H HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy and the Metabolite Determination of Typical Foods in Mediterranean Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Corsaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available NMR spectroscopy has become an experimental technique widely used in food science. The experimental procedures that allow precise and quantitative analysis on different foods are relatively simple. For a better sensitivity and resolution, NMR spectroscopy is usually applied to liquid sample by means of extraction procedures that can be addressed to the observation of particular compounds. For the study of semisolid systems such as intact tissues, High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS has received great attention within the biomedical area and beyond. Metabolic profiling and metabolism changes can be investigated both in animal organs and in foods. In this work we present a proton HR-MAS NMR study on the typical vegetable foods of Mediterranean diet such as the Protected Geographical Indication (PGI cherry tomato of Pachino, the PGI Interdonato lemon of Messina, several Protected Designation of Origin (PDO extra virgin olive oils from Sicily, and the Traditional Italian Food Product (PAT red garlic of Nubia. We were able to identify and quantify the main metabolites within the studied systems that can be used for their characterization and authentication.

  13. In vivo1H NMR spectroscopy of the human brain at 9.4 T: Initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deelchand, Dinesh Kumar; Moortele, Pierre-François Van de; Adriany, Gregor; Iltis, Isabelle; Andersen, Peter; Strupp, John P.; Thomas Vaughan, J.; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2010-09-01

    In vivo proton NMR spectroscopy allows non-invasive detection and quantification of a wide range of biochemical compounds in the brain. Higher field strength is generally considered advantageous for spectroscopy due to increased signal-to-noise and increased spectral dispersion. So far 1H NMR spectra have been reported in the human brain up to 7 T. In this study we show that excellent quality short echo time STEAM and LASER 1H NMR spectra can be measured in the human brain at 9.4 T. The information content of the human brain spectra appears very similar to that measured in the past decade in rodent brains at the same field strength, in spite of broader linewidth in human brain. Compared to lower fields, the T1 relaxation times of metabolites were slightly longer while T2 relaxation values of metabolites were shorter (<100 ms) at 9.4 T. The linewidth of the total creatine (tCr) resonance at 3.03 ppm increased linearly with magnetic field (1.35 Hz/T from 1.5 T to 9.4 T), with a minimum achievable tCr linewidth of around 12.5 Hz at 9.4 T. At very high field, B0 microsusceptibility effects are the main contributor to the minimum achievable linewidth.

  14. Monitoring the Electrochemical Processes in the Lithium–Air Battery by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Leskes, Michal; Moore, Amy J.; Goward, Gillian R.; Grey, Clare P.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-nuclear solid-state NMR approach is employed to investigate the lithium–air battery, to monitor the evolution of the electrochemical products formed during cycling, and to gain insight into processes affecting capacity fading. While lithium peroxide is identified by 17O solid state NMR (ssNMR) as the predominant product in the first discharge in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) based electrolytes, it reacts with the carbon cathode surface to form carbonate during the charging process. 13C ss...

  15. Metabolite Characterization in Peritoneal Dialysis Effluent Using High-resolution 1H and 1H-13C NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Guleria, Anupam; Rawat, Atul; Khetrapal, C L; Prasad, Narayan; Kumar, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Metabolite analysis of peritoneal dialysis (PD) effluent may provide information regarding onset and progression of complications associated with prolonged PD therapy. In this context, the NMR detectable small metabolites of PD effluent samples were characterized using high resolution 1H and 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. The various spectra were recorded (at 800 MHz proton frequency) on PD effluent samples obtained after 4 hour (intraperitoneal) dwell time from patients with end stage renal failure (ESRF) and continuing normally on PD therapy. Inspite of devastating spectral feature of PD effluent due to the presence of intense resonances from glucose and lactate, we were able to identify about 53 small endogenous metabolites (including many complex coupled spin systems) and more than 90 % of the total CH cross peaks of 1H-13C HSQC spectrum were identified specific to various metabolites of PD effluent. We foresee that the characteristic fingerprints of various metabolites of control PD effluent samples will be us...

  16. Metabolite profiling of Curcuma species grown in different regions using 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Youngae; Lee, Jueun; Kim, Ho Kyoung; Moon, Byeong Cheol; Ji, Yunui; Ryu, Do Hyun; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2012-12-01

    Curcuma is used to treat skin diseases and colic inflammatory disorders, and in insect repellants and antimicrobial and antidiabetic medications. Two Curcuma species (C. aromatica and C. longa) grown in Jeju-do and Jin-do were used in this study. Methanolic extracts were analyzed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and metabolite profiling coupled with multivariate analysis was applied to characterize the differences between species or origin. PCA analysis showed significantly greater differences between species than origins, and the metabolites responsible for the differences were identified. The concentrations of sugars (glucose, fructose, and sucrose) and essential oils (eucalyptol, curdione, and germacrone) were significantly different between the two species. However, the samples from Jeju-do and Jin-do were different mainly in their concentrations of organic acids (fumarate, succinate, acetate, and formate) and sugars. This study demonstrates that NMR-based metabolomics is an efficient method for fingerprinting and determining differences between Curcuma species or those grown in different regions.

  17. In vivo 31 P NMR Spectroscopy for the study of P Pools and their Dynamics in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Nanna

    The main objective of the studies described in the present P1i.D. thesis was to investigate the phospbate (P) metabolism of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi by in viv0 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. P is an essential nutrient for all organisms. It is required in relatively...... of AM fungi used included Scutellospora caloJpora, G. mosseae and Gigaspora rosea. The cucumber plants were grown in a central mesh-bag, which prevents root penetration but allow free passage of AM fungal hyphae. Tbe extraradical mycelium grew into sand surrounding the mesh-bag and could be collected...... from the sand, while root matenal could be collected from the mesh-bag. A circulation system was constructed for oxygenating the excised hyphae or roots while in the NMR tube. Both the efficiency of P, uptake and the turn-over of P metabolites by excised hyphae were investigated in order to clarify the...

  18. Structure and function of the Juxta membrane domain of the human epidermal growth factor receptor by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation. Its juxta membrane domain (JX), the region located between the transmembrane and kinase domains, plays important roles in receptor trafficking since both basolateral sorting in polarized epithelial cells and lysosomal sorting signals are identified in this region. In order to understand the regulation of these signals, we characterized the structural properties of recombinant JX domain in dodecyl phosphocholine detergent (DPC) by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In DPC micelles, structures derived from NMR data showed three amphipathic, helical segments. Two equivalent average structural models on the surface of micelles were obtained that differ only in the relative orientation between the first and second helices. Our data suggests that the activity of sorting signals may be regulated by their membrane association and restricted accessibility in the intact receptor

  19. In-situ annotation of carbohydrate diversity, abundance, and degradability in highly complex mixtures using NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Many functions of carbohydrates depend on the detection of short structural motifs, approximately up to hexasaccharide length, by receptors or catalysts. This study investigates the usefulness of state-of-the-art 1H–13C nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for characterizing the diversity......, abundance, and degradability of such short structural motifs in plant-derived carbohydrates. Assignments of carbohydrate signals for 1H–13C NMR spectra of beer, wine, and fruit juice yield up to >130 assignments in situ, i.e. in individual samples without separation or derivatization. More than 500...... structural motifs can be resolved over a concentration range of ~103 in experiments of a few hours duration. The diversity of carbohydrate units increases according to power laws at lower concentrations for both cereal and fruit-derived samples. Simple graphs resolve the smaller overall contribution of more...

  20. Structural characteristics of marine sedimentary humic acids by CP/MAS sup(13)C NMR spectroscopy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.; Wahidullah, S.

    Humic acids from sediments of different depositional environments have been studied by solid-state sup(13)C NMR and the results compared with the traditional wet chemical analysis. Results obtained are well in agreement with the previous literature...

  1. Structure elucidation of saponins and related natural products by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a number of examples strategies are developed and explained how structures of complex natural products, such as triterpene glycosides and related compounds, can be efficiently elucidated by application of modern one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques. (author)

  2. STD NMR spectroscopy: a case study of fosfomycin binding interactions in living bacterial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milagre, Cintia D.F.; Cabeca, Luis Fernando; Martins, Lucas G.; Marsaioli, Anita J., E-mail: anita@iq [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (IQ/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2011-07-01

    A saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR experiment was successfully employed to observe the binding interactions of fosfomycin resistant and non-resistant bacterial strains using living cell suspensions, without the need for isotopic labelling of the ligand or receptor. (author)

  3. Powder-XRD and (14) N magic angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of some metal nitrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempgens, Pierre; Britton, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Some metal nitrides (TiN, ZrN, InN, GaN, Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 ) have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and (14) N magic angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 , no (14) N NMR signal was observed. Low speed (νr  = 2 kHz for TiN, ZrN, and GaN; νr  = 1 kHz for InN) and 'high speed' (νr  = 15 kHz for TiN; νr  = 5 kHz for ZrN; νr  = 10 kHz for InN and GaN) MAS NMR experiments were performed. For TiN, ZrN, InN, and GaN, powder-XRD was used to identify the phases present in each sample. The number of peaks observed for each sample in their (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectrum matches perfectly well with the number of nitrogen-containing phases identified by powder-XRD. The (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectra are symmetric and dominated by the quadrupolar interaction. The envelopes of the spinning sidebands manifold are Lorentzian, and it is concluded that there is a distribution of the quadrupolar coupling constants Qcc 's arising from structural defects in the compounds studied.

  4. Use of NMR spectroscopy in combination with pattern recognition techniques for elucidation of origin and adulteration of foodstuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Standal, Inger Beate

    2009-07-01

    Consumers and food authorities are, to an increasing extent, concerned about factors such as the origin of food, how it is produced, and if it is healthy and safe. There are methods for general quality control to map the safety and nutritional value; however there is a need for suitable analytical methods to verify information such as the production method (wild/farmed), geographical origin, species, and process history of foods. This thesis evaluates the applicability of using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy combined with pattern recognition techniques for authentication of foodstuffs. Fish and marine oils were chosen as materials. 13C NMR was applied to authenticate marine oils and muscle lipids of both fatty and lean fish, according to production method (wild/farmed), geographical origin, species, and process history. 1H NMR was applied on low molecular weight compounds extracted from cod muscle to authenticate fish according to species and processing conditions. 13C NMR combined with pattern recognition techniques enabled the differentiation of marine oils according to wild/farmed and geographical origin of the raw material. It is suggested that this was mainly due to the different diets of the fish from which the oil was produced. It was also possible to authenticate marine oils according to species, and to say something about the level of mixtures detectable. The Sn-2 position specificity of fatty acids in triacylglycerols was shown to be an important characteristic to separate oils of different species. Esterified fish oil (concentrates) could easily be differentiated from natural fish oil by their 13C NMR profile. (Author)

  5. Complete resonance assignment for the polypeptide backbone of interleukin 1β using three-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete sequence-specific assignment of the 15N and 1H backbone resonances of the NMR spectrum of recombinant human interleukin 1β has been obtained by using primarily 15N-1H heteronuclear three-dimensional (3D) NMR techniques in combination with 15N-1H heteronuclear and 1H homonuclear two-dimensional NMR. The fingerprint region of the spectrum was analyzed by using a combination of 3D heteronuclear 1H Hartmann-Hahn 15N-1H multiple quantum coherence (3D HOHAHA-HMQC) and 3D heteronuclear 1H nuclear Overhauser 15N-1H multiple quantum coherence (3D NOESY-HMQC) spectroscopies. The authors show that the problems of amide NH and CαH chemical shift degeneracy that are prevalent for proteins of the size are readily overcome by using the 3D heteronuclear NMR technique. A doubling of some peaks in the spectrum was found to be due to N-terminal heterogeneity of the 15N-labeled protein, corresponding to a mixture of wild-type and des-Ala-1-interleukin 1β. The complete list of 15N and 1H assignments is given for all the amide NH and CαH resonances of all non-proline residues, as well as the 1H assignments for some of the amino acid side chains. This first example of the sequence-specific assignment of a protein using heteronuclear 3D NMR provides a basis for further conformational and dynamic studies of interleukin 1β

  6. Quality assessment in in vivo NMR spectroscopy: IV. A multicentre trial of test objects and protocols for performance assessment in clinical NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keevil, S.F.; Barbiroli, B; Collins, D.J.;

    1995-01-01

    A multicentre trial of test objects and protocols for performance assessment in single volume and slice selective magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was conducted by the European Community Concerted Action on MRI and MRS. The trial assessed phosphorus and proton localisation techniques...... development of the Concerted Action's final recommendations for MRS performance assessment, and demonstrate that such assessment provides valuable information in the comparison of spectroscopy data from different sites and in the development of new localisation sequences, and provides a means of quality...... implemented on commercially available MR systems at ten sites in Europe. At each site, a number of parameters devised by the Concerted Action were measured using prototype test objects. Some of these parameters related to the quality of localisation and others to the overall performance of the spectrometer...

  7. Structural investigations of PuIII phosphate by X-ray diffraction, MAS-NMR and XANES spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Karin; Raison, Philippe E.; Martel, Laura; Martin, Philippe M.; Prieur, Damien; Solari, Pier L.; Bouëxière, Daniel; Konings, Rudy J. M.; Somers, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    PuPO4 was prepared by a solid state reaction method and its crystal structure at room temperature was solved by powder X-ray diffraction combined with Rietveld refinement. High resolution XANES measurements confirm the +III valence state of plutonium, in agreement with valence bond derivation. The presence of the americium (as β- decay product of plutonium) in the +III oxidation state was determined based on XANES spectroscopy. High resolution solid state 31P NMR agrees with the XANES results and the presence of a solid-solution.

  8. In vivo NMR field-cycling relaxation spectroscopy reveals 14N1H relaxation sinks in the backbones of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this preliminary note, the authors report an in vivo study of Hirudo medicinalis, using field-cycling relaxation spectroscopy, showing clear 14N1H quadrupole dips, proving that the amide 14N1H groups of proteins can act as relaxation sinks in a frequency range relevant for NMR tomography. Also, as a byproduct of this work it is noted that during these experiments, leeches were exposed to field variation rates of about 50 Ts-1 in several thousand field-cycles up and down, without any obvious damage. (U.K.)

  9. Phenylalanine and tyrosine methyl ester intramolecular interactions and conformational analysis by (1)H NMR and infrared spectroscopies and theoretical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormanich, Rodrigo A; Ducati, Lucas C; Tormena, Cláudio F; Rittner, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    Amino acid conformational analysis in solution are scarce, since these compounds present a bipolar zwitterionic structure ((+)H3NCHRCOO(-)) in these media. Also, intramolecular hydrogen bonds have been classified as the sole interactions governing amino acid conformational behavior in the literature. In the present work we propose phenylalanine and tyrosine methyl ester conformational studies in different solvents by (1)H NMR and infrared spectroscopies and theoretical calculations. Both experimental and theoretical results are in agreement and suggest that the conformational behavior of the phenylalanine and tyrosine methyl esters are similar and are dictated by the interplay between steric and hyperconjugative interactions.

  10. New strategy for stable-isotope-aided, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy of DNA oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Okira; Tate, Shin-Ichi; Kainosho, Masatsune [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is the most efficient method for determining the solution structures of biomolecules. By applying multidimensional heteronuclear NMR techniques to {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled proteins, we can determine the solution structures of proteins with molecular mass of 20 to 30kDa at an accuracy similar to that of x-ray crystallography. Improvements in NMR instrumentation and techniques as well as the development of protein engineering methods for labeling proteins have rapidly advanced multidimensional heteronuclear NMR of proteins. In contrast, multidimensional heteronuclear NMR studies of nucleic acids is less advanced because there were no efficient methods for preparing large amounts of labeled DNA/RNA oligomers. In this report, we focused on the chemical synthesis of DNA oligomers labeled at specific residue(s). RNA oligomers with specific labels, which are difficult to synthesize by the enzyme method, can be synthesized by the chemical method. The specific labels are useful for conformational analysis of larger molecules such as protein-nucleic acid complexes.

  11. A simple mathematical model and practical approach for evaluating citric acid cycle fluxes in perfused rat hearts by 13C-NMR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran-Dinh, S; Hoerter, J A; Mateo, P; Bouet, F; Herve, M

    1997-04-15

    We propose a simple mathematical model and a practical approach for evaluating the flux constant and the absolute value of flux in the citric acid cycle in perfused organs by 13C-NMR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. We demonstrate that 13C-NMR glutamate spectra are independent of the relative sizes of the mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments and the exchange rates of glutamates, unless there is a difference in 13C chemical shifts of glutamate carbons between the two compartments. Wistar rat hearts (five beating and four KCl-arrested hearts) were aerobically perfused with 100% enriched [2-(13)C]acetate and the kinetics of glutamate carbon labeling from perchloric acid extracts were studied at various perfusion times. Under our experimental conditions, the citric acid cycle flux constant, which represents the fraction of glutamate in exchange with the citric acid cycle per unit time, is about 0.350 +/- 0.003 min(-1) for beating hearts and 0.0741 +/- 0.004 min(-1) for KCl-arrested hearts. The absolute values of the citric acid flux for beating hearts and for KCl-arrested hearts are 1.06 +/- 0.06 micromol x min(-1) x mg(-1) and 0.21 +/- 0.02 micromol x min(-1) x g(-1), respectively. The fraction of unlabeled acetate determined from the proton signal of the methyl group is small and essentially the same in beating and arrested hearts (7.4 +/- 1.7% and 8.8 +/- 2.1%, respectively). Thus, the large difference in the Glu C2/C4 between beating and arrested hearts is not due to the important contribution from anaplerotic sources in arrested hearts but simply to a substantial difference in citric acid cycle fluxes. Our model fits the experimental data well, indicating a fast exchange between 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate in the mitochondria of rat hearts. Analysis of the flux constant, calculated from the half-time of glutamate C4 labeling given in the literature, allows for a comparison of the citric acid flux for various working conditions in different animal species.

  12. Heterogeneous catalysis of NMR spectroscopy of spin 1/2 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a short review of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies on solid catalysts and heterogeneous catalytic reactions, various possibilities for a quantitative characterization of the acidity of ziolites and related catalysts by NMR methods are discussed. It is shown that proton magnetic resonance offers a unique method to determine quantitatively both the strength and concentration of Broensted acid sites by magic angle spinning (MAS) of evacuated samples. Two examples for an application of this novel method are given where the catalytic activity could be related quantitatively to the acidic properties of the catalytic activity could be related quantitatively to the acidic properties of the calalysts. In contrast, NMR methods fail until now to describe Lewis acidity of catalysts with a comparable success. (author). 41 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  13. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low-viscosity fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci, Nathaniel V; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution multi-dimensional solution NMR is unique as a biophysical and biochemical tool in its ability to examine both the structure and dynamics of macromolecules at atomic resolution. Conventional solution NMR approaches, however, are largely limited to examinations of relatively small (viscosity fluids has been developed as a means through which the 'slow tumbling problem' can be overcome. This approach has been successfully applied to diverse proteins and nucleic acids ranging up to 100kDa, considerably widening the range of biological macromolecules to which conventional solution NMR methodologies may be applied. Recent advances in methodology have significantly broadened the utility of this approach in structural biology and molecular biophysics. PMID:24656086

  14. Mechanisms of Action of (Methacrylates in Hemolytic Activity, in Vivo Toxicity and Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC Liposomes Determined Using NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichiro Fujisawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the quantitative structure-activity relationships between hemolytic activity (log 1/H50 or in vivo mouse intraperitoneal (ip LD50 using reported data for α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds such as (methacrylate monomers and their 13C-NMR β-carbon chemical shift (δ. The log 1/H50 value for methacrylates was linearly correlated with the δCβ value. That for (methacrylates was linearly correlated with log P, an index of lipophilicity. The ipLD50 for (methacrylates was linearly correlated with δCβ but not with log P. For (methacrylates, the δCβ value, which is dependent on the π-electron density on the β-carbon, was linearly correlated with PM3-based theoretical parameters (chemical hardness, η; electronegativity, χ; electrophilicity, ω, whereas log P was linearly correlated with heat of formation (HF. Also, the interaction between (methacrylates and DPPC liposomes in cell membrane molecular models was investigated using 1H-NMR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The log 1/H50 value was related to the difference in chemical shift (ΔδHa (Ha: H (trans attached to the β-carbon between the free monomer and the DPPC liposome-bound monomer. Monomer-induced DSC phase transition properties were related to HF for monomers. NMR chemical shifts may represent a valuable parameter for investigating the biological mechanisms of action of (methacrylates.

  15. Analysis of monoglycerides, diglycerides, sterols, and free fatty acids in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) oil by 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayrit, Fabian M; Buenafe, Olivia Erin M; Chainani, Edward T; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S

    2008-07-23

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( (31)P NMR) was used to differentiate virgin coconut oil (VCO) from refined, bleached, deodorized coconut oil (RCO). Monoglycerides (MGs), diglycerides (DGs), sterols, and free fatty acids (FFAs) in VCO and RCO were converted into dioxaphospholane derivatives and analyzed by (31)P NMR. On the average, 1-MG was found to be higher in VCO (0.027%) than RCO (0.019%). 2-MG was not detected in any of the samples down to a detection limit of 0.014%. On the average, total DGs were lower in VCO (1.55%) than RCO (4.10%). When plotted in terms of the ratio [1,2-DG/total DGs] versus total DGs, VCO and RCO samples grouped separately. Total sterols were higher in VCO (0.096%) compared with RCO (0.032%), and the FFA content was 8 times higher in VCO than RCO (0.127% vs 0.015%). FFA determination by (31)P NMR and titration gave comparable results. Principal components analysis shows that the 1,2-DG, 1,3-DG, and FFAs are the most important parameters for differentiating VCO from RCO.

  16. Structure and assembly of the mouse ASC inflammasome by combined NMR spectroscopy and cryo-electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sborgi, Lorenzo; Ravotti, Francesco; Dandey, Venkata P.; Dick, Mathias S.; Mazur, Adam; Reckel, Sina; Chami, Mohamed; Scherer, Sebastian; Huber, Matthias; Böckmann, Anja; Egelman, Edward H.; Stahlberg, Henning; Broz, Petr; Meier, Beat H.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multiprotein complexes that control the innate immune response by activating caspase-1, thus promoting the secretion of cytokines in response to invading pathogens and endogenous triggers. Assembly of inflammasomes is induced by activation of a receptor protein. Many inflammasome receptors require the adapter protein ASC [apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (CARD)], which consists of two domains, the N-terminal pyrin domain (PYD) and the C-terminal CARD. Upon activation, ASC forms large oligomeric filaments, which facilitate procaspase-1 recruitment. Here, we characterize the structure and filament formation of mouse ASC in vitro at atomic resolution. Information from cryo-electron microscopy and solid-state NMR spectroscopy is combined in a single structure calculation to obtain the atomic-resolution structure of the ASC filament. Perturbations of NMR resonances upon filament formation monitor the specific binding interfaces of ASC-PYD association. Importantly, NMR experiments show the rigidity of the PYD forming the core of the filament as well as the high mobility of the CARD relative to this core. The findings are validated by structure-based mutagenesis experiments in cultured macrophages. The 3D structure of the mouse ASC-PYD filament is highly similar to the recently determined human ASC-PYD filament, suggesting evolutionary conservation of ASC-dependent inflammasome mechanisms. PMID:26464513

  17. Metabolic Discrimination of Catharanthus roseus Leaves Infected by Phytoplasma Using 1H-NMR Spectroscopy and Multivariate Data Analysis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Hae; Tapias, Elisabet Casas; Kim, Hye Kyong; Lefeber, Alfons W.M.; Erkelens, Cornelis; Verhoeven, Jacobus Th.J.; Brzin, Jernej; Zel, Jana; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive metabolomic profiling of Catharanthus roseus L. G. Don infected by 10 types of phytoplasmas was carried out using one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy followed by principal component analysis (PCA), an unsupervised clustering method requiring no knowledge of the data set and used to reduce the dimensionality of multivariate data while preserving most of the variance within it. With a combination of these techniques, we were able to identify those metabolites that were present in different levels in phytoplasma-infected C. roseus leaves than in healthy ones. The infection by phytoplasma in C. roseus leaves causes an increase of metabolites related to the biosynthetic pathways of phenylpropanoids or terpenoid indole alkaloids: chlorogenic acid, loganic acid, secologanin, and vindoline. Furthermore, higher abundance of Glc, Glu, polyphenols, succinic acid, and Suc were detected in the phytoplasma-infected leaves. The PCA of the 1H-NMR signals of healthy and phytoplasma-infected C. roseus leaves shows that these metabolites are major discriminating factors to characterize the phytoplasma-infected C. roseus leaves from healthy ones. Based on the NMR and PCA analysis, it might be suggested that the biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids, together with that of phenylpropanoids, is stimulated by the infection of phytoplasma. PMID:15286294

  18. Formation of κ-carrageenan-gelatin polyelectrolyte complexes studied by (1)H NMR, UV spectroscopy and kinematic viscosity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voron'ko, Nicolay G; Derkach, Svetlana R; Vovk, Mikhail A; Tolstoy, Peter M

    2016-10-20

    The intermolecular interactions between an anionic polysaccharide from the red algae κ-carrageenan and a gelatin polypeptide, forming stoichiometric polysaccharide-polypeptide (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes in the aqueous phase, were examined. The major method of investigation was high-resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Additional data were obtained by UV absorption spectroscopy, light scattering dispersion and capillary viscometry. Experimental data were interpreted in terms of the changing roles of electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds when κ-carrageenan-gelatin complexes are formed. At high temperatures, when biopolymer macromolecules in solution are in the state of random coil, hydrophobic interactions make a major contribution to complex stabilization. At the temperature of gelatin's coil→helix conformational transition and at lower temperatures, electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds play a defining role in complex formation. A proposed model of the κ-carrageenan-gelatin complex is discussed. PMID:27474666

  19. Intermolecular Interactions between Eosin Y and Caffeine Using 1H-NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macduff O. Okuom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DETECHIP has been used in testing analytes including caffeine, cocaine, and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC from marijuana, as well as date rape and club drugs such as flunitrazepam, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB, and methamphetamine. This study investigates the intermolecular interaction between DETECHIP sensor eosin Y (DC1 and the analyte (caffeine that is responsible for the fluorescence and color changes observed in the actual array. Using 1H-NMR, 1H-COSY, and 1H-DOSY NMR methods, a proton exchange from C-8 of caffeine to eosin Y is proposed.

  20. Dynamic Processes in Prochiral Solvating Agents (pro-CSAs Studied by NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Labuta

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Several dynamic processes, including tautomerism and macrocyclic inversion, in 1H-NMR prochiral solvating agents (pro-CSAs are investigated. Various features of pro-CSA, including modes of interaction for complex formation, stoichiometry, binding strength and temperature effects were compared for three representative pro-CSA molecules. Structural effects of conjugated tetrapyrrole pro-CSA on the mechanism of enantiomeric excess determination are also discussed. Detailed analysis of species (complexes and dynamic processes occurring in solution and their 1H-NMR spectral manifestations at various temperatures is presented.

  1. Identification of bacterial species by untargeted NMR spectroscopy of the exo-metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palama, T L; Canard, I; Rautureau, G J P; Mirande, C; Chatellier, S; Elena-Herrmann, B

    2016-08-01

    Identification of bacterial species is a crucial bottleneck for clinical diagnosis of infectious diseases. Quick and reliable identification is a key factor to provide suitable antibiotherapies and avoid the development of multiple-drug resistance. We propose a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics strategy for rapid discrimination and identification of several bacterial species that relies on untargeted metabolic profiling of supernatants from bacterial culture media. We show that six bacterial species (Gram negative: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis; Gram positive: Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus) can be well discriminated from multivariate statistical analysis, opening new prospects for NMR applications to microbial clinical diagnosis. PMID:27349704

  2. GEL-STATE NMR OF BALL-MILLED WHOLE CELL WALLS IN DMSO-d6 USING 2D SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant cell walls were used for obtaining 2D solution-state NMR spectra without actual solubilization or structural modification. Ball-milled whole cell walls were swelled directly in the NMR tube with DMSO-d6 where they formed a gel. There are relatively few gel-state NMR studies. Most have involved...

  3. Coal structure at reactive sites by sup 1 H- sup 13 C- sup 19 F double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagaman, E.W.; Woody, M.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The solid state NMR technique, {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C-{sup 31}P double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy, uses the direct dipolar interaction between {sup 13}C-{sup 31}P spin pairs in organophosphorus substances to identify the subset of carbons within a spherical volume element of 0.4 nm radius centered on the {sup 31}P atom. In combination with chemical manipulation of coals designed to introduce phosphorus containing functionality into the organic matrix, the NMR experiment becomes a method to examine selectively the carbon bonding network at the reactive sites in the coal. This approach generates a statistical structure description of the coal at the reaction centers in contrast to bulk carbon characterization using conventional {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. 3 refs.

  4. Characterization of pyrogenic organic matter by 2-dimenstional HETeronucleus CORelation solid-state 13C NMR (HETCOR) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, increasing evidences are provided that the common view of charcoal as a polyaromatic network is too much simplified. Experiments with model compounds indicated that it represents a heterogeneous mixture of thermally altered biomacromolecules with N, O and likely also S substitutions as common features. If produced from a N-rich feedstock, the so called black nitrogen (BN) has to be considered as an integral part of the aromatic charcoal network. In order to study this network one-dimensional (1D) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is often applied. However, this technique suffers from broad resonance lines and low resolution. Applying 2D techniques can help but until recently, this was unfeasible for natural organic matter (NOM) due to sensitivity problems and the high complexity of the material. On the other hand, during the last decade, the development of stronger magnetic field instruments and advanced pulse sequences has put them into reach for NOM research. Although 2D NMR spectroscopy has many different applications, all pulse sequences are based on the introduction of a preparation time during which the magnetization of a spin system is adjusted into a state appropriate to whatever properties are to be detected in the indirect dimension. Then, the spins are allowed to evolve with the given conditions and after their additional manipulation during a mixing period the modulated magnetization is detected. Assembling several 1D spectra with incrementing evolution time creates a data set which is two-dimensional in time (t1, t2). Fourier transformation of both dimensions leads to a 2D contour plot correlating the interactions detected in the indirect dimension t1 with the signals detected in the direct dimension t2. The so called solid-state heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR spectroscopy represents a 2D technique allows the determination which protons are interacting with which carbons. In the present work this

  5. Cisplatin adducts on a GGG sequence within a DNA duplex studied by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téletchéa, Stéphane; Skauge, Tormod; Sletten, Einar; Kozelka, Jirí

    2009-11-16

    The antitumor drug cisplatin(cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2]) reacts with cellular DNA to form GG intrastrand adducts between adjacent guanines as predominant lesions. GGG sites have been shown to be hotspots of platination. To study the structural perturbation induced by binding of cisplatin to two adjacent guanines of a GGG trinucleotide,we examined here the decanucleotide duplex d[(G1C2C3G*4 G*5 G6T7-C8G9C10).d(G11C12G13A14C15C16C17G18-G19C20)] (dsCG*G*G) intrastrand cross-linked at the G* guanines by cis-{Pt(NH3)2}2+ using NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.The NMR spectra of dsCG*G*G were found to be similar to those of previously characterized DNA duplexes cross-linked by cisplatin at apyG*G*X site (py=pyrimidine; X=C,T, A). This similarity of NMR spectra indicates that the base at the 3'-side of the G*G*-Pt cross-link does not affect the structure to a large extent. An unprecedented reversible isomerization between the duplex dsCG*G*G (bearing a G*4 G*5 -Pt chelate) and duplex dsGG*G*T (bearing a G*5 G*6 -Pt chelate)was observed, which yielded a 40:60 equilibrium between the two intrastrand GG-Pt cross-links. No formation of interstrand cross-links was observed.NMR spectroscopic data of dsCG*G*G indicated that the deoxyribose of the 5'-G* adopts an N-type conformation, and the cytidines C3, C15,and C16 have average phase angles intermediate between S and N. The NMR spectroscopic chemical shifts of dsGG*G*T showed some fundamental differences to those of pyG*G*-platinum adducts but were in agreement with the NMR spectra reported previously for the DNA duplexes crosslinked at an AG*G*C sequence by cisplatin or oxaliplatin. The presence of apurine instead of a pyrimidine at the 5'-side of the G*G* cross-link seems therefore to affect the structure of the XG* step significantly. PMID:19813235

  6. Effect of 1,10-phenanthroline aromaticity in carboxylic acids:1H NMR spectroscopy, GIAO calculations and thermodynamic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Camila M. B.; Santos, Vanessa F. C.; Belarmino, Marcia K. D. L.; França, José A. A.; Moura, Gustavo L. C.; Lima, Nathalia B. D.

