WorldWideScience

Sample records for 2d laser scans

  1. Motion Detection from Mobile Robots with Fuzzy Threshold Selection in Consecutive 2D Laser Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. Martínez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Motion detection and tracking is a relevant problem for mobile robots during navigation to avoid collisions in dynamic environments or in applications where service robots interact with humans. This paper presents a simple method to distinguish mobile obstacles from the environment that is based on applying fuzzy threshold selection to consecutive two-dimensional (2D laser scans previously matched with robot odometry. The proposed method has been tested with the Auriga-α mobile robot in indoors to estimate the motion of nearby pedestrians.

  2. Terrain Classification for Outdoor Autonomous Robots using 2D Laser Scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rufus Blas, Morten; Riisgaard, Søren; Ravn, Ole;

    2005-01-01

    Interpreting laser data to allow autonomous robot navigation on paved as well as dirt roads using a fixed angle 2D laser scanner is a daunting task. This paper introduces an algorithm for terrain classification that fuses four distinctly different classifiers: raw height, step size, slope, and...... department developed Medium Mobile Robot and tests conducted in a national park environment....

  3. Terrain Classification for Outdoor Autonomous Robots using 2D Laser Scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rufus Blas, Morten; Riisgaard, Søren; Ravn, Ole;

    2005-01-01

    Interpreting laser data to allow autonomous robot navigation on paved as well as dirt roads using a fixed angle 2D laser scanner is a daunting task. This paper introduces an algorithm for terrain classification that fuses four distinctly different classifiers: raw height, step size, slope...... with a department developed Medium Mobile Robot and tests conducted in a national park environment....

  4. Closed-loop control of a 2-D mems micromirror with sidewall electrodes for a laser scanning microscope system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Chen, Albert; Jie Sun, Wei; Sun, Zhen Dong; Yeow, John TW

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the development and implementation of a robust nonlinear control scheme for a 2-D micromirror-based laser scanning microscope system. The presented control scheme, built around sliding mode control approach and augmented an adaptive algorithm, is proposed to improve the tracking accuracy in presence of cross-axis effect. The closed-loop controlled imaging system is developed through integrating a 2-D micromirror with sidewall electrodes (SW), a laser source, NI field-programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware, the optics, position sensing detector (PSD) and photo detector (PD). The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed scheme is able to achieve accurate tracking of a reference triangular signal. Compared with open-loop control, the scanning performance is significantly improved, and a better 2-D image is obtained using the micromirror with the proposed scheme.

  5. Traversable terrain classification for outdoor autonomous robots using single 2D laser scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Christian; Blas, Morten Rufus; Andersen, Nils Axel;

    2006-01-01

    , curvature, slope, width and invalid data. These are then used to extract road borders, traversable terrain and identify obstacles. Experimental results are shown and discussed. The results were obtained using a DTU developed mobile robot, and the autonomous tests were conducted in a national park......Interpreting laser data to allow autonomous robot navigation on paved as well as dirt roads using a fixed angle 2D laser scanner is a daunting task. This paper introduces an algorithm for terrain classification that fuses seven distinctly different classifiers: raw height, roughness, step size...

  6. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach. PMID:26151203

  7. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taekjun Oh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach.

  8. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-07-03

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach.

  9. INTEGRATION OF TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING POINTS AND 2D FLOOR PLANS BASED ON MAXIMUM SEQUENTIAL SIMILARITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Maximum Sequential Similarity Reasoning (MSSR algorithm based method for co-registration of 3D TLS data and 2D floor plans. The co-registration consists of two tasks: estimating a transformation between the two datasets and finding the vertical locations of windows and doors. The method first extracts TLS line sequences and floor plan line sequences from a series of horizontal cross-section bands of the TLS points and floor plans respectively. Then each line sequence is further decomposed into column vectors defined by using local transformation invariant information between two neighbouring line segments. Based on a normalized cross-correlation based similarity score function, the proposed MSSR algorithm is then used to iteratively estimate the vertical and horizontal locations of each floor plan by finding the longest matched consecutive column vectors between floor plan line sequences and TLS line sequences. A group matching algorithm is applied to simultaneously determine final matching results across floor plans and estimate the transformation parameters between floor plans and TLS points. With real datasets, the proposed method demonstrates its ability to deal with occlusions and multiple matching problems. It also shows the potential to detect conflict between floor plan and as-built, which makes it a promising method that can find many applications in many industrial fields.

  10. 2D and 3D documentation of St. Nicolas baroque church for the general reconstruction using laser scanning and photogrammetry technologies combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Křemen, Tomáš; Koska, Bronislav

    2013-04-01

    Total reconstruction of a historical object is a complicated process consisting of several partial steps. One of these steps is acquiring high-quality data for preparation of the project documentation. If these data are not available from the previous periods, it is necessary to proceed to a detailed measurement of the object and to create a required drawing documentation. New measurement of the object brings besides its costs also several advantages as complex content and form of drawings exactly according to the requirements together with their high accuracy. The paper describes measurement of the Baroque church by the laser scanning method extended by the terrestrial and air photogrammetry. It deals with processing the measured data and creating the final outputs, which is a 2D drawing documentation, orthophotos and a 3D model. Attention is focused on their problematic parts like interconnection of the measurement data acquired by various technologies, creation of orthophotos and creation of the detailed combined 3D model of the church exterior. Results of this work were used for preparation of the planned reconstruction of the object.

  11. 2D Saturable Absorbers for Fibre Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert I. Woodward

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D nanomaterials are an emergent and promising platform for future photonic and optoelectronic applications. Here, we review recent progress demonstrating the application of 2D nanomaterials as versatile, wideband saturable absorbers for Q-switching and mode-locking fibre lasers. We focus specifically on the family of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides, including MoS2, MoSe2 and WS2.

  12. Resolving 2D Amorphous Materials with Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burson, Kristen M.; Buechner, Christin; Lewandowski, Adrian; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    Novel two-dimensional (2D) materials have garnered significant scientific interest due to their potential technological applications. Alongside the emphasis on crystalline materials, such as graphene and hexagonal BN, a new class of 2D amorphous materials must be pursued. For amorphous materials, a detailed understanding of the complex structure is necessary. Here we present a structural study of 2D bilayer silica on Ru(0001), an insulating material which is weakly coupled to the substrate. Atomic structure has been determined with a dual mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) sensor in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperatures, revealing a network of different ring sizes. Liquid AFM measurements with sub-nanometer resolution bridge the gap between clean UHV conditions and the environments that many material applications demand. Samples are grown and characterized in vacuum and subsequently transferred to the liquid AFM. Notably, the key structural features observed, namely nanoscale ring networks and larger holes to the substrate, show strong quantitative agreement between the liquid and UHV microscopy measurements. This provides direct evidence for the structural stability of these silica films for nanoelectronics and other applications. KMB acknowledges support from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  13. A quantitative damage imaging technique based on enhanced CCRTM for composite plates using 2D scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiaze; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-10-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) non-contact areal scan system was developed to image and quantify impact damage in a composite plate using an enhanced zero-lag cross-correlation reverse-time migration (E-CCRTM) technique. The system comprises a single piezoelectric wafer mounted on the composite plate and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) for scanning a region in the vicinity of the PZT to capture the scattered wavefield. The proposed damage imaging technique takes into account the amplitude, phase, geometric spreading, and all of the frequency content of the Lamb waves propagating in the plate; thus, a reflectivity coefficients of the delamination is calculated and potentially related to damage severity. Comparisons are made in terms of damage imaging quality between 2D areal scans and 1D line scans as well as between the proposed and existing imaging conditions. The experimental results show that the 2D E-CCRTM performs robustly when imaging and quantifying impact damage in large-scale composites using a single PZT actuator with a nearby areal scan using LDV.

  14. New Type of 2-D Laser Doppler Vibrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The fundamentals and method of 2-D laser Doppler vibrometer are introduced.The factors influencing the measuring accuracy are analyzed. Moreover, the circuit for signal processing is designed. The vibrating amplitude and frequency of 2-D vibration in wider range can be measured simultaneously in non-contact means,the measuring results are accurate.

  15. Fast 2D phantom dosimetry for scanning proton beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, SN; van Luijk, P; Schippers, JM; Meertens, H; Denis, JM; Vynckier, S; Medin, J; Grusell, E

    1998-01-01

    A quality control system especially designed for dosimetry in scanning proton beams has been designed and tested. The system consists of a scintillating screen (Gd2O2S:Tb), mounted at the beam-exit side of a phantom, and observed by a low noise CCD camera with a long integration time. The purpose of

  16. Non Resonant Slots for Wide Band 2D Scanning Arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerini, G.; Bruni, S.; Neto, A.; Maci, S.

    2005-01-01

    A novel type of broadband integrated array scanning in one plane is proposed. Such arrays are aimed to meet the requirements typically set for airborne Synthetic Aperture Radars, while allowing the highest degree of integration between the T/R modules and radiating elements. The array is composed by

  17. Hyperchromatic laser scanning cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárnok, Attila; Mittag, Anja

    2007-02-01

    In the emerging fields of high-content and high-throughput single cell analysis for Systems Biology and Cytomics multi- and polychromatic analysis of biological specimens has become increasingly important. Combining different technologies and staining methods polychromatic analysis (i.e. using 8 or more fluorescent colors at a time) can be pushed forward to measure anything stainable in a cell, an approach termed hyperchromatic cytometry. For cytometric cell analysis microscope based Slide Based Cytometry (SBC) technologies are ideal as, unlike flow cytometry, they are non-consumptive, i.e. the analyzed sample is fixed on the slide. Based on the feature of relocation identical cells can be subsequently reanalyzed. In this manner data on the single cell level after manipulation steps can be collected. In this overview various components for hyperchromatic cytometry are demonstrated for a SBC instrument, the Laser Scanning Cytometer (Compucyte Corp., Cambridge, MA): 1) polychromatic cytometry, 2) iterative restaining (using the same fluorochrome for restaining and subsequent reanalysis), 3) differential photobleaching (differentiating fluorochromes by their different photostability), 4) photoactivation (activating fluorescent nanoparticles or photocaged dyes), and 5) photodestruction (destruction of FRET dyes). With the intelligent combination of several of these techniques hyperchromatic cytometry allows to quantify and analyze virtually all components of relevance on the identical cell. The combination of high-throughput and high-content SBC analysis with high-resolution confocal imaging allows clear verification of phenotypically distinct subpopulations of cells with structural information. The information gained per specimen is only limited by the number of available antibodies and by sterical hindrance.

  18. Enhanced Algorithms for Estimating Tree Trunk Diameter Using 2D Laser Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Ringdahl

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate vehicle localization in forest environments is still an unresolved problem. Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS have well known limitations in dense forest, and have to be combined with for instance laser based SLAM algorithms to provide satisfying accuracy. Such algorithms typically require accurate detection of trees, and estimation of tree center locations in laser data. Both these operations depend on accurate estimations of tree trunk diameter. Diameter estimations are important also for several other forestry automation and remote sensing applications. This paper evaluates several existing algorithms for diameter estimation using 2D laser scanner data. Enhanced algorithms, compensating for beam width and using multiple scans, were also developed and evaluated. The best existing algorithms overestimated tree trunk diameter by ca. 40%. Our enhanced algorithms, compensating for laser beam width, reduced this error to less than 12%.

  19. Selected papers on laser scanning and recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiser, L.

    Previously published papers concerned with laser scanning and recording techniques are presented. Subjects treated include laser beam information scanning and recording, laser scanning techniques, system design considerations for laser scanning, laser noise, reliability, resolution, and dynamic range, and optical data storage systems. Consideration is given to the components and media for developing laser scanning and recording systems, in particular the laser, the optics, the scanner, and the storage media. Topics discussed include basic and operational multichannel acoustooptic operation; galvanometer and analog compensations; motor and control systems; angle measurement of scanner by interferometry, preheat-aided laser recording, creating multidimensional scan using a single rotating component, digital techniques in high resolution analog scanning and recording; laser scanning parameters and latitudes in laser xerography; optical video disc technology; focus error detection in optical data storage systems, holographic laser scanners for nonimpact printing; and techniques in optical strobe recording. Laser beam recording, techniques, film recorder systems, laser scanner applicaations, the optimization of printing speed and printout quality of laser beam printers, an internal drum laser scanning plate exposure system, and an ultra-high resolution graphic data terminal are described.

  20. Robust, spatially scanning, open-path TDLAS hygrometer using retro-reflective foils for fast tomographic 2-D water vapor concentration field measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, A.; Wagner, S.; Dreizler, A.; Ebert, V.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a fast, spatially scanning direct tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (dTDLAS) that combines four polygon-mirror based scanning units with low-cost retro-reflective foils. With this instrument, tomographic measurements of absolute 2-D water vapor concentration profiles are possible without any calibration using a reference gas. A spatial area of 0.8 m × 0.8 m was covered, which allows for application in soil physics, where greenhouse gas emissio...

  1. Handbook of optical and laser scanning

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, Gerald F

    2011-01-01

    From its initial publication titled Laser Beam Scanning in 1985 to Handbook of Optical and Laser Scanning, now in its second edition, this reference has kept professionals and students at the forefront of optical scanning technology. Carefully and meticulously updated in each iteration, the book continues to be the most comprehensive scanning resource on the market. It examines the breadth and depth of subtopics in the field from a variety of perspectives. The Second Edition covers: Technologies such as piezoelectric devices Applications of laser scanning such as Ladar (laser radar) Underwater

  2. QUANTITATIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Krog Raarup

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses recent advances in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM for imaging of 3D structure as well as quantitative characterization of biomolecular interactions and diffusion behaviour by means of one- and two-photon excitation. The use of CLSM for improved stereological length estimation in thick (up to 0.5 mm tissue is proposed. The techniques of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, FCS (Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching are introduced and their applicability for quantitative imaging of biomolecular (co-localization and trafficking in live cells described. The advantage of two-photon versus one-photon excitation in relation to these techniques is discussed.

  3. Scanning laser polarimetry in glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanuj Dada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is an acquired progressive optic neuropathy which is characterized by changes in the optic nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL. White-on-white perimetry is the gold standard for the diagnosis of glaucoma. However, it can detect defects in the visual field only after the loss of as many as 40% of the ganglion cells. Hence, the measurement of RNFL thickness has come up. Optical coherence tomography and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP are the techniques that utilize the evaluation of RNFL for the evaluation of glaucoma. SLP provides RNFL thickness measurements based upon the birefringence of the retinal ganglion cell axons. We have reviewed the published literature on the use of SLP in glaucoma. This review elucidates the technological principles, recent developments and the role of SLP in the diagnosis and monitoring of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, in the light of scientific evidence so far.

  4. Scan mirrors relay for high resolution laser scanning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, David

    2014-09-01

    Two dimensional beam deflection is often required in medical laser scanning systems such as OCT or confocal microscopy. Commonly two linear galvo mirrors are used for performance in terms of their large apertures and scan angles. The galvo mirrors are placed at the vicinity of entrance pupil of the scan lens with a "displacement distance" separating them. This distance limits the scan fields and/or reduces the effective aperture of the scan lens. Another option is to use a beam or pupil relay, and image one galvo mirror onto the other. However, beam (or pupil) relays are notoriously complicated, expensive and can add significant aberrations. This paper discusses a simple, all reflective, diffraction limited, color corrected, beam relay, capable of large scan angles and large deflecting mirrors. The design is based on a unique combination of an Offner configuration with a Schmidt aspheric corrector. The design is highly corrected up to large scan mirrors and large scan angles down to milliwaves of aberrations. It allows significantly larger scan field and or scan lenses with higher numerical aperture as compared with scanners using galvos separated by the displacement distance. While this relay is of exceptionally high performance, it has one element located where the beam is focused which may present a problem for high power lasers. Thus modifications of the above design are introduced where the beam is focused in mid air thus making it usable for high power systems such including laser marking and fabrication systems.

  5. Laser Absorption spectrometer instrument for tomographic 2D-measurement of climate gas emission from soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Anne; Wagner, Steven; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker

    2014-05-01

    One of the most intricate effects in climate modelling is the role of permafrost thawing during the global warming process. Soil that has formerly never totally lost its ice cover now emits climate gases due to melting processes[1]. For a better prediction of climate development and possible feedback mechanisms, insights into physical procedures (like e.g. gas emission from underground reservoirs) are required[2]. Therefore, a long-term quantification of greenhouse gas concentrations (and further on fluxes) is necessary and the related structures that are responsible for emission need to be identified. In particular the spatial heterogeneity of soils caused by soil internal structures (e.g. soil composition changes or surface cracks) or by surface modifications (e.g. by plant growth) generate considerable complexities and difficulties for local measurements, for example with soil chambers. For such situations, which often cannot be avoided, a spatially resolved 2D-measurement to identify and quantify the gas emission from the structured soil would be needed, to better understand the influence of the soil sub-structures on the emission behavior. Thus we designed a spatially scanning laser absorption spectrometer setup to determine a 2D-gas concentration map in the soil-air boundary layer. The setup is designed to cover the surfaces in the range of square meters in a horizontal plane above the soil to be investigated. Existing field instruments for gas concentration or flux measurements are based on point-wise measurements, so structure identification is very tedious or even impossible. For this reason, we have developed a tomographic in-situ instrument based on TDLAS ('tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy') that delivers absolute gas concentration distributions of areas with 0.8m × 0.8m size, without any need for reference measurements with a calibration gas. It is a simple and robust device based on a combination of scanning mirrors and reflecting foils, so

  6. Quantized 1D- and 2D optical molasses: Laser cooling and spectrum of resonance fluorescene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results for laser cooling of optical molasses and the spectrum of resonance fluorescene based on a fully quantum mechanical treatment of the atomic center-of-mass motion for 1D and 2D laser configurations. Our calculations based on recently developed wave function simulations of the quantum master equation for laser cooling

  7. Formation of nitric oxide in an industrial burner measured by 2-D laser induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, A.; Bombach, R.; Kaeppeli, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    We have performed two-dimensional Laser Induced Fluorescence (2-D LIF) measurements of nitric oxide and hydroxyl radical distributions in an industrial burner at atmospheric pressure. The relative 2-D LIF data of NO were set to an absolute scale by calibration with probe sampling combined with gas analysis. (author) 3 figs., 7 refs.

  8. 2D size, position and shape definition of defects by B-scan image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Scafidi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The non-destructive evaluation of defects by automatic procedures is of great importance for structural components. Thanks to the developments of the non-contact ultrasonic techniques, the automation of the inspections is gaining a progressively important role. In this work, an automatic inspection technique for the evaluation of defects by the analysis of B-scan images obtained by a laser ultrasonic system is presented. The data are extracted directly from a B-scan map obtained for a panel with internal defects, and are used to build an image of the cross section of the panel. The proposed automatic procedure allows the definition of size, position and shape of defects in panels of known thickness

  9. Spatial heterodyne scanning laser confocal holographic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Changgeng

    2016-01-01

    Scanning laser confocal holographic microscopy using a spatial heterodyne detection method is presented. Spatial heterodyne detection technique employs a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with the reference beam frequency shifted by two acousto-optic modulators (AOM) relative to the object beam frequency. Different from the traditional temporal heterodyne detection technique in which hundreds temporal samples are taken at each scanning point to achieve the complex signal, the spatial heterodyne detection technique generates spatial interference fringes by use of a linear tempo-spatial relation provided by galvanometer scanning in a typical line-scanning confocal microscope or for the slow-scanning on one dimension in a point-scanning confocal microscope, thereby significantly reducing sampling rate and increasing the signal to noise ratio under the same illumination compared to the traditional temporal heterodyne counterpart. The proposed spatial heterodyne detection scheme applies to both line-scanning and point-s...

  10. 2D modelling of clad geometry and resulting thermal cycles during laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ya, Wei; Pathiraj, B.; Liu, Shaojie

    2016-01-01

    A 2D thermal model of laser cladding process based on mass and energy balance is built incorporating the powder efficiency and solved with the finite element software COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS® v4.4. Powder efficiency was used as one of the input parameters. Powder efficiency was determined with weight me

  11. Manufacture of a 2D optical fiber array coupler with micrometer precision for laser radar applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the manufacture of a 2D-fiber array coupler using UV-LIGA technology for the precise positioning of a two-dimensional (2D) optical fiber array. The precision of the alignment of the eight-by-eight fiber array was demonstrated to be less than 2 μm. The average concentricity error of the fibers to the positioning holes of the array coupler had a minimum and maximum error of 1.7 µm and 6.5 μm, respectively. The 2D fiber array coupler can fulfill the coupling and transmission requirements of 2D light spots for laser radar applications. The method developed here can easily be extended to the manufacture of larger arrays. (paper)

  12. Multiplatform Mobile Laser Scanning: Usability and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile laser scanning is an emerging technology capable of capturing three-dimensional data from surrounding objects. With state-of-the-art sensors, the achieved point clouds capture object details with good accuracy and precision. Many of the applications involve civil engineering in urban areas, as well as traffic and other urban planning, all of which serve to make 3D city modeling probably the fastest growing market segment in this field. This article outlines multiplatform mobile laser scanning solutions such as vehicle- and trolley-operated urban area data acquisition, and boat-mounted equipment for fluvial environments. Moreover, we introduce a novel backpack version of mobile laser scanning equipment for surveying applications in the field of natural sciences where the requirements include precision and mobility in variable terrain conditions. In addition to presenting a technical description of the systems, we discuss the performance of the solutions in the light of various applications in the fields of urban mapping and modeling, fluvial geomorphology, snow-cover characterization, precision agriculture, and in monitoring the effects of climate change on permafrost landforms. The data performance of the mobile laser scanning approach is described by the results of an evaluation of the ROAMER on a permanent MLS test field. Furthermore, an in situ accuracy assessment using a field of spherical 3D targets for the newly-introduced Akhka backpack system is conducted and reported on.

  13. Highly resolved measurements of atmospheric turbulence with the new 2d-Atmospheric Laser Cantilever Anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeromin, A.; Schaffarczyk, A. P.; Puczylowski, J.; Peinke, J.; Hölling, M.

    2014-12-01

    For the investigation of atmospheric turbulent flows on small scales a new anemometer was developed, the so-called 2d-Atmospheric Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-ALCA). It performs highly resolved measurements with a spatial resolution in millimeter range and temporal resolution in kHz range, thus detecting very small turbulent structures. The anemometer is a redesign of the successfully operating 2d-LCA for laboratory application. The new device was designed to withstand hostile operating environments (rain and saline, humid air). In February 2012, the 2d-ALCA was used for the first time in a test field. The device was mounted in about 53 m above ground level on a lattice tower near the German North Sea coast. Wind speed was measured by the 2d-ALCA at 10 kHz sampling rate and by cup anemometers at 1 Hz. The instantaneous wind speed ranged from 8 m/s to 19 m/s at an average turbulence level of about 7 %. Wind field characteristics were analyzed based on cup anemometer as well as 2d-ALCA. The combination of both devices allowed the study of atmospheric turbulence over several magnitudes in turbulent scales.

  14. Measurements of laboratory turbulence with the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Peinke, Joachim; Hoelling, Michael

    2013-11-01

    A newly developed anemometer, the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer, was used to measure the two-dimensional wind speed vector in laboratory-generated turbulence. The anemometer provides a temporal and spatial resolution comparable or even higher to those of commercial hot-wires and thus is an excellent alternative for high-resolution measurements. The 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer uses a previously unseen measurement technique in the range of anemometers. The principle is adopted from atomic force microscopes (AFM). A tiny micro-structured cantilever is brought into the airflow, where it experiences a drag force due to the moving fluid. The resulting deflection is measured using the laser pointer principle. Unlike the measuring principle of hot-wires this technique can be applied in challenging environments such as in liquids or very close to walls. Our comparing measurements with the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer and an x-wire were carried out in the wake of rigid bodies and grids. The results show a great agreement with regards to the increment statistics on various scales, power spectra and turbulence intensity, thus proving the new anemometer.

  15. An omnidirectional 3D sensor with line laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Gao, Bingtuan; Liu, Chuande; Wang, Peng; Gao, Shuanglei

    2016-09-01

    An active omnidirectional vision owns the advantages of the wide field of view (FOV) imaging, resulting in an entire 3D environment scene, which is promising in the field of robot navigation. However, the existing omnidirectional vision sensors based on line laser can measure points only located on the optical plane of the line laser beam, resulting in the low-resolution reconstruction. Whereas, to improve resolution, some other omnidirectional vision sensors with the capability of projecting 2D encode pattern from projector and curved mirror. However, the astigmatism property of curve mirror causes the low-accuracy reconstruction. To solve the above problems, a rotating polygon scanning mirror is used to scan the object in the vertical direction so that an entire profile of the observed scene can be obtained at high accuracy, without of astigmatism phenomenon. Then, the proposed method is calibrated by a conventional 2D checkerboard plate. The experimental results show that the measurement error of the 3D omnidirectional sensor is approximately 1 mm. Moreover, the reconstruction of objects with different shapes based on the developed sensor is also verified.

  16. Leonardo da Vinci's drapery studies: characterization of lead white pigments by µ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Victor; Calligaro, Thomas; Pichon, Laurent; Wallez, Gilles; Mottin, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    This work focuses on the composition and microstructure of the lead white pigment employed in a set of paintworks, using a combination of µ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF, directly applied on five drapery studies attributed to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and conserved in the Département des Arts Graphiques, Musée du Louvre and in the Musée des Beaux- Arts de Rennes. Trace elements present in the composition as well as in the lead white highlights were imaged by 2D scanning XRF. Mineral phases were determined in a fully noninvasive way using a special µ-XRD diffractometer. Phase proportions were estimated by Rietveld refinement. The analytical results obtained will contribute to differentiate lead white qualities and to highlight the artist's technique.

  17. A new curb detection method for unmanned ground vehicles using 2D sequential laser data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao; Wang, Jinling; Liu, Daxue

    2013-01-01

    Curb detection is an important research topic in environment perception, which is an essential part of unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) operations. In this paper, a new curb detection method using a 2D laser range finder in a semi-structured environment is presented. In the proposed method, firstly, a local Digital Elevation Map (DEM) is built using 2D sequential laser rangefinder data and vehicle state data in a dynamic environment and a probabilistic moving object deletion approach is proposed to cope with the effect of moving objects. Secondly, the curb candidate points are extracted based on the moving direction of the vehicle in the local DEM. Finally, the straight and curved curbs are detected by the Hough transform and the multi-model RANSAC algorithm, respectively. The proposed method can detect the curbs robustly in both static and typical dynamic environments. The proposed method has been verified in real vehicle experiments. PMID:23325170

  18. A New Curb Detection Method for Unmanned Ground Vehicles Using 2D Sequential Laser Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinling Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Curb detection is an important research topic in environment perception, which is an essential part of unmanned ground vehicle (UGV operations. In this paper, a new curb detection method using a 2D laser range finder in a semi-structured environment is presented. In the proposed method, firstly, a local Digital Elevation Map (DEM is built using 2D sequential laser rangefinder data and vehicle state data in a dynamic environment and a probabilistic moving object deletion approach is proposed to cope with the effect of moving objects. Secondly, the curb candidate points are extracted based on the moving direction of the vehicle in the local DEM. Finally, the straight and curved curbs are detected by the Hough transform and the multi-model RANSAC algorithm, respectively. The proposed method can detect the curbs robustly in both static and typical dynamic environments. The proposed method has been verified in real vehicle experiments.

  19. Validation of digit-length ratio (2D:4D) assessments on the basis of DXA-derived hand scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second-to-fourth digit-length ratio (2D:4D) may be a correlate of prenatal sex steroids, and it has been linked to sporting prowess. The aim of the study was to validate dual-energy X-ray-absorptiometry (DXA) as a technique to assess 2D:4D in soccer players under 15 years of age (U-15). Paired X-ray and DXA scans of the left hands of 63 male U-15 elite soccer players (age: 14.0 ± 0.3 years) were performed, and 2D:4D was then compared between the two techniques. The 2D:4D measurements were performed twice by two blinded raters. Intrarater and interrater reliability, as well as agreement between the X-ray and the DXA assessments, were tested. Intrarater reliabilities of both raters using X-ray with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of 0.97 and 0.90 were excellent. Using DXA, the ICCs were 0.90 and 0.91 thus also showing excellent reliability. Interrater reliabilities were excellent using both the X-ray (ICC of 0.94) and the DXA (ICC of 0.90), assessments respectively. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated that the 2D:4D ratios of the two raters did not differ significantly between the X-ray and the DXA assessments. The standard errors of estimate were 0.01 for both techniques. The 95% limits of agreement of ±0.018 (±2.0%) and ±0.023 (±2.6%), respectively, were within the acceptable tolerance of 5%, and showed very good agreement. DXA offered a replicable technique for assessing 2D:4D in youth soccer players. Therefore, the DXA technique seems to be an alternative method for evaluating 2D:4D in youth sports

  20. Automatic classification of trees from laser scanning point clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Sirmacek, B.; R. Lindenbergh

    2015-01-01

    Development of laser scanning technologies has promoted tree monitoring studies to a new level, as the laser scanning point clouds enable accurate 3D measurements in a fast and environmental friendly manner. In this paper, we introduce a probability matrix computation based algorithm for automatically classifying laser scanning point clouds into ’tree’ and ’non-tree’ classes. Our method uses the 3D coordinates of the laser scanning points as input and generates a new point cloud whic...

  1. Laser scanned image sensors using photoconductors with deep traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserjian, J.

    1975-01-01

    Photoconductor records image when holes and electrons are trapped inside it due to incident photons. Image can be read out by exposing photoconductor to scanning laser beam. Photons from scanning laser empty traps, generating photocurrent. Image information is obtained by detecting this photocurrent synchronously with laser scan.

  2. A design of a compact gantry for proton therapy with 2D-scanning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrenken, H.; Schuitema, R.; Dermois, O.C.; Schippers, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    A compact gantry (3 m radius) for proton therapy in which a so-called ''pencil" beam scans a 30 x 30 cm(2) surface, has been designed. The advantages of this gantry are its small size and the bet that no mechanical movements of magnets or patient couch are necessary to accomplish the two-dimensional

  3. OBSTACLE DETECTION BY ALV USING TWO 2D LASER RANGE FINDERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an effective method of obstacle detection by ALV (Autonomous Land Vehi- cle) equipped with two 2D laser range finders (LRF) installed at different locations of the ALV to obtain eom- prehensive information on the environment. The data processing includes two main steps: ( 1 ) data-processing of the current sample; (2) fusion of the former range data and the current one. The rough description of the ALV's environnent via the four sub-steps ( Data Filter, Obstacle Extraction, Obstacle Merging, Distinguish- ing Obstacle from Road-Edge) was not reliable enough for our control system. To overcome the shortcoming of the 2D LRF and the motion noise of the ALV, a Kalman filter was used to estimate the position of the obsta- cles; then the data of the two LRFs were collated to obtain the height and width of the obstacles. Experiment results attested the feasibility of the detection system.

  4. Robust, spatially scanning, open-path TDLAS hygrometer using retro-reflective foils for fast tomographic 2-D water vapor concentration field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, A.; Wagner, S.; Dreizler, A.; Ebert, V.

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a fast, spatially scanning direct tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (dTDLAS) that combines four polygon-mirror based scanning units with low-cost retro-reflective foils. With this instrument, tomographic measurements of absolute 2-D water vapor concentration profiles are possible without any calibration using a reference gas. A spatial area of 0.8 m x 0.8 m was covered, which allows for application in soil physics, where greenhouse gas emission from certain soil structures shall be monitored. The whole concentration field was measured with up to 2.5 Hz. In this paper, we present the setup and spectroscopic performance of the instrument regarding the influence of the polygon rotation speed and mode on the absorption signal. Homogeneous H2O distributions were measured and compared to a single channel, bi-static reference TDLAS spectrometer for validation of the instrument. Good accuracy and precision with errors of less than 6% of the absolute concentration and length and bandwidth normalized detection limits of up to 1.1 ppmv . m (Hz)-0.5 were achieved. The spectrometer is a robust and easy to set up instrument for tomographic reconstructions of 2-D-concentration fields that can be considered as a good basis for future field measurements in environmental research.

  5. Robust, spatially scanning, open-path TDLAS hygrometer using retro-reflective foils for fast tomographic 2-D water vapour concentration field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Seidel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a fast, spatially direct scanning tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (dTDLAS that combines four polygon-mirror based scanning units with low-cost retro-reflective foils. With this instrument, tomographic measurements of absolute 2-D water vapour concentration profiles are possible without any calibration using a reference gas. A spatial area of 0.8 m × 0.8 m was covered, which allows for application in soil physics, where greenhouse gas emission from certain soil structures shall be monitored. The whole concentration field was measured with up to 2.5 Hz. In this paper, we present the setup and spectroscopic performance of the instrument regarding the influence of the polygon rotation speed and mode on the absorption signal. Homogeneous H2O distributions were measured and compared to a single channel, bi-static reference TDLAS spectrometer for validation of the instrument. Good accuracy and precision with errors of less than 6% of the absolute concentration and length and bandwidth normalized detection limits of up to 1.1 ppmv · m · √Hz−1 were achieved. The spectrometer is a robust and easy to set up instrument for tomographic reconstructions of 2-D-concentration fields that can be considered a good basis for future field measurements in environmental research.

  6. Element distribution imaging in rat kidney using a 2 D rapid scan EDXRF device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, R. G. [Universidad de la Frontera, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Av. Francisco Salazar 1145, Temuco 4811230, Araucania (Chile); Lozano, E. [Instituto Nacional del Cancer, Unidad de Fisica Medica, Av. Profesor Zanartu 1010, Santiago (Chile); Bongiovanni, G., E-mail: figueror@ufro.cl [IDEPA-CONICET, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Investigacion y Desarrollo de la Patagonia Norte, Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina)

    2013-08-01

    Visualization of elemental distributions of biological tissue is gaining importance in many disciplines of biological, forensic and medical research. Furthermore, the maps of elements have wide application in archaeology for the understanding of the pigments, modes of preservation and environmental context. Since major advances in relation to collimators and detectors have yielded micro scale images, the chemical mapping via synchrotron scanning micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-{mu}X RF) is widely used as microanalytical techniques. However, the acquisition time is a limitation of current SR-{mu}X RF imaging protocols, doing tedious micro analysis of samples of more than 1 cm and very difficult to study of larger samples such as animal organ, whole organisms, work or art, etc. Recently we have developed a robotic system to image the chemistry of large specimens rapidly ar concentration levels of parts per million. Multiple images of distribution of elements can be obtained on surfaces of 100 x 100 mm and a spatial resolution of up to 0.2 mm{sup 2} per pixel, with a spectral capture time up to 1 ms per point. This system has proven to be highly efficient for the X RF mapping of elements in large biological samples, achieving comparable s results to those obtained by SR-{mu}X RF. Thus, images of As and Cu accumulation in renal cortex of arsenic-exposed rats were obtained by both methodologies. However, the new imaging system enables the X RF scanning in few minutes, whereas SR-{mu}X RF required several hours. These and other advantages as well as the potential applications of this system, will be discussed. (Author)

  7. Extraction of power lines from mobile laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Qing; Li, Jonathan; Wen, Chenglu; Huang, Pengdi

    2016-03-01

    Modern urban life is becoming increasingly more dependent on reliable electric power supply. Since power outages cause substantial financial losses to producers, distributors and consumers of electric power, it is in the common interest to minimize failures of power lines. In order to detect defects as early as possible and to plan efficiently the maintenance activities, distribution networks are regularly inspected. Carrying out foot patrols or climbing the structures to visually inspect transmission lines and aerial surveys (e.g., digital imaging or most recent airborne laser scanning (ALS) are the two most commonly used methods of power line inspection. Although much faster in comparison to the foot patrol inspection, aerial inspection is more expensive and usually less accurate, in complex urban areas particularly. This paper presents a scientific work that is done in the use of mobile laser scanning (MLS) point clouds for automated extraction of power lines. In the proposed method, 2D power lines are extracted using Hough transform in the projected XOY plane and the 3D power line points are visualized after the point searching. Filtering based on an elevation threshold is applied, which is combined with the vehicle's trajectory in the horizontal section.

  8. Mobile Laser Scanning for Indoor Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, C.; Apostolopoulos, G.; Backes, D.; Boehm, J.

    2013-10-01

    The process of capturing and modelling buildings has gained increased focus in recent years with the rise of Building Information Modelling (BIM). At the heart of BIM is a process change for the construction and facilities management industries whereby a BIM aids more collaborative working through better information exchange, and as a part of the process Geomatic/Land Surveyors are not immune from the changes. Terrestrial laser scanning has been proscribed as the preferred method for rapidly capturing buildings for BIM geometry. This is a process change from a traditional measured building survey just with a total station and is aided by the increasing acceptance of point cloud data being integrated with parametric building models in BIM tools such as Autodesk Revit or Bentley Architecture. Pilot projects carried out previously by the authors to investigate the geometry capture and modelling of BIM confirmed the view of others that the process of data capture with static laser scan setups is slow and very involved requiring at least two people for efficiency. Indoor Mobile Mapping Systems (IMMS) present a possible solution to these issues especially in time saved. Therefore this paper investigates their application as a capture device for BIM geometry creation over traditional static methods through a fit-for-purpose test.

  9. Exposure Limits in Ophthalmic Imaging with Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analysis of the exposure to laser radiation resulting from the use of scanning laser ophthalmoscopes in ophthalmic imaging of the ocular fundus. Exposures limits are determined, based on the IEC/EN 60825-1 standard. These limits are applied on the safety analysis of a commercial scanning laser ophthalmoscope. (author)

  10. Confocal laser scanning microscopy image correlation for nanoparticle flow velocimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Brian; Giarra, Matthew; Yang, Haisheng; Main, Russell; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-01-01

    We present a new particle image correlation technique for resolving nanoparticle flow velocity using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The two primary issues that complicate nanoparticle scanning laser image correlation (SLIC) based velocimetry are (1) the use of diffusion dominated nanoparticles as flow tracers, which introduce a random decorrelating error into the velocity estimate, and (2) the effects of the scanning laser image acquisition, which introduces a bias error. To date,...

  11. 2D electrostatic PIC algorithm for laser induced studying plasma in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, C. A.; Riascos, H.; Gonzalez, C.

    2016-02-01

    Particle-In-Cell(PIC) method is widely used for simulating plasma kinetic models. A 2D-PIC electrostatic algorithm is implemented for simulating the expansion of a laser- induced plasma plume. For potential and Electric Field calculation, Dirichlet and periodic boundary conditions are used in the X (perpendicular to the ablated material) and Y directions, respectively. Poisson-solver employs FFTW3 library and the five-point Laplacian to compute the electric potential. Electric field calculation is made by central finite differences method. Leap-frog scheme updates particle positions and velocities at each iteration. Plume expansion anlysis is done for the Emission and Post-Emission stages. In the Emission phase (while the laser is turned on), fast electron expansion is observed and ion particles remain near the surface of the ablated material. In the post-emission stage (with the laser turned off) the charge separation produces an electric field that accelerates the ions leading to the formation of a KeV per particle Ion-Front. At the end of the expansion, fastest electrons escape from the simulation space; an almost homogeneous ion-electron distribution is observed, decreasing the electric field value and the Coulomb interactions.

  12. Nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction of femtosecond laser pulses in a 2D nonlinear photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyunishev, A M; Arkhipkin, V G; Slabko, V V; Baturin, I S; Akhmatkhanov, A R; Shur, V Ya; Chirkin, A S

    2015-09-01

    We study second-harmonic generation (SHG) of femtosecond laser pulses in a rectangular two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal (NLPC). Multiple SH beams were observed in the vicinity of the propagation direction of the fundamental beam. It has been verified that the angular positions of these beams obey the conditions of nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction (NRND). The measured SH spectra of specific NRND orders consist of narrow peaks that experience a high-frequency spectral shift as the order grows. We derive an analytical expression for the process studied and find the theoretical results to be in good agreement with the experimental data. We estimate the enhancement factor of nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction in 2D NLPC to be 70. PMID:26368697

  13. Novel Aerial 3D Mapping System Based on UAV Platforms and 2D Laser Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Roca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The acquisition of 3D geometric data from an aerial view implies a high number of advantages with respect to terrestrial acquisition, the greatest being that aerial view allows the acquisition of information from areas with no or difficult accessibility, such as roofs and tops of trees. If the aerial platform is copter-type, other advantages are present, such as the capability of displacement at very low-speed, allowing for a more detailed acquisition. This paper presents a novel Aerial 3D Mapping System based on a copter-type platform, where a 2D laser scanner is integrated with a GNSS sensor and an IMU for the generation of georeferenced 3D point clouds. The accuracy and precision of the system are evaluated through the measurement of geometries in the point clouds generated by the system, as well as through the geolocation of target points for which the real global coordinates are known.

  14. D Model of AL Zubarah Fortress in Qatar - Terrestrial Laser Scanning VS. Dense Image Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, T.; Mechelke, K.; Maziull, L.

    2015-02-01

    In September 2011 the fortress Al Zubarah, built in 1938 as a typical Arabic fortress and restored in 1987 as a museum, was recorded by the HafenCity University Hamburg using terrestrial laser scanning with the IMAGER 5006h and digital photogrammetry for the Qatar Museum Authority within the framework of the Qatar Islamic Archaeology and Heritage Project. One goal of the object recording was to provide detailed 2D/3D documentation of the fortress. This was used to complete specific detailed restoration work in the recent years. From the registered laser scanning point clouds several cuttings and 2D plans were generated as well as a 3D surface model by triangle meshing. Additionally, point clouds and surface models were automatically generated from digital imagery from a Nikon D70 using the open-source software Bundler/PMVS2, free software VisualSFM, Autodesk Web Service 123D Catch beta, and low-cost software Agisoft PhotoScan. These outputs were compared with the results from terrestrial laser scanning. The point clouds and surface models derived from imagery could not achieve the same quality of geometrical accuracy as laser scanning (i.e. 1-2 cm).

  15. Mathematical model for light scanning system based on circular laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peiquan Xu; Shun Yao; Fenggui Lu; Xinhua Tang; Wei Zhang

    2005-01-01

    A novel light scanning system based on circular laser trajectory for welding robot is developed. With the help of image processing technique, intelligent laser welding could be realized. According to laser triangulation algorithm and Scheimpflug condition, mathematical model for circular laser vision is built.This scanning system projects circular laser onto welded seams and recovers the depth of the welded seams,escapes from shortcomings of less information, explains ambiguity and single tracking direction inherent in "spot" or "line" type laser trajectory. Three-dimensional (3D) model for welded seams could be recognized after depth recovery. The imaging error is investigated also.

  16. Automatic classification of trees from laser scanning point clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sirmacek, B.; Lindenbergh, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    Development of laser scanning technologies has promoted tree monitoring studies to a new level, as the laser scanning point clouds enable accurate 3D measurements in a fast and environmental friendly manner. In this paper, we introduce a probability matrix computation based algorithm for automatical

  17. Ultra-Rapid 2-D and 3-D Laser Microprinting of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Mark Andrew

    When viewed under the microscope, biological tissues reveal an exquisite microarchitecture. These complex patterns arise during development, as cells interact with a multitude of chemical and mechanical cues in the surrounding extracellular matrix. Tissue engineers have sought for decades to repair or replace damaged tissue, often relying on porous scaffolds as an artificial extracellular matrix to support cell development. However, these grafts are unable to recapitulate the complexity of the in vivo environment, limiting our ability to regenerate functional tissue. Biomedical engineers have developed several methods for printing two- and three-dimensional patterns of proteins for studying and directing cell development. Of these methods, laser microprinting of proteins has shown the most promise for printing sub-cellular resolution gradients of cues, but the photochemistry remains too slow to enable large-scale applications for screening and therapeutics In this work, we demonstrate a novel high-speed photochemistry based on multi-photon photobleaching of fluorescein, and we build the fastest 2-D and 3-D laser microprinter for proteins to date. First, we show that multiphoton photobleaching of a deoxygenated solution of biotin-4-fluorescein onto a PEG monolayer with acrylate end-group can enable print speeds of almost 20 million pixels per second at 600 nanometer resolution. We discovered that the mechanism of fluorescein photobleaching evolves from a 2-photon to 3- and 4-photon regime at higher laser intensities, unlocking faster printing kinetics. Using this 2-D printing system, we develop a novel triangle-ratchet method for directing the polarization of single hippocampal neurons. This ability to determine which neurite becomes an axon, and which neuritis become dendrites is an essential step for developing defined in vitro neural networks. Next, we modify our multiphoton photobleaching system to print in three dimensions. For the first time, we demonstrate 3

  18. Tree Height Growth Measurement with Single-Scan Airborne, Static Terrestrial and Mobile Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the feasibility of applying single-scan airborne, static terrestrial and mobile laser scanning for improving the accuracy of tree height growth measurement. Specifically, compared to the traditional works on forest growth inventory with airborne laser scanning, two issues are regarded: “Can the new technique characterize the height growth for each individual tree?” and “Can this technique refine the minimum growth-discernable temporal interval further?” To solve these two puzzles, the sampling principles of the three laser scanning modes were first examined, and their error sources against the task of tree-top capturing were also analyzed. Next, the three-year growths of 58 Nordic maple trees (Crimson King for test were intermittently surveyed with one type of laser scanning each time and then analyzed by statistics. The evaluations show that the height growth of each individual tree still cannot be reliably characterized even by single-scan terrestrial laser scanning, and statistical analysis is necessary in this scenario. After Gaussian regression, it is found that the minimum temporal interval with distinguishable tree height growths can be refined into one month based on terrestrial laser scanning, far better than the two years deduced in the previous works based on airborne laser scanning. The associated mean growth was detected to be about 0.12 m. Moreover, the parameter of tree height generally under-estimated by airborne and even mobile laser scanning can be relatively revised by means of introducing static terrestrial laser scanning data. Overall, the effectiveness of the proposed technique is primarily validated.

  19. TelePresence Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblom, Janey H.; Youngblom, James J.; Wilkinson, Jerry

    2001-05-01

    The advent of the Internet has allowed the development of remote access capabilities to a growing variety and number of microscopy systems. To date, the confocal microscope has not been included among these systems. At the California State University (CSU) Confocal Microscopy Core Facility, we have established a remote access confocal laser scanning microscope facility that allows users with virtually any type of computer platform to connect to our system. Our Leica TCS NT confocal system is accessible to any authorized user via the Internet by using a free software program called VNC (Virtual Network Computing). Once connectivity is established, remote users are able to control virtually all the functions to conduct real-time image analysis and quantitative assessments of their specimen. They can also move the motorized stage to view different regions of their specimen by using a software program associated with the stage. At the end of the session, all files generated during the session can be downloaded to the user's computer from a link on the CSU confocal website. A number of safeguard features have been developed to ensure security and privacy of data acquired during a remote session. PMID:12597815

  20. Structural monitoring of tunnels using terrestrial laser scanning

    OpenAIRE

    R. C. Lindenbergh; Uchanski, L.; Bucksch, A.; Van Gosliga, R.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years terrestrial laser scanning is rapidly evolving as a surveying technique for the monitoring of engineering objects like roof constructions, mines, dams, viaducts and tunnels. The advantage of laser scanning above traditional surveying methods is that it allows for the rapid acquisition of millions of scan points representing the whole surface of the object considered. Still it is a big challenge to obtain accuracies and precisions in the millimeter level when quantifying deform...

  1. Quality Analysis and Correction of Mobile Backpack Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnholm, P.; Liang, X.; Kukko, A.; Jaakkola, A.; Hyyppä, J.

    2016-06-01

    Backpack laser scanning systems have emerged recently enabling fast data collection and flexibility to make measurements also in areas that cannot be reached with, for example, vehicle-based laser scanners. Backpack laser scanning systems have been developed both for indoor and outdoor use. We have developed a quality analysis process in which the quality of backpack laser scanning data is evaluated in the forest environment. The reference data was collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) laser scanning system. The workflow included noise filtering, division of data into smaller patches, ground point extraction, ground data decimation, and ICP registration. As a result, we managed to observe the misalignments of backpack laser scanning data for 97 patches each including data from circa 10 seconds period of time. This evaluation revealed initial average misalignments of 0.227 m, 0.073 and -0.083 in the easting, northing and elevation directions, respectively. Furthermore, backpack data was corrected according to the ICP registration results. Our correction algorithm utilized the time-based linear transformation of backpack laser scanning point clouds. After the correction of data, the ICP registration was run again. This revealed remaining misalignments between the corrected backpack laser scanning data and the original UAV data. We found average misalignments of 0.084, 0.020 and -0.005 meters in the easting, northing and elevation directions, respectively.

  2. Synthetic aperture laser optical feedback imaging using a translational scanning with galvanometric mirrors

    OpenAIRE

    Glastre, Wilfried; Jacquin, Olivier; Hugon, Olivier; de Chatellus, Hugues Guillet; Lacot, Eric

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present an experimental setup based on Laser Optical Feedback Imaging (LOFI) and on Synthetic Aperture (SA) with translational scanning by galvanometric mirrors for the purpose of making deep and resolved images through scattering media. We provide real 2D optical synthetic-aperture image of a fixed scattering target with a moving aperture and an isotropic resolution. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that we can keep microscope resolution beyond the working dis...

  3. Laser-scanning techniques for rapid ballistics identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodburgy, R. C.; Nakich, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Two different laser-scanning methods may be utilized. In each case scanned cylindrical bullet surface is displayed ""unwrapped'' on oscilloscope screen. Bullets are compared by photographing each display and superimposing negatives of two images. With some modifications bullets can be scanned and compared by superimposing images on screen of dual-beam oscilloscope.

  4. Three-dimensional scanning confocal laser microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. Rox; Webb, Robert H.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    1999-01-01

    A confocal microscope for generating an image of a sample includes a first scanning element for scanning a light beam along a first axis, and a second scanning element for scanning the light beam at a predetermined amplitude along a second axis perpendicular to the first axis. A third scanning element scans the light beam at a predetermined amplitude along a third axis perpendicular to an imaging plane defined by the first and second axes. The second and third scanning element are synchronized to scan at the same frequency. The second and third predetermined amplitudes are percentages of their maximum amplitudes. A selector determines the second and third predetermined amplitudes such that the sum of the percentages is equal to one-hundred percent.

  5. RESEARCH ON LASER RANGE SCANNING AND ITS APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the development of the technology of the laserscanning is summarized.The principles of laser range scanning are introduced.Based on the laser scanning technology and methods,which are investigated by the authors to survey deposit volume,a surveying system is developed and a practical application is performed.It is shown that the laser-scanning technology has obvious advantages such as measurement precision,automation and visualization of observed data in comparison with the traditional methods.As a result,labor intensity is relieved obviously and work efficiency is promoted.

  6. Multispectral Analysis of Indigenous Rock Art Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, B.; Helmholz, P.; Belton, D.

    2016-06-01

    Multispectral analysis is a widely used technique in the photogrammetric and remote sensing industry. The use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) in combination with imagery is becoming increasingly common, with its applications spreading to a wider range of fields. Both systems benefit from being a non-contact technique that can be used to accurately capture data regarding the target surface. Although multispectral analysis is actively performed within the spatial sciences field, its extent of application within an archaeological context has been limited. This study effectively aims to apply the multispectral techniques commonly used, to a remote Indigenous site that contains an extensive gallery of aging rock art. The ultimate goal for this research is the development of a systematic procedure that could be applied to numerous similar sites for the purpose of heritage preservation and research. The study consisted of extensive data capture of the rock art gallery using two different TLS systems and a digital SLR camera. The data was combined into a common 2D reference frame that allowed for standard image processing to be applied. An unsupervised k-means classifier was applied to the multiband images to detect the different types of rock art present. The result was unsatisfactory as the subsequent classification accuracy was relatively low. The procedure and technique does however show potential and further testing with different classification algorithms could possibly improve the result significantly.

  7. Laser scanning dental probe for endodontic root canal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Molly A. B.; Friedrich, Michal; Hamilton, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Peggy; Berg, Joel; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Complications that arise during endodontic procedures pose serious threats to the long-term integrity and health of the tooth. Potential complexities of root canals include residual pulpal tissue, cracks, mesial-buccal 2 and accessory canals. In the case of a failed root canal, a successful apicoectomy can be jeopardized by isthmuses, accessory canals, and root microfracture. Confirming diagnosis using a small imaging probe would allow proper treatment and prevent retreatment of endodontic procedures. An ultrathin and flexible laser scanning endoscope of 1.2 to 1.6mm outer diameter was used in vitro to image extracted teeth with varied root configurations. Teeth were opened using a conventional bur and high speed drill. Imaging within the opened access cavity clarified the location of the roots where canal filing would initiate. Although radiographs are commonly used to determine the root canal size, position, and shape, the limited 2D image perspective leaves ambiguity that could be clarified if used in conjunction with a direct visual imaging tool. Direct visualization may avoid difficulties in locating the root canal and reduce the number of radiographs needed. A transillumination imaging device with the separated illumination and light collection functions rendered cracks visible in the prepared teeth that were otherwise indiscernible using reflected visible light. Our work demonstrates that a small diameter endoscope with high spatial resolution may significantly increase the efficiency and success of endodontic procedures.

  8. Laser scanning measurements on trees for logging harvesting operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yili; Liu, Jinhao; Wang, Dian; Yang, Ruixi

    2012-01-01

    Logging harvesters represent a set of high-performance modern forestry machinery, which can finish a series of continuous operations such as felling, delimbing, peeling, bucking and so forth with human intervention. It is found by experiment that during the process of the alignment of the harvesting head to capture the trunk, the operator needs a lot of observation, judgment and repeated operations, which lead to the time and fuel losses. In order to improve the operation efficiency and reduce the operating costs, the point clouds for standing trees are collected with a low-cost 2D laser scanner. A cluster extracting algorithm and filtering algorithm are used to classify each trunk from the point cloud. On the assumption that every cross section of the target trunk is approximate a standard circle and combining the information of an Attitude and Heading Reference System, the radii and center locations of the trunks in the scanning range are calculated by the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient algorithm. The method is validated through experiments in an aspen forest, and the optimized calculation time consumption is compared with the previous work of other researchers. Moreover, the implementation of the calculation result for automotive capturing trunks by the harvesting head during the logging operation is discussed in particular. PMID:23012543

  9. Laser scanning measurements on trees for logging harvesting operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yili; Liu, Jinhao; Wang, Dian; Yang, Ruixi

    2012-01-01

    Logging harvesters represent a set of high-performance modern forestry machinery, which can finish a series of continuous operations such as felling, delimbing, peeling, bucking and so forth with human intervention. It is found by experiment that during the process of the alignment of the harvesting head to capture the trunk, the operator needs a lot of observation, judgment and repeated operations, which lead to the time and fuel losses. In order to improve the operation efficiency and reduce the operating costs, the point clouds for standing trees are collected with a low-cost 2D laser scanner. A cluster extracting algorithm and filtering algorithm are used to classify each trunk from the point cloud. On the assumption that every cross section of the target trunk is approximate a standard circle and combining the information of an Attitude and Heading Reference System, the radii and center locations of the trunks in the scanning range are calculated by the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient algorithm. The method is validated through experiments in an aspen forest, and the optimized calculation time consumption is compared with the previous work of other researchers. Moreover, the implementation of the calculation result for automotive capturing trunks by the harvesting head during the logging operation is discussed in particular.

  10. Laser Scanning Measurements on Trees for Logging Harvesting Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixi Yang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Logging harvesters represent a set of high-performance modern forestry machinery, which can finish a series of continuous operations such as felling, delimbing, peeling, bucking and so forth with human intervention. It is found by experiment that during the process of the alignment of the harvesting head to capture the trunk, the operator needs a lot of observation, judgment and repeated operations, which lead to the time and fuel losses. In order to improve the operation efficiency and reduce the operating costs, the point clouds for standing trees are collected with a low-cost 2D laser scanner. A cluster extracting algorithm and filtering algorithm are used to classify each trunk from the point cloud. On the assumption that every cross section of the target trunk is approximate a standard circle and combining the information of an Attitude and Heading Reference System, the radii and center locations of the trunks in the scanning range are calculated by the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient algorithm. The method is validated through experiments in an aspen forest, and the optimized calculation time consumption is compared with the previous work of other researchers. Moreover, the implementation of the calculation result for automotive capturing trunks by the harvesting head during the logging operation is discussed in particular.

  11. Maritime Laser Scanning as the Source for Spatial Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szulwic Jakub

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of scanning technology, especially mobile scanning, gives the possibility to collect spatial data coming from maritime measurement platforms and autonomous manned or unmanned vehicles. Presented solution is derived from the mobile scanning. However we should keep in mind that the specificity of laser scanning at sea and processing collected data should be in the form acceptable in Geographical Information Systems, especially typical for the maritime needs. At the same time we should be aware that data coming from maritime mobile scanning constitutes a new approach to the describing of maritime environment and brings a new perspective that is completely different than air and terrestrial scanning.

  12. Laser Scanning and Simulation at Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kickbusch, Tracey E.

    2012-01-01

    We perform simulations of ground operations leading up launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA. We use Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to make sure operations are feasible, efficient, and safe.

  13. Laser scanning of a recirculation zone on the Bolund escarpment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Jakob; Angelou, Nikolas; Sjöholm, Mikael;

    2012-01-01

    Rapid variations in the height of the recirculation zone are measured with a scanning wind lidar over a small escarpment on the Bolund Peninsula. The lidar is essentially a continuous-wave laser Doppler anemometer with the capability of rapidly changing the focus distance and the beam direction...... scanning systems is done primarily for that purpose....

  14. Influence of laser frequency noise on scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer based laser Doppler velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    n this work, we study the performance of a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer based laser Doppler velocimeter (sFPILDV) and compare two candidate 1.5 um single-frequency laser sources for the system – a fiber laser (FL) and a semiconductor laser (SL). We describe a straightforward calibration...

  15. Ultra-low power threshold for laser induced changes in optical properties of 2D Molybdenum dichalcogenides

    CERN Document Server

    Cadiz, Fabian; Wang, Gang; Kong, Wilson; Fan, Xi; Blei, Mark; Lagarde, Delphine; Gay, Maxime; Manca, Marco; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Amand, Thierry; Marie, Xavier; Renucci, Pierre; Tongay, Sefaattin; Urbaszek, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The optical response of traditional semiconductors depends on the laser excitation power used in experiments. For two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors, laser excitation effects are anticipated to be vastly different due to complexity added by their ultimate thinness, high surface to volume ratio, and laser-membrane interaction effects. We show in this article that under laser excitation the optical properties of 2D materials undergo irreversible changes. Most surprisingly these effects take place even at low steady state excitation, which is commonly thought to be non-intrusive. In low temperature photoluminescence (PL) we show for monolayer (ML) MoSe2 samples grown by different techniques that laser treatment increases significantly the trion (i.e. charged exciton) contribution to the emission compared to the neutral exciton emission. Comparison between samples exfoliated onto different substrates shows that laser induced doping is more efficient for ML MoSe2 on SiO2/Si compared to h-BN and gold. For ML MoS2 ...

  16. Multicolor pattern scan laser for diabetic retinopathy with cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takao; Hirano; Yasuhiro; Iesato; Toshinori; Murata

    2014-01-01

    · AIM: To evaluate the ability of various laser wavelengths in delivering sufficient burns to the retina in eyes with cataract using a new multicolor pattern scan laser with green(532 nm), yellow(577 nm), and red(647 nm)lasers.·METHODS: The relationship between the Emery-Little(EL) degree of cataract severity and the laser wavelength required to deliver adequate burns was investigated in102 diabetic eyes. Treatment time, total number of laser shots, and intra-operative pain were assessed as well.·RESULTS: All EL-1 grade eyes and 50% of EL-2 eyes were successfully treated with the green laser, while 50%of EL-2 eyes, 96% of EL-3 eyes, and 50% of EL-4 eyes required the yellow laser. The red laser was effective in the remaining 4% of EL-3 and 50% of EL-4 eyes.·CONCLUSION: Longer wavelength lasers are more effective in delivering laser burns through cataract when we use a multicolor pattern scan laser system.

  17. Cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting: Generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and processing parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    to generate optimized cellular scanning strategies and processing parameters, with an objective of reducing thermal asymmetries and mechanical deformations. The optimized scanning strategies are used for selective laser melting of the standard samples, and experimental and numerical results are compared....... gradients that occur during the process. While process monitoring and control of selective laser melting is an active area of research, establishing the reliability and robustness of the process still remains a challenge.In this paper, a methodology for generating reliable, optimized scanning paths...

  18. Effects of scanning orientation on outlier formation in 3D laser scanning of reflective surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yutao; Feng, Hsi-Yung

    2016-06-01

    Inspecting objects with reflective surfaces using 3D laser scanning is a demanded but challenging part inspection task due to undesirable specular reflections, which produce extensive outliers in the scanned point cloud. These outliers need to be removed in order to alleviate subsequent data processing issues. Many existing automatic outlier removal methods do not detect outliers according to the outlier formation properties. As a result, these methods only offer limited capabilities in removing extensive and complex outliers from scanning objects with reflective surfaces. This paper reports an empirical study which experimentally investigates the outlier formation characteristics in relation to the scanning orientation of the laser probe. The objective is to characterize the scanning orientation effects on outlier formation in order to facilitate the development of an effective outlier detection and removal method. Such an experimental investigation was hardly done before. It has been found in this work that scanning orientation can directly affect outlier extensity and occurrence in 3D laser scanning. A general guidance on proper scan path planning can then be provided with an aim to reduce the occurrence of outliers. Further, the observed dependency of outlier formation on scanning orientation can be exploited to facilitate effective and automatic outlier detection and removal.

  19. Thermal effects in the 2D and 3D laser material marking and coloring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterian, P.; Mocanu, E.

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze two marking laser systems and to discuss the possible industrial applications of laser techniques; the first uses a diode pumped Ytterbium fiber laser and the second a pumped flash light Nd:YAG. Starting from the phenomena of heating due to laser irradiation and the spatial profile of deposited energy we try to explain the marking technique, including the laser-assisted coloring by studying the dynamics and the evolution of the parameters involved in this process. Also we emphasize the industrial importance of the laser possibilities compared to classical methods.

  20. Control and analysis software for a laser scanning microdensitometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H R Bundel; C P Navathe; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2006-02-01

    A PC-based control software and data acquisition system is developed for an existing commercial microdensitometer (Biomed make model No. SL-2D/1D UV/VIS) to facilitate scanning and analysis of X-ray films. The software is developed in Labview, which includes operation of the microdensitometer in 1D and 2D scans and analysis of spatial or spectral data on X-ray films, such as optical density, intensity and wavelength. It provides a user-friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) to analyse the scanned data and also store the analysed data/image in popular formats like data in Excel and images in jpeg. It has also on-line calibration facility with standard optical density tablets. The control software and data acquisition system is simple, inexpensive and versatile.

  1. 2D profile of poloidal magnetic field diagnosed by a laser-driven ion-beam trace probe (LITP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoyi; Xiao, Chijie; Chen, Yihang; Xu, Tianchao; Lin, Chen; Wang, Long; Xu, Min; Yu, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Based on large energy spread of laser-driven ion beam (LIB), a new method, the Laser-driven Ion-beam Trace Probe (LITP), was suggested recently to diagnose the poloidal magnetic field (Bp) and radial electric field (Er) in toroidal devices. Based on another property of LIB, a wide angular distribution, here we suggested that LITP could be extended to get 2D Bp profile or 1D profile of both poloidal and radial magnetic fields at the same time. In this paper, we show the basic principle, some preliminary simulation results, and experimental preparation to test the basic principle of LITP.

  2. Development, Calibration and Evaluation of a Portable and Direct Georeferenced Laser Scanning System for Kinematic 3D Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Erik; Eling, Christian; Wieland, Markus; Klingbeil, Lasse; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, kinematic laser scanning has become increasingly popular because it offers many benefits compared to static laser scanning. The advantages include both saving of time in the georeferencing and a more favorable scanning geometry. Often mobile laser scanning systems are installed on wheeled platforms, which may not reach all parts of the object. Hence, there is an interest in the development of portable systems, which remain operational even in inaccessible areas. The development of such a portable laser scanning system is presented in this paper. It consists of a lightweight direct georeferencing unit for the position and attitude determination and a small low-cost 2D laser scanner. This setup provides advantages over existing portable systems that employ heavy and expensive 3D laser scanners in a profiling mode. A special emphasis is placed on the system calibration, i. e. the determination of the transformation between the coordinate frames of the direct georeferencing unit and the 2D laser scanner. To this end, a calibration field is used, which consists of differently orientated georeferenced planar surfaces, leading to estimates for the lever arms and boresight angles with an accuracy of mm and one-tenth of a degree. Finally, point clouds of the mobile laser scanning system are compared with georeferenced point clouds of a high-precision 3D laser scanner. Accordingly, the accuracy of the system is in the order of cm to dm. This is in good agreement with the expected accuracy, which has been derived from the error propagation of previously estimated variance components.

  3. Repeat scanning technology for laser ultrasonic propagation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser ultrasonic scanning in combination with contact or non-contact sensors provides new paradigms in structural health management (SHM) and non-destructive in-process quality control (IPQC) for large composite structures. Wave propagation imaging technology based on laser ultrasonic scanning and fixed-point sensing shows remarkable advantages, such as minimal need for embedded sensors in SHM, minimum invasive defect visualization in IPQC and general capabilities of curved and complex target inspection, and temporal reference-free inspection. However, as with other SHM methods and non-destructive evaluation based on ultrasound, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a prevalent issue in real structural applications, especially with non-contact thin-composite sensing or with thick and heterogeneous composites. This study proposes a high-speed repeat scanning technique for laser ultrasonic propagation imaging (UPI) technology, which is realized with the scanning speed of 1 kHz of a Q-switched continuous wave laser, and precise control of the laser beam pulses for identical point scanning. As a result, the technique enables the achievement of significant improvement in the SNR to inspect real-world composite structures. The proposed technique provides enhanced results for impact damage detection in a 2 mm thick wing box made of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic, despite the low sensitivity of non-contact laser ultrasonic sensing. A field-applicable pure laser UPI system has been developed using a laser Doppler vibrometer as the non-contact ultrasonic sensor. The proposed technique enables the visualization of the disbond defect in a 15 mm thick wind blade specimen made of glass-fiber-reinforced plastic, despite the high dissipation of ultrasound in the thick composite. (paper)

  4. Confocal laser scanning microscopy image correlation for nanoparticle flow velocimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Jun, Brian; Yang, Haisheng; Main, Russell; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-01-01

    We present a new particle image correlation technique for resolving nanoparticle flow velocity using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The two primary issues that complicate nanoparticle scanning laser image correlation (SLIC) based velocimetry are (1) the use of diffusion dominated nanoparticles as flow tracers, which introduce a random decorrelating error into the velocity estimate, and (2) the effects of the scanning laser image acquisition, which introduces a bias error. To date, no study has quantified these errors or demonstrated a means to deal with them in SLIC velocimetry. In this work, we build upon the robust phase correlation (RPC) and existing methods of SLIC to quantify and mitigate these errors. First, we implement an ensemble RPC instead of using an ensemble standard cross correlation, and develop an SLIC optimal filter that maximizes the correlation strength in order to reliably and accurately detect the correlation peak representing the most probable average displacement of the nano...

  5. Street-Scene Tree Segmentation from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, H.; Cao, S.; Yu, Y.; Li, J.; Liu, N.; Chen, P.; Li, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Our work addresses the problem of extracting trees from mobile laser scanning data. The work is a two step-wise strategy, including terrain point removal and tree segmentation. First, a voxel-based upward growing filtering is proposed to remove terrain points from the mobile laser scanning data. Then, a tree segmentation is presented to extract individual trees via a Euclidean distance clustering approach and Voxel-based Normalized Cut (VNCut) segmentation approach. A road section data acquired by a RIEGL VMX-450 system are selected for evaluating the proposed tree segmentation method. Qualitative analysis shows that our algorithm achieves a good performance.

  6. Application of in vivo laser scanning microscope in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, Juergen; Richter, H.; Otberg, N.; Lawrenz, F.; Blume-Peytavi, U.; Sterry, W.

    2003-10-01

    The state of the art of in-vivo and in-vitro penetration measurements of topically applied substances is described. Only optical techniques represent online measuring methods based on the absorption or scattering properties of the topically applied substances. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has become a promising method for investigations in dermatology and skin physiology, after it was possible to analyze the skin surface on any body side in-vivo. In the present paper the application of a dermatological laser scanning microscope for penetration and distribution measurements of topically applied substances is described. The intercellular and follicular penetration pathways were studied.

  7. 2-D scanning technology in passive terahertz imaging%被动太赫兹成像二维扫描技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢巍; 侯丽伟; 潘鸣

    2014-01-01

    It is inevitable to use 2-D scanning in wide-Field of View(FOV) terahertz imaging due to the restriction of terahertz detector(lack of pixels and hardly integrated to large-scale plane array). The 45° mirror could be used in passive terahertz 2-D scanning imaging for its advantages in dimension, stability and scanning Field of View. The principle of 2-D scanning imaging using 45° mirror is analyzed in detail. A new method with horizontal scanning by rotating around axis Zand vertical stepping by rotating around axis Yis proposed. The scanning trace is calculated, the margin FOV distortion is about 3.2%. The method is validated by the imaging experiment and image is acquired in wide-Field of View.%太赫兹成像受探测器像元数少和无法进行大规模面阵集成的限制,大视场成像不可避免地要用到二维扫描。45º镜具有尺寸小,稳定性好,幅宽大等特点,可以用来实现被动太赫兹二维扫描成像。详细分析了45º镜扫描成像的工作原理和扫描方式,提出了绕Z轴摆动实现水平扫描,绕Y轴摆动实现垂直步进的扫描方案,计算了扫描轨迹,边沿视场成像畸变约3.2%,并通过成像实验对扫描方案进行了验证,得到了大视场下的被动太赫兹二维扫描图像。

  8. Leonardo da Vinci's drapery studies: characterization of lead white pigments by μ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Victor; Calligaro, Thomas [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, C2RMF, Paris (France); PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech-CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris, UMR8247, Paris (France); Pichon, Laurent; Mottin, Bruno [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, C2RMF, Paris (France); Wallez, Gilles [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech-CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris, UMR8247, Paris (France); Sorbonne University, UPMC Univ., Paris 06 (France)

    2015-11-15

    This work focuses on the composition and microstructure of the lead white pigment employed in a set of paintworks, using a combination of μ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF, directly applied on five drapery studies attributed to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and conserved in the Departement des Arts Graphiques, Musee du Louvre and in the Musee des Beaux-Arts de Rennes. Trace elements present in the composition as well as in the lead white highlights were imaged by 2D scanning XRF. Mineral phases were determined in a fully noninvasive way using a special μ-XRD diffractometer. Phase proportions were estimated by Rietveld refinement. The analytical results obtained will contribute to differentiate lead white qualities and to highlight the artist's technique. (orig.)

  9. Fluence scan: an unexplored property of a laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an extended theoretical background of so-called fluence scan (f-scan or F-scan) method, which is frequently being used for offline characterization of focused short-wavelength (EUV, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray) laser beams [J. Chalupsky et al., Opt. Express 18, 27836 (2010)]. The method exploits ablative imprints in various solids to visualize iso-fluence beam contours at different fluence and/or clip levels. An f-scan curve (clip level as a function of the corresponding iso-fluence contour area) can be generated for a general non-Gaussian beam. As shown in this paper, fluence scan encompasses important information about energy distribution within the beam profile, which may play an essential role in laser-matter interaction research employing intense non-ideal beams. Here we for the first time discuss fundamental properties of the f-scan function and its inverse counterpart (if-scan). Furthermore, we extensively elucidate how it is related to the effective beam area, energy distribution, and to the so called Liu's dependence [J.M. Liu, Opt. Lett. 7, 196 (1982)]. A new method of the effective area evaluation based on weighted inverse f-scan fit is introduced and applied to real data obtained at the SCSS (SPring-8 Compact SASE Source) facility. (authors)

  10. Synthetic aperture laser optical feedback imaging using a translational scanning with galvanometric mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Glastre, Wilfried; Hugon, Olivier; De Chatellus, Hugues Guillet; Lacot, Eric

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present an experimental setup based on Laser Optical Feedback Imaging (LOFI) and on Synthetic Aperture (SA) with translational scanning by galvanometric mirrors for the purpose of making deep and resolved images through scattering media. We provide real 2D optical synthetic-aperture image of a fixed scattering target with a moving aperture and an isotropic resolution. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that we can keep microscope resolution beyond the working distance. A photometric balance is made and we show that the number of photons participating in the final image decreases with the square of the reconstruction distance. This degradation is partially compensated by the high sensitivity of LOFI.

  11. OPTIMIZING TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING MEASUREMENT SET-UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Soudarissanane

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the main applications of the terrestrial laser scanner is the visualization, modeling and monitoring of man-made structures like buildings. Especially surveying applications require on one hand a quickly obtainable, high resolution point cloud but also need observations with a known and well described quality. To obtain a 3D point cloud, the scene is scanned from different positions around the considered object. The scanning geometry plays an important role in the quality of the resulting point cloud. The ideal set-up for scanning a surface of an object is to position the laser scanner in such a way that the laser beam is near perpendicular to the surface. Due to scanning conditions, such an ideal set-up is in practice not possible. The different incidence angles and ranges of the laser beam on the surface result in 3D points of varying quality. The stand-point of the scanner that gives the best accuracy is generally not known. Using an optimal stand-point of the laser scanner on a scene will improve the quality of individual point measurements and results in a more uniform registered point cloud. The design of an optimum measurement setup is defined such that the optimum stand-points are identified to fulfill predefined quality requirements and to ensure a complete spatial coverage. The additional incidence angle and range constraints on the visibility from a view point ensure that individual scans are not affected by bad scanning geometry effects. A complex and large room that would normally require five view point to be fully covered, would require nineteen view points to obtain full coverage under the range and incidence angle constraints.

  12. Theoretical benchmarking of laser-accelerated ion fluxes by 2D-PIC simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Mackenroth, Felix; Marklund, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    There currently exists a number of different schemes for laser based ion acceleration in the literature. Some of these schemes are also partly overlapping, making a clear distinction between the schemes difficult in certain parameter regimes. Here, we provide a systematic numerical comparison between the following schemes and their analytical models: light-sail acceleration, Coulomb explosions, hole boring acceleration, and target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA). We study realistic laser parameters and various different target designs, each optimized for one of the acceleration schemes, respectively. As a means of comparing the schemes, we compute the ion current density generated at different laser powers, using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, and benchmark the particular analytical models for the corresponding schemes against the numerical results. Finally, we discuss the consequences for attaining high fluxes through the studied laser ion-acceleration schemes.

  13. Photodynamic therapy with laser scanning mode of tumor irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepurna, Oksana; Shton, Irina; Kholin, Vladimir; Voytsehovich, Valerii; Popov, Viacheslav; Pavlov, Sergii; Gamaleia, Nikolai; Wójcik, Waldemar; Zhassandykyzy, Maral

    2015-12-01

    In this study we propose a new version of photodynamic therapy performed by laser scanning. The method consists in tumor treatment by a light beam of a small cross section which incrementally moves through the chosen area with a defined delay at each point and repetitively re-scans a zone starting from the initial position. Experimental evaluation of the method in vitro on murine tumor model showed that despite the dose, applied by scanning irradiation mode, was 400 times lower, the tumor inhibition rate conceded to attained with continuous irradiation mode by only 20%.

  14. A diffraction-limited scanning system providing broad spectral range for laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiun-Yann; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Zhuo, Zong-Yan; Huang, Chen-Han; Chui, Hsiang-Chen; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2009-11-01

    Diversified research interests in scanning laser microscopy nowadays require broadband capability of the optical system. Although an all-mirror-based optical design with a suitable metallic coating is appropriate for broad-spectrum applications from ultraviolet to terahertz, most researchers prefer lens-based scanning systems despite the drawbacks of a limited spectral range, ghost reflection, and chromatic aberration. One of the main concerns is that the geometrical aberration induced by off-axis incidence on spherical mirrors significantly deteriorates image resolution. Here, we demonstrate a novel geometrical design of a spherical-mirror-based scanning system in which off-axis aberrations, both astigmatism and coma, are compensated to reach diffraction-limited performance. We have numerically simulated and experimentally verified that this scanning system meets the Marechà l condition and provides high Strehl ratio within a 3°×3° scanning area. Moreover, we demonstrate second-harmonic-generation imaging from starch with our new design. A greatly improved resolution compared to the conventional mirror-based system is confirmed. This scanning system will be ideal for high-resolution linear/nonlinear laser scanning microscopy, ophthalmoscopic applications, and precision fabrications.

  15. An algorithm for circular test and improved optical configuration by two-dimensional (2D) laser heterodyne interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shanzhi; Yu, Shengrui; Han, Qingfu; Li, Ming; Wang, Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Circular test is an important tactic to assess motion accuracy in many fields especially machine tool and coordinate measuring machine. There are setup errors due to using directly centring of the measuring instrument for both of contact double ball bar and existed non-contact methods. To solve this problem, an algorithm for circular test using function construction based on matrix operation is proposed, which is not only used for the solution of radial deviation (F) but also should be applied to obtain two other evaluation parameters especially circular hysteresis (H). Furthermore, an improved optical configuration with a single laser is presented based on a 2D laser heterodyne interferometer. Compared with the existed non-contact method, it has a more pure homogeneity of the laser sources of 2D displacement sensing for advanced metrology. The algorithm and modeling are both illustrated. And error budget is also achieved. At last, to validate them, test experiments for motion paths are implemented based on a gantry machining center. Contrast test results support the proposal.

  16. Tree Stem Diameter Estimation from Mobile Laser Scanning Using Line-Wise Intensity-Based Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Forsman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diameter at breast height has been estimated from mobile laser scanning using a new set of methods. A 2D laser scanner was mounted facing forward, tilted nine degrees downwards, on a car. The trajectory was recorded using inertial navigation and visual SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping. The laser scanner data, the trajectory and the orientation were used to calculate a 3D point cloud. Clusters representing trees were extracted line-wise to reduce the effects of uncertainty in the positioning system. The intensity of the laser echoes was used to filter out unreliable echoes only grazing a stem. The movement was used to obtain measurements from a larger part of the stem, and multiple lines from different views were used for the circle fit. Two trigonometric methods and two circle fit methods were tested. The best results with bias 2.3% (6 mm and root mean squared error 14% (37 mm were acquired with the circle fit on multiple 2D projected clusters. The method was evaluated compared to field data at five test areas with approximately 300 caliper-measured trees within a 10-m working range. The results show that this method is viable for stem measurements from a moving vehicle, for example a forest harvester.

  17. Single scan vector prediction in selective laser melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, W.W.; Bruins, R.; Terpstra, L.; Huls, R.A.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In selective laser melting (SLM) products are built by melting layers of metal powder successively. Optimal process parameters are usually obtained by scanning single vectors and subsequently determining which settings lead to a good compromise between product density and build speed. This paper pro

  18. Automated rock mass characterisation using 3-D terrestrial laser scanning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slob, S.

    2010-01-01

    The research investigates the possibility of using point cloud data from 3-D terrestrial laser scanning as a basis to characterise discontinuities in exposed rock massed in an automated way. Examples of discontinuities in rock are bedding planes, joints, fractures and schistocity. The characterisati

  19. USE OF LASER SCANNING FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE DOCUMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulhan BENLI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In terms of raising an awareness of the historical, national and cultural properties in our country and ensuring a transfer of information to posterity, it is of vital importance to take inventory of the cultural and natural real properties located in protected sites. Many fields, such as medical science, construction, ground engineering, geodetic engineering, and architecture, make use of the present-day laser scanning technology. Even if contemporary and current scientific methods are used for the inventory and documentation studies related to cultural and natural real properties in the PROTECTED SITES in the field of architecture; acquiring data of the entirety of a protected site using these methods is a time consuming process. Among the scientific methods applied, laser scanning technology has the utmost importance in the latest years. The laser scanning devices for the detection of cultural, natural and historical properties in archeological, historical, urban or mixed protected sites in Turkey, eliminate challenges such as the enormity of sites, the difficulty of working in the sites, intense work hours, and the necessity of having a thorough knowledge of the site. In the scope of this study, the usage, application, facilities, advantages and attainments of geodetic laser scanning systems in conducting surveys on facade, street or avenue silhouettes in the protected sites, where historical buildings within field of architecture are widespread, will be examined.

  20. Optomechatronics Design and Control for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoo, H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is considered as one of the major advancements in microscopy in the last century and is widely accepted as a 3D fluorescence imaging tool for biological studies. For the emerging biological questions CLSM requires fast imaging to detect rapid biological proc

  1. A Robotic Indoor 3D Mapping System Using a 2D Laser Range Finder Mounted on a Rotating Four-Bar Linkage of a Mobile Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shin Chou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes our work in developing a 3D robotic mapping system composed by an experimental mobile platform equipped with a rotating laser range finder (LRF. For the purpose of obtaining more complete 3D scans of the environment, we design, construct and calibrate a crank‐rocker four‐bar linkage so that a LRF mounted on it could undergo repetitive rotational motion between two extreme positions, allowing both horizontal and vertical scans. To reduce the complexity of map representation suitable for optimization later, the local map from the LRF is a grid map represented by a distance‐transformed (DT matrix. We compare the DT‐transformed maps and find the transformation matrix of a robot pose by a linear simplex‐based map optimization method restricted to a local region allows efficient alignment of maps in scan matching. Several indoor 2D and 3D mapping experiments are presented to demonstrate the consistency, efficiency and accuracy of the 3D mapping system for a mobile robot that is stationary or in motion.

  2. Calibration of Short Range 2D Laser Range Finder for 3D SLAM Usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Olivka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The laser range finder is one of the most essential sensors in the field of robotics. The laser range finder provides an accurate range measurement with high angular resolution. However, the short range scanners require an additional calibration to achieve the abovementioned accuracy. The calibration procedure described in this work provides an estimation of the internal parameters of the laser range finder without requiring any special three-dimensional targets. This work presents the use of a short range URG-04LX scanner for mapping purposes and describes its calibration. The precision of the calibration was checked in an environment with known ground truth values and the results were statistically evaluated. The benefits of the calibration are also demonstrated in the practical applications involving the segmentation of the environment. The proposed calibration method is complex and detects all major manufacturing inaccuracies. The procedure is suitable for easy integration into the current manufacturing process.

  3. Performance improvements in temperature reconstructions of 2-D tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Doo-Won; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Cho, Gyeong-Rae; Kamimoto, Takahiro; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Doh, Deog-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Performance improvement was attained in data reconstructions of 2-dimensional tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) algorithm was adopted for data reconstruction. The data obtained in an experiment for the measurement of temperature and concentration fields of gas flows were used. The measurement theory is based upon the Beer-Lambert law, and the measurement system consists of a tunable laser, collimators, detectors, and an analyzer. Methane was used as a fuel for combustion with air in the Bunsen-type burner. The data used for the reconstruction are from the optical signals of 8-laser beams passed on a cross-section of the methane flame. The performances of MART algorithm in data reconstruction were validated and compared with those obtained by Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) algorithm.

  4. Enhanced 2D-image upconversion using solid-state lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian; Karamehmedovic, Emir; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin;

    2009-01-01

    the image inside a nonlinear PPKTP crystal located in the high intra-cavity field of a 1342 nm solid-state Nd:YVO4 laser, an upconverted image at 488 nm is generated. We have experimentally achieved an upconversion efficiency of 40% under CW conditions. The proposed technique can be further adapted for high...

  5. Novel adaptive laser scanning sensor for reverse engineering measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Ji; Ma Zi; Lin Na; Zhu Quanmin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a series of new techniques are used to optimize typical laser scanning sensor. The integrated prototype is compared with traditional approach to demonstrate the much improved performance. In the research and development, camera calibration is achieved by extracting characteristic points of the laser plane, so that the calibration efficiency is improved significantly. With feedback control of its intensity, the laser is automatically adjusted for different material. A modified algorithm is presented to improve the accuracy of laser stripe extraction. The fusion of data extracted from left and right camera is completed with re-sampling technique. The scanner is integrated with a robot arm and some other machinery for on-line measurement and inspection, which provides a flexible measurement tool for reverse engineering.

  6. Airborne laser scanning to detect pipeline area invasions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falat, Denise R.; Sallem Filho, Silas [ESTEIO Engenharia e Aerolevantamentos S.A, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The occupation of the surface on the pipeline right-of-ways needs constant detailing and updating. The speed of changes in the vegetation areas and the irregular growth of urbanization prove the need for quick answers on the identification of invasions and on the elaboration of technical reports showing spatially referenced elements. In this context, this technical paper seeks to identify changes on the surface, making use of data derived from airborne LASER (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiance) sensor scanning performed in different periods in the same study right-of-way. This technique has been successfully used in a number of applications, however, in most of the cases the LASER data are combined with digital photogrammetric products. This paper aims at the identification of alterations on the surface of right-of-ways and pipelines, using data exclusively from LASER scanning, performed in distinct periods. From the data processing are generated the DSM's (Digital Surface Models). The automatic comparison between the DSM's allows the identification of changes occurred between the surveys. Based on the configuration of the altered areas, we then expect to distinguish the several types of changes occurred as: new buildings, the advance of vegetation over right-of-ways and objects. For the validation of this methodology, photographic images of the regions have been used, obtained through photogrammetry in the same period of the LASER scanning. (author)

  7. Automated house internal geometric quality inspection using laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuchen; Zhang, Zhichao; Qiu, Zhouyan

    2015-12-01

    Taking a terrestrial laser scanner to scan the room of a house, the scanned data can be used to inspect the geometric quality of the room. Taking advantage of the scan line feature, we can quickly calculate normal of the scanned points. Afterwards, we develop a fast plane segmentation approach to recognize the walls of the room according to the semantic constraints of a common room. With geometric and semantic constraints, we can exclude points that don't belong to the inspecting room. With the segmented results, we can accurately do global search of max and min height, width and length of a room, and the flatness of the wall as well. Experiment shows the robustness of this geometric inspecting approach. This approach has the ability to measure some important indicators that cannot be done by manual work.

  8. 2D parameter optimization of Ne-like Cr x-ray laser on slab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Tao; Li Ying-Jun; Meng Li-Min; Yuan Su-Ying; Zhang Jie

    2009-01-01

    A method of studying a non-equilibrium x-ray laser plasma is developed by extending the existing one-dimensional similarity equations to the case of two-dimensional plasma study in the directions perpendicular to the slab and along a focal line. With this method the characteristics of pre-plasma are optimized for transient neon-like Cr x-ray laser. It is found that when the duration and the intensity of 1.053 μm pre-pulse are 1.2 ns and 6.5 TW/cm2respectively with a delay time of 1.5 us, the temperature and the temperature discrepancy each approach a proper state, which will provide a uniform distribution of properly ionized neon-like Cr ions before the arrival of pumping pulse.

  9. Synthesis by pulsed laser ablation of 2D nanostructures for advanced biomedical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusso, S.; Zanchi, C.; Bombelli, A.; Lucotti, A.; Tommasini, M.; de Grazia, U.; Ciusani, E.; Romito, L. M.; Ossi, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Au nanoparticle arrays with controlled nanostructure were produced by pulsed laser ablation on glass. Such substrates were optimized for biomedical sensing by means of SERS keeping fixed all process parameters but the laser pulse (LP) number that is a key deposition parameter. It allows to fine-tune the Au surface nanostructure with a considerable improvement in the SERS response towards the detection of apomorphine in blood serum (3.3 × 10‑6 M), when LP number is increased from 1 × 104 to 2 × 104. This result is the starting point to correlate the intensity of selected SERS signals of apomorphine to its concentration in the blood of patients with Parkinson's disease.

  10. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, G; Anlage, Steven M; Baldwin, C; Cheng, G; Flood, R; Jordan, K; Kneisel, P; Morrone, M; Nemes, G; Turlington, L; Wang, H; Wilson, K; Zhang, S

    2012-03-01

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about 2.4 mm and surface resistance resolution of ~1 μΩ at 3.3 GHz. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in detail in this contribution.

  11. Preparation of solder pads by selective laser scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenqing Shi; Yongqiang Yang; Yanlu Huang; Guoqiang Wei; Wei Guo

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new laser preparation technique to solder Sn-Ag3.5-Cu0.7 on a copper clad laminate (CCL). The experiment is conducted by selective laser heating and melting the thin solder layer and then preprint-ing it on CCL in order to form the matrix with solder pads. Through the analysis of macro morphology of the matrix with solder pads and microstructure of single pads, this technique is proved to be suitable for preparing solder pads and that the solder pads are of good mechanical properties. The results also reveal that high frequency laser pulse is beneficial to the formation of better solder pad, and that the 12-W fiber laser with a beam diameter of 0.030 mm can solder Sn-Ag3.5-Cu0.7 successfully on CCL at 500-kHz pulse frequency. The optimized parameters of laser soldering on CCL are as follows: the laser power is 12 W, the scanning speed is 1.0 mm/s, the beam diameter is 0.030 mm, the lead-free solder is Sn-Ag3.5-Cu0.7, and the laser pulse frequency is 500 kHz.

  12. Development and characterization of a 2D scintillation detector for quality assurance in scanned carbon ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, A.; Raffaele, L.; Mirandola, A.; Molinelli, S.; Viviani, C.; Spampinato, S.; Ciocca, M.

    2016-04-01

    At the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO Foundation), a two-dimensional high resolution scintillating dosimetry system has been developed and tested for daily Quality Assurance measurements (QA) in carbon ion radiotherapy with active scanning technique, for both single pencil beams and scanned fields produced by a synchrotron accelerator. The detector consists of a thin plane organic scintillator (25×25 cm2, 2 mm thick) coupled with a high spatial resolution CCD camera (0.25 mm) in a light-tight box. A dedicated Labview software was developed for image acquisition triggered with the beam extraction, data post-processing and analysis. The scintillator system was preliminary characterized in terms of short-term reproducibility (found to be within±0.5%), linearity with the number of particles (linear fit χ2 = 0.996) and dependence on particle flux (measured to be < 1.5 %). The detector was then tested for single beam spot measurements (Full Width at Half Maximum and position) and for 6×6 cm2 reference scanned field (determination of homogeneity) for carbon ions with energy from 115 MeV/u up to 400 MeV/u. No major differences in the investigated beam parameters measured with scintillator system and the radiochromic EBT3 reference films were observed. The system allows therefore real-time monitoring of the carbon ion beam relevant parameters, with a significant daily time saving with respect to films currently used. The results of this study show the suitability of the scintillation detector for daily QA in a carbon ion facility with an active beam delivery system.

  13. Practical Enhancement of Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Fluvial Geomorphology Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, K.; Chandler, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate measurement of microtopography plays an important role in fluvial geomorphology. Whereof the surface is obscured by vegetation or landform, airborne remote sensing can be impractical and ground-based surveys using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) show promise. TLS provides high resolution observations of the land surface for relatively low cost and with simple setup. However, the scanning range is effectively limited to less than 100 m, requiring individual scenes to be merged in software to represent larger landforms. For studies requiring several scenes, an efficient scanning strategy should be established in advance to optimize for time, resolution and spatial coverage. This requires careful consideration of scanner placement to merge scenes. We address problems encountered with blind spots. TLS is generally conducted on a 2-m (or shorter) tripod and the low scanning angle to the land surface at long distance inevitably causes blind spots in rugose or complex terrain. Similarly, the distance between TLS placement points is limited by the ability to resolve matching targets from sequential surveys. Here we present a simple geometry-based scanning plan regardless of the type and range of the instrument, with modification of the survey instrument platform. The half of a minimum range is used to make at least 18% of a superposed area with the next scan. Since scanning height barely affects the scanning range, the tripod was substituted to a 3-m stepladder and the platform of the scanner was modified to level and adjust the device easily with one hand. The results show that the new scanning plan performs well regardless of the topography and figure of the area of interest, with sufficient superposed area for combination with other adjacent scans. The modification of the platform also turned out to be more efficient to secure the observing angle and improve usability. The physical enhancement for TLS will provide valuable opportunity to conduct a standardized

  14. Differential diagnosis of choroidal melanomas and nervi using scanning laser ophthalmoscopical indocyanine green angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads V. Nis; Scherfig, Erik; Prause, J.U.

    1995-01-01

    Ophthalmology, choroidal melanoma, choroidal nevus, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green (ICG), scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), angiography......Ophthalmology, choroidal melanoma, choroidal nevus, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green (ICG), scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), angiography...

  15. Measurement of residual radioactive surface contamination by 2-D laser heated TLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of applying and adapting a two-dimensional laser heated thermoluminescence dosimetry system to the problem of surveying for radioactive surface contamination was studied. The system consists of a CO2 laser-based reader and monolithic arrays of thin dosimeter elements. The arrays consist of 10,201 thermoluminescent phosphor elements of 40 micron thickness, covering a 900 cm2 area. Array substrates are 125 micron thick polyimide sheets, enabling them to easily conform to regular surface shapes, especially for survey of surfaces that are inaccessible for standard survey instruments. The passive, integrating radiation detectors are sensitive to alpha and beta radiation at contamination levels below release guideline limits. Required contact times with potentially contaminated surfaces are under one hour to achieve detection of transuranic alpha emission at 100 dpm/100 cm2. Positional information obtained from array evaluation is useful for locating contamination zones. Unique capabilities of this system for survey of sites, facilities and material include measurement inside pipes and other geometrical configurations that prevent standard surveys, and below-surface measurement of alpha and beta emitters in contaminated soils. These applications imply a reduction of material that must be classified as radioactive waste by virtue of its possibility of contamination, and cost savings in soil sampling at contaminated sites

  16. Monitoring stream bluff erosion using repeat terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitzel, G.; Gran, K. B.

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) technology provides high-resolution topographic data that can be used to detect geomorphic change in fluvial environments. In this study, we utilize successive terrestrial laser scans to investigate the relationship between peak flow rates and stream bluff erosion in the Amity Creek watershed in Duluth, Minnesota. We also combine TLS scan results with bluff inventories from airborne lidar to estimate the volume of sediment erosion from bluffs in the watershed, which is an important source of fine sediment contributing to the creek's turbidity impairment. We selected nine study bluffs to conduct terrestrial laser scans on after all significant flood events over a two-year time period. The study employs a Faro Focus 3D phase-shift laser to collect data. Post-processing of the TLS-point cloud data sets involves: (1) removal of vegetation and objects other than the erosional surface of interest; (2) decimation of the point cloud in PC Tools and extraction of zmin values to produce a data set manageable in GIS; (3) creation of a bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) for each set of scans using ArcMap; and (4) utilization of Geomorphic Change Detection (GCD) software to generate DEMs of Difference (DODs) from subsequent terrestrial laser scans. Preliminary results from three flooding events indicate significant erosional activity at all field sites. Slumps were observed at two bluffs following spring melt and freeze/thaw cycling. Two major precipitation events in late spring and early summer provided a unique opportunity to observe the impact of extreme high flow events on bluff erosion throughout the watershed using TLS technology. 4.75 inches of intermittent rain over a six-day period in late May 2012 (May 23-28) resulted in slumping at many bluffs and one major failure. The ≥100-year flood that occurred on June 19-20 (7.25 inches), 2012 was powerful enough to induce considerable channel change. Slumps occurred at six study sites

  17. A New Multichannel Spectral Imaging Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhai Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multichannel spectral imaging laser scanning confocal microscope for effective detection of multiple fluorescent labeling in the research of biological tissues. In this paper, the design and key technologies of the system are introduced. Representative results on confocal imaging, 3-dimensional sectioning imaging, and spectral imaging are demonstrated. The results indicated that the system is applicable to multiple fluorescent labeling in biological experiments.

  18. Quantification of fold curvature and fracturing using terrestrial laser scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, M. A.; eospatial Research Ltd., Department of Earth Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, DH1 3LE, United Kingdom;; Jones, R. R.; Geospatial Research Ltd., Department of Earth Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, DH1 3LE, United Kingdom;; Smith, S. A. F.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia; McCaffrey, K .J. W.; Geospatial Research Ltd., Department of Earth Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, DH1 3LE, United Kingdom;

    2011-01-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning is used to capture the geometry of three single folded bedding surfaces. The resulting light detection and ranging (LIDAR) point clouds are filtered and smoothed to enable meshing and calculation of principal curvatures. Fracture traces, picked from the LIDAR data, are used to calculate fracture densities. The rich data sets produced by this method provide statistically robust estimates of spatial variations in fracture density across the fold surface. The digital n...

  19. Automation in laser scanning for cultural heritage applications

    OpenAIRE

    Böhm, Jan; Haala, Norbert; Alshawabkeh, Yahya

    2005-01-01

    Within the paper we present the current activities of the Institute for Photogrammetry in cultural heritage documentation in Jordan. In particular two sites, Petra and Jerash, were recorded using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). We present the results and the current status of the recording. Experiences drawn from these projects have led us to investigate more automated approaches to TLS data processing. We detail two approaches within this work. The automation of georeferencing for TLS data...

  20. Modeling 3D Objects for Navigation Purposes Using Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezary Specht

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the creation of 3d models and their applications in navigation. It contains a review of available methods and geometric data sources, focusing mostly on terrestrial laser scanning. It presents detailed description, from field survey to numerical elaboration, how to construct accurate model of a typical few storey building as a hypothetical reference in complex building navigation. Hence, the paper presents fields where 3d models are being used and their potential new applications.

  1. Improving Completeness of Geometric Models from Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Nothegger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of terrestrial laser scanning for the documentation of cultural heritage assets is becoming increasingly common. While the point cloud by itself is sufficient for satisfying many documentation needs, it is often desirable to use this data for applications other than documentation. For these purposes a triangulated model is usually required. The generation of topologically correct triangulated models from terrestrial laser scans, however, still requires much interactive editing. This is especially true when reconstructing models from medium range panoramic scanners and many scan positions. Because of residual errors in the instrument calibration and the limited spatial resolution due to the laser footprint, the point clouds from different scan positions never match perfectly. Under these circumstances many of the software packages commonly used for generating triangulated models produce models which have topological errors such as surface intersecting triangles, holes or triangles which violate the manifold property. We present an algorithm which significantly reduces the number of topological errors in the models from such data. The algorithm is a modification of the Poisson surface reconstruction algorithm. Poisson surfaces are resilient to noise in the data and the algorithm always produces a closed manifold surface. Our modified algorithm partitions the data into tiles and can thus be easily parallelized. Furthermore, it avoids introducing topological errors in occluded areas, albeit at the cost of producing models which are no longer guaranteed to be closed. The algorithm is applied to scan data of sculptures of the UNESCO World Heritage Site Schönbrunn Palace and data of a petrified oyster reef in Stetten, Austria. The results of the method’s application are discussed and compared with those of alternative methods.

  2. Calibration technology in application of robot-laser scanning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, YongJie; Yin, ShiBin; Zhu, JiGui

    2012-11-01

    A system composed of laser sensor and 6-DOF industrial robot is proposed to obtain complete three-dimensional (3-D) information of the object surface. Suitable for the different combining ways of laser sensor and robot, a new method to calibrate the position and pose between sensor and robot is presented. By using a standard sphere with known radius as a reference tool, the rotation and translation matrices between the laser sensor and robot are computed, respectively in two steps, so that many unstable factors introduced in conventional optimization methods can be avoided. The experimental results show that the accuracy of the proposed calibration method can be achieved up to 0.062 mm. The calibration method is also implemented into the automated robot scanning system to reconstruct a car door panel.

  3. Laser Brazing with Beam Scanning: Experimental and Simulative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmanek, M.; Dobler, M.; Graudenz, M.; Perret, W.; Göbel, G.; Schmidt, M.; Beyer, E.

    Laser beam brazing with copper based filler wire is a widely established technology for joining zinc-coated steel plates in the body-shop. Successful applications are the divided tailgate or the zero-gap joint, which represents the joint between the side panel and the roof-top of the body-in-white. These joints are in direct view to the customer, and therefore have to fulfil highest optical quality requirements. For this reason a stable and efficient laser brazing process is essential. In this paper the current results on quality improvement due to one dimensional laser beam deflections in feed direction are presented. Additionally to the experimental results a transient three-dimensional simulation model for the laser beam brazing process is taken into account. With this model the influence of scanning parameters on filler wire temperature and melt pool characteristics is analyzed. The theoretical predictions are in good accordance with the experimental results. They show that the beam scanning approach is a very promising method to increase process stability and seam quality.

  4. Measurement Axis Searching Model for Terrestrial Laser Scans Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoxing Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, terrestrial Lidar scans can cover rather a large area; the point densities are strongly varied because of the line-of-sight measurement principle in potential overlaps with scans taken from different viewpoints. Most of the traditional methods focus on registration algorithm and ignore searching model. Sometimes the traditional methods are directly used to align two point clouds; a large critically unsolved problem of the large biases will be created in areas distant from the overlaps while the local overlaps are often aligned well. So a novel measurement axis searching model (MASM has been proposed in this paper. The method includes four steps: (1 the principal axis fitting, (2 the measurement axis generation, (3 low-high-precision search, and (4 result generation. The principal axis gives an orientation to the point cloud; the search scope is limited by the measurement axis. The point cloud orientation can be adjusted gradually until the achievement of the global optimum using low- and high-precision search. We perform some experiments with simulated point clouds and real terrestrial laser scans. The results of simulated point clouds have shown the processing steps of our method, and the results of real terrestrial laser scans have shown the sensitivity of the approach with respect to the indoor and outdoor scenes.

  5. Dental scanning in CAD/CAM technologies: laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Faur, Nicolae; Negru, Radu; Romînu, Mihai; Cozarov, Dalibor

    2008-02-01

    Scanning, also called digitizing, is the process of gathering the requisite data from an object. Many different technologies are used to collect three dimensional data. They range from mechanical and very slow, to radiation-based and highly-automated. Each technology has its advantages and disadvantages, and their applications and specifications overlap. The aims of this study are represented by establishing a viable method of digitally representing artifacts of dental casts, proposing a suitable scanner and post-processing software and obtaining 3D Models for the dental applications. The method is represented by the scanning procedure made by different scanners as the implicated materials. Scanners are the medium of data capture. 3D scanners aim to measure and record the relative distance between the object's surface and a known point in space. This geometric data is represented in the form of point cloud data. The contact and no contact scanners were presented. The results show that contact scanning procedures uses a touch probe to record the relative position of points on the objects' surface. This procedure is commonly used in Reverse engineering applications. Its merits are represented by efficiency for objects with low geometric surface detail. Disadvantages are represented by time consuming, this procedure being impractical for artifacts digitization. The non contact scanning procedure implies laser scanning (laser triangulation technology) and photogrammetry. As a conclusion it can be drawn that different types of dental structure needs different types of scanning procedures in order to obtain a competitive complex 3D virtual model that can be used in CAD/CAM technologies.

  6. 2D hydrodynamic simulation of a line-focused plasma in Ni-like Ag x-ray laser research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Wu-Di; Zhang Guo-Ping

    2007-01-01

    In most collisional schemes of x-ray laser (XRL) experiments, a bow-like intensity distribution of XRL is often observed, and it is generally ascribed to the two-dimensional hydrodynamic behaviour of expanding plasma. In order to better understand its essence in physics, a newly developed two-dimensional non-equilibrium radiation hydrodynamic code XRL2D is used to simulate a quasi-steady state Ni-like Ag XRL experiment on ShenGuang-II facility. The simulation results show that the bow-like distribution of Ni-like ions caused by over-ionization in the central area of plasma is responsible for the bow-like shape of the XRL intensity distribution observed.

  7. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D; de la Fuente, G F; Jansen, M

    2012-04-01

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 °C. PMID:22559543

  8. Laser cutting of irregular shape object based on stereo vision laser galvanometric scanning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Li; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Shun; Tang, Zhiqiang; Yang, Huan; Zhang, Xuping

    2015-05-01

    Irregular shape objects with different 3-dimensional (3D) appearances are difficult to be shaped into customized uniform pattern by current laser machining approaches. A laser galvanometric scanning system (LGS) could be a potential candidate since it can easily achieve path-adjustable laser shaping. However, without knowing the actual 3D topography of the object, the processing result may still suffer from 3D shape distortion. It is desirable to have a versatile auxiliary tool that is capable of generating 3D-adjusted laser processing path by measuring the 3D geometry of those irregular shape objects. This paper proposed the stereo vision laser galvanometric scanning system (SLGS), which takes the advantages of both the stereo vision solution and conventional LGS system. The 3D geometry of the object obtained by the stereo cameras is used to guide the scanning galvanometers for 3D-shape-adjusted laser processing. In order to achieve precise visual-servoed laser fabrication, these two independent components are integrated through a system calibration method using plastic thin film target. The flexibility of SLGS has been experimentally demonstrated by cutting duck feathers for badminton shuttle manufacture.

  9. Efficient terrestrial laser scan segmentation exploiting data structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudabadi, Hamid; Olsen, Michael J.; Todorovic, Sinisa

    2016-09-01

    New technologies such as lidar enable the rapid collection of massive datasets to model a 3D scene as a point cloud. However, while hardware technology continues to advance, processing 3D point clouds into informative models remains complex and time consuming. A common approach to increase processing efficiently is to segment the point cloud into smaller sections. This paper proposes a novel approach for point cloud segmentation using computer vision algorithms to analyze panoramic representations of individual laser scans. These panoramas can be quickly created using an inherent neighborhood structure that is established during the scanning process, which scans at fixed angular increments in a cylindrical or spherical coordinate system. In the proposed approach, a selected image segmentation algorithm is applied on several input layers exploiting this angular structure including laser intensity, range, normal vectors, and color information. These segments are then mapped back to the 3D point cloud so that modeling can be completed more efficiently. This approach does not depend on pre-defined mathematical models and consequently setting parameters for them. Unlike common geometrical point cloud segmentation methods, the proposed method employs the colorimetric and intensity data as another source of information. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated on several datasets encompassing variety of scenes and objects. Results show a very high perceptual (visual) level of segmentation and thereby the feasibility of the proposed algorithm. The proposed method is also more efficient compared to Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC), which is a common approach for point cloud segmentation.

  10. Microanalysis of dental caries using laser-scanned fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Joseph R.; Paton, Barry E.; Zakariasen, Kenneth L.

    1992-06-01

    It is well known that enamel and dentin fluoresce when illuminated by short-wavelength optical radiation. Fluorescence emission from carious and non-carious regions of teeth have been studied using a new experimental scanning technique for fluorescence analysis of dental sections. Scanning in 2 dimensions will allow surface maps of dental caries to be created. These surface images are then enhanced using the conventional and newer image processing techniques. Carious regions can be readily identified and contour maps can be used to graphically display the degree of damage on both surfaces and transverse sections. Numerous studies have shown that carious fluorescence is significantly different than non-carious regions. The scanning laser fluorescence spectrometer focuses light from a 25 mW He-Cd laser at 442 nm through an objective lens onto a cross-section area as small as 3 micrometers in diameter. Microtome prepared dental samples 100 micrometers thick are laid flat onto an optical bench perpendicular to the incident beam. The sample is moved under computer control in X & Y with an absolute precision of 0.1 micrometers . The backscattered light is both spatial and wavelength filtered before being measured on a long wavelength sensitized photomultiplier tube. High precision analysis of dental samples allow detailed maps of carious regions to be determined. Successive images allow time studies of caries growth and even the potential for remineralization studies of decalcified regions.

  11. Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy: optimized testing strategies for psychophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Frans J.

    1996-12-01

    Retinal function can be evaluated with the scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO). the main advantage is a precise localization of the psychophysical stimulus on the retina. Four alternative forced choice (4AFC) and parameter estimation by sequential testing (PEST) are classic adaptive algorithms that have been optimized for use with the SLO, and combined with strategies to correct for small eye movements. Efficient calibration procedures are essential for quantitative microperimetry. These techniques measure precisely visual acuity and retinal sensitivity at distinct locations on the retina. A combined 632 nm and IR Maxwellian view illumination provides a maximal transmittance through the ocular media and has a animal interference with xanthophyll or hemoglobin. Future modifications of the instrument include the possibility of binocular evaluation, Maxwellian view control, fundus tracking using normalized gray-scale correlation, and microphotocoagulation. The techniques are useful in low vision rehabilitation and the application of laser to the retina.

  12. Automatic Railway Power Line Extraction Using Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanxin; Wang, Cheng; Yang, Zhuang; Chen, Yiping; Li, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Research on power line extraction technology using mobile laser point clouds has important practical significance on railway power lines patrol work. In this paper, we presents a new method for automatic extracting railway power line from MLS (Mobile Laser Scanning) data. Firstly, according to the spatial structure characteristics of power-line and trajectory, the significant data is segmented piecewise. Then, use the self-adaptive space region growing method to extract power lines parallel with rails. Finally use PCA (Principal Components Analysis) combine with information entropy theory method to judge a section of the power line whether is junction or not and which type of junction it belongs to. The least squares fitting algorithm is introduced to model the power line. An evaluation of the proposed method over a complicated railway point clouds acquired by a RIEGL VMX450 MLS system shows that the proposed method is promising.

  13. Surface characterization of weathered wood using a laser scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the existing methods to assess the effect of weathering on wood surfaces have some drawbacks that limit their use to specific tasks. The amount of surface erosion is often used as a measure for the weathering action. The application of a laser scanning system to reproduce surface profiles and to measure weathering erosion was tested on various samples and was found to be a very useful and superior alternative to existing methods. Further improvements of the system used can be made by refinements of the calibration procedures and by more comprehensive profile analyses. (author)

  14. Geomorphometric analysis of cave ceiling channels mapped with 3-D terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallay, Michal; Hochmuth, Zdenko; Kaňuk, Ján; Hofierka, Jaroslav

    2016-05-01

    The change of hydrological conditions during the evolution of caves in carbonate rocks often results in a complex subterranean geomorphology, which comprises specific landforms such as ceiling channels, anastomosing half tubes, or speleothems organized vertically in different levels. Studying such complex environments traditionally requires tedious mapping; however, this is being replaced with terrestrial laser scanning technology. Laser scanning overcomes the problem of reaching high ceilings, providing new options to map underground landscapes with unprecedented level of detail and accuracy. The acquired point cloud can be handled conveniently with dedicated software, but applying traditional geomorphometry to analyse the cave surface is limited. This is because geomorphometry has been focused on parameterization and analysis of surficial terrain. The theoretical and methodological concept has been based on two-dimensional (2-D) scalar fields, which are sufficient for most cases of the surficial terrain. The terrain surface is modelled with a bivariate function of altitude (elevation) and represented by a raster digital elevation model. However, the cave is a 3-D entity; therefore, a different approach is required for geomorphometric analysis. In this paper, we demonstrate the benefits of high-resolution cave mapping and 3-D modelling to better understand the palaeohydrography of the Domica cave in Slovakia. This methodological approach adopted traditional geomorphometric methods in a unique manner and also new methods used in 3-D computer graphics, which can be applied to study other 3-D geomorphological forms.

  15. Robust Locally Weighted Regression For Ground Surface Extraction In Mobile Laser Scanning 3D Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurunnabi, A.; West, G.; Belton, D.

    2013-10-01

    A new robust way for ground surface extraction from mobile laser scanning 3D point cloud data is proposed in this paper. Fitting polynomials along 2D/3D points is one of the well-known methods for filtering ground points, but it is evident that unorganized point clouds consist of multiple complex structures by nature so it is not suitable for fitting a parametric global model. The aim of this research is to develop and implement an algorithm to classify ground and non-ground points based on statistically robust locally weighted regression which fits a regression surface (line in 2D) by fitting without any predefined global functional relation among the variables of interest. Afterwards, the z (elevation)-values are robustly down weighted based on the residuals for the fitted points. The new set of down weighted z-values along with x (or y) values are used to get a new fit of the (lower) surface (line). The process of fitting and down-weighting continues until the difference between two consecutive fits is insignificant. Then the final fit represents the ground level of the given point cloud and the ground surface points can be extracted. The performance of the new method has been demonstrated through vehicle based mobile laser scanning 3D point cloud data from urban areas which include different problematic objects such as short walls, large buildings, electric poles, sign posts and cars. The method has potential in areas like building/construction footprint determination, 3D city modelling, corridor mapping and asset management.

  16. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merino D

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available David Merino, Pablo Loza-Alvarez The Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO, The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Castelldefels, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Adaptive optics (AO retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. Keywords: high-resolution, in vivo retinal imaging, AOSLO

  17. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it.

  18. Feature-Based Laser Scan Matching and Its Application for Indoor Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayuan Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Scan matching, an approach to recover the relative position and orientation of two laser scans, is a very important technique for indoor positioning and indoor modeling. The iterative closest point (ICP algorithm and its variants are the most well-known techniques for such a problem. However, ICP algorithms rely highly on the initial guess of the relative transformation, which will reduce its power for practical applications. In this paper, an initial-free 2D laser scan matching method based on point and line features is proposed. We carefully design a framework for the detection of point and line feature correspondences. First, distinct feature points are detected based on an extended 1D SIFT, and line features are extracted via a modified Split-and-Merge algorithm. In this stage, we also give an effective strategy for discarding unreliable features. The point and line features are then described by a distance histogram; the pairs achieving best matching scores are accepted as potential correct correspondences. The histogram cluster technique is adapted to filter outliers and provide an accurate initial value of the rigid transformation. We also proposed a new relative pose estimation method that is robust to outliers. We use the lq-norm (0 < q < 1 metric in this approach, in contrast to classic optimization methods whose cost function is based on the l2-norm of residuals. Extensive experiments on real data demonstrate that the proposed method is almost as accurate as ICPs and is initial free. We also show that our scan matching method can be integrated into a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM system for indoor mapping.

  19. High resolution scanning photoluminescence characterization of semi-insulating GaAs using a laser scanning microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, J.; Elliot, A. G.; Wilke, V.; Geiss, R.

    1986-12-01

    Spatially resolved photoluminescence properties of semi-insulating, liquid encapsulated Czochralski-grown GaAs substrates are analyzed with a laser scanning microscope. The improved resolution of the laser scanning microscope results in the observation of single dislocations within the subgrain boundaries of the polyganized dislocation cell network for the first time by photoluminescence. Both the cell structure and the Cottrell cloud are clearly resolved.

  20. Two-photon flow cytometer with laser scanning Bessel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongdong; Ding, Yu; Ray, Supriyo; Paez, Aurelio; Xiao, Chuan; Li, Chunqiang

    2016-03-01

    Flow cytometry is an important technique in biomedical discovery for cell counting, cell sorting and biomarker detection. In vivo flow cytometers, based on one-photon or two-photon excited fluorescence, have been developed for more than a decade. One drawback of laser beam scanning two-photon flow cytometer is that the two-photon excitation volume is fairly small due to the short Rayleigh range of a focused Gaussian beam. Hence, the sampling volume is much smaller than one-photon flow cytometry, which makes it challenging to count or detect rare circulating cells in vivo. Bessel beams have narrow intensity profiles with an effective spot size (FWHM) as small as several wavelengths, making them comparable to Gaussian beams. More significantly, the theoretical depth of field (propagation distance without diffraction) can be infinite, making it an ideal solution as a light source for scanning beam flow cytometry. The trade-off of using Bessel beams rather than a Gaussian beam is the fact that Bessel beams have small concentric side rings that contribute to background noise. Two-photon excitation can reduce this noise, as the excitation efficiency is proportional to intensity squared. Therefore, we developed a two-photon flow cytometer using scanned Bessel beams to form a light sheet that intersects the micro fluidic channel.