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen bonding represents a class of chemical interactions, which are directly responsible for several physical properties, such as: energetic stabilities, boiling points, vibrational modes, bond lengths, etc. In this article, we examine from the point of view of 1H NMR spectroscopy and GIAO calculations, the effects associated with the process of formation of the hydrogen bonds as they appear in the chemical shifts of the acidic hydrogens in the complexes between nitrogenated compounds, PHEN, BIPY and DIBIPY, and carboxylic acids, HOOCH, HOOCCH3 and HOOCC6H5. All computational simulations were performed using the quantum chemical methods B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) and ωB97X-D/def2-TZVP. The 1H NMR spectroscopy results showed that, in both cases, the hydrogen nucleus of the OH group is the most affected in the process of hydrogen bond formation. For the complexes involving PHEN we observed that the hydrogen nucleus is more strongly shielded when compared with this signal in the corresponding complexes involving BIPY and DIBIPY.

  7. Unraveling a phosphorylation event in a folded protein by NMR spectroscopy: phosphorylation of the Pin1 WW domain by PKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smet-Nocca, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.smet@univ-lille1.fr; Launay, Helene; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.landrieu@univ-lille1.fr [Universite de Lille-Nord de France, Institut Federatif de Recherches 147, CNRS UMR 8576 (France)

    2013-04-15

    The Pin1 protein plays a critical role in the functional regulation of the hyperphosphorylated neuronal Tau protein in Alzheimer's disease and is by itself regulated by phosphorylation. We have used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to both identify the PKA phosphorylation site in the Pin1 WW domain and investigate the functional consequences of this phosphorylation. Detection and identification of phosphorylation on serine/threonine residues in a globular protein, while mostly occurring in solvent-exposed flexible loops, does not lead to chemical shift changes as obvious as in disordered proteins and hence does not necessarily shift the resonances outside the spectrum of the folded protein. Other complications were encountered to characterize the extent of the phosphorylation, as part of the {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N amide resonances around the phosphorylation site are specifically broadened in the unphosphorylated state. Despite these obstacles, NMR spectroscopy was an efficient tool to confirm phosphorylation on S16 of the WW domain and to quantify the level of phosphorylation. Based on this analytical characterization, we show that WW phosphorylation on S16 abolishes its binding capacity to a phosphorylated Tau peptide. A reduced conformational heterogeneity and flexibility of the phospho-binding loop upon S16 phosphorylation could account for part of the decreased affinity for its phosphorylated partner. Additionally, a structural model of the phospho-WW obtained by molecular dynamics simulation and energy minimization suggests that the phosphate moiety of phospho-S16 could compete with the phospho-substrate.

  8. Identification of Imitation Cheese and Imitation Ice Cream Based on Vegetable Fat Using NMR Spectroscopy and Chemometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia B. Monakhova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oils and fats may be used as cheap substitutes for milk fat to manufacture imitation cheese or imitation ice cream. In this study, 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy of the fat fraction of the products was used in the context of food surveillance to validate the labeling of milk-based products. For sample preparation, the fat was extracted using an automated Weibull-Stoldt methodology. Using principal component analysis (PCA, imitation products can be easily detected. In both cheese and ice cream, a differentiation according to the type of raw material (milk fat and vegetable fat was possible. The loadings plot shows that imitation products were distinguishable by differences in their fatty acid ratios. Furthermore, a differentiation of several types of cheese (Edamer, Gouda, Emmentaler, and Feta was possible. Quantitative data regarding the composition of the investigated products can also be predicted from the same spectra using partial least squares (PLS regression. The models obtained for 13 compounds in cheese (R2 0.75–0.95 and 17 compounds in ice cream (R2 0.83–0.99 (e.g., fatty acids and esters were suitable for a screening analysis. NMR spectroscopy was judged as suitable for the routine analysis of dairy products based on milk or on vegetable fat substitutes.

  9. Unraveling a phosphorylation event in a folded protein by NMR spectroscopy: phosphorylation of the Pin1 WW domain by PKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pin1 protein plays a critical role in the functional regulation of the hyperphosphorylated neuronal Tau protein in Alzheimer’s disease and is by itself regulated by phosphorylation. We have used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to both identify the PKA phosphorylation site in the Pin1 WW domain and investigate the functional consequences of this phosphorylation. Detection and identification of phosphorylation on serine/threonine residues in a globular protein, while mostly occurring in solvent-exposed flexible loops, does not lead to chemical shift changes as obvious as in disordered proteins and hence does not necessarily shift the resonances outside the spectrum of the folded protein. Other complications were encountered to characterize the extent of the phosphorylation, as part of the 1H,15N amide resonances around the phosphorylation site are specifically broadened in the unphosphorylated state. Despite these obstacles, NMR spectroscopy was an efficient tool to confirm phosphorylation on S16 of the WW domain and to quantify the level of phosphorylation. Based on this analytical characterization, we show that WW phosphorylation on S16 abolishes its binding capacity to a phosphorylated Tau peptide. A reduced conformational heterogeneity and flexibility of the phospho-binding loop upon S16 phosphorylation could account for part of the decreased affinity for its phosphorylated partner. Additionally, a structural model of the phospho-WW obtained by molecular dynamics simulation and energy minimization suggests that the phosphate moiety of phospho-S16 could compete with the phospho-substrate.

  10. Transformation of meta-stable calcium silicate hydrates to tobermorite: reaction kinetics and molecular structure from XRD and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Jacqueline R; Maxwell, Robert S; Carroll, Susan A

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the integrity of well-bore systems that are lined with Portland-based cements is critical to the successful storage of sequestered CO2 in gas and oil reservoirs. As a first step, we investigate reaction rates and mechanistic pathways for cement mineral growth in the absence of CO2 by coupling water chemistry with XRD and NMR spectroscopic data. We find that semi-crystalline calcium (alumino-)silicate hydrate (Al-CSH) forms as a precursor solid to the cement mineral tobermorite. Rate constants for tobermorite growth were found to be k = 0.6 (+/- 0.1) x 10(-5) s(-1) for a solution:solid of 10:1 and 1.6 (+/- 0.8) x 10(-4) s(-1) for a solution:solid of 5:1 (batch mode; T = 150 degrees C). This data indicates that reaction rates for tobermorite growth are faster when the solution volume is reduced by half, suggesting that rates are dependent on solution saturation and that the Gibbs free energy is the reaction driver. However, calculated solution saturation indexes for Al-CSH and tobermorite differ by less than one log unit, which is within the measured uncertainty. Based on this data, we consider both heterogeneous nucleation as the thermodynamic driver and internal restructuring as possible mechanistic pathways for growth. We also use NMR spectroscopy to characterize the site symmetry and bonding environment of Al and Si in a reacted tobermorite sample. We find two [4]Al coordination structures at delta iso = 59.9 ppm and 66.3 ppm with quadrupolar product parameters (PQ) of 0.21 MHz and 0.10 MHz (+/- 0.08) from 27Al 3Q-MAS NMR and speculate on the Al occupancy of framework sites by probing the protonation environment of Al metal centers using 27Al{1H}CP-MAS NMR. PMID:19144195

  11. Self-Association of N-Methylacetamide Examined by Infrared and NMR Spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Heather L.; Hui, KaWai

    2011-01-01

    These spectroscopic experiments investigate polarity and concentration effects on self-association behavior in N-methylacetamide. Inquiry can be limited to the concentration dependence of hydrogen bonding and estimation of dimerization constant (NMR studies) or to the effect of solvent polarity on extent of hydrogen bonding (IR studies). The…

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Chemically Modified Starches by 1H-NMR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, R.A. de; Lammers, G.; Janssen, L.P.B.M.; Beenackers, A.A.C.M.

    1995-01-01

    A quantitative 1H-NMR method for the determination of the Molar Substitution (MS) of acetylated and hydroxypropylated starches was developed and tested for MS ranging from 0.09 to 0.5. Results were checked using the Johnson method and a titration method for hydroxypropylated and acetylated starch, r

  13. Quantitative analysis of chemically modified starches by H-1-NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, R.A.; Lammers, G; Janssen, L.P.B.M.; Beenackers, A.A C M

    1995-01-01

    A quantitative H-1-NMR method for the determination of the Molar Substitution (MS) of acetylated and hydroxypropylated starches was developed and tested for MS ranging from 0.09 to 0.5. Results were checked using the Johnson method and a titration method for hydroxypropylated and acetylated starch,

  14. In situ NMR spectroscopy of supercapacitors: insight into the charge storage mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Forse, Alexander C; Griffin, John M; Trease, Nicole M; Trognko, Lorie; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2013-12-18

    Electrochemical capacitors, commonly known as supercapacitors, are important energy storage devices with high power capabilities and long cycle lives. Here we report the development and application of in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methodologies to study changes at the electrode-electrolyte interface in working devices as they charge and discharge. For a supercapacitor comprising activated carbon electrodes and an organic electrolyte, NMR experiments carried out at different charge states allow quantification of the number of charge storing species and show that there are at least two distinct charge storage regimes. At cell voltages below 0.75 V, electrolyte anions are increasingly desorbed from the carbon micropores at the negative electrode, while at the positive electrode there is little change in the number of anions that are adsorbed as the voltage is increased. However, above a cell voltage of 0.75 V, dramatic increases in the amount of adsorbed anions in the positive electrode are observed while anions continue to be desorbed at the negative electrode. NMR experiments with simultaneous cyclic voltammetry show that supercapacitor charging causes marked changes to the local environments of charge storing species, with periodic changes of their chemical shift observed. NMR calculations on a model carbon fragment show that the addition and removal of electrons from a delocalized system should lead to considerable increases in the nucleus-independent chemical shift of nearby species, in agreement with our experimental observations.

  15. Study of formation of complexes between tetracycline and lanthanide ions by optical and NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of studies on the Eu3+ luminescence spectra in complexes with tetracycline, as well as the NMR spectra of the tetracycline complexes with La3+ and Yb3+ in water solutions are described. Participation of the tetracycline tricarbonylmethane groupings in interaction process with lanthanide ions is proved

  16. Self-Assembly, Guest Capture, and NMR Spectroscopy of a Metal-Organic Cage in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Eun Bin; Srisuknimit, Veerasak; Cheng, Stephanie L.; Vosburg, David A.

    2016-01-01

    A green organic-inorganic laboratory experiment has been developed in which students prepare a self-assembling iron cage in D[subscript 2]O at room temperature. The tetrahedral cage captures a small, neutral molecule such as cyclohexane or tetrahydrofuran. [Superscript 1]H NMR analysis distinguishes captured and free guests through diagnostic…

  17. International school on high field NMR spectroscopy for solids and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, D.; Meier, B.; Keeler, J.; Berthault, P.; Vedrine, P.; Grandinetti, P.; Delsuc, M.A.; Spiess, H

    2006-07-01

    The aim of the school is to offer high-level pedagogical courses on a wide range of liquid- and solid-state NMR concepts and techniques: theory, instrumentation (magnets and probes), data acquisition, processing and analysis, measurement of dipolar and quadrupolar couplings, spin relaxation and hyper-polarization. This document gathers only the slides of most presentations.

  18. Fast screening of turkish olive oil by NMR spectroscopy for geographical determination and discrimination purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ok, S.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study is to rapidly screen olive oil contents by acquiring one dimensional (1D 1H NMR spectra of 38 samples from Turkey, The Middle East, and Libya. The quantitative analysis of the 1H NMR helped in distinguishing the geographical origin of the olive oil samples. The intensity of 1H NMR variables was submitted to the statistical method, analysis of variance (ANOVA. As a result of combining the NMR data and ANOVA, olive oils were discriminated based on regional origin rather than province. This less time consuming discriminative screening by 1H NMR does not require any further analysis of the olive oil, including oxidative stability measurements or gas chromatography. The possibility of determining authenticity, even in an olive growing area of a small village was also shown. The two-dimensional (2D non-invasive 1H DOSY NMR experiment, known as “NMR chromatography”, was used to determine the olive oil sub-fraction.El objetivo es conocer de manera rápida el contenido de aceite de oliva mediante la adquisición de espectros de 1H RMN de una dimensión (1D. El estudio se ha realizado con 38 muestras procedentes de Turquía, Oriente Medio y Libia. El análisis cuantitativo de 1H RMN ayudó a distinguir el origen geográfico de las muestras de aceites de oliva. La intensidad de las señales de 1H RMN se sometió a estudio estadístico mediante análisis de varianza (ANOVA. Como resultado de la combinación de los datos de RMN y ANOVA, los aceites de oliva fueron discriminados por origen regional antes que por provincia. Esta técnica de discriminación rápida por 1H RMN no requiere ningún análisis adicional de los aceites de oliva mediante estudios de estabilidad a la oxidación o cromatografía de gases. También se demostró la posibilidad de determinar la autenticidad, incluso en el área de cultivo del olivo de una pequeña aldea. Los experimentos de RMN bi-dimensionales (2D no invasiva 1H DOSY, conocido como

  19. Conformation and dynamics of melittin bound to magnetically oriented lipid bilayers by solid-state (31)P and (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Naito, A.; T. Nagao; Norisada, K; Mizuno, T; Tuzi, S.; Saitô, H.

    2000-01-01

    The conformation and dynamics of melittin bound to the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer and the magnetic orientation in the lipid bilayer systems were investigated by solid-state (31)P and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Using (31)P NMR, it was found that melittin-lipid bilayers form magnetically oriented elongated vesicles with the long axis parallel to the magnetic field above the liquid crystalline-gel phase transition temperature (T(m) = 24 degrees C). The conformation, orientation, ...

  20. Determination of the structural changes by Raman and 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and 13C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra

  1. Characterisation of PEGylated PLGA nanoparticles comparing the nanoparticle bulk to the particle surface using UV/vis spectroscopy, SEC, {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spek, S.; Haeuser, M. [Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, University of Muenster, Corrensstrasse 48, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Schaefer, M.M. [nanoAnalytics, Heisenbergstrasse 11, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Langer, K., E-mail: k.langer@wwu.de [Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, University of Muenster, Corrensstrasse 48, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We compared nanoparticles prepared on the basis of PLGA and PEG–PLGA for their polymeric composition in the particle bulk and on the surface. • We validated three analytical methods (UV/vis, SEC, {sup 1}H NMR) for quantification of the polymeric stabiliser PVA and {sup 1}H NMR for the quantification of PEG. • In the case of PEG–PLGA as starting material we observed significant PEG contents not only on the surface but even in the particle bulk. • We observed an unexpected accumulation of the polymeric stabiliser PVA on PEGylated particle surfaces. - Abstract: Hypothesis: The bulk and the surface structure of nanoparticles based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and PLGA–PEG copolymer is expected to consist of different polymer compositions. An enrichment of hydrophilic PEG on the surface in combination with an accumulation of PLGA in the bulk is anticipated. Hence, the imbalance between bulk and surface composition should be detectable by suitable analytical methods. Experiments: Nanoparticles were assembled using an emulsion-evaporation method with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as stabiliser. Mixtures of PLGA and PLGA–PEG copolymer were applied to achieve variably PEGylated nanoparticles. The nanoparticle composition was analysed with respect to PLGA, PVA and PEG, comparing the polymer content of the nanoparticle bulk to the surface. For the bulk, PVA was quantified by a UV/vis spectroscopic method as well as size exclusion chromatography (SEC), and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. PEG determination of the bulk was carried out using quantitative {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. Surface composition was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Findings: For the characterisation of the polymer composition {sup 1}H NMR, SEC, and XPS-methods were successfully established and validated. Unexpectedly, a significant PEG content was detected within the particle bulk. The comparison of

  2. Determination of Kinetic Parameters within a Single Nonisothermal On-Flow Experiment by Nanoliter NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, M Victoria; Rodriguez, Antonio M; de la Hoz, Antonio; Jimenez-Marquez, Francisco; Fratila, Raluca M; Barneveld, Peter A; Velders, Aldrik H

    2015-10-20

    Conventional methods to determine the kinetic parameters for a certain reaction require multiple, separate isothermal experiments, resulting in time- and material-consuming processes. Here, an approach to determine the kinetic information within a single nonisothermal on-flow experiment is presented, consuming less than 10 μmol of reagents and having a total measuring time of typically 10 min. This approach makes use of a microfluidic NMR chip hyphenated to a continuous-flow microreactor and is based on the capabilities of the NMR chip to analyze subnanomole quantities of material in the 25 nL detection volume. Importantly, useful data are acquired from the microreactor platform in specific isothermal and nonisothermal frames. A model fitting the experimental data enables rapid determination of kinetic parameters, as demonstrated for a library of isoxazole and pyrazole derivatives. PMID:26383715

  3. High-field magic-angle spinning 13C NMR spectroscopy of Co4(CO)12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-field (68-MHz) 13C MAS NMR spectra of solid Co4(CO)12 is reported at three different spinning rates. The different spinning rates were required to allow the separation of sidebands from centerbands in the spectrum. This NMR study resulted in the observation of signal(s) due to bridging carbonyls as required by either a dynamic or static Co4(CO)12 structure. The failure to previously observe bridging carbonyl resonances at low field is thought to be most likely due to residual coupling to the quadrupolar cobalt nucleus and/or rapid and selective scalar relaxation of the carbonyl ligand by the cobalt cation. 22 refs., 3 figs

  4. Design and application of robust rf pulses for toroid cavity NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, Thomas E; Woelk, Klaus; Gershenzon, Naum I; Glaser, Steffen J

    2010-01-01

    We present robust radio frequency (rf) pulses that tolerate a factor of six inhomogeneity in the B1 field, significantly enhancing the potential of toroid cavity resonators for NMR spectroscopic applications. Both point-to-point (PP) and unitary rotation (UR) pulses were optimized for excitation, inversion, and refocusing using the gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) algorithm based on optimal control theory. In addition, the optimized parameterization (OP) algorithm applied to the adiabatic BIR-4 UR pulse scheme enabled ultra-short (50 microsec) pulses with acceptable performance compared to standard implementations. OP also discovered a new class of non-adiabatic pulse shapes with improved performance within the BIR-4 framework. However, none of the OP-BIR4 pulses are competitive with the more generally optimized UR pulses. The advantages of the new pulses are demonstrated in simulations and experiments. In particular, the DQF COSY result presented here represents the first implementation of 2D NMR sp...

  5. Fast Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy of High Molecular Weight Protein Assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optimized NMR experiment that combines the advantages of methyl-TROSY and SOFAST-HMQC has been developed. It allows the recording of high quality methyl 1H-13C correlation spectra of protein assemblies of several hundreds of kDa in a few seconds. The SOFAST-methyl-TROSY-based experiment offers completely new opportunities for the study of structural and dynamic changes occurring in molecular nano-machines while they perform their biological function in vitro. (authors)

  6. Metabonomic signature analysis of cervical carcinoma and precancerous lesions in women by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hasim, Ayshamgul; ALI, MAYINUER; MAMTIMIN, BATUR; Ma, Jun-Qi; Li, Qiao-Zhi; ABUDULA, ABULIZI

    2012-01-01

    1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics has been used to characterize the metabolic profiles of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). Principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were used to model the systematic variation related to patients with CIN or CSCC with healthy controls. Potential metabolic biomarkers were identified using database comparisons, and the one-way a...

  7. Structural investigation of molten fluorides of nuclear interest by NMR and XAFS spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of the renewal of the different nuclear plans, the molten salt reactor is one of the six concepts of reactors of 4. generation. This reactor has the particularity to use a liquid fuel based on LiF-ThF4 mixtures. In order to develop and to optimize this concept, it is important to characterize the structure of the melt and to describe its physical and chemical properties. Our work has been based on the study of the system MF-ZrF4 (M = Li, Na, K) selected as a model of ThF4 based systems. We have combined two spectroscopic techniques, the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and the X-ray Absorption at high temperature, with molecular dynamics calculations. We particularly focused on the local environments of the fluorine and the zirconium. In order to interpret the NMR data obtain in the molten state, we performed a preliminary study on zirconium halides and rare earth and alkali fluoro zirconates using the 91Zr solid-state NMR at very high magnetic fields. New correlations between structural parameters and NMR data have been established. At high temperature, in MF-ZrF4 melts we have shown the coexistence of three different kind of Zr-based complexes with different proportions depending on the amount of ZrF4 and on the nature of the alkali. Depending on the ZrF4 content, three kinds of fluorine have been characterized: form free fluorines at low amount of zirconium fluorides, fluorines involved in Zr-based complexes and bridging fluorines at higher ZrF4 content. This original and innovative approach of molten fluorides mixtures, combining NMR and EXAFS at high temperature with molecular dynamics calculations, is very efficient to describe their speciation and thus their fluoro-acidity. (author)

  8. Characterization of water-soluble organic matter in urban aerosol by 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalbot, Marie-Cecile G.; Chitranshi, Priyanka; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; Pollock, Erik; Kavouras, Ilias G.

    2016-03-01

    The functional and 13C isotopic compositions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in atmospheric aerosol were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in an urban location in the Southern Mississippi Valley. The origin of WSOC was resolved using the functional distribution of organic hydrogen, δ13C ratio, and positive matrix factorization (PMF). Three factors were retained based on NMR spectral bins loadings. Two factors (factors 1 and 3) demonstrated strong associations with the aliphatic region in the NMR spectra and levoglucosan resonances. Differences between the two factors included the abundance of the aromatic functional group for factor 1, indicating fresh emissions and, for factor 3, the presence of resonances attributed to secondary ammonium nitrate and low δ13C ratio values that are indicative of secondary organic aerosol. Factors 1 and 3 added 0.89 and 1.08 μgC m-3, respectively, with the highest contribution in the summer and fall. Factor 2 retained resonances consistent with saccharides and was attributed to pollen particles. Its contribution to WSOC varied from 0.22 μgC m-3 in winter to 1.04 μgC m-3 in spring.

  9. Mg/Al Ordering in Layered Double Hydroxides Revealed by Multinuclear NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Grey, Clare P.; Sideris, Paul J.;

    2008-01-01

    The anion- exchange ability of layered double hydroxides ( LDHs) has been exploited to create materials for use in catalysis, drug delivery, and environmental remediation. The specific cation arrangements in the hydroxide layers of hydrotalcite- like LDHs, of general formula Mg1-x2+Alx3+OH2(Anion...... contacts. The application of rapid MAS NMR methods to investigate proton distributions in a wide range of materials is readily envisaged.......(x/n)(n-)).yH(2)O, have, however, remained elusive, and their elucidation could enhance the functional optimization of these materials. We applied rapid ( 60 kilohertz) magic angle spinning ( MAS) to obtain high- resolution hydrogen- 1 nuclear magnetic resonance ( H-1 NMR) spectra and characterize the magnesium...... and aluminum distribution. These data, in combination with H-1-Al-27 double- resonance and Mg-25 triple- quantum MAS NMR data, show that the cations are fully ordered for magnesium: aluminum ratios of 2:1 and that at lower aluminum content, a nonrandom distribution of cations persists, with no Al3+-Al3+ close...

  10. NMR spectroscopy: structure elucidation of cycloelatanene A: a natural product case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Sylvia; Dias, Daniel Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The structure elucidation of new secondary metabolites derived from marine and terrestrial sources is frequently a challenging task. The hurdles include the ability to isolate stable secondary metabolites of sufficient purity that are often present in conversions and/or degradations. Immediately after purification, the next step is to rapidly acquire all analytical spectroscopic data in order to complete the characterization of the isolated secondary metabolite(s), prior to any possible decomposition. The final hurdle in this multiple step process, especially in the acquisition of the NMR spectroscopic and other analytical data (mass spectra, infrared and ultra-violet spectra, optical rotation, etc.), is to assemble the structural moieties/units in an effort to complete the structure elucidation. Often ambiguity with the elucidation of the final structure remains when structural fragments identified are difficult to piece together on the basis of the HMBC NMR correlations or when the relative configuration cannot be unequivocally identified on the basis of NOE NMR enhancements observed. Herein, we describe the methodology used to carry out the structure elucidation of a new C16 chamigrene, cycloelatanene A (5) which was isolated from the southern Australian marine alga Laurencia elata (Rhodomelaceae). The general approach and principles used in the structure determination of this compound can be applied to the structure elucidation of other small molecular weight compounds derived from either natural or synthetic sources. PMID:23963906

  11. Mesh size analysis of cellulose nanofibril hydrogels using solute exclusion and PFG-NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowkarderis, Leila; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2015-12-21

    The pore structure of TEMPO-mediated oxidized CNF hydrogels, chemically cross-linked with water-soluble diamines, is studied. A solute exclusion method and pulsed-field-gradient NMR are used to estimate the mesh size distribution in the gel network in its hydrated state. Dextran fractions with the nominal molecular weights in the range of 10-2000 kDa are used as probes. The results show a nonuniform network structure, consisting of a group of large openings that contain ∼50% of water, and regions with a more compact structure and smaller mesh units that restrict the diffusivity of the dextran molecules. A biexponential model is proposed for the NMR echo amplitude decay due to the probe diffusion into the gel network. A typical single exponential model does not fit the experimental data when the probe molecular size is comparable to the network mesh size. The results obtained with NMR, using the proposed biexponential model, are in very good agreement with those determined with solute exclusion. Precise mesh size estimation with solute exclusion using pore models is subject to restrictions, and vary with the assumed pore geometry. The average mesh size obtained using a spherical pore model, ∼35 nm, in the compact regions of the hydrogel, is in good agreement with the theoretical value in a network of rodlike particles. Neglecting the wall effects leads to underestimation of the mesh size with both techniques. PMID:26417984

  12. Chemical tagging of chlorinated phenols for their facile detection and analysis by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdez, Carlos A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leif, Roald N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-03-22

    A derivatization method that employs diethyl (bromodifluoromethyl) phosphonate (DBDFP) to efficiently tag the endocrine disruptor pentachlorophenol (PCP) and other chlorinated phenols (CPs) along with their reliable detection and analysis by NMR is presented. The method accomplishes the efficient alkylation of the hydroxyl group in CPs with the difluoromethyl (CF2H) moiety in extremely rapid fashion (5 min), at room temperature and in an environmentally benign manner. The approach proved successful in difluoromethylating a panel of 18 chlorinated phenols, yielding derivatives that displayed unique 1H, 19F NMR spectra allowing for the clear discrimination between isomerically related CPs. Due to its biphasic nature, the derivatization can be applied to both aqueous and organic mixtures where the analysis of CPs is required. Furthermore, the methodology demonstrates that PCP along with other CPs can be selectively derivatized in the presence of other various aliphatic alcohols, underscoring the superiority of the approach over other general derivatization methods that indiscriminately modify all analytes in a given sample. The present work demonstrates the first application of NMR on the qualitative analysis of these highly toxic and environmentally persistent species.

  13. NMR doesn't lie or how solid-state NMR spectroscopy contributed to a better understanding of the nature and function of soil organic matter (Philippe Duchaufour Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    "Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) does not lie". More than anything else, this statement of a former colleague and friend has shaped my relation to solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Indeed, if this technique leads to results which contradict the expectations, it is because i) some parts of the instrument are broken, ii) maladjustment of the acquisition parameters or iii) wrong preparation or confusion of samples. However, it may be even simpler, namely that the expectations were wrong. Of course, for researchers, the latter is the most interesting possibility since it forces to reassess accepted views and to search for new explanations. As my major analytical tool, NMR spectroscopy has confronted me with this challenge often enough to turn this issue into the main subject of my talk and to share with the audience how it formed my understanding of function and nature of soil organic matter (SOM). Already shortly after its introduction into soil science in the 1980's, the data obtained with solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy opened the stage for ongoing discussions, since they showed that in humified SOM aromatic carbon is considerably less important than previously thought. This finding had major implications regarding the understanding of the origin of SOM and the mechanisms by which it is formed. Certainly, the discrepancy between the new results and previous paradigms contributed to mistrust in the reliability of solid-state NMR techniques. The respective discussion has survived up to our days, although already in the 1980's and 1990's fundamental studies could demonstrate that quantitative solid-state NMR data can be obtained if i) correct acquisition parameters are chosen, ii) the impact of paramagnetic compounds is reduced and iii) the presence of soot in soils can be excluded. On the other hand, this mistrust led to a detailed analysis of the impact of paramagnetics on the NMR behavior of C groups which then improved our understanding of the role of carbohydrates

  14. Characterization of polysulfone and polysulfone/vanillin microcapsules by 1H NMR spectroscopy, solid-state 13C CP/MAS-NMR spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption-desorption analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Brisa; de Ménorval, Louis-Charles; Garcia-Valls, Ricard; Gumí, Tània

    2011-11-01

    Textile detergent and softener industries have incorporated perfume microencapsulation technology to improve their products. Perfume encapsulation allows perfume protection until use and provides a long-lasting fragrance release. But, certain industrial microcapsules show low encapsulation capacity and low material stability. Polysulfone capsules have been already proposed to solve these drawbacks. Among them, PSf/Vanillin capsules were considered as a desirable system. They present both good material stability and high encapsulation capacity. However, several factors such as the final location of the perfume in the polymeric matrix, the aggregation state that it has in the capsule and its interaction with the capsule components have not been studied yet. These factors can provide vast information about the capsule performance and its improvement. With the aim to characterize these parameters, the physical and chemical properties of PSf/Vanillin capsules have been investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and N(2) adsorption-desorption measurements. AFM micrograph and N(2) isotherms confirm that the presence of vanillin modify the physical structure of PSf/Vanillin microcapsules as it is trapped in the capsule porosity. NMR results show that vanillin is present in solid state in PSf/Vanillin microcapsules.

  15. An investigation on the structure, spectroscopy and thermodynamic aspects of Br2((-))(H2O)n clusters using a conjunction of stochastic and quantum chemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Pulak; Chaudhury, Pinaki

    2016-06-28

    In this work we obtained global as well as local structures of Br2((-))(H2O)n clusters for n = 2 to 6 followed by the study of IR-spectral features and thermochemistry for the structures. The way adopted by us to obtain structures is not the conventional one used in most cases. Here we at first generated excellent quality pre-optimized structures by exploring the suitable empirical potential energy surface using stochastic optimizer simulated annealing. These structures are then further refined using quantum chemical calculations to obtain the final structures, and spectral and thermodynamic features. We clearly showed that our approach results in very quick and better convergence which reduces the computational cost and obviously using the strategy we are able to get one [i.e. global] or more than one [i.e. global and local(s)] energetically lower structures than those which are already reported for a given cluster size. Moreover, IR-spectral results and the evolutionary trends in interaction energy, solvation energy and vertical detachment energy for global structures of each size have also been presented to establish the utility of the procedure employed. PMID:27251059

  16. Study of Protonic Mobility in CaHPO 4·2H 2O (Brushite) and CaHPO 4(Monetite) by Infrared Spectroscopy and Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortet, L.; Gavarri, J. R.; Nihoul, G.; Dianoux, A. J.

    1997-08-01

    We report the first quasi-elastic neutron scattering analysis of proton mobility in the solid electrolyte CaHPO4·2H2O (brushite). We have studied this hydrated phosphate, in powder state, from 190 to 520 K, using an incident wavelength of 5.12 Å. The time of flight spectra are converted inS(Q,ω) structure factor and inelastic frequency distributionP(Q,ω) in the energy range 0-200 meV (0-1600 cm)-1. A quasi-elastic contribution is clearly evidenced above room temperature; it is fitted with a jump model, involving hydrogen bonds. The quasi-elastic and inelastic scattering data are compared with FTIR results. Two kinds of motions are determined: jumps of acidic protons on hydrogen bonds and vibrations of lattice water molecules associated with the motion of their hydrogen atom on hydrogen bonds (Ea≈0.145 eV). Above 450 K the dehydration of the compound is accompanied by the appearance of a long-range diffusive motion and by the disappearance of some low-frequency inelastic bands.

  17. Metabolome Profiling by HRMAS NMR Spectroscopy of Pheochromocytomas and Paragangliomas Detects SDH Deficiency: Clinical and Pathophysiological Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Imperiale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Succinate dehydrogenase gene (SDHx mutations increase susceptibility to develop pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs. In the present study, we evaluate the performance and clinical applications of 1H high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy–based global metabolomic profiling in a large series of PHEOs/PGLs of different genetic backgrounds. Eighty-seven PHEOs/PGLs (48 sporadic/23 SDHx/7 von Hippel-Lindau/5 REarranged during Transfection/3 neurofibromatosis type 1/1 hypoxia-inducible factor 2α, one SDHD variant of unknown significance, and two Carney triad (CTr–related tumors were analyzed by HRMAS-NMR spectroscopy. Compared to sporadic, SDHx-related PHEOs/PGLs exhibit a specific metabolic signature characterized by increased levels of succinate (P < .0001, methionine (P = .002, glutamine (P = .002, and myoinositol (P < .0007 and decreased levels of glutamate (P < .0007, regardless of their location and catecholamine levels. Uniquely, ATP/ascorbate/glutathione was found to be associated with the secretory phenotype of PHEOs/PGLs, regardless of their genotype (P < .0007. The use of succinate as a single screening test retained excellent accuracy in distinguishing SDHx versus non–SDHx-related tumors (sensitivity/specificity: 100/100%. Moreover, the quantification of succinate could be considered a diagnostic alternative for assessing SDHx-related mutations of unknown pathogenicity. We were also able, for the first time, to uncover an SDH-like pattern in the two CTr-related PGLs. The present study demonstrates that HRMAS-NMR provides important information for SDHx-related PHEO/PGL characterization. Besides the high succinate–low glutamate hallmark, SDHx tumors also exhibit high values of methionine, a finding consistent with the hypermethylation pattern of these tumors. We also found important levels of glutamine, suggesting that glutamine metabolism might be involved in the

  18. Characterization of partitioning relevant lanthanide and actinide complexes by NMR spectroscopy; Charakterisierung von partitioningrelevanten Lanthaniden- und Actinidenkomplexen mittels NMR-Spektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, Christian

    2016-01-15

    In the present work the interaction of N-donor ligands, such as 2,6-Bis(5,6-dipropyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)pyridine (nPrBTP) and 2,6-Bis(5-(2,2-dimethylpropyl)1H-pyrazol)-3-yl-pyridine (C5-BPP), with trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions was studied. Ligands of this type show a high selectivity for the separation of trivalent actinide ions over lanthanides from nitric acid solutions. However, the reason for this selectivity, which is crucial for future partitioning and transmutation strategies for radioactive wastes, is still unknown. So far, the selectivity of some N-donor ligands is supposed to be an effect of an increased covalency in the actinide-ligand bond, compared to the lanthanide compounds. NMR spectroscopy on paramagnetic metal complexes is an excellent tool for the elucidation of bonding modes. The overall paramagnetic chemical shift consists of two contributions, the Fermi Contact Shift (FCS), due to electron spin delocalisation through covalent bonds, and the Pseudo Contact Shift (PCS), which describes the dipolar coupling of the electron magnetic moment and the nuclear spin. By assessing the FCS share in the paramagnetic shift, the degree of covalency in the metal-ligand bond can be gauged. Several methods to discriminate FCS and PCS have been used on the data of the nPrBTP- and C5-BPP-complexes and were evaluated regarding their applicability on lanthanide and actinide complexes with N-donor ligands. The study comprised the synthesis of all Ln(III) complexes with the exceptions of Pm(III) and Gd(III) as well as the Am(III) complex as a representative of the actinide series with both ligands. All complexes were fully characterised ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N spectra) using NMR spectroscopy. By isotope enrichment with the NMR-active {sup 15}N in positions 8 and 9 in both ligands, resonance signals of these nitrogen atoms were detected for all complexes. The Bleaneymethod relies on different temperature dependencies for FCS (T{sup -1}) and PCS (T

  19. Metabolic profiling studies on the toxicological effects of realgar in rats by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxicological effects of realgar after intragastrical administration (1 g/kg body weight) were investigated over a 21 day period in male Wistar rats using metabonomic analysis of 1H NMR spectra of urine, serum and liver tissue aqueous extracts. Liver and kidney histopathology examination and serum clinical chemistry analyses were also performed. 1H NMR spectra and pattern recognition analyses from realgar treated animals showed increased excretion of urinary Kreb's cycle intermediates, increased levels of ketone bodies in urine and serum, and decreased levels of hepatic glucose and glycogen, as well as hypoglycemia and hyperlipoidemia, suggesting the perturbation of energy metabolism. Elevated levels of choline containing metabolites and betaine in serum and liver tissue aqueous extracts and increased serum creatine indicated altered transmethylation. Decreased urinary levels of trimethylamine-N-oxide, phenylacetylglycine and hippurate suggested the effects on the gut microflora environment by realgar. Signs of impairment of amino acid metabolism were supported by increased hepatic glutamate levels, increased methionine and decreased alanine levels in serum, and hypertaurinuria. The observed increase in glutathione in liver tissue aqueous extracts could be a biomarker of realgar induced oxidative injury. Serum clinical chemistry analyses showed increased levels of lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase as well as increased levels of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, indicating slight liver and kidney injury. The time-dependent biochemical variations induced by realgar were achieved using pattern recognition methods. This work illustrated the high reliability of NMR-based metabonomic approach on the study of the biochemical effects induced by traditional Chinese medicine

  20. The Influence of Plant Litter on Soil Water Repellency: Insight from 13C NMR Spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspare Cesarano

    Full Text Available Soil water repellency (SWR, i.e. reduced affinity for water owing to the presence of organic hydrophobic coatings on soil particles has relevant hydrological implications because low rates of infiltration enhance water runoff, and untargeted diffusion of fertilizers and pesticides. Previous studies investigated the occurrence of SWR in ecosystems with different vegetation cover but did not clarify its relationships with litter biochemical quality. Here, we investigated the capability of different plant litter types to induce SWR by using fresh and decomposed leaf materials from 12 species, to amend a model sandy soil over a year-long microcosm experiment. Water repellency, measured by the Molarity of an Ethanol Droplet (MED test, was tested for the effects of litter species and age, and compared with litter quality assessed by 13C-CPMAS NMR in solid state and elemental chemical parameters. All litter types were highly water repellent, with MED values of 18% or higher. In contrast, when litter was incorporated into the soil, only undecomposed materials induced SWR, but with a large variability of onset and peak dynamics among litter types. Surprisingly, SWR induced by litter addition was unrelated to the aliphatic fraction of litter. In contrast, lignin-poor but labile C-rich litter, as defined by O-alkyl C and N-alkyl and methoxyl C of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectral regions, respectively, induced a stronger SWR. This study suggests that biochemical quality of plant litter is a major controlling factor of SWR and, by defining litter quality with 13C-CPMAS NMR, our results provide a significant novel contribution towards a full understanding of the relationships between plant litter biochemistry and SWR.

  1. Determination of structural topology of a membrane protein in lipid bilayers using polarization optimized experiments (POE) for static and MAS solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mote, Kaustubh R. [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States); Gopinath, T. [University of Minnesota, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States); Veglia, Gianluigi, E-mail: vegli001@umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The low sensitivity inherent to both the static and magic angle spinning techniques of solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has thus far limited the routine application of multidimensional experiments to determine the structure of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers. Here, we demonstrate the advantage of using a recently developed class of experiments, polarization optimized experiments, for both static and MAS spectroscopy to achieve higher sensitivity and substantial time-savings for 2D and 3D experiments. We used sarcolipin, a single pass membrane protein, reconstituted in oriented bicelles (for oriented ssNMR) and multilamellar vesicles (for MAS ssNMR) as a benchmark. The restraints derived by these experiments are then combined into a hybrid energy function to allow simultaneous determination of structure and topology. The resulting structural ensemble converged to a helical conformation with a backbone RMSD {approx}0.44 A, a tilt angle of 24 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign , and an azimuthal angle of 55 Degree-Sign {+-} 6 Degree-Sign . This work represents a crucial first step toward obtaining high-resolution structures of large membrane proteins using combined multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR.

  2. Conformational Study of 8-C-glucosyl-prunetin by Dynamic NMR Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By means of variable temperature NMR spectra, conformation of 8-C-glucosyl prunetin,isolated from the leaves of Dalbergia hainanensis (Leguminosae), was studied. The restricted rotation around the C (sp3)-C (sp2) bond in the C-glucosides isoflavonoid results in two main conformers (syn and anti). With the help of MM calculation, the preferred conformation A has H-I" gauche to the 7-OCH3. The barrier to rotation was 18.1 kcal/mol. This result agrees with the calculated value 16.2 kcal/mol of free energy of activation for the interconversion between the conformers.

  3. Measurement of Long-Range Interatomic Distances by Solid-State Tritium-NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In summary, we have described a simple, sensitive, and accurate approach for the determination of short- to long-range interatomic distances using standard probe electronics and sample holders and have successfully applied it to model compounds. The measured distance of 14.4±2.2 Angstroms reported here is the highest ever obtained using NMR. To generalize this approach to samples with a larger 3H chemical shift distribution or shorter T1ρ values, modifications of the experimental conditions such as use of higher spinning frequency, sample volume reduction, or design of new pulse sequences would be beneficial. (authors)

  4. Conformational Study of 8—C—glucosyl—prunetin by Dynamic NMR Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PeiChengZHANG; YingHongWANG; 等

    2002-01-01

    By means of variable temperature NMR spectra,conformation of 8-C-glucosyl prunetin, isolated from the leaves of Dalbergia hainanensis (Leguminosae), was studied. The restricted rotation around the C(sp3)-C(sp2) bond in the C-glucosides isoflavonoid results in two main conformers (syn and anti). With the help of MM calculation, the preferred conformation A has H-1″ gauche to the 7-OCH3. The barrier to rotation was 18.1 kcal/mol. This result agrees with the calculated value 16.2 kcal/mol of free energy of activation for the interconversion between the conformers.

  5. 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Multivariate Analysis of Monovarietal EVOOs as a Tool for Modulating Coratina-Based Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Del Coco

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Coratina cultivar-based olives are very common among 100% Italian extra virgin olive oils (EVOOs. Often, the very spicy character of this cultivar, mostly due to the high polyphenols concentration, requires blending with other “sweetener” oils. In this work, monovarietal EVOO samples from the Coratina cultivar (Apulia, Italy were investigated and compared with monovarietal EVOO from native or recently introduced Apulian (Italy cultivars (Ogliarola Garganica, Ogliarola Barese, Cima di Mola, Peranzana, Picholine, from Calabria (Italy (Carolea and Rossanese and from other Mediterranean countries, such as Spain (Picual and Greece (Kalamata and Koroneiki by 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis (principal component analysis (PCA. In this regard, NMR signals could allow a first qualitative evaluation of the chemical composition of EVOO and, in particular, of its minor component content (phenols and aldehydes, an intrinsic behavior of EVOO taste, related to the cultivar and geographical origins. Moreover, this study offers an opportunity to address blended EVOOs tastes by using oils from a specific region or country of origin.

  6. Quality of spelt pasta enriched with eggs and identification of eggs using 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Jelena S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the characteristics of spelt pasta enriched with eggs. Eggs were added to spelt farina in the quantity of 0, 124 or 248 g/kg (equivalent to 0, 3 or 6 eggs, respectively. Post-hoc Tukey’s HSD test at 95% confidence limit showed significant differences between various samples. Relatively low coefficients of variation have been obtained for each applied assay (1.25-12.42%, which confirmed the high accuracy measurements and statistically significant results. Standard score analysis is applied for accessing the contribution of eggs content to spelt pasta quality. Maximum scores regarding quality (0.89 and chemical characteristics (0.70, have been obtained for 6 eggs spelt pasta formulation. It is also shown that the presence of eggs in pasta can be clearly confirmed by 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy. Simultaneous increase in area of peak positioned at 29.5 and 176 ppm is directly associated with the increase in the content of added eggs in the corresponding samples. Pertinent data point at positive contribution of eggs to the spelt pasta and also that NMR spectrum can be used in the egg quantity control. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TRI 46005 i br. TR 31029

  7. Integrated analysis of the conformation of a protein-linked spin label by crystallography, EPR and NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-range structural information derived from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement observed in the presence of a paramagnetic nitroxide radical is highly useful for structural characterization of globular, modular and intrinsically disordered proteins, as well as protein–protein and protein-DNA complexes. Here we characterized the conformation of a spin-label attached to the homodimeric protein CylR2 using a combination of X-ray crystallography, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and NMR spectroscopy. Close agreement was found between the conformation of the spin label observed in the crystal structure with interspin distances measured by EPR and signal broadening in NMR spectra, suggesting that the conformation seen in the crystal structure is also preferred in solution. In contrast, conformations of the spin label observed in crystal structures of T4 lysozyme are not in agreement with the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement observed for spin-labeled CylR2 in solution. Our data demonstrate that accurate positioning of the paramagnetic center is essential for high-resolution structure determination.

  8. Comparative Investigation of the Ionicity of Aprotic and Protic Ionic Liquids in Molecular Solvents by using Conductometry and NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thawarkar, Sachin; Khupse, Nageshwar D; Kumar, Anil

    2016-04-01

    Electrical conductivity (σ), viscosity (η), and self-diffusion coefficient (D) measurements of binary mixtures of aprotic and protic imidazolium-based ionic liquids with water, dimethyl sulfoxide, and ethylene glycol were measured from 293.15 to 323.15 K. The temperature dependence study reveals typical Arrhenius behavior. The ionicities of aprotic ionic liquids were observed to be higher than those of protic ionic liquids in these solvents. The aprotic ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, [bmIm][BF4 ], displays 100 % ionicity in both water and ethylene glycol. The protic ionic liquids in both water and ethylene glycol are classed as good ionic candidates, whereas in DMSO they are classed as having a poor ionic nature. The solvation dynamics of the ionic species of the ionic liquids are illustrated on the basis of the (1) H NMR chemical shifts of the ionic liquids. The self-diffusion coefficients D of the cation and anion of [HmIm][CH3 COO] in D2 O and in [D6 ]DMSO are determined by using (1) H nuclei with pulsed field gradient spin-echo NMR spectroscopy.

  9. Combined Reversed Phase HPLC, Mass Spectrometry, and NMR Spectroscopy for a Fast Separation and Efficient Identification of Phosphatidylcholines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Willmann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In respect of the manifold involvement of lipids in biochemical processes, the analysis of intact and underivatised lipids of body fluids as well as cell and tissue extracts is still a challenging task, if detailed molecular information is required. Therefore, the advantage of combined use of high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC, mass spectrometry (MS, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy will be shown analyzing three different types of extracts of the ubiquitous membrane component phosphatidylcholine. At first, different reversed phase modifications were tested on phosphatidylcholines (PC with the same effective carbon number (ECN for their applicability in lipid analysis. The results were taken to improve the separation of three natural PC extract types and a new reversed phase (RP-HPLC method was developed. The individual species were characterized by one- and two-dimensional NMR and positive or negative ion mode quadrupole time of flight (q-TOF-MS as well as MS/MS techniques. Furthermore, ion suppression effects during electrospray ionisation (ESI, difficulties, limits, and advantages of the individual analytical techniques are addressed.

  10. Structural investigations of Pu{sup III} phosphate by X-ray diffraction, MAS-NMR and XANES spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popa, Karin [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Raison, Philippe E., E-mail: philippe.raison@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Martel, Laura [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Martin, Philippe M. [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Prieur, Damien [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Solari, Pier L. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, 91190 Saint-Aubin (France); Bouëxière, Daniel; Konings, Rudy J.M.; Somers, Joseph [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    PuPO{sub 4} was prepared by a solid state reaction method and its crystal structure at room temperature was solved by powder X-ray diffraction combined with Rietveld refinement. High resolution XANES measurements confirm the +III valence state of plutonium, in agreement with valence bond derivation. The presence of the americium (as β{sup −} decay product of plutonium) in the +III oxidation state was determined based on XANES spectroscopy. High resolution solid state {sup 31}P NMR agrees with the XANES results and the presence of a solid-solution. - Graphical abstract: A full structural analysis of PuPO{sub 4} based on Rietveld analysis of room temperature X-ray diffraction data, XANES and MAS NMR measurements was performed. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of PuPO{sub 4} monazite is solved. • In PuPO{sub 4} plutonium is strictly trivalent. • The presence of a minute amount of Am{sup III} is highlighted. • We propose PuPO{sub 4} as a potential reference material for spectroscopic and microscopic studies.

  11. Rapid identification of osmolytes in tropical microalgae and cyanobacteria by (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zea Obando, Claudia; Linossier, Isabelle; Kervarec, Nelly; Zubia, Mayalen; Turquet, Jean; Faÿ, Fabienne; Rehel, Karine

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report the chemical characterization of 47 tropical microalgae and cyanobacteria by HR-MAS. The generated data confirm the interest of HR-MAS as a rapid screening technique with the major advantage of its easiness. The sample is used as powder of freeze-dried microalgae without any extraction process before acquisition. The spectral fingerprints of strains are then tested as variables for a chemotaxonomy study to discriminate cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates. The individual factor map generated by PCA analysis succeeds in separating the two groups, essentially thanks to the presence of specific carbohydrates. Furthermore, more resolved signals enable to identify many osmolytes. More precisely the characteristics δ of 2-O-alpha-D-glucosylglycerol (GG) are observed in all 21 h-MAS spectra of tropical cyanobacteria. After specific extraction, complementary analysis by 1D and 2D-NMR spectroscopies validates the identification of this osmolyte. PMID:27130130

  12. Evaluation of chemical changes during Myrciaria cauliflora (jabuticaba fruit) fermentation by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy and chemometric analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, Gilmara A.C.; Naves, Sara S.; Ferri, Pedro H.; Santos, Suzana C., E-mail: suzana.quimica.ufg@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de Bioatividade Molecular

    2012-10-15

    Organic acids, sugars, alcohols, phenolic compounds, color properties, pH and titratable acidity were monitored during the commercial fermentation of jabuticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora) by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, spectrophotometric assays and standard methods of analysis. Data collected was analyzed by principal component (PCA), hierarchical cluster (HCA) and canonical correlation (CCA) analyses. Two sample groups were distinguished and the variables responsible for separation were sugars, anthocyanins, alcohols, hue and acetic and succinic acids. The canonical correlation analysis confirmed the influence of alcohols (ethanol, methanol and glycerol), organic acids (citric, succinic and acetic acids), pH and titratable acidity on the extraction and stability of anthocyanins and co pigments. As a result, color properties were also affected by phenolic variation throughout the fermentative process. (author)

  13. An efficient method and device for transfer of semisolid materials into solid-state NMR spectroscopy rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisao, Grant S.; Harland, Michael A.; Brown, Robert A.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Wilson, Thomas E.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-04-01

    The study of mass-limited biological samples by magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy critically relies upon the high-yield transfer of material from a biological preparation into the MAS rotor. This issue is particularly important for maintaining biological activity and hydration of semi-solid samples such as membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, pharmaceutical formulations, microcrystalline proteins and protein fibrils. Here we present protocols and designs for rotor-packing devices specifically suited for packing hydrated samples into Pencil-style 1.6 mm, 3.2 mm standard, and 3.2 mm limited speed MAS rotors. The devices are modular and therefore readily adaptable to other rotor and/or ultracentrifugation tube geometries.

  14. An efficient method and device for transfer of semisolid materials into solid-state NMR spectroscopy rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisao, Grant S; Harland, Michael A; Brown, Robert A; Berthold, Deborah A; Wilson, Thomas E; Rienstra, Chad M

    2016-04-01

    The study of mass-limited biological samples by magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy critically relies upon the high-yield transfer of material from a biological preparation into the MAS rotor. This issue is particularly important for maintaining biological activity and hydration of semi-solid samples such as membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, pharmaceutical formulations, microcrystalline proteins and protein fibrils. Here we present protocols and designs for rotor-packing devices specifically suited for packing hydrated samples into Pencil-style 1.6 mm, 3.2 mm standard, and 3.2 mm limited speed MAS rotors. The devices are modular and therefore readily adaptable to other rotor and/or ultracentrifugation tube geometries. PMID:26905816

  15. NMR/MS Translator for the Enhanced Simultaneous Analysis of Metabolomics Mixtures by NMR Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry: Application to Human Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingol, Kerem; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    A novel metabolite identification strategy is presented for the combined NMR/MS analysis of complex metabolite mixtures. The approach first identifies metabolite candidates from 1D or 2D NMR spectra by NMR database query, which is followed by the determination of the masses (m/z) of their possible ions, adducts, fragments, and characteristic isotope distributions. The expected m/z ratios are then compared with the MS(1) spectrum for the direct assignment of those signals of the mass spectrum that contain information about the same metabolites as the NMR spectra. In this way, the mass spectrum can be assigned with very high confidence, and it provides at the same time validation of the NMR-derived metabolites. The method was first demonstrated on a model mixture, and it was then applied to human urine collected from a pool of healthy individuals. A number of metabolites could be detected that had not been reported previously, further extending the list of known urine metabolites. The new analysis approach, which is termed NMR/MS Translator, is fully automated and takes only a few seconds on a computer workstation. NMR/MS Translator synergistically uses the power of NMR and MS, enhancing the accuracy and efficiency of the identification of those metabolites compiled in databases. PMID:25881480

  16. Infrared rovibrational spectroscopy of OH–C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in {sup 4}He nanodroplets: Parity splitting due to partially quenched electronic angular momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douberly, Gary E., E-mail: douberly@uga.edu; Liang, Tao [Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2556 (United States); Raston, Paul L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Marshall, Mark D., E-mail: mdmarshall@amherst.edu [Department of Chemistry, Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts 01002-5000 (United States)

    2015-04-07

    The T-shaped OH–C{sub 2}H{sub 2} complex is formed in helium droplets via the sequential pick-up and solvation of the monomer fragments. Rovibrational spectra of the a-type OH stretch and b-type antisymmetric CH stretch vibrations contain resolved parity splitting that reveals the extent to which electronic angular momentum of the OH moiety is quenched upon complex formation. The energy difference between the spin-orbit coupled {sup 2}B{sub 1} (A″) and {sup 2}B{sub 2} (A′) electronic states is determined spectroscopically to be 216 cm{sup −1} in helium droplets, which is 13 cm{sup −1} larger than in the gas phase [Marshall et al., J. Chem. Phys. 121, 5845 (2004)]. The effect of the helium is rationalized as a difference in the solvation free energies of the two electronic states. This interpretation is motivated by the separation between the Q(3/2) and R(3/2) transitions in the infrared spectrum of the helium-solvated {sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} OH radical. Despite the expectation of a reduced rotational constant, the observed Q(3/2) to R(3/2) splitting is larger than in the gas phase by ≈0.3 cm{sup −1}. This observation can be accounted for quantitatively by assuming the energetic separation between {sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} and {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2} manifolds is increased by ≈40 cm{sup −1} upon helium solvation.

  17. Vibration-rotation alchemy in acetylene (12C2H2), ? at low vibrational excitation: from high resolution spectroscopy to fast intramolecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David S.; Miller, Anthony; Amyay, Badr; Fayt, André; Herman, Michel

    2010-04-01

    The link between energy-resolved spectra and time-resolved dynamics is explored quantitatively for acetylene (12C2H2), ? with up to 8600 cm-1 of vibrational energy. This comparison is based on the extensive and reliable knowledge of the vibration-rotation energy levels and on the model Hamiltonian used to fit them to high precision [B. Amyay, S. Robert, M. Herman, A. Fayt, B. Raghavendra, A. Moudens, J. Thiévin, B. Rowe, and R. Georges, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 114301 (2009)]. Simulated intensity borrowing features in high resolution absorption spectra and predicted survival probabilities in intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) are first investigated for the v 4 + v 5 and v 3 bright states, for J = 2, 30 and 100. The dependence of the results on the rotational quantum number and on the choice of vibrational bright state reflects the interplay of three kinds of off-diagonal resonances: anharmonic, rotational l-type, and Coriolis. The dynamical quantities used to characterize the calculated time-dependent dynamics are the dilution factor φ d, the IVR lifetime τ IVR , and the recurrence time τ rec. For the two bright states v 3 + 2v 4 and 7v 4, the collisionless dynamics for thermally averaged rotational distributions at T = 27, 270 and 500 K were calculated from the available spectroscopic data. For the 7v 4 bright state, an apparent irreversible decay of is found. In all cases, the model Hamiltonian allows a detailed calculation of the energy flow among all of the coupled zeroth-order vibration-rotation states.

  18. High resolution triple resonance micro magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy of nanoliter sample volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauckmann, J Ole; Janssen, J W G Hans; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2016-02-14

    To be able to study mass-limited samples and small single crystals, a triple resonance micro-magic angle spinning (μMAS) probehead for the application of high-resolution solid-state NMR of nanoliter samples was developed. Due to its excellent rf performance this allows us to explore the limits of proton NMR resolution in strongly coupled solids. Using homonuclear decoupling we obtain unprecedented (1)H linewidths for a single crystal of glycine (Δν(CH2) = 0.14 ppm) at high field (20 T) in a directly detected spectrum. The triple channel design allowed the recording of high-resolution μMAS (13)C-(15)N correlations of [U-(13)C-(15)N] arginine HCl and shows that the superior (1)H resolution opens the way for high-sensitivity inverse detection of heteronuclei even at moderate spinning speeds and rf-fields. Efficient decoupling leads to long coherence times which can be exploited in many correlation experiments.

  19. FUNCTIONALIZATION PATTERN OF TERT-BUTYLDIMETHYL-SILYL CELLULOSE EVALUATED BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Heinze

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Tert-butyldimethylsilyl cellulose with a degree of substitution (DS of up to 2 could be obtained by homogeneous conversion of the biopolymer with tert-butylchlorosilane in N,N-dimethyl aceteamide/LiCl in the presence of imidazole. The cellulose derivatives were characterized in detail by means of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic techniques including subsequent derivatization of the original polymer by consecutive methylation-desilyation-acetylation. The very well resolved NMR spectra indicate that dependent on the reaction temperature 2,6-di-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl moieties are the main repeating units. 3,6-di-O- and 6-mono-O functionalized repeating units were identified in very small amount if the reaction is carried out at room temperature. Additionally, 2,3,6-tri-O-silylated functions appear if reaction is carried out at temperature of 100°C. Thus, a novel path for regioselective protection of position 2 and 6 for cellulose was established.

  20. Identification of Li-Ion Battery SEI Compounds through (7)Li and (13)C Solid-State MAS NMR Spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Laura A; Tavassol, Hadi; Esbenshade, Jennifer L; Xing, Wenting; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-13

    Solid-state (7)Li and (13)C MAS NMR spectra of cycled graphitic Li-ion anodes demonstrate SEI compound formation upon lithiation that is followed by changes in the SEI upon delithiation. Solid-state (13)C DPMAS NMR shows changes in peaks associated with organic solvent compounds (ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate, EC/DMC) upon electrochemical cycling due to the formation of and subsequent changes in the SEI compounds. Solid-state (13)C NMR spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time measurements of lithiated Li-ion anodes and reference poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) powders, along with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry results, indicate that large-molecular-weight polymers are formed in the SEI layers of the discharged anodes. MALDI-TOF MS and NMR spectroscopy results additionally indicate that delithiated anodes exhibit a larger number of SEI products than is found in lithiated anodes. PMID:26653886

  1. Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1991 "for his contributions to the development of the methodology of high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy": Richard R. Ernst

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    Prof. Richard R. Ernst presents "The domestication of nuclear spins by chemists and biologists".The usage of nuclear spins in chemistry and biology for exploring the structure and dynamics of matter is discussed. The main emphasis is put on the methodological aspects of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that are responsible for the success of this powerful analytical technique.

  2. Chemical structures of swine-manure chars produced under different carbonization conditions investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two types of swine manure chars, hydrothermally-produced hydrochar and slow-pyrolysis pyrochar, and their raw swine manure solid were characterized using advanced 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Compared with the parent raw swine manure, both hydrochars and pyrochar di...

  3. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy as a tool to link soil organic matter composition to ecosystem processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Erhagen, Björn; Öquist, Mats; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Environmental factors (e.g. temperature and moisture) and the size and composition of soil microbial populations are often considered the main drivers of soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization. Less consideration is given to the role of SOM as a substrate for microbial metabolism and the importance of the organo-chemical composition of SOM on decomposition. In addition, a fraction of the SOM is often considered as recalcitrant to mineralization leading to accumulation of SOM. However, recently the concept of intrinsic recalcitrance of SOM to mineralization has been questioned. The challenge in investigating the role of SOM composition on its mineralization to a large extent stems from the difficulties in obtaining high resolution characterization of a very complex matrix. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a widely used tool to characterize SOM. However, SOM is a very complex mixture and in the resulting 13C NMR spectra, the identified functional groups may represent different molecular fragments that appear in the same spectral region leading to broad peaks. These overlaps defy attempts to identify molecular moieties, and this makes it impossible to derive information at a resolution needed for evaluating e.g. recalcitrance of SOM. Here we applied a method, developed in wood science for the pulp paper industry, to achieve a better characterization of SOM. We directly dissolved finely ground organic layers of boreal forest floors-litters, fibric and humic horizons of both coniferous and broadleaved stands-in dimethyl sulfoxide and analyzed the resulting solution with a two-dimensional (2D) 1H-13C NMR experiment. We will discuss methodological aspects related to the ability to identify and quantify individual molecular moieties in SOM. We will demonstrate how the spectra resolve signals of CH groups in a 2D plane determined by the 13C and 1H chemical shifts, thereby vastly increasing the resolving power and information content of NMR spectra. The

  4. Characterization of partitioning relevant lanthanide and actinide complexes by NMR spectroscopy; Charakterisierung von partitioningrelevanten Lanthaniden- und Actinidenkomplexen mittels NMR-Spektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, Christian

    2016-01-15

    In the present work the interaction of N-donor ligands, such as 2,6-Bis(5,6-dipropyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)pyridine (nPrBTP) and 2,6-Bis(5-(2,2-dimethylpropyl)1H-pyrazol)-3-yl-pyridine (C5-BPP), with trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions was studied. Ligands of this type show a high selectivity for the separation of trivalent actinide ions over lanthanides from nitric acid solutions. However, the reason for this selectivity, which is crucial for future partitioning and transmutation strategies for radioactive wastes, is still unknown. So far, the selectivity of some N-donor ligands is supposed to be an effect of an increased covalency in the actinide-ligand bond, compared to the lanthanide compounds. NMR spectroscopy on paramagnetic metal complexes is an excellent tool for the elucidation of bonding modes. The overall paramagnetic chemical shift consists of two contributions, the Fermi Contact Shift (FCS), due to electron spin delocalisation through covalent bonds, and the Pseudo Contact Shift (PCS), which describes the dipolar coupling of the electron magnetic moment and the nuclear spin. By assessing the FCS share in the paramagnetic shift, the degree of covalency in the metal-ligand bond can be gauged. Several methods to discriminate FCS and PCS have been used on the data of the nPrBTP- and C5-BPP-complexes and were evaluated regarding their applicability on lanthanide and actinide complexes with N-donor ligands. The study comprised the synthesis of all Ln(III) complexes with the exceptions of Pm(III) and Gd(III) as well as the Am(III) complex as a representative of the actinide series with both ligands. All complexes were fully characterised ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N spectra) using NMR spectroscopy. By isotope enrichment with the NMR-active {sup 15}N in positions 8 and 9 in both ligands, resonance signals of these nitrogen atoms were detected for all complexes. The Bleaneymethod relies on different temperature dependencies for FCS (T{sup -1}) and PCS (T

  5. Structure of the novel steroidal antibiotic squalamine determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrli, S L; Moore, K S; Roder, H; Durell, S; Zasloff, M

    1993-08-01

    Squalamine is a novel aminosterol recently isolated from the dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias. This water-soluble steroid exhibits potent antibacterial activity against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. In addition, squalamine is fungicidal and induces osmotic lysis of protozoa. We report here the structural determination of squalamine, 3 beta-N-1-[N(3-[4-aminobutyl])-1,3 diaminopropane]-7 alpha,24 zeta-dihydroxy-5 alpha-cholestane 24-sulfate, which was deduced from the analysis of fast atom bombardment spectra and a series of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. Squalamine is a cationic steroid characterized by a condensation of an anionic bile salt intermediate with the polyamine, spermidine. This molecule is a potential host-defense agent in the shark, and provides insight into a new class of vertebrate antimicrobial molecules. PMID:8212087

  6. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissues usingprojected Magic Angle Spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Rachel W.; Jachmann, Rebecca C.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Pines, Alexander

    2005-01-27

    High-resolution NMR spectra of materials subject toanisotropic broadening are usually obtained by rotating the sample aboutthe magic angle, which is 54.7 degrees to the static magnetic field. Inprojected Magic Angle Spinning (p-MAS), the sample is spun about twoangles, neither of which is the magic angle. This provides a method ofobtaining isotropic spectra while spinning at shallow angles. The p-MASexperiment may be used in situations where spinning the sample at themagic angle is not possible due to geometric or other constraints,allowing the choice of spinning angle to be determined by factors such asthe shape of the sample, rather than by the spin physics. The applicationof this technique to bovine tissue samples is demonstrated as a proof ofprinciple for future biological or medical applications.