  1. Street environment change detection from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wen; Vallet, Bruno; Brédif, Mathieu; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) has become a popular technique for road inventory, building modelling, infrastructure management, mobility assessment, etc. Meanwhile, due to the high mobility of MLS systems, it is easy to revisit interested areas. However, change detection using MLS data of street environment has seldom been studied. In this paper, an approach that combines occupancy grids and a distance-based method for change detection from MLS point clouds is proposed. Unlike conventional occupancy grids, our occupancy-based method models space based on scanning rays and local point distributions in 3D without voxelization. A local cylindrical reference frame is presented for the interpolation of occupancy between rays according to the scanning geometry. The Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) is utilized for both intra-data evidence fusion and inter-data consistency assessment. Occupancy of reference point cloud is fused at the location of target points and then the consistency is evaluated directly on the points. A point-to-triangle (PTT) distance-based method is combined to improve the occupancy-based method. Because it is robust to penetrable objects, e.g. vegetation, which cause self-conflicts when modelling occupancy. The combined method tackles irregular point density and occlusion problems, also eliminates false detections on penetrable objects.

  2. A pulsated weak-resonant-cavity laser diode with transient wavelength scanning and tracking for injection-locked RZ transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Liao, Yu-Sheng; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Liao, Zhi-Wang; Wang, Hai-Lin; Lin, Gong-Cheng

    2012-06-18

    By spectrally slicing a single longitudinal-mode from a master weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode with transient wavelength scanning and tracking functions, the broadened self-injection-locking of a slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode is demonstrated to achieve bi-directional transmission in a 200-GHz array-waveguide-grating channelized dense-wavelength-division-multiplexing passive optical network system. Both the down- and up-stream slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes are non-return-to-zero modulated below threshold and coherently injection-locked to deliver the pulsed carrier for 25-km bi-directional 2.5 Gbits/s return-to-zero transmission. The master weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode is gain-switched at near threshold condition and delivers an optical coherent pulse-train with its mode linewidth broadened from 0.2 to 0.8 nm by transient wavelength scanning, which facilitates the broadband injection-locking of the slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes with a threshold current reducing by 10 mA. Such a transient wavelength scanning induced spectral broadening greatly releases the limitation on wavelength injection-locking range required for the slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode. The theoretical modeling and numerical simulation on the wavelength scanning and tracking effects of the master and slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes are performed. The receiving power sensitivity for back-to-back transmission at bit-error-rate transmission is less than 2 dB for all 16 channels. PMID:22714427

  3. A pulsated weak-resonant-cavity laser diode with transient wavelength scanning and tracking for injection-locked RZ transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Liao, Yu-Sheng; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Liao, Zhi-Wang; Wang, Hai-Lin; Lin, Gong-Cheng

    2012-06-18

    By spectrally slicing a single longitudinal-mode from a master weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode with transient wavelength scanning and tracking functions, the broadened self-injection-locking of a slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode is demonstrated to achieve bi-directional transmission in a 200-GHz array-waveguide-grating channelized dense-wavelength-division-multiplexing passive optical network system. Both the down- and up-stream slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes are non-return-to-zero modulated below threshold and coherently injection-locked to deliver the pulsed carrier for 25-km bi-directional 2.5 Gbits/s return-to-zero transmission. The master weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode is gain-switched at near threshold condition and delivers an optical coherent pulse-train with its mode linewidth broadened from 0.2 to 0.8 nm by transient wavelength scanning, which facilitates the broadband injection-locking of the slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes with a threshold current reducing by 10 mA. Such a transient wavelength scanning induced spectral broadening greatly releases the limitation on wavelength injection-locking range required for the slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode. The theoretical modeling and numerical simulation on the wavelength scanning and tracking effects of the master and slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes are performed. The receiving power sensitivity for back-to-back transmission at bit-error-rate transmission is less than 2 dB for all 16 channels.

  4. An algorithm for kilovoltage x-ray dose calculations with applications in kV-CBCT scans and 2D planar projected radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new model-based dose calculation algorithm is presented for kilovoltage x-rays and is tested for the cases of calculating the radiation dose from kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT) and 2D planar projected radiographs. This algorithm calculates the radiation dose to water-like media as the sum of primary and scattered dose components. The scatter dose is calculated by convolution of a newly introduced, empirically parameterized scatter dose kernel with the primary photon fluence. Several approximations are introduced to increase the scatter dose calculation efficiency: (1) the photon energy spectrum is approximated as monoenergetic; (2) density inhomogeneities are accounted for by implementing a global distance scaling factor in the scatter kernel; (3) kernel tilting is ignored. These approximations allow for efficient calculation of the scatter dose convolution with the fast Fourier transform. Monte Carlo simulations were used to obtain the model parameters. The accuracy of using this model-based algorithm was validated by comparing with the Monte Carlo method for calculating dose distributions for real patients resulting from radiotherapy image guidance procedures including volumetric kV-CBCT scans and 2D planar projected radiographs. For all patients studied, mean dose-to-water errors for kV-CBCT are within 0.3% with a maximum standard deviation error of 4.1%. Using a medium-dependent correction method to account for the effects of photoabsorption in bone on the dose distribution, mean dose-to-medium errors for kV-CBCT are within 3.6% for bone and 2.4% for soft tissues. This algorithm offers acceptable accuracy and has the potential to extend the applicability of model-based dose calculation algorithms from megavoltage to kilovoltage photon beams. (paper)

  5. Theoretical and practical improvement of forest inventory by using laser scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Bikuvienė, Ina

    2012-01-01

    The aim and objectives. Overall: To improve forest inventory methods using laser scanning. Specific: To create methodological background for laser scanning in the Lithuanian forest inventory and to provide practical suggestions for the use of remote sensing technique in practice. To attain the objective, the following tasks were formulated: 1. To investigate the influence of forest cover on the digital surface model accuracy when it is drawn up based on laser scanning dat...

  6. Application of laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Antoniou, Christina; Sterry, Wolfram; Patzelt, Alexa; Kramer, Axel; Meyer, Lars; Lademann, Jürgen; Alborova, Alena

    2007-01-01

    Optical non-invasive methods have become more and more important for the characterization of skin lesions and for therapy control. In vivo laser scanning microscopy is a promising method which can be used for the analysis of cellular structures in the skin up to a depth of 250 µm. Therefore, laser scanning microscopy (LSM) is well-suited for the characterization of wound healing processes. In contrast to measurements of the transepidermal waterloss (TEWL) the laser scanning microscopy allows ...

  7. System Design Considerations In Bar-Code Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Eric; Swartz, Jerome

    1984-08-01

    The unified transfer function approach to the design of laser barcode scanner signal acquisition hardware is considered. The treatment of seemingly disparate system areas such as the optical train, the scanning spot, the electrical filter circuits, the effects of noise, and printing errors is presented using linear systems theory. Such important issues as determination of depth of modulation, filter specification, tolerancing of optical components, and optimi-zation of system performance in the presence of noise are discussed. The concept of effective spot size to allow for impact of optical system and analog processing circuitry upon depth of modulation is introduced. Considerations are limited primarily to Gaussian spot profiles, but also apply to more general cases. Attention is paid to realistic bar-code symbol models and to implications with respect to printing tolerances.

  8. URBAN TREE CLASSIFICATION USING FULL-WAVEFORM AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zs. Koma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation mapping in urban environments plays an important role in biological research and urban management. Airborne laser scanning provides detailed 3D geodata, which allows to classify single trees into different taxa. Until now, research dealing with tree classification focused on forest environments. This study investigates the object-based classification of urban trees at taxonomic family level, using full-waveform airborne laser scanning data captured in the city centre of Vienna (Austria. The data set is characterised by a variety of taxa, including deciduous trees (beeches, mallows, plane trees and soapberries and the coniferous pine species. A workflow for tree object classification is presented using geometric and radiometric features. The derived features are related to point density, crown shape and radiometric characteristics. For the derivation of crown features, a prior detection of the crown base is performed. The effects of interfering objects (e.g. fences and cars which are typical in urban areas on the feature characteristics and the subsequent classification accuracy are investigated. The applicability of the features is evaluated by Random Forest classification and exploratory analysis. The most reliable classification is achieved by using the combination of geometric and radiometric features, resulting in 87.5% overall accuracy. By using radiometric features only, a reliable classification with accuracy of 86.3% can be achieved. The influence of interfering objects on feature characteristics is identified, in particular for the radiometric features. The results indicate the potential of using radiometric features in urban tree classification and show its limitations due to anthropogenic influences at the same time.

  9. Urban Tree Classification Using Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koma, Zs.; Koenig, K.; Höfle, B.

    2016-06-01

    Vegetation mapping in urban environments plays an important role in biological research and urban management. Airborne laser scanning provides detailed 3D geodata, which allows to classify single trees into different taxa. Until now, research dealing with tree classification focused on forest environments. This study investigates the object-based classification of urban trees at taxonomic family level, using full-waveform airborne laser scanning data captured in the city centre of Vienna (Austria). The data set is characterised by a variety of taxa, including deciduous trees (beeches, mallows, plane trees and soapberries) and the coniferous pine species. A workflow for tree object classification is presented using geometric and radiometric features. The derived features are related to point density, crown shape and radiometric characteristics. For the derivation of crown features, a prior detection of the crown base is performed. The effects of interfering objects (e.g. fences and cars which are typical in urban areas) on the feature characteristics and the subsequent classification accuracy are investigated. The applicability of the features is evaluated by Random Forest classification and exploratory analysis. The most reliable classification is achieved by using the combination of geometric and radiometric features, resulting in 87.5% overall accuracy. By using radiometric features only, a reliable classification with accuracy of 86.3% can be achieved. The influence of interfering objects on feature characteristics is identified, in particular for the radiometric features. The results indicate the potential of using radiometric features in urban tree classification and show its limitations due to anthropogenic influences at the same time.

  10. Airborne Laser Scanning and Image Processing Techniques for Archaeological Prospection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltýnová, M.; Nový, P.

    2014-06-01

    Aerial photography was, for decades, an invaluable tool for archaeological prospection, in spite of the limitation of this method to deforested areas. The airborne laser scanning (ALS) method can be nowadays used to map complex areas and suitable complement earlier findings. This article describes visualization and image processing methods that can be applied on digital terrain models (DTMs) to highlight objects hidden in the landscape. Thanks to the analysis of visualized DTM it is possible to understand the landscape evolution including the differentiation between natural processes and human interventions. Different visualization methods were applied on a case study area. A system of parallel tracks hidden in a forest and its surroundings - part of old route called "Devil's Furrow" near the town of Sázava was chosen. The whole area around well known part of Devil's Furrow has not been prospected systematically yet. The data from the airborne laser scanning acquired by the Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre was used. The average density of the point cloud was approximately 1 point/m2 The goal of the project was to visualize the utmost smallest terrain discontinuities, e.g. tracks and erosion furrows, which some were not wholly preserved. Generally we were interested in objects that are clearly not visible in DTMs displayed in the form of shaded relief. Some of the typical visualization methods were tested (shaded relief, aspect and slope image). To get better results we applied image-processing methods that were successfully used on aerial photographs or hyperspectral images in the past. The usage of different visualization techniques on one site allowed us to verify the natural character of the southern part of Devil's Furrow and find formations up to now hidden in the forests.

  11. Control electronics for a multi-laser/multi-detector scanning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Mars Rover Laser Scanning system uses a precision laser pointing mechanism, a photodetector array, and the concept of triangulation to perform three dimensional scene analysis. The system is used for real time terrain sensing and vision. The Multi-Laser/Multi-Detector laser scanning system is controlled by a digital device called the ML/MD controller. A next generation laser scanning system, based on the Level 2 controller, is microprocessor based. The new controller capabilities far exceed those of the ML/MD device. The first draft circuit details and general software structure are presented.

  12. Pedestrian Detection by Laser Scanning and Depth Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, A.; Lovas, T.; Molnar, B.; Somogyi, A.; Igazvolgyi, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Pedestrian flow is much less regulated and controlled compared to vehicle traffic. Estimating flow parameters would support many safety, security or commercial applications. Current paper discusses a method that enables acquiring information on pedestrian movements without disturbing and changing their motion. Profile laser scanner and depth camera have been applied to capture the geometry of the moving people as time series. Procedures have been developed to derive complex flow parameters, such as count, volume, walking direction and velocity from laser scanned point clouds. Since no images are captured from the faces of pedestrians, no privacy issues raised. The paper includes accuracy analysis of the estimated parameters based on video footage as reference. Due to the dense point clouds, detailed geometry analysis has been conducted to obtain the height and shoulder width of pedestrians and to detect whether luggage has been carried or not. The derived parameters support safety (e.g. detecting critical pedestrian density in mass events), security (e.g. detecting prohibited baggage in endangered areas) and commercial applications (e.g. counting pedestrians at all entrances/exits of a shopping mall).

  13. Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning for Automated Map Updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matikainen, Leena; Hyyppä, Juha; Litkey, Paula

    2016-06-01

    During the last 20 years, airborne laser scanning (ALS), often combined with multispectral information from aerial images, has shown its high feasibility for automated mapping processes. Recently, the first multispectral airborne laser scanners have been launched, and multispectral information is for the first time directly available for 3D ALS point clouds. This article discusses the potential of this new single-sensor technology in map updating, especially in automated object detection and change detection. For our study, Optech Titan multispectral ALS data over a suburban area in Finland were acquired. Results from a random forests analysis suggest that the multispectral intensity information is useful for land cover classification, also when considering ground surface objects and classes, such as roads. An out-of-bag estimate for classification error was about 3% for separating classes asphalt, gravel, rocky areas and low vegetation from each other. For buildings and trees, it was under 1%. According to feature importance analyses, multispectral features based on several channels were more useful that those based on one channel. Automatic change detection utilizing the new multispectral ALS data, an old digital surface model (DSM) and old building vectors was also demonstrated. Overall, our first analyses suggest that the new data are very promising for further increasing the automation level in mapping. The multispectral ALS technology is independent of external illumination conditions, and intensity images produced from the data do not include shadows. These are significant advantages when the development of automated classification and change detection procedures is considered.

  14. Imaging Single ZnO Vertical Nanowire Laser Cavities using UV-Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gargas, D.J.; Toimil-Molares, M.E.; Yang, P.

    2008-11-17

    We report the fabrication and optical characterization of individual ZnO vertical nanowire laser cavities. Dilute nanowire arrays with interwire spacing>10 ?m were produced by a modified chemical vapor transport (CVT) method yielding an ideal platform for single nanowire imaging and spectroscopy. Lasing characteristics of a single vertical nanowire are presented, as well as high-resolution photoluminescence imaging by UV-laser scanning confocal microscopy. In addition, three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the photoluminescence emission performed in both planar and vertical dimensions demonstrates height-selective imaging useful for vertical nanowires and heteronanostructures emerging in the field of optoelectronics and nanophotonics.

  15. [Laser scan microscopy: a new imaging procedure in quality assessment of artificial lenses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochels, R; Ziegler, E

    1989-01-01

    Laser-scan microscopy permits the evaluation of surfaces and deeper layers of an object by computer-assisted scanning with a laser beam. The reflected helium-neon or argon laser light is transmitted to a photodetector and after signal processing, to a frame store and a TV monitor. Imaging is realized by synchronous scanning and modulation of light intensity. Laser-scan microscopy revealed a smooth surface of both PMMA and HEMA lenses, whereas tears were detected in folded silicone implants. The physical and chemical homogeneity inside the three different materials was optimal. Compared to scanning electron microscopy, the quality of imaging is not as good with laser-scan microscopy. Nevertheless, one decisive advantage of the latter method is an analysis free of processing and artifacts, which permits a routine control of brand new and folded intraocular lenses. PMID:2722098

  16. Deformation Monitoring of Motorway Underpasses Using Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, I.; González-Jorge, H.; Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.

    2012-07-01

    is a Optech Lynx mobile LiDAR. This laser scanner is based on time of flight technology and presents an accuracy of 6 mm in the determination of the geometrical coordinates. This accuracy can be improved to around 1 mm using fitting post-processing techniques and makes this technology very useful for studies related with deformation monitoring. The laser scanner, in comparison with other geodetic techniques as total stations, allows the control of all the structure, including unexpected deformations. Reflective targets are permanently positioned over the small walls of the structure to allow the 3D orientation of the different scans. Two main scans are made for this study, before and after the backfilling process. Backfilling takes about 10 days for the construction companies. The scans need a time of approximately 12 minutes. Construction works do not need to be interrupted during the scans. Point clouds are then post-processed using QT Modeler Software. First, the point cloud is cleaned to use only the data directly related with the structure under study. Then, using the target coordinates, both point clouds are moved to the same coordinate system. Finally, the deformation of the underpass is studied using two algorithms specifically developed using Matlab software. First algorithm fits a geometrical surface to the point cloud of the first scan and evaluates the residuals of both scans for this fitting surface. Differences in the residuals give the deformation map of the structure. Second algorithm takes a portion of the point cloud from the top of the structure, where it is located the joining point between the voussoirs. The joining between two voussoirs shows a height step that in an ideal case must tend to zero. Deformations produced by the loading of the structure are measured as a comparison between the steps before and after the backfilling process. The analysis of the results show as some deformation occurs in the structure in the joining point of the

  17. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehoon Jung

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs: one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system’s trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach.

  18. Development of an Online Archive for Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Christopher; Lowry, Ben; McWhirter, Jeff; Phillips, David; Meertens, Chuck

    2013-04-01

    The UNAVCO Geodetic Imaging program provides terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) support to the Earth science research community through a TLS instrumentation pool of five scanners, field engineering, data processing, and technical training. As part of this community TLS support role, UNAVCO is responsible for generation of level one (L1) TLS data products and TLS data archive and access. A UNAVCO-organized and US National Science Foundation-funded TLS community workshop held October 2011 in Boulder, Colorado defined many of the challenges and requirements a TLS data archive and access system must address. TLS data acquisition presents unique challenges for metadata, provenance capture, and data archive. TLS datasets are often large and level zero (L0 - raw) data are stored in a variety of proprietary formats, requiring conversion and standardization for access and exchange. Due to the wide range of scientific and engineering objectives that motivate TLS data collection, field methods and collection techniques vary greatly and must be thoroughly documented in project metadata. These challenges make data and metadata capture, preservation, and provenance important objectives for an online TLS archive. To address these challenges, UNAVCO is developing a TLS archive based on the open source RAMADDA platform (http://ramadda.org). The UNAVCO TLS archive will provide online archive of L0 and L1 data products, capture field metadata and data processing workflows for provenance, and store original georeferencing information. In addition, the TLS repository provides on-demand services for simple point cloud visualization, data sub-setting and thinning, and file format (e.g., LAS, ASCII, proprietary) data conversion. The system also offers automation of RINEX processing of GPS data, OPUS and CSRS submission and solution ingestion, and generation of control point lists to streamline georeferencing of TLS point cloud data. Georeferencing metadata and GPS file provenance are

  19. MIMIC: An Innovative Methodology for Determining Mobile Laser Scanning System Point Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor Cahalane

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how various Mobile Mapping System (MMS laser hardware configurations and operating parameters exercise different influence on point density is important for assessing system performance, which in turn facilitates system design and MMS benchmarking. Point density also influences data processing, as objects that can be recognised using automated algorithms generally require a minimum point density. Although obtaining the necessary point density impacts on hardware costs, survey time and data storage requirements, a method for accurately and rapidly assessing MMS performance is lacking for generic MMSs. We have developed a method for quantifying point clouds collected by an MMS with respect to known objects at specified distances using 3D surface normals, 2D geometric formulae and line drawing algorithms. These algorithms were combined in a system called the Mobile Mapping Point Density Calculator (MIMIC and were validated using point clouds captured by both a single scanner and a dual scanner MMS. Results from MIMIC were promising: when considering the number of scan profiles striking the target, the average error equated to less than 1 point per scan profile. These tests highlight that MIMIC is capable of accurately calculating point density for both single and dual scanner MMSs.

  20. Time-resolved investigations of the fragmentation dynamic of H2 (D2) in and with ultra-short laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In course of this work pump-probe experiments aimed to study ultrafast nuclear motion in H2 (D2) fragmentation by intense 6-25 fs laser pulses have been carried out. In order to perform time-resolved measurements, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer providing two identical synchronized laser pulses with the time-delay variable from 0 to 3000 fs with 300 as accuracy and long-term stability has been built. The laser pulses at the intensities of up to 1015 W/cm2 were focused onto a H2 (D2) molecular beam leading to the ionization or dissociation of the molecules, and the momenta of all charged reactions fragments were measured with a reaction microscope. With 6-7 fs pulses it was possible to probe the time evolution of the bound H+2 (D+2) nuclear wave packet created by the first (pump) laser pulse, fragmenting the molecule with the second (probe) pulse. A fast delocalization, or ''collapse'', and subsequent ''revival'' of the vibrational wave packet have been observed. In addition, the signatures of the ground state vibrational excitation in neutral D2 molecule have been found, and the dominance of a new, purely quantum mechanical wave packet preparation mechanism (the so-called ''Lochfrass'') has been proved. In the experiments with 25 fs pulses the theoretically predicted enhancement of the ionization probability for the dissociating H+2 molecular ion at large internuclear distances has been detected for the first time. (orig.)

  1. Parametric modeling and optimization of laser scanning parameters during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, K.; Ramanujam, R.; Kuppan, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a parametric effect, microstructure, micro-hardness and optimization of laser scanning parameters (LSP) on heating experiments during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718 alloy. The laser source used for experiments is a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser with maximum power of 2 kW. The experimental parameters in the present study are cutting speed in the range of 50-100 m/min, feed rate of 0.05-0.1 mm/rev, laser power of 1.25-1.75 kW and approach angle of 60-90°of laser beam axis to tool. The plan of experiments are based on central composite rotatable design L31 (43) orthogonal array. The surface temperature is measured via on-line measurement using infrared pyrometer. Parametric significance on surface temperature is analysed using response surface methodology (RSM), analysis of variance (ANOVA) and 3D surface graphs. The structural change of the material surface is observed using optical microscope and quantitative measurement of heat affected depth that are analysed by Vicker's hardness test. The results indicate that the laser power and approach angle are the most significant parameters to affect the surface temperature. The optimum ranges of laser power and approach angle was identified as 1.25-1.5 kW and 60-65° using overlaid contour plot. The developed second order regression model is found to be in good agreement with experimental values with R2 values of 0.96 and 0.94 respectively for surface temperature and heat affected depth.

  2. Evaluation of a laser scanning sensor for variable-rate tree sprayer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate canopy measurement capabilities are prerequisites to automate variable-rate sprayers. A 270° radial range laser scanning sensor was tested for its scanning accuracy to detect tree canopy profiles. Signals from the laser sensor and a ground speed sensor were processed with an embedded comput...

  3. Tree Classification with Fused Mobile Laser Scanning and Hyperspectral Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Hyyppä

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Laser Scanning data were collected simultaneously with hyperspectral data using the Finnish Geodetic Institute Sensei system. The data were tested for tree species classification. The test area was an urban garden in the City of Espoo, Finland. Point clouds representing 168 individual tree specimens of 23 tree species were determined manually. The classification of the trees was done using first only the spatial data from point clouds, then with only the spectral data obtained with a spectrometer, and finally with the combined spatial and hyperspectral data from both sensors. Two classification tests were performed: the separation of coniferous and deciduous trees, and the identification of individual tree species. All determined tree specimens were used in distinguishing coniferous and deciduous trees. A subset of 133 trees and 10 tree species was used in the tree species classification. The best classification results for the fused data were 95.8% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes. The best overall tree species classification succeeded with 83.5% accuracy for the best tested fused data feature combination. The respective results for paired structural features derived from the laser point cloud were 90.5% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes and 65.4% for the species classification. Classification accuracies with paired hyperspectral reflectance value data were 90.5% for the separation of coniferous and deciduous classes and 62.4% for different species. The results are among the first of their kind and they show that mobile collected fused data outperformed single-sensor data in both classification tests and by a significant margin.

  4. Scanning Transmission X-Ray, Laser Scanning, and Transmission Electron Microscopy Mapping of the Exopolymeric Matrix of Microbial Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, J. R.; Swerhone, G. D. W.; Leppard, G. G.; T. Araki; Zhang, X.; West, M. M.; A. P. Hitchcock

    2003-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) were used to map the distribution of macromolecular subcomponents (e.g., polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) of biofilm cells and matrix. The biofilms were developed from river water supplemented with methanol, and although they comprised a complex microbial community, the biofilms were dominated by heterotrophic bacteria. TEM provid...

  5. The Simulation Research on Capturing Time of Three Scanning Styles in Laser Tracking System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leihong Zhang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the optical communication, the choosing scanning style is important for the optical communication, because the illuminating laser beam is narrow and the communication range is long. In this study, three typical scanning styles of raster scan, spiral scan and square spiral scan are compared with each other. The characteristics of the scanning styles are introduced. The numerical simulation model is built. The capturing time at the same condition is computed. The capturing time is affected by the scanning interval and the scanning area. In the same scanning area and scanning interval, the capturing time of raster scan is the biggest one and the capturing time of the square spiral scan is the smallest one.

  6. MULTI-PASS APPROACH FOR MOBILE TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nolan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanning (MTLS has been utilised for an increasing number of corridor surveys. Current MTLS surveys require that many targets be placed along the corridor to monitor the MTLS trajectory’s accuracy. These targets enable surveyors to directly evaluate the magnitude of GNSS errors at regular intervals and can also be used to adjust the trajectory to the survey control. However, this “Multi-Target” approach (MTA is an onerous task that can significantly reduce efficiency. It also is inconvenient to the travelling public, as lanes are often blocked and traffic slowed to permit surveyors to work safely along the road corridor. This paper introduces a “Multi-Pass” approach (MPA, which minimises the number of targets required for monitoring the GNSS-controlled trajectory while still maintaining strict engineering accuracies. MPA uses the power of multiple, independent MTLS passes with different GNSS constellations to generate a “Control Polyline” from the point cloud for the corridor. The Control Polyline can be considered as a statistically valid survey measurement and be incorporated in a network adjustment to strengthen a control network by identifying outliers. Results from a test survey at the MTLS course maintained by the Oregon Department of Transportation illustrate the effectiveness of this approach.

  7. Estimation of forest parameters using airborne laser scanning data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cohen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Methods for the estimation of forest characteristics by airborne laser scanning (ALS data have been introduced by several authors. Tree height (TH and canopy closure (CC describing the forest properties can be used in forest, construction and industry applications, as well as research and decision making. The National Land Survey has been collecting ALS data from Finland since 2008 to generate a nationwide high resolution digital elevation model. Although this data has been collected in leaf-off conditions, it still has the potential to be utilized in forest mapping. A method where this data is used for the estimation of CC and TH in the boreal forest region is presented in this paper. Evaluation was conducted in eight test areas across Finland by comparing the results with corresponding Multi-Source National Forest Inventory (MS-NFI datasets. The ALS based CC and TH maps were generally in a good agreement with the MS-NFI data. As expected, deciduous forests caused some underestimation in CC and TH, but the effect was not major in any of the test areas. The processing chain has been fully automated enabling fast generation of forest maps for different areas.

  8. Multi-Pass Approach for Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, J.; Eckels, R.; Evers, M.; Singh, R.; Olsen, M. J.

    2015-08-01

    Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanning (MTLS) has been utilised for an increasing number of corridor surveys. Current MTLS surveys require that many targets be placed along the corridor to monitor the MTLS trajectory's accuracy. These targets enable surveyors to directly evaluate the magnitude of GNSS errors at regular intervals and can also be used to adjust the trajectory to the survey control. However, this "Multi-Target" approach (MTA) is an onerous task that can significantly reduce efficiency. It also is inconvenient to the travelling public, as lanes are often blocked and traffic slowed to permit surveyors to work safely along the road corridor. This paper introduces a "Multi-Pass" approach (MPA), which minimises the number of targets required for monitoring the GNSS-controlled trajectory while still maintaining strict engineering accuracies. MPA uses the power of multiple, independent MTLS passes with different GNSS constellations to generate a "Control Polyline" from the point cloud for the corridor. The Control Polyline can be considered as a statistically valid survey measurement and be incorporated in a network adjustment to strengthen a control network by identifying outliers. Results from a test survey at the MTLS course maintained by the Oregon Department of Transportation illustrate the effectiveness of this approach.

  9. Detecting Terrain Stoniness From Airborne Laser Scanning Data †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paavo Nevalainen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Three methods to estimate the presence of ground surface stones from publicly available Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS point clouds are presented. The first method approximates the local curvature by local linear multi-scale fitting, and the second method uses Discrete-Differential Gaussian curvature based on the ground surface triangulation. The third baseline method applies Laplace filtering to Digital Elevation Model (DEM in a 2 m regular grid data. All methods produce an approximate Gaussian curvature distribution which is then vectorized and classified by logistic regression. Two training data sets consisted of 88 and 674 polygons of mass-flow deposits, respectively. The locality of the polygon samples is a sparse canopy boreal forest, where the density of ALS ground returns is sufficiently high to reveal information about terrain micro-topography. The surface stoniness of each polygon sample was categorized for supervised learning by expert observation on the site. The leave-pair-out (L2O cross-validation of the local linear fit method results in the area under curve A U C = 0 . 74 and A U C = 0 . 85 on two data sets, respectively. This performance can be expected to suit real world applications such as detecting coarse-grained sediments for infrastructure construction. A wall-to-wall predictor based on the study was demonstrated.

  10. High-Q MEMS Resonators for Laser Beam Scanning Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Hofmann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on design, fabrication and characterization of high-Q MEMS resonators to be used in optical applications like laser displays and LIDAR range sensors. Stacked vertical comb drives for electrostatic actuation of single-axis scanners and biaxial MEMS mirrors were realized in a dual layer polysilicon SOI process. High Q-factors up to 145,000 have been achieved applying wafer level vacuum packaging technology including deposition of titanium thin film getters. The effective reduction of gas damping allows the MEMS actuator to achieve large amplitudes at high oscillation frequencies while driving voltage and power consumption can be minimized. Exemplarily shown is a micro scanner that achieves a total optical scan angle of 86 degrees at a resonant frequency of 30.8 kHz, which fulfills the requirements for HD720 resolution. Furthermore, results of a new wafer based glass-forming technology for fabrication of three dimensionally shaped glass lids with tilted optical windows are presented.

  11. Performance of a scanning laser line striper in outdoor lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    For search and rescue robots and reconnaissance robots it is important to detect objects in their vicinity. We have developed a scanning laser line striper that can produce dense 3D images using active illumination. The scanner consists of a camera and a MEMS-micro mirror based projector. It can also detect the presence of optically difficult material like glass and metal. The sensor can be used for autonomous operation or it can help a human operator to better remotely control the robot. In this paper we will evaluate the performance of the scanner under outdoor illumination, i.e. from operating in the shade to operating in full sunlight. We report the range, resolution and accuracy of the sensor and its ability to reconstruct objects like grass, wooden blocks, wires, metal objects, electronic devices like cell phones, blank RPG, and other inert explosive devices. Furthermore we evaluate its ability to detect the presence of glass and polished metal objects. Lastly we report on a user study that shows a significant improvement in a grasping task. The user is tasked with grasping a wire with the remotely controlled hand of a robot. We compare the time it takes to complete the task using the 3D scanner with using a traditional video camera.

  12. Monitoring Riverbank Erosion in Mountain Catchments Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Longoni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sediment yield is a key factor in river basins management due to the various and adverse consequences that erosion and sediment transport in rivers may have on the environment. Although various contributions can be found in the literature about sediment yield modeling and bank erosion monitoring, the link between weather conditions, river flow rate and bank erosion remains scarcely known. Thus, a basin scale assessment of sediment yield due to riverbank erosion is an objective hard to be reached. In order to enhance the current knowledge in this field, a monitoring method based on high resolution 3D model reconstruction of riverbanks, surveyed by multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning, was applied to four banks in Val Tartano, Northern Italy. Six data acquisitions over one year were taken, with the aim to better understand the erosion processes and their triggering factors by means of more frequent observations compared to usual annual campaigns. The objective of the research is to address three key questions concerning bank erosion: “how” erosion happens, “when” during the year and “how much” sediment is eroded. The method proved to be effective and able to measure both eroded and deposited volume in the surveyed area. Finally an attempt to extrapolate basin scale volume for bank erosion is presented.

  13. Estimation of forest parameters using airborne laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J.

    2015-12-01

    Methods for the estimation of forest characteristics by airborne laser scanning (ALS) data have been introduced by several authors. Tree height (TH) and canopy closure (CC) describing the forest properties can be used in forest, construction and industry applications, as well as research and decision making. The National Land Survey has been collecting ALS data from Finland since 2008 to generate a nationwide high resolution digital elevation model. Although this data has been collected in leaf-off conditions, it still has the potential to be utilized in forest mapping. A method where this data is used for the estimation of CC and TH in the boreal forest region is presented in this paper. Evaluation was conducted in eight test areas across Finland by comparing the results with corresponding Multi-Source National Forest Inventory (MS-NFI) datasets. The ALS based CC and TH maps were generally in a good agreement with the MS-NFI data. As expected, deciduous forests caused some underestimation in CC and TH, but the effect was not major in any of the test areas. The processing chain has been fully automated enabling fast generation of forest maps for different areas.

  14. Detection of Gold Nanoparticles Aggregation Growth Induced by Nucleic Acid through Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ramla Gary; Giovani Carbone; Gia Petriashvili; Maria Penelope De Santo; Riccardo Barberi

    2016-01-01

    The gold nanoparticle (GNP) aggregation growth induced by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied by laser scanning confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopies. As in the investigated case the direct light scattering analysis is not suitable, we observe the behavior of the fluorescence produced by a dye and we detect the aggregation by the shift and the broadening of the fluorescence peak. Results of laser scanning confocal microscopy images and the fluorescence emission spectra ...

  15. Wind Tunnel Testing of a One-Dimensional Laser Beam Scanning and Laser Sheet Approach to Shock Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokars, Roger; Adamovsky, Grigory; Anderson, Robert; Hirt, Stefanie; Huang, John; Floyd, Bertram

    2012-01-01

    A 15- by 15-cm supersonic wind tunnel application of a one-dimensional laser beam scanning approach to shock sensing is presented. The measurement system design allowed easy switching between a focused beam and a laser sheet mode for comparison purposes. The scanning results were compared to images from the tunnel Schlieren imaging system. The tests revealed detectable changes in the laser beam in the presence of shocks. The results lend support to the use of the one-dimensional scanning beam approach for detecting and locating shocks in a flow, but some issues must be addressed in regards to noise and other limitations of the system.

  16. Modelling and calibration of the laser beam-scanning triangulation measurement system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Guoyu; Zheng, Bing; Li, Xin; Houkes, Z.; Regtien, P.P.L.

    2002-01-01

    We present an approach of modelling and calibration of an active laser beam-scanning triangulation measurement system. The system works with the pattern of two-dimensional beam-scanning illumination and one-dimensional slit-scanning detection with a photo-multiplier tube instead of a CCD camera. By

  17. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari, E-mail: tetsu-n@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Imai, Koichi [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Akio [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-magnification images with depth selection, and thin sections were observed using CLSM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The direction and velocity of calcification of the bone was observed by administration of 2 fluorescent dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In dog femora grafted with coral blocks, newly-formed bone was observed in the coral block space with a rough surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twelve weeks after dental implant was grafted in dog femora, the space between screws was filled with newly-formed bones. - Abstract: Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 {mu}m/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  18. Cosmetic and aesthetic skin photosurgery using a computer-assisted CO2 laser-scanning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutu, Doru C. A.; Dumitras, Dan C.; Nedelcu, Ioan; Ghetie, Sergiu D.

    1997-12-01

    Since the first application of CO2 laser in skin photosurgery, various techniques such as laser pulsing, beam scanning and computer-assisted laser pulse generator have been introduced for the purpose of reducing tissue carbonization and thermal necrosis. Using a quite simple XY optical scanner equipped with two galvanometric driven mirrors and an appropriate software to process the scanning data and control the interaction time and energy density in the scanned area, we have obtained a device which can improve CO2 laser application in cosmetic and aesthetic surgery. The opto-mechanical CO2 laser scanner based on two total reflecting flat mirrors placed at 90 degree(s) in respect to the XY scanning directions and independently driven through a magnetic field provides a linear movement of the incident laser beam in the operating field. A DA converter supplied with scanning data by the software enables a scanning with linearity better than 1% for a maximum angular deviation of 20 degree(s). Because the scanning quality of the laser beam in the operating field is given not only by the displacement function of the two mirrors, but also by the beam characteristics in the focal plane and the cross distribution in the laser beam, the surgeon can control through software either the scanning field dimensions or the distance between two consecutive points of the vertically and/or horizontally sweep line. The development of computer-assisted surgical scanning techniques will help control the surgical laser, to create either a reproducible incision with a controlled depth or a controlled incision pattern with minimal incision width, a long desired facility for plastic surgery, neurosurgery, ENT and dentistry.

  19. Facial recognition and laser surface scan: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Kristoffersen, Agnethe May;

    2009-01-01

    software (MIMICS and Photoshop) the surface scans were matched with the photographs in blind trials. The matches were graded as: a good fit; possible fit; and no fit. All the surface scans and photos were matched correctly, although one surface scan could be matched with two angled photographs, meaning...

  20. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurement following laser in situ keratomileusis using scanning laser polarimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dada Tanuj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK on the measurement of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness by scanning laser polarimetry using customized corneal compensation in myopes. Materials and Methods: Scanning laser polarimetry was performed on 54 eyes of 54 healthy patients with myopia using the glaucoma diagnostics variable corneal compensation (GDx VCC instrument (Laser Diagnostic Technologies, San Diego, California before and a week after LASIK. The various parameters were compared using the Student′s t test. Results: No statistically significant change was observed in any of the retinal nerve fiber layer parameters before and after LASIK. Conclusions: While the measurement of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness by scanning laser polarimetry is affected by anterior segment birefringent properties and LASIK would be expected to produce changes in the same, customized corneal compensation using the GDx VCC seems to adequately compensate for these changes.

  1. Periodic and uniform nanogratings formed on cemented carbide by femtosecond laser scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Periodic and uniform nanogratings are fabricated by femtosecond laser scanning on cemented carbide. Specifically, three experiments are designed to study the influence of single pulse energy, scanning speed, and scanning spacing on the period and the uniformity of the formed nanogratings. The results show that the sample with single pulse energy of 2 μJ, scanning speed of 1000 μm/s, and scanning spacing of 5 μm shows the best quality of nanogratings among all the tested samples at different processing parameters. The uniformity of the nanogratings is largely determined by single pulse energy, scanning speed, and scanning spacing. Single pulse energy and scanning speed significantly affect the period of the nanogratings, whereas the period of the nanogratings maintains a fixed value under different scanning spacings. The period of the nanogratings increases gradually with the decrease of the single pulse energy and the increase of the scanning speed, respectively.

  2. Characterization of landslide ground surface kinematics from terrestrial laser scanning and strain field computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teza, Giordano; Pesci, Arianna; Genevois, Rinaldo; Galgaro, Antonio

    2008-05-01

    Assessment and mitigation of the risk induced by landslide activation need an appropriate phenomenon investigation, to obtain useful information about the failure processes. The first step is the complete kinematics characterization of the landslide ground surface, by evaluating the involved displacement and deformation patterns. A dense displacement field can be obtained from comparison of a series of multi-temporal observations performed by means of terrestrial laser scanning. Subsequently, the strain field can be computed from displacement vectors. In this paper, a modified least square technique is employed to compute the strain on the nodes of a regular grid (2D approach) or on the points of a digital terrain model (3D approach). Such a computation takes into account the displacements, their spatial distribution, as well as the measurement and modelling errors. A scale factor is introduced in order to emphasize the contributions of the experimental points on the basis of their distance from each computation point, and to recognize possible scale-depending behaviours. This method has been implemented in Matlab and applied on two landslides located in the northeastern Italian Alps (Lamosano and Perarolo di Cadore). The experiments show that different kinematics can be recognized, and the presence and influence of eventual discontinuities can be revealed.

  3. AN H2 (D2)/F2 CHEMICAL LASER INITIATED WITH A NOVEL TEFLON SURFACE SPARK UV FLASH

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, K.; Sato, Y; Lee, C; Obara, M.; Fujioka, T.

    1980-01-01

    The performance characteristics and the optimization parameters of a newly developed HF (DF) laser initiated by a novel surface spark UV flash using Teflon are presented. We have obtained an output energy of 0.65 J/pulse (11 J/1, 1.6 µsec FWHM) for HF laser, 0.25 J/pulse (4.2 J/1, 2.0 µsec FWHM) for DF laser with the improved maintenance of the light source. An intense short-pulse surface spark UV source driven by a coaxial Marx generator is realized experimentally in order to improve the pow...

  4. New applications of scanning laser Doppler vibrometry (SLDV) to nondestructive diagnosis of artwork: mosaics, ceramics, inlaid wood, and easel painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, Paolo; Esposito, Enrico; Marchetti, Barbara; Paone, Nicola; Tomasini, Enrico P.

    2001-10-01

    During the last years the growing importance of the correct determination of the state of conservation of artworks has been stated by all personalities in care of Cultural Heritage. There exist many analytical methodologies and techniques to individuate the physical and chemical characteristics of artworks, but at present their structural diagnostics mainly rely on the expertise of the restorer and the typical diagnostic process is accomplished mainly through manual and visual inspection of the object surface. The basic idea behind the proposed technique is to substitute human senses with measurement instruments: surfaces are very slightly vibrated by mechanical actuators, while a laser Doppler vibrometer scans the objects measuring surface velocity and producing 2D or 3D maps. Where a defect occurs velocity is higher than neighboring areas so defects can be easily spotted. Laser vibrometers also identify structural resonance frequencies thus leading to a complete characterization of defects. This work will present the most recent results coming out of the application of Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometers (SLDV) to different types of artworks: mosaics, ceramics, inlaid wood and easel painting. Real artworks and samples realized on purpose have been studied using the proposed technique and different measuring issues resulting from each artwork category will be described.

  5. Laser-driven proton and deuteron acceleration from a pure solid-density H2/D2 cryogenic jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongjin; Gauthier, Maxence; Aurand, Bastian; Curry, Chandra; Goede, Sebastian; Goyon, Clement; Williams, Jackson; Kerr, Shaun; Ruby, John; Propp, Adrienne; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Pak, Art; Hazi, Andy; Glenzer, Siegfried; Roedel, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven proton acceleration has become of tremendous interest for the fundamental science and the potential applications in tumor therapy and proton radiography. We have developed a cryogenic liquid hydrogen jet, which can deliver a self-replenishing target of pure solid-density hydrogen or deuterium. This allows for a target compatible with high-repetition-rate experiments and results in a pure hydrogen plasma, facilitating comparison with simulations. A new modification has allowed for the formation of jets with rectangular profiles, facilitating comparison with foil targets. This jet was installed at the Titan laser and driven by laser pulses of 40-60 J of 527 nm laser light in 1 ps. The resulting proton and deuteron spectra were measured in multiple directions with Thomson parabola spectrometers and RCF stacks. The spectral and angular information suggest contribution from both the TNSA and RPA acceleration mechanisms.

  6. Retinal Oximetry with Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehmeijer, Wouter B.; Magnusdottir, Vigdis; Eliasdottir, Thorunn S.; Hardarson, Sveinn Hakon; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; Stefánsson, Einar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dual wavelength retinal oximetry has been developed for adults, but is not available for infants. Retinal oximetry may provide insight into the pathophysiology of oxygen-mediated diseases like retinopathy of prematurity. More insight in the oxygen metabolism of the retina in infants may provide valuable clues for better understanding and subsequent prevention or treatment of the disease. The measurements of oxygen saturation are obtained with two fundus images simultaneously captured in two different wavelengths of light. The comparison in light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin can be used to estimate the oxygen saturation within the retinal vessels by means of a software algorithm. This study aims to make retinal oximetry available for neonates. The first step towards estimating retinal oxygen saturation is determining the optical density ratio. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to image healthy newborn infants with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope and determine the optical density ratio for retinal oximetry analysis. Methods Images of the retina of full-term healthy infants were obtained with an SLO, Optomap 200Tx (Optos), with two laser wavelengths (532nm and 633nm). The infant lay face down on the lower arm of the parent, while the parent supported the chest and chin with one hand, and stabilized the back with the other hand. No mydriatics or eyelid specula were used during this study. The images were analyzed with modified Oxymap Analyzer software for calculation of the Optical Density Ratio (ODR) and vessel width. The ODR is inversely and approximately linearly related to the oxygen saturation. Measurements were included from the superotemporal vessel pair. A paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results Fifty-nine infants, (58% female), were included with mean gestational age of 40 ± 1.3 weeks (mean ± SD) and mean post-natal age of 16 ± 4.8 days. A total of 28 images were selected for retinal oximetry analysis

  7. Clinical applications of in vivo fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Kim, Junhyung; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Chun, Byungseon; Gweon, Daegab

    2008-02-01

    Living skin for basic and clinical research can be evaluated by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) non-invasively. CLSM imaging system can achieve skin image its native state either "in vivo" or "fresh biopsy (ex vivo)" without fixation, sectioning and staining that is necessary for routine histology. This study examines the potential fluorescent CLSM with a various exogenous fluorescent contrast agent, to provide with more resolution images in skin. In addition, in vivo fluorescent CLSM researchers will be extended a range of potential clinical application. The prototype of our CLSM system has been developed by Prof. Gweon's group. The operating parameters are composed of some units, such as illuminated wavelength 488 nm, argon illumination power up to 20mW on the skin, objective lens, 0.9NA oil immersion, axial resolution 1.0μm, field of view 200μm x 100μm (lateral resolution , 0.3μm). In human volunteer, fluorescein sodium was administrated topically and intradermally. Animal studies were done in GFP transgenic mouse, IRC mouse and pig skin. For imaging of animal skin, fluorescein sodium, acridine orange, and curcumine were used for fluorescein contrast agent. We also used the GFP transgenic mouse for fluorescein CLSM imaging. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. Curcumin is a yellow food dye that has similar fluorescent properties to fluorescein sodium. Acridin Orange can be highlight nuclei in viable keratinocyte. In vivo CLSM of transgenic GFP mouse enable on in vivo, high resolution view of GFP expressing skin tissue. GFP signals are brightest in corneocyte, kertinocyte, hair and eccrine gland. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. In

  8. Precise measurement of the micron-scale spot of ultrashort laser pulse based on film scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengtie Wu; Jianrong Zhang; Yunbin Chen; Dongdong Guo

    2008-01-01

    @@ A novel and precise micron-scale nanosecond laser spot measurement based on film-scanning method is presented. The method can be used to measure the spot size, beam profile, and intensity distribution of the pulse.

  9. A Rapid Calibration Technique for Scanning Line-Structured Laser Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel procedure to calibrate the scanning line-structured laser sensor is presented. A drone composed of two orthogonal planes is designed, with the result that camera parameters and light-plane equation parameters is achieved simultaneously.

  10. Event-based progression detection strategies using scanning laser polarimetry images of the human retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, K.A.; Lo, B.; Zhou, Q.; Vos, F.M.; Vossepoel, A.M.; Lemij, H.G.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring glaucoma patients and ensuring optimal treatment requires accurate and precise detection of progression. Many glaucomatous progression detection strategies may be formulated for Scanning Laser Polarimetry (SLP) data of the local nerve fiber thickness. In this paper, several strategies, al

  11. 3D cavity detection technique and its application based on cavity auto scanning laser system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-ling; LI Xi-bing; LI Fa-ben; ZHAO Guo-yan; QIN Yu-hui

    2008-01-01

    Ground constructions and mines are severely threatened by underground cavities especially those unsafe or inaccessible ones. Safe and precise cavity detection is vital for reasonable cavity evaluation and disposal. The conventional cavity detection methods and their limitation were analyzed. Those methods cannot form 3D model of underground cavity which is used for instructing the cavity disposal; and their precisions in detection are always greatly affected by the geological circumstance. The importance of 3D cavity detection in metal mine for safe exploitation was pointed out; and the 3D cavity laser detection method and its principle were introduced. A cavity auto scanning laser system was recommended to actualize the cavity 3D detection after comparing with the other laser detection systems. Four boreholes were chosen to verify the validity of the cavity auto scanning laser system. The results show that the cavity auto scanning laser system is very suitable for underground 3D cavity detection, especially for those inaccessible ones.

  12. Reconstructing 3D building models from laser scanning to calculate the heat demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neidhart, Hauke; Sester, Monika

    2008-09-15

    The objective of the project is to determine the heat demand of settlement areas using geospatial data, especially airborne laser scanning data. With airborne laser scanning it possible to record detailed 3D data for great areas. With this 3D data it is possible to reconstruct 3D building models. The geometry then can be used to derive information for the calculation of the heat demand

  13. Numerical 2D And 3D Simulations of a Spherical Fabry–Pérot Resonator for Application as a Reference Cavity for Laser Frequency Stabilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitiss E.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on the results of a numerical study of deformations of a spherical Fabry-Pérot cavity that can be used for laser frequency stabilisation. It is demonstrated that for a precise simulation of the cavity deformations a 3D model has to be used instead of a simpler 2D model, which employs simulation on the symmetry plane of the cavity. To lower the sensitivity to environmental perturbations, it is suggested to use a material with a low density and a high Young’s modulus. We also show that the mechanical resonance frequencies of the cavity are mainly determined by the size of the cavity.

  14. Stop-and-Go Mode: Sensor Manipulation as Essential as Sensor Development in Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antero Kukko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was dedicated to illustrating the significance of sensor manipulation in the case of terrestrial laser scanning, which is a field now in quick development. In fact, this quickness was mainly rooted in the emergence of new sensors with better performance, while the implications of sensor manipulation have not been fully recognized by the whole community. For this technical gap, the stop-and-go mapping mode can be reckoned as one of the potential solution plans. Stop-and-go was first proposed to handle the low efficiency of traditional static terrestrial laser scanning, and then, it was re-emphasized to improve the stability of sample collections for the state-of-the-art technology of mobile laser scanning. This work reviewed the previous efforts of trying the stop-and-go mode for improving the performance of static and mobile terrestrial laser scanning and generalized their principles respectively. This work also analyzed its advantages compared to the fully-static and fully-kinematic terrestrial laser scanning, and suggested the plans with more automatic measures for raising the efficacy of terrestrial laser scanning. Overall, this literature review indicated that the stop-and-go mapping mode as a case with generic sense can verify the presumption of sensor manipulation as essential as sensor development.

  15. Airborne Laser Scanning of Forest Stem Volume in a Mountainous Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Klemens Schadauer; Bernhard Maier; Wolfgang Wagner; Markus Hollaus

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is an active remote sensing technique that uses the time-of-flight measurement principle to capture the three-dimensional structure of the earth’s surface with pulsed lasers that transmit nanosecond-long laser pulses with a high pulse repetition frequency. Over forested areas most of the laser pulses are reflected by the leaves and branches of the trees, but a certain fraction of the laser pulses reaches the forest floor through small gaps in the c...

  16. Efficient sintering of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide films for dye solar cells via raster scanning laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mincuzzi, Girolamo; Vesce, Luigi; Reale, Andrea; Di Carlo, Aldo; Brown, Thomas M.

    2009-09-01

    By identifying the right combination of laser parameters, in particular the integrated laser fluence Φ, we fabricated dye solar cells (DSCs) with UV laser-sintered TiO2 films exhibiting a power conversion efficiency η =5.2%, the highest reported for laser-sintered devices. η is dramatically affected by Φ and a clear trend is reported. Significantly, DSCs fabricated by raster scanning the laser beam to sinter the TiO2 films are made as efficient as those with oven-sintered ones. These results, confirmed on three batches of cells, demonstrate the remarkable potential (noncontact, local, low cost, rapid, selective, and scalable) of scanning laser processing applied to DSC technology.

  17. Assessment of Relative Accuracy of AHN-2 Laser Scanning Data Using Planar Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshelham, K.; Soudarissanane , S.; Van der Sande, C.

    2010-01-01

    AHN-2 is the second part of the Actueel Hoogtebestand Nederland project, which concerns the acquisition of high-resolution altimetry data over the entire Netherlands using airborne laser scanning. The accuracy assessment of laser altimetry data usually relies on comparing corresponding tie elements,

  18. 2D hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas target for density down-ramp injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononenko, O.; Lopes, N. C.; Cole, J. M.; Kamperidis, C.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Osterhoff, J.; Poder, K.; Rusby, D.; Symes, D. R.; Warwick, J.; Wood, J. C.; Palmer, C. A. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas cell were performed using the open source fluid code OpenFOAM. The gas cell was designed to study controlled injection of electrons into a laser-driven wakefield at the Astra Gemini laser facility. The target consists of two compartments: an accelerator and an injector section connected via an aperture. A sharp transition between the peak and plateau density regions in the injector and accelerator compartments, respectively, was observed in simulations with various inlet pressures. The fluid simulations indicate that the length of the down-ramp connecting the sections depends on the aperture diameter, as does the density drop outside the entrance and the exit cones. Further studies showed, that increasing the inlet pressure leads to turbulence and strong fluctuations in density along the axial profile during target filling, and consequently, is expected to negatively impact the accelerator stability.

  19. Application of step-scan FTIR to the research of quantum cascade lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junqi Liu; Xiuzhen Lu; Yu Guo; Xiuqi Huang; Xiaoling Che; Wen Lei; Fengqi Liu

    2005-01-01

    The principle of step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is introduced. Double modulation step-scan FTIR technique is used to obtain the quantum cascade laser's stacked emission spectra in the time domain. Optical property and thermal accumulation of devices due to large drive current are analyzed.

  20. Eye safety analysis for non-uniform retinal scanning laser trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelinski, Uwe; Dallmann, Hans-Georg; Grüger, Heinrich; Knobbe, Jens; Pügner, Tino; Reinig, Peter; Woittennek, Franziska

    2016-03-01

    Scanning the retinae of the human eyes with a laser beam is an approved diagnosis method in ophthalmology; moreover the retinal blood vessels form a biometric modality for identifying persons. Medical applied Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopes (SLOs) usually contain galvanometric mirror systems to move the laser spot with a defined speed across the retina. Hence, the load of laser radiation is uniformly distributed and eye safety requirements can be easily complied. Micro machined mirrors also known as Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are interesting alternatives for designing retina scanning systems. In particular double-resonant MEMS are well suited for mass fabrication at low cost. However, their Lissajous-shaped scanning figure requires a particular analysis and specific measures to meet the requirements for a Class 1 laser device, i.e. eye-safe operation. The scanning laser spot causes a non-uniform pulsing radiation load hitting the retinal elements within the field of view (FoV). The relevant laser safety standards define a smallest considerable element for eye-related impacts to be a point source that is visible with an angle of maximum 1.5 mrad. For non-uniform pulsing expositions onto retinal elements the standard requires to consider all particular impacts, i.e. single pulses, pulse sequences in certain time intervals and cumulated laser radiation loads. As it may be expected, a Lissajous scanning figure causes the most critical radiation loads at its edges and borders. Depending on the applied power the laser has to be switched off here to avoid any retinal injury.

  1. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with integrated wide-field retinal imaging and tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, R. Daniel; Zhong, Zhangyi; Hammer, Daniel X.; Mujat, Mircea; Patel, Ankit H.; Deng, Cong; Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new, unified implementation of the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) incorporating a wide-field line-scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) and a closed-loop optical retinal tracker. AOSLO raster scans are deflected by the integrated tracking mirrors so that direct AOSLO stabilization is automatic during tracking. The wide-field imager and large-spherical-mirror optical interface design, as well as a large-stroke deformable mirror (DM), enable the AOSLO image fi...

  2. Note: Laser beam scanning using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Abhijit [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039, Assam (India); Department of Physics, Gauhati University, Guwahati 781014, Assam (India); Boruah, Bosanta R., E-mail: brboruah@iitg.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039, Assam (India)

    2014-04-15

    In this work we describe laser beam scanning using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator. Commercially available ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulators are capable of displaying 85 colored images in 1 s using a time dithering technique. Each colored image, in fact, comprises 24 single bit (black and white) images displayed sequentially. We have used each single bit image to write a binary phase hologram. For a collimated laser beam incident on the hologram, one of the diffracted beams can be made to travel along a user defined direction. We have constructed a beam scanner employing the above arrangement and demonstrated its use to scan a single laser beam in a laser scanning optical sectioning microscope setup.

  3. Nano-strip grating lines self-organized by a high speed scanning CW laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Satoru; Ito, Takeshi; Akiyama, Kensuke; Yasui, Manabu; Kato, Chihiro; Tanaka, Satomi; Hirabayashi, Yasuo [Kanagawa Industrial Technology Center, Kanagawa Prefectural Government, 705-1 Shimo-Imaizumi, Ebina, Kanagawa 243-0435 (Japan); Mastuno, Akira; Nire, Takashi [Phoeton Corp., 3050 Okada, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0021 (Japan); Funakubo, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Mamoru, E-mail: satoru@kanagawa-iri.go.jp [Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan)

    2011-04-29

    After a laser annealing experiment on Si wafer, we found an asymmetric sheet resistance on the surface of the wafer. Periodic nano-strip grating lines (nano-SGLs) were self-organized along the trace of one-time scanning of the continuous wave (CW) laser. Depending on laser power, the nano-trench formed with a period ranging from 500 to 800 nm with a flat trough between trench structures. This simple method of combining the scanning laser with high scanning speed of 300 m min{sup -1} promises a large area of nanostructure fabrication with a high output. As a demonstration of the versatile method, concentric circles were drawn on silicon substrate rotated by a personal computer (PC) cooling fan. Even with such a simple system, the nano-SGL showed iridescence from the concentric circles.

  4. Laser transmission welding of Clearweld-coated polyethylene glycol terephthalate by incremental scanning technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Wang, A. H.; Weng, Z. K.; Xia, H. B.

    2016-06-01

    Transmission laser welding using Incremental Scanning Technique(TWIST) mode and conventional contour welding mode were adopted to investigate laser transmission welding of 0.5 mm thick PET plate. A 1064 nm fiber laser was used to weld PET at the (TWIST) mode, and an 808 nm diode laser was applied to conduct the conventional contour welding. The Clearweld coating was used as laser absorbing material. The influences of laser parameters (i.e. defocusing distance, distance between two circles) on the quality of weld seams were analyzed by optical microscopy. Moreover, geometry and shear strength of the weld zone were tested to optimize laser parameters. Additionally, the water vapor permeability (WVP) of weld seams was measured to test hermetical capacity. Results show that the shear strength and hermetic capacity of weld seam by TWIST mode are at the same level in comparison with that of the conventional contour welding.