  7. NMR spectroscopy and chemometrics to evaluate different processing of coconut water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucupira, N R; Alves Filho, E G; Silva, L M A; de Brito, E S; Wurlitzer, N J; Sousa, P H M

    2017-02-01

    NMR and chemometrics was applied to understand the variations in chemical composition of coconut water under different processing. Six processing treatments were applied to coconut water and analyzed: two control (with and without sulphite), and four samples thermally processed at 110°C and 136°C (with and without sulphite). Samples processed at lower temperature and without sulphite presented pink color under storage. According to chemometrics, samples processed at higher temperature exhibited lower levels of glucose and malic acid. Samples with sulphite processed at 136°C presented lower amount of sucrose, suggesting the degradation of the carbohydrates after harshest thermal treatment. Samples with sulphite and processed at lower temperature showed higher concentration of ethanol. However, no significant changes were verified in coconut water composition as a whole. Sulphite addition and the temperature processing to 136°C were effective to prevent the pinking and to maintain the levels of main organic compounds. PMID:27596412

  8. NMR spectroscopy, Hammett correlations and biological activity of some Schiff bases derived from piperonal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echevarria, Aurea [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Itaguai, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Nascimento, Maria da Graca; Geronimo, Vanilde [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Miller, Joseph [Paraiba Univ., Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Giesbrecht, Astrea [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas

    1999-07-01

    A series of eleven Schiff Bases have been synthesized. They were obtained by condensation of piperonal (3,4-methylenedioxybenzaldehyde) with the corresponding aromatic primary amines. Their {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C-NMR spectra have been obtained and the Hammett correlations including chemical shifts and the substituent constants ({sigma}{sub p}, {sigma}R e {sigma}I) were studied. Linear and bilinear significant correlations were observed for iminic carbon (C-{alpha}) and C-1{sup '}, showing a more significant resonance effect on chemical shifts. The chemical shifts for C-4{sup '} were highly affected by substituent effects, especially for halogens in the expected direction. Their biological activity against microorganisms has also been measured and significant activity was showed against Epidermophyton floccosum. The biological activity did not give a reasonable relationship with electronic effects. (author)

  9. NMR spectroscopy, Hammett correlations and biological activity of some Schiff bases derived from piperonal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of eleven Schiff Bases have been synthesized. They were obtained by condensation of piperonal (3,4-methylenedioxybenzaldehyde) with the corresponding aromatic primary amines. Their 1H and 13C-NMR spectra have been obtained and the Hammett correlations including chemical shifts and the substituent constants (σp, σR e σI) were studied. Linear and bilinear significant correlations were observed for iminic carbon (C-α) and C-1', showing a more significant resonance effect on chemical shifts. The chemical shifts for C-4' were highly affected by substituent effects, especially for halogens in the expected direction. Their biological activity against microorganisms has also been measured and significant activity was showed against Epidermophyton floccosum. The biological activity did not give a reasonable relationship with electronic effects. (author)

  10. Lanthanide-cyclodextrin complexes as probes for elucidating optical purity by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzel, T.J.; Bogyo, M.S.; Lebeau, E.L. (Bates College, Lewiston, ME (United States))

    1994-06-01

    A multidentate ligand is bonded to cyclodextrins by the reaction of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic dianhydride with 6-mono- and 2-mono(ethylenediamine) derivatives of cyclodextrin. Adding Dy(III) to the cyclodextrin derivatives enhances the enantiomeric resolution in the [sup 1]H NMR spectra of carbionoxamine maleate, doxylamine succinate, pheniramine maleate, propranolol hydrochloride, and tryptophan. The enhancement is more pronounced with the secondary derivative. The Dy(III)-induced shifts can be used to elucidate the geometry of cyclodextrin-substrate inclusion complexes. Lanthanide-induced shifts are reported for complexes of aspartame, tryptophan, propranolol, and 1-anilino-8-naphthalenesulfonate with cyclodextrins, and the relative magnitudes of the shifts agree with previously reported structures of the complexes. 37 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Molecular dynamics of neutral polymer bonding agent (NPBA) as revealed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Su, Yongchao; Zhou, Lei; Pang, Aimin; Cai, Rulin; Ma, Xingang; Li, Shenhui

    2014-01-22

    Neutral polymer bonding agent (NPBA) is one of the most promising polymeric materials, widely used in nitrate ester plasticized polyether (NEPE) propellant as bonding agent. The structure and dynamics of NPBA under different conditions of temperatures and sample processing are comprehensively investigated by solid state NMR (SSNMR). The results indicate that both the main chain and side chain of NPBA are quite rigid below its glass transition temperature (Tg). In contrast, above the Tg, the main chain remains relatively immobilized, while the side chains become highly flexible, which presumably weakens the interaction between bonding agent and the binder or oxidant fillers and in turn destabilizes the high modulus layer formed around the oxidant fillers. In addition, no obvious variation is found for the microstructure of NPBA upon aging treatment or soaking with acetone. These experimental results provide useful insights for understanding the structural properties of NPBA and its interaction with other constituents of solid composite propellants under different processing and working conditions.

  12. Quantitative analysis of cyclic dimer fatty acid content in the dimerization product by proton NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyun Joo; Kim, Minyoung; Seok, Seunghwan; Kim, Young-Wun; Kim, Do Hyun

    2015-01-01

    In this work, (1)H NMR is utilized for the quantitative analysis of a specific cyclic dimer fatty acid in a dimer acid mixture using the pseudo-standard material of mesitylene on the basis of its structural similarity. Mesitylene and cyclic dimer acid levels were determined using the signal of the proton on the cyclic ring (δ=6.8) referenced to the signal of maleic acid (δ=6.2). The content of the cyclic dimer fatty acid was successfully determined through the standard curve of mesitylene and the reported equation. Using the linearity of the mesitylene curve, the cyclic dimer fatty acid in the oil mixture was quantified. The results suggest that the proposed method can be used to quantify cyclic compounds in mixtures to optimize the dimerization process.

  13. Self-healing capacity of nuclear glass observed by NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Thibault; Martel, Laura; Mir, Anamul H.; Somers, Joseph; Jégou, Christophe; Peuget, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    Safe management of high level nuclear waste is a worldwide significant issue for which vitrification has been selected by many countries. There exists a crucial need for improving our understanding of the ageing of the glass under irradiation. While external irradiation by ions provides a rapid simulation of damage induced by alpha decays, short lived actinide doping is more representative of the reality. Here, we report radiological NMR experiments to compare the damage in International Simplified Glass (ISG) when irradiated by these two methods. In the 0.1 mole percent 244Cm doped glass, accumulation of high alpha decay only shows small modifications of the local structure, in sharp contrast to heavy ion irradiation. These results reveal the ability of the alpha particle to partially repair the damage generated by the heavy recoil nuclei highlighting the radiation resistance of nuclear glass and the difficulty to accurately simulate its behaviour by single ion beam irradiations.

  14. Measurement of Moments and Radii of Light Nuclei by Collinear Fast-Beam Laser Spectroscopy and $\\beta$-NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Marinova, K P

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear Moments and radii of light unstable isotopes are investigated by applying different high-sensitivity and high-resolution techniques based on collinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy. A study of nuclear structure in the sd shell is performed on neon isotopes in the extended chain of $^{17-28}$Ne, in particular on the proton-halo candidate $^{17}$Ne. Measurements of hyperfine structure and isotope shift have become possible by introducing an ultra-sensitive non-optical detection method which is based on optical pumping, state-selective collisional ionization and $\\beta$-activity counting. The small effect of nuclear radii on the optical isotope shifts of light elements requires very accurate measurements. The errors are dominated by uncertainties of the Doppler shifts which are conventionally determined from precisely measured acceleration voltages. These uncertainties are removed by measuring the beam energy with simultaneous excitation of two optical lines in parallel / antiparallel beam configuration. ...

  15. The secondary structure of echistatin from 1H-NMR, circular-dichroism and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saudek, V; Atkinson, R A; Lepage, P; Pelton, J T

    1991-12-01

    Detailed biophysical studies have been carried out on echistatin, a member of the disintegrin family of small, cysteine-rich, RGD-containing proteins, isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus. Analysis of circular-dichroism spectra indicates that, at 20 degrees C, echistatin contains no alpha-helix but contains mostly beta-turns and beta-sheet. Two isobestic points are observed as the temperature is raised, the conformational changes associated with that observed between 40 degrees C and 72 degrees C being irreversible. Raman spectra also indicate considerable beta-turn and beta-sheet (20%) structure and an absence of alpha-helical structure. Three of the four disulphide bridges are shown to be in an all-gauche conformation, while the fourth adopts a trans-gauche-gauche conformation. The 1H-NMR spectrum of echistatin has been almost fully assigned. A single conformation was observed at 27 degrees C with the four proline residues adopting only the trans conformation. A large number of backbone amide protons were found to exchange slowly, but no segments of the backbone were found to be in either alpha-helical or beta-sheet conformation. A number of turns could be characterised. An irregular beta-hairpin contains the RGD sequence in a mobile loop at its tip. Two of the four disulphide cross-links have been identified from the NMR spectra. The data presented in this paper will serve to define the structure of echistatin more closely in subsequent studies. PMID:1761037

  16. Differential Isotope Labeling Strategy for Determining the Structure of Myristoylated Recoverin by NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki [University of Tsukuba, Center for Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance and Institute of Applied Biochemistry (Japan); Ames, James B. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Neurobiology (United States); Kainosho, Masatsune [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Chemistry (Japan); Stryer, Lubert [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Neurobiology (United States); Ikura, Mitsuhiko [University of Tsukuba, Center for Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance and Institute of Applied Biochemistry (Japan)

    1998-02-15

    The three-dimensional solution structure of recombinant bovine myristoylated recoverin in the Ca2+-free state has been refined using an array of isotope-assisted multidimensional heteronuclear NMR techniques. In some experiments, the myristoyl group covalently attached to the protein N-terminus was labeled with 13C and the protein was unlabeled or vice versa; in others, both were 13C-labeled. This differential labeling strategy was essential for structural refinement and can be applied to other acylated proteins. Stereospecific assignments of 41 pairs of {beta}-methylene protons and 48 methyl groups of valine and leucine were included in the structure refinement. The refined structure was constructed using a total of 3679 experimental NMR restraints, comprising 3242 approximate interproton distance restraints (including 153 between the myristoyl group and the polypeptide), 140 distance restraints for 70 backbone hydrogen bonds, and 297 torsion angle restraints. The atomic rms deviations about the averaged minimized coordinate positions for the secondary structure region of the N-terminal and C-terminal domains are 0.44 {+-} 0.07 and 0.55 {+-} 0.18 A for backbone atoms, and 1.09 {+-} 0.07 and 1.10 {+-} 0.15 A for all heavy atoms, respectively. The refined structure allows for a detailed analysis of the myristoyl binding pocket. The myristoyl group is in a slightly bent conformation: the average distance between C1 and C14 atoms of the myristoyl group is 14.6 A. Hydrophobic residues Leu28, Trp31, and Tyr32 form a cluster that interacts with the front end of the myristoyl group (C1-C8), whereas residues Phe49, Phe56, Tyr86, Val87, and Leu90 interact with the tail end (C9-C14). The relatively deep hydrophobic pocket that binds the myristoyl group (C14:0) could also accommodate other naturally occurring acyl groups such as C12:0, C14:1, and C14:2 chains.

  17. Human calf muscular metabolism study with a home-made ergometer using 31P NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peynsaert, J.; Achten, E.; Claeys, E. [Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Rousseaux, M. [Ghent University Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Sport Medicine

    1995-12-01

    Phosphorus-31 NMR measurements were performed to examine the variations in the concentration of phosphate metabolites in calf muscle during exercise. Therefore, volunteers, installed in the supine position, were asked to push repetitively on the pedal of a home-made ergometer. The produced work and the changes in phosphorus containing metabolites were measured continuously. Correlations were made between the inorganic phosphate/phosphocreatine ratio and the cumulative work and between the intracellular pH and the cumulative work. The exercise protocol could be changed interactively with respect to the imposed initial pressure, the maximum pressure, the pressure increase per level and the time a certain level was held. The whole experiment could be graphically followed on-line. In the first stadium, the in vitro reproducibility of the ergometer was tested for different protocols. These tests revealed that, though the deviation in produced work was markedly the highest at high working pressures, the relative error never exceeded 3%. Consequently, the ex vitro reproducibility of the data was examined with the equipment placed in the scanner. Generally, same conclusions could be derived. In a next stage, the work will be synchronized with the biochemical data. Extreme precautions will be taken to examine each volunteer every time under the same physical and psychological conditions.

  18. Molecular Dynamics of Neutral Polymer Bonding Agent (NPBA as Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutral polymer bonding agent (NPBA is one of the most promising polymeric materials, widely used in nitrate ester plasticized polyether (NEPE propellant as bonding agent. The structure and dynamics of NPBA under different conditions of temperatures and sample processing are comprehensively investigated by solid state NMR (SSNMR. The results indicate that both the main chain and side chain of NPBA are quite rigid below its glass transition temperature (Tg. In contrast, above the Tg, the main chain remains relatively immobilized, while the side chains become highly flexible, which presumably weakens the interaction between bonding agent and the binder or oxidant fillers and in turn destabilizes the high modulus layer formed around the oxidant fillers. In addition, no obvious variation is found for the microstructure of NPBA upon aging treatment or soaking with acetone. These experimental results provide useful insights for understanding the structural properties of NPBA and its interaction with other constituents of solid composite propellants under different processing and working conditions.

  19. Escherichia coli Topoisomerase IV E Subunit and an Inhibitor Binding Mode Revealed by NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wong, Ying Lei; Ng, Fui Mee; Liu, Boping; Wong, Yun Xuan; Poh, Zhi Ying; Liu, Shuang; Then, Siew Wen; Lee, Michelle Yueqi; Ng, Hui Qi; Huang, Qiwei; Hung, Alvin W; Cherian, Joseph; Hill, Jeffrey; Keller, Thomas H; Kang, CongBao

    2016-08-19

    Bacterial topoisomerases are attractive antibacterial drug targets because of their importance in bacterial growth and low homology with other human topoisomerases. Structure-based drug design has been a proven approach of efficiently developing new antibiotics against these targets. Past studies have focused on developing lead compounds against the ATP binding pockets of both DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. A detailed understanding of the interactions between ligand and target in a solution state will provide valuable information for further developing drugs against topoisomerase IV targets. Here we describe a detailed characterization of a known potent inhibitor containing a 9H-pyrimido[4,5-b]indole scaffold against the N-terminal domain of the topoisomerase IV E subunit from Escherichia coli (eParE). Using a series of biophysical and biochemical experiments, it has been demonstrated that this inhibitor forms a tight complex with eParE. NMR studies revealed the exact protein residues responsible for inhibitor binding. Through comparative studies of two inhibitors of markedly varied potencies, it is hypothesized that gaining molecular interactions with residues in the α4 and residues close to the loop of β1-α2 and residues in the loop of β3-β4 might improve the inhibitor potency. PMID:27365392

  20. Solution structure of loperamide and -cyclodextrin inclusion complexes using NMR spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santosh Kumar Upadhyay; Syed Mashhood Ali

    2009-07-01

    Loperamide (LPR) is a synthetic, poorly water soluble, peripherally acting opiate agonist drug used for the treatment of diarrhea. Major challenges in formulating this drug for clinical applications include solubility enhancement and improved stability in biological systems. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are chiral, truncated cone shaped; cyclic oligosaccharides that can encapsulate a variety of poorly water soluble drug molecules into inclusion complexes, thereby increasing their stability and solubility. 1H NMR spectroscopic studies showed the inclusion complexation between -CD and LPR, based on the upfield shift changes in the -CD cavity protons (H-3' and H-5') and downfield shift changes in the guest (LPR) protons. 2D COSY spectral data was used for assignment of -CD as well as LPR protons and 2D ROESY spectral data to know the inclusion of LPR inside the -CD cavity. The 1 : 1 stoichiometry and overall association constant (a) were determined by using Scott’s plot method to be 68.805 M-1. 2D ROESY spectral data suggest that the inclusion of aromatic rings of LPR in -CD cavity can be from narrower as well as the wider rim side and the six possible 1 : 1 LPR : -CD inclusion complexes have been proposed. Thus, we anticipate that complexation of LPR with -CD would increase its solubility and stability in biological system.

  1. Metabolic profiling of vitamin C deficiency in Gulo-/- mice using proton NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggan, Gavin E. [University of Calgary, Biochemistry Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences (Canada); Joan Miller, B.; Jirik, Frank R. [University of Calgary, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health (Canada); Vogel, Hans J., E-mail: vogel@ucalgary.ca [University of Calgary, Biochemistry Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    Nutrient deficiencies are an ongoing problem in many populations and ascorbic acid is a key vitamin whose mild or acute absence leads to a number of conditions including the famously debilitating scurvy. As such, the biochemical effects of ascorbate deficiency merit ongoing scrutiny, and the Gulo knockout mouse provides a useful model for the metabolomic examination of vitamin C deficiency. Like humans, these animals are incapable of synthesizing ascorbic acid but with dietary supplements are otherwise healthy and grow normally. In this study, all vitamin C sources were removed after weaning from the diet of Gulo-/- mice (n = 7) and wild type controls (n = 7) for 12 weeks before collection of serum. A replicate study was performed with similar parameters but animals were harvested pre-symptomatically after 2-3 weeks. The serum concentration of 50 metabolites was determined by quantitative profiling of 1D proton NMR spectra. Multivariate statistical models were used to describe metabolic changes as compared to control animals; replicate study animals were used for external validation of the resulting models. The results of the study highlight the metabolites and pathways known to require ascorbate for proper flux.

  2. Metabolic profiling of vitamin C deficiency in Gulo−/− mice using proton NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutrient deficiencies are an ongoing problem in many populations and ascorbic acid is a key vitamin whose mild or acute absence leads to a number of conditions including the famously debilitating scurvy. As such, the biochemical effects of ascorbate deficiency merit ongoing scrutiny, and the Gulo knockout mouse provides a useful model for the metabolomic examination of vitamin C deficiency. Like humans, these animals are incapable of synthesizing ascorbic acid but with dietary supplements are otherwise healthy and grow normally. In this study, all vitamin C sources were removed after weaning from the diet of Gulo−/− mice (n = 7) and wild type controls (n = 7) for 12 weeks before collection of serum. A replicate study was performed with similar parameters but animals were harvested pre-symptomatically after 2–3 weeks. The serum concentration of 50 metabolites was determined by quantitative profiling of 1D proton NMR spectra. Multivariate statistical models were used to describe metabolic changes as compared to control animals; replicate study animals were used for external validation of the resulting models. The results of the study highlight the metabolites and pathways known to require ascorbate for proper flux.

  3. Human calf muscular metabolism study with a home-made ergometer using 31P NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphorus-31 NMR measurements were performed to examine the variations in the concentration of phosphate metabolites in calf muscle during exercise. Therefore, volunteers, installed in the supine position, were asked to push repetitively on the pedal of a home-made ergometer. The produced work and the changes in phosphorus containing metabolites were measured continuously. Correlations were made between the inorganic phosphate/phosphocreatine ratio and the cumulative work and between the intracellular pH and the cumulative work. The exercise protocol could be changed interactively with respect to the imposed initial pressure, the maximum pressure, the pressure increase per level and the time a certain level was held. The whole experiment could be graphically followed on-line. In the first stadium, the in vitro reproducibility of the ergometer was tested for different protocols. These tests revealed that, though the deviation in produced work was markedly the highest at high working pressures, the relative error never exceeded 3%. Consequently, the ex vitro reproducibility of the data was examined with the equipment placed in the scanner. Generally, same conclusions could be derived. In a next stage, the work will be synchronized with the biochemical data. Extreme precautions will be taken to examine each volunteer every time under the same physical and psychological conditions

  4. Investigations of Structure and Dynamics of Insulin Mutants using NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk Olsen, Helle

    såvel som den tertiære struktur i dette kemeområde er bevaret gennem hele serien af strukturer. Forskelle mellem struktureme findes primært i de terminale dele af B-kaden. Sammenlignet med strukturen af B16 His mutanten, som denne struktur ligner mest Helle Birk Olsen Insulin Structure i serien af......Nærværende ph.d. afhandling omhandler NMR (kerne magnetisk resonans) spektroskopiske undersøgelser af struktur og dynamik af en række mutanter af human insulin. Projektet blev udført som en erhvervsforskeruddannelse i et samarbejde mellem Novo Nordisk A/S, Roskilde Universitetscenter og Akademiet...... for de Teknisk Videnskaber (ATV). Den insulinkrzvende (Type 1) diabetes mellitus er karakteriseret ved en stærkt nedsat eller fraværende produktion af endogen insulin. Patienter med denne kroniske sygdom behandles med subkutane injektioner af insulinpræparater en eller flere gange dagligt...

  5. Chemical curing in alkyd paints: An evaluation via FT-IR and NMR spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolozzi, G.; Marchiafava, V.; Mirabello, V.; Peruzzini, M.; Picollo, M.

    2014-01-01

    A study aimed at determining the time necessary for an alkyd paint to attain chemical curing is presented. In particular, the object of our investigation was an oil paint made by Winsor & Newton, namely French ultramarine (PB29) in the Griffin Alkyd “fast drying oil colour” series. Using this paint, we prepared several mock-ups on glass. These were left in the laboratory at room temperature in a piece of furniture with glass doors for a total of 70 days. Samples were taken at different times, and the changes in their composition were monitored by means of FT-IR and multinuclear NMR spectroscopic analyses. Since the cross-linking reactions involved in the formation of the pictorial film mainly affect the amount of carbon-carbon double bonds, we monitored the decrease in allyl, diallyl and vinyl protons and carbons. The data obtained from the use of both techniques led us to conclude that, in our particular experimental conditions, the chemical curing of the paint layer is reached within the first 70 days, thus establishing the beginning of the ageing phenomena.

  6. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  7. NMR spectroscopy reveals unexpected structural variation at the protein-protein interface in MHC class I molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerbaum, Monika; Ballaschk, Martin; Erdmann, Natalja [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany); Schnick, Christina [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Immungenetik, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Diehl, Anne [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany); Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Immungenetik, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Schmieder, Peter, E-mail: schmieder@fmp-berlin.de [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    {beta}{sub 2}-Microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}m) is a small, monomorphic protein non-covalently bound to the heavy chain (HC) in polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Given the high evolutionary conservation of structural features of {beta}{sub 2}m in various MHC molecules as shown by X-ray crystallography, {beta}{sub 2}m is often considered as a mere scaffolding protein. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we investigate here whether {beta}{sub 2}m residues at the interface to the HC exhibit changes depending on HC polymorphisms and the peptides bound to the complex in solution. First we show that human {beta}{sub 2}m can effectively be produced in deuterated form using high-cell-density-fermentation and we employ the NMR resonance assignments obtained for triple-labeled {beta}{sub 2}m bound to the HLA-B*27:09 HC to examine the {beta}{sub 2}m-HC interface. We then proceed to compare the resonances of {beta}{sub 2}m in two minimally distinct subtypes, HLA-B*27:09 and HLA-B*27:05, that are differentially associated with the spondyloarthropathy Ankylosing Spondylitis. Each of these subtypes is complexed with four distinct peptides for which structural information is already available. We find that only the resonances at the {beta}{sub 2}m-HC interface show a variation of their chemical shifts between the different complexes. This indicates the existence of an unexpected plasticity that enables {beta}{sub 2}m to accommodate changes that depend on HC polymorphism as well as on the bound peptide through subtle structural variations of the protein-protein interface.

  8. Application of High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy to Define the Cell Uptake of MRI Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabi, Luisella; Alfieri, Goffredo; Biondi, Luca; De Miranda, Mario; Paleari, Lino; Ghelli, Stefano

    2002-06-01

    A new method, based on proton high-resolution magic-angle spinning ( 1H HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy, has been employed to study the cell uptake of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (MRI-CAs). The method was tested on human red blood cells (HRBC) and white blood cells (HWBC) by using three gadolinium complexes, widely used in diagnostics, Gd-BOPTA, Gd-DTPA, and Gd-DOTA, and the analogous complexes obtained by replacing Gd(III) with Dy(III), Nd(III), and Tb(III) (i.e., complexes isostructural to the ones of gadolinium but acting as shift agents). The method is based on the evaluation of the magnetic effects, line broadening, or induced lanthanide shift (LIS) caused by these complexes on NMR signals of intra- and extracellular water. Since magnetic effects are directly linked to permeability, this method is direct. In all the tests, these magnetic effects were detected for the extracellular water signal only, providing a direct proof that these complexes are not able to cross the cell membrane. Line broadening effects (i.e., the use of gadolinium complexes) only allow qualitative evaluations. On the contrary, LIS effects can be measured with high precision and they can be related to the concentration of the paramagnetic species in the cellular compartments. This is possible because the HR-MAS technique provides the complete elimination of bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) shift and the differentiation of extra- and intracellular water signals. Thus with this method, the rapid quantification of the MRI-CA amount inside and outside the cells is actually feasible.

  9. Determination of the Electron Self-Exchange Rates of Blue Copper Proteins by Super-WEFT NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Lixin; Philipp, Else Astrid; Led, Jens J.

    2001-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis plastocyanin, blue copper proteins, electron self-exchange rates, electron transfer, super-WEFT NMR......Anabaena variabilis plastocyanin, blue copper proteins, electron self-exchange rates, electron transfer, super-WEFT NMR...

  10. Excited States of Nucleic Acids Probed by Proton Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juen, Michael Andreas; Wunderlich, Christoph Hermann; Nußbaumer, Felix; Tollinger, Martin; Kontaxis, Georg; Konrat, Robert; Hansen, D Flemming; Kreutz, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    In this work an improved stable isotope labeling protocol for nucleic acids is introduced. The novel building blocks eliminate/minimize homonuclear (13) C and (1) H scalar couplings thus allowing proton relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments to report accurately on the chemical exchange of nucleic acids. Using site-specific (2) H and (13) C labeling, spin topologies are introduced into DNA and RNA that make (1) H relaxation dispersion experiments applicable in a straightforward manner. The novel RNA/DNA building blocks were successfully incorporated into two nucleic acids. The A-site RNA was previously shown to undergo a two site exchange process in the micro- to millisecond time regime. Using proton relaxation dispersion experiments the exchange parameters determined earlier could be recapitulated, thus validating the proposed approach. We further investigated the dynamics of the cTAR DNA, a DNA transcript that is involved in the viral replication cycle of HIV-1. Again, an exchange process could be characterized and quantified. This shows the general applicablility of the novel labeling scheme for (1) H RD experiments of nucleic acids. PMID:27533469

  11. Delineating the conformational flexibility of trisaccharides from NMR spectroscopy experiments and computer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingjun; Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault; Säwén, Elin; Jana, Madhurima; Widmalm, Göran; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2016-07-28

    The conformation of saccharides in solution is challenging to characterize in the context of a single well-defined three-dimensional structure. Instead, they are better represented by an ensemble of conformations associated with their structural diversity and flexibility. In this study, we delineate the conformational heterogeneity of five trisaccharides via a combination of experimental and computational techniques. Experimental NMR measurements target conformationally sensitive parameters, including J couplings and effective distances around the glycosidic linkages, while the computational simulations apply the well-calibrated additive CHARMM carbohydrate force field in combination with efficient enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulation methods. Analysis of conformational heterogeneity is performed based on sampling of discreet states as defined by dihedral angles, on root-mean-square differences of Cartesian coordinates and on the extent of volume sampled. Conformational clustering, based on the glycosidic linkage dihedral angles, shows that accounting for the full range of sampled conformations is required to reproduce the experimental data, emphasizing the utility of the molecular simulations in obtaining an atomic detailed description of the conformational properties of the saccharides. Results show the presence of differential conformational preferences as a function of primary sequence and glycosidic linkage types. Significant differences in conformational ensembles associated with the anomeric configuration of a single glycosidic linkage reinforce the impact of such changes on the conformational properties of carbohydrates. The present structural insights of the studied trisaccharides represent a foundation for understanding the range of conformations adopted in larger oligosaccharides and how these molecules encode their conformational heterogeneity into the monosaccharide sequence. PMID:27346493

  12. Characterization of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+} ATPase nucleotide binding domain mutants using NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myint, Wazo; Gong, Qingguo; Ahn, Jinwoo [Department of Structural Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3501 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Ishima, Rieko, E-mail: ishima@pitt.edu [Department of Structural Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3501 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Structural consequence by substitution mutations on the isolated SERCA-nucleotide binding (SERCA-N) domain was studied. {yields} The study fills a gap between the previous clinical, physiological, and biochemical data and the molecular basis of SERCA-N. {yields} The E412G mutation, known to be seen in patients with Darier's disease, was found to maintain the active conformation but exhibit reduced protein stability. -- Abstract: Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+} ATPase (SERCA) is essential for muscle function by transporting Ca{sup 2+} from the cytosol into the sarcoplasmic reticulum through ATP hydrolysis. In this report, the effects of substitution mutations on the isolated SERCA-nucleotide binding domain (SERCA-N) were studied using NMR. {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H HSQC spectra of substitution mutants at the nucleotide binding site, T441A, R560V, and C561A, showed chemical shift changes, primarily in residues adjacent to the mutation sites, indicating only local effects. Further, the patterns of chemical shift changes upon AMP-PNP binding to these mutants were similar to that of the wild type SERCA-N (WT). In contrast to these nucleotide binding site mutants, a mutant found in patients with Darier's disease, E412G, showed small but significant chemical shift changes throughout the protein and rapid precipitation. However, the AMP-PNP dissociation constant ({approx}2.5 mM) was similar to that of WT ({approx}3.8 mM). These results indicate that the E412G mutant retains its catalytic activity but most likely reduces its stability. Our findings provide molecular insight into previous clinical, physiological, and biochemical observations.

  13. Metabonomic signature analysis of cervical carcinoma and precancerous lesions in women by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasim, Ayshamgul; Ali, Mayinuer; Mamtimin, Batur; Ma, Jun-Qi; Li, Qiao-Zhi; Abudula, Abulizi

    2012-06-01

    (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics has been used to characterize the metabolic profiles of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). Principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were used to model the systematic variation related to patients with CIN or CSCC with healthy controls. Potential metabolic biomarkers were identified using database comparisons, and the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was used to examine the significance of the metabolites. Compared with plasma obtained from the healthy controls, plasma from patients with CIN had higher levels of very-low density lipoprotein (VLDL), acetone, unsaturated lipid and carnitine, together with lower levels of creatine, lactate, isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, glutamine, histidine, glycine, acetylcysteine, myo-inositol, choline and glycoprotein. Plasma from patients with CSCC had higher levels of acetate and formate, together with lower levels of creatine, lactate, isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, glutamine, histidine and tyrosine compared with the plasma of the healthy controls. In addition, compared with the plasma of patients with CIN, the plasma of CSCC patients had higher levels of acetate, formate, lactate, isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, glutamine, histidine, tyrosine, acetylcysteine, myo-inositol, glycoprotein, α-glucose and β-glucose, together with lower levels of acetone, unsaturated lipid and carnitine. Moreover, the profiles showed high feasibility and specificity by statistical analysis with OPLS-DA compared to the Thinprep cytology test (TCT) by setting the histopathological outcome as standard. The metabolic profile obtained for cervical cancer is significant, even for the precancerous disease. This suggests a systemic metabolic response to cancer, which may be used to identify potential early diagnostic biomarkers of the cancer and to establish

  14. Residue-specific membrane location of peptides and proteins using specifically and extensively deuterated lipids and {sup 13}C-{sup 2}H rotational-echo double-resonance solid-state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Li; Ghosh, Ujjayini; Schmick, Scott D.; Weliky, David P., E-mail: weliky@chemistry.msu.edu [Michigan State University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Residue-specific location of peptides in the hydrophobic core of membranes was examined using {sup 13}C-{sup 2}H REDOR and samples in which the lipids were selectively deuterated. The transmembrane topology of the KALP peptide was validated with this approach with substantial dephasing observed for deuteration in the bilayer center and reduced or no dephasing for deuteration closer to the headgroups. Insertion of {beta} sheet HIV and helical and {beta} sheet influenza virus fusion peptides into the hydrophobic core of the membrane was validated in samples with extensively deuterated lipids.

  15. Ionic-liquid-like local structure in $LiNO_3-Ca(NO_3)_2-H_2O$ as studied by ion and solvent nuclei NMR relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Matveev, Vladimir V; Lähderanta, Erkki

    2010-01-01

    Relaxation rates in the $13mLiNO_3-6,5mCa(NO_3)_2-H_2O$ ternary system have been measured for nuclei of water ($^1H$ and $^{17}O$), anion ($^{14}N$), and both cations ($^7Li$, $^{43}Ca$). The data analysis reveals the system structure as consisting of two main charged units: [Li(H$_2$O)$_4$]$^+$ and [Ca(NO$_3$)$_4$]$^{2-}$. Thus the system presents inorganic ionic liquid like structure.

  16. Use of diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy and HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR to identify undeclared synthetic drugs in medicines illegally sold as phytotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lorena M A; Filho, Elenilson G A; Thomasi, Sérgio S; Silva, Bianca F; Ferreira, Antonio G; Venâncio, Tiago

    2013-09-01

    The informal (and/or illegal) e-commerce of pharmaceutical formulations causes problems that governmental health agencies find hard to control, one of which concerns formulas sold as natural products. The purpose of this work was to explore the advantages and limitations of DOSY and HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR. These techniques were used to identify the components of a formula illegally marketed in Brazil as an herbal medicine possessing anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. DOSY was able to detect the major components present at higher concentrations. Complete characterization was achieved using HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR, and 1D and 2D NMR analyses enabled the identification of known synthetic drugs. These were ranitidine and a mixture of orphenadrine citrate, piroxicam, and dexamethasone, which are co-formulated in a remedy called Rheumazim that is used to relieve severe pain, but it is prohibited in Brazil because of a lack of sufficient pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information. PMID:23818305

  17. Use of diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy and HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR to identify undeclared synthetic drugs in medicines illegally sold as phytotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lorena M A; Filho, Elenilson G A; Thomasi, Sérgio S; Silva, Bianca F; Ferreira, Antonio G; Venâncio, Tiago

    2013-09-01

    The informal (and/or illegal) e-commerce of pharmaceutical formulations causes problems that governmental health agencies find hard to control, one of which concerns formulas sold as natural products. The purpose of this work was to explore the advantages and limitations of DOSY and HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR. These techniques were used to identify the components of a formula illegally marketed in Brazil as an herbal medicine possessing anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. DOSY was able to detect the major components present at higher concentrations. Complete characterization was achieved using HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR, and 1D and 2D NMR analyses enabled the identification of known synthetic drugs. These were ranitidine and a mixture of orphenadrine citrate, piroxicam, and dexamethasone, which are co-formulated in a remedy called Rheumazim that is used to relieve severe pain, but it is prohibited in Brazil because of a lack of sufficient pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information.

  18. NMR-MRI, μSR and Mössbauer Spectroscopies in Molecular Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Carretta, Pietro

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of molecular nanomagnets showing novel quantum effects, as the quantum tunneling of the magnetization, has brought to a renewed interest for the study of molecular magnetism and multifunctional molecular material. These materials have recently triggered an intense research activity in view of their possible applicabilities as, for example, as nanosized information storage units and as magnetic nanoparticles for bio-medicine. Several fundamental aspects of the microscopic static and dynamic properties of these molecular materials have been obtained by means of spectroscopies using local probes, as nuclei and muons. In this book an extensive overview on the results obtained during the last decade and on recent achievements in the study of molecular magnets by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Muon Spin Rotation, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Mossbauer techniques is presented. The aim is to introduce the reader to these techniques and to give a general background on their application to molecul...

  19. Alternate strategies to obtain mass balance without the use of radiolabeled compounds: application of quantitative fluorine (19F) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in metabolism studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlib, Abdul; Espina, Robert; Atherton, James; Wang, Jianyao; Talaat, Rasmy; Scatina, JoAnn; Chandrasekaran, Appavu

    2012-03-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is playing an increasingly important role in the quantitation of small and large molecules. Recently, we demonstrated that (1)H NMR could be used to quantitate drug metabolites isolated in submilligram quantities from biological sources. It was shown that these metabolites, once quantitated by NMR, were suitable to be used as reference standards in quantitative LC/MS-based assays, hence circumventing the need for radiolabeled material or synthetic standards to obtain plasma exposure estimates in humans and preclinical species. The quantitative capabilities of high-field NMR is further demonstrated in the current study by obtaining the mass balance of fluorinated compounds using (19)F-NMR. Two fluorinated compounds which were radio-labeled with carbon-14 on metabolically stable positions were dosed in rats and urine and feces collected. The mass balance of the compounds was obtained initially by counting the radioactivity present in each sample. Subsequently, the same sets of samples were analyzed by (19)F-NMR, and the concentrations determined by this method were compared with data obtained using radioactivity counting. It was shown that the two methods produced comparable values. To demonstrate the value of this analytical technique in drug discovery, a fluorinated compound was dosed intravenously in dogs and feces and urine collected. Initial profiling of samples showed that this compound was excreted mainly unchanged in feces, and hence, an estimate of mass balance was obtained using (19)F-NMR. The data obtained by this method was confirmed by additional quantitative studies using mass spectrometry. Hence cross-validations of the quantitative (19)F-NMR method by radioactivity counting and mass spectrometric analysis were demonstrated in this study. A strategy outlining the use of fluorinated compounds in conjunction with (19)F-NMR to understand their routes of excretion or mass balance in animals is proposed. These

  20. Self-assembling properties of porphyrinic photosensitizers and their effect on membrane interactions probed by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermathen, Martina; Marzorati, Mattia; Bigler, Peter

    2013-06-13

    Aggregation and membrane penetration of porphyrinic photosensitizers play crucial roles for their efficacy in photodynamic therapy. The current study was aimed at comparing the aggregation behavior of selected photosensitizers and correlating it with membrane affinity. Self-assembling properties of 15 amphiphilic free-base chlorin and porphyrin derivatives bearing carboxylate substituents were studied in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, making use of ring current induced aggregation shifts. All compounds exhibited aggregation in PBS to a different degree with dimers or oligomers showing slow aggregate growth over time. Aggregate structures were proposed on the basis of temperature dependent chemical shift changes. All chlorin compounds revealed similar aggregation maps with their hydrophobic sides overlapping and their carboxylate groups protruding toward the exterior. In contrast, for the porphyrin compounds, the carboxylate groups were located in overlapping regions. Membrane interactions were probed using 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayer vesicles and 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC) micelles as models. The chlorin derivatives had higher membrane affinity and were all monomerized by DHPC micelles as opposed to the porphyrin compounds. The observed differences were attributed to the different aggregate structures proposed for the chlorin and porphyrin derivatives. Free accessibility of the carboxylate groups seemed to promote initial surface interaction with phospholipid bilayers and micelles.

  1. Differentiation of Histidine Tautomeric States using 15N Selectively Filtered 13C Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-01-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all 13C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When 15N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the 13C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of 13C,15N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture. PMID:25026459

  2. Detection of Butter Adulteration with Lard by Employing (1)H-NMR Spectroscopy and Multivariate Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadzillah, Nurrulhidayah Ahmad; Man, Yaakob bin Che; Rohman, Abdul; Rosman, Arieff Salleh; Ismail, Amin; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Khatib, Alfi

    2015-01-01

    The authentication of food products from the presence of non-allowed components for certain religion like lard is very important. In this study, we used proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy for the analysis of butter adulterated with lard by simultaneously quantification of all proton bearing compounds, and consequently all relevant sample classes. Since the spectra obtained were too complex to be analyzed visually by the naked eyes, the classification of spectra was carried out.The multivariate calibration of partial least square (PLS) regression was used for modelling the relationship between actual value of lard and predicted value. The model yielded a highest regression coefficient (R(2)) of 0.998 and the lowest root mean square error calibration (RMSEC) of 0.0091% and root mean square error prediction (RMSEP) of 0.0090, respectively. Cross validation testing evaluates the predictive power of the model. PLS model was shown as good models as the intercept of R(2)Y and Q(2)Y were 0.0853 and -0.309, respectively.

  3. Absolute quantification of human liver metabolite concentrations by localized in vivo {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy in diffuse liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noren, Bengt; Wirell, Staffan; Smedby, Oerjan [Linkoeping University, Depatment of Radiology/IMV, Linkoeping (Sweden); Lundberg, Peter [Linkoeping University, Depatment of Radiology/IMV, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Department of Radiation Physics, Linkoeping (Sweden); Ressner, Marcus [Linkoeping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Linkoeping (Sweden); Almer, Sven [Linkoeping University, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology/IMK, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy using slice selection (DRESS) was used to investigate the absolute concentrations of metabolites in the human liver. Absolute concentrations provide more specific biochemical information compared to spectrum integral ratios. Nine patients with histopathologically proven diffuse liver disease and 12 healthy individuals were examined in a 1.5-T MR scanner (GE Signa LX Echospeed plus). The metabolite concentration quantification procedures included: (1) determination of optimal depth for the in vivo measurements, (2) mapping the detection coil characteristics, (3) calculation of selected slice and liver volume ratios using simple segmentation procedures and (4) spectral analysis in the time domain. The patients had significantly lower concentrations of phosphodiesters (PDE), 6.3{+-}3.9 mM, and ATP-{beta}, 3.6{+-}1.1 mM, (P<0.05) compared with the control group (10.0{+-}4.2 mM and 4.2{+-}0.3 mM, respectively). The concentrations of phosphomonoesters (PME) were higher in the patient group, although this was not significant. Constructing an anabolic charge (AC) based on absolute concentrations, [PME]/([PME] + [PDE]), the patients had a significantly larger AC than the control subjects, 0.29 vs. 0.16 (P<0.005). Absolute concentration measurements of phosphorus metabolites in the liver are feasible using a slice selective sequence, and the technique demonstrates significant differences between patients and healthy subjects. (orig.)

  4. Photodegradation of major soil microbial biomolecules is comparable to biodegradation: Insights from infrared and diffusion editing NMR spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Adrian; Kelleher, Brian P.

    2016-03-01

    As a primary decomposition process in terrestrial biosystems, biodegradation has been extensively studied with regard to its impact on soil organic matter transformation. However, the biotransformation of soil microbial biomass (a primary source of soil organic carbon) remains poorly understood, and even less is known about the fate of microbial-derived carbon under photodegradation. Here, we combine infrared and diffusion editing NMR spectroscopies to provide molecular-level information on the photodegradation of major biochemical components in soil microbial biomass and leachates over time. Results indicate a considerable enrichment in aliphatic components, presumably polymethylenic-C [(C-H2)n] and the simultaneous loss of carbohydrate and protein structures in the biomass. An immediate conclusion is that photodegradation increased the conversion of macromolecular carbohydrates and proteins to smaller components. However, further analysis reveals that macromolecular carbohydrates and proteins may be more resistant to photodegradation than initially thought and are found in the leachates. Although attenuated, there is also evidence to suggest that some aliphatic structures persist in the leachates. Overall, the photodegradation pathway reported here is remarkably similar to that of biodegradation, suggesting that under rapidly expanding anthropogenic land disturbances, photodegradation could be an important driver of the transformation of microbial-derived organic matter in terrestrial biosystems.

  5. Gender-specific metabolomic profiling of obesity in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Young Won

    Full Text Available Despite the numerous metabolic studies on obesity, gender bias in obesity has rarely been investigated. Here, we report the metabolomic analysis of obesity by using leptin-deficient ob/ob mice based on the gender. Metabolomic analyses of urine and serum from ob/ob mice compared with those from C57BL/6J lean mice, based on the (1H NMR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate statistical analysis, revealed clear metabolic differences between obese and lean mice. We also identified 48 urine and 22 serum metabolites that were statistically significantly altered in obese mice compared to lean controls. These metabolites are involved in amino acid metabolism (leucine, alanine, ariginine, lysine, and methionine, tricarbocylic acid cycle and glucose metabolism (pyruvate, citrate, glycolate, acetoacetate, and acetone, lipid metabolism (cholesterol and carnitine, creatine metabolism (creatine and creatinine, and gut-microbiome-derived metabolism (choline, TMAO, hippurate, p-cresol, isobutyrate, 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, methylamine, and trigonelline. Notably, our metabolomic studies showed distinct gender variations. The obese male mice metabolism was specifically associated with insulin signaling, whereas the obese female mice metabolism was associated with lipid metabolism. Taken together, our study identifies the biomarker signature for obesity in ob/ob mice and provides biochemical insights into the metabolic alteration in obesity based on gender.

  6. Biochemical characterization of blood plasma of coronary artery disease patients by in vitro high-resolution proton NMR spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anu Malik; Uma Sharma; R Lakshmy; Rajiv Narang; Naranamanglam R Jagannathan

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the biochemical profile of blood plasma of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and angiographically normal subjects (controls) to determine biomarkers for their differentiation. In this double blind study, 5 mL venous blood was drawn before angiography from CAD patients (n=60) and controls (n=13) comprising angiography normal individuals. In vitro high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of these blood plasma samples was carried out at 400 MHz, and intensity data were analysed with partial least square discriminant analysis. Categorization of subjects as controls or CAD patients and the patients further as single vessel disease (SVD), double vessel disease (DVD) and triple vessel disease (TVD) was done at the end of the study based on their angiography reports. Raised levels of lipids, alanine (Ala) and isoleucine/leucine/valine (Ile/Leu/Val) were observed in CAD patients compared with controls. Partial least square discriminant analysis showed separation between controls vs CAD patients. TVD patients showed increased levels of Ile/Leu/Val and Ala compared with controls and SVD. Alanine, Ile/Leu/Val, and LDL/VLDL appear as possible biomarkers for distinguishing between controls and patients with SVD and TVD. A metabolic adaptation of myocardium may play a role in raising the Ala level.

  7. Peach fruit: metabolic comparative analysis of two varieties with different resistances to insect attacks by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitani, Donatella; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Tomassini, Alberta; Sciubba, Fabio; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Mannina, Luisa; Delfini, Maurizio

    2013-02-27

    The metabolite profile of aqueous extracts of two peach varieties, Percoca Romagnola 7 and Flaminia, with different susceptibilities to Ceratitis capitata attack was investigated by means of 1D and 2D high-field NMR spectroscopy. Water-soluble metabolites belonging to different classes such as organic acids (citric, fumaric, malic, quinic, shikimic, and succinic acids), sugars (fucose, fructose, fructose-6-phosphate, glucose, glucose-6-phosphate, rhamnose, sucrose, and xylose), amino acids (alanine, asparagine, isoleucine, threonine, and valine) and other metabolites such as myo-inositol, choline, trigonelline, catechin, chlorogenic and neochlorogenic acids, orthophosphate, and α-l-glycerophosphorylcholine were identified. The metabolite profile together with a suitable statistical analysis was used to make a comparison between the two varieties. The levels of glucose, xylose, myo-inositol, choline, isoleucine, and valine were found to be higher in Flaminia than in Percoca Romagnola 7 samples, whereas the levels of fumaric acid, alanine, quinic acid, sucrose, fucose, and chlorogenic and neochlorogenic acid were found to be higher in Percoca Romagnola 7 than in Flaminia samples.

  8. Investigating sorption on iron-oxyhydroxide soil minerals by solid-state NMR spectroscopy: a 6Li MAS NMR study of adsorption and absorption on goethite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Paik, Younkee; Julmis, Keinia;

    2005-01-01

    H, the system representing an ideal model system for NMR studies. 6Li resonances with large hyperfine shifts (approximately 145 ppm) were observed above the goethite point of zero charge, providing clear evidence for the presence of Li-O-Fe connectivities, and thus the formation of an inner sphere Li+ complex...

  9. High-resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy of fish muscle, eggs and small whole fish via Hadamard-encoded intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghao Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy has become an important technique for tissue studies. Since tissues are in semisolid-state, their high-resolution (HR spectra cannot be obtained by conventional NMR spectroscopy. Because of this restriction, extraction and high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR MAS are widely applied for HR NMR spectra of tissues. However, both of the methods are subject to limitations. In this study, the feasibility of HR (1H NMR spectroscopy based on intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence (iMQC technique is explored using fish muscle, fish eggs, and a whole fish as examples. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Intact salmon muscle tissues, intact eggs from shishamo smelt and a whole fish (Siamese algae eater are studied by using conventional 1D one-pulse sequence, Hadamard-encoded iMQC sequence, and HR MAS. RESULTS: When we use the conventional 1D one-pulse sequence, hardly any useful spectral information can be obtained due to the severe field inhomogeneity. By contrast, HR NMR spectra can be obtained in a short period of time by using the Hadamard-encoded iMQC method without shimming. Most signals from fatty acids and small metabolites can be observed. Compared to HR MAS, the iMQC method is non-invasive, but the resolution and the sensitivity of resulting spectra are not as high as those of HR MAS spectra. CONCLUSION: Due to the immunity to field inhomogeneity, the iMQC technique can be a proper supplement to HR MAS, and it provides an alternative for the investigation in cases with field distortions and with samples unsuitable for spinning. The acquisition time of the proposed method is greatly reduced by introduction of the Hadamard-encoded technique, in comparison with that of conventional iMQC method.

  10. Mapping the Binding Site of P53 on UBC9 by NMR Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN,Dong-Hai(林东海)

    2002-01-01

    Human UBC9 is a member of the E2 family of proteins. However, instead of conjugating to ubiquitin, it conjugates to a ubiquitin homologue SUMO-1 (also known as UBL1, GMP1,SMTP3, PICT-1 and sentrin). The SUMO-1 conjugation pathway is very similar to that of ubiquitin with regard to the primary sequences of the ubiquitin activating enzymes (E1), the three-dimensional structures of the ubiquitin conjugating enzymes (E2), and the chemistry of the overall conjugation pathway. The interaction of p53 and UBC9, the E2 of the SUMO-1 pathway, has been studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A peptide corresponding to the nuclear localization domain of p53 specifically interacts with UBC9 and this interaction is likely to be important for conjugation of p53 with SUMO-1. The largest chenical shift changes on UBC9 occur at residues 94 and 129-135. Tnis region is adjacent to the active site and has significant dynamic behavior on the μs-ms and ps-ns timescales. Correlation of chemical shift changes and mobility of these residues further suggest the importance of these residues in substrate recognition.

  11. Mapping the Binding Site of P53 on UBC9 by NMR Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林东海

    2002-01-01

    Human UBCP9 is a member of the E2 family of proteins.However,instead of conjugating to ubiquitin,it conjugates to a ubiquitin bomologue SUMO-1(also known as UBL1,GMP1,SMTP3,PICT-1 and sentrin).The SUMO-1 conjugation pathway is very similar to that of ubiquin with regard to the primary sequences of the ubiquitin activating enzymes(E1),the three-dimensional structures of the ubiquitin conjugating enzymes(E2),and the chemistry of the overall conjugation pathway.The interactiov of p53 and UBC9,the E2 of the SUMO-1 pathway,has heen studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.A peptide corresponding to the nuclear localization domain of p53 specifically interacts with UBC9 and this interaction is likely to be important for conjugation of p53 with SUMO-1.The largest chemical shift changes on UBC9 occur at residues94 and 129-135.This region is adjacent to the active site and has slgniflcant dynamic behavior on the μs-ms and ps-ns timescales.Correlation of chemical shift changes and mobility of these residues further suggest the importance of these residues in substrate recognition.

  12. High-resolution solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy of the paramagnetic metal-organic frameworks, STAM-1 and HKUST-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Daniel M; Jamieson, Lauren E; Mohideen, M Infas H; McKinlay, Alistair C; Smellie, Iain A; Cadou, Romain; Keddie, Neil S; Morris, Russell E; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2013-01-21

    Solid-state (13)C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is used to investigate the structure of the Cu(II)-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), HKUST-1 and STAM-1, and the structural changes occurring within these MOFs upon activation (dehydration). NMR spectroscopy is an attractive technique for the investigation of these materials, owing to its high sensitivity to local structure, without any requirement for longer-range order. However, interactions between nuclei and unpaired electrons in paramagnetic systems (e.g., Cu(II)-based MOFs) pose a considerable challenge, not only for spectral acquisition, but also in the assignment and interpretation of the spectral resonances. Here, we exploit the rapid T(1) relaxation of these materials to obtain (13)C NMR spectra using a spin-echo pulse sequence at natural abundance levels, and employ frequency-stepped acquisition to ensure uniform excitation of resonances over a wide frequency range. We then utilise selective (13)C isotopic labelling of the organic linker molecules to enable an unambiguous assignment of NMR spectra of both MOFs for the first time. We show that the monomethylated linker can be recovered from STAM-1 intact, demonstrating not only the interesting use of this MOF as a protecting group, but also the ability (for both STAM-1 and HKUST-1) to recover isotopically-enriched linkers, thereby reducing significantly the overall cost of the approach.

  13. Chemical composition of the essential oil from Corsican Mentha aquatica--combined analysis by GC(RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutour, Sylvain; Tomi, Félix; Bradesi, Pascale; Casanova, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    The essential oil (EO) of M. aquatica L. growing wild in Corsica was isolated by dry vapor distillation and submitted to combined analysis by column chromatography over silica gel, GC(RI), GC-MS and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The composition was dominated byoxygenated monoterpenes and characterized by the occurrence of menthofuran (50.7%) as the major component. In parallel, seven laboratory-distilled oil samples isolated from individual plants collected in Corsica were analyzed by GC(RI) and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Onlyquantitative differences were observed between the samples. Beside the usual terpenes, various p-menthane lactones (mintlactone, isomintlactone, hydroxymintlactone, menthofurolactone and epimenthofurolactone) have been identified in all the oil samples.

  14. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  15. Compact NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  16. In Situ Determination of Tacticity, Deactivation, and Kinetics in [rac-(C2H4(1-Indenyl)2)ZrMe][B(C6F5)4] and [Cp2ZrMe][B(C6F5)4]-Catalyzed Polymerization of 1-Hexene Using (13)C Hyperpolarized NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hsiu; Shih, Wei-Chun; Hilty, Christian

    2015-06-01

    The stereochemistry, kinetics, and mechanism of olefin polymerization catalyzed by a set of zirconium-based metallocenes was studied by NMR using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Hyperpolarized 1-hexene was polymerized in situ with a C2 symmetric catalyst, [(EBI)ZrMe][B(C6F5)4] (EBI = rac-(C2H4(1-indenyl)2)), and a C2v symmetric catalyst, [(Cp)2ZrMe][B(C6F5)4] (Cp = cyclopentadienyl). Hyperpolarized (13)C NMR spectra were used to characterize product tacticity following initiation of the reaction. At the same time, a signal gain of 3 orders of magnitude from (13)C hyperpolarization enabled the real time observation of catalyst-polymeryl species and deactivation products, such as vinylidene and a Zr-allyl complex. The compounds appearing in the reaction provide evidence for the existence of β-hydride elimination and formation of a dormant site via a methane-generating mechanism. The presence of a deactivating mechanism was incorporated in a model used to determine kinetic parameters of the reaction. On this basis, rate constants were measured between 0.8 and 6.7 mol % of catalyst. The concentration dependence of the rate constants obtained indicates a second-order process for polymerization concomitant with a first-order process for deactivation. The simultaneous observation of both processes in the time evolution of (13)C NMR signals over the course of several seconds underlines the utility of hyperpolarized NMR for quantifying early events in polymerization reactions. PMID:25961793

  17. Optical absorption, 31P NMR, and photoluminescence spectroscopy study of copper and tin co-doped barium–phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optical and structural properties of 50P2O5:50BaO glasses prepared by melting have been investigated for additive concentrations of 10 and 1 mol% of CuO and SnO dopants. Absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopies were employed in the optical characterization, whereas structural properties were assessed by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Residual Cu2+ was detectable by absorption spectroscopy for the highest concentration of CuO and SnO. More prominently, the optical data suggests contributions from both twofold-coordinated Sn centers and Cu+ ions to light absorption and emission in the glasses. The luminescence depends strongly on excitation wavelength for the highest concentration of dopants where a blue–white emission is observed under short-wavelength excitation (e.g., 260 nm) largely due to tin, while an orange luminescence is exhibited for longer excitation wavelengths (e.g., 360 nm) essentially due to Cu+ ions. On the other hand, dissimilar luminescent properties were observed in connection to Cu+ ions for the lowest concentration studied, as the copper ions were preferentially excited in a narrower range at shorter wavelengths near tin centers absorption. The structural analyses revealed the glass matrix to be composed essentially of Q2 (two bridging oxygens) and Q1 (one bridging oxygen) phosphate tetrahedra. A slight increase in the Q1/Q2 ratio reflected upon SnO doping alone suggests a major incorporation of tin into the glass network via P–O–Sn bonds, compatible with the 2-coordinated state attributed to the luminescent Sn centers. However, a significant increase in the Q1/Q2 ratio was indicated with the incorporation of copper at the highest concentration, consistent with a key role of the metal ions as network modifiers. Thus, the change in Cu+ optical properties concurs with different distributions of local environments around the ions induced by variation in metal ion concentration. Luminescence decay curve

  18. Direct one step preparation and 13 C-NMR spectroscopy characterization of α-ferrocenyl carbocations derived from ferrocene and carbonyl compounds in trifluoroacetic acid medium1a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactions of aldehydes and ketones with ferrocene, in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid, afforded a series of stable long lived αferrocenylalkyl carbocations which were characterized by 13 C-NMR spectroscopy. When this reactions was attempted using tetraphenyl cyclopentadienone quite unexpectedly corresponding dihydro derivative 3 was isolated, in very good yield. Formation of this compound may require ferrocene acting as a reducing agent. (author)

  19. Local environment and composition of magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides determined from solid-state 1H and 71Ga NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Line B.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Zorin, Vadim; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2014-11-01

    Ordering of gallium(III) in a series of magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides (LDH’s), [Mg1-xGax(OH)2(NO3)x yH2O], was determined using solid-state 1H and 71Ga NMR spectroscopy. Depletion of Ga in these LDH’s is demonstrated to be the result of soluble [Ga(OH)4]-complexes formed during synthesis.

  20. High field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter from the South Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hertkorn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Non target high resolution organic structural spectroscopy of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM isolated on 27 November 2008 by means of solid phase extraction (SPE from four different depths in the South Atlantic Ocean off the Angola coast (3.1° E; −17.7° S; Angola basin provided molecular level information of complex unknowns with unprecedented coverage and resolution. The sampling was intended to represent major characteristic oceanic regimes of general significance: 5 m (FISH; near surface photic zone, 48 m (FMAX; fluorescence maximum, 200 m (upper mesopelagic zone and 5446 m (30 m above ground.

    800 MHz proton (1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR 1H NMR, spectra were least affected by fast and differential transverse NMR relaxation and produced at first similar looking, rather smooth bulk NMR envelopes reflecting intrinsic averaging from massive signal overlap. Visibly resolved NMR signatures were most abundant in surface DOM but contributed at most a few percent to the total 1H NMR integral and were mainly limited to unsaturated and singly oxygenated carbon chemical environments. The relative abundance and variance of resolved signatures between samples was maximal in the aromatic region; in particular, the aromatic resolved NMR signature of the deep ocean sample at 5446 m was considerably different from that of all other samples. When scaled to equal total NMR integral, 1H NMR spectra of the four marine DOM samples revealed considerable variance in abundance for all major chemical environments across the entire range of chemical shift. Abundance of singly oxygenated CH units and acetate derivatives declined from surface to depth whereas aliphatics and carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM derived molecules increased in abundance. Surface DOM contained a remarkably lesser abundance of methyl esters than all other marine DOM, likely a consequence of photodegradation from direct

  1. The 'Nuts and Bolts' of 13C NMR Spectroscopy at Elevated-Pressures and -Temperatures for Monitoring In Situ CO2 Conversion to Metal Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. K.; Surface, J. A.; Skemer, P. A.; Conradi, M. S.; Hayes, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    characterization of multiple metastable mineral phases in pure forms and in mixtures. Notably, NMR spectroscopy is able to observe signals from amorphous materials, and mixtures of both crystalline and amorphous species can be analyzed. NMR results are verified through a combination of Raman spectroscopy and powder XRD (of crystalline species). Further, we have examined the effects on mineralization reactions of pH gradients in the sample--also monitored in situ by NMR--and these results will be presented. Reference: 'In Situ Measurement of Magnesium Carbonate Formation from CO2 Using Static High-Pressure and -Temperature 13C NMR' J. Andrew Surface, Philip Skemer, Sophia E. Hayes, and Mark S. Conradi, Environ. Sci. Technol. 2013, 47, 119-125. DOI: 10.1021/es301287n

  2. Measurement of lipid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris via flow cytometry and liquid-state ¹H NMR spectroscopy for development of an NMR-traceable flow cytometry protocol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Bono

    Full Text Available In this study, we cultured Chlorella vulgaris cells with a range of lipid contents, induced via nitrogen starvation, and characterized them via flow cytometry, with BODIPY 505/515 as a fluorescent lipid label, and liquid-state 1H NMR spectroscopy. In doing so, we demonstrate the utility of calibrating flow cytometric measurements of algal lipid content using triacylglyceride (TAG, also known as triacylglycerol or triglyceride content per cell as measured via quantitative 1H NMR. Ensemble-averaged fluorescence of BODIPY-labeled cells was highly correlated with average TAG content per cell measured by bulk NMR, with a linear regression yielding a linear fit with r2 = 0.9974. This correlation compares favorably to previous calibrations of flow cytometry protocols to lipid content measured via extraction, and calibration by NMR avoids the time and complexity that is generally required for lipid quantitation via extraction. Flow cytometry calibrated to a direct measurement of TAG content can be used to investigate the distribution of lipid contents for cells within a culture. Our flow cytometry measurements showed that Chlorella vulgaris cells subjected to nitrogen limitation exhibited higher mean lipid content but a wider distribution of lipid content that overlapped the relatively narrow distribution of lipid content for replete cells, suggesting that nitrogen limitation induces lipid accumulation in only a subset of cells. Calibration of flow cytometry protocols using direct in situ measurement of TAG content via NMR will facilitate rapid development of more precise flow cytometry protocols, enabling investigation of algal lipid accumulation for development of more productive algal biofuel feedstocks and cultivation protocols.