  5. An Automatic Algorithm for Minimizing Anomalies and Discrepancies in Point Clouds Acquired by Laser Scanning Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Fabiane; Gonzaga, Luiz, Jr.; Galhardo Muller, Fabricio; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Scaioni, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Laser scanning technique from airborne and land platforms has been largely used for collecting 3D data in large volumes in the field of geosciences. Furthermore, the laser pulse intensity has been widely exploited to analyze and classify rocks and biomass, and for carbon storage estimation. In general, a laser beam is emitted, collides with targets and only a percentage of emitted beam returns according to intrinsic properties of each target. Also, due interferences and partial collisions, the laser return intensity can be incorrect, introducing serious errors in classification and/or estimation processes. To address this problem and avoid misclassification and estimation errors, we have proposed a new algorithm to correct return intensity for laser scanning sensors. Different case studies have been used to evaluate and validated proposed approach.

  6. The geometry of terrestrial laser scanning; identification of errors, modeling and mitigation of scanning geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soudarissanane, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, Terrestrial Laser Scanners are increasingly being used in a broad spectrum of applications, from surveying to civil engineering, medical modeling and forensics. Especially surveying applications require on one hand a quickly obtainable, high resolution point cloud but also

  7. Influence of scanning velocity on bovine shank bone ablation with pulsed CO2 laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianzeng Zhang; Shusen Xie; Qing Ye; Zhenlin Zhan

    2009-01-01

    The influence of scanning speed on hard bone tissue ablation is studied with a 10.6-μm laser. The groove morphology and the thermal damage created in bovine shank bone by pulsed CO2 laser are examined as a function of incident fluence by optical microscope following standard histological processing. The results show that ablation groove width, depth and ablation volume, as well as the zone of thermal injury, increase gradually with incident fluence. As compared to the result for high scanning speed, the lower scanning speed always produces larger ablation volume but thicker zone of thermal injury. It is evident that scanning speed plays an important role in the ablation process. In clinical applications, it is important to select appropriate scanning speed to obtain both high ablation rates and minimal thermal injury.

  8. Angle extended linear MEMS scanning system for 3D laser vision sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yajun; Zhang, Yinxin; Yang, Huaidong; Zhu, Pan; Gai, Ye; Zhao, Jian; Huang, Zhanhua

    2016-09-01

    Scanning system is often considered as the most important part for 3D laser vision sensor. In this paper, we propose a method for the optical system design of angle extended linear MEMS scanning system, which has features of huge scanning degree, small beam divergence angle and small spot size for 3D laser vision sensor. The principle of design and theoretical formulas are derived strictly. With the help of software ZEMAX, a linear scanning optical system based on MEMS has been designed. Results show that the designed system can extend scanning angle from ±8° to ±26.5° with a divergence angle small than 3.5 mr, and the spot size is reduced for 4.545 times.

  9. Detection of Gold Nanoparticles Aggregation Growth Induced by Nucleic Acid through Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Ramla; Carbone, Giovani; Petriashvili, Gia; De Santo, Maria Penelope; Barberi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The gold nanoparticle (GNP) aggregation growth induced by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied by laser scanning confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopies. As in the investigated case the direct light scattering analysis is not suitable, we observe the behavior of the fluorescence produced by a dye and we detect the aggregation by the shift and the broadening of the fluorescence peak. Results of laser scanning confocal microscopy images and the fluorescence emission spectra from lambda scan mode suggest, in fact, that the intruding of the hydrophobic moiety of the probe within the cationic surfactants bilayer film coating GNPs results in a Förster resonance energy transfer. The environmental scanning electron microscopy images show that DNA molecules act as template to assemble GNPs into three-dimensional structures which are reminiscent of the DNA helix. This study is useful to design better nanobiotechnological devices using GNPs and DNA. PMID:26907286

  10. Detection of Gold Nanoparticles Aggregation Growth Induced by Nucleic Acid through Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramla Gary

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The gold nanoparticle (GNP aggregation growth induced by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA is studied by laser scanning confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopies. As in the investigated case the direct light scattering analysis is not suitable, we observe the behavior of the fluorescence produced by a dye and we detect the aggregation by the shift and the broadening of the fluorescence peak. Results of laser scanning confocal microscopy images and the fluorescence emission spectra from lambda scan mode suggest, in fact, that the intruding of the hydrophobic moiety of the probe within the cationic surfactants bilayer film coating GNPs results in a Förster resonance energy transfer. The environmental scanning electron microscopy images show that DNA molecules act as template to assemble GNPs into three-dimensional structures which are reminiscent of the DNA helix. This study is useful to design better nanobiotechnological devices using GNPs and DNA.

  11. An hybrid detector GEM-ASIC for 2-D soft X-ray imaging for laser produced plasma and pulsed sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, D.; Claps, G.; De Angelis, R.; Murtas, F.

    2016-03-01

    The following paper presents a new 2-D detector (`GEMpix') in the soft X-ray range, having a wide dynamic range thanks to its intrisic gain, working in charge integration mode to be used for diagnosing laser produced plasma (LPP) or X-ray pulsed sources. It is a gas detector based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology with a quad-medipix chip as read-out electronics. In our prototype, the substitution of semiconductor material with a gas triple-GEM allows several advantages with respect to the detectors commonly used in LPP, as X-ray CCDs and Micro Channel Plates or Image Plates. In these experiments the configuration Time-over-Threshold (ToT) has been used, to measure the total charge released to the gas and collected by each pixel, integrated over the X-ray burst duration. Intensity response and spatial resolution has been measured first in laboratory for calibration, as function of the voltage applied to the GEMs, in single photon regime with energies between 3.7 and 17 keV. Subsequently it has been tested at the ABC laser facility (ENEA, Frascati). In this case, we measured the X-rays produced when the ABC neodymium laser, with pulse of 50 J and 3 ns time width, hits plane targets of aluminum. 2-D images have been acquired by means of a pinhole configuration with magnification 1.5 and 50 μ m of spatial resolution. The results are encouraging regarding the capability of this imaging detector to work in experiments where soft X-ray emissivity varies over many orders of magnitude.

  12. An hybrid detector GEM-ASIC for 2-D soft X-ray imaging for laser produced plasma and pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following paper presents a new 2-D detector ('GEMpix') in the soft X-ray range, having a wide dynamic range thanks to its intrisic gain, working in charge integration mode to be used for diagnosing laser produced plasma (LPP) or X-ray pulsed sources. It is a gas detector based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology with a quad-medipix chip as read-out electronics. In our prototype, the substitution of semiconductor material with a gas triple-GEM allows several advantages with respect to the detectors commonly used in LPP, as X-ray CCDs and Micro Channel Plates or Image Plates. In these experiments the configuration Time-over-Threshold (ToT) has been used, to measure the total charge released to the gas and collected by each pixel, integrated over the X-ray burst duration. Intensity response and spatial resolution has been measured first in laboratory for calibration, as function of the voltage applied to the GEMs, in single photon regime with energies between 3.7 and 17 keV. Subsequently it has been tested at the ABC laser facility (ENEA, Frascati). In this case, we measured the X-rays produced when the ABC neodymium laser, with pulse of 50 J and 3 ns time width, hits plane targets of aluminum. 2-D images have been acquired by means of a pinhole configuration with magnification 1.5 and 50 μ m of spatial resolution. The results are encouraging regarding the capability of this imaging detector to work in experiments where soft X-ray emissivity varies over many orders of magnitude

  13. Optimizing terrestrial laser scanning measurement set-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soudarissanane, S.S.; Lindenbergh, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main applications of the terrestrial laser scanner is the visualization, modeling and monitoring of man-made structures like buildings. Especially surveying applications require on one hand a quickly obtainable, high resolution point cloud but also need observations with a known and well

  14. Recommendations for the design and the installation of large laser scanning microscopy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, P. Johannes

    2012-03-01

    Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has since the inventions of the Confocal Scanning Laser Microscope (CLSM) and the Multi Photon Laser Scanning Microscope (MPLSM) developed into an essential tool in contemporary life science and material science. The market provides an increasing number of turn-key and hands-off commercial LSM systems, un-problematic to purchase, set up and integrate even into minor research groups. However, the successful definition, financing, acquisition, installation and effective use of one or more large laser scanning microscopy systems, possibly of core facility character, often requires major efforts by senior staff members of large academic or industrial units. Here, a set of recommendations is presented, which are helpful during the process of establishing large systems for confocal or non-linear laser scanning microscopy as an effective operational resource in the scientific or industrial production process. Besides the description of technical difficulties and possible pitfalls, the article also illuminates some seemingly "less scientific" processes, i.e. the definition of specific laboratory demands, advertisement of the intention to purchase one or more large systems, evaluation of quotations, establishment of contracts and preparation of the local environment and laboratory infrastructure.

  15. Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning for Geometry Documentation and Construction Management of Highway Tunnels during Excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis Gikas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the use and explores the potential of laser scanning technology to accurately track excavation and construction activities of highway tunnels. It provides a detailed overview of the static laser scanning method, its principles of operation and applications for tunnel construction operations. Also, it discusses the planning, execution, data processing and analysis phases of laser scanning activities, with emphasis given on geo-referencing, mesh model generation and cross-section extraction. Specific case studies are considered based on two construction sites in Greece. Particularly, the potential of the method is examined for checking the tunnel profile, producing volume computations and validating the smoothness/thickness of shotcrete layers at an excavation stage and during the completion of excavation support and primary lining. An additional example of the use of the method in the geometric documentation of the concrete lining formwork is examined and comparisons against dimensional tolerances are examined. Experimental comparisons and analyses of the laser scanning method against conventional surveying techniques are also considered.

  16. The Combination of Laser Scanning and Structure from Motion Technology for Creation of Accurate Exterior and Interior Orthophotos of ST. Nicholas Baroque Church

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, B.; Křemen, T.

    2013-02-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning technology is used for creation of building documentation and 3D building model from its emerging at the turn of the millennium. Photogrammetry has even longer tradition in this field. Both technologies have some technical limitations if they are used for creation of a façade or even an interior orthophoto, but combination of both technologies seems profitable. Laser scanning can be used for creation of an accurate 3D model and photogrammetry for consequent application of high quality colour information. Both technologies were used in synergy to create the building plans, 2D drawing documentation of facades and interior views and the orthophotos of St. Nicholas Baroque church in Prague. The case study is described in details in the paper.

  17. Slope excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation in hydraulic projects based on laser scanning technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Slope excavation is one of the most crucial steps in the construction of a hydraulic project. Excavation project quality assessment and excavated volume calculation are critical in construction management. The positioning of excavation projects using traditional instruments is inefficient and may cause error. To improve the efficiency and precision of calculation and assessment, three-dimensional laser scanning technology was used for slope excavation quality assessment. An efficient data acquisition, processing, and management workflow was presented in this study. Based on the quality control indices, including the average gradient, slope toe elevation, and overbreak and underbreak, cross-sectional quality assessment and holistic quality assessment methods were proposed to assess the slope excavation quality with laser-scanned data. An algorithm was also presented to calculate the excavated volume with laser-scanned data. A field application and a laboratory experiment were carried out to verify the feasibility of these methods for excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation. The results show that the quality assessment indices can be obtained rapidly and accurately with design parameters and scanned data, and the results of holistic quality assessment are consistent with those of cross-sectional quality assessment. In addition, the time consumption in excavation project quality assessment with the laser scanning technology can be reduced by 70%−90%, as compared with the traditional method. The excavated volume calculated with the scanned data only slightly differs from measured data, demonstrating the applicability of the excavated volume calculation method presented in this study.

  18. Mobile laser scanning applied to the earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Benjamin A.; Glennie, Craig; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Ericksen, Todd; Hauser, Darren

    2013-01-01

    Lidar (light detection and ranging), a method by which the precise time of flight of emitted pulses of laser energy is measured and converted to distance for reflective targets, has helped scientists make topographic maps of Earth's surface at scales as fine as centimeters. These maps have allowed the discovery and analysis of myriad otherwise unstudied features, such as fault scarps, river channels, and even ancient ruins [Glennie et al., 2013b].

  19. Combining laser scan and photogrammetry for 3D object modeling using a single digital camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Xiangwei

    2009-07-01

    In the fields of industrial design, artistic design and heritage conservation, physical objects are usually digitalized by reverse engineering through some 3D scanning methods. Laser scan and photogrammetry are two main methods to be used. For laser scan, a video camera and a laser source are necessary, and for photogrammetry, a digital still camera with high resolution pixels is indispensable. In some 3D modeling tasks, two methods are often integrated to get satisfactory results. Although many research works have been done on how to combine the results of the two methods, no work has been reported to design an integrated device at low cost. In this paper, a new 3D scan system combining laser scan and photogrammetry using a single consumer digital camera is proposed. Nowadays there are many consumer digital cameras, such as Canon EOS 5D Mark II, they usually have features of more than 10M pixels still photo recording and full 1080p HD movie recording, so a integrated scan system can be designed using such a camera. A square plate glued with coded marks is used to place the 3d objects, and two straight wood rulers also glued with coded marks can be laid on the plate freely. In the photogrammetry module, the coded marks on the plate make up a world coordinate and can be used as control network to calibrate the camera, and the planes of two rulers can also be determined. The feature points of the object and the rough volume representation from the silhouettes can be obtained in this module. In the laser scan module, a hand-held line laser is used to scan the object, and the two straight rulers are used as reference planes to determine the position of the laser. The laser scan results in dense points cloud which can be aligned together automatically through calibrated camera parameters. The final complete digital model is obtained through a new a patchwise energy functional method by fusion of the feature points, rough volume and the dense points cloud. The design

  20. Il laser scanning e CloudCUBE per le grotte di Naica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erminio Paolo Canevese

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser scanning and CloudCube for Naica cavesOn May 2007, Virtualgeo, a geomatic software development and communication company, took part in the first official expedition to Mexico. The Project, coined "Naica", involves researchers from ten universities, four companies and several laboratories. Virtualgeo carried out the survey by applying laser scanning technology to hypogeal caves covered with selenite crystals. The data was processed using CloudCUBE, a proprietary software designed to manage and model 3D point clouds. The first results of the laser scanning survey of a spectacular “forest of crystals” are presented here.

  1. Embedding complementary imaging data in laser scanning microscopy micrographs by reversible watermarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, Ioan-Catalin; Stanciu, Stefan G; Hristu, Radu; Coanda, Henri-George; Tranca, Denis E; Popescu, Marius; Coltuc, Dinu

    2016-04-01

    Complementary laser scanning microscopy micrographs are considered as pairs consisting in a master image (MI) and a slave image (SI), the latter with potential for facilitating the interpretation of the MI. We propose a strategy based on reversible watermarking for embedding a lossy compressed version of the SI into the MI. The use of reversible watermarking ensures the exact recovery of the host image. By storing and/or transmitting the watermarked MI in a single file, the information contained in both images that constitute the pair is made available to a potential end-user, which simplifies data association and transfer. Examples are presented using support images collected by two complementary techniques, confocal scanning laser microscopy and transmission laser scanning microscopy, on Hematoxylin and Eosin stained tissue fragments. A strategy for minimizing the watermarking distortions of the MI, while preserving the content of the SI, is discussed in detail.

  2. Laser-induced cantilever behaviour in apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser-induced deformation of a typical commercial cantilever commonly used for scanning near-field optical microscopes was investigated by means of a software package based on the finite element method. The thermo-mechanical behaviour of such a cantilever whose tip was irradiated by a laser beam was calculated in the temperature regime between room temperature and 850 K. The spatial tip displacement was simulated at timescales <0.1 ms, since feedback-based constant force measurements exhibit reaction times in this range. It could be shown that in addition to former tip-based thermal expansion calculations the cantilever deformation is already significant at moderate temperatures, particularly when a reflective coating is present. The experimental and calculated results suggest that tip scanning in cantilever-based scanning probe microscopes for laser-based surface modification applications should be performed in thermal equilibrium. (paper)

  3. Application of Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning and Surveying in Geological Investigation of High Rock Slope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Runqiu; Dong Xiujun

    2008-01-01

    The appearance of 3D laser scanning technology is one of the most important technology revolutions in surveying and mapping field. It can be widely used in many interrelated fields, such as engineering constructions and 3D measurements, owing to its prominent characteristics of the high efficiency and high precision. At present its application is still in the initial state, and it is quite rarely used in China, especially in geotechnical engineering and geological engineering fields. Starting with a general introduction of 3D laser scanning technology, this article studies how to apply the technology to high rock slope investigations. By way of a case study, principles and methods of quick slope documentation and occurrence measurement of discontinuities are discussed and analyzed. Analysis results show that the application of 3D laser scanning technology to geotechnical and geological engineering has a great prospect and value.

  4. Surveying a fossil oyster reef using terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring, A.; Exner, U.; Harzhauser, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Korneuburg Basin, situated north-west of Vienna, is well known to contain a rich variety of fossils from the Early Miocene (16.5 ma) and therefore has been investigated extensively by scientists in the past decades. An exceptional discovery was made in 2005: a large fossil oyster reef has been excavated and documented carefully during the last years. Aside from the giant-sized oyster (Crassostrea gryphoides), the excavation site contains numerous species of molluscs along with teeth of sharks and rays and even isolated bones of sea cows. The oysters, having lengths of up to 80 cm, are protruding from the ground surface, which is more or less a tilted plane (25˚ ) with a size of about 300 m2. The entire site is crosscut by a network of geological faults, often also offsetting individual oyster shells. Displacements along the normal faults do not exceed ~ 15 cm. The faulted fossils offer a unique opportunity to measure displacement distribution along the faults in great detail and provide insight in deformation mechanisms in porous, barely lithified sediments. In order to get a precise 3D model of the oyster reef, the terrestrial laser scanner system Leica HDS 6000 is used. It is a phase-based laser scanner, i.e. the distance measurement is performed using the phase-shift principle. Compared to the time-of-flight principle, this method is generally more appropriate to projects like this one, where the distances to be measured are relatively small (Digital Terrain Model) software SCOP++. The entire site has also been systematically documented by a large number of digital photographs. The obtained texture information allows a visual interpretation of the underlying surface. We discuss in how far such a 3D model derived from terrestrial laser scanner data may be useful to support the research work of geoscientists.

  5. Advances in Forest Inventory Using Airborne Laser Scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Hannu Hyyppä; Mikko Vastaranta; Markus Holopainen; Antero Kukko; Harri Kaartinen; Anttoni Jaakkola; Matti Vaaja; Jarkko Koskinen; Petteri Alho; Xiaowei Yu; Juha Hyyppä

    2012-01-01

    We present two improvements for laser-based forest inventory. The first improvement is based on using last pulse data for tree detection. When trees overlap, the surface model between the trees corresponding to the first pulse stays high, whereas the corresponding model from the last pulse results in a drop in elevation, due to its better penetration between the trees. This drop in elevation can be used for separating trees. In a test carried out in Evo, Southern Finland, we used 292 forests ...

  6. Analysis of Systematic Error Influences on Accuracy of Airborne Laser Scanning Altimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaohong; LIU Jingnan

    2004-01-01

    The error sources related to the laser rangefinder, GPS and INS are analyzed in details. Several coordinates systems used in airborne laser scanning are set up, and then the basic formula of system is given. This paper emphasizes on discussing the kinematic offset correction between GPS antenna phase center and laser fired point. And kinematic time delay influence on laser footprint position, the ranging errors, positioning errors, attitude errors and integration errors of the system are also explored. Finally, the result shows that the kinematic time delay can be neglected as compared with other error sources. The accuracy of the coordinates is not only influenced by the amplitude of the error, but also controlled by the operation parameters such as flight height, scanning angle amplitude and attitude magnitude of the platform.

  7. New kind of subarea-parallel scanning mode for laser metal deposition shaping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Hongyou; LIU Weijun; ZHAO Jibin

    2007-01-01

    A scanning mode is the key technology in a laser metal deposition shaping (LMDS) fabrication process. On the basis of the analysis of existing scanning modes and their influences on the fabrication efficiency and the quality of parts, some disadvantages of them are pointed out. A new kind of subarea-parallel scanning mode for LMDS based on a subdividing profiled outline into monotonous polygon subareas is presented. First, based on the principle of point visibility, inner loops are eliminated, and simple polygons are subdivided into monotonous polygons with the minimal zones. Second, the parallel scanning paths of all monotonous polygon subareas are finished, which diminishes the length of the scanning line. The practical application shows that the scanning mode can enhance the fabrication efficiency and quality.

  8. Hyperfine structure and lifetime measurements in the 4s2nd 2D3/2 Rydberg sequence of Ga I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunqing; Tian, Yanshan; Yu, Qi; Bai, Wanshuang; Wang, Xinghao; Wang, Chong; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-05-01

    The hyperfine structure (HFS) constants of the 4s2nd 2D3/2 (n=6-18) Rydberg sequence and the 4s26p 2P3/2 level for two isotopes of 69Ga and 71Ga atoms were measured by means of the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) technique and the quantum beat method. The observed hyperfine quantum beat spectra were analyzed and the magnetic-dipole HFS constants A as well as the electric-quadrupole HFS constants B of these levels were obtained by Fourier transform and a program for multiple regression analysis. Also using TR-LIF method radiative lifetimes of the above sequence states were determined at room temperature. The measured lifetime values range from 69 to 2279 ns with uncertainties no more than 10%. To our knowledge, the HFS constants of this Rydberg sequence and the lifetimes of the 4s2nd 2D3/2 (n=10-18) levels are reported for the first time. Good agreement between our results and the previous is achieved.

  9. Geodetic Imaging of Marsh Surface Elevation with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C. T.; Starek, M. J.; Gibeaut, J. C.; Lord, A.

    2015-12-01

    The resilience of marshes to a rising sea is dependent on their elevation response. Given the level of precision required to measure minute changes in marsh elevation over time, survey methods have to be adapted to minimize impacts to the sediment surface. Current approaches include Surface Elevation Tables (SETs), which are used to monitor wetland surface change with respect to an in situ vertical benchmark. Although SETs have been proven as an effective technique to track subtle sedimentation rates (definition monitoring of marsh surface evolution. However, several challenges must be overcome in the application of the technology for geodetic imaging of marsh surfaces. These challenges include surface occlusion by dense vegetation, error propagation due to scan co-registration and referencing across time, impacts of scan angle, and filtering of non-ground points. Researchers at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi conducted a field-survey of a marsh within the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve using TLS and RTK GPS for comparison. Grand Bay in Mississippi USA is one of the most biologically productive estuarine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. The study region is covered by dense and tall saw-grass that makes it a challenging environment for bare-earth mapping. For this survey, a Riegl VZ-400 TLS (1550 nm wavelength) was utilized. The system is capable of recording multiple returns per a transmitted pulse (up to 15) and provides full-waveform output for signal post-processing to extract returns. The objectives of the study are twofold: 1) examine impacts of TLS survey design, scan angle and scan density on marsh elevation mapping; 2) assess the capabilities of multiple-echo and full-waveform TLS data to extract the bare-earth surface below the dense vegetation. This presentation will present results of the study including the developed TLS survey protocol and data processing workflow, details on waveform and multi-echo approaches for ground point

  10. Influence of scanning velocity on femtosecond laser direct writing lines on FOTURAN glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinzhong Wu; Ching-Yue Wang; Wei Jia; Xiaochang Ni; Minglie Hu; Lu Chai

    2008-01-01

    Lines are induced on the surface of a photosensitive (FOTURAN) glass by focused femtosecond laser transverse writing with scanning velocity in a wide range of 40- 1800μm/s. The formed lines are analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope (OM). It is observed that three distinct morphologies of lines are produced depending on the scanning velocity. Lines written in low velocity level (40 - 100 μm/s) and high velocity level (1000 - 1800 μm/s) are uniform and regular, while those written in moderate velocity level (150 - 600 μm/s) are rough. The influence of scanning velocity is explained based on different pulses overlapping or cumulative dose of laser exposure in irradiated area. Fabrication of shallow groove on the surface is also demonstrated.

  11. Dynamic occlusion detection and inpainting of in situ captured terrestrial laser scanning point clouds sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi; Yang, Bisheng

    2016-09-01

    Laser point clouds captured using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in an uncontrollable urban outdoor or indoor scene suffer from irregular shaped data blanks caused by dynamic occlusion that temporarily exists, i.e., moving objects, such as pedestrians or cars, resulting in integrality and quality losses of the scene data. This paper proposes a novel automatic dynamic occlusion detection and inpainting method for sequential TLS point clouds captured from one scan position. In situ collected laser point clouds sequences are indexed by establishing a novel panoramic space partition that assigns a three dimensional voxel to each laser point according to the scanning setups. Then two stationary background models are constructed at the ray voxel level using the laser reflectance intensity and geometrical attributes of the point set inside each voxel across the TLS sequence. Finally, the background models are combined to detect the points on the dynamic object, and the ray voxels of the detected dynamic points are tracked for further inpainting by replacing the ray voxels with the corresponding background voxels from another scan. The resulting scene is free of dynamic occlusions. Experiments validated the effectiveness of the proposed method for indoor and outdoor TLS point clouds captured by a commercial terrestrial scanner. The proposed method achieves high precision and recall rate for dynamic occlusion detection and produces clean inpainted point clouds for further processing.

  12. Analysis of Femtosecond Laser Assisted Capsulotomy Cutting Edges and Manual Capsulorhexis Using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastiano Serrao; Giuseppe Lombardo; Giovanni Desiderio; Lucio Buratto; Domenico Schiano-Lomoriello; Marco Pileri; Marco Lombardo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS) laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM). Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n=5, and Victus, n=5). In addition, five manual CCC (n=5) were obtained using a rhexis f...

  13. Low-cost Mobile Laser Scanning and its Feasibility for Environmental Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Jaakkola, Anttoni

    2015-01-01

    Mobile laser scanning is a measurement technology that combines accurate positioning and attitude information from navigation satellites and inertial sensors with distance measurements from a laser scanner into a point cloud that represents the geometry of the environment surrounding the measurement platform. This geometrical information can be utilized in a variety of applications ranging from 3D city modelling and infrastructure maintenance to forestry and environmental monitoring. In th...

  14. Application of pressure scanning to the tuning of a high resolution dye laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressure tuning of a dye laser pumped by a nitrogen laser is described. Tuning is by a grating with an intracavity etalon or by grating, etalon and extracavity confocal filter. Pressure chambers of dry nitrogen surround the grating filter combination and the filter, respectively. Without the filter, the tuning range is more than 40 cm-1. With the filter the scan range is 4 cm-1. Results of an absorption experiment show isotope shifts of the chromium ions in ruby. (U.S.)

  15. The use of targets to improve the precision of mobile laser scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulrahman, Farsat Heeto

    2013-01-01

    A Mobile Laser Scanning System (MLSS) is a kinematic platform combining different sensors, namely: GPS, IMU and laser scanner. These sensors are integrated and synchronised to a common time base providing 3D geo-referenced data. MLSS is used in several areas; such as 3D urban and landscape modelling for visualisation in planning and road design, simulations for environmental management, and to support land use decision-making. The accuracy of 3D geo-referenced points, achieved via Mobil...

  16. Novel Image Metrics for Retrieval of the Lateral Resolution in Line Scan-Based 2D LA-ICPMS Imaging via an Experimental-Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elteren, Johannes Teun; Izmer, Andrei; Šelih, Vid Simon; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-07-19

    The quality of elemental image maps obtained via line scan-based LA-ICPMS is a function of the temporal response of the entire system, governed by the design of the system and mapping and acquisition conditions used, next to the characteristics of the sample. To quantify image degradation, ablation targets with periodic gratings are required for the construction of a modulation transfer function (MTF) and subsequent determination of the lateral resolution as a function of image noise and contrast. Since such ablation targets, with suitable matrix composition, are not readily available, computer-generated periodic gratings were virtually ablated via a computational process based on a two-step discrete-time convolution procedure using empirical/experimental input data. This experimental-modeling procedure simulates LA-ICPMS imaging based on two consecutive processes, viz., LA sampling (via ablation crater profiles [ACP]) and aerosol washout/transfer/ICPMS measurement (via single pulse responses [SPR]). By random selection of experimental SPRs from a large database for each individual pulse during the simulation, the convolution procedure simulates an accurate elemental image map of the periodic gratings with realistic (proportional or flicker) noise. This facilitates indirect retrieval of the experimental lateral resolution for the matrix targeted without performing actual line scanning on periodic gratings. PMID:27349804

  17. Retrieval of Gap Fraction and Effective Plant Area Index from Phase-Shift Terrestrial Laser Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyare Pueschel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of canopy structure is crucial for modeling eco-physiological processes. Two commonly used metrics for characterizing canopy structure are the gap fraction and the effective Plant Area Index (PAIe. Both have been successfully retrieved with terrestrial laser scanning. However, a systematic assessment of the influence of the laser scan properties on the retrieval of these metrics is still lacking. This study investigated the effects of resolution, measurement speed, and noise compression on the retrieval of gap fraction and PAIe from phase-shift FARO Photon 120 laser scans. We demonstrate that FARO’s noise compression yields gap fractions and PAIe that deviate significantly from those based on scans without noise compression and strongly overestimate Leaf Area Index (LAI estimates based on litter trap measurements. Scan resolution and measurement speed were also shown to impact gap fraction and PAIe, but this depended on leaf development phase, stand structure, and LAI calculation method. Nevertheless, PAIe estimates based on various scan parameter combinations without noise compression proved to be quite stable.

  18. Fine micro-welding of thin metal sheet by high speed laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Gillner, Arnold; Olowinsky, Alexander; Gedicke, Jens; Uno, Yoshiyuki

    2007-05-01

    Recently, since the size of component becomes smaller, then the welding of thin metal sheet has been required. Besides, the flexibility of process is important according to the accessibility especially for small components. Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology had developed the SHADOW ® welding technology, in which the high speed joining with small distortion is possible using pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The possibility of high speed and high quality welding had been reported by using single-mode fiber laser. The combination of micro beam and high speed laser scanning has the advantages for thin metal sheet welding. Therefore, the characteristics of micro-welding for thin metal sheet were investigated by high speed laser scanning, in which the welding was carried out by high speed scanner system with single-mode fiber laser and pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The proper welding region was narrow by the laser beam with a large focus diameter of 160 μm without pulse control, while a small focus diameter of 22 μm can control the welding state widely. A small focus diameter can perform the excellent welding seam from the extreme beginning without pulse control. The penetration depth can be controlled by the energy density with a small focus diameter of 22 μm at the energy densities less than 1 J/mm2. Besides, the unique periodic structure appeared at the high velocity of beam scanning with a small focus diameter. Moreover, the overlap welding of 25 μm thickness sheet can be performed regardless of small gap distance between two sheets by the laser beam with a small focus diameter of 22 μm.

  19. Topographic laser ranging and scanning principles and processing

    CERN Document Server

    Shan, Jie

    2008-01-01

    A systematic, in-depth introduction to theories and principles of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology is long overdue, as it is the most important geospatial data acquisition technology to be introduced in recent years. An advanced discussion, this text fills the void.Professionals in fields ranging from geology, geography and geoinformatics to physics, transportation, and law enforcement will benefit from this comprehensive discussion of topographic LiDAR principles, systems, data acquisition, and data processing techniques. The book covers ranging and scanning fundamentals, and broad, contemporary analysis of airborne LiDAR systems, as well as those situated on land and in space. The authors present data collection at the signal level in terms of waveforms and their properties; at the system level with regard to calibration and georeferencing; and at the data level to discuss error budget, quality control, and data organization. They devote the bulk of the book to LiDAR data processing and inform...

  20. Generation of UV laser light by stimulated Raman scattering in D2, D2/Ar and D2/He using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 355nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐贲; 岳古明; 张寅超; 胡欢陵; 周军; 胡顺星

    2003-01-01

    A pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 355nm is used to pump Raman cell filled with D2,D2/Ar and D2/He.With adequately adjusted parameters,the maximum photon conversion efficiency of the first-order Stokes light(S1,396.796nm)reaches 33.33% in D2/Ar and the stability of S1 in pure D2 is fairly high,the energy drift being less than 10% when the pump energy drifts in the range of 5%.The conversion efficiency and stability,which are functions of the composition and pressure of the Raman medium and the energy of pump laser,are investigated.The result has been used to optimize the laser transmitter system for a differential absorption lidar system to measure NO2 concentration profiles.

  1. Semiautomatic generation of three-view drawing of building using terrestrial laser scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrestrial laser scanning is an effective and efficient technique for acquisition of three dimensional data of indoor and outdoor environment in a short period of time. Precision of laser scanning data are usually within millimetres, which is satisfactory for building surveying and mapping. In recent years terrestrial laser scanning has been widely used in historical building preservation and cultural heritage documentation. Three-view drawing (plan, front and section views) is standard and important presentation of building surveying and mapping. However, generation of three-view drawing of a building using terrestrial laser scanning data often entails much human intervention. In this paper we present a methodology for semiautomatic generation of three-view drawing of a building. Three-view drawing of a building is often made on virtual planes which are perpendicular to the axis directions of the building. We define the projection plane using interactively selected laser points of the building surface and project point cloud to the determined projection plane. We project point cloud data to such a virtual plane defined by interactively selected points on the surface of building. A depth image is generated based on the distance between points and the virtual plane. The generated depth image is orthographic projection of three-dimensional laser scanning scene, which preserves the structural information of a building. Then segmentation and pattern recognition methods are exploited to extract the features (geometric primitives) from the depth image. The extracted features can be further refined to generate three-view drawing of a building. The presented methodology greatly reduces volume of data in operation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the methodology

  2. Compact multisensor laser scanning head for processing and monitoring microspot welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Moustapha; Julliard, Karin; Grossmann, Sylvain; Olivetta, Lino; Sidler, Thomas C.; Salathe, Rene-Paul; Schwob, Hans-Peter; Blom, Toon; Hoving, Willem

    2000-11-01

    In order to improve the reliability of micro-spot welding of metal parts in production such as e.g. in electron guns for TV picture tubes, real-time information about the evolution of the welding process should be available to allow on-line modification of the laser parameters. Such information can be derived from a set of sensors that are mounted on a laser-scanning head. Different sensors are used to monitor the optical fiber output power to determine the evolution of temperature during the spot welding process, to measure plasma emission and back-reflected laser light. A vision channel and a CCD camera are used to control the position of the laser spot on the parts to be processed. The compact scanning head is composed of a tip/tilt laser scanner, a collimating lens and a focusing lens. The scanner is fast steering, with a bandwidth of 700Hz, and can tilt by +/- 3.5 degree(s) with a repeatability better than 50(mu) rad. The settling time for maximum deflection is less that 10ms. The scanning lens is a newly developed focusing lens designed to replace commercial cumbersome scanning lenses such as F-(theta) lenses, which have large volume, weight and price. This lens is based on the well-known Cooke triplet design and guarantees a constant shape of the spot all over the scan surface and is specially well suited for high power beam delivery. The scan field achieved by the system is limited to 25mm x 25mm. The laser used for this application is a pulsed Nd:YAG laser delivered by an optical fiber to the optical head. However, the system can be adapted to different types of lasers. Laser micro-spot welding on copper substrate has been performed in the frame of the Brite-Euram project MAIL. Smaller tolerances (a factor of 2 less) on the spot diameters were obtained in the case of a sensor controlled operation compared to the case where sensor control is not used.

  3. Aesthetic applications of scanning CO2 laser surgery: hype or state-of-the-art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Elliot

    1995-05-01

    The clinical application of the CO2 laser for skin surgery has traditionally been plagued with a number of inherent disadvantages. These problems mainly consist of variable depth of penetration, dermal charring with thermal build-up, and a slow surgical technique. This has severely limited the success and usefulness of the laser in aesthetic plastic surgery. An optomechanical flashscanner unit-`SwiftlaseTM', was coupled to a continuous-wave CO2 laser and used during numerous plastic surgical procedures--both reconstructive and purely aesthetic. The instrument uses two rotating mirrors to cause a vaporizing laser beam to scan across target biological tissue in a somewhat sinusoidal array, thus modulating the CO2 laser. Another flashscanner unit, `SilktouchTM' was also utilized. The scanning pattern of the SilktouchTM yields a whirling spiral across the target and is typically used in a pulsed mode. Areas that were treated in this study included the face, trunk and extremities. Treatment mainly consisted of management of facial wrinkles and scars, benign lesions, and rhinophyma. Histology confirmed depth of dermal penetration as a function of fluence. There were no wound healing complications. Healing occurred in a predictable manner dependent on depth of laser penetration. Conservative, primarily ablative flashscanning CO2 laser surgery has usefulness for treatment of patients in aesthetic surgery and offers major advantages.

  4. Analysis of somitogenesis using multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Mary E.; Longmuir, Kenneth J.; Fraser, Scott E.

    2001-04-01

    In order to study complex cellular interactions in the developing somite and nervous system, we have been refining techniques for labeling and imaging individual cells within the living vertebrate embryo. Most recently, we have been using MPLSM to analyze cellular behaviors, such as cell migration, filopodial extension, cell process collapse, and neuron pathfinding using time-lapse microscopy in 3-dimensions (3-d). To enhance the efficiency of two-photon excitation in these samples, we have been using a Zeiss LSM 510 NLO fiber delivery system with a Grating Dispersion Compensator (GDC). This system not only offers the convenience of fiber delivery for coupling our Ti:Sapphire laser to the microscope, but also affords us precise control over the pulsewidth of the mode- locked beam. In addition, we have developed a novel peptide/non-cationic lipid gene delivery system to introduce GFP plasmid into somite cells. This approach has allowed us to generate detailed 3-d images of somite cell morphologies at various stages of somite development in a way that best preserves the vitality of the cells being imaged.

  5. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  6. Initial Tests and Accuracy Assesment of a Compact Mobile Laser Scanning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julge, K.; Ellmann, A.; Vajakas, T.; Kolka, R.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) is a faster and cost-effective alternative to static laser scanning, even though there is a slight trade-off in accuracy. This contribution describes a compact mobile laser scanning system mounted on a vehicle. The technical parameters of the used system components, i.e. a small LIDAR sensor Velodyne VLP-16 and a dual antenna GNSS/INS system Advanced Navigation Spatial Dual, are reviewed, along with the integration of these components for spatial data acquisition. Calculation principles of 3D coordinates from the real-time data of all the involved sensors are discussed. The field tests were carried out in a controlled environment of a parking lot and at different velocities. Experiments were carried out to test the ability of the GNSS/INS system to cope with difficult conditions, e.g. sudden movements due to cornering or swerving. The accuracy of the resulting MLS point cloud is evaluated with respect to high-accuracy static terrestrial laser scanning data. Problems regarding combining LIDAR, GNSS and INS sensors are outlined, as well as the initial accuracy assessments. Initial tests revealed errors related to insufficient quality of inertial data and a need for the trajectory post-processing calculations. Although this study was carried out while the system was mounted on a car, there is potential for operating the system on an unmanned aerial vehicle, all-terrain vehicle or in a backpack mode due to its relatively compact size.

  7. Imaging inclusion complex formation in starch granules using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manca, Marianna; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Loos, Katja; Loi, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    The tendency of amylose to form inclusion complexes with guest molecules has been an object of wide interest due to its fundamental role in food processing. Here we investigated the features of starch granules from several botanical sources using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and uncover

  8. Nondestructive estimates of above-ground biomass using terrestrial laser scanning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calders, K.; Newnham, G.; Burt, A.; Murphy, S.; Raumonen, P.; Herold, M.; Culvenor, D.; Avitabile, V.; Disney, M.; Armston, J.; Kaasalainen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Allometric equations are currently used to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) based on the indirect relationship with tree parameters. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can measure the canopy structure in 3D with high detail. In this study, we develop an approach to estimate AGB from TLS data, which

  9. Towards automated characterization of horizontal and vertical forest structure using multi-seasonal airborne laser scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Leiterer, Reik; Schaepman, Michael E; Morsdorf, Felix

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to characterize the vertical layering of forests in space and time based on vertical echo distributions from airborne laser scanning. We further demonstrate successful scaling from local to regional areas, including assessment of transferability, robustness and operational use of the method.

  10. Dynamic experimentation on the confocal laser scanning microscope : application to soft-solid, composite food materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plucknett, K.P.; Pomfret, S.J.; Normand, V.; Ferdinando, D.; Veerman, C.; Frith, W.J.; Norton, I.T.

    2001-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is used to follow the dynamic structural evolution of several phase-separated mixed biopolymer gel composites. Two protein/polysaccharide mixed gel systems were examined: gelatin/maltodextrin and gelatin/agarose. These materials exhibit 'emulsion-like' struc

  11. Synchronous cavity mode and feedback wavelength scanning in dye laser oscillators with gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicholl, P; Metcalf, H J

    1985-09-01

    A simple result of scalar diffraction theory is used to derive the round trip phase accrual of a plane wave in dye laser oscillators containing gratings. This is used to determine configurations where the standing wave condition is satisfied at the feedback wavelength throughout an angle scan. We find that at least one such exactly synchronous configuration always exists regardless of oscillator type.

  12. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of apoptosis in organogenesis-stage mouse embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with a vital stain has been used to study apoptosis in organogenesis-stage mouse embryos. In order to achieve optical sectioning through embryos, it was necessary to use low power objectives and to prepare the sample appropriately. Mous...

  13. Visualisation of biopolymer mixtures using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) and covalent labelling techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van de F.; Weinbreck, F.; Edelman, M.W.; Linden, van der E.; Tromp, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) has been used to study the behaviour of mixtures of proteins, gelatine, whey proteins and ß-lactoglobulin, and polysaccharides, dextran, gellan gum, carrageenan, gum Arabic, and starch. CSLM proved to be a suitable technique to visualise the microstructure o

  14. a Study about Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Reconstruction of Precast Concrete to Support Qlassic Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, M. A.; Idris, K. M.; Majid, Z.; Ariff, M. F. M.; Yusoff, A. R.; Luh, L. C.; Abbas, M. A.; Chong, A. K.

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, terrestrial laser scanning shows the potential to improve construction productivity by measuring the objects changes using real-time applications. This paper presents the process of implementation of an efficient framework for precast concrete using terrestrial laser scanning that enables contractors to acquire accurate data and support Quality Assessment System in Construction (QLASSIC). Leica Scanstation C10, black/white target, Autodesk Revit and Cyclone software were used in this study. The results were compared with the dimensional of based model precast concrete given by the company as a reference with the AutoDesk Revit model from the terrestrial laser scanning data and conventional method (measuring tape). To support QLASSIC, the tolerance dimensions of cast in-situ & precast elements is +10mm / -5mm. The results showed that the root mean square error for a Revit model is 2.972mm while using measuring tape is 13.687mm. The accuracy showed that terrestrial laser scanning has an advantage in construction jobs to support QLASSIC.

  15. A confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope for retinal vessel oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lompado, Arthur

    Measurement of a person's blood oxygen saturation has long been recognized as a useful metric for the characterizing ailments ranging from chronic respiratory disorders to acute, potentially life threatening, traumas. The ubiquity of oxygen saturation monitors in the medical field, including portable pulse oximeters and laboratory based CO-oximeters, is a testament to the importance of this technique. The work presented here documents the design, fabrication and development of a unique type of oxygen saturation monitor, a confocal scanning retinal vessel oximeter, with the potential to expand the usefulness of the present devices. A large part of the knowledge base required to construct the instrument comes from the consideration of light scattering by red blood cells in a blood vessel. Therefore, a substantial portion of this work is devoted to the process of light scattering by whole human blood and its effects on the development of a more accurate oximeter. This light scattering effect has been both measured and modeled stochastically to determine its contribution to the measured oximeter signal. It is shown that, although well accepted in the published literature, the model only correlates marginally to the measurements due to inherent limitations imposed by the model assumptions. Nonetheless, enough material has been learned about the scattering to allow development of a mathematical model for the interaction of light with blood in a vessel, and this knowledge has been applied to the data reduction of the present oximeter. This data reduction technique has been tested in a controlled experiment employing a model eye with a blood filled mock retinal vessel. It will be shown that the presently developed technique exhibited strong correlation between the known blood oxygen saturation and that calculated by the new system.

  16. Standalone Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Efficiently Capturing Aec Buildings for As-Built Bim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassier, M.; Vergauwen, M.; Van Genechten, B.

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing popularity of as-built building models for the architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) industry, the demand for highly accurate and dense point cloud data is rising. The current data acquisition methods are labour intensive and time consuming. In order to compete with indoor mobile mapping systems (IMMS), surveyors are now opting to use terrestrial laser scanning as a standalone solution. However, there is uncertainty about the accuracy of this approach. The emphasis of this paper is to determine the scope for which terrestrial laser scanners can be used without additional control. Multiple real life test cases are evaluated in order to identify the boundaries of this technique. Furthermore, this research presents a mathematical prediction model that provides an indication of the data accuracy given the project dimensions. This will enable surveyors to make informed discussions about the employability of terrestrial laser scanning without additional control in mid to large-scale projects.

  17. Estimation of forest resources from a country wide laser scanning survey and national forest inventory data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Schumacher, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    for deciduous forest and negatively biased for coniferous forest. Species type specific (coniferous, deciduous, or mixed forest) models reduced root mean squared error by 3–12% and removed the bias. In application, model predictions will be improved by stratification into deciduous and coniferous forest using e......Airborne laser scanning may provide a means for assessing local forest biomass resources. In this study, national forest inventory (NFI) data was used as reference data for modeling forest basal area, volume, aboveground biomass, and total biomass from laser scanning data obtained in a countrywide...... scanning survey. Data covered a wide range of forest ecotypes, stand treatments, tree species, and tree species mixtures. The four forest characteristics were modeled using nonlinear regression and generalized method-of-moments estimation to avoid biased and inefficient estimates. The coefficient...

  18. Femtosecond laser surface ablation of polymethyl-methacrylate with position control through z-scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spatial resolution of laser micromachining of polymers can be improved with the use of femtosecond laser pulses. Due to the short interaction time, thermal effects are significantly reduced. Additionally, the non-linear character of the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with transparent materials allows the modification inside their bulk also. However, this creates the challenge to accurately focus the laser beam in the surface when only surface ablation is required. Thus, this work presents a study of the laser ablation of a transparent polymer at different pulse energies and focusing positions controlled through z-scan transmittance measurements. Experiments were performed using an Yb:KYW laser with 450 fs pulses and 1027 nm wavelength. Morphological analysis of the polymer surface after irradiation was performed using scanning electron microscopy. Similar ablation craters were found for a range of sample positions around the beam waist. However, focused ion beam cross-sections of the craters unveil significant inner modifications under most of the focusing conditions leading to surface ablation. Hence, surface ablation without damaging the bulk material only occurs at critical positions where the beam waist is located slightly outside the sample. In situ monitoring of the sample position can be made through transmittance measurements. (paper)

  19. The Calibration Model and Simulation Analysis of Circular Scanning Airborne Laser Bathymetry System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHEN Erhua

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To improve the positioning accuracy of circular scanning airborne laser bathymetry system, a calibration method is presented in this paper. When the laser points are collected by the bathymetry system on the level area, they should be on the same plane. However, they are not coplanar because of systematic error and random error. So we try to fit the points to a plane, which may help to adjust the errors and then correct the point location.Firstly, the circular scanning airborne laser bathymetry positioning model is derived in the simple mode. The intersection of laser line and sea surface is simulated depending on the mathematical principles of line and plane intersection. Combined with the direction vector of laser line in the water got by the refraction principle, the sea floor plane mathematical equation is used to compute the location of the laser points. Then, the parameter weighted least squares adjustment model is derived with the prior variance introduced, which lays the foundation for the following computing of calibration model. Finally, the calibration adjustment mathematic model and the detailed computing process are derived. The simulation computing and analysis for the calibration process is presented, and some meaningful conclusions for the calibration are achieved.

  20. 3D change detection at street level using mobile laser scanning point clouds and terrestrial images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Rongjun; Gruen, Armin

    2014-04-01

    Automatic change detection and geo-database updating in the urban environment are difficult tasks. There has been much research on detecting changes with satellite and aerial images, but studies have rarely been performed at the street level, which is complex in its 3D geometry. Contemporary geo-databases include 3D street-level objects, which demand frequent data updating. Terrestrial images provides rich texture information for change detection, but the change detection with terrestrial images from different epochs sometimes faces problems with illumination changes, perspective distortions and unreliable 3D geometry caused by the lack of performance of automatic image matchers, while mobile laser scanning (MLS) data acquired from different epochs provides accurate 3D geometry for change detection, but is very expensive for periodical acquisition. This paper proposes a new method for change detection at street level by using combination of MLS point clouds and terrestrial images: the accurate but expensive MLS data acquired from an early epoch serves as the reference, and terrestrial images or photogrammetric images captured from an image-based mobile mapping system (MMS) at a later epoch are used to detect the geometrical changes between different epochs. The method will automatically mark the possible changes in each view, which provides a cost-efficient method for frequent data updating. The methodology is divided into several steps. In the first step, the point clouds are recorded by the MLS system and processed, with data cleaned and classified by semi-automatic means. In the second step, terrestrial images or mobile mapping images at a later epoch are taken and registered to the point cloud, and then point clouds are projected on each image by a weighted window based z-buffering method for view dependent 2D triangulation. In the next step, stereo pairs of the terrestrial images are rectified and re-projected between each other to check the geometrical

  1. Method to quantify accuracy of position feedback signals of a three-dimensional two-photon laser-scanning microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Michael; Kirmse, Knut; Witte, Otto W; Haueisen, Jens; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-10-01

    Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy enables to record neuronal network activity in three-dimensional space while maintaining single-cellular resolution. One of the proposed approaches combines galvanometric x-y scanning with piezo-driven objective movements and employs hardware feedback signals for position monitoring. However, readily applicable methods to quantify the accuracy of those feedback signals are currently lacking. Here we provide techniques based on contact-free laser reflection and laser triangulation for the quantification of positioning accuracy of each spatial axis. We found that the lateral feedback signals are sufficiently accurate (defined as laser scanning microscopes. PMID:26504620

  2. Scan Profiles Based Method for Segmentation and Extraction of Planar Objects in Mobile Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang Long; Belton, David; Helmholz, Petra

    2016-06-01

    The demand for accurate spatial data has been increasing rapidly in recent years. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems have become a mainstream technology for measuring 3D spatial data. In a MLS point cloud, the point clouds densities of captured point clouds of interest features can vary: they can be sparse and heterogeneous or they can be dense. This is caused by several factors such as the speed of the carrier vehicle and the specifications of the laser scanner(s). The MLS point cloud data needs to be processed to get meaningful information e.g. segmentation can be used to find meaningful features (planes, corners etc.) that can be used as the inputs for many processing steps (e.g. registration, modelling) that are more difficult when just using the point cloud. Planar features are dominating in manmade environments and they are widely used in point clouds registration and calibration processes. There are several approaches for segmentation and extraction of planar objects available, however the proposed methods do not focus on properly segment MLS point clouds automatically considering the different point densities. This research presents the extension of the segmentation method based on planarity of the features. This proposed method was verified using both simulated and real MLS point cloud datasets. The results show that planar objects in MLS point clouds can be properly segmented and extracted by the proposed segmentation method.

  3. SCAN PROFILES BASED METHOD FOR SEGMENTATION AND EXTRACTION OF PLANAR OBJECTS IN MOBILE LASER SCANNING POINT CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The demand for accurate spatial data has been increasing rapidly in recent years. Mobile laser scanning (MLS systems have become a mainstream technology for measuring 3D spatial data. In a MLS point cloud, the point clouds densities of captured point clouds of interest features can vary: they can be sparse and heterogeneous or they can be dense. This is caused by several factors such as the speed of the carrier vehicle and the specifications of the laser scanner(s. The MLS point cloud data needs to be processed to get meaningful information e.g. segmentation can be used to find meaningful features (planes, corners etc. that can be used as the inputs for many processing steps (e.g. registration, modelling that are more difficult when just using the point cloud. Planar features are dominating in manmade environments and they are widely used in point clouds registration and calibration processes. There are several approaches for segmentation and extraction of planar objects available, however the proposed methods do not focus on properly segment MLS point clouds automatically considering the different point densities. This research presents the extension of the segmentation method based on planarity of the features. This proposed method was verified using both simulated and real MLS point cloud datasets. The results show that planar objects in MLS point clouds can be properly segmented and extracted by the proposed segmentation method.

  4. Morphology and deflection properties of bat wing sensory hairs: scanning electron microscopy, laser scanning vibrometry, and mechanics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterbing-D'Angelo, S J; Liu, H; Yu, M; Moss, C F

    2016-01-01

    Bat wings are highly adaptive airfoils that enable demanding flight maneuvers, which are performed with astonishing robustness under turbulent conditions, and stability at slow flight velocities. The bat wing is sparsely covered with microscopically small, sensory hairs that are associated with tactile receptors. In a previous study we demonstrated that bat wing hairs are involved in sensing airflow for improved flight maneuverability. Here, we report physical measurements of these hairs and their distribution on the wing surface of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, based on scanning electron microscopy analyses. The wing hairs are strongly tapered, and are found on both the dorsal and ventral wing surfaces. Laser scanning vibrometry tests of 43 hairs from twelve locations across the wing of the big brown bat revealed that their natural frequencies inversely correlate with length and range from 3.7 to 84.5 kHz. Young's modulus of the average wing hair was calculated at 4.4 GPa, which is comparable with rat whiskers or arthropod airflow-sensing hairs. PMID:27545727

  5. Correlative Analysis of Immunoreactivity in Confocal Laser-Scanning Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Focused Ion Beam Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro eSonomura

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional reconstruction of ultrastructure of rat brain with minimal effort has recently been realized by scanning electron microscopy combined with focused ion beam milling (FIB-SEM. Because application of immunohistochemical staining to electron microscopy has a great advantage in that molecules of interest are specifically localized in ultrastructures, we here tried to apply immunocytochemistry to FIB-SEM and correlate immunoreactivity in confocal laser-scanning microcopy (CF-LSM with that in FIB-SEM. The dendrites of medium-sized spiny neurons in rat neostriatum were visualized with a recombinant viral vector, which labeled the infected neurons with membrane-targeted GFP in a Golgi stain-like fashion, and thalamostriatal afferent terminals were immunolabeled with Cy5 fluorescence for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2. After detecting the sites of terminals apposed to the dendrites in CF-LSM, GFP and VGluT2 immunoreactivities were further developed for electron microscopy by the immunogold/silver enhancement and immunoperoxidase/diaminobenzidine (DAB methods, respectively. In the contrast-inverted FIB-SEM images, silver precipitation and DAB deposits were observed as fine dark grains and diffuse dense profiles, respectively, indicating that these immunoreactivities were easily recognizable as in the images of transmission electron microscopy. In the sites of interest, some appositions were revealed to display synaptic specialization of asymmetric type. The present method is thus useful in the three-dimensional analysis of immunocytochemically differentiated synaptic connection in the central neural circuit.

  6. Multiparameter Correction Intensity of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data as AN Input for Rock Surface Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleček, V.; Kubíček, P.

    2016-06-01

    A large increase in the creation of 3D models of objects all around us can be observed in the last few years; thanks to the help of the rapid development of new advanced technologies for spatial data collection and robust software tools. A new commercially available airborne laser scanning data in Czech Republic, provided in the form of the Digital terrain model of the fifth generation as irregularly spaced points, enable locating the majority of rock formations. However, the positional and height accuracy of this type of landforms can reach huge errors in some cases. Therefore, it is necessary to start mapping using terrestrial laser scanning with the possibility of adding a point cloud data derived from ground or aerial photogrammetry. Intensity correction and noise removal is usually based on the distance between measured objects and the laser scanner, the incidence angle of the beam or on the radiometric and topographic characteristics of measured objects. This contribution represents the major undesirable effects that affect the quality of acquisition and processing of laser scanning data. Likewise there is introduced solutions to some of these problems.

  7. Roof Modelling Potential of Unmanned Air Vehicle Point Clouds with Respect to Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakis, Serkan; Gunes Sefercik, Umut; Atalay, Can

    2016-07-01

    In parallel with the improvement of laser scanning technologies, dense point clouds which provide the detailed description of terrain and non-terrain objects became indispensable for remotely-sensed data users. Owing to the large demand, besides laser scanning, point clouds were started to achieve using photogrammetric images. Unmanned air vehicle (UAV) images are one of the most preferred data for creating dense point clouds by the advantage of low cost, rapid and periodically gain. In this study, we tried to assess the roof modelling potential of UAV point clouds by comparing three dimensional (3D) roof models produced from UAV and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds. In the study, very popular low cost action camera SJ4000 and Faro Laser Scanner Focus3D X 330 were used to provide point clouds and the roof of Bulent Ecevit University Civil Aviation Academy building was utilized. For the validation of horizontal and vertical geolocation accuracies, standard deviation was used as the main indicator. The visual results demonstrated that UAV roof model is almost coherent with TLS roof model after the filtering-based refinement on noisy pixels and systematic bias correction. Moreover, the horizontal geolocation accuracy is approx. |5cm| both in X and Y directions and bias corrected vertical geolocation accuracy is approx. 17cm for zero roof slope.