  3. NMR studies of metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyan; Sun, Hongzhe

    2012-01-01

    Metalloproteins represent a large share of the proteomes, with the intrinsic metal ions providing catalytic, regulatory, and structural roles critical to protein functions. Structural characterization of metalloproteins and identification of metal coordination features including numbers and types of ligands and metal-ligand geometry, and mapping the structural and dynamic changes upon metal binding are significant for understanding biological functions of metalloproteins. NMR spectroscopy has long been used as an invaluable tool for structure and dynamic studies of macromolecules. Here we focus on the application of NMR spectroscopy in characterization of metalloproteins, including structural studies and identification of metal coordination spheres by hetero-/homo-nuclear metal NMR spectroscopy. Paramagnetic NMR as well as (13)C directly detected protonless NMR spectroscopy will also be addressed for application to paramagnetic metalloproteins. Moreover, these techniques offer great potential for studies of other non-metal binding macromolecules.

  4. From Traditional Resource to Global Commodities:-A Comparison of Rhodiola Species Using NMR Spectroscopy-Metabolomics and HPTLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Anthony; Zhai, Lixiang; Gkouva, Christina; Li, Shuyuan; Heinrich, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The fast developing international trade of products based on traditional knowledge and their value chains has become an important aspect of the ethnopharmacological debate. The structure and diversity of value chains and their impact on the phytochemical composition of herbal medicinal products, as well as the underlying government policies and regulations, have been overlooked in the debate about quality problems in transnational trade. Rhodiola species, including Rhodiola rosea L. and Rhodiola crenulata (Hook. f. & Thomson) H. Ohba, are used as traditional herbal medicines. Faced with resource depletion and environment destruction, R. rosea and R. crenulata are becoming endangered, making them more economically valuable to collectors and middlemen, and also increasing the risk of adulteration and low quality. Rhodiola products have been subject to adulteration and we recently assessed 39 commercial products for their composition and quality. However, the range of Rhodiola species potentially implicated has not been assessed. Also, the ability of selected analytical techniques in differentiating these species is not known yet. Using a strategy previously developed by our group, we compare the phytochemical differences among Rhodiola raw materials available on the market to provide a practical method for the identification of different Rhodiola species from Europe and Asia and the detection of potential adulterants. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis software and high performance thin layer chromatography techniques were used to analyse the samples. Rosavin and rosarin were mainly present in R. rosea but also in Rosea sachalinensis Borris. 30% of the Rhodiola samples purchased from the Chinese market were adulterated by other Rhodiola spp. The utilization of a combined platform based on (1)H-NMR and HPTLC methods resulted in an integrated analysis of different Rhodiola species. We identified adulteration at the earliest stage

  5. Conformational studies on 2-substituted ethanesulfonates in aqueous solution by 1H NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2009-09-01

    The conformation of some 2-substituted sodium ethanesulfonates exerting biological functions, XCH 2CH 2SO 3Na (X = S -, Br, Cl, OH, NH 2, SH), has been investigated in aqueous solution by 1H NMR spectroscopy. Potential energy curves for rotation about the C-C bond have been calculated at DFT level of theory (B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p)) in vacuum and in water (by IEF-PCM method). As concerning dianionic coenzyme M (X = S -), 2-bromo- and 2-chloroethanesulfonate, in vacuum the torsional potential curves and the variations of atomic charges and geometric parameters suggest that electrostatic and steric repulsions between the substituent X and -SO3- moiety determine the preference for anti conformer. In isethionate (X = OH), anionic taurine (X = NH 2), and coenzyme M (X = SH), the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond stabilizes also gauche-like conformers and the torsional potential curves exhibit two minima. According to Natural Bond Orbital analysis, hydrogen bond can be ascribed to electron transfer from two oxygen lone-pairs of the -SO3- moiety to the antibonding Y-H orbital of the substituent X. In all the compounds examined, hyperconjugative interactions tend to stabilize the gauche conformers with respect to the anti one. This means that conformational preferences in vacuum are determined by a counterbalancing of electrostatic, steric, and hyperconjugative interactions. Calculations in vacuum are not in agreement with the experimental conformational behaviour of the compounds examined. In order to reproduce the experimental results at least qualitatively, solvent effect must be introduced.

  6. Exploring abiotic stress on asynchronous protein metabolism in single kernels of wheat studied by NMR spectroscopy and chemometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winning, H.; Viereck, N.; Wollenweber, B.;

    2009-01-01

    at the vegetative growth stage had little effect on the parameters investigated. For the first time, H-1 HR-MAS NMR spectra of grains taken during grain-filling were analysed by an advanced multiway model. In addition to the results from the chemical protein analysis and the H-1 HR-MAS NMR spectra of single kernels...

  7. Decrease in brain choline-containing compounds following a short period of global ischemia in gerbils as detected by 1H NMR spectroscopy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhmonen, J; Sivenius, J; Riekkinen, P J; Kauppinen, R A

    1994-08-01

    Cerebral metabolism was studied in the postischaemic gerbil brain using surface coil 31P and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The ratio of choline-containing compounds (Cho) to total creatine (Cr) in the brain decreased from 0.46 +/- 0.02 to 0.32 +/- 0.02 by the fifth day following exposure to 5 min of global ischaemia and it remained at this low level for at least 19 days. The amounts of cerebral Cho as quantified by 1H NMR in vivo were 1.70 +/- 0.15 and 1.09 +/- 0.22 mmol/kg in control and postischaemic animals, respectively. The T2 of Cho was longer in the postischaemic cerebral cortex than in the control one. N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) as determined by 1H NMR in vivo did not differ in the two animal groups. High-resolution 1H NMR of acid-extracted brain cortices showed a decrease in total Cho (glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine and choline) by 31%, but no changes in NAA, total creatine, taurine and myo-inositol, in the brain cortex seven days postischaemia relative to control animals. The decrease in acid extractable Cho was mainly due to the drop in glycerophosphocholine concentration. 31P NMR indicated normal energy state and phosphomonoester/phosphocreatine (PCr) and phosphodiester/PCr ratios in the in vivo brain 7 days postischaemia. Silver impregnation did not reveal neuronal degeneration but immunohistochemical staining showed a number of glial fibrillary acidic protein expressing astrocytes as indicators of reactive gliosis in the postischaemic cerebral cortex. These data show, for the first time, that a 1H NMR decrease in Cho metabolites takes place as a consequence of brief ischaemic episode even in the absence of obvious neuronal degeneration. PMID:7848813

  8. Structure and Two-dimensional Correlation Infrared Spectroscopy Study of a New One-dimensional Chain Compound:(4,4'-Hbpy)3[NaMo8O26] (4,4'-bpy)2(H2O)4 (bpy = Bipydine)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yi-Ping; ZHANG Han-Hui; KE Da-Mei; SHEN Xiao-Min; HUANG Chang-Cang; SUN Rui-Qing

    2005-01-01

    A novel compound, (4,4'-Hbpy)3[NaMo8O26](4,4'-bpy)2(H2O)4 1 (bpy = bipydine),was synthesized by the hydrothermal method. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction shows that compound 1 belongs to the monoclinic system, space group C2/m with a = 19.1921(5), b = 18.6931(6), c = 9.3821 (3) (A), β = 104.8020(11)°, V = 3254.22(17) (A)3, C50H51Mo8N10NaO30, Mr = 2062.52, Z = 2,F(000) = 2016,μ = 1.591 mm- 1 and Dc = 2.105 g/cm3. The final R = 0.0283 and wR = 0.0912 for 3118 observed reflections (I > 2σ(Ⅰ)). Compound 1 contains the β-[Mo8O26]4- anion, sodium ion, 4,4'-bpy and lattice crystalline water molecules. The β-[Mo8O26] units link the sodium ion to form a chain structure. The infinitechains of [Na(Mo8O26)]3- blocks are surrounded by protonized 4,4'-bpy cations,4,4'-bpy and lattice crystalline water molecules. The 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy study indicates that the stretching vibrations of Mo=O occur more preferentially due to the thermal effect. The TGA analysis shows that compound 1 has high thermal stability.

  9. Calculation of average molecular parameters, functional groups, and a surrogate molecule for heavy fuel oils using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2016-04-22

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) is primarily used as fuel in marine engines and in boilers to generate electricity. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a powerful analytical tool for structure elucidation and in this study, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy were used for the structural characterization of 2 HFO samples. The NMR data was combined with elemental analysis and average molecular weight to quantify average molecular parameters (AMPs), such as the number of paraffinic carbons, naphthenic carbons, aromatic hydrogens, olefinic hydrogens, etc. in the HFO samples. Recent formulae published in the literature were used for calculating various derived AMPs like aromaticity factor 〖(f〗_a), C/H ratio, average paraffinic chain length (¯n), naphthenic ring number 〖(R〗_N), aromatic ring number〖 (R〗_A), total ring number〖 (R〗_T), aromatic condensation index (φ) and aromatic condensation degree (Ω). These derived AMPs help in understanding the overall structure of the fuel. A total of 19 functional groups were defined to represent the HFO samples, and their respective concentrations were calculated by formulating balance equations that equate the concentration of the functional groups with the concentration of the AMPs. Heteroatoms like sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen were also included in the functional groups. Surrogate molecules were finally constructed to represent the average structure of the molecules present in the HFO samples. This surrogate molecule can be used for property estimation of the HFO samples and also serve as a surrogate to represent the molecular structure for use in kinetic studies.

  10. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolism. Applications of proton and 13C NMR to the study of glutamate metabolism in cultured glial cells and human brain in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portais, J C; Pianet, I; Allard, M; Merle, M; Raffard, G; Kien, P; Biran, M; Labouesse, J; Caille, J M; Canioni, P

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism of cells from the central nervous system both in vitro on perchloric acid extracts obtained either from cultured tumoral cells (C6 rat glioma) or rat astrocytes in primary culture, and in vivo within the human brain. Analysis of carbon 13 NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts prepared from cultured cells in the presence of NMR [1-13C] glucose as substrate allowed determination of the glutamate and glutamine enrichments in both normal and tumoral cells. Preliminary results indicated large changes in the metabolism of these amino acids (and also of aspartate and alanine) in the C6 cell as compared to its normal counterpart. Localized proton NMR spectra of the human brain in vivo were obtained at 1.5 T, in order to evaluate the content of various metabolites, including glutamate, in peritumoral edema from a selected volume of 2 x 2 x 2 cm3. N-acetyl aspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine, creatine, choline and inositol derivative resonances were observed in 15 min spectra. N-acetyl-aspartate was found to be at a lower level in contrast to glutamate which was detected at a higher level in the injured area as compared to the contralateral unaffected side. PMID:1674432

  11. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolism. Applications of proton and sup 13 C NMR to the study of glutamate metabolism in cultured glial cells and human brain in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portais, J.C.; Pianet, I.; Merle, M.; Raffard, G.; Biran, M.; Labouesse, J.; Canioni, P. (Bordeaux-2 Univ., 33 (FR)); Allard, M.; Kien, P.; Caille, J.M. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 33 Bordeaux (FR))

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism of cells from the central nervous system both in vitro on perchloric acid extracts obtained either from cultured tumoral cells (C6 rat glioma) or rat astrocytes in primary culture, and in vivo within the human brain. Analysis of carbon 13 NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts prepared from cultured cells in the presence of NMR (1-{sup 13}C) glucose as substrate allowed determination of the glutamate and glutamine enrichments in both normal and tumoral cells. Preliminary results indicated large changes in the metabolism of these amino acids (and also of aspartate and alanine) in the C6 cell as compared to its normal counterpart. Localized proton NMR spectra of the human brain in vivo were obtained at 1.5 T, in order to evaluate the content of various metabolites, including glutamate, in peritumoral edema from a selected volume of 2 x 2 x 2 cm{sup 3}. N-acetyl aspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine, creatine, choline and inositol derivative resonances were observed in 15 min spectra. N-acetyl-aspartate was found to be at a lower level in contrast to glutamate which was detected at a higher level in the injured area as compared to the controlateral unaffected side.

  12. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ∼57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin

  13. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wenxing; Bhatt, Avni [University of Florida, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine (United States); Smith, Adam N. [University of Florida, Department of Chemistry, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (United States); Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine, E-mail: jbrady@dental.ufl.edu [University of Florida, Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry (United States); Long, Joanna R., E-mail: jrlong@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ∼57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin.

  14. In situ NMR spectroscopy: inulin biomass conversion in ZnCl₂ molten salt hydrate medium-SnCl₄ addition controls product distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingxiong; Pedersen, Christian Marcus; Qiao, Yan; Deng, Tiansheng; Shi, Jing; Hou, Xianglin

    2015-01-22

    The dehydration of inulin biomass to the platform chemicals, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) and levulinic acid (LA), in ZnCl2 molten salt hydrate medium was investigated. The influence of the Lewis acid catalyst, SnCl4, on the product distribution was examined. An in situ(1)H NMR technique was employed to follow the reaction at the molecular level. The experimental results revealed that only 5-HMF was obtained from degradation of inulin biomass in ZnCl2 molten salt hydrate medium, while the LA was gradually becoming the main product when the reaction temperature was increased in the presence of the Lewis acid catalyst SnCl4. In situ NMR spectroscopy could monitor the reaction and give valuable insight.

  15. Analysing the effects of frozen storage and processing on the metabolite profile of raw mullet roes using ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Cristina; Scano, Paola; Locci, Emanuela; Sanna, Roberta; Marincola, Flaminia Cesare

    2014-09-15

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate changes in the low molecular weight metabolic profile of raw mullet (Mugil spp.) roes during frozen storage and upon processing. NMR data were analysed by Principal Component Analyses (PCA). In the model constructed using frozen roes, no statistical significant metabolic modifications were observed in the first six months of storage, while choline derivatives, dimethylamine, lactate, and most of the free amino acids were identified as changing with statistical significance (p<0.05) in response to frozen storage time of twelve months. The PCA model comparing the metabolic profiles of roes before and after processing showed that the major modifications occurring upon manufacturing were the increase of the choline derivative compounds, uracil, and free amino acids, and a large decrease of taurine, glucose, lactate, and creatine/phosphocreatine. All of the above mentioned modifications reflect the occurrence of chemical/biochemical reactions arising from degradation processes such as lipolysis and proteolysis.

  16. Combining NMR Spectroscopy and Gas-Liquid Chromatography for Analysis of the Fatty Acid Composition of Fenugreek Seed Oil (Trigonella foenum graecum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skakovskii, E. D.; Tychinskaya, L. Yu.; Mauchanava, V. A.; Karankevich, E. G.; Lamotkin, S. A.; Ahabalayeva, A. D.; Reshetnikov, V. N.

    2013-11-01

    1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy established that fenugreek seed oil consists mainly of triacylglycerides. Oleic and linoleic acids are found preferentially in the 2 position and α-linolenic acid is found preferentially in the 1,3 positions of the glycerol backbone. By combining NMR and gas-liquid chromatography, we have shown that fenugreek seeds contain 5.5 %-6.8 % oil, consisting mainly of unsaturated fatty acids (68.2 %-82.1 %): linoleic (31.3 %-46.8 %), α-linolenic (15.1 %-36.6 %), and oleic (11.6 %-21.3 %). The highest unsaturated fatty acid content is found in the cultivars D-19, Ovary Gold, Blidet, Ovary 4 and the lowest fatty acid content is found in the Metha cultivar. The percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids is higher in oils of fenugreek cultivars from northern regions (Belarus, Hungary, France).

  17. Solid state P-31 MAS NMR spectroscopy and conductivity measurements on NbOPO4 and H3PO4 composite materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risskov Sørensen, Daniel; Nielsen, U. G.; Skou, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    A systematic study of composite powders of niobium oxide phosphate (NbOPO4) and phosphoric acid (H3PO4) has been performed in order to characterize the material's ability to perform as an electrolyte material in medium temperature fuel cells and electrolyzers. Powders of H3PO4 contents between 13.......1 and 74.2 M% were produced and characterized with powder X-ray diffraction, P-31 MAS NMR and impedance spectroscopy. NMR revealed that a significant degree of dehydration and vaporization of H3PO4 takes place above 200 degrees C, and increases with temperature. At 500 degrees C the NbOPO4 and H3PO4 has...

  18. 13C-Labeled Heparan Sulfate Analogue as a Tool To Study Protein/Heparan Sulfate Interactions by NMR Spectroscopy: Application to the CXCL12α Chemokine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heparan sulfate (HS), a polysaccharide of the glycosaminoglycan family characterized by a unique level of complexity, has emerged as a key regulator of many fundamental biological processes. Although it has become clear that this class of molecules exert their functions by interacting with proteins, the exact modes of interaction still remain largely unknown. Here we report the engineering of a 13C-labeled HS-like oligosaccharide with a defined oligo-saccharidic sequence that was used to investigate the structural determinants involved in protein/HS recognition by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Using the chemokine CXCL12α as a model system, we obtained experimental NMR data on both the oligosaccharide and the chemokine that was used to obtain a structural model of a protein/HS complex. This new approach provides a foundation for further investigations of protein/HS interactions and should find wide application. (authors)

  19. Hexameric Capsules Studied by Magic Angle Spinning Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Identifying Solvent Molecules in Pyrogallol[4]arene Capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, Liat; Goldbourt, Amir; Cohen, Yoram

    2016-01-18

    Powders of pyrogallol[4]arene hexamers were produced by evaporation from organic solvents and were studied, for the first time, by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR (MAS ssNMR). Evaporation selectively removed non-encapsulated solvent molecules leaving stable hexameric capsules encapsulating solvent molecules. After exposure of the powder to solvent vapors, (1)H/(13)C heteronuclear correlation MAS ssNMR experiments were used to assign the signals of the external and encapsulated solvent molecules. The formed capsules were stable for months and the process of solvent encapsulation was reversible. According to the ssNMR experiments, the encapsulated solvent molecules occupy different sites and those sites differ in their mobility. The presented approach paves the way for studying guest exchange, guest affinity, and gas storage in hexamers of this type in the solid state.

  20. Preparation of cold ions in strong magnetic field and its application to gas-phase NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuke, K., E-mail: fuke@kobe-u.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular Science (Japan); Ohshima, Y. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (Japan); Tona, M. [Ayabo Co. Fukukama (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) technique is widely used as a powerful tool to study the physical and chemical properties of materials. However, this technique is limited to the materials in condensed phases. To extend this technique to the gas-phase molecular ions, we are developing a gas-phase NMR apparatus. In this note, we describe the basic principle of the NMR detection for molecular ions in the gas phase based on a Stern-Gerlach type experiment in a Penning trap and outline the apparatus under development. We also present the experimental procedures and the results on the formation and the manipulation of cold ions under a strong magnetic field, which are the key techniques to detect the NMR by the present method.

  1. Preparation of cold ions in strong magnetic field and its application to gas-phase NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuke, K.; Ohshima, Y.; Tona, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) technique is widely used as a powerful tool to study the physical and chemical properties of materials. However, this technique is limited to the materials in condensed phases. To extend this technique to the gas-phase molecular ions, we are developing a gas-phase NMR apparatus. In this note, we describe the basic principle of the NMR detection for molecular ions in the gas phase based on a Stern-Gerlach type experiment in a Penning trap and outline the apparatus under development. We also present the experimental procedures and the results on the formation and the manipulation of cold ions under a strong magnetic field, which are the key techniques to detect the NMR by the present method.

  2. Preparation of cold ions in strong magnetic field and its application to gas-phase NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) technique is widely used as a powerful tool to study the physical and chemical properties of materials. However, this technique is limited to the materials in condensed phases. To extend this technique to the gas-phase molecular ions, we are developing a gas-phase NMR apparatus. In this note, we describe the basic principle of the NMR detection for molecular ions in the gas phase based on a Stern-Gerlach type experiment in a Penning trap and outline the apparatus under development. We also present the experimental procedures and the results on the formation and the manipulation of cold ions under a strong magnetic field, which are the key techniques to detect the NMR by the present method

  3. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of protein in heterogeneous membranes: the baseplate antenna complex of Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulminskaya, Natalia V; Pedersen, Marie Ø; Bjerring, Morten; Underhaug, Jarl; Miller, Mette; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Nielsen, Jakob T; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2012-07-01

    A clever combination: an in situ solid-state NMR analysis of CsmA proteins in the heterogeneous environment of the photoreceptor of Chlorobaculum tepidum is reported. Using different combinations of 2D and 3D solid-state NMR spectra, 90 % of the CsmA resonances are assigned and provide on the basis of chemical shift data information about the structure and conformation of CsmA in the CsmA-bacteriochlorophyll a complex.

  4. Indirect two-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. (/sup 31/P, /sup 57/Fe) spectra of organoiron complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benn, R.; Brenneke, H.; Frings, A.; Lehmkuhl, H.; Mehler, G.; Rufinska, A.; Wildt, T.

    1988-08-17

    The indirect heteronuclear two-dimensional (2D) triple-resonance (S,I)-(/sup 1/H) NMR spectroscopy is introduced for measuring the chemical shift and scalar spin-spin coupling constants of an insensitive nucleus I via its scalar coupling J(S,I) by detection of the nucleus S of higher sensitivity. The versatility of this approach is demonstrated by extracting delta(/sup 57/Fe) and J(Fe,X) from (/sup 31/P,/sup 57/Fe)-(/sup 1/H) spectra of various dissolved ((/eta//sup 5/-Cp)(L/sub 2/(R)))Fe, ((/eta//sup 3/-allyl)(/eta//sup 5/-Cp)(L))Fe, and ((/eta//sup 1/,/eta//sup 2/-alkenyl)(/eta//sup 5/-Cp)(L))Fe complexes (R = alkyl, hydride; L = PR/sub 3/). In practice the sensitivity of 2D (/sup 31/P,/sup 57/Fe) spectra was found to be higher than that of the direct observation scheme by at least a factor (..gamma../sub P//..gamma../sub Fe/)/sup 5/2/. Due to the intrinsically higher resolving power of a two-dimensional experiment, small scalar couplings like /sup 2J/(Fe,F) and /sup 1/J(Fe,H) were readily obtained from indirect two-dimensional spectra. Combinations of (/sup 1/H,/sup 57/Fe) and (/sup 31/P,/sup 57/Fe) spectra yielded the relative signs of the J(Fe,X) couplings: /sup 1/J(Fe,P) is positive and increases with increasing ..pi..-acceptor power of the phosphorus ligand L from 55 (L = PMe/sub 3/, R = H) to 149 Hz (L = PF/sub 3/). /sup 1/J(Fe,H) is around +9 Hz (R = H), whereas /sup 2/J(P,H) in these complexes was found to be negative. In all of the allyl complexes investigated, /sup 2J/(Fe,F) (L = PF/sub 3/) is positive and around 3 Hz. In the quasi-tetragonal and -trigonal iron complexes, delta(/sup 57/Fe) varies by about 4000 ppM. This can be rationalized qualitatively by the electronegativity of the atoms directly bonded to iron and the higher oxidation potential in the presence of more basic ligands L via the paramagnetic shielding term. 52 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  5. Quantitative evaluation of the lactate signal loss and its spatial dependence in press localized (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, W I; Bunse, M; Lutz, O

    2001-10-01

    Localized (1)H NMR spectroscopy using the 90 degrees -t(1)-180 degrees -t(1)+t(2)-180 degrees -t(2)-Acq. PRESS sequence can lead to a signal loss for the lactate doublet compared with signals from uncoupled nuclei which is dependent on the choice of t(1) and t(2). The most striking signal loss of up to 78% of the total signal occurs with the symmetrical PRESS sequence (t(1)=t(2)) at an echo time of 2/J (approximately 290 ms). Calculations have shown that this signal loss is related to the pulse angle distributions produced by the two refocusing pulses which leads to the creation of single quantum polarization transfer (PT) as well as to not directly observable states (NDOS) of the lactate AX(3) spin system: zero- and multiple-quantum coherences, and longitudinal spin orders. In addition, the chemical shift dependent voxel displacement (VOD) leads to further signal loss. By calculating the density operator for various of the echo times TE=n/J, n=1, 2, 3,..., we calculated quantitatively the contributions of these effects to the signal loss as well as their spatial distribution. A maximum signal loss of 75% can be expected from theory for the symmetrical PRESS sequence and TE=2/J for Hamming filtered sinc pulses, whereby 47% are due to the creation of NDOS and up to 28% arise from PT. Taking also the VOD effect into account (2 mT/m slice selection gradients, 20-mm slices) leads to 54% signal loss from NDOS and up to 24% from PT, leading to a maximum signal loss of 78%. Using RE-BURP pulses with their more rectangular pulse angle distributions reduces the maximum signal loss to 44%. Experiments at 1.5 T using a lactate solution demonstrated a maximum lactate signal loss for sinc pulses of 82% (52% NDOS, 30% PT) at TE=290 ms using the symmetrical PRESS sequence. The great signal loss and its spatial distribution is of importance for investigations using a symmetrical PRESS sequence at TE=2/J. PMID:11567573

  6. Quantitative Evaluation of the Lactate Signal Loss and Its Spatial Dependence in PRESS Localized 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Wulf-Ingo; Bunse, Michael; Lutz, Otto

    2001-10-01

    Localized 1H NMR spectroscopy using the 90°-t1-180°-t1+t2-180°-t2-Acq. PRESS sequence can lead to a signal loss for the lactate doublet compared with signals from uncoupled nuclei which is dependent on the choice of t1 and t2. The most striking signal loss of up to 78% of the total signal occurs with the symmetrical PRESS sequence (t1=t2) at an echo time of 2/J (≃290 ms). Calculations have shown that this signal loss is related to the pulse angle distributions produced by the two refocusing pulses which leads to the creation of single quantum polarization transfer (PT) as well as to not directly observable states (NDOS) of the lactate AX3 spin system: zero- and multiple-quantum coherences, and longitudinal spin orders. In addition, the chemical shift dependent voxel displacement (VOD) leads to further signal loss. By calculating the density operator for various of the echo times TE=n/J, n=1, 2, 3, …, we calculated quantitatively the contributions of these effects to the signal loss as well as their spatial distribution. A maximum signal loss of 75% can be expected from theory for the symmetrical PRESS sequence and TE=2/J for Hamming filtered sinc pulses, whereby 47% are due to the creation of NDOS and up to 28% arise from PT. Taking also the VOD effect into account (2 mT/m slice selection gradients, 20-mm slices) leads to 54% signal loss from NDOS and up to 24% from PT, leading to a maximum signal loss of 78%. Using RE-BURP pulses with their more rectangular pulse angle distributions reduces the maximum signal loss to 44%. Experiments at 1.5 T using a lactate solution demonstrated a maximum lactate signal loss for sinc pulses of 82% (52% NDOS, 30% PT) at TE=290 ms using the symmetrical PRESS sequence. The great signal loss and its spatial distribution is of importance for investigations using a symmetrical PRESS sequence at TE=2/J.

  7. Acidic Properties and Structure-Activity Correlations of Solid Acid Catalysts Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Anmin; Li, Shenhui; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2016-04-19

    Solid acid materials with tunable structural and acidic properties are promising heterogeneous catalysts for manipulating and/or emulating the activity and selectivity of industrially important catalytic reactions. On the other hand, the performances of acid-catalyzed reactions are mostly dictated by the acidic features, namely, type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount, strength, and local environment of acid sites. The latter is relevant to their location (intra- vs extracrystalline), and possible confinement and Brønsted-Lewis acid synergy effects that may strongly affect the host-guest interactions, reaction mechanism, and shape selectivity of the catalytic system. This account aims to highlight some important applications of state-of-the-art solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for exploring the structural and acidic properties of solid acid catalysts as well as their catalytic performances and relevant reaction pathway invoked. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations may be exploited in conjunction with experimental SSNMR studies to verify the structure-activity correlations of the catalytic system at a microscopic scale. We describe in this Account the developments and applications of advanced ex situ and/or in situ SSNMR techniques, such as two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum magic-angle spinning (DQ MAS) homonuclear correlation spectroscopy for structural investigation of solid acids as well as study of their acidic properties. Moreover, the energies and electronic structures of the catalysts and detailed catalytic reaction processes, including the identification of reaction species, elucidation of reaction mechanism, and verification of structure-activity correlations, made available by DFT theoretical calculations were also discussed. Relevant discussions will focus primarily on results obtained from our laboratories in the past decade, including (i) quantitative and qualitative acidity characterization utilizing assorted probe molecules

  8. Metabolic characterization of Palatinate German white wines according to sensory attributes, varieties, and vintages using NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Kashif; Maltese, Federica [Leiden University, Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology (Netherlands); Toepfer, Reinhard [Institute for Grapevine Breeding Geilweilerhof, Julius Kuehn Institute (JKI), Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants (Germany); Choi, Young Hae, E-mail: y.choi@chem.leidenuniv.nl; Verpoorte, Robert [Leiden University, Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology (Netherlands)

    2011-04-15

    {sup 1}H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) has been used for metabolomic analysis of 'Riesling' and 'Mueller-Thurgau' white wines from the German Palatinate region. Diverse two-dimensional NMR techniques have been applied for the identification of metabolites, including phenolics. It is shown that sensory analysis correlates with NMR-based metabolic profiles of wine. {sup 1}H NMR data in combination with multivariate data analysis methods, like principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares projections to latent structures (PLS), and bidirectional orthogonal projections to latent structures (O2PLS) analysis, were employed in an attempt to identify the metabolites responsible for the taste of wine, using a non-targeted approach. The high quality wines were characterized by elevated levels of compounds like proline, 2,3-butanediol, malate, quercetin, and catechin. Characterization of wine based on type and vintage was also done using orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) analysis. 'Riesling' wines were characterized by higher levels of catechin, caftarate, valine, proline, malate, and citrate whereas compounds like quercetin, resveratrol, gallate, leucine, threonine, succinate, and lactate, were found discriminating for 'Mueller-Thurgau'. The wines from 2006 vintage were dominated by leucine, phenylalanine, citrate, malate, and phenolics, while valine, proline, alanine, and succinate were predominantly present in the 2007 vintage. Based on these results, it can be postulated the NMR-based metabolomics offers an easy and comprehensive analysis of wine and in combination with multivariate data analyses can be used to investigate the source of the wines and to predict certain sensory aspects of wine.

  9. Metabolic characterization of Palatinate German white wines according to sensory attributes, varieties, and vintages using NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) has been used for metabolomic analysis of ‘Riesling’ and ‘Mueller-Thurgau’ white wines from the German Palatinate region. Diverse two-dimensional NMR techniques have been applied for the identification of metabolites, including phenolics. It is shown that sensory analysis correlates with NMR-based metabolic profiles of wine. 1H NMR data in combination with multivariate data analysis methods, like principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares projections to latent structures (PLS), and bidirectional orthogonal projections to latent structures (O2PLS) analysis, were employed in an attempt to identify the metabolites responsible for the taste of wine, using a non-targeted approach. The high quality wines were characterized by elevated levels of compounds like proline, 2,3-butanediol, malate, quercetin, and catechin. Characterization of wine based on type and vintage was also done using orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) analysis. ‘Riesling’ wines were characterized by higher levels of catechin, caftarate, valine, proline, malate, and citrate whereas compounds like quercetin, resveratrol, gallate, leucine, threonine, succinate, and lactate, were found discriminating for ‘Mueller-Thurgau’. The wines from 2006 vintage were dominated by leucine, phenylalanine, citrate, malate, and phenolics, while valine, proline, alanine, and succinate were predominantly present in the 2007 vintage. Based on these results, it can be postulated the NMR-based metabolomics offers an easy and comprehensive analysis of wine and in combination with multivariate data analyses can be used to investigate the source of the wines and to predict certain sensory aspects of wine.

  10. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  11. Cerebral NMR spectroscopy to study intracellular space in vivo: methodological development for diffusion weighted spectroscopy at short time scale and for pH measurement using 31P detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR spectroscopy is a unique modality to evaluate intracellular environment in vivo. Indeed observed molecules are specifically intracellular and generally have a biochemistry role and a specific cellular compartmentation. That could be a useful tool to understand cell functioning in their environment. My thesis work consisted in development of new sequence in both diffusion and phosphorus NMR spectroscopy.My first study was to develop a diffusion-weighted spectroscopy at ultra-short diffusion time to look at the anomalous diffusion in the rat brain. ADC evolution as a function of time shows that brain metabolites motion is mainly due to random diffusion and that active transport (if exist) are negligible. Data modeling evidences that diffusion at short diffusion time is sensitive to cytoplasm viscosity and short scale crowding. In collaboration with the pharmaceutical company, this technique was chosen to follow up transgenic mice (rTg4510), model of tau pathology. Preliminary results show significant differences of ADC at an early stage of neuro-degenerescence (3 and 6 months).Phosphorus spectroscopy allows observation of metabolites directly implicated in energetic processes. During this thesis, localization sequences were developed to measure intracellular pH in the primate striatum. These sequences are supposed to be used to evaluate the potential of pH as a bio-marker of neuro-degenerescence in a phenotypic model of the Huntington disease in the non-human primate. (author)

  12. Synthesis and structure elucidation of a series of pyranochromene chalcones and flavanones using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Sunayna S; Koorbanally, Neil A

    2014-06-01

    A series of novel pyranochromene chalcones and corresponding flavanones were synthesized. This is the first report on the confirmation of the absolute configuration of chromene-based flavanones using X-ray crystallography. These compounds were characterized by 2D NMR spectroscopy, and their assignments are reported herein. The 3D structure of the chalcone 3b and flavanone 4g was determined by X-ray crystallography, and the structure of the flavanone was confirmed to be in the S configuration at C-2.

  13. Isotope labeling of mammalian GPCRs in HEK293 cells and characterization of the C-terminus of bovine rhodopsin by high resolution liquid NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Karla; Richter, Christian; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith, E-mail: jks33@pitt.edu; Schwalbe, Harald [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Institute for Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany)], E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de

    2008-01-15

    High amino acid coverage labeling of the mammalian G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) rhodopsin was established with {sup 15}N and {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C isotopes. Rhodopsin was expressed at preparative scale in HEK293S cells and studied in full-length by NMR spectroscopy in detergent micelle solution. This resulted in the assignment and detailed study of the dynamic properties of the C-terminus of rhodopsin. The rhodopsin C-terminus is immobilized until Ala333, after which it becomes unstructured.

  14. Absolute quantitative proton NMR spectroscopy based on the amplitude of the local water suppression pulse. Quantification of brain water and metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E R; Henriksen, O

    1994-01-01

    Quantification in localized proton NMR spectroscopy has been achieved by various methods in recent years. A new method for absolute quantification is described in this paper. The method simultaneously rules out problems with B1 field inhomogeneity and coil loading, utilizing a relation between the...... locally optimized amplitude of a chemical shift selective water suppression pulse and the acquired signal. Validity and feasibility of quantification using the method of the water suppression pulse is demonstrated. Brain water and cerebral metabolites have been quantified in a study of 12 healthy...

  15. Automated Control of the Organic and Inorganic Composition of Aloe vera Extracts Using (1)H NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Randel, Gabriele; Diehl, Bernd W K

    2016-09-01

    Recent classification of Aloe vera whole-leaf extract by the International Agency for Research and Cancer as a possible carcinogen to humans as well as the continuous adulteration of A. vera's authentic material have generated renewed interest in controlling A. vera. The existing NMR spectroscopic method for the analysis of A. vera, which is based on a routine developed at Spectral Service, was extended. Apart from aloverose, glucose, malic acid, lactic acid, citric acid, whole-leaf material (WLM), acetic acid, fumaric acid, sodium benzoate, and potassium sorbate, the quantification of Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and fructose is possible with the addition of a Cs-EDTA solution to sample. The proposed methodology was automated, which includes phasing, baseline-correction, deconvolution (based on the Lorentzian function), integration, quantification, and reporting. The NMR method was applied to 41 A. vera preparations in the form of liquid A. vera juice and solid A. vera powder. The advantages of the new NMR methodology over the previous method were discussed. Correlation between the new and standard NMR methodologies was significant for aloverose, glucose, malic acid, lactic acid, citric acid, and WLM (P < 0.0001, R(2) = 0.99). NMR was found to be suitable for the automated simultaneous quantitative determination of 13 parameters in A. vera. PMID:27413027

  16. The flexibility of SIMPSON and SIMMOL for numerical simulations in solid-and liquid-state NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Vosegaard, T; Nielsen, N C

    2002-01-01

    Addressing the need for numerical simulations in the design and interpretation of advanced solid- and liquid-state NMR experiments, we present a number of novel features for numerical simulations based on the SIMPSON and SIMMOL open source software packages. Major attention is devoted to the flexibility of these Tcl-interfaced programs for numerical simulation of NMR experiments being complicated by demands for efficient powder averaging, large spin systems, and multiple-pulse rf irradiation. These features are exemplified by fast simulation of second-order quadrupolar powder patterns using crystallite interpolation, analysis of rotary resonance triple-quantum excitation for quadrupolar nuclei, iterative fitting of MQ-MAS spectra by combination of SIMIPSON and MINUIT, simulation of multiple-dimensional PISEMA-type correlation experiments for macroscopically oriented membrane proteins, simulation of Hartman-Hahn polarization transfers in liquid-state NMR, and visualization of the spin evolution under complex c...

  17. Synthesis and biological characterization of new amino-phosphonates for mitochondrial pH determination by 31P NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of mitochondria targeted α-amino-phosphonates combining a diethoxy-phosphoryl group and an alkyl chain-connected triphenylphosphonium bromide tail were designed and synthesized, and their pH-sensitive 31P NMR properties and biological activities in vitro and in vivo were evaluated. The results showed a number of these mitoaminophosphonates exhibiting pKa values fitting the mitochondrial pH range, short relaxation, and chemical shift parameters compatible with sensitive 31P NMR detection, and low cytotoxicity on green algae and murine fibroblasts cell cultures. Of these, two selected compounds demonstrated to distribute at NMR detectable levels within the cytosolic and mitochondrial sites following their perfusion to isolated rat livers, with no detrimental effects on cell energetics and aerobic respiration. This study provided a new molecular scaffold for further development of in situ spectroscopic real-time monitoring of mitochondrion/cytosol pH gradients. (authors)

  18. A Consortium to Develop the Medical Uses of NMR Imaging, NMR Spectroscopy, and Positron Emission Tomography. Final report, 6/1/92 - 5/31/98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During years one, two and three, this project concentrated on quantifying skeletal muscle blood flow and metabolism for assessment of ischemia. The ultimate goal is to provide a non-invasive method of measuring viability of skeletal muscle following traumatic vascular compromise. The technique involves the use of both dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) coupled with compartmental model analysis of the resulting time activity relationships and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS). PET scanning is ideally suited for this project because of the capability to utilize labeled organic compounds. Blood flow was measured with N-13 ammonia. Metabolism was assessed with F-18 deoxyglucose (FDG)

  19. High-field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hertkorn

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available High-performance, non-target, high-resolution organic structural spectroscopy was applied to solid phase extracted marine dissolved organic matter (SPE-DOM isolated from four different depths in the open South Atlantic Ocean off the Angola coast (3° E, 18° S; Angola Basin and provided molecular level information with extraordinary coverage and resolution. Sampling was performed at depths of 5 m (Angola Current; near-surface photic zone, 48 m (Angola Current; fluorescence maximum, 200 m (still above Antarctic Intermediate Water, AAIW; upper mesopelagic zone and 5446 m (North Atlantic Deep Water, NADW; abyssopelagic, ~30 m above seafloor and produced SPE-DOM with near 40% carbon yield and beneficial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR relaxation properties, a crucial prerequisite for the acquisition of NMR spectra with excellent resolution. 1H and 13C NMR spectra of all four marine SPE-DOM showed smooth bulk envelopes, reflecting intrinsic averaging from massive signal overlap, with a few percent of visibly resolved signatures and variable abundances for all major chemical environments. The abundance of singly oxygenated aliphatics and acetate derivatives in 1H NMR spectra declined from surface to deep marine SPE-DOM, whereas C-based aliphatics and carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM increased in abundance. Surface SPE-DOM contained fewer methyl esters than all other samples, likely a consequence of direct exposure to sunlight. Integration of 13C NMR spectra revealed continual increase of carboxylic acids and ketones from surface to depth, reflecting a progressive oxygenation, with concomitant decline of carbohydrate-related substructures. Aliphatic branching increased with depth, whereas the fraction of oxygenated aliphatics declined for methine, methylene and methyl carbon. Lipids in the oldest SPE-DOM at 5446 m showed a larger share of ethyl groups and methylene carbon than observed in the other samples. Two-dimensional NMR spectra showed

  20. High-field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertkorn, N.; Harir, M.; Koch, B. P.; Michalke, B.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2013-03-01

    High-performance, non-target, high-resolution organic structural spectroscopy was applied to solid phase extracted marine dissolved organic matter (SPE-DOM) isolated from four different depths in the open South Atlantic Ocean off the Angola coast (3° E, 18° S; Angola Basin) and provided molecular level information with extraordinary coverage and resolution. Sampling was performed at depths of 5 m (Angola Current; near-surface photic zone), 48 m (Angola Current; fluorescence maximum), 200 m (still above Antarctic Intermediate Water, AAIW; upper mesopelagic zone) and 5446 m (North Atlantic Deep Water, NADW; abyssopelagic, ~30 m above seafloor) and produced SPE-DOM with near 40% carbon yield and beneficial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties, a crucial prerequisite for the acquisition of NMR spectra with excellent resolution. 1H and 13C NMR spectra of all four marine SPE-DOM showed smooth bulk envelopes, reflecting intrinsic averaging from massive signal overlap, with a few percent of visibly resolved signatures and variable abundances for all major chemical environments. The abundance of singly oxygenated aliphatics and acetate derivatives in 1H NMR spectra declined from surface to deep marine SPE-DOM, whereas C-based aliphatics and carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM) increased in abundance. Surface SPE-DOM contained fewer methyl esters than all other samples, likely a consequence of direct exposure to sunlight. Integration of 13C NMR spectra revealed continual increase of carboxylic acids and ketones from surface to depth, reflecting a progressive oxygenation, with concomitant decline of carbohydrate-related substructures. Aliphatic branching increased with depth, whereas the fraction of oxygenated aliphatics declined for methine, methylene and methyl carbon. Lipids in the oldest SPE-DOM at 5446 m showed a larger share of ethyl groups and methylene carbon than observed in the other samples. Two-dimensional NMR spectra showed exceptional

  1. Hydrogen Bonds in GlcNAc(β1,3)Gal(β)OMe in DMSO Studied by NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen bond is an important factor in the structures of carbohydrates. Because of great strength, short range, and strong angular dependence, hydrogen bonding is an important factor stabilizing the structure of carbohydrate. In this study, conformational properties and the hydrogen bonds in GlcNAc(β1,3)Gal(β)OMe in DMSO are investigated through NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. Lowest energy structure in the adiabatic energy map was utilized as an initial structure for the molecular dynamics simulations in DMSO. NOEs, temperature coefficients, SIMPLE NMR data, and molecular dynamics simulations proved that there is a strong intramolecular hydrogen bond between O7' and HO3' in GlcNAc(β1,3)Gal(β)OMe in DMSO. In aqueous solution, water molecule makes intermolecular hydrogen bonds with the disaccharides and there was no intramolecular hydrogen bonds in water. Since DMSO molecule is too big to be inserted deep into GlcNAc(β1,3)Gal(β)OMe, DMSO can not make strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding with carbohydrate and increases the ability of O7' in GlcNAc(β1,3)Gal(β)OMe to participate in intramolecular hydrogen bonding. Molecular dynamics simulation in conjunction with NMR experiments proves to be efficient way to investigate the intramolecular hydrogen bonding existed in carbohydrate

  2. Mechanisms of action of (meth)acrylates in hemolytic activity, in vivo toxicity and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes determined using NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Seiichiro; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the quantitative structure-activity relationships between hemolytic activity (log 1/H(50)) or in vivo mouse intraperitoneal (ip) LD(50) using reported data for α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds such as (meth)acrylate monomers and their (13)C-NMR β-carbon chemical shift (δ). The log 1/H(50) value for methacrylates was linearly correlated with the δC(β) value. That for (meth)acrylates was linearly correlated with log P, an index of lipophilicity. The ipLD(50) for (meth)acrylates was linearly correlated with δC(β) but not with log P. For (meth)acrylates, the δC(β) value, which is dependent on the π-electron density on the β-carbon, was linearly correlated with PM3-based theoretical parameters (chemical hardness, η; electronegativity, χ; electrophilicity, ω), whereas log P was linearly correlated with heat of formation (HF). Also, the interaction between (meth)acrylates and DPPC liposomes in cell membrane molecular models was investigated using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The log 1/H(50) value was related to the difference in chemical shift (ΔδHa) (Ha: H (trans) attached to the β-carbon) between the free monomer and the DPPC liposome-bound monomer. Monomer-induced DSC phase transition properties were related to HF for monomers. NMR chemical shifts may represent a valuable parameter for investigating the biological mechanisms of action of (meth)acrylates.

  3. Direct observation of the active center for methane dehydroaromatization using an ultrahigh field 95Mo NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heng; Ma, Ding; Bao, Xinhe; Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H F

    2008-03-26

    The use of an ultrahigh magnetic field spectrometer and 95Mo isotope enrichment facilitate the direct observation of the local structure of Mo species on Mo/zeolite catalysts by 95Mo NMR. Top trace: The experimental 95Mo NMR spectrum of 6Mo/HZSM-5. Bottom traces: The simulated overall spectrum (orange), the spectral component corresponding to MoO3 (purple), and the component corresponding to the exchanged Mo species (green). The exchanged Mo species proved to be the active center for the methane dehydroaromatization (MDA) reaction.

  4. Ligand-induced substrate steering and reshaping of [Ag2(H)](+) scaffold for selective CO2 extrusion from formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavras, Athanasios; Khairallah, George N; Krstić, Marjan; Girod, Marion; Daly, Steven; Antoine, Rodolphe; Maitre, Philippe; Mulder, Roger J; Alexander, Stefanie-Ann; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Dugourd, Philippe; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2016-01-01

    Metalloenzymes preorganize the reaction environment to steer substrate(s) along the required reaction coordinate. Here, we show that phosphine ligands selectively facilitate protonation of binuclear silver hydride cations, [LAg2(H)](+) by optimizing the geometry of the active site. This is a key step in the selective, catalysed extrusion of carbon dioxide from formic acid, HO2CH, with important applications (for example, hydrogen storage). Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions, collision-induced dissociation (CID), infrared and ultraviolet action spectroscopy and computational chemistry link structure to reactivity and mechanism. [Ag2(H)](+) and [Ph3PAg2(H)](+) react with formic acid yielding Lewis adducts, while [(Ph3P)2Ag2(H)](+) is unreactive. Using bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (dppm) reshapes the geometry of the binuclear Ag2(H)(+) scaffold, triggering reactivity towards formic acid, to produce [dppmAg2(O2CH)](+) and H2. Decarboxylation of [dppmAg2(O2CH)](+) via CID regenerates [dppmAg2(H)](+). These gas-phase insights inspired variable temperature NMR studies that show CO2 and H2 production at 70 °C from solutions containing dppm, AgBF4, NaO2CH and HO2CH. PMID:27265868

  5. Half-sandwich (6-arene)ruthenium(II) chiral Schiff base complexes: Analysis of the diastereomeric mixtures in solution by 2D-NMR spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rakesh K Rath; G A Nagana Gowda; Akhil R Chakravarty

    2002-10-01

    2D NMR spectroscopy has been used to determine the metal configuration in solution of three complexes, viz. [($\\eta^6$--cymene)Ru(L∗)Cl] (1) and [(6--cymene)Ru(L∗)(L')] (ClO4) (L' = H2O, 2; PPh3, 3), where L∗ is the anion of ()-(1-phenylethyl)salicylaldimine. The complexes exist in two diastereomeric forms in solution. Both the (Ru, C)- and (Ru, C)-diastereomers display the presence of attractive CH/ interaction involving the phenyl group attached to the chiral carbon and the cymene ring hydrogens. This interaction restricts the rotation of the C∗-N single bond and, as a result, two structural types with either the hydrogen atom attached to the chiral carbon (C∗) or the methyl group attached to C∗ in close proximity of the cymene ring protons get stabilized. Using 2D NMR spectroscopy as a tool, the spatial interaction involving these protons are studied in order to obtain the metal configuration(s) of the diastereomeric complexes in solution. This technique has enabled us to determine the metal configuration as (Ru, C) for the major isomers of 1-3 in solution.

  6. Compartmentalised cerebral metabolism of [1,6-13C]glucose determined by in vivo 13C NMR spectroscopy at 14.1 T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M.N. Duarte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral metabolism is compartmentalised between neurons and glia. Although glial glycolysis is thought to largely sustain the energetic requirements of neurotransmission while oxidative metabolism takes place mainly in neurons, this hypothesis is matter of debate. The compartmentalization of cerebral metabolic fluxes can be determined by 13C NMR spectroscopy upon infusion of 13C-enriched compounds, especially glucose. Rats under light α-chloralose anaesthesia were infused with [1,6-13C]glucose and 13C enrichment in the brain metabolites was measured by 13C NMR spectroscopy with high sensitivity and spectral resolution at 14.1 T. This allowed determining 13C enrichment curves of amino acid carbons with high reproducibility and to reliably estimate cerebral metabolic fluxes (mean error of 8%. We further found that TCA cycle intermediates are not required for flux determination in mathematical models of brain metabolism. Neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle rate (VTCA and neurotransmission rate (VNT were 0.45±0.01 and 0.11±0.01 µmol/g/min, respectively. Glial VTCA was found to be for 38±3% of total cerebral oxidative metabolism, accounting for more than half of neuronal oxidative metabolism. Furthermore, glial anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation rate (VPC was 0.069±0.004 µmol/g/min, i.e. 25±1% of the glial TCA cycle rate. These results support a role of glial cells as active partners of neurons during synaptic transmission beyond glycolytic metabolism.

  7. 核磁共振法快速检测肝素钠粗品%Fast Determination of Crude Heparin Sodium by NMR Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘英华; 王婧; 刘振军

    2013-01-01

    A method to detect over sulfated chondroitin sulfate(OSCS) contaminant in heparin sodium was established by 1H NMR spectroscopy.0.3 % OSCS in crude heparin sodium could be detected in 5 minutes.The results showed that,1H NMR spectroscopy can be used for the quantitative determination of contaminants in heparin.%采用1 H NMR对肝素钠、多硫酸软骨素标准品进行测试,并对谱图进行了归属,建立了核磁共振法快速检测肝素钠粗品的分析方法.结果表明:用500 MHz核磁共振波谱仪器进行检测,样品浓度为35 mg/0.6mL时,能快速(5 min)检测出粗品肝素钠中是否存在杂质多硫酸软骨素,检出限为0.3%.

  8. Local environment and composition of magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides determined from solid-state {sup 1}H and {sup 71}Ga NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Line Boisen [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M (Denmark); Lipton, Andrew S. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Zorin, Vadim [Agilent Technologies UK Ltd., 6 Mead Road, Yarnton, Oxfordshire OX5 1QU (United Kingdom); Nielsen, Ulla Gro, E-mail: ugn@sdu.dk [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2014-11-15

    Ordering of gallium(III) in a series of magnesium gallium (MgGa) layered double hydroxides (LDHs), [Mg{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}(OH){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub x}·yH{sub 2}O] was investigated using solid-state {sup 1}H and {sup 71}Ga NMR spectroscopy as well as powder X-ray diffraction. Three different proton environments from Mg{sub 3}-OH, Mg{sub 2}Ga-OH and intergallery water molecules were assigned and quantified using ({sup 1}H,{sup 71}Ga) HETCOR and {sup 1}H MAS NMR. A single {sup 71}Ga site originating from the unique Ga site in the MgGa LDH's was observed in {sup 71}Ga MAS and 3QMAS NMR spectra. Both {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra recorded at 21.1 T (900 MHz) and elemental analysis show that the synthesized MgGa LDH's had a lower Mg:Ga ratio than that of the starting reactant solution. The origin of this is the formation of soluble [Ga(OH){sub 4}]{sup −} complexes formed during synthesis, and not due to formation of insoluble gallium (oxy)hydroxides. No sign of Ga-O-Ga connectivities or defects were detected for the MgGa LDH's. - Graphical abstract: Two types of hydroxides groups are observed in magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides revealing an ordering of Ga in the cation layer. - Highlights: • Ga is ordered in our magnesium gallium layered double hydroxides. • Ga depletion due to formation of soluble Ga complexes during synthesis. • No sign of Ga rich regions in magnesium gallium LDHs. • Solid state {sup 1}H and {sup 71}Ga give detailed insight into the structure.

  9. Solution structure of the 45-residue MgATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as examined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, D.C.; Byler, D.M.; Susi, H.; Brown, M.; Kuby, S.A.; Mildvan A.S.

    1988-05-17

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been studied in aqueous solution by two-dimensional NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy. This peptide, which binds MgATP and is believed to represent most of the MgATP-binding site of the enzyme, appears to maintain a conformation similar to that of residues 1-45 in the X-ray structure of intact porcine adenylate kinase, with 42% of the residues of the peptide showing NOEs indicative of phi and psi angles corresponding to those found in the protein. The NMR studies suggest that the peptide is composed of two helical regions of residues 4-7 and 23-29, and three stretches of ..beta..-strand at residues 8-15, 30-32, and 35-40, yielding an overall secondary structure consisting of 24% ..cap alpha..-helix, 38% ..beta..-structure, and 38% aperiodic. Although the resolution-enhanced amide I band of the peptide FTIR spectrum is broad and rather featureless, possible due to disorder, it can be fit by using methods developed on well-characterized globular proteins. The CD spectrum is best fit by assuming the presence of at most 13% ..cap alpha..-helix in the peptide, 24 +/- 2% ..beta..-structure, and 66 +/- 4% aperiodic. The inability of the high-frequency FTIR and CD methods to detect helices in the amount found by NMR may result from the short helical lengths as well as from static and dynamic disorder in the peptide. Upon binding of MgATP, numerous conformation changes in the backbone of the peptide are detected by NMR, with smaller alterations in the overall secondary structure as assess by CD.

  10. Assessment of a 1H high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy procedure for free sugars quantification in intact plant tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Goñi, Teresa; Campo, Sonia; Martín-Sitjar, Juana; Cabañas, Miquel E; San Segundo, Blanca; Arús, Carles

    2013-08-01

    In most plants, sucrose is the primary product of photosynthesis, the transport form of assimilated carbon, and also one of the main factors determining sweetness in fresh fruits. Traditional methods for sugar quantification (mainly sucrose, glucose and fructose) require obtaining crude plant extracts, which sometimes involve substantial sample manipulation, making the process time-consuming and increasing the risk of sample degradation. Here, we describe and validate a fast method to determine sugar content in intact plant tissue by using high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS NMR). The HR-MAS NMR method was used for quantifying sucrose, glucose and fructose in mesocarp tissues from melon fruits (Cucumis melo var. reticulatus and Cucumis melo var. cantalupensis). The resulting sugar content varied among individual melons, ranging from 1.4 to 7.3 g of sucrose, 0.4-2.5 g of glucose; and 0.73-2.83 g of fructose (values per 100 g fw). These values were in agreement with those described in the literature for melon fruit tissue, and no significant differences were found when comparing them with those obtained using the traditional, enzymatic procedure, on melon tissue extracts. The HR-MAS NMR method offers a fast (usually <30 min) and sensitive method for sugar quantification in intact plant tissues, it requires a small amount of tissue (typically 50 mg fw) and avoids the interferences and risks associated with obtaining plant extracts. Furthermore, this method might also allow the quantification of additional metabolites detectable in the plant tissue NMR spectrum. PMID:23824526

  11. Identification and quantification of the main organic components of vinegars by high resolution {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caligiani, A. [Dipartimento di Chimica Organica e Industriale, Universita degli Studi di Parma, Via Usberti 17A, 43100-Parma (Italy)]. E-mail: augusta.caligiani@unipr.it; Acquotti, D. [Centro Interfacolta Misure, Universita degli Studi di Parma, Via Usberti 23A, 43100-Parma (Italy); Palla, G. [Dipartimento di Chimica Organica e Industriale, Universita degli Studi di Parma, Via Usberti 17A, 43100-Parma (Italy); Bocchi, V. [Dipartimento di Chimica Organica e Industriale, Universita degli Studi di Parma, Via Usberti 17A, 43100-Parma (Italy)

    2007-02-28

    A detailed analysis of the proton high-field NMR spectra of vinegars (in particular of Italian balsamic vinegars) is reported. A large number of organic substances belonging to different classes, such as carbohydrates, alcohols, organic acids, volatile compounds and amino acids, were assigned. The possibility of quantification of the substances identified in the whole vinegar sample, without extraction or pre-concentration steps, was also tested. The data validity was demonstrated in terms of precision, accuracy, repeatability and inter-day reproducibility. The effects of the most critical experimental parameters (sample concentration, water suppression and relaxation time) on the analysis response were also discussed. {sup 1}H NMR results were compared with those obtained by traditional techniques (GC-MS, titrations), and good correlations were obtained. The results showed that {sup 1}H NMR with water suppression allows a rapid, simultaneous determination of carbohydrates (glucose and fructose), organic acids (acetic, formic, lactic, malic, citric, succinic and tartaric acids), alcohols and polyols (ethanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, hydroxymethylfurfural), and volatile substances (ethyl acetate) in vinegar samples. On the contrary, the amino acid determination without sample pre-concentration was critical. The {sup 1}H NMR method proposed was applied to different samples of vinegars, allowing, in particular, the discrimination of vinegars and balsamic vinegars.

  12. Tannin fingerprinting in vegetable tanned leather by solid state NMR spectroscopy and comparison with leathers tanned by other processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Frederik H; Underwood, Andrew P; Senekal, Nadine D; Bonnet, Susan L; Duer, Melinda J; Reid, David G; van der Westhuizen, Jan H

    2011-01-28

    Solid state ¹³C-NMR spectra of pure tannin powders from four different sources--mimosa, quebracho, chestnut and tara--are readily distinguishable from each other, both in pure commercial powder form, and in leather which they have been used to tan. Groups of signals indicative of the source, and type (condensed vs. hydrolyzable) of tannin used in the manufacture are well resolved in the spectra of the finished leathers. These fingerprints are compared with those arising from leathers tanned with other common tanning agents. Paramagnetic chromium (III) tanning causes widespread but selective disappearance of signals from the spectrum of leather collagen, including resonances from acidic aspartyl and glutamyl residues, likely bound to Cr (III) structures. Aluminium (III) and glutaraldehyde tanning both cause considerable leather collagen signal sharpening suggesting some increase in molecular structural ordering. The ²⁷Al-NMR signal from the former material is consistent with an octahedral coordination by oxygen ligands. Solid state NMR thus provides easily recognisable reagent specific spectral fingerprints of the products of vegetable and some other common tanning processes. Because spectra are related to molecular properties, NMR is potentially a powerful tool in leather process enhancement and quality or provenance assurance.

  13. Tannin Fingerprinting in Vegetable Tanned Leather by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy and Comparison with Leathers Tanned by Other Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan H. van der Westhuizen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid state 13C-NMR spectra of pure tannin powders from four different sources – mimosa, quebracho, chestnut and tara – are readily distinguishable from each other, both in pure commercial powder form, and in leather which they have been used to tan.  Groups of signals indicative of the source, and type (condensed vs. hydrolyzable of tannin used in the manufacture are well resolved in the spectra of the finished leathers.  These fingerprints are compared with those arising from leathers tanned with other common tanning agents.  Paramagnetic chromium (III tanning causes widespread but selective disappearance of signals from the spectrum of leather collagen, including resonances from acidic aspartyl and glutamyl residues, likely bound to Cr (III structures. Aluminium (III and glutaraldehyde tanning both cause considerable leather collagen signal sharpening suggesting some increase in molecular structural ordering. The 27Al-NMR signal from the former material is consistent with an octahedral coordination by oxygen ligands. Solid state NMR thus provides easily recognisable reagent specific spectral fingerprints of the products of vegetable and some other common tanning processes. Because spectra are related to molecular properties, NMR is potentially a powerful tool in leather process enhancement and quality or provenance assurance.

  14. Non-targeted detection of chemical contamination in carbonated soft drinks using NMR spectroscopy, variable selection and chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlton, Adrian J. [Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: adrian.charlton@csl.gov.uk; Robb, Paul; Donarski, James A.; Godward, John [Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-23

    An efficient method for detecting malicious and accidental contamination of foods has been developed using a combined {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics approach. The method has been demonstrated using a commercially available carbonated soft drink, as being capable of identifying atypical products and to identify contaminant resonances. Soft-independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to compare {sup 1}H NMR profiles of genuine products (obtained from the manufacturer) against retail products spiked in the laboratory with impurities. The benefits of using feature selection for extracting contaminant NMR frequencies were also assessed. Using example impurities (paraquat, p-cresol and glyphosate) NMR spectra were analysed using multivariate methods resulting in detection limits of approximately 0.075, 0.2, and 0.06 mM for p-cresol, paraquat and glyphosate, respectively. These detection limits are shown to be approximately 100-fold lower than the minimum lethal dose for paraquat. The methodology presented here is used to assess the composition of complex matrices for the presence of contaminating molecules without a priori knowledge of the nature of potential contaminants. The ability to detect if a sample does not fit into the expected profile without recourse to multiple targeted analyses is a valuable tool for incident detection and forensic applications.