  8. Wafer-level vacuum packaged resonant micro-scanning mirrors for compact laser projection displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ulrich; Oldsen, Marten; Quenzer, Hans-Joachim; Janes, Joachim; Heller, Martin; Weiss, Manfred; Fakas, Georgios; Ratzmann, Lars; Marchetti, Eleonora; D'Ascoli, Francesco; Melani, Massimiliano; Bacciarelli, Luca; Volpi, Emilio; Battini, Francesco; Mostardini, Luca; Sechi, Francesco; De Marinis, Marco; Wagner, Bernd

    2008-02-01

    Scanning laser projection using resonant actuated MEMS scanning mirrors is expected to overcome the current limitation of small display size of mobile devices like cell phones, digital cameras and PDAs. Recent progress in the development of compact modulated RGB laser sources enables to set up very small laser projection systems that become attractive not only for consumer products but also for automotive applications like head-up and dash-board displays. Within the last years continuous progress was made in increasing MEMS scanner performance. However, only little is reported on how mass-produceability of these devices and stable functionality even under harsh environmental conditions can be guaranteed. Automotive application requires stable MEMS scanner operation over a wide temperature range from -40° to +85°Celsius. Therefore, hermetic packaging of electrostatically actuated MEMS scanning mirrors becomes essential to protect the sensitive device against particle contamination and condensing moisture. This paper reports on design, fabrication and test of a resonant actuated two-dimensional micro scanning mirror that is hermetically sealed on wafer level. With resonant frequencies of 30kHz and 1kHz, an achievable Theta-D-product of 13mm.deg and low dynamic deformation package surface can be seperated from the projection field by permanent inclination of the micromirror.

  9. Inspection of float glass using a novel retroreflective laser scanning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jonathan D.

    1997-07-01

    Since 1988, Image Automation has marketed a float glass inspection system using a novel retro-reflective laser scanning system. The (patented) instrument scans a laser beam by use of a polygon through the glass onto a retro-reflective screen, and collects the retro-reflected light off the polygon, such that a stationary image of the moving spot on the screen is produced. The spot image is then analyzed for optical effects introduced by defects within the glass, which typically distort and attenuate the scanned laser beam, by use of suitable detectors. The inspection system processing provides output of defect size, shape and severity, to the factory network for use in rejection or sorting of glass plates to the end customer. This paper briefly describes the principles of operation, the system architecture, and limitations to sensitivity and measurement repeatability. New instruments based on the retro-reflective scanning method have recently been developed. The principles and implementation are described. They include: (1) Simultaneous detection of defects within the glass and defects in a mirror coating on the glass surface using polarized light. (2) A novel distortion detector for very dark glass. (3) Measurement of optical quality (flatness/refractive homogeneity) of the glass using a position sensitive detector.

  10. AUTOMATIC RECOGNITION OF PIPING SYSTEM FROM LARGE-SCALE TERRESTRIAL LASER SCAN DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kawashima

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, changes in plant equipment have been becoming more frequent because of the short lifetime of the products, and constructing 3D shape models of existing plants (as-built models from large-scale laser scanned data is expected to make their rebuilding processes more efficient. However, the laser scanned data of the existing plant has massive points, captures tangled objects and includes a large amount of noises, so that the manual reconstruction of a 3D model is very time-consuming and costs a lot. Piping systems especially, account for the greatest proportion of plant equipment. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to propose an algorithm which can automatically recognize a piping system from terrestrial laser scan data of the plant equipment. The straight portion of pipes, connecting parts and connection relationship of the piping system can be recognized in this algorithm. Eigenvalue analysis of the point clouds and of the normal vectors allows for the recognition. Using only point clouds, the recognition algorithm can be applied to registered point clouds and can be performed in a fully automatic way. The preliminary results of the recognition for large-scale scanned data from an oil rig plant have shown the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  11. Reduction of the pulse duration of the ultrafast laser pulses of the Two-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (2PLSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshak Ali

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We provide an update of our two-photon laser scanning microscope by compressing or reducing the broadening of the pulse width of ultrafast laser pulses for dispersion precompensation, to enable the pulses to penetrate deeply inside the sample. Findings The broadening comes as the pulses pass through the optical elements. We enhanced and modified the quality and the sharpness of images by enhancing the resolution using special polarizer namely Glan Laser polarizer GL10. This polarizer consists of two prisms separated by air space. This air separation between the two prisms uses to delay the red wavelength when the light leaves the first prism to the air then to second prism. We note a considerable enhancing with using the GL polarizer, and we can see the details of the leaf structure in early stages when we trying to get focus through z-stacks of images in comparison to exactly the same measurements without using GL polarizer. Hence, with this modification we able to reduce the time of exposure the sample to the laser radiation thereby we will reduce the probability of photobleaching and phototoxicity. When the pulse width reduced, the average power of the laser pulses maintained at a constant level. Significant enhancement is found between the two kinds of images of the Two-Photon Excitation Fluorescence (TPEF. Conclusion In summary reduction the laser pulse width allowed to collect more diffraction orders which will used to form the images. The more diffraction orders the higher resolution images.

  12. Highly reproducible laser beam scanning device for an internal source laser desorption microprobe Fourier transform mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, mass spectrometry has relied on manipulating the sample target to provide scanning capabilities for laser desorption microprobes. This has been problematic for an internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LD-FTMS) because of the high magnetic field (7 Tesla) and geometric constraints of the superconducting magnet bore. To overcome these limitations, we have implemented a unique external laser scanning mechanism for an internal source LD-FTMS. This mechanism provides adjustable resolution enhancement so that the spatial resolution at the target is not limited to that of the stepper motors at the light source (˜5 μm/step). The spatial resolution is now limited by the practical optical diffraction limit of the final focusing lens. The scanning mechanism employs a virtual source that is wavelength independent up to the final focusing lens, which can be controlled remotely to account for focal length dependence on wavelength. A binary index provides an automatic alignment feature. The virtual source is located ˜9 ft from the sample; therefore, it is completely outside of the vacuum system and beyond the 50 G line of the fringing magnetic field. To eliminate reproducibility problems associated with vacuum pump vibrations, we have taken advantage of the magnetic field inherent to the FTMS to utilize Lenz's law for vibrational dampening. The LD-FTMS microprobe has exceptional reproducibility, which enables successive mapping sequences for depth-profiling studies.

  13. An automated method to register airborne and terrestrial laser scanning point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bisheng; Zang, Yufu; Dong, Zhen; Huang, Ronggang

    2015-11-01

    Laser scanning techniques have been widely used to capture three-dimensional (3D) point clouds of various scenes (e.g. urban scenes). In particular, airborne laser scanning (ALS) and mobile laser scanning (MLS), terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) are effective to capture point clouds from top or side view. Registering the complimentary point clouds captured by ALS and MLS/TLS provides an aligned data source for many purposes (e.g. 3D reconstruction). Among these MLS can be directly geo-referenced to ALS according to the equipped position systems. For small scanning areas or dense building areas, TLS is used instead of MLS. However, registering ALS and TLS datasets suffers from poor automation and robustness because of few overlapping areas and sparse corresponding geometric features. A robust method for the registration of TLS and ALS datasets is proposed, which has four key steps. (1) extracts building outlines from TLS and ALS data sets independently; (2) obtains the potential matching pairs of outlines according to the geometric constraints between building outlines; (3) constructs the Laplacian matrices of the extracted building outlines to model the topology between the geometric features; (4) calculates the correlation coefficients of the extracted geometric features by decomposing the Laplacian matrices into the spectral space, providing correspondences between the extracted features for coarse registration. Finally, the multi-line adjustment strategy is employed for the fine registration. The robustness and accuracy of the proposed method are verified using field data, demonstrating a reliable and stable solution to accurately register ALS and TLS datasets.

  14. Multi-frequency AOM for multi-beam laser scanning exposure system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinada, Hidetoshi

    2016-08-01

    Digital printing systems recorded on films or computer to plates (CTPs) have been required to improve their productivity and image quality. Under the circumstance, a printing technology of the multi-beam laser scanning for the drum capstan system, which is almost the same as optics configuration as the flat bed system, was developed using a newly developed multi-frequency acousto-optic modulator (AOM) as a key device instead of ultra-fast scanning devices toward a main scan direction. The multi-frequency AOM was developed with phased array-type transducers, achieving a wider bandwidth of over 160 MHz. The design consisted of a simultaneous three beams generation with interlace scan to avoid the beat effect by adjacent Doppler-shifted beams, which consequently attained the fastest recording speed of 5.0 mm/s compared with 2.0-3.0 mm/s of existing systems in those days. Furthermore, a couple of critical parameters of the multi-frequency AOM are studied, for example, a treatment of third-order intermodulation and also beat effect in connection with photosensitive media. As a result, the necessity of interlaces scanning to obtain good image quality without beat effect and also to allow a lower laser power to apply is proposed.

  15. Analysis of the geometry of the cultural heritage object from the terrestrial laser scanning data

    OpenAIRE

    Gabršček, Tjaša

    2015-01-01

    On the selected case (the belfry in village Črni kal, Slovenia) the analysis of data about terrestial laser scanning with a view to graphically and numerically determined nonverticality and other possible deformations of the belfry is carried out. Data acquired with a terrestrial laser scanner has been provided by 3D ATA Ltd. Data analysis was conducted with a program Geomagic, and a program AutoCAD has been used to draw horizontal planes. The point cloud was imported into the pro...

  16. Brief communication "Application of mobile laser scanning in snow cover profiling"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kaasalainen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a snowmobile-based mobile mapping system and its first application to snow cover roughness and change detection measurement. The ROAMER mobile mapping system, constructed at the Finnish Geodetic Institute, consists of the positioning and navigating systems, a terrestrial laser scanner, and the carrying platform (a snowmobile sledge in this application. We demonstrate the applicability of the instrument to snow cover roughness profiling and change detection by presenting preliminary results from a mobile laser scanning (MLS campaign. The results show the potential of MLS for fast and efficient snow profiling from large areas in a millimetre scale.

  17. Generation of 3D Virtual Geographic Environment Based on Laser Scanning Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jie; CHEN Xiaoyong; FumioYamazaki

    2003-01-01

    This paper demonstrates an experiment on the generation of 3D virtual geographic environment on the basis of experimental flight laser scanning data by a set of algorithms and methods that were developed to automatically interpret range images for extracting geo-spatial features and then to reconstruct geo-objects. The algorithms and methods for the interpretation and modeling of laser scanner data include triangulated-irregular-network (TIN)-based range image interpolation ; mathematical-morphology(MM)-based range image filtering,feature extraction and range image segmentation, feature generalization and optimization, 3D objects reconstruction and modeling; computergraphics (CG)-based visualization and animation of geographic virtual reality environment.

  18. Capturing Detailed Outcrop Geology Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning (Lidar) and Other Digital Technologies: Current Status and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. R.; McCaffrey, K. J.

    2007-12-01

    Geospatial data acquisition at global to regional scales has wide acceptance, and tools such as Google Earth have been instrumental in extending Earth visualisation far beyond specialist users of GIS and satellite imagery. At the outcrop scale, the number of industry and academic geoscientists adopting digital technologies to gather field data is steadily increasing. When integrated with traditional field skills, these technologies offer two fundamental advantages: firstly, outcrop geology can now be recorded with very high detail and precision; secondly, observations and data are precisely georeferenced, which is a prerequisite for 2D and 3D spatial analysis. Digital outcrop data are being used in a wide variety of ways, many of which can be characterised in terms of two end members. Firstly, using methods such as terrestrial laser scanning and digital photogrammetry, it is possible to create highly realistic virtual copies of the outcrop. These virtual outcrop models can be used to great effect to enhance teaching, to provide virtual field-trips (most effective in conjunction with a real visit to the outcrop), to promote group discussion and interpretation, or as part of Health & Safety briefing. Secondly, digital outcrop data is also being used to derive quantitative attribute measurements from specific geological features. Here the emphasis is not on capturing a photo-realistic copy of the outcrop, but rather on gathering the relevant types of data at the most appropriate resolution and geospatial precision for the type of analysis undertaken. In addition to laser scanning, useful technologies include dGPS, laser range-finding, and Total Station surveying. Examples of this kind of quantitative analysis include fault curvature, roughness, branch-line geometry, spatial variation in fault displacement, fracture spacing and 3D spatial clustering, fold curvature, sedimentary channel morphology, lateral and vertical facies variations, and geomorphological analysis of

  19. Research and Development of High-speed Laser Scanning Galvanometer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Ching Ho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study developed and controlled laser scanning mechanism and circuit design, in order to reduce the vibratory magnitude resulted from high-speed operation. The principle of mechanism design is that the output end mirror can swing within ± 3° when the laser scanning mechanism is in operation, the accuracy value is ± 0.2°. The static simulation and dynamic measurement were carried out for mutual validation. The vibration generated in the operation of machine causes dynamic unbalance, influencing the stability of machine. In order to overcome and improve the dynamic unbalance generated when the mechanism is in motion, different solutions were proposed, such as changing the output end mass, to add elastic material in or to change constant speed control of input end motor to variable speed control.

  20. Scanning laser ultrasound and wavenumber spectroscopy for in-process inspection of additively manufactured parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskelo, EliseAnne C.; Flynn, Eric B.

    2016-04-01

    We present a new in-process laser ultrasound inspection technique for additive manufacturing. Ultrasonic energy was introduced to the part by attaching an ultrasonic transducer to the printer build-plate and driving it with a single-tone, harmonic excitation. The full-field response of the part was measured using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer after each printer layer. For each scan, we analyzed both the local amplitudes and wavenumbers of the response in order to identify defects. For this study, we focused on the detection of delamination between layers in a fused deposition modeling process. Foreign object damage, localized heating damage, and the resulting delamination between layers were detected in using the technique as indicated by increased amplitude and wavenumber responses within the damaged area.

  1. Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning for Geometry Documentation and Construction Management of Highway Tunnels during Excavation

    OpenAIRE

    Gikas, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the...

  2. WIDE-AREA MAPPING OF FOREST WITH NATIONAL AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING AND FIELD INVENTORY DATASETS

    OpenAIRE

    Monnet, J.-M.; C. Ginzler; Clivaz, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) remote sensing data are now available for entire countries such as Switzerland. Methods for the estimation of forest parameters from ALS have been intensively investigated in the past years. However, the implementation of a forest mapping workflow based on available data at a regional level still remains challenging. A case study was implemented in the Canton of Valais (Switzerland). The national ALS dataset and field data of the Swiss National Forest Inventory w...

  3. Nanoparticle flow velocimetry with image phase correlation for confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Brian H.; Giarra, Matthew; Yang, Haisheng; Main, Russell; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2016-10-01

    We present a new particle image correlation technique for resolving nanoparticle flow velocity using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The two primary issues that complicate nanoparticle scanning laser image correlation (SLIC)-based velocimetry are (1) the use of diffusion-dominated nanoparticles as flow tracers, which introduce a random decorrelating error into the velocity estimate, and (2) the effects of the scanning laser image acquisition, which introduces a bias error. To date, no study has quantified these errors or demonstrated a means to deal with them in SLIC velocimetry. In this work, we build upon the robust phase correlation (RPC) and existing methods of SLIC to quantify and mitigate these errors. First, we implement an ensemble RPC instead of using an ensemble standard cross-correlation, and develop a SLIC optimal filter that maximizes the correlation strength in order to reliably and accurately detect the correlation peak representing the most probable average displacement of the nanoparticles. Secondly, we developed an analytical model of the SLIC measurement bias error due to image scanning of diffusion-dominated tracer particles. We show that the bias error depends only on the ratio of the mean velocity of the tracer particles to that of the laser scanner and we use this model to correct the induced errors. We validated our technique using synthetic images and experimentally obtained SLIC images of nanoparticle flow through a micro-channel. Our technique reduced the error by up to a factor of ten compared to other SLIC algorithms for the images tested in this study. Moreover, our optimized RPC filter reduces the number of image pairs required for the convergence of the ensemble correlation by two orders of magnitude compared to the standard cross correlation. This feature has broader implications to ensemble correlation methods and should be further explored in depth in the future.

  4. Effect of airborne laser scanning accuracy on forest stock and yield estimates

    OpenAIRE

    HOLOPAINEN Markus

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to assess the magnitude of uncertainty of airborne laser scanning (ALS) -based forest inventory data in forest net present value (NPV) computations. A starting point was the current state of change in operative forest-planning in which traditional standwise field inventories (SWFI) are being replaced by area-based ALS inventories (A_ALS). The more detailed objectives were as follows: 1) to investigate the significance of the accuracy of current (SWFI, A_ALS...

  5. Three-dimensional imaging of monogenoidean sclerites by laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Paolo; Strona, Giovanni; Villa, Anna Maria; Benzoni, Francesca; Fabrizio, Stefani; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Kritsky, Delane C

    2006-04-01

    A nondestructive protocol for preparing specimens of Monogenoidea for both alpha-taxonomic studies and reconstruction of 3-dimensional structure is presented. Gomori's trichrome, a stain commonly used to prepare whole-mount specimens of monogenoids for taxonomic purposes, is used to provide fluorescence of genital spines, the copulatory organ, accessory piece, squamodisc, anchors, hooks, bars, and clamps under laser scanning confocal microscopy. PMID:16729702

  6. Reproducibility and sensitivity of scanning laser Doppler flowmetry during graded changes in PO2

    OpenAIRE

    Strenn, K.; Menapace, R.; Rainer, G.; Findl, O; Wolzt, M.; Schmetterer, L

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Recently a commercially available scanning laser Doppler flowmeter has been produced, which provides two dimensional maps of the retinal perfusion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the reproducibility and the sensitivity of these measurements.
METHODS—16 healthy subjects were randomised to inhale different gas mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen in a double blind crossover study. The following gas mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen were administered: 100% oxygen + 0% n...

  7. Design of Dual Axis Laser Scanning Diameter Measuring Gauge System with PID Co

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin-qiu; LI Zhi-wei; LIU Da-jiang

    2009-01-01

    Dual axis laser scanning diameter measuring gauge system(DALSDMGS)with PID controller,which can be used for online non-contact diameter measuring and control on the hose,wire and rod production line,is introduced.The measure principle and implementation of this system are also presented.A PID control module with PID parameters tuning is included in the measuring and control system,which functions as a PID automatic controller of the diameter.

  8. UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANT ADDITION ON RHEOLOGY USING LASER SCANNING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T

    2007-05-08

    The effectiveness of three dispersants to modify rheology was examined using rheology measurements and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) in simulated waste solutions. All of the dispersants lowered the yield stress of the slurries below the baseline samples. The rheology curves were fitted reasonably to a Bingham Plastic model. The three-dimensional LSCM images of simulants showed distinct aggregates were greatly reduced after the addition of dispersants leading to a lowering of the yield stress of the simulated waste slurry solutions.

  9. Histometric data obtained by in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy in patients with systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altmeyer Peter

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It would be a benefit if time-saving, non-invasive methods could give hints for diagnosing systemic sclerosis. To investigate the skin of patients with systemic sclerosis using confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo and to develop histometric parameters to describe characteristic cutaneous changes of systemic sclerosis observed by this new technique, we conducted an exploratory study. Materials and Methods Fifteen patients with systemic sclerosis treated with extracorporal photopheresis were compared with 15 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with other disorders also treated with extracorporal photopheresis. All subjects were investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo. Results Micromorphologic characteristics of skin of patients with systemic sclerosis and measuring parameters for melanisation, epidermal hypotrophy, and fibrosis for dislocation of capillaries by collagen deposits in the papillary dermis were evaluated. An interesting finding was an increased thickness of the tissue in the dermal papillae superior to the first dermal papilla vessel. It was also possible to reproduce characteristic histologic features by confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo. Histometric parameters for fibrosis and vascular features developed in this study showed significant differences in patients with systemic sclerosis compared to controls. Conclusions Although the predominant histopathological features in systemic sclerosis are findings of the reticular dermis and the subcutis, and in histopathological investigation the epidermis seems to remain unaffected by the disease, we have demonstrate some characteristic differences in the epidermis and papillary dermis by confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo. Some of them have not been described so far. However, to use this technique as a tool for diagnosis and/or staging of systemic sclerosis, further studies are needed investigating the sensitivity and

  10. Objective quantitative analysis of eosinophils and bronchial epithelial cells in induced sputum by laser scanning cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Woltmann, G; Ward, R.; Symon, F; Rew, D.; Pavord, I.; Wardlaw, A

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Sputum induction is an important non-invasive technique for measuring airway inflammation in asthma. Cell numbers are often too low for flow cytometric analysis. Laser scanning cytometry (LSC) is a novel technique that allows objective multicolour fluorescence analysis of cells on a microscope slide.
METHODS—LSC was used to determine sputum eosinophil and bronchial epithelial cell counts. We first confirmed that we could measure eosinophil counts accurately in ...

  11. Analysis of femtosecond laser assisted capsulotomy cutting edges and manual capsulorhexis using environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Sebastiano; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Desiderio, Giovanni; Buratto, Lucio; Schiano-Lomoriello, Domenico; Pileri, Marco; Lombardo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS) laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM). Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n = 5, and Victus, n = 5). In addition, five manual CCC (n = 5) were obtained using a rhexis forceps. The specimens were imaged by eSEM (FEI Quanta 400, OR, USA). Objective metrics, which included the arithmetic mean deviation of the surface (Sa) and the root-mean-square deviation of the surface (Sq), were used to evaluate the irregularity of both the FS laser capsulotomies and the manual CCC cutting edges. Results. Several microirregularities were shown across the FS laser capsulotomy cutting edges. The edges of manually torn capsules were shown, by comparison of Sa and Sq values, to be smoother (P laser capsulotomy edges. Conclusions. Work is needed to understand whether the FS laser capsulotomy edge microirregularities, not seen in manual CCC, may act as focal points for the concentration of stress that would increase the risk of capsular tear during phacoemulsification as recently reported in the literature.

  12. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF THE RAT ADRENAL GLAND AFTER SURGICAL LASER EXPOSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Kemoklidze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We studied via low vacuum scanning electron microscopy the effects of a surgical laser exposure to adrenal glands and results of regeneration processes after. Materials and methods.Purpose of this work is modeling of effects of the removal with a surgical laser a pathological focus in the adrenal glands. For this Wistar male rat (n = 19 adrenal glands were researched without the laser exposure, immediately after it and 1 month later. Results. Immediately after exposure occurs laser ablation crater with rough edges and melted surface penetrated by equidistant pores, which are footprints of blood vessels. Beneath of the surface are numerous vaporizationbubbles. Around the crater, the surface wrinkles and sags due to decreased ability to retain water. 1 month after the laser damage, the affected area tightened by a scar. Its coarse bundles of collagen fibers braid shapeless lumps of coal and caverns. Tissues with normal appearance are close to the scar, both outside and inside of the organ. The wrinkling and the sagging are absent. The undamaged organ part has retained the previous shape, without hypertrophies. The damaged part has shrunk. The nature of the regeneration processes indicates a low probability of a relapse after the destruction of a pathological focus via the surgical laser exposure.

  13. In vivo quantification of microglia dynamics with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope in a mouse model of focal laser injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Clemens; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-03-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells of the central nervous system and play a crucial role in maintaining neuronal health and function. Their dynamic behavior, that is, the constant extension and retraction of microglia processes, is thought to be critical for communication between microglia and their cellular neighbors, such as neurons, astrocytes and vascular endothelial cells. Here, we investigated the morphology and dynamics of retinal microglia in vivo under normal conditions and in response to focal laser injury of blood vessel endothelial wall, using a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) designed specifically for imaging the retina of live mice. The multichannel confocal imaging system allows retinal microstructure, such as the processes of microglia and retinal vasculature, to be visualized simultaneously. In order to generate focal laser injury, a photocoagulator based on a continuous wave (cw) laser was coupled into the SLO. An acousto-optic modulator chopped pulses from the cw laser. A tip-tilt-scanner was used to direct the laser beam into a blood vessel of interest under SLO image guidance. Mild coagulation was produced using millisecond-long pulses. Microglia react dynamically to focal laser injury of blood vessel endothelial walls. Under normal conditions, microglia somas remain stationary and the processes probe a territory of their immediate environment. In response to local injury, process movement velocity approximately doubles within minutes after injury. Moreover, the previously unpolarized process movement assumes a distinct directionality towards the injury site, indicating signaling between the injured tissue and the microglia. In vivo retinal imaging is a powerful tool for understanding the dynamic behavior of retinal cells.

  14. A 1 kHz A-scan rate pump-probe laser-ultrasound system for robust inspection of composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Shtokolov, Alex; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    We recently built a fiber-optic laser-ultrasound (LU) scanner for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aircraft composites and demonstrated its greatly improved sensitivity and stability compared with current noncontact systems. It is also very attractive in terms of cost, stability to environmental noise and surface roughness, simplicity in adjustment, footprint, and flexibility. A new type of a balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is a key component of this all-optical LU pump-probe system. Very high A-scan rates can be achieved because no reference arm or stabilization feedback are needed. Here, we demonstrate LU system performance at 1000 A-scans/s combined with a fast 2-D translator operating at a scanning speed of 100 mm/s with a peak acceleration of 10 m/s(2) in both lateral directions to produce parallel B-scans at high rates. The fast scanning strategy is described in detail. The sensitivity of this system, in terms of noise equivalent pressure, was further improved to be only 8.3 dB above the Nyquist thermal noise limit. To our knowledge, this is the best reported sensitivity for a noncontact ultrasonic detector of this dimension used to inspect aircraft composites. PMID:26415130

  15. Cell depth imaging by point laser scanning fluorescence microscopy with an optical disk pickup head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Chen, Jung-Po; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Chiang, Hung-Chih; Cheng, Chih-Ming; Huang, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Tai-Ting; Cheng, Chung-Ta; Tiao, Golden

    2015-09-01

    A compact, cost-effective, and position-addressable digital laser scanning microscopy (DLSM) instrument is made using a commercially available Blu-ray disc read-only memory (BD-ROM) pickup head. Fluorescent cell images captured by DLSM have resolutions of 0.38 µm. Because of the position-addressable function, multispectral fluorescence cell images are captured using the same sample slide with different excitation laser sources. Specially designed objective lenses with the same working distance as the image-capturing beam are used for the different excitation laser sources. By accurately controlling the tilting angles of the sample slide or by moving the collimator lens of the image-capturing beam, the fluorescence cell images along different depth positions of the sample are obtained. Thus, z-section images with micrometer-depth resolutions are achievable.

  16. Geometric validation of a mobile laser scanning system for urban applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Haiyan; Li, Jonathan; Yu, Yongtao; Liu, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) technologies have been actively studied and implemented over the past decade, as their application fields are rapidly expanding and extending beyond conventional topographic mapping. Trimble's MX-8, as one of the MLS systems in the current market, generates rich survey-grade laser and image data for urban surveying. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether Trimble MX-8 MLS data satisfies the accuracy requirements of urban surveying. According to the formula of geo-referencing, accuracies of navigation solution and laser scanner determines the accuracy of the collected LiDAR point clouds. Two test sites were selected to test the performance of Trimble MX-8. Those extensive tests confirm that Trimble MX-8 offers a very promising tool to survey complex urban areas.

  17. Benchmarking the Performance of Mobile Laser Scanning Systems Using a Permanent Test Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannu Hyyppä

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The performance of various mobile laser scanning systems was tested on an established urban test field. The test was connected to the European Spatial Data Research (EuroSDR project “Mobile Mapping—Road Environment Mapping Using Mobile Laser Scanning”. Several commercial and research systems collected laser point cloud data on the same test field. The system comparisons focused on planimetric and elevation errors using a filtered digital elevation model, poles, and building corners as the reference objects. The results revealed the high quality of the point clouds generated by all of the tested systems under good GNSS conditions. With all professional systems properly calibrated, the elevation accuracy was better than 3.5 cm up to a range of 35 m. The best system achieved a planimetric accuracy of 2.5 cm over a range of 45 m. The planimetric errors increased as a function of range, but moderately so if the system was properly calibrated. The main focus on mobile laser scanning development in the near future should be on the improvement of the trajectory solution, especially under non-ideal conditions, using both improvements in hardware and software. Test fields are relatively easy to implement in built environments and they are feasible for verifying and comparing the performance of different systems and also for improving system calibration to achieve optimum quality.

  18. Algorithm of geometry correction for airborne 3D scanning laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Siying; Zhang, Yinchao; Ni, Guoqiang

    2009-11-01

    Airborne three-dimensional scanning laser radar is used for wholesale scanning exploration to the target realm, then three-dimensional model can be established and target features can be identified with the characteristics of echo signals. So it is used widely and have bright prospect in the modern military, scientific research, agriculture and industry. At present, most researchers are focus on higher precision, more reliability scanning system. As the scanning platform is fixed on the aircraft, the plane cannot keep horizontal for a long time, also impossibly for a long time fly in the route without deviation. Data acquisition and the subsequence calibration rely on different equipments. These equipments bring errors both in time and space. Accurate geometry correction can amend the errors created by the process of assembly. But for the errors caused by the plane during the flight, whole imaging process should be analyzed. Take the side-roll as an example; scanning direction is inclined, so that the scanning point deviates from the original place. New direction and coordinate is the aim to us. In this paper, errors caused by the side-roll, pitch, yaw and assembly are analyzed and the algorithm routine is designed.

  19. Non-contact measurement of facial surface vibration patterns during singing by scanning laser Doppler vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of measuring the vibration patterns on facial surfaces by using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The surfaces of the face, neck, and body vibrate during phonation and, according to Titze (2001), these vibrations occur when aerodynamic energy is efficiently converted into acoustic energy at the glottis. A vocalist's vibration velocity patterns may therefore indicate his or her phonatory status or singing skills. LDVs enable laser-based non-contact measurement of the vibration velocity and displacement of a certain point on a vibrating object, and scanning LDVs permit multipoint measurements. The benefits of scanning LDVs originate from the facts that they do not affect the vibrations of measured objects and that they can rapidly measure the vibration patterns across planes. A case study is presented herein to demonstrate the method of measuring vibration velocity patterns with a scanning LDV. The objective of the experiment was to measure the vibration velocity differences between the modal and falsetto registers while three professional soprano singers sang sustained vowels at four pitch frequencies. The results suggest that there is a possibility that pitch frequency are correlated with vibration velocity. However, further investigations are necessary to clarify the relationships between vibration velocity patterns and phonation status and singing skills.

  20. Identifying underground coal mine displacement through field and laboratory laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaker, Brent; Westman, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The ability to identify ground movements in the unique environment of an underground coalmine is explored through the use of laser scanning. Time-lapse scans were performed in an underground coal mine to detect rib surface change after different volumes of coal were removed from the mine ribs. Surface changes in the rib as small as 57 cm3 were detected through analysis of surface differences between triangulated surfaces created from point clouds. Results suggest that the uneven geometry, coal reflectance, and small movements of objects and references in the scene due to ventilation air do not significantly influence monitoring ability. Time-lapse scans were also performed on an artificial coal rib constructed to allow the researchers to control deformation and error precisely. A test of displacement measurement precision showed relative standard deviations of 3200 pts/m2. Changing the distance and angle of incidence of the artificial coal rib to the scanner had little impact on the accuracy of results beyond the expected reduction due to a smaller point density of the target area. The results collected in this study suggest that laser scanning can be a useful, comprehensive tool for measuring ground change in an underground coal mining environment.

  1. Development of scanning laser sensor for underwater 3D imaging with the coaxial optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochimizu, Hideaki; Imaki, Masaharu; Kameyama, Shumpei; Saito, Takashi; Ishibashi, Shoujirou; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    We have developed the scanning laser sensor for underwater 3-D imaging which has the wide scanning angle of 120º (Horizontal) x 30º (Vertical) with the compact size of 25 cm diameter and 60 cm long. Our system has a dome lens and a coaxial optics to realize both the wide scanning angle and the compactness. The system also has the feature in the sensitivity time control (STC) circuit, in which the receiving gain is increased according to the time of flight. The STC circuit contributes to detect a small signal by suppressing the unwanted signals backscattered by marine snows. We demonstrated the system performance in the pool, and confirmed the 3-D imaging with the distance of 20 m. Furthermore, the system was mounted on the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), and demonstrated the seafloor mapping at the depth of 100 m in the ocean.

  2. Development of a 2D laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry mapping procedure for mercury in maize (Zea mays L.) root cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LA-ICP-MS mapping to study the distribution of Hg in plant root cross-sections. •Sorption of LA-generated Hg vapour leads to serious memory effects. •Spot analysis with a delay time of 10 s in between spots alleviates memory effects. •Ablation straight through the sample simplifies calibration. •Hg2+ does not cross the endodermal root barrier of maize plants. -- Abstract: A LA-ICP-MS method based on a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser and a quadrupole ICP-MS has been developed for mapping of mercury in root cross-sections of maize (Zea mays L.) to investigate the mechanism of mercury uptake from soil and its potential translocation to the edible parts. Conventional rastering was found to be unusable due to sorption of mercury onto the internal parts of the LA device, giving rising to memory effects resulting in serious loss of resolution and inaccurate quantification. Spot analysis on a virtual grid on the surface of the root sections using washout times of 10 s in between spots greatly alleviated problems related to these memory effects. By ablating straight through the root sections on a poly(methyl methacrylate) support the calibration process was simplified as internal standardization and matrix-matching could be circumvented. Mercury-spiked freeze-drying embedding medium, sectioned similarly to the root sections, was used for the preparation of the standards. Standards and root sections were subjected to spot analysis using the following operational parameters: beam diameter, 15 μm; laser fluence, 2.5 J cm−2; repetition rate, 20 Hz; dwell time, 1 s; acquisition time, 0.1 s. The mercury peaks for standards and roots sections could be consistently integrated for quantification and construction of the 2D mercury maps for the root sections. This approach was successfully used to investigate the mercury distribution in root sections of maize grown in soil spiked to a level of 50 mg kg−1 DW HgCl2. It was found that at given Hg

  3. Development of a 2D laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry mapping procedure for mercury in maize (Zea mays L.) root cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debeljak, Marta [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Večna Pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Elteren, Johannes T. van, E-mail: elteren@ki.si [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Večna Pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-07-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LA-ICP-MS mapping to study the distribution of Hg in plant root cross-sections. •Sorption of LA-generated Hg vapour leads to serious memory effects. •Spot analysis with a delay time of 10 s in between spots alleviates memory effects. •Ablation straight through the sample simplifies calibration. •Hg{sup 2+} does not cross the endodermal root barrier of maize plants. -- Abstract: A LA-ICP-MS method based on a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser and a quadrupole ICP-MS has been developed for mapping of mercury in root cross-sections of maize (Zea mays L.) to investigate the mechanism of mercury uptake from soil and its potential translocation to the edible parts. Conventional rastering was found to be unusable due to sorption of mercury onto the internal parts of the LA device, giving rising to memory effects resulting in serious loss of resolution and inaccurate quantification. Spot analysis on a virtual grid on the surface of the root sections using washout times of 10 s in between spots greatly alleviated problems related to these memory effects. By ablating straight through the root sections on a poly(methyl methacrylate) support the calibration process was simplified as internal standardization and matrix-matching could be circumvented. Mercury-spiked freeze-drying embedding medium, sectioned similarly to the root sections, was used for the preparation of the standards. Standards and root sections were subjected to spot analysis using the following operational parameters: beam diameter, 15 μm; laser fluence, 2.5 J cm{sup −2}; repetition rate, 20 Hz; dwell time, 1 s; acquisition time, 0.1 s. The mercury peaks for standards and roots sections could be consistently integrated for quantification and construction of the 2D mercury maps for the root sections. This approach was successfully used to investigate the mercury distribution in root sections of maize grown in soil spiked to a level of 50 mg kg{sup −1} DW HgCl{sub 2}. It was

  4. Real-Time Detection and Tracking of Multiple People in Laser Scan Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J.; Song, X.; Zhao, H.; Zha, H.; Shibasaki, R.

    This chapter presents an approach to detect and track multiple people ro bustly in real time using laser scan frames. The detection and tracking of people in real time is a problem that arises in a variety of different contexts. Examples in clude intelligent surveillance for security purposes, scene analysis for service robot, and crowd behavior analysis for human behavior study. Over the last several years, an increasing number of laser-based people-tracking systems have been developed in both mobile robotics platforms and fixed platforms using one or multiple laser scanners. It has been proved that processing on laser scanner data makes the tracker much faster and more robust than a vision-only based one in complex situations. In this chapter, we present a novel robust tracker to detect and track multiple people in a crowded and open area in real time. First, raw data are obtained that measures two legs for each people at a height of 16 cm from horizontal ground with multiple registered laser scanners. A stable feature is extracted using accumulated distribu tion of successive laser frames. In this way, the noise that generates split and merged measurements is smoothed well, and the pattern of rhythmic swinging legs is uti lized to extract each leg. Second, a probabilistic tracking model is presented, and then a sequential inference process using a Bayesian rule is described. A sequential inference process is difficult to compute analytically, so two strategies are presented to simplify the computation. In the case of independent tracking, the Kalman fil ter is used with a more efficient measurement likelihood model based on a region coherency property. Finally, to deal with trajectory fragments we present a concise approach to fuse just a little visual information from synchronized video camera to laser data. Evaluation with real data shows that the proposed method is robust and effective. It achieves a significant improvement compared with existing laser

  5. A model for the ultrasonic detection of surface-breaking cracks by the scanning laser source technique

    OpenAIRE

    Arias Vicente, Irene; Achenbach, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    A model for the scanning laser source (SLS) technique is presented. The SLS is a novel laser-based inspection method for the ultrasonic detection of small surface-breaking cracks. The generated ultrasonic signal is monitored as a line-focused laser is scanned over the defect. Characteristic changes in the amplitude and the frequency content are observed. The modeling approach is based on the decomposition of the field generated by the laser in a cracked two-dimensional half-space, by virtue o...

  6. 2D elemental mapping of sections of human kidney stones using laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Possibilities and limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vašinová Galiová, Michaela [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Čopjaková, Renata; Škoda, Radek [Department of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Štěpánková, Kateřina; Vaňková, Michaela [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kuta, Jan [Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Kamenice 126/3, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Prokeš, Lubomír [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kynický, Jindřich [Department of Pedology and Geology, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 3, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); and others

    2014-10-01

    A 213 nm Nd:YAG-based laser ablation (LA) system coupled to quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and an ArF* excimer-based LA-system coupled to a double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer were employed to study the spatial distribution of various elements in kidney stones (uroliths). Sections of the surfaces of uroliths were ablated according to line patterns to investigate the elemental profiles for the different urolith growth zones. This exploratory study was mainly focused on the distinguishing of the main constituents of urinary calculus fragments by means of LA-ICP-mass spectrometry. Changes in the ablation rate for oxalate and phosphate phases related to matrix density and hardness are discussed. Elemental association was investigated on the basis of 2D mapping. The possibility of using NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal as an external standard for calibration was tested. It is shown that LA-ICP-MS is helpful for determination of the mineralogical composition and size of all phases within the analyzed surface area, for tracing down elemental associations and for documenting the elemental content of urinary stones. LA-ICP-MS results (elemental contents and maps) are compared to those obtained with electron microprobe analysis and solution analysis ICP-MS. - Highlights: • Elements in phosphate and oxalate urolith phases were quantified by LA-ICP-MS. • SRM NIST 1486 Bone Meal was proved suitable for quantification in uroliths. • Different ablation rates in particular phases were included at quantification. • Oxalate and apatite phases show opposite hardness order to natural minerals. • Uroliths were classified according to elemental association to phases.

  7. 2D elemental mapping of sections of human kidney stones using laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Possibilities and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 213 nm Nd:YAG-based laser ablation (LA) system coupled to quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and an ArF* excimer-based LA-system coupled to a double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer were employed to study the spatial distribution of various elements in kidney stones (uroliths). Sections of the surfaces of uroliths were ablated according to line patterns to investigate the elemental profiles for the different urolith growth zones. This exploratory study was mainly focused on the distinguishing of the main constituents of urinary calculus fragments by means of LA-ICP-mass spectrometry. Changes in the ablation rate for oxalate and phosphate phases related to matrix density and hardness are discussed. Elemental association was investigated on the basis of 2D mapping. The possibility of using NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal as an external standard for calibration was tested. It is shown that LA-ICP-MS is helpful for determination of the mineralogical composition and size of all phases within the analyzed surface area, for tracing down elemental associations and for documenting the elemental content of urinary stones. LA-ICP-MS results (elemental contents and maps) are compared to those obtained with electron microprobe analysis and solution analysis ICP-MS. - Highlights: • Elements in phosphate and oxalate urolith phases were quantified by LA-ICP-MS. • SRM NIST 1486 Bone Meal was proved suitable for quantification in uroliths. • Different ablation rates in particular phases were included at quantification. • Oxalate and apatite phases show opposite hardness order to natural minerals. • Uroliths were classified according to elemental association to phases

  8. A Target Detection Method for Artifical Harvesting Based on 2D Laser and Images%基于二维激光与图像的人工林采育目标检测方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁小康; 闫磊; 孔建磊; 刘晋浩

    2015-01-01

    performance. [Result]Models with different optimizations were compared by ROC curves. Experiment results showed that the optimized model by GA used in this paper could recognize harvesting targets effectively and it’s correct rate could reach more than 96%.[Conclusion]Multi-sensor fusion technology was introduced into smart forestry equipment in this paper. Instead of the commonly used expensive 3D laser scanning system,2D laser and images were combined and used. On the one hand,it saved the costs; on the other hand,for the 2D data,the data processing was faster. At the same time, the complementary among sensorsmade the measuring and identification more accurate. The results showed that the method used in this study could provide the information needed by forestry equipment operations,which improved operational efficiency and reduced operational risks.%【目的】对人工林区内的采育目标进行检测和识别,为采育作业操作员提供辅助信息,弥补人眼判断的不足,提高作业效率,降低操作风险。【方法】提出一种基于二维激光和图像的人工林采育目标检测方法,主要内容包括以下几个方面:1)基于二维激光测距仪和红外热像仪搭建采育目标信息采集系统,利用上位机对传感器的信息采集进行控制,并对采集到的信号进行预处理,获取目标的激光数据、可见光图像和红外热图像;2)将激光与图像进行标定,得到图像中的目标区域,同时由激光坐标得到目标的位置信息,为目标识别和定位打好基础;3)将可见光图像与红外图像进行融合,融合后的图像信息更丰富并减少由单一传感器所引起的不确定性,起到互补的作用;4)根据采育目标的特点,基于激光与图像信息进行特征提取,包括温度特征、颜色特征和形状特征等,为目标识别提供具体依据;5)在获得采育目标特征的基础上,运用当前流行的机器学习算法—

  9. FROM THE CONTINUOS TO THE DISCRETE MODEL: A LASER SCANNING APPLICATION TO CONSERVATION PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cardaci

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to demonstrate the usage of laser scanning (in particular through a methodology based on the integrated use of the software "FARO© Scene" and "GEXCEL JRC-3D Reconstructor" as a valid alternative to traditional surveying techniques, especially when finalized to the restoration and conservation repair of historical buildings. The need to recreate the complex and often irregular shapes of the ancient architecture, by acting quickly and also being accurate, as well as the subsequent implementation of FEM (Finite Element Method for structural analysis, have made nowadays the laser scanning survey a very useful technique. The point cloud obtained by laser scanning can be a flexible tool for every need; not a finished product, but a huge database from which it is possible to extract different information at different times. The use of numerical methods in data processing allows wide opportunities of further investigations starting from the fitting equations. The numerical model lends by itself to the possibility of usage in many applications, such as modelization and structure analysis software. This paper presents the case study of the Church of the Assumption and Saint Michael the Archangel, located in Borgo di Terzo (Italy, a magnificent 18th century's building that presented several structural problems like as the overturning of the façade, the cracking of part of the vaulted ceiling. The survey, carried out by laser scanner (FARO© Photon 120 allowed the reconstruction of the exact geometry of the church, offering the basis for performing structural analysis supported by a realistic model (and not an idealized regular one, useful also in the design of repair interventions.

  10. Lateral resolution improvement of laser-scanning imaging for nano defects detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokozeki, Hiroki; Kudo, Ryota; Takahashi, Satoru; Takamasu, Kiyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Demand for higher efficiency in the semiconductor manufacturing industry is continually increasing. In particular, nano defects measurement on patterned or bare Si semiconductor wafer surfaces is an important quality control factor for realizing high productivity and reliability of semiconductor device fabrication. Optical methods and electron beam methods are conventionally used for the inspection of semiconductor wafers. Because they are nondestructive and suitable for high-throughput inspection, optical methods are preferable to electron beam methods such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and so on. However, optical methods generally have an essential disadvantage about lateral spatial resolution than electron beam methods, because of the diffraction limit depending on the optical wavelength. In this research, we aim to develop a novel laser-scanning imaging method that can be applied to nano-/micro manufacturing processes such as semiconductor wafer surface inspection to allow lateral spatial super-resolution imaging with resolution beyond the diffraction limit. In our proposed method, instead of detecting the light intensity value from the beam spot on the inspection surface, the light intensity distribution, which is formed with infinity corrected optical system, coming from the beam spot on the inspection surface is detected. In addition, nano scale shifts in the beam spot are applied for laser spot scanning using a conventional laser-scanning method in which the spots are shifted at about a 100 nm pitch. By detecting multiple light intensity distributions due to the nano scale shifts, a super-resolution image reconstruction with resolution beyond the diffraction limit can be expected. In order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method, several numerical simulations were carried out.

  11. Confocal laser scanning microscopy, a new in vivo diagnostic tool for schistosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fritzsche

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The gold standard for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis is the detection of the parasite's characteristic eggs in urine, stool, or rectal and bladder biopsy specimens. Direct detection of eggs is difficult and not always possible in patients with low egg-shedding rates. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM permits non-invasive cell imaging in vivo and is an established way of obtaining high-resolution images and 3-dimensional reconstructions. Recently, CLSM was shown to be a suitable method to visualize Schistosoma mansoni eggs within the mucosa of dissected mouse gut. In this case, we evaluated the suitability of CLSM to detect eggs of Schistosoma haematobium in a patient with urinary schistosomiasis and low egg-shedding rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The confocal laser scanning microscope used in this study was based on a scanning laser system for imaging the retina of a living eye, the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II, in combination with a lens system (image modality. Standard light cystoscopy was performed using a rigid cystoscope under general anaesthesia. The CLSM endoscope was then passed through the working channel of the rigid cystoscope. The mucosal tissue of the bladder was scanned using CLSM. Schistoma haematobium eggs appeared as bright structures, with the characteristic egg shape and typical terminal spine. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We were able to detect schistosomal eggs in the urothelium of a patient with urinary schistosomiasis. Thus, CLSM may be a suitable tool for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis in humans, especially in cases where standard diagnostic tools are not suitable.

  12. Automatic Detection of Small Single Trees in the Forest-Tundra Ecotone Using Airborne Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Stumberg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A large proportion of Norway’s land area is occupied by the forest-tundra ecotone. The vegetation of this temperature-sensitive ecosystem between mountain forest and the alpine zone is expected to be highly affected by climate change and effective monitoring techniques are required. For the detection of such small pioneer trees, airborne laser scanning (ALS has been proposed as a useful tool employing laser height data. The objective of this study was to assess the capability of an unsupervised classification for automated monitoring programs of small individual trees using high-density ALS data. Field and ALS data were collected along a 1500 km long transect stretching from northern to southern Norway. Different laser and tree height thresholds were tested in various combinations within an unsupervised classification of tree and nontree raster cells employing different cell sizes. Suitable initial cell sizes for the exclusion of large treeless areas as well as an optimal cell size for tree cell detection were determined. High rates of successful tree cell detection involved high levels of commission error at lower laser height thresholds, however, exceeding the 20 cm laser height threshold, the rates of commission error decreased substantially with a still satisfying rate of successful tree cell detection.

  13. Efficacy of Pattern Scan Laser photocoagulation for superficial conjunctival nevi ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Min; Lee, Ji-Eun; Lee, Jong Soo

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the efficacy and safety of Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) photocoagulation in the removal of superficial conjunctival nevi. Superficial conjunctival nevi were removed from 10 eyes of 10 patients using PASCAL. The laser spots were 200 μm in size, and the power delivered ranged from 250 to 300 mW. The duration of the laser pulse was kept at the minimum needed for adequate lesion removal. The duration of the laser pulse administered to the patients varied from 100 to 200 ms. Complete removal of the conjunctival nevus was observed in all the patients after PASCAL photocoagulation. Six months after treatment, complete re-epithelialization of the overlying conjunctiva was noted. No signs of recurrence or scarring were found in any of the patients during the follow-up period. Pure thermal denaturation is the main mechanism of PASCAL photocoagulation for removal of superficial conjunctival nevi. PASCAL can be considered as an alternative to conventional argon laser treatment or surgery. PMID:26914686

  14. Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope Measurement of Local Fundus Reflectance and Autofluorescence Changes Arising from Rhodopsin Bleaching and Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Jessica I. W.; Pugh, Edward N.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin was measured locally in the retina with a widely available, dual wavelength scanning laser ophthalmoscope that does not require pupil dilation. Increased autofluorescence attendant bleaching arises largely from transient removal of rhodopsin's screening of autofluorescent fluorochromes.

  15. A LOW BUDGET MOBILE LASER SCANNING SOLUTION USING ON BOARD SENSORS AND FIELD BUS SYSTEMS OF TODAY'S CONSUMER AUTOMOBILES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. M. Vock

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile laser scanning systems (MLS offer a great potential for acquiring detailed point cloud data of urban and suburban surroundings with minimum effort. In this paper a new solution for MLSs is presented, requiring solely a combination of a profile laser scanning device and systems that are included in today's serialized end consumer vehicles. While today's mobile laser scan systems require different and expensive additional hardware that needs to be mounted onto the vehicle, the devices included within vehicle electronics offer good alternatives without additional costs.The actual scan consists of a continuous profile scan together with information gathered from on-board sensor modules. In a post- processing step, the sensor data is used to reconstruct the car's trajectory for the period of the scan and, based on this information, the track of the scan device for every measured laser pixel. Synchronization of pixel data and vehicle movement is realized via a timestamp signal which is transmitted to the car's field bus system and the scan device. To generate the final point cloud scenario, the trajectory is interpolated for every single scan point and used to convert its local position within the profile into the global coordinate system (Fig.1, Left.

  16. Optimization of 3D laser scanning speed by use of combined variable step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cruz, X. M.; Sergiyenko, O. Yu.; Tyrsa, Vera; Rivas-Lopez, M.; Hernandez-Balbuena, D.; Rodriguez-Quiñonez, J. C.; Basaca-Preciado, L. C.; Mercorelli, P.

    2014-03-01

    The problem of 3D TVS slow functioning caused by constant small scanning step becomes its solution in the presented research. It can be achieved by combined scanning step application for the fast search of n obstacles in unknown surroundings. Such a problem is of keynote importance in automatic robot navigation. To maintain a reasonable speed robots must detect dangerous obstacles as soon as possible, but all known scanners able to measure distances with sufficient accuracy are unable to do it in real time. So, the related technical task of the scanning with variable speed and precise digital mapping only for selected spatial sectors is under consideration. A wide range of simulations in MATLAB 7.12.0 of several variants of hypothetic scenes with variable n obstacles in each scene (including variation of shapes and sizes) and scanning with incremented angle value (0.6° up to 15°) is provided. The aim of such simulation was to detect which angular values of interval still permit getting the maximal information about obstacles without undesired time losses. Three of such local maximums were obtained in simulations and then rectified by application of neuronal network formalism (Levenberg-Marquradt Algorithm). The obtained results in its turn were applied to MET (Micro-Electro-mechanical Transmission) design for practical realization of variable combined step scanning on an experimental prototype of our previously known laser scanner.

  17. Effects of Pulse Duration on Bulk Laser Damage in 350-nm Raster-Scanned DKDP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runkel, M; Bruere, J; Sell, W; Weiland, T; Milam, D; Hahn, D E; Nostrand, M C

    2002-10-30

    In this paper we present the results of bulk damage experiments done on Type-I1 DKDP triple harmonic generator crystals that were raster conditioned with 351-355 nm wavelengths and pulse durations of 4 and 23.2 ns. In the first phase of experiments 20 different scan protocols were rastered into a sample of rapid growth DKDP. The sample was then rastered at damage-causing fluences to determine the three most effective protocols. These three protocols were scanned into a 15-cm sample of conventional-growth DKDP and then exposed to single shots of a I-cm beam from LLNL's Optical Sciences Laser at fluences ranging from 0.5 - 1.5X of the 10% damage probability fluence and nominal pulse durations of 0.1,0.3,0.8,3.2,7.0 and 20 ns. The experiment showed that pulse durations in the 1-3 ns range were much more effective at conditioning than pulses in the 16.3 ns range and that the multiple pass 'peak fluence' scan was more effective than the single pass 'leading edge' scan for 23.2 ns XeF scans.

  18. An interactive mapping tool for visualizing lacunarity of laser scanned point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kania, Adam; Székely, Balázs

    2016-04-01

    Lacunarity, a measure of the spatial distribution of the empty space in a certain model or real space over large spatial scales, is found to be a useful descriptive quantity in many fields using imagery, including, among others, geology, dentistry, neurology. Its application in ecology was suggested more than 20 years ago. The main problem of its application was the lack of appropriate high resolution data. Nowadays, full-waveform laser scanning, also known as FWF LiDAR, provides the tool for mapping the vegetation in unprecedented details and accuracy. Consequently, the lacunarity concept can be revitalized, in order to study the structure of the vegetation in this sense as well. Calculation of lacunarity, even if it is done in two dimensions (2D), is still has its problems: on one hand it is a number-crunching procedure, on the other hand, it produces 4D results: at each 3D point it returns a set of data that are function of scale. These data sets are difficult to visualize, to evaluate, and to compare. In order to solve this problem, an interactive mapping tool has been conceptualized that is designed to manipulate and visualize the data, lets the user set parameters for best visualization or comparison results. The system is able to load large amounts of data, visualize them as lacunarity curves, or map view as horizontal slices or in 3D point clouds coloured according to the user's choice. Lacunarity maps are presented as a series of (usually) horizontal profiles, e.g. rasters, which cells contain color-mapped values of selected lacunarity of the point cloud. As lacunarity is usually analysed in a series of successive windows sizes, the tool can show a series of rasters with sequentially animated lacunarity maps calculated for various window sizes. A very fast switching of colour schemes is possible to facilitate rapid visual feedback to better understand underlying data patterns exposed by lacunarity functions. In the comparison mode, two sites (or two areas

  19. Time resolved three-dimensional flamebase imaging of a lifted jet flame by laser scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of flame surface evolution in both space and time is necessary for the advancement of knowledge concerning the physical processes contributing to lifted jet flame stabilisation. Previous studies either reproduce the flame front accurately in three-dimensional space or in time. In this study a measurement system capable of both is presented. Based on the Mie-scattering of oil droplets added to the jet flow, the system reconstructs the volumetric surface at the base of a lifted jet flame from a series of two-dimensional slices. The slices are created using a pulsed high-speed laser and a polygonal laser scanner unit which serves to sweep the laser beam through the measurement volume. A single high-speed camera is used for recording the subsequent measurement slices. The achieved temporal and spatial resolution as well as the accuracy and precision of the sheet placement are discussed in respect to the flames’ scales. The first results of the reconstruction of the lifted jet flame at its stabilisation point show the potential of such measurements to avoid the ambiguities in interpreting conventional 2D-data. (paper)

  20. Intercomparison of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Instruments for Assessing Forested Ecosystems: A Brisbane Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armston, J.; Newnham, G.; Strahler, A. H.; Schaaf, C.; Danson, M.; Gaulton, R.; Zhang, Z.; Disney, M.; Sparrow, B.; Phinn, S. R.; Schaefer, M.; Burt, A.; Counter, S.; Erb, A.; Goodwin, N.; Hancock, S.; Howe, G.; Johansen, K.; Li, Z.; Lollback, G.; Martel, J.; Muir, J.; Paynter, I.; Saenz, E.; Scarth, P.; Tindall, D.; Walker, L.; Witte, C.; Woodgate, W.; Wu, S.

    2013-12-01

    During 28th July - 3rd August, 2013, an international group of researchers brought five terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) to long-term monitoring plots in three eucalyptus-dominated woodland sites near Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, to acquire scans at common locations for calibration and intercomparison.They included: DWEL - a dual-wavelength full-waveform laser scanner (Boston U., U. Massachusetts Lowell, U. Massachusetts Boston, USA) SALCA - a dual-wavelength full-waveform laser scanner (U. Salford, UK) CBL - a canopy biomass lidar, a small ultraportable low-cost multiple discrete return scanner (U. Massachusetts Boston, USA) Riegl VZ400 - a survey-grade commercial waveform scanner (Queensland Government and TERN, U. Queensland, Australia) FARO Focus 3D - a lightweight commercial phase-shift ranging laser scanner (U. Southern Queensland) Two plots were scanned at Karawatha Forest Park, a Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) Supersite, and one plot at D'Aguilar National Park. At each 50 x 100 m plot, a center scan point was surrounded by four scan points located 25 m away in a cross pattern allowing for 3-D reconstructions of scan sites in the form of point clouds. At several center points, multiple instrument configurations (i.e. different beam divergence, angular resolution, pulse rate) were acquired to test the impact of instrument specifications on separation of woody and non-woody materials and estimation of vegetation structure parameters. Three-dimensional Photopoint photographic panoramas were also acquired, providing reconstructions of stems in the form of point clouds using photogrammetric correlation methods. Calibrated reflectance targets were also scanned to compare instrument geometric and radiometric performance. Ancillary data included hemispherical photos, TRAC LAI/clumping measurements, spectra of leaves, bark, litter, and other target components. Wet and dry leaf weights determined water content. Planned intercomparison topics and

  1. Time-resolved investigations of the fragmentation dynamic of H{sub 2} (D{sub 2}) in and with ultra-short laser pulses; Zeitaufgeloeste Untersuchungen zur Fragmentationsdynamik von H{sub 2} (D{sub 2}) in ultra-kurzen Laserpulsen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ergler, T.

    2006-07-19

    In course of this work pump-probe experiments aimed to study ultrafast nuclear motion in H{sub 2} (D{sub 2}) fragmentation by intense 6-25 fs laser pulses have been carried out. In order to perform time-resolved measurements, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer providing two identical synchronized laser pulses with the time-delay variable from 0 to 3000 fs with 300 as accuracy and long-term stability has been built. The laser pulses at the intensities of up to 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} were focused onto a H{sub 2} (D{sub 2}) molecular beam leading to the ionization or dissociation of the molecules, and the momenta of all charged reactions fragments were measured with a reaction microscope. With 6-7 fs pulses it was possible to probe the time evolution of the bound H{sup +}{sub 2} (D{sup +}{sub 2}) nuclear wave packet created by the first (pump) laser pulse, fragmenting the molecule with the second (probe) pulse. A fast delocalization, or ''collapse'', and subsequent ''revival'' of the vibrational wave packet have been observed. In addition, the signatures of the ground state vibrational excitation in neutral D{sub 2} molecule have been found, and the dominance of a new, purely quantum mechanical wave packet preparation mechanism (the so-called ''Lochfrass'') has been proved. In the experiments with 25 fs pulses the theoretically predicted enhancement of the ionization probability for the dissociating H{sup +}{sub 2} molecular ion at large internuclear distances has been detected for the first time. (orig.)

  2. D Documentation of a Historical Monument Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning Case Study: Byzantine Water Cistern, Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temizer, T.; Nemli, G.; Ekizce, E.; Ekizce, A.; Demir, S.; Bayram, B.; Askin, F. H.; Cobanoglu, A. V.; Yilmaz, H. F.

    2013-07-01

    3D modelling of architectural structures for monitoring, conservation and restoration alterations in heritage sites has special challenges for data acquisition and processing. The accuracy of created 3D model is very important. In general, because of the complexity of the structures, 3D modelling can be time consuming and may include some difficulties. 3D terrestrial laser scanning technique is a reliable and advantageous method for reconstruction and conservation of monuments. This technique is commonly acknowledged due to its accuracy, speed and flexibility. Terrestrial laser scanners can be used for documentation of the cultural heritage for the future. But it is also important to understand the capabilities and right conditions of use and limitations of this technology. Istanbul is a rich city with cultural monuments, buildings and cultural heritage. The presented study consists of documentation of a Byzantine water cistern situated underground the court of Sarnicli Han building. The cistern which represents a very good living example of its period has been modelled in 3D by using terrestrial laser scanning technology and the accuracy assessment of this modelling is examined.

  3. Real time confocal laser scanning microscopy: Potential applications in space medicine and cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollan, Ana; Ward, Thelma; McHale, Anthony P.

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), in which tissues may be rendered fatally light-sensitive represents a relatively novel treatment for cancer and other disorders such as cardiovascular disease. It offers significant application to disease control in an isolated environment such as space flight. In studying PDT in the laboratory, low energy lasers such as HeNe lasers are used to activate the photosensitized cellular target. A major problem associated with these studies is that events occurring during actual exposure of the target cells to the system cannot be examined in real time. In this study HeLa cells were photosensitized and photodynamic activation was accomplished using the scanning microbeam from a confocal laser scanning microscope. This form of activation allowed for simultaneous photoactivation and observation and facilitated the recording of events at a microscopic level during photoactivation. Effects of photodynamic activation on the target cells were monitored using the fluorophores rhodamine 123 and ethidium homodimer-1. Potential applications of these forms of analyses to space medicine and cell biology are discussed.

  4. Laser scanning probe with multiple detectors used for sculptured surface digitization in reverse engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a single-point laser probe with multiple detectors for scanning of a sculptured surface for digitization by reverse engineering. The probe consists of a point laser source and four linear high-resolution PSDs (Position Sensitive Devices). Its target scanning distance is 180 mm from the probe to the measured surface, with a measurable range of 90 mm. Assuming a diffusive surface, the displacement from the light spot on the measured surface to the probe along the light-axis can be derived by the Lambert model. In addition, the inclination angle of the measured point from the vertical axis of the light beam is also calculated. In this study, the probe is mounted on the NC machine integrating the three-axis controller, personal computer and A/D card to conduct the digitization process. Functions of the probe are verified by a standard half-sphere model. The test results show that the displacement resolution is reaching 50 μm and the measurable range of the inclination angle is 80 degrees. A mask model is digitized to demonstrate the scanning results

  5. 3-D reconstruction of neurons from multichannel confocal laser scanning image series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouterlood, Floris G

    2014-01-01

    A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) collects information from a thin, focal plane and ignores out-of-focus information. Scanning of a specimen, with stepwise axial (Z-) movement of the stage in between each scan, produces Z-series of confocal images of a tissue volume, which then can be used to 3-D reconstruct structures of interest. The operator first configures separate channels (e.g., laser, filters, and detector settings) for each applied fluorochrome and then acquires Z-series of confocal images: one series per channel. Channel signal separation is extremely important. Measures to avoid bleaching are vital. Post-acquisition deconvolution of the image series is often performed to increase resolution before 3-D reconstruction takes place. In the 3-D reconstruction programs described in this unit, reconstructions can be inspected in real time from any viewing angle. By altering viewing angles and by switching channels off and on, the spatial relationships of 3-D-reconstructed structures with respect to structures visualized in other channels can be studied. Since each brand of CLSM, computer program, and 3-D reconstruction package has its own proprietary set of procedures, a general approach is provided in this protocol wherever possible.

  6. Experimental underwater scanning imaging system using pulsed blue-green lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Xu, Zhi-yong; Zhang, Qi-heng; Wang, Hua-chuang; Yu, Xue-gang; Nie, Rui-jie

    2011-06-01

    A new, simple and compact experimental laser scanning imaging system is introduced for underwater imaging, and the characteristics of the system are analyzed in this paper. The system consists of the illuminator, optical scanning system, optical receiving system, narrow band filters, high-sensitivity gated image sensor, synchronous control and data acquisition system and power supply and cooling system. The illuminator is a lump-pumped, Q-switched, frequency doubled Nd:YAG pulsed laser operating at 532 nm with a frequency of 50 Hz. The receiver is a self-made gated intensified charge coupled device (ICCD). As a result, gated super Gen-II image intensifier and PAL format charge-coupled device (CCD) camera are assembled to meet the requirements. The coupling gated ICCD has a sensitivity of approximated 10-5lx, and the minimum gate width can reach to 40 ns. And a set of scanning structure which only uses one mirror is used in the experimental system. In addition, the performance parameters are listed. Finally, the detection capabilities of the imaging system are theoretically analyzed in typical seawater. The analysis indicates that the detection depth of the system can reach to 16 m in the clear seawater.

  7. 3-D reconstruction of neurons from multichannel confocal laser scanning image series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouterlood, Floris G

    2014-01-01

    A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) collects information from a thin, focal plane and ignores out-of-focus information. Scanning of a specimen, with stepwise axial (Z-) movement of the stage in between each scan, produces Z-series of confocal images of a tissue volume, which then can be used to 3-D reconstruct structures of interest. The operator first configures separate channels (e.g., laser, filters, and detector settings) for each applied fluorochrome and then acquires Z-series of confocal images: one series per channel. Channel signal separation is extremely important. Measures to avoid bleaching are vital. Post-acquisition deconvolution of the image series is often performed to increase resolution before 3-D reconstruction takes place. In the 3-D reconstruction programs described in this unit, reconstructions can be inspected in real time from any viewing angle. By altering viewing angles and by switching channels off and on, the spatial relationships of 3-D-reconstructed structures with respect to structures visualized in other channels can be studied. Since each brand of CLSM, computer program, and 3-D reconstruction package has its own proprietary set of procedures, a general approach is provided in this protocol wherever possible. PMID:24723320

  8. Multidimensional Laser Scanning System for Underwater Mapping of Small Structures and Bottom Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, E.

    2005-05-01

    A multidimensional laser scanning imaging system is under development to investigate new concepts in underwater imaging. The system is a modification of the 3D Laser Imaging & Tracking Electro-optical System (3D LITES; HBOI, patent # 5,418,608) that was developed for 3D mapping applications in biological oceanography. The new 3D-FLITES ("F" stands for added Fluorescence capability) captures both spatial and spectral data and offers extended operation capabilities. The system can capture the range to each pixel in the sensor's field of view, the relative reflectance of each pixel (similar to "conventional" images) and five channels of fluorescence emission in the scene, captured sequentially. Multidimensional data sets can be instrumental in bottom topography mapping and object identification. The 3D FLITES has the unique capability to operate in user-selectable line or raster scanning modes if mounted on a moving platform. In raster mode two perpendicular mirrors are driven, allowing the operator to capture single frames (capturing either reflectance or fluorescence data) or a stream of images in fast rate (16 frames per second). With this operational flexibility the operator can combine a "fly over" scanning mode with "look ahead", "look sideways" and "zoom" modes. The current system is limited in range and resolution; nevertheless it can serve as a test-bed to evaluate operational parameters, data acquisition and signal processing protocols that could lead to a smaller, more efficient system in the future.

  9. Highly Accurate Tree Models Derived from Terrestrial Laser Scan Data: A Method Description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hackenberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for fitting cylinders into a point cloud, derived from a terrestrial laser-scanned tree. Utilizing high scan quality data as the input, the resulting models describe the branching structure of the tree, capable of detecting branches with a diameter smaller than a centimeter. The cylinders are stored as a hierarchical tree-like data structure encapsulating parent-child neighbor relations and incorporating the tree’s direction of growth. This structure enables the efficient extraction of tree components, such as the stem or a single branch. The method was validated both by applying a comparison of the resulting cylinder models with ground truth data and by an analysis between the input point clouds and the models. Tree models were accomplished representing more than 99% of the input point cloud, with an average distance from the cylinder model to the point cloud within sub-millimeter accuracy. After validation, the method was applied to build two allometric models based on 24 tree point clouds as an example of the application. Computation terminated successfully within less than 30 min. For the model predicting the total above ground volume, the coefficient of determination was 0.965, showing the high potential of terrestrial laser-scanning for forest inventories.

  10. Semi-Automatic Registration of Airborne and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data Using Building Corner Matching with Boundaries as Reliability Check

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Cheng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Data registration is a prerequisite for the integration of multi-platform laser scanning in various applications. A new approach is proposed for the semi-automatic registration of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data with buildings without eaves. Firstly, an automatic calculation procedure for thresholds in density of projected points (DoPP method is introduced to extract boundary segments from terrestrial laser scanning data. A new algorithm, using a self-extending procedure, is developed to recover the extracted boundary segments, which then intersect to form the corners of buildings. The building corners extracted from airborne and terrestrial laser scanning are reliably matched through an automatic iterative process in which boundaries from two datasets are compared for the reliability check. The experimental results illustrate that the proposed approach provides both high reliability and high geometric accuracy (average error of 0.44 m/0.15 m in horizontal/vertical direction for corresponding building corners for the final registration of airborne laser scanning (ALS and tripod mounted terrestrial laser scanning (TLS data.

  11. A Combination of Stop-and-Go and Electro-Tricycle Laser Scanning Systems for Rural Cadastral Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, land-based laser scanning technologies have been actively studied and implemented, in response to the need for detailed three-dimensional (3D data about our rural and urban environment for topographic mapping, cadastral mapping, and other street-level features, which are difficult and time consuming to measure by other instruments. For rural areas in China, the complex terrain and poor planning limit the applicability of this advanced technology. To improve the efficiency of rural surveys, we present two SSW (Shoushi and SiWei laser scanning systems for rapid topographic mapping: stop-and-go and electro-tricycle laser scanning systems. The objective of this paper is to evaluate whether laser scanning data collected by the developed SSW systems meet the accuracy requirements for rural homestead mapping. We investigated the performance of the two laser scanning systems on Ma’anshan Village, a small, typical village in Hubei Province, China. To obtain full coverage of the village, we fused the stop-and-go and electro-tricycle laser scanning data. The performance of the developed SSW systems is described by the results of building contours extracted from the fused data against the established building vector map.

  12. Laser-scanning velocimetry: A confocal microscopy method for quantitative measurement of cardiovascular performance in zebrafish embryos and larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linney Elwood

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zebrafish Danio rerio is an important model system for drug discovery and to study cardiovascular development. Using a laser-scanning confocal microscope, we have developed a non-invasive method of measuring cardiac performance in zebrafish embryos and larvae that obtains cardiovascular parameters similar to those obtained using Doppler echocardiography in mammals. A laser scan line placed parallel to the path of blood in the dorsal aorta measures blood cell velocity, from which cardiac output and indices of vascular resistance and contractility are calculated. Results This technique, called laser-scanning velocimetry, was used to quantify the effects of pharmacological, developmental, and genetic modifiers of cardiac function. Laser-scanning velocimetry was applied to analyze the cardiovascular effects of morpholino knockdown of osmosensing scaffold for MEKK3 (OSM, which when mutated causes the human vascular disease cerebral cavernous malformations. OSM-deficient embryos had a constricted aortic arch and markedly increased peak cell velocity, a characteristic indicator of aortic stenosis. Conclusion These data validate laser-scanning velocimetry as a quantitative tool to measure cardiovascular performance for pharmacological and genetic analysis in zebrafish, which requires no specialized equipment other than a laser-scanning confocal microscope.

  13. Monostatic coaxial 1.5 μm laser Doppler velocimeter using a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We present a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) in monostatic coaxial arrangement consisting of off-the-shelf telecom-grade components: a single frequency laser (wavelength λ = 1.5 μm) and a high-finesse scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer (sFPI). In contrast to previous 1.5 μm LDV systems based...

  14. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables

  15. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  16. Improving peatland erosion rate measurements through the use of terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, R.; Holden, J.; Jones, R.; Lloyd, A.

    2013-12-01

    Globally peatlands account for 30-50% of all carbon stored within soils (Holden, 2005). Within the UK they represent the single largest terrestrial carbon store, with blanket bogs covering roughly 7.5% (Tallis et al., 1997); unfortunately these upland blanket bogs are often found in a degraded state. The amount of carbon being lost to erosional processes in peatlands is poorly constrained, with estimates typically being based on traditional low-tech methods. Erosion pins have been the primary method for measuring erosion rates in peatlands; however their use is prone to error due to the depth of peat and its high water content which allows both horizontal and vertical movement through time. Erosion pins can only realistically be used over a relatively small area and assume erosion remains constant between pins making any upscaling problematic. Therefore, innovative methods are required to improve estimates of peatland erosion that are capable of increasing both spatial coverage and accuracy. Terrestrial laser scanning is increasingly being used by geomorphologists to produce highly detailed 3D topographic maps. A pilot study was undertaken to assess the ability of terrestrial laser scanning to measure erosion rates within peatlands and to identify any obstacles that may need to be overcome. An actively eroding blanket bog in northern England was chosen as the test site with surveys being carried out before and after winter as active erosion is most likely during winter months. Erosion measurements were also made using erosion pins to allow comparisons between the two methods. Terrestrial laser scanning was not only found to offer vastly improved spatial coverage compared with erosion pins but was also able to provide data at a much higher resolution. Erosion rates calculated using erosion pins were significantly higher than the average rate calculated using terrestrial laser scanning (-35mm compared to +2.5mm), this overestimation by the erosion pins primarily

  17. 2D and 3D imaging of the gas phase close to an operating model catalyst by planar laser induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Sara; Zhou, Jianfeng; Gustafson, Johan; Zetterberg, Johan; Lundgren, Edvin

    2016-11-16

    In recent years, efforts have been made in catalysis related surface science studies to explore the possibilities to perform experiments at conditions closer to those of a technical catalyst, in particular at increased pressures. Techniques such as high pressure scanning tunneling/atomic force microscopy (HPSTM/AFM), near ambient pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (NAPXPS), surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) and polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) at semi-realistic conditions have been used to study the surface structure of model catalysts under reaction conditions, combined with simultaneous mass spectrometry (MS). These studies have provided an increased understanding of the surface dynamics and the structure of the active phase of surfaces and nano particles as a reaction occurs, providing novel information on the structure/activity relationship. However, the surface structure detected during the reaction is sensitive to the composition of the gas phase close to the catalyst surface. Therefore, the catalytic activity of the sample itself will act as a gas-source or gas-sink, and will affect the surface structure, which in turn may complicate the assignment of the active phase. For this reason, we have applied planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to the gas phase in the vicinity of an active model catalysts. Our measurements demonstrate that the gas composition differs significantly close to the catalyst and at the position of the MS, which indeed should have a profound effect on the surface structure. However, PLIF applied to catalytic reactions presents several beneficial properties in addition to investigate the effect of the catalyst on the effective gas composition close to the model catalyst. The high spatial and temporal resolution of PLIF provides a unique tool to visualize the on-set of catalytic reactions and to compare different model catalysts in the same reactive environment. The technique can be

  18. 2D and 3D imaging of the gas phase close to an operating model catalyst by planar laser induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Sara; Zhou, Jianfeng; Gustafson, Johan; Zetterberg, Johan; Lundgren, Edvin

    2016-11-16

    In recent years, efforts have been made in catalysis related surface science studies to explore the possibilities to perform experiments at conditions closer to those of a technical catalyst, in particular at increased pressures. Techniques such as high pressure scanning tunneling/atomic force microscopy (HPSTM/AFM), near ambient pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (NAPXPS), surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) and polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) at semi-realistic conditions have been used to study the surface structure of model catalysts under reaction conditions, combined with simultaneous mass spectrometry (MS). These studies have provided an increased understanding of the surface dynamics and the structure of the active phase of surfaces and nano particles as a reaction occurs, providing novel information on the structure/activity relationship. However, the surface structure detected during the reaction is sensitive to the composition of the gas phase close to the catalyst surface. Therefore, the catalytic activity of the sample itself will act as a gas-source or gas-sink, and will affect the surface structure, which in turn may complicate the assignment of the active phase. For this reason, we have applied planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to the gas phase in the vicinity of an active model catalysts. Our measurements demonstrate that the gas composition differs significantly close to the catalyst and at the position of the MS, which indeed should have a profound effect on the surface structure. However, PLIF applied to catalytic reactions presents several beneficial properties in addition to investigate the effect of the catalyst on the effective gas composition close to the model catalyst. The high spatial and temporal resolution of PLIF provides a unique tool to visualize the on-set of catalytic reactions and to compare different model catalysts in the same reactive environment. The technique can be

  19. 2D and 3D imaging of the gas phase close to an operating model catalyst by planar laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Sara; Zhou, Jianfeng; Gustafson, Johan; Zetterberg, Johan; Lundgren, Edvin

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, efforts have been made in catalysis related surface science studies to explore the possibilities to perform experiments at conditions closer to those of a technical catalyst, in particular at increased pressures. Techniques such as high pressure scanning tunneling/atomic force microscopy (HPSTM/AFM), near ambient pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (NAPXPS), surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) and polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) at semi-realistic conditions have been used to study the surface structure of model catalysts under reaction conditions, combined with simultaneous mass spectrometry (MS). These studies have provided an increased understanding of the surface dynamics and the structure of the active phase of surfaces and nano particles as a reaction occurs, providing novel information on the structure/activity relationship. However, the surface structure detected during the reaction is sensitive to the composition of the gas phase close to the catalyst surface. Therefore, the catalytic activity of the sample itself will act as a gas-source or gas-sink, and will affect the surface structure, which in turn may complicate the assignment of the active phase. For this reason, we have applied planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to the gas phase in the vicinity of an active model catalysts. Our measurements demonstrate that the gas composition differs significantly close to the catalyst and at the position of the MS, which indeed should have a profound effect on the surface structure. However, PLIF applied to catalytic reactions presents several beneficial properties in addition to investigate the effect of the catalyst on the effective gas composition close to the model catalyst. The high spatial and temporal resolution of PLIF provides a unique tool to visualize the on-set of catalytic reactions and to compare different model catalysts in the same reactive environment. The technique can be

  20. Volumetric evolution of Surtsey, Iceland, from topographic maps and scanning airborne laser altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, J.B.; Williams, R.S.; Frawley, J.J.; Krabill, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    The volumetric evolution of Surtsey has been estimated on the basis of digital elevation models derived from NASA scanning airborne laser altimeter surveys (20 July 1998), as well as digitized 1:5,000-scale topographic maps produced by the National Land Survey of Iceland and by Norrman. Subaerial volumes have been computed from co-registered digital elevation models (DEM's) from 6 July 1968, 11 July 1975, 16 July 1993, and 20 July 1998 (scanning airborne laser altimetry), as well as true surface area (above mean sea level). Our analysis suggests that the subaerial volume of Surtsey has been reduced from nearly 0.100 km3 on 6 July 1968 to 0.075 km3 on 20 July 1998. Linear regression analysis of the temporal evolution of Surtsey's subaerial volume indicates that most of its subaerial surface will be at or below mean sea-level by approximately 2100. This assumes a conservative estimate of continuation of the current pace of marine erosion and mass-wasting on the island, including the indurated core of the conduits of the Surtur I and Surtur II eruptive vents. If the conduits are relatively resistant to marine erosion they will become sea stacks after the rest of the island has become a submarine shoal, and some portions of the island could survive for centuries. The 20 July 1998 scanning laser altimeter surveys further indicate rapid enlargement of erosional canyons in the northeastern portion of the partial tephra ring associated with Surtur I. Continued airborne and eventually spaceborne topographic surveys of Surtsey are planned to refine the inter-annual change of its subaerial volume.

  1. Street-side vehicle detection, classification and change detection using mobile laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wen; Vallet, Bruno; Schindler, Konrad; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Statistics on street-side car parks, e.g. occupancy rates, parked vehicle types, parking durations, are of great importance for urban planning and policy making. Related studies, e.g. vehicle detection and classification, mostly focus on static images or video. Whereas mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems are increasingly utilized for urban street environment perception due to their direct 3D information acquisition, high accuracy and movability. In this paper, we design a complete system for car park monitoring, including vehicle recognition, localization, classification and change detection, from laser scanning point clouds. The experimental data are acquired by an MLS system using high frequency laser scanner which scans the streets vertically along the system's moving trajectory. The point clouds are firstly classified as ground, building façade, and street objects which are then segmented using state-of-the-art methods. Each segment is treated as an object hypothesis, and its geometric features are extracted. Moreover, a deformable vehicle model is fitted to each object. By fitting an explicit model to the vehicle points, detailed information, such as precise position and orientation, can be obtained. The model parameters are also treated as vehicle features. Together with the geometric features, they are applied to a supervised learning procedure for vehicle or non-vehicle recognition. The classes of detected vehicles are also investigated. Whether vehicles have changed across two datasets acquired at different times is detected to estimate the durations. Here, vehicles are trained pair-wisely. Two same or different vehicles are paired up as training samples. As a result, the vehicle recognition, classification and change detection accuracies are 95.9%, 86.0% and 98.7%, respectively. Vehicle modelling improves not only the recognition rate, but also the localization precision compared to bounding boxes.

  2. Gravel transport by ice in a subarctic river from accurate laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotsari, Eliisa; Wang, Yunsheng; Kaartinen, Harri; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Kukko, Antero; Vaaja, Matti; Hyyppä, Hannu; Hyyppä, Juha; Alho, Petteri

    2015-10-01

    For decades the importance of ice and the effects of cold-region processes on river channel morphology have been discussed, with a general consensus as to their importance emerging only recently. River ice cover, anchor ice, frazil ice, and ice jams may not only scour the channel bed and banks but also pick up, transport, and deposit fine sediments and gravels during winter, especially during the spring ice breakup period. However, knowledge of the interactions between coarse sediment transport and ice processes remains insufficient, particularly in rockier river reaches, with a lack of accurate and sufficiently extensive data hindering their quantification. The aim of this study was to quantify and analyse the impact of river ice on gravel transport in a subarctic river during one winter via the acquisition of laser scanning data for the river channel and ice surface. Terrestrial and mobile laser scanning were performed in 2012-2013 on the Tana River in northern Finland. Both of these techniques are considered accurate and applicable for detecting elevation and volumetric changes in river bed, defining gravel clast sizes, and detecting the movement of individual clasts. More importantly, ice surface, thickness, and decay during spring were also captured via laser scanning. In the winter of 2012-2013, a period characterised by an absence of ice jams and mid-winter ice-decay periods, with spring ice breakup discharges close to average yearly conditions, ice had the most significant role, greater than that of flowing water, in erosion and transport of coarse sediment from the channel bed and gently sloping banks. Changes in river bed elevation and volume were recorded throughout the study site, and erosion predominated. In addition to broader scale erosion, the movement of single clasts up to 2 m in size occurred. However, the observed overall channel change patterns did not coincide with the areas of fastest ice decay. The obtained results could also be applied to

  3. Transmissive liquid-crystal device correcting primary coma aberration and astigmatism in laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Ayano; Hibi, Terumasa; Ipponjima, Sari; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2016-03-01

    Laser scanning microscopy allows 3D cross-sectional imaging inside biospecimens. However, certain aberrations produced can degrade the quality of the resulting images. We previously reported a transmissive liquid-crystal device that could compensate for the predominant spherical aberrations during the observations, particularly in deep regions of the samples. The device, inserted between the objective lens and the microscope revolver, improved the image quality of fixed-mouse-brain slices that were observed using two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy, which was originally degraded by spherical aberration. In this study, we developed a transmissive device that corrects primary coma aberration and astigmatism, motivated by the fact that these asymmetric aberrations can also often considerably deteriorate image quality, even near the sample surface. The device's performance was evaluated by observing fluorescent beads using single-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy. The fluorescence intensity in the image of the bead under a cover slip tilted in the y-direction was increased by 1.5 times after correction by the device. Furthermore, the y- and z-widths of the imaged bead were reduced to 66% and 65%, respectively. On the other hand, for the imaged bead sucked into a glass capillary in the longitudinal x-direction, correction with the device increased the fluorescence intensity by 2.2 times compared to that of the aberrated image. In addition, the x-, y-, and z-widths of the bead image were reduced to 75%, 53%, and 40%, respectively. Our device successfully corrected several asymmetric aberrations to improve the fluorescent signal and spatial resolution, and might be useful for observing various biospecimens.

  4. Lifting approach to simplify output-only continuous-scan laser vibrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shifei; Allen, Matthew S.

    2014-04-01

    Continuous-scan laser Doppler vibrometry (CSLDV) can greatly accelerate modal testing by continuously sweeping the measuring laser over a structure, effectively capturing its response at tens or even hundreds of points along the laser path. Several techniques have been devised to process CSLDV measurements from structures under controlled input. The authors recently extended CSLDV to the case where the input forces are unmeasured random white noise, using the harmonic power spectrum of a time periodic system. The harmonic power spectrum is analogous to the power spectrum used in the identification of time invariant systems, but with many additional harmonics for each mode, requiring an additional effort in modal parameter estimation. This paper presents a variant on the harmonic power spectrum, proposing a simplified algorithm based on the lifting approach. Lifting causes all sideband peaks in the harmonic power spectrum to collapse into a single peak in the range from zero to half of the scan frequency, so the spectra are far easier to interpret. The proposed algorithm is first evaluated on a simulated beam, and found to give results that are comparable with those obtained by the harmonic power spectrum method, yet the data reduction with the lifting approach is much simpler. This algorithm is then employed to identify the first several modes of a parked wind turbine under wind excitation, using a new long range remote sensing vibrometer. The speckle noise is found to be remarkably small even at a standoff distance of 77 m and a surface scan velocity of 500 m/s without any surface treatment.

  5. Multimodal ophthalmic imaging using swept source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Joseph D.; El-Haddad, Mohamed T.; Tye, Logan A.; Majeau, Lucas; Godbout, Nicolas; Rollins, Andrew M.; Boudoux, Caroline; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) benefit clinical diagnostic imaging in ophthalmology by enabling in vivo noninvasive en face and volumetric visualization of retinal structures, respectively. Spectrally encoding methods enable confocal imaging through fiber optics and reduces system complexity. Previous applications in ophthalmic imaging include spectrally encoded confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SECSLO) and a combined SECSLO-OCT system for image guidance, tracking, and registration. However, spectrally encoded imaging suffers from speckle noise because each spectrally encoded channel is effectively monochromatic. Here, we demonstrate in vivo human retinal imaging using a swept source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscope and OCT (SSSESLO- OCT) at 1060 nm. SS-SESLO-OCT uses a shared 100 kHz Axsun swept source, shared scanner and imaging optics, and are detected simultaneously on a shared, dual channel high-speed digitizer. SESLO illumination and detection was performed using the single mode core and multimode inner cladding of a double clad fiber coupler, respectively, to preserve lateral resolution while improving collection efficiency and reducing speckle contrast at the expense of confocality. Concurrent en face SESLO and cross-sectional OCT images were acquired with 1376 x 500 pixels at 200 frames-per-second. Our system design is compact and uses a shared light source, imaging optics, and digitizer, which reduces overall system complexity and ensures inherent co-registration between SESLO and OCT FOVs. En face SESLO images acquired concurrent with OCT cross-sections enables lateral motion tracking and three-dimensional volume registration with broad applications in multivolume OCT averaging, image mosaicking, and intraoperative instrument tracking.

  6. Oral biofilm analysis of palatal expanders by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Barbara; Rodler, Claudia; Koller, Martin; Wimmer, Gernot; Kessler, Harald H; Grube, Martin; Santigli, Elisabeth

    2011-10-20

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) of natural heterogeneous biofilm is today facilitated by a comprehensive range of staining techniques, one of them being fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We performed a pilot study in which oral biofilm samples collected from fixed orthodontic appliances (palatal expanders) were stained by FISH, the objective being to assess the three-dimensional organization of natural biofilm and plaque accumulation. FISH creates an opportunity to stain cells in their native biofilm environment by the use of fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA-targeting probes. Compared to alternative techniques like immunofluorescent labeling, this is an inexpensive, precise and straightforward labeling technique to investigate different bacterial groups in mixed biofilm consortia. General probes were used that bind to Eubacteria (EUB338 + EUB338II + EUB338III; hereafter EUBmix), Firmicutes (LGC354 A-C; hereafter LGCmix), and Bacteroidetes (Bac303). In addition, specific probes binding to Streptococcus mutans (MUT590) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (POGI) were used. The extreme hardness of the surface materials involved (stainless steel and acrylic resin) compelled us to find new ways of preparing the biofilm. As these surface materials could not be readily cut with a cryotome, various sampling methods were explored to obtain intact oral biofilm. The most workable of these approaches is presented in this communication. Small flakes of the biofilm-carrying acrylic resin were scraped off with a sterile scalpel, taking care not to damage the biofilm structure. Forceps were used to collect biofilm from the steel surfaces. Once collected, the samples were fixed and placed directly on polysine coated glass slides. FISH was performed directly on these slides with the probes mentioned above. Various FISH protocols were combined and modified to create a new protocol that was easy to handle. Subsequently the samples were analyzed by confocal laser scanning

  7. The Use of Computer Vision Algorithms for Automatic Orientation of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Jakub Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents analysis of the orientation of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data. In the proposed data processing methodology, point clouds are considered as panoramic images enriched by the depth map. Computer vision (CV) algorithms are used for orientation, which are applied for testing the correctness of the detection of tie points and time of computations, and for assessing difficulties in their implementation. The BRISK, FASRT, MSER, SIFT, SURF, ASIFT and CenSurE algorithms are used to search for key-points. The source data are point clouds acquired using a Z+F 5006h terrestrial laser scanner on the ruins of Iłża Castle, Poland. Algorithms allowing combination of the photogrammetric and CV approaches are also presented.

  8. Modeling the Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon Thin Films Using a High Repetition Rate Scanning Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Černý

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimum design of experimental setup for the preparation of polycrystalline silicon (pc-Si films from amorphous layers applicable in the solar cell production is analyzed in the paper. In the computational simulations, the influence of basic characteristic parameters of the experimental procedure on the mechanisms of pc-Si lateral growth is studied. Among these parameters, the energy density of the applied laser and the thickness of the amorphous silicon (a-Si layer are identified as the most significant. As an optimum solution, the mechanism of pc-Si growth consisting in repeated melting of a part of already crystallized pc-Si layer by the scanning laser is proposed.

  9. Pointwise and scanning laser anemometer measurements in steady and unsteady separated turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R. L.; Chehroudi, B.; Shivaprasad, B. G.

    1982-01-01

    The physical features of steady and unsteady freestream separating turbulent boundary layers that have been determined by pointwise laser anemometer measurements are outlined. It is seen that the large-scale structures control the outer region's backflow behavior. Near the wall, the mean backflow velocity profile for both the steady and unsteady cases is found to scale on the maximum negative mean velocity and its distance from the wall. A description is given of a scanning laser anemometer that produces nearly instantaneous velocity profiles for examing the temporal features of these large-scale structures. Also described is a 'zero-wake' seeder that supplies particles to the outer shear layer and freestream flow with a minimal disturbance.

  10. Model Based Viewpoint Planning for Terrestrial Laser Scanning from AN Economic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wujanz, D.; Neitzel, F.

    2016-06-01

    Despite the enormous popularity of terrestrial laser scanners in the field of Geodesy, economic aspects in the context of data acquisition are mostly considered intuitively. In contrast to established acquisition techniques, such as tacheometry and photogrammetry, optimisation of the acquisition configuration cannot be conducted based on assumed object coordinates, as these would change in dependence to the chosen viewpoint. Instead, a combinatorial viewpoint planning algorithm is proposed that uses a given 3D-model as an input and simulates laser scans based on predefined viewpoints. The method determines a suitably small subset of viewpoints from which the sampled object surface is preferably large. An extension of the basic algorithm is proposed that only considers subsets of viewpoints that can be registered to a common dataset. After exemplification of the method, the expected acquisition time in the field is estimated based on computed viewpoint plans.

  11. Accurate flexural spring constant calibration of colloid probe cantilevers using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Richard S.; Osborn, William A.; Shaw, Gordon A.

    2015-06-01

    Calibration of the flexural spring constant for atomic force microscope (AFM) colloid probe cantilevers provides significant challenges. The presence of a large attached spherical added mass complicates many of the more common calibration techniques such as reference cantilever, Sader, and added mass. Even the most promising option, AFM thermal calibration, can encounter difficulties during the optical lever sensitivity measurement due to strong adhesion and friction between the sphere and a surface. This may cause buckling of the end of the cantilever and hysteresis in the approach-retract curves resulting in increased uncertainty in the calibration. Most recently, a laser Doppler vibrometry thermal method has been used to accurately calibrate the normal spring constant of a wide variety of tipped and tipless commercial cantilevers. This paper describes a variant of the technique, scanning laser Doppler vibrometry, optimized for colloid probe cantilevers and capable of spring constant calibration uncertainties near ±1%.

  12. Efficacy of patterned scan laser in treatment of macular edema and retinal neovascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimple Modi

    2009-08-01

    -term follow-up. PASCAL® photocoagulation can be performed quicker with less discomfort for patients.Keywords: diabetic retinopathy, laser, macular edema, PASCAL, patterned scan laser, photocoagulation, retinal neovascularization

  13. Evaluation of Yogurt Microstructure Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Jacob Lercke; Ghita, Ovidiu; Whelan, Paul F.;

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure of protein networks in yogurts defines important physical properties of the yogurt and hereby partly its quality. Imaging this protein network using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) has shown good results, and CSLM has become a standard measuring technique for fermented...... scanning microscopy images can be used to provide information on the protein microstructure in yogurt products. For large numbers of microscopy images, subjective evaluation becomes a difficult or even impossible approach, if the images should be incorporated in any form of statistical analysis alongside...... to image texture description. Here, CSLM images from a yogurt fermentation study are investigated, where production factors including fat content, protein content, heat treatment, and incubation temperature are varied. The descriptors are evaluated through nearest neighbor classification, variance analysis...

  14. Static terrestrial laser scanning of juvenile understory trees for field phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanhuan; Lin, Yi

    2014-11-01

    This study was to attempt the cutting-edge 3D remote sensing technique of static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) for parametric 3D reconstruction of juvenile understory trees. The data for test was collected with a Leica HDS6100 TLS system in a single-scan way. The geometrical structures of juvenile understory trees are extracted by model fitting. Cones are used to model trunks and branches. Principal component analysis (PCA) is adopted to calculate their major axes. Coordinate transformation and orthogonal projection are used to estimate the parameters of the cones. Then, AutoCAD is utilized to simulate the morphological characteristics of the understory trees, and to add secondary branches and leaves in a random way. Comparison of the reference values and the estimated values gives the regression equation and shows that the proposed algorithm of extracting parameters is credible. The results have basically verified the applicability of TLS for field phenotyping of juvenile understory trees.

  15. Use of laser-scan technology to analyse topography and flow in a weir pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Dresel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of laser-scan techniques provides opportunity for detailed terrain analysis in hydrologic studies. Ground based scans were used to model the ground surface elevation in the area of a stream gauge weir over an area of 240 m2 at a resolution of 0.05 m. The terrain model was used to assess the possibility of flow bypassing the weir and to calculate stream flow during filling of the weir pool, prior to flow through the weir notch. The mapped surface shows a subtle low-lying area at the south end of the structure where flow could bypass the weir. The flow calculations quantify low-flows that do not reach the weir notch during small rain events and flow at the beginning of larger events in the ephemeral stream.

  16. Spatiotemporal Rank Filtering Improves Image Quality Compared to Frame Averaging in 2-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Pinkard

    Full Text Available Live imaging of biological specimens using optical microscopy is limited by tradeoffs between spatial and temporal resolution, depth into intact samples, and phototoxicity. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM, the gold standard for imaging turbid samples in vivo, has conventionally constructed images with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR generated by sequential raster scans of the focal plane and temporal integration of the collected signals. Here, we describe spatiotemporal rank filtering, a nonlinear alternative to temporal integration, which makes more efficient use of collected photons by selectively reducing noise in 2P-LSM images during acquisition. This results in much higher SNR while preserving image edges and fine details. Practically, this allows for at least a four fold decrease in collection times, a substantial improvement for time-course imaging in biological systems.

  17. Absolute and relative surface profile interferometry using multiple frequency-scanned lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Peca, Marek; Vojtíšek, Petr; Lédl, Vít

    2016-01-01

    An interferometer has been used to measure the surface profile of generic object. Frequency scanning interferometry has been employed to provide unambiguous phase readings, to suppress etalon fringes, and to supersede phase-shifting. The frequency scan has been performed in three narrow wavelength bands, each generated by a temperature tuned laser diode. It is shown, that for certain portions of measured object, it was possible to get absolute phase measurement, counting all wave periods from the point of zero path difference, yielding precision of 2.7nm RMS over 11.75mm total path difference. For the other areas where steep slopes were present in object geometry, a relative measurement is still possible, at measured surface roughness comparable to that of machining process (the same 2.7nm RMS). It is concluded, that areas containing steep slopes exhibit systematic error, attributed to a combined factors of dispersion and retrace error.

  18. 2D numerical modelling of gas temperature in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge excited in a high temperature gas-discharge tube for the high-power strontium laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    An active volume scaling in bore and length of a Sr atom laser excited in a nanosecond pulse longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge is carried out. Considering axial symmetry and uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed by numerical methods for determination of gas temperature in a new large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge free zone, in order to find out the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. A 2D model (r, z) of gas temperature is developed by numerical methods for axial symmetry and uniform power input. The model determines gas temperature of nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  19. In vivo measurements of skin barrier: comparison of different methods and advantages of laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, A.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2010-12-01

    A major function of the skin is to provide a protective barrier at the interface between external environment and the organism. For skin barrier measurement, a multiplicity of methods is available. As standard methods, the determination of the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as well as the measurement of the stratum corneum hydration, are widely accepted, although they offer some obvious disadvantages such as increased interference liability. Recently, new optical and spectroscopic methods have been introduced to investigate skin barrier properties in vivo. Especially, laser scanning microscopy has been shown to represent an excellent tool to study skin barrier integrity in many areas of relevance such as cosmetology, occupation, diseased skin, and wound healing.

  20. IMAGING WOOD PULP FIBRE SURFACE LIGNIN BY FLUORESCENCE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KechengLi; DouglasW.Reeve

    2004-01-01

    A novel methodology for imaging wood pulp fibre surface lignin by fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy was developed. Various imaging modes and imaging conditions were explored for quantitative analysis. Acridine Orange was used for labelling lignin and the orthochromatic labelling condition was developed. With the thusly established methodology, the distribution of lignin across the fibre wall was clearly imaged. It was found that surface lignin concentration is about 2-4 times higher than bulk lignin concentration and that high concentration of lignin was also found on the fibre lumen surfaces and pit borders.

  1. IMAGING WOOD PULP FIBRE SURFACE LIGNIN BY FLUORESCENCE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kecheng Li; Douglas W. Reeve

    2004-01-01

    A novel methodology for imaging wood pulp fibre surface lignin by fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy was developed. Various imaging modes and imaging conditions were explored for quantitative analysis. Acridine Orange was used for labelling lignin and the orthochromatic labelling condition was developed. Withthe thusly established methodology, the distribution of lignin across the fibre wall was clearly imaged. It was found that surface lignin concentration is about 2-4 times higher than bulk lignin concentration, and that high concentration of lignin was also found on the fibre lumen surfaces and pit borders.

  2. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with multiple deformable mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Diana C.; Olivier, Scot S.; Jones; Steven M.

    2010-02-23

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopes is introduced to produce non-invasive views of the human retina. The use of dual deformable mirrors improved the dynamic range for correction of the wavefront aberrations compared with the use of the MEMS mirror alone, and improved the quality of the wavefront correction compared with the use of the bimorph mirror alone. The large-stroke bimorph deformable mirror improved the capability for axial sectioning with the confocal imaging system by providing an easier way to move the focus axially through different layers of the retina.

  3. Scanning cross-correlator for monitoring uniform 3D ellipsoidal laser beams

    CERN Document Server

    Zelenogorskii, V V; Gacheva, E I; Gelikonov, G V; Krasilnikov, M; Mart'yanov, M A; Mironov, S Yu; Potemkin, A K; Syresin, E M; Stephan, F; Khazanov, E A

    2014-01-01

    The specific features of experimental implementation of a cross-correlator with a scan rate above 1600 cm s(-1) and a spatial delay amplitude of more than 15 mm are considered. The possibility of measuring the width of femtosecond pulses propagating in a train 300 mu s in duration with a repetition rate of 1 MHz is demonstrated. A time resolution of 300 fs for the maximum time window of 50 ps is attained.The cross-correlator is aimed at testing 3D pulses of a laser driver of an electron photo-injector.

  4. Terrestrial Laser Scanning Cultural Heritage preservation in case of natural hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordic, B.; Medak, D.; Pribicevic, B.

    2009-04-01

    Croatian Adriatic coast and the City of Zagreb area are hazardous with respect to earthquake occurance. These areas are rich with cultural monuments, buildings, sculptures... Accurate 3D documentation is needed for reconstruction in case of damage caused by natural disasters like earthquake, landslide ,fire... The technology of terestrial laser scanning is a promising method for providing exact 3D models of cultural heritage. Meshes, point-clouds and models should be collected and constructed. Georeferenced models can be used for tourism as a basis for virtual worlds available both in the WWW or on DVD-s...

  5. The scanning laser ophthalmoscope-a review of its role in bioscience and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) offers the potential for retinal imaging that is complementary both to that of the fundus camera and also the newly developing technique of optical coherence tomography (OCT). It has the ability to produce rapid images at low light levels using light of specific wavelengths. This permits temporal studies of fluorescent-labelled cells which offer a unique insight into inflammatory processes in the eye. The facility to image with several different wavelengths simultaneously offers the potential for spectral imaging of retinal tissue with the aim of revealing those early changes in tissue perfusion that indicate the onset of retinal disease, so increasing the probability of successful therapy

  6. Investigation of strain heterogeneities by laser scanning extensometry in strain ageing materials: application to zirconium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graff, S.; Forest, S.; Strudel, J.L. [Centre des Materiaux / UMR 7633, Ecole des Mines de Paris / CNRS, BP 87, 91003 Evry (France); Dierke, H.; Neuhauser, H. [Institut fur Physik der Kondensierten Materie, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Prioul, C. [MSSMAT, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry (France); Bechade, J.L. [SRMA, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2005-07-01

    Laser scanning extensometry was used to detect and characterize propagating plastic instabilities such as the Luders bands at the millimeter scale. Spatio-temporal plastic heterogeneities are due to either static or dynamic strain ageing (SSA and DSA) phenomena. Regarding zirconium alloys, different type of heterogeneities were observed: their features strongly depended on mechanical test conditions. In one case, they appeared to be non propagating but preserved along the stress-strain curve and were associated with SSA effects such as stress peaks after relaxation periods or after unloading steps with waiting times. In other case, they appeared as non propagating but were not associated with SSA effects. (authors)

  7. Design & Reality of CAD/CAM in Laser Beam Scanning Manufacturing System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jianjun; SUN Huilai; ZHAO Fangfang; LIN Shuzhong; QI Xiangyang

    2006-01-01

    In laser beam scanning manufacturing (LSM) system the PLT file was adopted as design file. The data of design file were processed by CAD software programmed. And the control model was adopted DEA control model. The DEA model was concerned with not only the distance of the two swaying mirrors, the distance between the swaying mirror and convex lens, the mirror swaying angle and the lens focal length but also the lens central height, the lens convex radius and the medium refractive index. It improved the precision and reduced the error in LBM system. The application of CAD/CAM system in LSM improved the LSM manufacturing velocity and manufacturing quality.

  8. Reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy for detecting internal voids in structural ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, D.J.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of 100 MHz scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting internal voids in sintered specimens of silicon nitride and silicon carbide was evaluated. The specimens contained artificially implanted voids and were positioned at depths ranging up to 2 mm below the specimen surface. Detection probability of 0.90 at a 0.95 confidence level was determined as a function of material, void diameter, and void depth. The statistical results presented for void detectability indicate some of the strengths and limitations of SLAM as a nondestructive evaluation technique for structural ceramics.

  9. Quantitative void characterization in structural ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, D.J.; Generazio, E.R.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) to characterize artificially seeded voids in sintered silicon nitride structural ceramic specimens was investigated. Using trigonometric relationships and Airy's diffraction theory, predictions of internal void depth and size were obtained from acoustic diffraction patterns produced by the voids. Agreement was observed between actual and predicted void depths. However, predicted void diameters were generally much greater than actual diameters. Precise diameter predictions are difficult to obtain due to measurement uncertainty and the limitations of 100 MHz SLAM applied to typical ceramic specimens.

  10. Reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy for detecting internal voids in structural ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, D.J.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-07-01

    The reliability of 100 MHz scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting internal voids in sintered specimens of silicon nitride and silicon carbide was evaluated. The specimens contained artificially implanted voids and were positioned at depths ranging up to 2 mm below the specimen surface. Detection probability of 0.90 at a 0.95 confidence level was determined as a function of material, void diameter, and void depth. The statistical results presented for void detectability indicate some of the strengths and limitations of SLAM as a nondestructive evaluation technique for structural ceramics. 28 references.

  11. Using laser confocal scanning microscope to study ischemia-hypoxia injury in rat brain slice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The level of lipid peroxidation and cellular necrosis in rat living brain slices during brain ischemia-hypoxia injury have been observed using a laser confocal scanning microscope (LCSM) with double labeling of fluorescent probes D-399 (2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate) and propidium iodide (PI).The hypoxia and/or reoxygenation injury in rat brain slices is markedly decreased by pretreatment with L-NG-nitro-arginine (L-NNA) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC),showing that the nitric oxide (NO) and other free radicals play an important role in brain ischemia-hypoxia injury.

  12. OBSERVATION OF THE ALTERNATION OF NUCLEIC ACID IN BRAIN SLICE AND NEURONS BY CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Confocal laser scanning microscope is one of the most important biomedicine Altus instru ment〔1〕. It has the characteristics of high sensitivity for detecting the stereo structure, and can scan a few hundreds of micrometer-thick tissue. It may get graphs of intracyte or tissue with uninvading stage scan and is named "cell CT". In this study, the nucleic acid alterations of whole brain slice was investigated with this technique after the formation of LTP.

  13. A new laser vibrometry-based 2D selective intensity method for source identification in reverberant fields: part II. Application to an aircraft cabin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, G. M.; Martarelli, M.; Chiariotti, P.

    2010-07-01

    The selective intensity technique is a powerful tool for the localization of acoustic sources and for the identification of the structural contribution to the acoustic emission. In practice, the selective intensity method is based on simultaneous measurements of acoustic intensity, by means of a couple of matched microphones, and structural vibration of the emitting object. In this paper high spatial density multi-point vibration data, acquired by using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer, have been used for the first time. Therefore, by applying the selective intensity algorithm, the contribution of a large number of structural sources to the acoustic field radiated by the vibrating object can be estimated. The selective intensity represents the distribution of the acoustic monopole sources on the emitting surface, as if each monopole acted separately from the others. This innovative selective intensity approach can be very helpful when the measurement is performed on large panels in highly reverberating environments, such as aircraft cabins. In this case the separation of the direct acoustic field (radiated by the vibrating panels of the fuselage) and the reverberant one is difficult by traditional techniques. The work shown in this paper is the application of part of the results of the European project CREDO (Cabin Noise Reduction by Experimental and Numerical Design Optimization) carried out within the framework of the EU. Therefore the aim of this paper is to illustrate a real application of the method to the interior acoustic characterization of an Alenia Aeronautica ATR42 ground test facility, Alenia Aeronautica being a partner of the CREDO project.

  14. Coupling airborne laser scanning and acoustic Doppler current profiler data to model stream rating curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, N.; Lyon, S. W.; Kean, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The rating curve enables the translation of water depth into discharge through a reference cross section. Errors in estimating stream channel geometry can therefore result in increased discharge uncertainty. This study investigates coupling national-scale airborne laser scanning (ALS) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) bathymetric survey data for generating stream rating curves. Specifically, stream channel geometries were generated from coupled ALS and ADCP scanning data collected for a well-monitored site located in northern Sweden. These data were used to define the hydraulic geometry required by a physically-based 1-D hydraulic model. The results of our study demonstrate that the effects of potential scanning data errors on the model generated rating curve were less than the uncertainties due to stream gauging measurements and empirical rating curve fitting. Further analysis of the ALS data showed that an overestimation of the streambank elevation (the main scanning data error) was primarily due to vegetation that could be adjusted for through a root-mean-square-error bias correction. We consider these findings encouraging as hydrometric agencies can potentially leverage national-scale ALS and ADCP instrumentation to reduce the cost and effort required for maintaining and establish rating curves at gauging stations.

  15. Airborne Laser Scanning of Forest Stem Volume in a Mountainous Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemens Schadauer

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Airborne laser scanning (ALS is an active remote sensing technique that uses the time-of-flight measurement principle to capture the three-dimensional structure of the earth’s surface with pulsed lasers that transmit nanosecond-long laser pulses with a high pulse repetition frequency. Over forested areas most of the laser pulses are reflected by the leaves and branches of the trees, but a certain fraction of the laser pulses reaches the forest floor through small gaps in the canopy. Thus it is possible to reconstruct both the three-dimensional structure of the forest canopy and the terrain surface. For the retrieval of quantitative forest parameters such as stem volume or biomass it is necessary to use models that combine ALS with inventory data. One approach is to use multiplicative regression models that are trained with local inventory data. This method has been widely applied over boreal forest regions, but so far little experience exists with applying this method for mapping alpine forest. In this study the transferability of this approach to a 128 km2 large mountainous region in Vorarlberg, Austria, was evaluated. For the calibration of the model, inventory data as operationally collected by Austrian foresters were used. Despite these inventory data are based on variable sample plot sizes, they could be used for mapping stem volume for the entire alpine study area. The coefficient of determination R2 was 0.85 and the root mean square error (RMSE 90.9 m3ha-1 (relative error of 21.4% which is comparable to results of ALS studies conducted over topographically less complex environments. Due to the increasing availability, ALS data could become an operational part of Austrian’s forest inventories.

  16. Testing of Land Cover Classification from Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakuła, K.; Kupidura, P.; Jełowicki, Ł.

    2016-06-01

    Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning provides a new opportunity for airborne data collection. It provides high-density topographic surveying and is also a useful tool for land cover mapping. Use of a minimum of three intensity images from a multiwavelength laser scanner and 3D information included in the digital surface model has the potential for land cover/use classification and a discussion about the application of this type of data in land cover/use mapping has recently begun. In the test study, three laser reflectance intensity images (orthogonalized point cloud) acquired in green, near-infrared and short-wave infrared bands, together with a digital surface model, were used in land cover/use classification where six classes were distinguished: water, sand and gravel, concrete and asphalt, low vegetation, trees and buildings. In the tested methods, different approaches for classification were applied: spectral (based only on laser reflectance intensity images), spectral with elevation data as additional input data, and spectro-textural, using morphological granulometry as a method of texture analysis of both types of data: spectral images and the digital surface model. The method of generating the intensity raster was also tested in the experiment. Reference data were created based on visual interpretation of ALS data and traditional optical aerial and satellite images. The results have shown that multispectral ALS data are unlike typical multispectral optical images, and they have a major potential for land cover/use classification. An overall accuracy of classification over 90% was achieved. The fusion of multi-wavelength laser intensity images and elevation data, with the additional use of textural information derived from granulometric analysis of images, helped to improve the accuracy of classification significantly. The method of interpolation for the intensity raster was not very helpful, and using intensity rasters with both first and last return

  17. Viability and antibacterial efficacy of four root canal disinfection techniques evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Mathew

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several disinfection techniques have been recently introduced with the main objective of improving root canal disinfection in the inaccessible areas of the root canal system. This in vitro study was done to evaluate the antimicrobial effect and viability of Enterococcus faecalis biofilms using conventional irrigation, EndoActivator (Dentsply, Tulsa Dental, USA, diode laser irradiation and photon-initiated photoacoustic streaming (PIPS. Materials and Methods: Root canals of 130 single rooted mandibular premolars, standardized to a uniform length of 20 mm were instrumented until finishing file, F1 (Universal Protaper Rotary System, Dentsply, Tulsa Dental Specialties, USA. After smear layer removal and sterilization, five teeth were randomly selected to assure sterility before bacterial inoculation. The remaining 125 samples were contaminated with E. faecalis suspension, incubated for 21 days and divided into five groups (n = 25. In Group 1; untreated group (positive control, the root canals were not subjected to any disinfection procedure. Sampling was performed within the canals and the colony-forming unit count was evaluated for 20 samples. Five samples were selected to visualize the pattern of colonization at Level 1 (4 mm from the apex and Level 2 (1 mm from the apex by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Samples in Groups 2-5 namely conventional needle irrigation, EndoActivator, diode laser and PIPS were subjected to their respective disinfection procedures. Postdisinfection sample evaluation criteria was followed for all groups as same as that for Group 1. Results: Diode laser displayed the highest antibacterial efficacy and least viable bacteria than the other three disinfection techniques. Conclusion: Diode laser group showed better antibacterial efficacy and least viable bacteria when compared to conventional needle irrigation, PIPS and EndoActivator groups in minimally instrumented, experimentally infected root canals.

  18. Comparison of high resolution terrestrial laser scanning and terrestrial photogrammetry for modeling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Samed; Bayrak, Temel

    2016-04-01

    3D documentation of cultural heritage and engineering projects is an important matter. These documentation applications, requires highest possible accuracy and detail to represent the actual surface correctly. Terrestrial photogrammetric method which is employed to produce 3D models to day, now can obtain dense point clouds thanks to advancements in computer technology. Terrestrial laser scanners gained popularity in the last decade because of their high capacity and today they are being widely used in many applications. However every application has its own requirements that depend on the type of application, modeling environment, accuracy and budget limitations. This means, for every application highest accuracy instruments are not always best, considering the facts that mentioned before. In this study, laser scanner and terrestrial photogrammetric methods' spatial and model accuracies investigated under various conditions which include measuring targets at different instrument to object distances then investigating the accuracy of these measurements, modeling an irregular shaped surface to compare two surfaces volume and surface areas, at last comparing dimensions of known geometrical shaped small objects. Also terrestrial laser scanners and terrestrial photogrammetric methods most suitable application conditions investigated in terms of cost, time, mobility and accuracy. Terrestrial laser scanner has the ability to, measure distances under cm accuracy and directly measuring 3D world but there is also some drawbacks like sensitive, bulky and expensive equipment. When it comes to terrestrial photogrammetry, it has above cm accuracy, comparatively fast (considering the image acquisition stage), inexpensive but it can be affected by the coarse geometry, surface texture and the environmental lighting. Key Words: Accuracy, Comparison, Model, Terrestrial Photogrammetry, Terrestrial Laser Scanning,.

  19. QUANTIFICATION OF BIOFILMS IN MULTI-SPECTRAL DIGITAL1 VOLUMES FROM CONFOCAL LASER-SCANNING MICROSCOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Rodenacker

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Populations of bacteria in sludge flocs and biofilm marked by fluorescence marked with fluorescent probes are digitised with a confocal laser scanning microscope. These data are used to analyse the microbial community structure, to obtain information on the localisation of specific bacterial groups and to examine gene expression. This information is urgently required for an in-depth understanding of the function and, more generally, the microbial ecology of biofilms. Methods derived from quantitative image analysis are applied to digitised data from confocal laser scanning microscopes to obtain quantitative descriptions of volumetric, topological (and topographical properties of different compartments of the components under research. In addition to free-moving flocs, also biofilms attached to a substratum in an experimental environment are analysed. Growth form as well as interaction of components are quantitatively described. Classical measurements of volume and intensity (shape, distribution and distance dependent interaction measurements using methods from mathematical morphology are performed. Mainly image (volume processing methods are outlined. Segmented volumes are globally and individually (in terms of 3Dconnected components measured and used for distance mapping transform as well as for estimation of geodesic distances from the substrate. All transformations are applied on the 3D data set. Resulting distance distributions are quantified and related to information on the identity and activity of the probe-identified bacteria.