  15. Identification and quantification of the main organic components of vinegars by high resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiani, A; Acquotti, D; Palla, G; Bocchi, V

    2007-02-28

    A detailed analysis of the proton high-field NMR spectra of vinegars (in particular of Italian balsamic vinegars) is reported. A large number of organic substances belonging to different classes, such as carbohydrates, alcohols, organic acids, volatile compounds and amino acids, were assigned. The possibility of quantification of the substances identified in the whole vinegar sample, without extraction or pre-concentration steps, was also tested. The data validity was demonstrated in terms of precision, accuracy, repeatability and inter-day reproducibility. The effects of the most critical experimental parameters (sample concentration, water suppression and relaxation time) on the analysis response were also discussed. (1)H NMR results were compared with those obtained by traditional techniques (GC-MS, titrations), and good correlations were obtained. The results showed that (1)H NMR with water suppression allows a rapid, simultaneous determination of carbohydrates (glucose and fructose), organic acids (acetic, formic, lactic, malic, citric, succinic and tartaric acids), alcohols and polyols (ethanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, hydroxymethylfurfural), and volatile substances (ethyl acetate) in vinegar samples. On the contrary, the amino acid determination without sample pre-concentration was critical. The (1)H NMR method proposed was applied to different samples of vinegars, allowing, in particular, the discrimination of vinegars and balsamic vinegars. PMID:17386654

  16. Insight into the Supramolecular Architecture of Intact Diatom Biosilica from DNP-Supported Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jantschke, Anne; Koers, Eline; Mance, Deni; Weingarth, Markus; Brunner, Eike; Baldus, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Diatom biosilica is an inorganic/organic hybrid with interesting properties. The molecular architecture of the organic material at the atomic and nanometer scale has so far remained unknown, in particular for intact biosilica. A DNP-supported ssNMR approach assisted by microscopy, MS, and MD simulat

  17. Non-targeted detection of chemical contamination in carbonated soft drinks using NMR spectroscopy, variable selection and chemometrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An efficient method for detecting malicious and accidental contamination of foods has been developed using a combined 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics approach. The method has been demonstrated using a commercially available carbonated soft drink, as being capable of identifying atypical products and to identify contaminant resonances. Soft-independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to compare 1H NMR profiles of genuine products (obtained from the manufacturer) against retail products spiked in the laboratory with impurities. The benefits of using feature selection for extracting contaminant NMR frequencies were also assessed. Using example impurities (paraquat, p-cresol and glyphosate) NMR spectra were analysed using multivariate methods resulting in detection limits of approximately 0.075, 0.2, and 0.06 mM for p-cresol, paraquat and glyphosate, respectively. These detection limits are shown to be approximately 100-fold lower than the minimum lethal dose for paraquat. The methodology presented here is used to assess the composition of complex matrices for the presence of contaminating molecules without a priori knowledge of the nature of potential contaminants. The ability to detect if a sample does not fit into the expected profile without recourse to multiple targeted analyses is a valuable tool for incident detection and forensic applications

  18. De novo fragment-based design of inhibitors of DXS guided by spin-diffusion-based NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masini, T.; Pilger, J.; Kroezen, B. S.; Illarionov, B.; Lottmann, P.; Fischer, M.; Griesinger, C.; Hirsch, A. K. H.

    2014-01-01

    We applied for the first time an innovative ligand-based NMR methodology (STI) to a medicinal-chemistry project aimed at the development of inhibitors for the enzyme 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS). DXS is the first enzyme of the 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, presen

  19. Novel insights from NMR spectroscopy into seasonal changes in the composition of dissolved organic matter exported to the Bering Sea by the Yukon River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Aiken, George R.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Butler, Kenna; Mao, Jingdong; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal (spring freshet, summer–autumn, and winter) variability in the chemical composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the Yukon River was determined using advanced one- and two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, coupled with isotopic measurements and UV–visible spectroscopy. Analyses were performed on two major DOM fractions, the hydrophobic organic acid (HPOA) and transphilic organic acid (TPIA) fractions obtained using XAD resins. Together these two fractions comprised 64–74% of the total DOM. Carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM) accounted for the majority of carbon atoms in the HPOA (63–77%) and TPIA (54–78%) samples, and more so in winter and summer than in spring samples. 2D and selective NMR data revealed association of abundant nonprotonated O-alkyl and quaternary alkyl C (OCnp, OCnpO and Cq, 13–17% of HPOA and 15–20% of TPIA) and isolated O–CH structures with CRAM, which were not recognized in previous studies. Spectral editing and 2D NMR allowed for the discrimination of carbohydrate-like O-alkyl C from non-carbohydrate O-alkyl C. Whereas two spring freshet TPIA samples contained carbohydrate clusters such as carboxylated carbohydrates (16% and 26%), TPIA samples from other seasons or HPOA samples mostly had small amounts (exported by the Yukon River across different seasons, due to the predominance of CRAM and their associated nonprotonated C–O and O–C–O structures, and elevated reactivity (bio- and photo-lability) of spring DOM due to the presence of terrestrial inputs enriched in carbohydrates and aromatic structures.

  20. Novel insights from NMR spectroscopy into seasonal changes in the composition of dissolved organic matter exported to the Bering Sea by the Yukon River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Aiken, George R.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Butler, Kenna; Mao, Jingdong; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Seasonal (spring freshet, summer-autumn, and winter) variability in the chemical composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the Yukon River was determined using advanced one- and two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, coupled with isotopic measurements and UV-visible spectroscopy. Analyses were performed on two major DOM fractions, the hydrophobic organic acid (HPOA) and transphilic organic acid (TPIA) fractions obtained using XAD resins. Together these two fractions comprised 64-74% of the total DOM. Carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM) accounted for the majority of carbon atoms in the HPOA (63-77%) and TPIA (54-78%) samples, and more so in winter and summer than in spring samples. 2D and selective NMR data revealed association of abundant nonprotonated O-alkyl and quaternary alkyl C (OCnp, OCnpO and Cq, 13-17% of HPOA and 15-20% of TPIA) and isolated O-CH structures with CRAM, which were not recognized in previous studies. Spectral editing and 2D NMR allowed for the discrimination of carbohydrate-like O-alkyl C from non-carbohydrate O-alkyl C. Whereas two spring freshet TPIA samples contained carbohydrate clusters such as carboxylated carbohydrates (16% and 26%), TPIA samples from other seasons or HPOA samples mostly had small amounts (exported by the Yukon River across different seasons, due to the predominance of CRAM and their associated nonprotonated C-O and O-C-O structures, and elevated reactivity (bio- and photo-lability) of spring DOM due to the presence of terrestrial inputs enriched in carbohydrates and aromatic structures.

  1. Holistic Control of Herbal Teas and Tinctures Based on Sage (Salvia officinalis L.) for Compounds with Beneficial and Adverse Effects using NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephan G; Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Kuballa, Thomas; Stühlinger, Wolf; Monakhova, Yulia B

    2012-01-01

    A methodology that utilizes (1)H-NMR spectroscopy has been developed to simultaneously analyze toxic terpenes (thujone and camphor), major polyphenolic compounds, the total antioxidant capacity (ORAC) and the Folin-Ciocalteu (FC) index in foods and medicines containing sage. The quantitative determination of rosmarinic acid (limit of detection (LOD) = 10 mg/L) and total thujone (LOD = 0.35 mg/L) was possible using direct integration of the signals. For other parameters (derivatives of rosmarinic acid, carnosol and flavone glycosides, ORAC and FC index), chemometric regression models obtained separately for alcohol-based tinctures (R(2) = 0.94-0.98) and aqueous tea infusions (R(2) = 0.79-0.99) were suitable for screening analysis. The relative standard deviations for authentic samples were below 10%. The developed methodology was applied for the analysis of a wide variety of sage products (n = 108). The total thujone content in aqueous tea infusions was found to be in the range of not detectable (nd) to 37.5 mg/L (average 9.2 mg/L), while tinctures contained higher levels (range nd-409 mg/L, average 107 mg/L). The camphor content varied from 2.1 to 43.7 mg/L in aqueous infusions and from not detectable to 748 mg/L in tinctures (averages were 14.1 and 206 mg/L, respectively). Phenolic compounds were also detected in the majority of the investigated products. (1)H-NMR spectroscopy was proven to have the ability to holistically control all important adverse and beneficial compounds in sage products in a single experiment, considerably saving time, resources and costs as NMR replaces four separate methodologies that were previously needed to analyze the same parameters.

  2. Soil nitrogen mineralisation and organic matter composition revealed by 13C NMR spectroscopy under repeated prescribed burning in eucalypt forests of south-east Queensland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of burning on in situ extractable nitrogen (NH+4-N+NO-3-N) and net N mineralisation following scheduled fuel reduction burns in repeatedly burnt dry and wet sclerophyll forest sites in south-east Queensland were assessed. In addition, soil organic matter composition in the wet sclerophyll site was assessed by 13C NMR spectroscopy. The results showed that at the dry sclerophyll site, extractable N and net N mineralisation for 1 year were largely unaffected by burning, while at the wet sclerophyll site, these parameters decreased. 13C NMR analysis of soil samples from the wet sclerophyll site revealed that there was a significant reduction in the proportion of O-alkyl (alkoxy/carbohydrate) C with increasing burning frequency. Statistically significant effects on the other chemical shift regions were not detected. The ratio of alkyl C to O-alkyl C, a proposed index of organic matter decomposition, increased with increasing burning frequency. A high ratio of alkyl C to O-alkyl C suggests low amounts of carbohydrates relative to waxes and cutins, which could in turn lead to slower mineralisation. The findings are in accord with this hypothesis. There were significant linear relationships between cumulative N mineralisation for 1 year and the proportions of alkyl C and O-alkyl C, and the ratio of alkyl C/O-alkyl C. Thus, in addition to reductions in substrate quantity (low organic C and total N for burnt soils), there was also an alteration of substrate quality as revealed by 13C NMR spectroscopy which is reflected in low N mineralisation. Copyright (1999) CSIRO Publishing

  3. Investigations of the structure and "interfacial" surface chemistry of Bioglass (RTM) materials by solid-state multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Gautam

    Bioactive materials such as BioglassRTM 45S5 (45% SiO 2, 24.5% CaO, 24.5% Na2O, and 6% P2O5 by weight) are sodium-phosphosilicate glasses containing independent three-dimensional silicate and phosphate networks and Na+ and Ca2+ ions as modifying cations. Due to their bioactivity, these materials are currently used as implants and for other surgical and clinical applications. The bioactivity of BioglassesRTM is due to their unique capability to form chemical bonds to tissues through an octacalciumphosphate (OCP)- and/or hydroxyapatite-like (HA) "interfacial" matrix. The formation of OCP and/or HA is preceded by the formation of a silica-rich surface layer and the subsequent growth of an amorphous calcium phosphate (a-CP) layer. Structural characterization of a series of commercial and synthesized Bioglass materials 45S5 52S, 55S, 60S, and synthesized 17O-labelled "Bioglass materials 45S, 52S, 55S and 60S" have been obtained using solid-state single-pulse magic-angle spinning (SP/MAS) 17O, 23Na, 29Si and 31P NMR. The 17O NMR isotropic chemical shifts and estimates of the quadrupole coupling constants (Cq) [at fixed asymmetry parameter ( hQ ) values of zero] have been obtained from solid-state spin-echo 17O SP/MAS NMR spectra of 17O-labelled "Bioglasses". The simulation results of these spectra reveal the presence of both bridging-oxygens (BO, i.e. ≡ Si-17OSi ≡ ) and non-bridging oxygens (NBO, i.e. ≡ Si-17O-Na+/Ca2+ ) in the silicate networks in these materials. 17O NMR spectra of these Bioglass materials do not show any direct evidence for the presence of BO and NBO atoms in the phosphate units; however, they are expected to be present in small amounts. In vitro reactions of BioglassRTM 45S5, 60S and 77S powders have been used to study the "interfacial" surface chemistry of these materials in simulated body-fluid (SBF, Kyoto or K9 solution) and/or 17O-enriched tris-buffer solution. 29Si and 31P SP/MAS NMR have been used to identify and quantify the extent of

  4. Structural Investigations of Portland Cement Components, Hydration, and Effects of Admixtures by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen Bengaard; Andersen, Morten D.; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    for the C-S-H phase formed during hydration. It will be demonstrated that Al3+ and flouride guest-ions in the anhydrous and hydrated calcium silicates can be studied in detail by 27Al and 19F MAS NMR, thereby providing information on the local structure and the mechanisms for incorporation of these ions...... in the cement phases. The role of flouride ions is of special interest for mineralized Portland cements and it demonstrated that the location of these anions in anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements can be clarified using 19F MAS or 29Si{19F} CP/MAS NMR despite these cements contain only about 0.2 wt...

  5. Choosing the best pulse sequences, acquisition parameters, postacquisition processing strategies, and probes for natural product structure elucidation by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, William F; Enríquez, Raúl G

    2002-02-01

    The relative merits of different pairs of two-dimensional NMR pulse sequences (COSY-90 vs COSY-45, NOESY vs T-ROESY, HSQC vs HMQC, HMBC vs CIGAR, etc.) are compared and recommendations are made for the preferred choice of sequences for natural product structure elucidation. Similar comparisons are made between different selective 1D sequences and the corresponding 2D sequences. Many users of 2D NMR use longer than necessary relaxation delays and neglect to use forward linear prediction processing. It is shown that using shorter relaxation delays in combination with forward linear prediction allows one to get better resolved spectra in less time. The relative merits of different probes and likely future probe developments are also discussed.

  6. On The Potential of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Diamonds in Solid-State and Dissolution (13) C NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bretschneider, Christian O; Akbey, Ümit; Aussenac, Fabien;

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a versatile option to improve the sensitivity of NMR and MRI. This versatility has elicited interest for overcoming potential limitations of these techniques, including the achievement of solid-state polarization enhancement at ambient conditions, and the...... environments ranging from cryogenic to ambient temperatures, in both solution and solid-state experiments. It was found that (13) C NMR signals could be boosted by orders of magnitude in either low- or room-temperature solid-state DNP experiments by utilizing naturally occurring paramagnetic P1 substitutional......) C Zeeman splitting. The efficiency of this solid-state polarization process, however, is harder to exploit in dissolution DNP-enhanced MRI contexts. The prospects for utilizing polarized diamond approaching nanoscale dimensions for both solid and solution applications are briefly discussed....

  7. Determination and comparison of seed oil triacylglycerol composition of various soybeans (Glycine max (L.)) using ¹H-NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Woo; Rho, Ho Sik; Hong, Yong Deog; Yeom, Myung Hun; Shin, Song Seok; Yi, Jun Gon; Lee, Min-Seuk; Park, Hye Yoon; Cho, Dong Ha

    2013-11-21

    Seed oil triacylglycerol (TAG) composition of 32 soybean varieties were determined and compared using ¹H-NMR. The contents of linolenic (Ln), linoleic (L), and oleic (O) ranged from 10.7% to 19.3%, 37.4%-50.1%, and 15.7%-34.1%, respectively. As is evident, linoleic acid was the major fatty acid of soybean oil. Compositional differences among the varieties were observed. Natural oils containing unsaturated groups have been regarded as important nutrient and cosmetic ingredients because of their various biological activities. The TAG profiles of the soy bean oils could be useful for distinguishing the origin of seeds and controlling the quality of soybean oils. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in which the TAG composition of various soybean oils has been analyzed using the ¹H-NMR method.

  8. Quantification of chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate in danaparoid sodium by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and PLS regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustün, B; Sanders, K B; Dani, P; Kellenbach, E R

    2011-01-01

    Danaparoid sodium (the active pharmaceutical ingredient in Orgaran; Merck Sharp and Dohme) is a biopolymeric non-heparin drug used as anticoagulant and antithrombotic agent approved for the prophylaxis of post-operative deep-vein thrombosis, which may lead to pulmonary embolism in patients undergoing, e.g., elective hip replacement surgery. It consists of a mixture of three glycosaminoglycans (GAGs): heparan sulfate (HS), dermatan sulfate (DS), and chondroitin sulfate (CS). Currently, the CS and DS content are quantified by means of a time-consuming enzymatic method. In this paper the use of (1)H NMR in combination with multivariate regression (partial least-squares, PLS) is proposed as a new method. In order to evaluate the proposed method, a series of danaparoid sodium samples were analyzed and the results were compared with those obtained by the enzymatic method (reference method). The results showed that the proposed (1)H NMR method is a good alternative for analysis of CS and DS in danaparoid sodium. Accuracy of ±0.7% (w/w) and ±1.1% (w/w) for CS and DS was obtained by the (1)H NMR method and accuracy of ±1.0% (w/w) and ±1.3% (w/w) by the enzymatic method. Furthermore, the use of (1)H NMR in combination with PLS results in a fast quantification. The analysis time is reduced to 35 min per sample instead of 60 h for a maximum of 16 samples. PMID:20862579

  9. Detection of Potential TNA and RNA Nucleoside Precursors in a Prebiotic Mixture by Pure Shift Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, S

    2013-01-01

    In the context of prebiotic chemistry, one of the characteristics of mixed nitrogenous-oxygenous chemistry is its propensity to give rise to highly complex reaction mixtures. There is therefore an urgent need to develop improved spectroscopic techniques if onerous chromatographic separations are to be avoided. One potential avenue is the combination of pure shift methodology, in which NMR spectra are measured with greatly improved resolution by suppressing multiplet structure, with diffusion-...

  10. Direct determination of phosphate sugars in biological material by (1)H high-resolution magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diserens, Gaëlle; Vermathen, Martina; Gjuroski, Ilche; Eggimann, Sandra; Precht, Christina; Boesch, Chris; Vermathen, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The study aim was to unambiguously assign nucleotide sugars, mainly UDP-X that are known to be important in glycosylation processes as sugar donors, and glucose-phosphates that are important intermediate metabolites for storage and transfer of energy directly in spectra of intact cells, as well as in skeletal muscle biopsies by (1)H high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HR-MAS) NMR. The results demonstrate that sugar phosphates can be determined quickly and non-destructively in cells and biopsies by HR-MAS, which may prove valuable considering the importance of phosphate sugars in cell metabolism for nucleic acid synthesis. As proof of principle, an example of phosphate-sugar reaction and degradation kinetics after unfreezing the sample is shown for a cardiac muscle, suggesting the possibility to follow by HR-MAS NMR some metabolic pathways. Graphical abstract Glucose-phosphate sugars (Glc-1P and Glc-6P) detected in muscle by 1H HR-MAS NMR.

  11. {sup 1}H NMR-based spectroscopy detects metabolic alterations in serum of patients with early-stage ulcerative colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying; Lin, Lianjie [Second Department of Gastroenterology, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Xu, Yanbin [Wanlei Life Sciences (Shenyang) Co., Ltd., Shenyang 110179 (China); Lin, Yan; Jin, Yu [Second Department of Gastroenterology, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zheng, Changqing, E-mail: changqing_zheng@126.com [Second Department of Gastroenterology, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Twenty ulcerative colitis patients and nineteen healthy controls were enrolled. •Increased 3-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, phenylalanine, and decreased lipid were found. •We report early stage diagnosis of ulcerative colitis using NMR-based metabolomics. -- Abstract: Ulcerative colitis (UC) has seriously impaired the health of citizens. Accurate diagnosis of UC at an early stage is crucial to improve the efficiency of treatment and prognosis. In this study, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR)-based metabolomic analysis was performed on serum samples collected from active UC patients (n = 20) and healthy controls (n = 19), respectively. The obtained spectral profiles were subjected to multivariate data analysis. Our results showed that consistent metabolic alterations were present between the two groups. Compared to healthy controls, UC patients displayed increased 3-hydroxybutyrate, β-glucose, α-glucose, and phenylalanine, but decreased lipid in serum. These findings highlight the possibilities of NMR-based metabolomics as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for UC.

  12. ¹H NMR spectroscopy profiling of metabolic reprogramming of Chinese hamster ovary cells upon a temperature shift during culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane L Wagstaff

    Full Text Available We report an NMR based approach to determine the metabolic reprogramming of Chinese hamster ovary cells upon a temperature shift during culture by investigating the extracellular cell culture media and intracellular metabolome of CHOK1 and CHO-S cells during culture and in response to cold-shock and subsequent recovery from hypothermic culturing. A total of 24 components were identified for CHOK1 and 29 components identified for CHO-S cell systems including the observation that CHO-S media contains 5.6 times the level of glucose of CHOK1 media at time zero. We confirm that an NMR metabolic approach provides quantitative analysis of components such as glucose and alanine with both cell lines responding in a similar manner and comparable to previously reported data. However, analysis of lactate confirms a differentiation between CHOK1 and CHO-S and that reprogramming of metabolism in response to temperature was cell line specific. The significance of our results is presented using principal component analysis (PCA that confirms changes in metabolite profile in response to temperature and recovery. Ultimately, our approach demonstrates the capability of NMR providing real-time analysis to detect reprogramming of metabolism upon cellular perception of cold-shock/sub-physiological temperatures. This has the potential to allow manipulation of metabolites in culture supernatant to improve growth or productivity.

  13. 1H NMR-based spectroscopy detects metabolic alterations in serum of patients with early-stage ulcerative colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Twenty ulcerative colitis patients and nineteen healthy controls were enrolled. •Increased 3-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, phenylalanine, and decreased lipid were found. •We report early stage diagnosis of ulcerative colitis using NMR-based metabolomics. -- Abstract: Ulcerative colitis (UC) has seriously impaired the health of citizens. Accurate diagnosis of UC at an early stage is crucial to improve the efficiency of treatment and prognosis. In this study, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR)-based metabolomic analysis was performed on serum samples collected from active UC patients (n = 20) and healthy controls (n = 19), respectively. The obtained spectral profiles were subjected to multivariate data analysis. Our results showed that consistent metabolic alterations were present between the two groups. Compared to healthy controls, UC patients displayed increased 3-hydroxybutyrate, β-glucose, α-glucose, and phenylalanine, but decreased lipid in serum. These findings highlight the possibilities of NMR-based metabolomics as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for UC

  14. NMR methodologies for studying mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Tiago C; Jarak, Ivana; Carvalho, Rui A

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a technique with an increasing importance in the study of metabolic diseases. Its initial important role in the determination of chemical structures (1, 2) has been considerably overcome by its potential for the in vivo study of metabolism (3-5). The main characteristic that makes this technique so attractive is its noninvasiveness. Only nuclei capable of transitioning between energy states, in the presence of an intense and constant magnetic field, are studied. This includes abundant nuclei such as proton ((1)H) and phosphorous ((31)P), as well as stable isotopes such as deuterium ((2)H) and carbon 13 ((13)C). This allows a wide range of applications that vary from the determination of water distribution in tissues (as obtained in a magnetic resonance imaging scan) to the calculation of metabolic fluxes under ex vivo and in vivo conditions without the need to use radioactive tracers or tissue biopsies (as in a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) scan). In this chapter, some technical aspects of the methodology of an NMR/MRS experiment as well as how it can be used to study mitochondrial bioenergetics are overviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo MRS versus high-resolution NMR using proton high rotation magic angle spinning (HRMAS) of tissue biopsies and tissue extracts are also discussed. PMID:22057574

  15. Synthesis and conformational analysis of new derivatives of 7-chloro-1,3-dihydro-5-phenyl-2h-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one

    CERN Document Server

    Imanzadeh, G H; Sadra, Y

    2011-01-01

    1,4-benzodiazepine-2-ones and their derivatives are prominent structures in medicinal chemistry. These biomolecules have wide biological activities and posses therapeutic applications. In this works, we introduce new derivatives of 1,4-benzodiazepine-2-ones which are synthesized using michael addition reaction of 7-chloro- 1,3-dihydro-5-phenyl-2H-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-ones with fumaric esters that matches with green chemistry protocols. The structures of all products are confirmed by FT-IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and MASS spectroscopy. Since the stereochemistry of 1,4-benzo diazepine-2-ones is important, we study the most stable conformer of one of the products as a model for conformational analysis by hyper chem soft ware and semi empirical AM1 program. Also, using the 1H-NMR spectrum, we investigate the produced diastereomers of one of products as a model.

  16. Water Structure and Dynamics in Smectites: X-ray Diffraction and 2 H NMR Spectroscopy of Mg–, Ca–, Sr–, Na–, Cs–, and Pb–Hectorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, U. Venkateswara; Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Loganathan, Narasimhan; Bowden, Mark; Yazaydin, A. Ozgur; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    2016-04-06

    Variable-temperature X-ray diffraction and 2H NMR spectroscopy of the smectite mineral, hectorite, containing interlayer Na+, K+, Cs+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, and Pb2+ equilibrated at 43% relative humidity (RH) and mixed with 2H2O to form a paste provide a comprehensive picture of the structural environments and dynamics of interlayer 2H2O and the relationships of these properties to interlayer hydration state, the hydration energy and polarizability of the cation, temperature, and the formation of ice-1h in the interparticle pores. The variation in basal spacing shown by the XRD data correlates well with the 2H NMR behavior, and the XRD data show for the first time in hectorites that crystallization of interparticle ice-1h causes a decrease in the interlayer spacing, likely due to removal of interlayer 2H2O. The variation of the 2H NMR behavior of all the samples with decreasing temperature reflects decreasing frequencies of motion for the rotation of the 2H2O molecules around their dipoles, reorientation of the 2H2O molecules, and exchange of the 2H2O molecules between interlayer sites coordinated to and not coordinated to the cations.

  17. Tracking Sodium-Antimonide Phase Transformations in Sodium-Ion Anodes: Insights from Operando Pair Distribution Function Analysis and Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Phoebe K; Griffin, John M; Darwiche, Ali; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Wiaderek, Kamila M; Chapman, Karena W; Morris, Andrew J; Chupas, Peter J; Monconduit, Laure; Grey, Clare P

    2016-02-24

    Operando pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and ex situ (23)Na magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS ssNMR) spectroscopy are used to gain insight into the alloying mechanism of high-capacity antimony anodes for sodium-ion batteries. Subtraction of the PDF of crystalline NaxSb phases from the total PDF, an approach constrained by chemical phase information gained from (23)Na ssNMR in reference to relevant model compounds, identifies two previously uncharacterized intermediate species formed electrochemically; a-Na(3-x)Sb (x ≈ 0.4-0.5), a structure locally similar to crystalline Na3Sb (c-Na3Sb) but with significant numbers of sodium vacancies and a limited correlation length, and a-Na(1.7)Sb, a highly amorphous structure featuring some Sb-Sb bonding. The first sodiation breaks down the crystalline antimony to form first a-Na(3-x)Sb and, finally, crystalline Na3Sb. Desodiation results in the formation of an electrode formed of a composite of crystalline and amorphous antimony networks. We link the different reactivity of these networks to a series of sequential sodiation reactions manifesting as a cascade of processes observed in the electrochemical profile of subsequent cycles. The amorphous network reacts at higher voltages reforming a-Na(1.7)Sb, then a-Na(3-x)Sb, whereas lower potentials are required for the sodiation of crystalline antimony, which reacts to form a-Na(3-x)Sb without the formation of a-Na(1.7)Sb. a-Na(3-x)Sb is converted to crystalline Na3Sb at the end of the second discharge. We find no evidence of formation of NaSb. Variable temperature (23)Na NMR experiments reveal significant sodium mobility within c-Na3Sb; this is a possible contributing factor to the excellent rate performance of Sb anodes.

  18. The Asp245-->Asn mutant of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. Characterization by 1H-NMR spectroscopy and comparison with the wild-type enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, N C; Gao, Y; Welinder, K G

    1996-11-12

    The resting, fluoride-ligated and cyanide-ligated states of the Asp245-->Asn mutant of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (D245N CIP) have been characterized using 1H-NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with parallel studies of the wild-type enzyme. Analysis of the spectra of resting state D245N CIP over the pH range 5-10 has uncovered the existence of three high-spin species in dynamic equilibrium with each other. The predominant species at neutral pH is six-coordinate high-spin (6-c HS), with a distal water molecule as the sixth ligand. This species is in slow exchange on the NMR time scale with a second six-coordinate high-spin species (6-c HS*) and a five-coordinate high-spin species (5-c HS**), toward acidic and alkaline pH values, respectively. The 6-c HS* species appears to be unique and is proposed to differ from the 6-c HS species by protonation of the proximal His residue, whereas the 5-c HS** species lacks the proximal His ligand and is coordinated by a hydroxyl group. In sharp contrast, wild-type CIP is a five-coordinate high-spin (5-c HS) species over the same pH range. The D245N CIP mutant also exhibits a greater affinity for fluoride than wild-type CIP. The 1H-NMR spectrum of cyanide-ligated D245N CIP, assigned using two-dimensional methods, differs significantly from that of the wild-type enzyme. Perturbations to heme and heme-linked proton resonances are rationalised in terms of the loss or significant weakening of the hydrogen bond between His183 N delta 1H and the side-chain of residue 245 when Asp is replaced by Asn. This subtle interaction directly affects the heme pocket structure of CIP both proximal and distal to the heme plane.

  19. FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible, and NMR spectroscopy and vibrational properties of the labdane-type diterpene 13-epi-sclareol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chain, Fernando E.; Leyton, Patricio; Paipa, Carolina; Fortuna, Mario; Brandán, Silvia A.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible and NMR spectroscopies and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to study the structural and vibrational properties of the labdane-type diterpene 13-epi-sclareol using the hybrid B3LYP method together with the 6-31G∗ basis set. Three stable structures with minimum energy found on the potential energy curves (PES) were optimized, and the corresponding molecular electrostatic potentials, atomic charges, bond orders, stabilization energies and topological properties were computed at the same approximation level. The complete assignment of the bands observed in the vibrational spectrum of 13-epi-sclareol was performed taking into account the internal symmetry coordinates for the three structures using the scaled quantum mechanical force field (SQMFF) methodology at the same level of theory. In addition, the force constants were calculated and compared with those reported in the literature for similar compounds. The predicted vibrational spectrum and the calculated 1H NMR and 13C NMR chemical shifts are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results. The theoretical UV-Vis spectra for the most stable structure of 13-epi-sclareol demonstrate a better correlation with the corresponding experimental spectrum. The study of the three conformers by means of the theory of atoms in molecules (AIM) revealed different H bond interactions and a strong dependence of the interactions on the distance between the involved atoms. Furthermore, the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations showed the characteristics of the electronic delocalization for the two six-membered rings with chair conformations.

  20. {sup 19}F-labeling of the adenine H2-site to study large RNAs by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sochor, F. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany); Silvers, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory (United States); Müller, D.; Richter, C.; Fürtig, B., E-mail: fuertig@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de; Schwalbe, H., E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    In comparison to proteins and protein complexes, the size of RNA amenable to NMR studies is limited despite the development of new isotopic labeling strategies including deuteration and ligation of differentially labeled RNAs. Due to the restricted chemical shift dispersion in only four different nucleotides spectral resolution remains limited in larger RNAs. Labeling RNAs with the NMR-active nucleus {sup 19}F has previously been introduced for small RNAs up to 40 nucleotides (nt). In the presented work, we study the natural occurring RNA aptamer domain of the guanine-sensing riboswitch comprising 73 nucleotides from Bacillus subtilis. The work includes protocols for improved in vitro transcription of 2-fluoroadenosine-5′-triphosphat (2F-ATP) using the mutant P266L of the T7 RNA polymerase. Our NMR analysis shows that the secondary and tertiary structure of the riboswitch is fully maintained and that the specific binding of the cognate ligand hypoxanthine is not impaired by the introduction of the {sup 19}F isotope. The thermal stability of the {sup 19}F-labeled riboswitch is not altered compared to the unmodified sequence, but local base pair stabilities, as measured by hydrogen exchange experiments, are modulated. The characteristic change in the chemical shift of the imino resonances detected in a {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N-HSQC allow the identification of Watson–Crick base paired uridine signals and the {sup 19}F resonances can be used as reporters for tertiary and secondary structure transitions, confirming the potential of {sup 19}F-labeling even for sizeable RNAs in the range of 70 nucleotides.