  20. Evaluation of confocal laser scanning microscopy for enumeration of virus-like particles in aquatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agis, Martin; Luef, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Abundances of virus-like particles (VLPs, mostly bacteriophages) are high in aquatic environments; therefore, techniques for precise enumeration are essential in ecological monitoring. VLPs were determined after staining with SYBR Gold by conventional epifluorescence microscopy and compared to enumerations performed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In order to assess the potential of CLSM for viral direct counts (VDCs), we processed samples from different freshwater and marine systems. Optical sectioning by CLSM and production of an overlay picture of multiple scans enables the often uneven whole investigated filter area to be brought to the plane of focus. This allows for subsequent image analysis of digitally created high-quality images. Another advantage using the CLSM was that the short spot excitation of the stain via laser beam minimized fading of the stain. The VDC results show that there is no significant difference between the two methods. Regarding the known difficulties of viral abundance estimates on particulate material, CLSM was further applied to enumerate VLPs on a small set of marine transparent exopolymeric particles sampled from the Atlantic Ocean. Our data suggest that CLSM is a useful tool to count viruses in water samples as well as attached to certain types of aquatic aggregates. PMID:23108709

  1. Conceptual Issues Regarding the Development of Underground Railway Laser Scanning Systems

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    Raymond Hung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS systems are widely applied for spatial data collection and support applications in many aspects. In recent years, MLS technology had been introduced to railway applications and greatly enhanced the spatial detail and efficiency when compared to traditional approaches. However, the advance of MLS technology is not completely applied to railway environment. Typical MLS systems rely on integrated navigation through the use of Inertial Navigation Systems (INS and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS for geo-referencing, while operation under long-term GNSS outages or even GNSS-free environments, such as underground railway or long tunnels, remains a challenging issue due to the degraded operation of standalone inertial navigation. Commercial MLS systems usually employ high performance inertial measurement units (IMU and various strategies to manage GNSS outages, but GNSS components are still necessary prior to and after experiencing the loss of GNSS signals. To tackle the problem of permanent GNSS outages, alternative methods are introduced to replace the GNSS and so allow the use of MLS systems in GNSS-free underground railway environments. Such approaches encourage the MLS systems to be developed into the Underground Railway Laser Scanning (URLS systems, which may provide several alternative operational functions for the management of underground railway operation.

  2. High Resolution Airborne Laser Scanning and Hyperspectral Imaging with a Small Uav Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallay, Michal; Eck, Christoph; Zgraggen, Carlo; Kaňuk, Ján; Dvorný, Eduard

    2016-06-01

    The capabilities of unmanned airborne systems (UAS) have become diverse with the recent development of lightweight remote sensing instruments. In this paper, we demonstrate our custom integration of the state-of-the-art technologies within an unmanned aerial platform capable of high-resolution and high-accuracy laser scanning, hyperspectral imaging, and photographic imaging. The technological solution comprises the latest development of a completely autonomous, unmanned helicopter by Aeroscout, the Scout B1-100 UAV helicopter. The helicopter is powered by a gasoline two-stroke engine and it allows for integrating 18 kg of a customized payload unit. The whole system is modular providing flexibility of payload options, which comprises the main advantage of the UAS. The UAS integrates two kinds of payloads which can be altered. Both payloads integrate a GPS/IMU with a dual GPS antenna configuration provided by OXTS for accurate navigation and position measurements during the data acquisition. The first payload comprises a VUX-1 laser scanner by RIEGL and a Sony A6000 E-Mount photo camera. The second payload for hyperspectral scanning integrates a push-broom imager AISA KESTREL 10 by SPECIM. The UAS was designed for research of various aspects of landscape dynamics (landslides, erosion, flooding, or phenology) in high spectral and spatial resolution.

  3. HIGH RESOLUTION AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING AND HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING WITH A SMALL UAV PLATFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gallay

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The capabilities of unmanned airborne systems (UAS have become diverse with the recent development of lightweight remote sensing instruments. In this paper, we demonstrate our custom integration of the state-of-the-art technologies within an unmanned aerial platform capable of high-resolution and high-accuracy laser scanning, hyperspectral imaging, and photographic imaging. The technological solution comprises the latest development of a completely autonomous, unmanned helicopter by Aeroscout, the Scout B1-100 UAV helicopter. The helicopter is powered by a gasoline two-stroke engine and it allows for integrating 18 kg of a customized payload unit. The whole system is modular providing flexibility of payload options, which comprises the main advantage of the UAS. The UAS integrates two kinds of payloads which can be altered. Both payloads integrate a GPS/IMU with a dual GPS antenna configuration provided by OXTS for accurate navigation and position measurements during the data acquisition. The first payload comprises a VUX-1 laser scanner by RIEGL and a Sony A6000 E-Mount photo camera. The second payload for hyperspectral scanning integrates a push-broom imager AISA KESTREL 10 by SPECIM. The UAS was designed for research of various aspects of landscape dynamics (landslides, erosion, flooding, or phenology in high spectral and spatial resolution.

  4. Laser Scanning of a Monolithic Column during Processing in Middle Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajioka, O.; Hori, Y.

    2011-09-01

    From ancient quarries around Akoris in Middle Egypt, which belong to the Ptolemaic and Roman periods, the stone blocks could be carried to the working area located in the outside of the city. Those blocks included a giant monolithic column measured approximately 14m in length, which had been cracked for reasons unknown and must have contributed to disuse of monolith. The first deal is a comparison of plans drawn by the point clouds by laser scanning with those coming from plane-tabling, which had been one of popular methods for measuring in the last century. This part shows how the laser scanning technology is useful in far better measuring and documentation of the site. The second discuss is about a detailed assessment of the procedure of processing through the observation of chisel marks and the detail analysis about the 3 dimensional data. In the result, we are succeed to show the restoration of the procedure of the proceedings using guidelines and a wooden curve since we concentrate attention on the point of abstracting the centre line and shaving the surface into the round shape.

  5. Epiphany sealer penetration into dentinal tubules: Confocal laser scanning microscopic study

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    S V Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of the following study was to evaluate the percentage and average depth of epiphany sealer penetration into dentinal tubules among the coronal, middle and apical thirds of the root using the confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Materials and Methods: A total of 10 maxillary central incisors were prepared and obturated with Resilon-Epiphany system. Sealer was mixed with fluorescent rhodamine B isothiyocyanate dye for visibility under confocal microscope. Teeth were cross-sectioned into coronal, middle and apical sections-2 mm thick. Sections were observed under CLSM. Images were analyzed for percentage and average depth of sealer penetration into dentinal tubules using the lasso tool in Adobe Photoshop CS3 (Adobe systems incorporated, San jose, CA and laser scanning microscopy (LSM 5 image analyzer. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way analysis of variance with Student Neuman Keuls post hoc tests, Kruskal-Wallis test and Wilcoxon signed-rank post hoc tests. Results: The results showed that a higher percentage of sealer penetration in coronal section-89.23%, followed by middle section-84.19% and the apical section-64.9%. Average depth of sealer penetration for coronal section was 526.02 μm, middle-385.26 μm and apical-193.49 μm. Conclusions: Study concluded that there was higher epiphany sealer penetration seen in coronal followed by middle and least at apical third of the roots.

  6. Application of laser scan microscopy in vivo for wound healing characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering the advancing age of the population, wound healing disturbances are becoming increasingly important in clinical routine. The development of wound healing creams and lotions as well as therapy control require an objective evaluation of the wound healing process, which represents the destruction of the barrier. Therefore, transepidermal water loss measurements are often carried out. These measurements have the disadvantage that they are disturbed by the interstitial fluid, which is located on the surface of chronic wounds and also by water components of the creams and lotions. Additionally, the TEWL measurements are very sensitive to temperature changes and to the anxiety of the volunteers. In the present study, in vivo laser scanning microscopy was used to analyze the reepithelialization and barrier recovery of standardized wounds produced by the suction blister technique. It was demonstrated that this non-invasive, on-line spectroscopic method allows the evaluation of the wound healing process, without any disturbances. It was found that the wound healing starts not only from the edges of the wound, but also out of the hair follicles. The in vivo laser scanning microscopy is well suited to evaluate the efficacy of wound healing creams and for therapy control

  7. LIDAR AND INS FUSION IN PERIODS OF GPS OUTAGES FOR MOBILE LASER SCANNING MAPPING SYSTEMS

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    I. Klein

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile laser scanning systems are becoming an increasingly popular means to obtain 3D coverage on a large scale. To perform the mapping, the exact position of the vehicle must be known throughout the trajectory. Exact position is achieved via integration of Global Positioning Systems (GPS and Inertial Navigation Systems (INS. Yet, in urban environments, cases of complete or even partial GPS outages may occur leaving the navigation solution to rely only on the INS. The INS navigation solution degrades with time as the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU measurements contains noise, which permeates into the navigation equations. Degradation of the position determination leads to loss of data in such segments. To circumvent such drift and its effects, we propose fusing INS with lidar data by using building edges. This detection of edges is then translated into position data, which is used as an aiding to the INS. It thereby enables the determination of the vehicle position with a satisfactory level accuracy, sufficient to perform the laser-scanning based mapping in those outage periods.

  8. Compact Multipurpose Mobile Laser Scanning System — Initial Tests and Results

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    Craig Glennie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a prototype compact mobile laser scanning system that may be operated from a backpack or unmanned aerial vehicle. The system is small, self-contained, relatively inexpensive, and easy to deploy. A description of system components is presented, along with the initial calibration of the multi-sensor platform. The first field tests of the system, both in backpack mode and mounted on a helium balloon for real-world applications are presented. For both field tests, the acquired kinematic LiDAR data are compared with highly accurate static terrestrial laser scanning point clouds. These initial results show that the vertical accuracy of the point cloud for the prototype system is approximately 4 cm (1σ in balloon mode, and 3 cm (1σ in backpack mode while horizontal accuracy was approximately 17 cm (1σ for the balloon tests. Results from selected study areas on the Sacramento River Delta and San Andreas Fault in California demonstrate system performance, deployment agility and flexibility, and potential for operational production of high density and highly accurate point cloud data. Cost and production rate trade-offs place this system in the niche between existing airborne and tripod mounted LiDAR systems.

  9. Tritium Removal from JET and TFTR Tiles by a Scanning Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast and efficient tritium removal is needed for future D-T machines with carbon plasma-facing components. A novel method for tritium release has been demonstrated on co-deposited layers on tiles retrieved from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and from the Joint European Torus (JET). A scanning continuous wave neodymium laser beam was focused to =100 W/mm2 and scanned at high speed over the co-deposits, heating them to temperatures =2000 C for about 10 ms in either air or argon atmospheres. Fiber optic coupling between the laser and scanner was implemented. Up to 87% of the co-deposited tritium was thermally desorbed from the JET and TFTR samples. This technique appears to be a promising in-situ method for tritium removal in a next-step D-T device as it avoids oxidation, the associated de-conditioning of the plasma-facing surfaces, and the expense of processing large quantities of tritium oxide

  10. Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometry Application to Artworks: New Acoustic and Mechanical Exciters for Structural Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnani, A.; Esposito, E.

    After first attempts some years ago, the scanning laser Doppler vibrometer has become an effective way of diagnosing different types of artworks; successful applications regard frescoes, icons, mosaics, ceramic artefacts and wood inlays. Also application to historical bridges has been successfully developed and a recently approved European Commission project will see the employment of scanning laser Doppler Vibrometry (SLDV) for the dynamical characterization of ancient buildings. However, a critical issue consists in the adequate excitation of the structure under test. Moreover different types of defects and different kinds of artworks require different types of excitation, so this topic needs a deep consideration. In this work we will present two new types of exciters developed at our Department, namely an acoustic exciter and a mechanical one. Acoustic exciters allow remote non-invasive loading but are limited in the lower frequency range and in the amount of vibrational energy input into the structure. The proposed automatic tapping device based on a commercial impact hammer overcomes these problems. Also another acoustic exciter, a HyperSonic Sound (HSS) source has been evaluated, showing interesting features as regards sound radiation.

  11. Assessment of Light Environment Variability in Broadleaved Forest Canopies Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

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    Dimitry Van der Zande

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Light availability inside a forest canopy is of key importance to many ecosystem processes, such as photosynthesis and transpiration. Assessment of light availability and within-canopy light variability enables a more detailed understanding of these biophysical processes. The changing light-vegetation interaction in a homogeneous oak (Quercus robur L. stand was studied at different moments during the growth season using terrestrial laser scanning datasets and ray tracing technology. Three field campaigns were organized at regular time intervals (24 April 2008; 07 May 2008; 23 May 2008 to monitor the increase of foliage material. The laser scanning data was used to generate 3D representations of the forest stands, enabling structure feature extraction and light interception modeling, using the Voxel-Based Light Interception Model (VLIM. The VLIM is capable of estimating the relative light intensity or Percentage of Above Canopy Light (PACL at any arbitrary point in the modeled crown space. This resulted in a detailed description of the dynamic light environments inside the canopy. Mean vertical light extinction profiles were calculated for the three time frames, showing significant differences in light attenuation by the canopy between April 24 on the one hand, and May 7 and May 23 on the other hand. The proposed methodology created the opportunity to link these within-canopy light distributions to the increasing amount of photosynthetically active leaf material and its distribution in the considered 3D space.

  12. Extraction of Vertical Walls from Mobile Laser Scanning Data for Solar Potential Assessment

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    Martin Rutzinger

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increasing demand among home owners for cost effective sustainable energy production such as solar energy to provide heating and electricity. A lot of research has focused on the assessment of the incoming solar radiation on roof planes acquired by, e.g., Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS. However, solar panels can also be mounted on building facades in order to increase renewable energy supply. Due to limited reflections of points from vertical walls, ALS data is not suitable to perform solar potential assessment of vertical building facades. This paper focuses on a new method for automatic solar radiation modeling of facades acquired by Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS and uses the full 3D information of the point cloud for both the extraction of vertical walls covered by the survey and solar potential analysis. Furthermore, a new method isintroduced determining the interior and exterior face, respectively, of each detected wall in order to calculate its slope and aspect angles that are of crucial importance for solar potential assessment. Shadowing effects of nearby objects are considered by computing the 3D horizon of each point of a facade segment within the 3D point cloud.

  13. The Use of Airborne and Mobile Laser Scanning for Modeling Railway Environments in 3D

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    Lingli Zhu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents methods for 3D modeling of railway environments from airborne laser scanning (ALS and mobile laser scanning (MLS. Conventionally, aerial data such as ALS and aerial images were utilized for 3D model reconstruction. However, 3D model reconstruction only from aerial-view datasets can not meet the requirement of advanced visualization (e.g., walk-through visualization. In this paper, objects in a railway environment such as the ground, railroads, buildings, high voltage powerlines, pylons and so on were reconstructed and visualized in real-life experiments in Kokemaki, Finland. Because of the complex terrain and scenes in railway environments, 3D modeling is challenging, especially for high resolution walk-through visualizations. However, MLS has flexible platforms and provides the possibility of acquiring data in a complex environment in high detail by combining with ALS data to produce complete 3D scene modeling. A procedure from point cloud classification to 3D reconstruction and 3D visualization is introduced, and new solutions are proposed for object extraction, 3D reconstruction, model simplification and final model 3D visualization. Image processing technology is used for the classification, 3D randomized Hough transformations (RHT are used for the planar detection, and a quadtree approach is used for the ground model simplification. The results are visually analyzed by a comparison with an orthophoto at a 20 cm ground resolution.

  14. Laser Scanning In Vivo Confocal Microscopy of Clear Grafts after Penetrating Keratoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dai; Song, Peng; Wang, Shuting; Sun, Dapeng; Wang, Yuexin; Zhang, Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the changes of keratocytes and dendritic cells in the central clear graft by laser scanning in vivo confocal microscopy after penetrating keratoplasty (PK). Methods. Thirty adult subjects receiving PK at Shandong Eye Institute and with clear grafts and no sign of immune rejection after surgery were recruited into this study, and 10 healthy adults were controls. The keratocytes and dendritic cells in the central graft were evaluated by laser scanning confocal microscopy, as well as epithelium cells, keratocytes, corneal endothelium cells, and corneal nerves (especially subepithelial plexus nerves). Results. Median density of subepithelial plexus nerves, keratocyte density in each layer of the stroma, and density of corneal endothelium cells were all lower in clear grafts than in controls. The dendritic cells of five (16.7%) patients were active in Bowman's membrane and stromal membrane of the graft after PK. Conclusions. Activated dendritic cells and Langerhans cells could be detected in some of the clear grafts, which indicated that the subclinical stress of immune reaction took part in the chronic injury of the clear graft after PK, even when there was no clinical rejection episode. PMID:27034940

  15. Laser Scanning In Vivo Confocal Microscopy of Clear Grafts after Penetrating Keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the changes of keratocytes and dendritic cells in the central clear graft by laser scanning in vivo confocal microscopy after penetrating keratoplasty (PK. Methods. Thirty adult subjects receiving PK at Shandong Eye Institute and with clear grafts and no sign of immune rejection after surgery were recruited into this study, and 10 healthy adults were controls. The keratocytes and dendritic cells in the central graft were evaluated by laser scanning confocal microscopy, as well as epithelium cells, keratocytes, corneal endothelium cells, and corneal nerves (especially subepithelial plexus nerves. Results. Median density of subepithelial plexus nerves, keratocyte density in each layer of the stroma, and density of corneal endothelium cells were all lower in clear grafts than in controls. The dendritic cells of five (16.7% patients were active in Bowman’s membrane and stromal membrane of the graft after PK. Conclusions. Activated dendritic cells and Langerhans cells could be detected in some of the clear grafts, which indicated that the subclinical stress of immune reaction took part in the chronic injury of the clear graft after PK, even when there was no clinical rejection episode.

  16. A 5-mm piezo-scanning fiber device for high speed ultrafast laser microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferhanoglu, Onur; Yildirim, Murat; Subramanian, Kaushik; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2014-07-01

    Towards developing precise microsurgery tools for the clinic, we previously developed image-guided miniaturized devices using low repetition rate amplified ultrafast lasers for surgery. To improve the speed of tissue removal while reducing device diameter, here we present a new 5-mm diameter device that delivers high-repetition rate laser pulses for high speed ultrafast laser microsurgery. The device consists of an air-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBF) for the delivery of high energy pulses, a piezoelectric tube actuator for fiber scanning, and two aspheric lenses for focusing the light. Its inline optical architecture provides easy alignment and substantial size reduction to 5 mm diameter as compared to our previous MEMS-scanning devices while realizing improved intensity squared (two-photon) lateral and axial resolutions of 1.16 μm and 11.46 μm, respectively. Our study also sheds light on the maximum pulse energies that can be delivered through the air-core PBF and identifies cladding damage at the input facet of the fiber as the limiting factor. We have achieved a maximum energy delivery larger than 700 nJ at 92% coupling efficiency. An in depth analysis reveals how this value is greatly affected by possible slight misalignments of the beam during coupling and the measured small beam pointing fluctuations. In the absence of these imperfections, self-phase modulation becomes the limiting factor for the maximum energy delivery, setting the theoretical upper bound to near 2 μJ for a 1-m long, 7-μm, air-core PBF. Finally, the use of a 300 kHz repetition rate fiber laser enabled rapid ablation of 150 µm x 150 µm area within only 50 ms. Such ablation speeds can now allow the surgeons to translate the surgery device as fast as ~4 mm/s to continuously remove a thin layer of a 150 µm wide tissue. Thanks to a high optical transmission efficiency of the in-line optical architecture of the device and improved resolution, we could successfully perform ablation of

  17. Laser Scanning in Engineering Surveying: Methods of Measurement and Modeling of Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenda, Grzegorz; Uznański, Andrzej; Strach, Michał; Lewińska, Paulina

    2016-06-01

    The study is devoted to the uses of laser scanning in the field of engineering surveying. It is currently one of the main trends of research which is developed at the Department of Engineering Surveying and Civil Engineering at the Faculty of Mining Surveying and Environmental Engineering of AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow. They mainly relate to the issues associated with tower and shell structures, infrastructure of rail routes, or development of digital elevation models for a wide range of applications. These issues often require the use of a variety of scanning techniques (stationary, mobile), but the differences also regard the planning of measurement stations and methods of merging point clouds. Significant differences appear during the analysis of point clouds, especially when modeling objects. Analysis of the selected parameters is already possible basing on ad hoc measurements carried out on a point cloud. However, only the construction of three-dimensional models provides complete information about the shape of structures, allows to perform the analysis in any place and reduces the amount of the stored data. Some structures can be modeled in the form of simple axes, sections, or solids, for others it becomes necessary to create sophisticated models of surfaces, depicting local deformations. The examples selected for the study allow to assess the scope of measurement and office work for a variety of uses related to the issue set forth in the title of this study. Additionally, the latest, forward-looking technology was presented - laser scanning performed from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (drones). Currently, it is basically in the prototype phase, but it might be expected to make a significant progress in numerous applications in the field of engineering surveying.

  18. Laser Scanning in Engineering Surveying: Methods of Measurement and Modeling of Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenda Grzegorz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study is devoted to the uses of laser scanning in the field of engineering surveying. It is currently one of the main trends of research which is developed at the Department of Engineering Surveying and Civil Engineering at the Faculty of Mining Surveying and Environmental Engineering of AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow. They mainly relate to the issues associated with tower and shell structures, infrastructure of rail routes, or development of digital elevation models for a wide range of applications. These issues often require the use of a variety of scanning techniques (stationary, mobile, but the differences also regard the planning of measurement stations and methods of merging point clouds. Significant differences appear during the analysis of point clouds, especially when modeling objects. Analysis of the selected parameters is already possible basing on ad hoc measurements carried out on a point cloud. However, only the construction of three-dimensional models provides complete information about the shape of structures, allows to perform the analysis in any place and reduces the amount of the stored data. Some structures can be modeled in the form of simple axes, sections, or solids, for others it becomes necessary to create sophisticated models of surfaces, depicting local deformations. The examples selected for the study allow to assess the scope of measurement and office work for a variety of uses related to the issue set forth in the title of this study. Additionally, the latest, forward-looking technology was presented - laser scanning performed from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (drones. Currently, it is basically in the prototype phase, but it might be expected to make a significant progress in numerous applications in the field of engineering surveying.

  19. Biochar Erosion in a Temperate Forest Assessed with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, Milutin; Bruckman, Viktor; Hollaus, Markus; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    Biochar amendment in soils is seen as a potential greenhouse gas mitigation strategy. There are a number of examples of successful amendment strategies in agricultural ecosystems, where biochar is mixed with the mineral topsoil by ploughing or similar manipulation techniques. The application in forest ecosystems, however, comes with the limitation that biochar can only be applied directly on the surface. Light-weight biochar particles may be prone to erosion by environmental forces, such as precipitation and wind. We therefore assessed biochar erosion patterns by using Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) in combination with a time-lapse camera on a micro topography scale in a temperate spruce-dominated forest with herbaceous ground vegetation. TLS is a photogrammetric technique that utilizes the laser light detection and ranging (LiDAR) principle to provide high resolution, 3D geometrical information of the object at millimeter scale. A biochar-amended (10 t/ha) plot with the size of ca. 3m x 3m was surveyed with 4 TLS scans taken from each of 4 plot's sides. The acquired scans were co-registered using the professional targets that were installed on the plot's corners. The resulting point cloud was then used as a base for calculating digital terrain model (DTM), to spatially map vegetation heights, vegetation density and roughness. These TLS products were derived by analyzing the geometrical properties of the acquired point cloud. A time-lapse camera was installed during summer 2013, continuously observing the entire plot at 3min intervals. A single, representative, precipitation event in August was selected for a detailed image analysis of biochar particle movement. The analysis showed that areas of notable particle movement correspond to places of flow accumulation simulated from the DTM. This suggests that the very high resolution terrain information can be usefully for planning the biochar amendment on temperate forest ecosystems.

  20. [Research on absolute calibration of sun channel of sun photometer using laser raster scanning method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen-Bin; Li, Jian-Jun; Zheng, Xiao-Bing

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, a new calibration method of absolute spectral irradiance responsivity of sun channel of sun photometer was developed. A tunable laser was used as source and a standard tranfer detector, calibrated against cryogenic absolute radiometer, was used to measure laser beam power. By raster scanning of a single collimated laser beam to generate the uniform irradiance field at the plane of effective aperture stop of sun photometer, the absolute irradiance responsivity of center wavelength of the 870 nm unpolarized sun channels of sun photometer was obtained accurately. The relative spectral irradiance responsivity of corresponding channel was obtained by using lamp-monochromator system and then used to acquire the absolute spectral irradiance responsivity in the laboratory. On the basis of the above results, the top-of-the-atmosphere responsive constant V0 was obtained by integration with extraterrestrial solar spectral irradiance data. Comparing the calibration result with that from GSFC, NASA in 2009, the difference is only 3.75%. In the last, the uncertainties of calibration were evaluated and reached to 2.06%. The principle feasibility of the new method was validated.

  1. Co-Registration of DSMs Generated by Uav and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancil Persad, Ravi; Armenakis, Costas

    2016-06-01

    An approach for the co-registration of Digital Surface Models (DSMs) derived from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS) is proposed. Specifically, a wavelet-based feature descriptor for matching surface keypoints on the 2.5D DSMs is developed. DSMs are useful in wide-scope of various applications such as 3D building modelling and reconstruction, cultural heritage, urban and environmental planning, aircraft navigation/path routing, accident and crime scene reconstruction, mining as well as, topographic map revision and change detection. For these listed applications, it is not uncommon that there will be a need for automatically aligning multi-temporal DSMs which may have been acquired from multiple sensors, with different specifications over a period of time, and may have various overlaps. Terrestrial laser scanners usually capture urban facades in an accurate manner; however this is not the case for building roof structures. On the other hand, vertical photography from UAVs can capture the roofs. Therefore, the automatic fusion of UAV and laser-scanning based DSMs is addressed here as it serves various geospatial applications.

  2. Towards Automatic Single-Sensor Mapping by Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahokas, E.; Hyyppä, J.; Yu, X.; Liang, X.; Matikainen, L.; Karila, K.; Litkey, P.; Kukko, A.; Jaakkola, A.; Kaartinen, H.; Holopainen, M.; Vastaranta, M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the possibilities of the Optech Titan multispectral airborne laser scanner in the fields of mapping and forestry. Investigation was targeted to six land cover classes. Multispectral laser scanner data can be used to distinguish land cover classes of the ground surface, including the roads and separate road surface classes. For forest inventory using point cloud metrics and intensity features combined, total accuracy of 93.5% was achieved for classification of three main boreal tree species (pine, spruce and birch).When using intensity features - without point height metrics - a classification accuracy of 91% was achieved for these three tree species. It was also shown that deciduous trees can be further classified into more species. We propose that intensity-related features and waveform-type features are combined with point height metrics for forest attribute derivation in area-based prediction, which is an operatively applied forest inventory process in Scandinavia. It is expected that multispectral airborne laser scanning can provide highly valuable data for city and forest mapping and is a highly relevant data asset for national and local mapping agencies in the near future.

  3. CO-REGISTRATION OF DSMs GENERATED BY UAV AND TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Persad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An approach for the co-registration of Digital Surface Models (DSMs derived from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs and Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS is proposed. Specifically, a wavelet-based feature descriptor for matching surface keypoints on the 2.5D DSMs is developed. DSMs are useful in wide-scope of various applications such as 3D building modelling and reconstruction, cultural heritage, urban and environmental planning, aircraft navigation/path routing, accident and crime scene reconstruction, mining as well as, topographic map revision and change detection. For these listed applications, it is not uncommon that there will be a need for automatically aligning multi-temporal DSMs which may have been acquired from multiple sensors, with different specifications over a period of time, and may have various overlaps. Terrestrial laser scanners usually capture urban facades in an accurate manner; however this is not the case for building roof structures. On the other hand, vertical photography from UAVs can capture the roofs. Therefore, the automatic fusion of UAV and laser-scanning based DSMs is addressed here as it serves various geospatial applications.

  4. AUTOMATIC EXTRACTION OF ROAD SURFACE AND CURBSTONE EDGES FROM MOBILE LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Miraliakbari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a procedure for automatic extraction of the road surface from geo-referenced mobile laser scanning data. The basic assumption of the procedure is that the road surface is smooth and limited by curbstones. Two variants of jump detection are investigated for detecting curbstone edges, one based on height differences the other one based on histograms of the height data. Region growing algorithms are proposed which use the irregular laser point cloud. Two- and four-neighbourhood growing strategies utilize the two height criteria for examining the neighborhood. Both height criteria rely on an assumption about the minimum height of a low curbstone. Road boundaries with lower or no jumps will not stop the region growing process. In contrast to this objects on the road can terminate the process. Therefore further processing such as bridging gaps between detected road boundary points and the removal of wrongly detected curbstone edges is necessary. Road boundaries are finally approximated by splines. Experiments are carried out with a ca. 2 km network of smalls streets located in the neighbourhood of University of Applied Sciences in Stuttgart. For accuracy assessment of the extracted road surfaces, ground truth measurements are digitized manually from the laser scanner data. For completeness and correctness of the region growing result values between 92% and 95% are achieved.

  5. Compound Cellular Imaging of Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy by Using Gold Nanoparticles and Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiunn-Woei Liaw

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Combining the scattered light of gold nanoparticles (GNPs and the fluorescence of dye molecules, a compound cellular imaging of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM is obtained. The human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-435S, BCRC 60429 is used for experiment. These cells are incubated with a glucose medium containing GNPs for 26 hours, and then are stained by Prodium Iodide (PI for their nuclei. By using a single laser to illuminate these cells and adjusting the ranges of two bandpass filters for the detection, the scattered light from the GNPs and the fluorescence of PI can be induced simultaneously, but be detected separately without crosstalk. Furthermore, a compound cellular image can be obtained by merging the two images of the expressions of GNP and PI together. From the TEM images of these cells, it is observed that GNPs are aggregated in the vesicles of the cytoplasm due to the cell’s endocytosis. The aggregation of GNPs makes the surface plasmon resonance band of GNPs broadened, so that strong scattered light from GNPs can be generated by the illumination of different-wavelength lasers (458, 488, 514, 561, and 633 nm.

  6. Application of Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Measuring Soil Roughness at Meso-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, Milutin; Pfeifer, Norbert; Glira, Philipp; Ressl, Camillo

    2014-05-01

    Soil roughness is a dynamic property of bare-soil surfaces. It affects infiltration and runoff during a rain event, regulates wind erosion rates, and also influences the backscattered energy of radar signals. In geophysical modeling, this soil parameter is considered to be related to local surface features like tillage structure, soil aggregates and particles, and therefore, it is typically described trough its regional stochastic properties. Since soil roughness elements range from millimeter to several centimeters in size, high-resolution 3D measurements are required to determine these stochastic parameters accurately. Measurements by a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) provide precise, high-density 3D information which can match these requirements. However, the resolution and precision of these TLS measurements decrease with range. Therefore, special TLS acquisition settings are required already for investigating soil roughness at meso-scale, i.e. from ca. 10m to 50m. Such information about soil roughness, for example, will soon be required for SAR products of the incoming Sentinel-1 mission, with pixel spacing expected to be 10m-25m in the high-resolution, multi-look mode. This work focuses on estimating an effective area that can be surveyed by a single TLS scan at the resolution of a few millimeters under different soil roughness conditions. To answer this, a field experiment was conducted where two soil roughness patterns were scanned: oriented- and isotropic-roughness. The roughness patterns were prepared on a 3m x 3m rectangular plot in the Botanical Garden of the University of Vienna. The measurements were performed from several scan positions using an amplitude-modulated continuous-wave TLS. The instrument has a specified precision bellow 1mm, a small beam divergence (0.22mrad), and a sampling interval of 1.6mm at 5m range. Additionally to these TLS measurements, a small sub-area (0.5m x 1m) was surveyed by a triangulating laser scanner. This instrument

  7. The effect of short ground vegetation on terrestrial laser scans at a local scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lei; Powrie, William; Smethurst, Joel; Atkinson, Peter M.; Einstein, Herbert

    2014-09-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can record a large amount of accurate topographical information with a high spatial accuracy over a relatively short period of time. These features suggest it is a useful tool for topographical survey and surface deformation detection. However, the use of TLS to survey a terrain surface is still challenging in the presence of dense ground vegetation. The bare ground surface may not be illuminated due to signal occlusion caused by vegetation. This paper investigates vegetation-induced elevation error in TLS surveys at a local scale and its spatial pattern. An open, relatively flat area vegetated with dense grass was surveyed repeatedly under several scan conditions. A total station was used to establish an accurate representation of the bare ground surface. Local-highest-point and local-lowest-point filters were applied to the point clouds acquired for deriving vegetation height and vegetation-induced elevation error, respectively. The effects of various factors (for example, vegetation height, edge effects, incidence angle, scan resolution and location) on the error caused by vegetation are discussed. The results are of use in the planning and interpretation of TLS surveys of vegetated areas.

  8. Adaptive circle-ellipse fitting method for estimating tree diameter based on single terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Guochao; Wang, Pei

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has been used to extract accurate forest biophysical parameters for inventory purposes. The diameter at breast height (DBH) is a key parameter for individual trees because it has the potential for modeling the height, volume, biomass, and carbon sequestration potential of the tree based on empirical allometric scaling equations. In order to extract the DBH from the single-scan data of TLS automatically and accurately within a certain range, we proposed an adaptive circle-ellipse fitting method based on the point cloud transect. This proposed method can correct the error caused by the simple circle fitting method when a tree is slanted. A slanted tree was detected by the circle-ellipse fitting analysis, then the corresponding slant angle was found based on the ellipse fitting result. With this information, the DBH of the trees could be recalculated based on reslicing the point cloud data at breast height. Artificial stem data simulated by a cylindrical model of leaning trees and the scanning data acquired with the RIEGL VZ-400 were used to test the proposed adaptive fitting method. The results shown that the proposed method can detect the trees and accurately estimate the DBH for leaning trees.

  9. Laser scanning fluorescence microscopic measurement of the movement of cleaving egg surface of Rana Amurensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUGUOYAN; ChengtangXu; 等

    1995-01-01

    By laser scanning fluorescence microscopy for quantitative measurement of fluorescence intensity changes on egg surface stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate during cleavage furrow extending forward,it was found that in area of presumptive cleavage furrow the scanning curve became ∨ shape,indicating dark stripe appeared in that place.Then the fluorescence intensity increased at the place where the bottom of ∨ shape had located,and the scanning curve turned to ∧ shape,indicating single stripe was formed.While enhanced fluorescence appeared on the borders of ∧ shape,an M shape curve was found,showing double stripe occurred.During the distance between two borders of M shape incresing from 50μm to 100μm,a fluorescence peak came to sight in the middle of the M shape,which being the cleavge furrow bottom.The two lateral sides of furrow bottom with decreasing fluorescence were nascent membrane.At that time the curve became W shape.By the sides of cleavage furrow the the stress folds became conspicous after double stripe stage,showing the stretching of the egg surface being increased.With our[31,33]and others[32] reports that polylysine could induce the appearance of nascent membrane and phytohemagglutinins could decrease or prevent the appearance of nascent membrane,we believed the idea of Schroeder[25] that increasing mechanical stress could initiate nascent membrane formation and thought that the stresslay to the outsides of cleavage furrow.

  10. Numerical descriptors for the analysis of wear surfaces using laser scanning confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anamalay, R.V. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia); Kirk, T.B. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia); Panzera, D. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia)

    1995-03-01

    Machinery wear is a major cost to industry and its minimisation would result in significant savings. In order to do this, it is important to understand the mechanisms of wear. Techniques have to be developed to enable the detailed measurement and analysis of wear surfaces. Conventional methods of surface measurement have involved profilometers. Profilometers, however, have severe limitations in terms of the surface features detectable and difficulties arise when 3D data sets of surfaces are required. Alternative methods that have been explored are stereo microscopy, reflected light interference microscopy (RLIM) and scanning electron microscopy. But these methods have proven to be severely limited either by the depth of field that can be obtained, difficulties associated with obtaining and interpreting images or the prohibitive costs involved. Laser scanning confocal microscopes (LSCM), however, have the capabilities to record surface features quickly and conveniently. LSCM techniques allow the determination and analysis of the true surface topography of a sample surface. LSCM has no depth of field limitations, is significantly cheaper than scanning electron microscopy, requires minimal sample preparation and provides images of sufficient quality for engineering purposes. Better measurement techniques facilitate the use of new surface parameters, in addition to the traditional parameters (all of which can be measured using LSCM techniques). In this paper, parameters developed for the measurement and analysis of surfaces using LSCM techniques are discussed. A comparison is made between surface analysis using LSCM techniques and conventional profilometer methods. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of surface moisture using infra-red terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruessink, Gerben; Brakenhoff, Laura; van Maarseveen, Marcel

    2014-05-01

    The measured aeolian supply of sand from the beach to the foredune is generally less than the potential supply because the wetness of the beach surface limits sand entrainment and supply. The strong spatial and temporal variability in surface moisture is, however, notoriously difficult to determine, which has prevented the development of quantitatively more realistic sand-supply models. Here we test the possibility of deriving surface moisture content from the reflectance signal of an infra-red terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) in a large area (~ 100 × 100 m) with high spatial (~ 0.25 × 0.25 m) and temporal (~ 30 minutes) resolution. We deployed a RIEGL VZ-400 3D laser scanner (short-wave infra-red, wavelength = 1550 nm) from a tripod at Egmond Beach, The Netherlands, with the instrument about 2 m above beach level. The TLS collected data through 360° in the horizontal plane and 100° in the vertical, with a rate of 122,000 points/s. A full 360°/100° (panorama) scan with a 0.02° resolution in the horizontal and vertical took about 12 minutes to complete. Nine panorama scans were performed over a single tidal cycle, during which also 69 surface scrapings (thickness of a few millimetres) were taken. After each panorama scan, a cross-shore profile from the dunefoot to the shoreline was scanned 10 times per second for 2 minutes to explore the repeatability of the TLS data. The nine scans were processed into 0.25 × 0.25 m reflectance maps, while the scrapings were processed into moisture estimates using standard laboratory techniques. The RIEGL VZ-400 expresses reflectance in decibels, with a 1/R2 correction to account for the reduction of returned intensity with range R. We found that reflectance does not change for R = 15 - 60 m over beach sand with spatially invariant moisture content. Apparently, the returned reflectance is then indeed proportional to 1/R2 and independent of the angle between the laser pulse and the beach surface. For R 60 m reflectance drops

  12. Topographical and chemical microanalysis of surfaces with a scanning probe microscope and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossakovski; Beauchamp

    2000-10-01

    Spatially resolved chemical imaging is achieved by combining a fiber-optic scanning probe microscope with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in a single instrument, TOPOLIBS. Elemental composition of surfaces can be mapped and correlated with topographical data. The experiment is conducted in air with minimal sample preparation. In a typical experiment, surface topography is analyzed by scanning a sharp fiber-optic probe across the sample using shear force feedback. The probe is then positioned over a feature of interest and pulsed radiation is delivered to the surface using a nitrogen laser. The pulse vaporizes material from the surface and generates a localized plasma plume. Optical emission from the plume is analyzed with a compact UV/visible spectrometer. Ablation crater size is controlled by the amount of laser power coupled into the probe. Sampling areas with submicrometer dimensions are achieved by using reduced laser power. PMID:11028639

  13. Characterization of acoustic lenses with the Foucault test by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Mohamed, E. T.; Abdelrahman, A.; Pluta, M.; Grill, W.

    2010-03-01

    In this work, the Foucault knife-edge test, which has traditionally been known as the classic test for optical imaging devices, is used to characterize an acoustic lens for operation at 1.2 GHz. A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) was used as the illumination and detection device utilizing its pinhole instead of the classical knife edge that is normally employed in the Foucault test. Information about the geometrical characteristics, such as the half opening angle of the acoustic lens, were determined as well as the quality of the calotte of the lens used for focusing. The smallest focal spot size that could be achieved with the examined lens employed as a spherical reflector was found to be about 1 μm. By comparison to the idealized resolution a degradation of about a factor of 2 can be deduced. This limits the actual quality of the acoustic focus.

  14. Object shape classification and scene shape representation for three-dimensional laser scanned outdoor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Xiaopeng

    2013-02-01

    Shape analysis of a three-dimensional (3-D) scene is an important issue and could be widely used for various applications: city planning, robot navigation, virtual tourism, etc. We introduce an approach for understanding the primitive shape of the scene to reveal the semantic scene shape structure and represent the scene using shape elements. The scene objects are labeled and recognized using the geometric and semantic features for each cluster, which is based on the knowledge of scene. Furthermore, the object in scene with a different primitive shape could also be classified and fitted using the Gaussian map of the segmented scene. We demonstrate the presented approach on several complex scenes from laser scanning. According to the experimental result, the proposed method can accurately represent the geometric structure of the 3-D scene.

  15. Recognition and Reconstruction of Zebra Crossings on Roads from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zebra crossings provide guidance and warning to pedestrians and drivers, thereby playing an important role in traffic safety management. Most previous studies have focused on detecting zebra stripes but have not provided full information about the areas, which is critical to both driver assistance systems and guide systems for blind individuals. This paper presents a stepwise procedure for recognizing and reconstructing zebra crossings using mobile laser scanning data. First, we propose adaptive thresholding based on road surface partitioning to reduce the impact of intensity unevenness and improve the accuracy of road marking extraction. Then, dispersion degree filtering is used to reduce the noise. Finally, zebra stripes are recognized according to the rectangular feature and fixed size, which is followed by area reconstruction according to arrangement patterns. We test our method on three datasets captured by an Optech Lynx mobile mapping system. The total recognition rate of 90.91% demonstrates the effectiveness of the method.

  16. Using Mobile Laser Scanning Data for Features Extraction of High Accuracy Driving Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bisheng; Liu, Yuan; Liang, Fuxun; Dong, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    High Accuracy Driving Maps (HADMs) are the core component of Intelligent Drive Assistant Systems (IDAS), which can effectively reduce the traffic accidents due to human error and provide more comfortable driving experiences. Vehicle-based mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems provide an efficient solution to rapidly capture three-dimensional (3D) point clouds of road environments with high flexibility and precision. This paper proposes a novel method to extract road features (e.g., road surfaces, road boundaries, road markings, buildings, guardrails, street lamps, traffic signs, roadside-trees, power lines, vehicles and so on) for HADMs in highway environment. Quantitative evaluations show that the proposed algorithm attains an average precision and recall in terms of 90.6% and 91.2% in extracting road features. Results demonstrate the efficiencies and feasibilities of the proposed method for extraction of road features for HADMs.

  17. In vivo integrated photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for retinal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hao F.; Wei, Qing; Cao, Wenwu

    2012-12-01

    The physiological and pathological properties of retina are closely associated with various optical contrasts. Hence, integrating different ophthalmic imaging technologies is more beneficial in both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of several blinding diseases. Recently, photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) was developed for in vivo retinal imaging in small animals, which demonstrated the capability of imaging retinal vascular networks and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) at high sensitivity. We combined PAOM with traditional imaging modalities, such as fluorescein angiography (FA), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and auto-fluorescence scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AF-SLO), for imaging rats and mice. The multimodal imaging system provided more comprehensive evaluation of the retina based on the complementary imaging contrast mechanisms. The high-quality retinal images show that the integrated ophthalmic imaging system has great potential in the investigation of blinding disorders.

  18. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics by use of scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, D.J.; Klima, S.J.; Kiser, J.D.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics. 20 references.

  19. SINGLE TREE DETECTION FROM AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA USING A MARKED POINT PROCESS BASED METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tree detection and reconstruction is of great interest in large-scale city modelling. In this paper, we present a marked point process model to detect single trees from airborne laser scanning (ALS data. We consider single trees in ALS recovered canopy height model (CHM as a realization of point process of circles. Unlike traditional marked point process, we sample the model in a constraint configuration space by making use of image process techniques. A Gibbs energy is defined on the model, containing a data term which judge the fitness of the model with respect to the data, and prior term which incorporate the prior knowledge of object layouts. We search the optimal configuration through a steepest gradient descent algorithm. The presented hybrid framework was test on three forest plots and experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Building Facade Documentation Using Laser Scanning and Photogrammetry and Data Implementation Into Bim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltýnová, M.; Matoušková, E.; Šedina, J.; Pavelka, K.

    2016-06-01

    A project started last year called MORE-CONNECT, which focuses on the renovation of buildings (especially building facades) using prefabricated elements. The aim of this project is to create a competitive solution consisting of a technology and processes which enable fast, cost-effective renovation with minimal difficulties to inhabitants. Significant cost savings in renovation costs lies in the usage of prefabricated elements and the reduction of construction works on site. The precision of the prefabricated element depends on the precision of the construction, project and building documentation. This article offers an overview of the possible methods for building documentation and spatial data transfer into BIM (Building Information Modelling) software. The description of methods focuses on laser scanning and photogrammetry (including RPAS based), its advantages, disadvantages and limitations according to the documented building, level of renovation, situation on site etc. The next part involves spatial data transfer into BIM software. A proposed solution is tested in a case study.

  1. Pharmaceutical applications of confocal laser scanning microscopy: the physical characterisation of pharmaceutical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pygall, Samuel R; Whetstone, Joanne; Timmins, Peter; Melia, Colin D

    2007-12-10

    The application of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to the physicochemical characterisation of pharmaceutical systems is not as widespread as its application within the field of cell biology. However, methods have been developed to exploit the imaging capabilities of CLSM to study a wide range of pharmaceutical systems, including phase-separated polymers, colloidal systems, microspheres, pellets, tablets, film coatings, hydrophilic matrices, and chromatographic stationary phases. Additionally, methods to measure diffusion in gels, bioadhesives, and for monitoring microenvironmental pH change within dosage forms have been utilised. CLSM has also been used in the study of the physical interaction of dosage forms with biological barriers such as the eye, skin and intestinal epithelia, and in particular, to determine the effectiveness of a plethora of pharmaceutical systems to deliver drugs through these barriers. In the future, there is continuing scope for wider exploitation of existing techniques, and continuing advancements in instrumentation.

  2. Evaluation of the Cytotoxic Behavior of Fungal Extracellular Synthesized Ag Nanoparticles Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher A. Salaheldin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles have been synthesized by subjecting a reaction medium to a Fusarium oxysporum biomass at 28 °C for 96 h. The biosynthesized Ag nanoparticles were characterized on the basis of their anticipated peak at 405 nm using UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy. Structural confirmation was evident from the characteristic X-ray diffraction (XRD pattern, high-resolution transmission electron Microscopy (HRTEM and the particle size analyzer. The Ag nanoparticles were of dimension 40 ± 5 nm and spherical in shape. The study mainly focused on using the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM to examine the cytotoxic activities of fungal synthesized Ag nanoparticles on a human breast carcinoma cell line MCF7 cell, which featured remarkable vacuolation, thus indicating a potent cytotoxic activity.

  3. Analysis of the melanin distribution in different ethnic groups by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, C.; Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Astner, S.; Patzelt, A.; Zastrow, L.; Sterry, W.; Koch, S.

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSM) is able to visualize differences in melanin content and distribution in different Skin Phototypes. The investigations were carried out on six healthy volunteers with Skin Phototypes II, IV, and VI. Representative skin samples of Skin Phototypes II, V, and VI were obtained for histological analysis from remaining tissue of skin grafts and were used for LSM-pathologic correlation. LSM evaluation showed significant differences in melanin distribution in Skin Phototypes II, IV, and VI, respectively. Based on the differences in overall reflectivity and image brightness, a visual evaluation scheme showed increasing brightness of the basal and suprabasal layers with increasing Skin Phototypes. The findings correlated well with histological analysis. The results demonstrate that LSM may serve as a promising adjunctive tool for real time assessment of melanin content and distribution in human skin, with numerous clinical applications and therapeutic and preventive implications.

  4. Research on OEF geometry control algorithm in dual-galvanometric laser scanning manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huilai Sun; Shuzhong Lin; Tao Wang

    2005-01-01

    For the dual-galvanometric laser scanning manufacturing, the traditional geometry algorithm-fθ only considered the distance between the two swaying mirrors, the distance between the swaying mirror and the convex lens, the mirror swaying angle, and the lens focal length. And it could not correctly express the manufacturing track which was made geometry distorted. Based on analysis, a creative geometry control algorithm - optical entire factors (OEF) was brought forward. From the creative algorithm it can be known that OEF geometry control algorithm was concerned with not only the distance of the two swaying mirrors, distance between the swaying mirror and the convex lens, mirror swaying angle, and lens focal length, but also the lens central height, lens convex radius, and medium refractive index. The manufacturing system can manufacture satisfied geometry with the creative double ends approach (DEA) control model based on OEF in the experiments.

  5. 3D laser scanning in plant and pipeline engineering; 3D-Laserscanning im Anlagen- und Rohrleitungsbau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, T. [Kaeser und Reiner, Ingenieurbuero fuer Vermessung und Geoinformation, Fellbach (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    3D laser scanning has been in use for a number of years now in the fields of surveying, building and factory planning. Laser scanning can, however, provide a highly supportive and helpful tool for the plant and piping designer, too. The benefits of this technology are relevant wherever the geometry of existing systems and subsystems needs to be registered and recorded. This may be the case in planning changes (basic and detail engineering), collision checks, documentation, plant relocations and visual?display projects. (orig.)

  6. 9nm node wafer defect inspection using three-dimensional scanning, a 405nm diode laser, and a broadband source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renjie; Edwards, Chris; Bryniarski, Casey A.; Popescu, Gabriel; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2015-03-01

    We recently built a 405nm laser based optical interferometry system for 9nm node patterned wafer defect inspection. Defects with volumes smaller than 15nm by 90nm by 35nm have been detected. The success of defect detection relied on accurate mechanical scanning of the wafer and custom engineered image denoising post-processing. To further improve the detection sensitivity, we designed a higher precision XYZ scanning stage and replaced the laser source with an incoherent LED to remove the speckle noise. With these system modifications, we successfully detected both defects and surface contamination particles in bright-field imaging mode. Recently, we have upgraded this system for interferometric defect inspection.

  7. Segmentation of Planar Surfaces from Laser Scanning Data Using the Magnitude of Normal Position Vector for Adaptive Neighborhoods

    OpenAIRE

    Changjae Kim; Ayman Habib; Muwook Pyeon; Goo-rak Kwon; Jaehoon Jung; Joon Heo

    2016-01-01

    Diverse approaches to laser point segmentation have been proposed since the emergence of the laser scanning system. Most of these segmentation techniques, however, suffer from limitations such as sensitivity to the choice of seed points, lack of consideration of the spatial relationships among points, and inefficient performance. In an effort to overcome these drawbacks, this paper proposes a segmentation methodology that: (1) reduces the dimensions of the attribute space; (2) considers the a...

  8. A cost-effective laser scanning method for mapping stream channel geometry and roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Norris; Nathanson, Marcus; Lundgren, Niclas; Rehnström, Robin; Lyon, Steve

    2015-04-01

    In this pilot project, we combine an Arduino Uno and SICK LMS111 outdoor laser ranging camera to acquire high resolution topographic area scans for a stream channel. The microprocessor and imaging system was installed in a custom gondola and suspended from a wire cable system. To demonstrate the systems capabilities for capturing stream channel topography, a small stream (stream channel resulted in a point spacing of 4mm and a point cloud density of 5600 points/m2 for the 5m by 2m area. A grain size distribution of the streambed material was extracted from the point cloud using a moving window, local maxima search algorithm. The median, 84th and 90th percentiles (common metrics to describe channel roughness) of this distribution were found to be within the range of measured values while the largest modelled element was approximately 35% smaller than its measured counterpart. The laser scanning system captured grain sizes between 30mm and 255mm (coarse gravel/pebbles and boulders based on the Wentworth (1922) scale). This demonstrates that our system was capable of resolving both large-scale geometry (e.g. bed slope and stream channel width) and small-scale channel roughness elements (e.g. coarse gravel/pebbles and boulders) for the study area. We further show that the point cloud resolution is suitable for estimating ecohydraulic parameters such as Manning's n and hydraulic radius. Although more work is needed to fine-tune our system's design, these preliminary results are encouraging, specifically for those with a limited operational budget.

  9. Scanning laser optical tomography resolves structural plasticity during regeneration in an insect brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Eickhoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Optical Projection Tomography (OPT is a microscopic technique that generates three dimensional images from whole mount samples the size of which exceeds the maximum focal depth of confocal laser scanning microscopes. As an advancement of conventional emission-OPT, Scanning Laser Optical Tomography (SLOTy allows simultaneous detection of fluorescence and absorbance with high sensitivity. In the present study, we employ SLOTy in a paradigm of brain plasticity in an insect model system. METHODOLOGY: We visualize and quantify volumetric changes in sensory information procession centers in the adult locust, Locusta migratoria. Olfactory receptor neurons, which project from the antenna into the brain, are axotomized by crushing the antennal nerve or ablating the entire antenna. We follow the resulting degeneration and regeneration in the olfactory centers (antennal lobes and mushroom bodies by measuring their size in reconstructed SLOTy images with respect to the untreated control side. Within three weeks post treatment antennal lobes with ablated antennae lose as much as 60% of their initial volume. In contrast, antennal lobes with crushed antennal nerves initially shrink as well, but regain size back to normal within three weeks. The combined application of transmission-and fluorescence projections of Neurobiotin labeled axotomized fibers confirms that recovery of normal size is restored by regenerated afferents. Remarkably, SLOTy images reveal that degeneration of olfactory receptor axons has a trans-synaptic effect on second order brain centers and leads to size reduction of the mushroom body calyx. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that SLOTy is a suitable method for rapid screening of volumetric plasticity in insect brains and suggests its application also to vertebrate preparations.

  10. Spectroscopic, scanning laser OBIC, and I-V/QE characterizations of browned EVA solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pern, F.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Eisgruber, I.L. [Materials Research Group, Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Micheels, R.H. [Polestar Technologies, Inc., Needham Hts, MA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The effects of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) discoloration due to accelerated field or laboratory exposure on the encapsulated silicon (Si) solar cells or EVA/glass laminates were characterized quantitatively by using non-invasive, non-destructive ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry, spectrocolorimetry, spectrofluorometry, scanning laser OBIC (optical beam induced current) spectroscopy, and current-voltage (I-V) and quantum efficiency (QE) measurements. The results show that the yellowness index (YI) measured directly over the AR-coated solar cells under the glass superstrate increased from the range of -80 to -90 to the range of -20 to 15 as the EVA changed from clear to brown. The ratio of two fluorescence emission peak areas generally increased from 1.45 to 5.69 as browning increased, but dropped to 4.21 on a darker EVA. For a solar cell with brown EVA in the central region, small-area grating QE measurements and scanning laser OBIC analysis between the brown and clear EVA regions showed that the quantum efficiency loss at 633 nm was 42%-48% of the loss at 488 nm, due to a reduced decrease of transmittance in browned EVA at the longer wavelengths. The portion of the solar cell under the browned EVA showed a decrease of {approximately}36% in efficiency, as compared to the cell efficiency under clear EVA. Transmittance loss at 633 nm was 38% of the loss at 488 nm for a light yellow-brown EVA/glass laminate that showed a small increase of 10 in the yellowness index.

  11. Automatic Feature Detection, Description and Matching from Mobile Laser Scanning Data and Aerial Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussnain, Zille; Oude Elberink, Sander; Vosselman, George

    2016-06-01

    In mobile laser scanning systems, the platform's position is measured by GNSS and IMU, which is often not reliable in urban areas. Consequently, derived Mobile Laser Scanning Point Cloud (MLSPC) lacks expected positioning reliability and accuracy. Many of the current solutions are either semi-automatic or unable to achieve pixel level accuracy. We propose an automatic feature extraction method which involves utilizing corresponding aerial images as a reference data set. The proposed method comprise three steps; image feature detection, description and matching between corresponding patches of nadir aerial and MLSPC ortho images. In the data pre-processing step the MLSPC is patch-wise cropped and converted to ortho images. Furthermore, each aerial image patch covering the area of the corresponding MLSPC patch is also cropped from the aerial image. For feature detection, we implemented an adaptive variant of Harris-operator to automatically detect corner feature points on the vertices of road markings. In feature description phase, we used the LATCH binary descriptor, which is robust to data from different sensors. For descriptor matching, we developed an outlier filtering technique, which exploits the arrangements of relative Euclidean-distances and angles between corresponding sets of feature points. We found that the positioning accuracy of the computed correspondence has achieved the pixel level accuracy, where the image resolution is 12cm. Furthermore, the developed approach is reliable when enough road markings are available in the data sets. We conclude that, in urban areas, the developed approach can reliably extract features necessary to improve the MLSPC accuracy to pixel level.

  12. Three dimensional microvascular measurements in human endometrium using optical slices from laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manconi, Frank; Kable, Eleanor P; Dwarte, Dennis; Jones, Allan; Russell, Peter; Chullapram, Teerapat; Gange, Prasantha V; Obeysekara, Sunil; Thomas, Graham A; Fraser, Ian S

    2011-12-01

    There is increasing interest in the structure of the microvascular environment in human endometrium because of the recognition of the complexity and functional importance of this tissue. Endometrial microcirculatory networks and their relationships have rarely been studied in three-dimensions. Longitudinal uterine slices containing endometrial tissue were carefully selected from women undergoing a hysterectomy. Formalin-fixed endometrial sections (≤ 50 μm) representing the fundal and isthmic regions were immunofluorescently labeled with monoclonal antibody (CD34) to target the endothelium of microvessel and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled goat anti-mouse. Digital images were acquired using a Nikon Eclipse E800 microscope equipped with a Radiance 2000 confocal scanning laser attachment. ImarisBasic 4.1 visualization suite was utilized for qualitative interpretation. NeuronTracer 1.0 software was utilized to derive the length and numerical densities. There were significant changes across the phases of the menstrual cycle in functional and basal endometrial layers in vessel length density (LD(v)) and branch point density (ND(v)) within both fundal and isthmic regions of the uterus (P<0.001). There was also a significant effect of menstrual cycle phase on mean vessel segment length (SL(v)) within each region and within each of the layers (P<0.001). The capillary radial diffusion distance r(diff) was negatively correlated with LD(v). In general, within each of the menstrual cycle phases, LD(v), ND(v) were greater in the fundal than the isthmic regions while, in contrast, SL(v) was found to be greatest in the isthmic region. Utilization of immunofluorescence and laser scanning confocal microscopy has enabled us to demonstrate significant vascular changes in human endometrial layers illustrating that in general, within each of the menstrual cycle phases, vessel length and branch point densities were greater in the fundal than the isthmic regions, while vessel

  13. Equivalente esférico e valores da espessura da camada de fibras nervosas obtidas com o GDX TM Scanning Laser System® Spherical equivalent and nerve fiber layer thickness assessed with GDX TM Scanning Laser System®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lênio Souza Alvarenga

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Estudar a influência do equivalente esférico nos valores obtidos pelo GDX TM Scanning Laser System®. Métodos: Foram avaliados 41 olhos de 41 voluntários sem doenças oculares e com campo visual sem alterações. Foi realizada a polarimetria de varredura a laser com o GDX TM Scanning Laser System® de acordo com as instruções contidas no manual do aparelho. Foram comparados os valores obtidos nesse exame em um grupo de pacientes com equivalente esférico positivo e em um outro com este valor nulo ou negativo, pelo teste de Mann-Whitney. Resultados: Não se verificou diferença estatística entre os valores obtidos nos olhos de pacientes do grupo I e os do grupo II. Não foi encontrada correlação entre o equivalente esférico e os valores obtidos com o GDX TM Scanning Laser System®. Conclusões: Na amostra estudada não houve diferença estatística entre os valores obtidos em um grupo de olhos com equivalente esférico positivo e outro com este valor negativo ou nulo, usando-se o GDX TM Scanning Laser System®.Purpose: To evaluate the effect of spherical equivalent on the acquisition of nerve fiber layer (NFL thickness with GDX TM Scanning Laser System®. Methods: Forty-one eyes of 41 volunteers were enrolled in this study. All of them presented with no ocular disease and no visual field defect. The NFL thickness was measured with GDX TM Scanning Laser System® as described in its manual. The values obtained in a group of volunteers with negative spherical equivalent (group I were compared to those from a group with a positive spherical equivalent (group II by the Mann-Whitney test. Results: There was no statistical difference between mea-surements in eyes of group I and those in group II. The NFL thickness measurements were not correlated with the sphe-rical equivalent. Conclusions: In the studied group there was no statistical difference in the GDX TM Scanning Laser System® parameters related to spherical equivalent.

  14. Calculating point of origin of blood spatter using laser scanning technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Nashad; Liscio, Eugene

    2015-03-01

    The point of origin of an impact pattern is important in establishing the chain of events in a bloodletting incident. In this study, the accuracy and reproducibility of the point of origin estimation using the FARO Scene software with the FARO Focus(3D) laser scanner was determined. Five impact patterns were created for each of three combinations of distances from the floor (z) and the front wall (x). Fifteen spatters were created using a custom impact rig, scanned using the laser scanner, photographed using a DSLR camera, and processed using the Scene software. Overall results gave a SD = 3.49 cm (p < 0.0001) in the x-direction, SD = 1.14 cm (p = 0.9291) in the y-direction, and SD = 9.08 cm (p < 0.0115) in the z-direction. The technique performs within literature ranges of accepted accuracy and reproducibility and is comparable to results reported for other virtual stringing software.

  15. Changes in cortical microvasculature during misery perfusion measured by two-photon laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Yosuke; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Seki, Chie; Masamoto, Kazuto; Ikoma, Yoko; Taniguchi, Junko; Aoki, Ichio; Tomita, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norihiro; Kanno, Iwao; Saeki, Naokatsu; Ito, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the cortical microvessel diameter response to hypercapnia in misery perfusion using two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM). We evaluated whether the vascular response to hypercapnia could represent the cerebrovascular reserve. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) during normocapnia and hypercapnia was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry through cranial windows in awake C57/BL6 mice before and at 1, 7, 14, and 28 days after unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (UCCAO). Diameters of the cortical microvessels during normocapnia and hypercapnia were also measured by TPLSM. Cerebral blood flow and the vascular response to hypercapnia were decreased after UCCAO. Before UCCAO, vasodilation during hypercapnia was found primarily in arterioles (22.9%±3.5%). At 14 days after UCCAO, arterioles, capillaries, and venules were autoregulatorily dilated by 79.5%±19.7%, 57.2%±32.3%, and 32.0%±10.8%, respectively. At the same time, the diameter response to hypercapnia in arterioles was significantly decreased to 1.9%±1.5%. A significant negative correlation was observed between autoregulatory vasodilation and the diameter response to hypercapnia in arterioles. Our findings indicate that arterioles play main roles in both autoregulatory vasodilation and hypercapnic vasodilation, and that the vascular response to hypercapnia can be used to estimate the cerebrovascular reserve.

  16. Three-dimensional imaging of intracochlear tissue by scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinne, N.; Nolte, L.; Antonopoulos, G. C.; Schulze, J.; Andrade, J.; Heisterkamp, A.; Meyer, H.; Warnecke, A.; Majdani, O.; Ripken, T.

    2016-02-01

    The presented study focuses on the application of scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) for non-destructive visualization of anatomical structures inside the human cochlea ex vivo. SLOT is a laser-based highly efficient microscopy technique, which allows for tomographic imaging of the internal structure of transparent large-scale specimens (up to 1 cm3). Thus, in the field of otology this technique is best convenient for an ex vivo study of the inner ear anatomy. For this purpose, the preparation before imaging comprises mechanically assisted decalcification, dehydration as well as optical clearing of the cochlea samples. Here, we demonstrate results of SLOT visualizing hard and soft tissue structures of the human cochlea with an optical resolution in the micrometer range using absorption and autofluorescence as contrast mechanisms. Furthermore, we compare our results with the method of X-ray micro tomography (micro-CT, μCT) as clinical gold standard which is based only on absorption. In general, SLOT can provide the advantage of covering all contrast mechanisms known from other light microscopy techniques, such as fluorescence or scattering. For this reason, a protocol for antibody staining has been developed, which additionally enables selective mapping of cellular structures within the cochlea. Thus, we present results of SLOT imaging rodent cochleae showing specific anatomical structures such as hair cells and neurofilament via fluorescence. In conclusion, the presented study has shown that SLOT is an ideally suited tool in the field of otology for in toto visualization of the inner ear microstructure.

  17. Human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography guided by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Shu, Xiao; Fawzi, Amani A; Zhang, Hao F

    2015-10-01

    We achieved human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) guided by an integrated scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO). We adapted a spectral domain OCT configuration and used a supercontinuum laser as the illumating source. The center wavelength was 564 nm and the bandwidth was 115 nm, which provided a 0.97 µm axial resolution measured in air. We characterized the sensitivity to be 86 dB with 226 µW incidence power on the pupil. We also integrated an SLO that shared the same optical path of the vis-OCT sample arm for alignment purposes. We demonstrated the retinal imaging from both systems centered at the fovea and optic nerve head with 20° × 20° and 10° × 10° field of view. We observed similar anatomical structures in vis-OCT and NIR-OCT. The contrast appeared different from vis-OCT to NIR-OCT, including slightly weaker signal from intra-retinal layers, and increased visibility and contrast of anatomical layers in the outer retina. PMID:26504622

  18. Study of Subtropical Forestry Index Retrieval Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Hemispherical Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Yun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to retrieve gap fraction, leaf inclination angle, and leaf area index (LAI of subtropical forestry canopy, here we acquired forestry detailed information by means of hemispherical photography, terrestrial laser scanning, and LAI-2200 plant canopy analyzer. Meanwhile, we presented a series of image processing and computer graphics algorithms that include image and point cloud data (PCD segmentation methods for branch and leaf classification and PCD features, such as normal vector, tangent plane extraction, and hemispherical projection method for PCD coordinate transformation. In addition, various forestry mathematical models were proposed to deduce forestry canopy indexes based on the radiation transfer model of Beer-Lambert law. Through the comparison of the experimental results on many plot samples, the terrestrial laser scanner- (TLS- based index estimation method obtains results similar to digital hemispherical photograph (HP and LAI-2200 plant canopy analyzer taken of the same stands and used for validation. It indicates that the TLS-based algorithm is able to capture the variability in LAI of forest stands with a range of densities, and there is a high chance to enhance TLS as a calibration tool for other devices.

  19. Possibilities of a Personal Laser Scanning System for Forest Mapping and Ecosystem Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinlian Liang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A professional-quality, personal laser scanning (PLS system for collecting tree attributes was demonstrated in this paper. The applied system, which is wearable by human operators, consists of a multi-constellation navigation system and an ultra-high-speed phase-shift laser scanner mounted on a rigid baseplate and consisting of a single sensor block. A multipass-corridor-mapping method was developed to process PLS data and a 2,000 m2 forest plot was utilized in the test. The tree stem detection accuracy was 82.6%; the root mean square error (RMSE of the estimates of tree diameter at breast height (DBH was 5.06 cm; the RMSE of the estimates of tree location was 0.38 m. The relative RMSE of the DBH estimates was 14.63%. The results showed, for the first time, the potential of the PLS system in mapping large forest plots. Further research on mapping accuracy in various forest conditions, data correction methods and multi-sensoral positioning techniques is needed. The utilization of this system in different applications, such as harvester operations, should also be explored. In addition to collecting tree-level and plot-level data for forest inventory, other possible applications of PLS for forest ecosystem services include mapping of canopy gaps, measuring leaf area index of large areas, documenting and visualizing forest routes feasible for recreation, hiking and berry and mushroom picking.

  20. Possibilities of a personal laser scanning system for forest mapping and ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xinlian; Kukko, Antero; Kaartinen, Harri; Hyyppä, Juha; Yu, Xiaowei; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Wang, Yunsheng

    2014-01-10

    A professional-quality, personal laser scanning (PLS) system for collecting tree attributes was demonstrated in this paper. The applied system, which is wearable by human operators, consists of a multi-constellation navigation system and an ultra-high-speed phase-shift laser scanner mounted on a rigid baseplate and consisting of a single sensor block. A multipass-corridor-mapping method was developed to process PLS data and a 2,000 m2 forest plot was utilized in the test. The tree stem detection accuracy was 82.6%; the root mean square error (RMSE) of the estimates of tree diameter at breast height (DBH) was 5.06 cm; the RMSE of the estimates of tree location was 0.38 m. The relative RMSE of the DBH estimates was 14.63%. The results showed, for the first time, the potential of the PLS system in mapping large forest plots. Further research on mapping accuracy in various forest conditions, data correction methods and multi-sensoral positioning techniques is needed. The utilization of this system in different applications, such as harvester operations, should also be explored. In addition to collecting tree-level and plot-level data for forest inventory, other possible applications of PLS for forest ecosystem services include mapping of canopy gaps, measuring leaf area index of large areas, documenting and visualizing forest routes feasible for recreation, hiking and berry and mushroom picking.

  1. Laser induced fluorescence as a diagnostic tool integrated into a scanning fiber endoscope for mouse imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher M.; Maggio-Price, Lillian; Seibel, Eric J.

    2007-02-01

    Scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) technology has shown promise as a minimally invasive optical imaging tool. To date, it is capable of capturing full-color 500-line images, at 15 Hz frame rate in vivo, as a 1.6 mm diameter endoscope. The SFE uses a singlemode optical fiber actuated at mechanical resonance to scan a light spot over tissue while backscattered or fluorescent light at each pixel is detected in time series using several multimode optical fibers. We are extending the capability of the SFE from a RGB reflectance imaging device to a diagnostic tool by imaging laser induced fluorescence (LIF) in tissue, allowing for correlation of endogenous fluorescence to tissue state. Design of the SFE for diagnostic imaging is guided by a comparison of single point spectra acquired from an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) model to tissue histology evaluated by a pathologist. LIF spectra were acquired by illuminating tissue with a 405 nm light source and detecting intrinsic fluorescence with a multimode optical fiber. The IBD model used in this study was mdr1a-/- mice, where IBD was modulated by infection with Helicobacter bilis. IBD lesions in the mouse model ranged from mild to marked hyperplasia and dysplasia, from the distal colon to the cecum. A principle components analysis (PCA) was conducted on single point spectra of control and IBD tissue. PCA allowed for differentiation between healthy and dysplastic tissue, indicating that emission wavelengths from 620 - 650 nm were best able to differentiate diseased tissue and inflammation from normal healthy tissue.

  2. Automated Analysis of Barley Organs Using 3D Laser Scanning: An Approach for High Throughput Phenotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Paulus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rise of laser scanning the 3D geometry of plant architecture is easy to acquire. Nevertheless, an automated interpretation and, finally, the segmentation into functional groups are still difficult to achieve. Two barley plants were scanned in a time course, and the organs were separated by applying a histogram-based classification algorithm. The leaf organs were represented by meshing algorithms, while the stem organs were parameterized by a least-squares cylinder approximation. We introduced surface feature histograms with an accuracy of 96% for the separation of the barley organs, leaf and stem. This enables growth monitoring in a time course for barley plants. Its reliability was demonstrated by a comparison with manually fitted parameters with a correlation R2 = 0:99 for the leaf area and R2 = 0:98 for the cumulated stem height. A proof of concept has been given for its applicability for the detection of water stress in barley, where the extension growth of an irrigated and a non-irrigated plant has been monitored.

  3. Use of terrestrial laser scanning to evaluate the spatial distribution of soil disturbance by skidding operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koren M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the disturbance to the surface of a skid trail caused by removing cut timber from inside the forest to the roadside by dragging using terrestrial laser scanning technology. We scanned the study site prior to taking any action, after skidding and after implementing post-harvesting reinstatement to the surface of the skid trail. From the point cloud obtained, we derived an irregular point field. We generated a triangulated irregular network which we then interpolated into a raster digital terrain model with a resolution of 1cm. By comparing the digital terrain models, we analysed the influence of skidding the timber and the influence of post-harvesting reinstatement upon the surface of the skid trail. The surface of the skid trail was most significantly affected in the area where the harvested logs were extracted and stacked for hauling. In the centre section of the trail, where the logs were dragged by a tractor, quite deep tracks were created and the intensity of soil disturbance was comparable to the handling section. The lowest intensity of soil disturbance was found in the area where the skid trail met the roadside. The post-harvesting reinstatement of the working area resulted in levelling the surface of the skid trail and the deepest tracks were filled in. The post-harvesting reinstatement caused a 12% increase of the volume of ruts, a 49% decrease of the volume of mounds of soil and a 6% increase of total soil volume change.

  4. Detecting Changes in Forest Structure over Time with Bi-Temporal Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Melkas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes to stems caused by natural forces and timber harvesting constitute an essential input for many forestry-related applications and ecological studies, especially forestry inventories based on the use of permanent sample plots. Conventional field measurement is widely acknowledged as being time-consuming and labor-intensive. More automated and efficient alternatives or supportive methods are needed. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS has been demonstrated to be a promising method in forestry field inventories. Nevertheless, the applicability of TLS in recording changes in the structure of forest plots has not been studied in detail. This paper presents a fully automated method for detecting changes in forest structure over time using bi-temporal TLS data. The developed method was tested on five densely populated forest plots including 137 trees and 50 harvested trees in point clouds. The present study demonstrated that 90 percent of tree stem changes could be automatically located from single-scan TLS data. These changes accounted for 92 percent of the changed basal area. The results indicate that the processing of TLS data collected at different times to detect tree stem changes can be fully automated.

  5. Assessing Metrics for Estimating Fire Induced Change in the Forest Understorey Structure Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Gupta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying post-fire effects in a forested landscape is important to ascertain burn severity, ecosystem recovery and post-fire hazard assessments and mitigation planning. Reporting of such post-fire effects assumes significance in fire-prone countries such as USA, Australia, Spain, Greece and Portugal where prescribed burns are routinely carried out. This paper describes the use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS to estimate and map change in the forest understorey following a prescribed burn. Eighteen descriptive metrics are derived from bi-temporal TLS which are used to analyse and visualise change in a control and fire-altered plot. Metrics derived are Above Ground Height-based (AGH percentiles and heights, point count and mean intensity. Metrics such as AGH50change, mean AGHchange and point countchange are sensitive enough to detect subtle fire-induced change (28%–52% whilst observing little or no change in the control plot (0–4%. A qualitative examination with field measurements of the spatial distribution of burnt areas and percentage area burnt also show similar patterns. This study is novel in that it examines the behaviour of TLS metrics for estimating and mapping fire induced change in understorey structure in a single-scan mode with a minimal fixed reference system. Further, the TLS-derived metrics can be used to produce high resolution maps of change in the understorey landscape.

  6. Automated analysis of barley organs using 3D laser scanning: an approach for high throughput phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Stefan; Dupuis, Jan; Riedel, Sebastian; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rise of laser scanning the 3D geometry of plant architecture is easy to acquire. Nevertheless, an automated interpretation and, finally, the segmentation into functional groups are still difficult to achieve. Two barley plants were scanned in a time course, and the organs were separated by applying a histogram-based classification algorithm. The leaf organs were represented by meshing algorithms, while the stem organs were parameterized by a least-squares cylinder approximation. We introduced surface feature histograms with an accuracy of 96% for the separation of the barley organs, leaf and stem. This enables growth monitoring in a time course for barley plants. Its reliability was demonstrated by a comparison with manually fitted parameters with a correlation R(2) = 0:99 for the leaf area and R(2) = 0:98 for the cumulated stem height. A proof of concept has been given for its applicability for the detection of water stress in barley, where the extension growth of an irrigated and a non-irrigated plant has been monitored. PMID:25029283

  7. Design of a Compact, Bimorph Deformable Mirror-Based Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi; Deng, Guohua; Wei, Ling; Li, Xiqi; Yang, Jinsheng; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, constructed and tested an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) using a bimorph mirror. The simulated AOSLO system achieves diffraction-limited criterion through all the raster scanning fields (6.4 mm pupil, 3° × 3° on pupil). The bimorph mirror-based AOSLO corrected ocular aberrations in model eyes to less than 0.1 μm RMS wavefront error with a closed-loop bandwidth of a few Hz. Facilitated with a bimorph mirror at a stroke of ±15 μm with 35 elements and an aperture of 20 mm, the new AOSLO system has a size only half that of the first-generation AOSLO system. The significant increase in stroke allows for large ocular aberrations such as defocus in the range of ±600° and astigmatism in the range of ±200°, thereby fully exploiting the AO correcting capabilities for diseased human eyes in the future.

  8. Serous retinal detachment following panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) using Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) photocoagulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Georges; Wolff, Benjamin; Cornut, Pierre-Loïc; Mauget-Faÿsse, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To report a case of serous retinal detachment after Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) treatment in a diabetic woman. Methods: A 34-year-old diabetic woman presented with florid diabetic retinopathy after a miscarriage during the 20th week of pregnancy. Her Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA) was 20/40 right eye (OD) and 20/30 left eye (OS). Fundus exam showed multiple microaneurysms, large blot hemorrhages and venous dilation both eyes (OU). Fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) revealed large areas of capillary nonperfusion and panretinal neovascularisation in all quadrants OU. Macular Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography scan (SD-OCT) did not show any foveal thickening. Panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) was immediately performed OU during the same day. Results: Two days after PASCAL treatment, her BCVA decreased to 20/80 OU and worsened to Count Fingers (CF) during the following days. Fundus exam revealed an extensive serous retinal detachment confirmed on SD-OCT. 2 sub-conjunctival injections of 0.1 ml Betamethasone were done OU. One month later, BCVA improved to 20/30 and SD-OCT confirmed regression of retinal detachment. Conclusions: PASCAL is considered to be a safe treatment, but one has to be aware of its potential side effects. It has to be used with caution in pregnant women.

  9. Comparison of pain scores between patients undergoing panretinal photocoagulation using navigated or pattern scan laser systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Ubeyt Inan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To compare the pain responses of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR undergoing panretinal photocoagulation (PRP using either pattern scan laser (PASCAL or navigated laser photocoagulation (NAVILAS. Methods: Patients diagnosed with PDR were randomly assigned to undergo either PASCAL or NAVILAS photocoagulation treatment. PRP was performed using the multi-shot mode with a spot size of 200-400 µm and a pulse duration of 30 ms to obtain a white-grayish spot on the retina. Parameters were identical in both procedures. After 30 min of PRP application, patients were asked to verbally describe their pain perception as either "none," "mild," "moderate," "severe," or "very severe" using a verbal rating scale (VRS and visual analog scale (VAS by indicating a score from "0" to "10," representing the severity of pain from "no pain" to "severe pain." Results: A total of 60 eyes of 60 patients (20 females and 40 males diagnosed with PDR were treated. The mean age of patients was 62.22 ± 9.19 years, and the mean diabetes duration was 195.47 ± 94.54 months. The mean number of laser spots delivered during PRP was 389.47 ± 71.52 in the NAVILAS group and 392.70 ± 54.33 in the PASCAL group (p=0.57. The difference in pain responses between patients in the NAVILAS and PASCAL groups was significant with regard to the mean VRS (1.10 ± 0.67 and 1.47 ± 0.69, respectively; p=0.042 and mean VAS (2.13 ± 1.17 and 2.97 ± 1.35, respectively; p=0.034 scores. Conclusions: Pain responses in patients undergoing PRP with a 30-ms pulse duration were significantly milder in the NAVILAS group than in the PASCAL group.

  10. Segmentation of Heritage Building by Means of Geometric and Radiometric Components from Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitelkadi, K.; Tahiri, D.; Simonetto, E.; Sebari, I.; Polidori, L.

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays, the terrestrial laser scanning represents an integral source of data for cultural heritage 3D storage and access through digital communication tools. The achievement of 3D models requires the implementation of several tasks such as segmentation. Segmentation is the key step during the point cloud processing where all homogeneous areas are identified, which describe a building facade. Usually, a large part of the segmentation approach focuses on the geometric information contained in the point cloud data by exploiting mathematical representation of a parametric surface. However, due to the complexity of the architecture, such segmentation does not suffice. Henceforth, other approaches turn to the use of color and laser intensity components. Although a variety of algorithms have been developed in this sense, problems of over-segmentation or under-segmentation are observed. In this context, we propose a new approach for point cloud segmentation aiming at a more accurate result. This approach relies on all the components of a colored point - both geometric and radiometric - combining the RGB values, laser intensity and geometric data. Our process begins with the extraction of homogeneous planar segments using the RANSAC algorithm. Next, the result is subjected to a radiometric-based segmentation, first through color similarity as one of the homogeneity criteria of a region growing algorithm, then through the use of intensity similarity for segment fusion. Experiments are performed on a facade presenting an example of Moroccan classical architecture located in Casablanca's Medina. Results show the importance of integrating all point cloud components, both geometric and radiometric.

  11. Ultrafast dark-field surface inspection with hybrid-dispersion laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Akio; Kim, Chanju; Chan, Jacky; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Goda, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Jalali, Bahram

    2014-06-01

    High-speed surface inspection plays an important role in industrial manufacturing, safety monitoring, and quality control. It is desirable to go beyond the speed limitation of current technologies for reducing manufacturing costs and opening a new window onto a class of applications that require high-throughput sensing. Here, we report a high-speed dark-field surface inspector for detection of micrometer-sized surface defects that can travel at a record high speed as high as a few kilometers per second. This method is based on a modified time-stretch microscope that illuminates temporally and spatially dispersed laser pulses on the surface of a fast-moving object and detects scattered light from defects on the surface with a sensitive photodetector in a dark-field configuration. The inspector's ability to perform ultrafast dark-field surface inspection enables real-time identification of difficult-to-detect features on weakly reflecting surfaces and hence renders the method much more practical than in the previously demonstrated bright-field configuration. Consequently, our inspector provides nearly 1000 times higher scanning speed than conventional inspectors. To show our method's broad utility, we demonstrate real-time inspection of the surface of various objects (a non-reflective black film, transparent flexible film, and reflective hard disk) for detection of 10 μm or smaller defects on a moving target at 20 m/s within a scan width of 25 mm at a scan rate of 90.9 MHz. Our method holds promise for improving the cost and performance of organic light-emitting diode displays for next-generation smart phones, lithium-ion batteries for green electronics, and high-efficiency solar cells.

  12. Morphological Changes Along a Dike Landside Slope Sampled by 4d High Resolution Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Huertaa, Mónica; Lindenbergh, Roderik; Ponsioen, Luc; van Damme, Myron

    2016-06-01

    Emergence of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology provides new tools for geomorphologic studies improving spatial and temporal resolution of data sampling hydrogeological instability phenomena. Specifically, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) collects high resolution 3D point clouds allowing more accurate monitoring of erosion rates and processes, and thus, quantify the geomorphologic change on vertical landforms like dike landside slopes. Even so, TLS captures observations rapidly and automatically but unselectively. In this research, we demonstrate the potential of TLS for morphological change detection, profile creation and time series analysis in an emergency simulation for characterizing and monitoring slope movements in a dike. The experiment was performed near Schellebelle (Belgium) in November 2015, using a Leica Scan Station C10. Wave overtopping and overflow over a dike were simulated whereby the loading conditions were incrementally increased and 14 successful scans were performed. The aim of the present study is to analyse short-term morphological dynamic processes and the spatial distribution of erosion and deposition areas along a dike landside slope. As a result, we are able to quantify the eroded material coming from the impact on the terrain induced by wave overtopping which caused the dike failure in a few minutes in normal storm scenarios (Q = 25 l/s/m) as 1.24 m3. As this shows that the amount of erosion is measurable using close range techniques; the amount and rate of erosion could be monitored to predict dike collapse in emergency situation. The results confirm the feasibility of the proposed methodology, providing scalability to a comprehensive analysis over a large extension of a dike (tens of meters).

  13. Ultrafast dark-field surface inspection with hybrid-dispersion laser scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-speed surface inspection plays an important role in industrial manufacturing, safety monitoring, and quality control. It is desirable to go beyond the speed limitation of current technologies for reducing manufacturing costs and opening a new window onto a class of applications that require high-throughput sensing. Here, we report a high-speed dark-field surface inspector for detection of micrometer-sized surface defects that can travel at a record high speed as high as a few kilometers per second. This method is based on a modified time-stretch microscope that illuminates temporally and spatially dispersed laser pulses on the surface of a fast-moving object and detects scattered light from defects on the surface with a sensitive photodetector in a dark-field configuration. The inspector's ability to perform ultrafast dark-field surface inspection enables real-time identification of difficult-to-detect features on weakly reflecting surfaces and hence renders the method much more practical than in the previously demonstrated bright-field configuration. Consequently, our inspector provides nearly 1000 times higher scanning speed than conventional inspectors. To show our method's broad utility, we demonstrate real-time inspection of the surface of various objects (a non-reflective black film, transparent flexible film, and reflective hard disk) for detection of 10 μm or smaller defects on a moving target at 20 m/s within a scan width of 25 mm at a scan rate of 90.9 MHz. Our method holds promise for improving the cost and performance of organic light-emitting diode displays for next-generation smart phones, lithium-ion batteries for green electronics, and high-efficiency solar cells.

  14. Digital Terrain Models from Mobile Laser Scanning Data in Moravian Karst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagur, N.; Hollaus, M.

    2016-06-01

    During the last ten years, mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems have become a very popular and efficient technology for capturing reality in 3D. A 3D laser scanner mounted on the top of a moving vehicle (e.g. car) allows the high precision capturing of the environment in a fast way. Mostly this technology is used in cities for capturing roads and buildings facades to create 3D city models. In our work, we used an MLS system in Moravian Karst, which is a protected nature reserve in the Eastern Part of the Czech Republic, with a steep rocky terrain covered by forests. For the 3D data collection, the Riegl VMX 450, mounted on a car, was used with integrated IMU/GNSS equipment, which provides low noise, rich and very dense 3D point clouds. The aim of this work is to create a digital terrain model (DTM) from several MLS data sets acquired in the neighbourhood of a road. The total length of two covered areas is 3.9 and 6.1 km respectively, with an average width of 100 m. For the DTM generation, a fully automatic, robust, hierarchic approach was applied. The derivation of the DTM is based on combinations of hierarchical interpolation and robust filtering for different resolution levels. For the generation of the final DTMs, different interpolation algorithms are applied to the classified terrain points. The used parameters were determined by explorative analysis. All MLS data sets were processed with one parameter set. As a result, a high precise DTM was derived with high spatial resolution of 0.25 x 0.25 m. The quality of the DTMs was checked by geodetic measurements and visual comparison with raw point clouds. The high quality of the derived DTM can be used for analysing terrain changes and morphological structures. Finally, the derived DTM was compared with the DTM of the Czech Republic (DMR 4G) with a resolution of 5 x 5 m, which was created from airborne laser scanning data. The vertical accuracy of the derived DTMs is around 0.10 m.

  15. Roughness of biopores and cracks in Bt-horizons by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leue, Martin; Gerke, Horst H.

    2016-04-01

    During preferential flow events in structured soils, the movement of water and reactive solutes is mostly restricted to larger inter-aggregate pores, cracks, and biopores. The micro-topography of such macropores in terms of pore shapes, geometry, and roughness is crucial for describing the exchange of water and solutes between macropores and the soil matrix. The objective of this study was to determine the surface roughness of intact structural surfaces from the Bt-horizon of Luvisols by confocal laser scanning microscopy. For this purpose, samples with the structural surface types including cracks with and without clay-organic coatings from Bt-horizons developed on loess and glacial till were compared. The surface roughness of these structures was calculated in terms of three parameters from selected surface regions of 0.36 mm² determined with a confocal laser scanning microscope of the type Keyence VK-X100K. These data were evaluated in terms of the root-mean-squared roughness, Rq, the curvature, Rku, and the ratio between surface area and base area, RA. Values of Rq and RA were smaller for coated as compared to uncoated cracks and earthworm burrows of the Bt-horizons from both parent materials. The results indicated that the illuviation of clayey material led to a "smoothing" of the crack surfaces, which was similar for the coarser textured till-Bt and the finer-textured loess-Bt surfaces. The roughness indicated by Rq and RA values was only slightly smaller and that indicated by Rku slightly higher for the structural surfaces from the loess as compared to those from the glacial till. These results suggest a minor importance of the parent material on the roughness of structural surfaces in the Bt-horizon. The similarity of Rq, RA, and Rku values between surfaces of earthworm burrows and uncoated cracks did not confirm an expected smoothing effect of the burrow walls by the earthworm. In contrast to burrow walls, root channels from the loess-Bt were smoother

  16. Linking water surface roughness to velocity patterns using terrestrial laser scanning and acoustic doppler velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritage, George; Milan, David; Entwistle, Neil

    2010-05-01

    There are well established links between water surface characteristics and hydraulics. Biotope identification is currently an important part of the River Habitat Survey in England and Wales. Their differentiation is based upon recognition of a family of flow features exhibited on the water surface. Variability in this water surface ‘roughness' is dependent upon the interaction of flow with boundary roughness and flow depth. Past research that has attempted to differentiate biotopes based upon differences in Froude number (Fr) and Reynolds number (Re), however this linkage has only been limited to local analysis between flow velocity, depth and roughness. Milan et al. (2010) have recently demonstrated that terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can be applied to produce fully quantitative maps of hydraulic habitat, based upon defined water surface roughness delimeters. However the nature of the linkages between water surface roughness, flow velocity and depth are still poorly understood, particularly at the reach-scale. This study attempts to provide a full spatial picture of the links between water surface roughness, flow depth and velocity. A Sontek Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP) was used to provide detailed information on vertical velocity and water depth for a 300 m reach of the gravel-bed River Wharfe, Yorkshire, UK. Simultaneous to the ADVP measurements, a Riegl LMS-Z210 TLS was used to take a series of first return scans of the water surface. Categorisation of the point cloud elevation data for the water surface was achieved through the allocation of moving window standard deviation values to a regular grid, thus defining water surface roughness. The ADVP data demonstrate gross reach-scale variation in velocity and depth linked to bedforms, and more localised spatial and temporal variation within biotope units. The ADVP data was used to produce reach-scale maps of Fr and Re. The extent to which water surface roughness defined biotopes mapped onto these

  17. Processing of airborne laser scanning data to generate accurate DTM for floodplain wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Mirosław-Świątek, Dorota; Grygoruk, Mateusz; Michałowski, Robert; Kardel, Ignacy

    2015-10-01

    Structure of the floodplain, especially its topography and vegetation, influences the overland flow and dynamics of floods which are key factors shaping ecosystems in surface water-fed wetlands. Therefore elaboration of the digital terrain model (DTM) of a high spatial accuracy is crucial in hydrodynamic flow modelling in river valleys. In this study the research was conducted in the unique Central European complex of fens and marshes - the Lower Biebrza river valley. The area is represented mainly by peat ecosystems which according to EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) are called "water-dependent ecosystems". Development of accurate DTM in these areas which are overgrown by dense wetland vegetation consisting of alder forest, willow shrubs, reed, sedges and grass is very difficult, therefore to represent terrain in high accuracy the airborne laser scanning data (ALS) with scanning density of 4 points/m2 was used and the correction of the "vegetation effect" on DTM was executed. This correction was performed utilizing remotely sensed images, topographical survey using the Real Time Kinematic positioning and vegetation height measurements. In order to classify different types of vegetation within research area the object based image analysis (OBIA) was used. OBIA allowed partitioning remotely sensed imagery into meaningful image-objects, and assessing their characteristics through spatial and spectral scale. The final maps of vegetation patches that include attributes of vegetation height and vegetation spectral properties, utilized both the laser scanning data and the vegetation indices developed on the basis of airborne and satellite imagery. This data was used in process of segmentation, attribution and classification. Several different vegetation indices were tested to distinguish different types of vegetation in wetland area. The OBIA classification allowed correction of the "vegetation effect" on DTM. The final digital terrain model was compared and examined

  18. Cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting: Evolution of optimal grid-based scanning path & parametric approach to thermal homogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    Selective laser melting, as a rapid manufacturing technology, is uniquely poised to enforce a paradigm shift in the manufacturing industry by eliminating the gap between job- and batch-production techniques. Products from this process, however, tend to show an increased amount of defects...

  19. 2D numerical modelling of the gas temperature in a high-temperature high-power strontium atom laser excited by nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in a He-SrBr2 mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2014-05-01

    Assuming axial symmetry and a uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed numerically for determination of the gas temperature in the case of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in He-SrBr2 formed in a newly-designed large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge-free zone, in order to find the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. The model determines the gas temperature of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  20. Identification of Serine Conformers by Matrix-Isolation IR Spectroscopy Aided by Near-Infrared Laser-Induced Conformational Change, 2D Correlation Analysis, and Quantum Mechanical Anharmonic Computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najbauer, Eszter E; Bazsó, Gábor; Apóstolo, Rui; Fausto, Rui; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Tarczay, György

    2015-08-20

    The conformers of α-serine were investigated by matrix-isolation IR spectroscopy combined with NIR laser irradiation. This method, aided by 2D correlation analysis, enabled unambiguously grouping the spectral lines to individual conformers. On the basis of comparison of at least nine experimentally observed vibrational transitions of each conformer with empirically scaled (SQM) and anharmonic (GVPT2) computed IR spectra, six conformers were identified. In addition, the presence of at least one more conformer in Ar matrix was proved, and a short-lived conformer with a half-life of (3.7 ± 0.5) × 10(3) s in N2 matrix was generated by NIR irradiation. The analysis of the NIR laser-induced conversions revealed that the excitation of the stretching overtone of both the side chain and the carboxylic OH groups can effectively promote conformational changes, but remarkably different paths were observed for the two kinds of excitations. PMID:26201050

  1. USE OF MULTIPHOTON LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY TO IMAGE BENZO[A]PYRENE AND METABOLITES IN FISH EGGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) is a promising tool to study the tissue distribution of environmental chemical contaminants during fish early life stages. One such chemical for which this is possible is benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon that a...

  2. USE OF MULTIPHOTON LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY TO IMAGE BENZO[A]PYRENE AND METABOLITES IN FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiphoton laser scanning micrsocopy holds promise as a tool to study the tissue distribution of environmental chemical contaminants during fish early life stage development. One such chemical for which this is possible is benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a polyaromatic hydrocarbon that a...

  3. Analysis of a marine phototrophic biofilm by confocal laser scanning microscopy using the new image quantification software PHLIP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, L.N.; de Brouwer, J.F.C.; Almeida, J.S.; Stal, L.J.; Xavier, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Background Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the method of choice to study interfacial biofilms and acquires time-resolved three-dimensional data of the biofilm structure. CLSM can be used in a multi-channel modus where the different channels map individual biofilm components. This commun

  4. Accuracy in estimation of timber assortments and stem distribution - A comparison of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankare, Ville; Vauhkonen, Jari; Tanhuanpää, Topi; Holopainen, Markus; Vastaranta, Mikko; Joensuu, Marianna; Krooks, Anssi; Hyyppä, Juha; Hyyppä, Hannu; Alho, Petteri; Viitala, Risto

    2014-11-01

    Detailed information about timber assortments and diameter distributions is required in forest management. Forest owners can make better decisions concerning the timing of timber sales and forest companies can utilize more detailed information to optimize their wood supply chain from forest to factory. The objective here was to compare the accuracies of high-density laser scanning techniques for the estimation of tree-level diameter distribution and timber assortments. We also introduce a method that utilizes a combination of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning in timber assortment estimation. The study was conducted in Evo, Finland. Harvester measurements were used as a reference for 144 trees within a single clear-cut stand. The results showed that accurate tree-level timber assortments and diameter distributions can be obtained, using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) or a combination of TLS and airborne laser scanning (ALS). Saw log volumes were estimated with higher accuracy than pulpwood volumes. The saw log volumes were estimated with relative root-mean-squared errors of 17.5% and 16.8% with TLS and a combination of TLS and ALS, respectively. The respective accuracies for pulpwood were 60.1% and 59.3%. The differences in the bucking method used also caused some large errors. In addition, tree quality factors highly affected the bucking accuracy, especially with pulpwood volume.

  5. Plastic-to-Elastic Transition in Aggregated Emulsion Networks, Studied with Atomic Force Microscopy-Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy Microrheology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filip, D.; Duits, M.H.G.; Uricanu, V.I.; Mellema, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate how the simultaneous application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) can be used to characterize the (local) rheological properties of soft condensed matter at micrometer length scales. Measurement of AFM force curves as a func

  6. Introduction of an ultrathin and flexible laser scanning endoscope for color imaging and integrated PDD and future PDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Eric J.; Kenerson, Heidi L.; Lee, Cameron M.; Melville, C. David; Johnston, Richard S.; Yeung, Raymond S.

    2009-06-01

    The scanning fiber endoscope (SFE), an ultrathin laser scanning endoscope capable of producing 500-line color images at 30-Hz frame rate, has been developed at the University of Washington. The SFE probe is a 1-mm diameter by 9-mm long rigid scanner at the tip of a highly flexible and robust tether (minimum bend radius perfusion with 0.4 mM hypericin. The 442-nm blue and 532-nm green laser illumination sources were used for both standard reflectance imaging and fluorescence excitation, while the red 635- nm illumination was disabled. Red detection signal gain was increased to amplify the red fluorescence signal from the photomultiplier tube and within the computer image display. Results show green and blue reflectance images overlaid with red fluorescence signal in tumor regions of the kidney. These imaging capabilities portend future adoption of laser-based SFE imaging for real-time PDD.

  7. Impact of multiple sub-melt laser scans on the activation and diffusion of shallow Boron junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosseel, E.; Vandervorst, W.; Clarysse, T.;

    2008-01-01

    Sub-melt laser annealing is a promising technique to achieve the required sheet resistance and junction depth specifications for the 32 nm technology node and beyond. In order to obtain a production worthy process with minimal sheet resistance variation at a macroscopic and microscopic level......, careful process optimization is required. While macroscopic variations can easily be addressed using the proper spatial power compensation it is more difficult to completely eliminate the micro scale non-uniformity which is intimately linked to the laser beam profile, the amount of overlaps and the scan...... pitch. In this work, we will present micro scale sheet resistance uniformity measurements for shallow 0.5 keV B junctions and zoom in on the underlying effect of multiple subsequent laser scans. A variety of characterization techniques are used to extract the relevant junction parameters and the role...

  8. Application of terrestrial laser scanning for coastal geomorphologic research questions in western Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, Dirk; Curdt, Constanze; Tilly, Nora; Ntageretzis, Konstantin; Aasen, Helge; Vött, Andreas; Bareth, Georg

    2013-04-01

    Coasts are areas of permanent change, influenced by gradual changes and sudden impacts. In particular, western Greece is a tectonically active region, due to the nearby plate boundary of the Hellenic Arc. The region has suffered from numerous earthquakes and tsunamis during prehistoric and historic times and is thus characterized by a high seismic and tsunami hazard risk. Additionally, strong winter storms may reach considerable dimensions. In this study, terrestrial laser scanning was applied for (i) annual change detection at seven coastal areas of western Greece for three years (2009-2011) and (ii) accurate parameter detection of large boulders, dislocated by high-energy wave impacts. The Riegl LMS-Z420i laser scanner was used in combination with a precise DGPS system (Topcon HiPer Pro) for all surveys. Each scan position and a further target were recorded for georeferencing and merging of the point clouds. (i) For the annual detection of changes, reference points for the base station of the DGPS system were marked. High-resolution digital elevation models (HRDEM) were generated from each dataset of the different years and are compared to each other, resulting in mass balances. (ii) 3D-models of dislocated boulders were reconstructed and parameters (e.g. volume in combination with density measurements, distance and height above present sea-level) were derived for the solution of wave transport equations, which estimate the minimum wave height or velocity that is necessary for boulder movement. (i) Our results show that annual changes are detectable by multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning. In general, volumetric changes and affected areas are quantifiable and maps of changes can be established. On exposed beach areas, bigger changes were detectable, where seagrass and sand is eroded and gravel accumulated. In opposite, only minor changes for elevated areas are derived. Dislocated boulders on several sites showed no movement. At coastal areas with a high

  9. VOXEL-BASED APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING URBAN TREE VOLUME FROM TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vonderach

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of single trees and the determination of related parameters has been recognized in recent years, e.g. for forest inventories or management. For urban areas an increasing interest in the data acquisition of trees can be observed concerning aspects like urban climate, CO2 balance, and environmental protection. Urban trees differ significantly from natural systems with regard to the site conditions (e.g. technogenic soils, contaminants, lower groundwater level, regular disturbance, climate (increased temperature, reduced humidity and species composition and arrangement (habitus and health status and therefore allometric relations cannot be transferred from natural sites to urban areas. To overcome this problem an extended approach was developed for a fast and non-destructive extraction of branch volume, DBH (diameter at breast height and height of single trees from point clouds of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS. For data acquisition, the trees were scanned with highest scan resolution from several (up to five positions located around the tree. The resulting point clouds (20 to 60 million points are analysed with an algorithm based on voxel (volume elements structure, leading to an appropriate data reduction. In a first step, two kinds of noise reduction are carried out: the elimination of isolated voxels as well as voxels with marginal point density. To obtain correct volume estimates, the voxels inside the stem and branches (interior voxels where voxels contain no laser points must be regarded. For this filling process, an easy and robust approach was developed based on a layer-wise (horizontal layers of the voxel structure intersection of four orthogonal viewing directions. However, this procedure also generates several erroneous "phantom" voxels, which have to be eliminated. For this purpose the previous approach was extended by a special region growing algorithm. In a final step the volume is determined layer-wise based on the

  10. Diameter distribution estimation with laser scanning based multisource single tree inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankare, Ville; Liang, Xinlian; Vastaranta, Mikko; Yu, Xiaowei; Holopainen, Markus; Hyyppä, Juha

    2015-10-01

    Tree detection and tree species recognition are bottlenecks of the airborne remote sensing-based single tree inventories. The effect of these factors in forest attribute estimation can be reduced if airborne measurements are aided with tree mapping information that is collected from the ground. The main objective here was to demonstrate the use of terrestrial laser scanning-derived (TLS) tree maps in aiding airborne laser scanning-based (ALS) single tree inventory (multisource single tree inventory, MS-STI) and its capability in predicting diameter distribution in various forest conditions. Automatic measurement of TLS point clouds provided the tree maps and the required reference information from the tree attributes. The study area was located in Evo, Finland, and the reference data was acquired from 27 different sample plots with varying forest conditions. The workflow of MS-STI included: (1) creation of automatic tree map from TLS point clouds, (2) automatic diameter at breast height (DBH) measurement from TLS point clouds, (3) individual tree detection (ITD) based on ALS, (4) matching the ITD segments to the field-measured reference, (5) ALS point cloud metric extraction from the single tree segments and (6) DBH estimation based on the derived metrics. MS-STI proved to be accurate and efficient method for DBH estimation and predicting diameter distribution. The overall accuracy (root mean squared error, RMSE) of the DBH was 36.9 mm. Results showed that the DBH accuracy decreased if the tree density (trees/ha) increased. The highest accuracies were found in old-growth forests (tree densities less than 500 stems/ha). MS-STI resulted in the best accuracies regarding Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.)-dominated forests (RMSE of 29.9 mm). Diameter distributions were predicted with low error indices, thereby resulting in a good fit compared to the reference. Based on the results, diameter distribution estimation with MS-STI is highly dependent on the forest

  11. Long-range laser scanning and 3D imaging for the Gneiss quarries survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, Filippo Luca; Spataro, Alessio; Pozzoni, Maurizio; Ambrosi, Christian; Cannata, Massimiliano; Günther, Felix; Corboud, Federico

    2016-04-01

    In Canton Ticino (Southern Switzerland), the exploitation of natural stone, mostly gneisses, is an important activity of valley's economies. Nowadays, these economic activities are menaced by (i) the exploitation costs related to geological phenomena such as fractures, faults and heterogeneous rocks that hinder the processing of the stone product, (ii) continuously changing demand because of the evolving natural stone fashion and (iii) increasing administrative limits and rules acting to protect the environment. Therefore, the sustainable development of the sector for the next decades needs new and effective strategies to regulate and plan the quarries. A fundamental step in this process is the building of a 3D geological model of the quarries to constrain the volume of commercial natural stone and the volume of waste. In this context, we conducted Terrestrial Laser Scanning surveys of the quarries in the Maggia Valley to obtain a detailed 3D topography onto which the geological units were mapped. The topographic 3D model was obtained with a long-range laser scanning Riegl VZ4000 that can measure from up to 4 km of distance with a speed of 147,000 points per second. It operates with the new V-line technology, which defines the surface relief by sensing differentiated signals (echoes), even in the presence of obstacles such as vegetation. Depending on the esthetics of the gneisses, we defined seven types of natural stones that, together with faults and joints, were mapped onto the 3D models of the exploitation sites. According to the orientation of the geological limits and structures, we projected the different rock units and fractures into the excavation front. This way, we obtained a 3D geological model from which we can quantitatively estimate the volume of the seven different natural stones (with different commercial value) and waste (with low commercial value). To verify the 3D geological models and to quantify exploited rock and waste volumes the same

  12. Segmentation of Planar Surfaces from Laser Scanning Data Using the Magnitude of Normal Position Vector for Adaptive Neighborhoods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjae Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse approaches to laser point segmentation have been proposed since the emergence of the laser scanning system. Most of these segmentation techniques, however, suffer from limitations such as sensitivity to the choice of seed points, lack of consideration of the spatial relationships among points, and inefficient performance. In an effort to overcome these drawbacks, this paper proposes a segmentation methodology that: (1 reduces the dimensions of the attribute space; (2 considers the attribute similarity and the proximity of the laser point simultaneously; and (3 works well with both airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data. A neighborhood definition based on the shape of the surface increases the homogeneity of the laser point attributes. The magnitude of the normal position vector is used as an attribute for reducing the dimension of the accumulator array. The experimental results demonstrate, through both qualitative and quantitative evaluations, the outcomes’ high level of reliability. The proposed segmentation algorithm provided 96.89% overall correctness, 95.84% completeness, a 0.25 m overall mean value of centroid difference, and less than 1° of angle difference. The performance of the proposed approach was also verified with a large dataset and compared with other approaches. Additionally, the evaluation of the sensitivity of the thresholds was carried out. In summary, this paper proposes a robust and efficient segmentation methodology for abstraction of an enormous number of laser points into plane information.

  13. Segmentation of Planar Surfaces from Laser Scanning Data Using the Magnitude of Normal Position Vector for Adaptive Neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changjae; Habib, Ayman; Pyeon, Muwook; Kwon, Goo-rak; Jung, Jaehoon; Heo, Joon

    2016-01-01

    Diverse approaches to laser point segmentation have been proposed since the emergence of the laser scanning system. Most of these segmentation techniques, however, suffer from limitations such as sensitivity to the choice of seed points, lack of consideration of the spatial relationships among points, and inefficient performance. In an effort to overcome these drawbacks, this paper proposes a segmentation methodology that: (1) reduces the dimensions of the attribute space; (2) considers the attribute similarity and the proximity of the laser point simultaneously; and (3) works well with both airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data. A neighborhood definition based on the shape of the surface increases the homogeneity of the laser point attributes. The magnitude of the normal position vector is used as an attribute for reducing the dimension of the accumulator array. The experimental results demonstrate, through both qualitative and quantitative evaluations, the outcomes' high level of reliability. The proposed segmentation algorithm provided 96.89% overall correctness, 95.84% completeness, a 0.25 m overall mean value of centroid difference, and less than 1° of angle difference. The performance of the proposed approach was also verified with a large dataset and compared with other approaches. Additionally, the evaluation of the sensitivity of the thresholds was carried out. In summary, this paper proposes a robust and efficient segmentation methodology for abstraction of an enormous number of laser points into plane information. PMID:26805849

  14. Detection of Aspens Using High Resolution Aerial Laser Scanning Data and Digital Aerial Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Eerikäinen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to use high resolution Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS data and aerial images to detect European aspen (Populus tremula L. from among other deciduous trees. The field data consisted of 14 sample plots of 30 m × 30 m size located in the Koli National Park in the North Karelia, Eastern Finland. A Canopy Height Model (CHM was interpolated from the ALS data with a pulse density of 3.86/m2, low-pass filtered using Height-Based Filtering (HBF and binarized to create the mask needed to separate the ground pixels from the canopy pixels within individual areas. Watershed segmentation was applied to the low-pass filtered CHM in order to create preliminary canopy segments, from which the non-canopy elements were extracted to obtain the final canopy segmentation, i.e. the ground mask was analysed against the canopy mask. A manual classification of aerial images was employed to separate the canopy segments of deciduous trees from those of coniferous trees. Finally, linear discriminant analysis was applied to the correctly classified canopy segments of deciduous trees to classify them into segments belonging to aspen and those belonging to other deciduous trees. The independent variables used in the classification were obtained from the first pulse ALS point data. The accuracy of discrimination between aspen and other deciduous trees was 78.6%. The independent variables in the classification function were the proportion of vegetation hits, the standard deviation of in pulse heights, accumulated intensity at the 90th percentile and the proportion of laser points reflected at the 60th height percentile. The accuracy of classification corresponded to the validation results of earlier ALS-based studies on the classification of individual deciduous trees to tree species.

  15. A reference-free micro defect visualization using pulse laser scanning thermography and image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinyeol; Choi, Jaemook; Hwang, Soonkyu; An, Yun-Kyu; Sohn, Hoon

    2016-08-01

    As quality control of micro devices and early detection of micro defects in these devices are becoming increasingly important, the demand for a fast and automated online inspection technique to detect micro defects with high spatial resolution is increasing. In this study, a reference-free micro defect visualization algorithm is developed based on laser scanning thermography to detect micro defects in devices instantaneously and automatically with high spatial resolution. A pulse modulated continuous wave laser generates thermal waves in a target device, and the corresponding thermal responses are recorded by an infrared (IR) camera. When the thermal wave encounters a micro defect, the propagation of the thermal wave is blocked at the interface of the micro defect. The blockage of the thermal wave is detected by the proposed reference-free micro defect visualization algorithm. First, an edge detection algorithm is applied to a raw thermal image obtained at a specific time point to extract the thermal discontinuities formed at the boundaries of the defect. The edge images obtained from all time sequences are then assembled into a single accumulated edge image to accentuate defect-induced thermal disturbances in the form of edge features. Finally, the accumulated edge image is automatically processed using a binary imaging algorithm to visualize the micro defect in the target device. The performance of the proposed reference-free micro defect visualization algorithm is examined using two types of specimens, semiconductor chips and ceramic-epoxy composites. The proposed algorithm successfully diagnoses micro defects ranging from 4 μm to 40 μm in width.

  16. Estimating single-tree branch biomass of Norway spruce by airborne laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauglin, Marius; Dibdiakova, Janka; Gobakken, Terje; Næsset, Erik

    2013-05-01

    The use of forest biomass for bioenergy purposes, directly or through refinement processes, has increased in the last decade. One example of such use is the utilization of logging residues. Branch biomass constitutes typically a considerable part of the logging residues, and should be quantified and included in future forest inventories. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is widely used when collecting data for forest inventories, and even methods to derive information at the single-tree level has been described. Procedures for estimation of single-tree branch biomass of Norway spruce using features derived from ALS data are proposed in the present study. As field reference data the dry weight branch biomass of 50 trees were obtained through destructive sampling. Variables were further derived from the ALS echoes from each tree, including crown volume calculated from an interpolated crown surface constructed with a radial basis function. Spatial information derived from the pulse vectors were also incorporated when calculating the crown volume. Regression models with branch biomass as response variable were fit to the data, and the prediction accuracy assessed through a cross-validation procedure. Random forest regression models were compared to stepwise and simple linear least squares models. In the present study branch biomass was estimated with a higher accuracy by the best ALS-based models than by existing allometric biomass equations based on field measurements. An improved prediction accuracy was observed when incorporating information from the laser pulse vectors into the calculation of the crown volume variable, and a linear model with the crown volume as a single predictor gave the best overall results with a root mean square error of 35% in the validation.

  17. Possibilities of CT Scanning as Analysis Method in Laser Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karme, Aleksis; Kallonen, Aki; Matilainen, Ville-Pekka; Piili, Heidi; Salminen, Antti

    Laser additive manufacturing is an established and constantly developing technique. Structural assessment should be a key component to ensure directed evolution towards higher level of manufacturing. The macroscopic properties of metallic structures are determined by their internal microscopic features, which are difficult to assess using conventional surface measuring methodologies. X-ray microtomography (CT) is a promising technique for three-dimensional non-destructive probing of internal composition and build of various materials. Aim of this study is to define the possibilities of using CT scanning as quality control method in LAM fabricated parts. Since the parts fabricated with LAM are very often used in high quality and accuracy demanding applications in various industries such as medical and aerospace, it is important to be able to define the accuracy of the build parts. The tubular stainless steel test specimens were 3D modelled, manufactured with a modified research AM equipment and imaged after manufacturing with a high-power, high-resolution CT scanner. 3D properties, such as surface texture and the amount and distribution of internal pores, were also evaluated in this study. Surface roughness was higher on the interior wall of the tube, and deviation from the model was systematically directed towards the central axis. Pore distribution showed clear organization and divided into two populations; one following the polygon model seams along both rims, and the other being associated with the concentric and equidistant movement path of the laser. Assessment of samples can enhance the fabrication by guiding the improvement of both modelling and manufacturing process.

  18. Assessment of DNA replication in central nervous system by Laser Scanning Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Dominik; Mosch, Birgit; Bocsi, Jozsef; Arendt, Thomas; Tárnok, Attila

    2004-07-01

    μIn neurons of patients with Alzheimers's disease (AD) signs of cell cycle re-entry as well as polyploidy have been reported1, 2, indicating that the entire or a part of the genome of the neurons is duplicated before its death but mitosis is not initiated so that the cellular DNA content remains tetraploid. It was concluded, that this imbalance is the direct cause of the neuronal loss in AD3. Manual counting of polyploidal cells is possible but time consuming and possibly statistically insufficient. The aim of this study was to develop an automated method that detects the neuronal DNA content abnormalities with Laser Scanning Cytometry (LSC).Frozen sections of formalin-fixed brain tissue of AD patients and control subjects were labelled with anti-cyclin B and anti-NeuN antibodies. Immunolabelling was performed using Cy5- and Cy2-conjugated secondary antibodies and biotin streptavidin or tyramid signal amplification. In the end sections of 20m thickness were incubated with propidium iodide (PI) (50μg/ml) and covered on slides. For analysis by the LSC PI was used as trigger. Cells identified as neurons by NeuN expression were analyzed for cyclin B expression. Per specimen data of at least 10,000 neurons were acquired. In the frozen brain sections an automated quantification of the amount of nuclear DNA is possible with LSC. The DNA ploidy as well as the cell cycle distribution can be analyzed. A high number of neurons can be scanned and the duration of measuring is shorter than a manual examination. The amount of DNA is sufficiently represented by the PI fluorescence to be able to distinguish between eu- and polyploid neurons.

  19. 3D digital image processing for biofilm quantification from confocal laser scanning microscopy: Multidimensional statistical analysis of biofilm modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Jerzy S.

    The dramatic increase in number and volume of digital images produced in medical diagnostics, and the escalating demand for rapid access to these relevant medical data, along with the need for interpretation and retrieval has become of paramount importance to a modern healthcare system. Therefore, there is an ever growing need for processed, interpreted and saved images of various types. Due to the high cost and unreliability of human-dependent image analysis, it is necessary to develop an automated method for feature extraction, using sophisticated mathematical algorithms and reasoning. This work is focused on digital image signal processing of biological and biomedical data in one- two- and three-dimensional space. Methods and algorithms presented in this work were used to acquire data from genomic sequences, breast cancer, and biofilm images. One-dimensional analysis was applied to DNA sequences which were presented as a non-stationary sequence and modeled by a time-dependent autoregressive moving average (TD-ARMA) model. Two-dimensional analyses used 2D-ARMA model and applied it to detect breast cancer from x-ray mammograms or ultrasound images. Three-dimensional detection and classification techniques were applied to biofilm images acquired using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Modern medical images are geometrically arranged arrays of data. The broadening scope of imaging as a way to organize our observations of the biophysical world has led to a dramatic increase in our ability to apply new processing techniques and to combine multiple channels of data into sophisticated and complex mathematical models of physiological function and dysfunction. With explosion of the amount of data produced in a field of biomedicine, it is crucial to be able to construct accurate mathematical models of the data at hand. Two main purposes of signal modeling are: data size conservation and parameter extraction. Specifically, in biomedical imaging we have four key problems

  20. Use of terrestrial laser scanning for the documentation of quaternary caves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyszkowski, Sebastian; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Wiśniewska, Daria; Urban, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Due to the nature of their occurrence and genesis, caves in the Polish Lowlands represent a peculiarity of geological heritage, unique on the European scale. They are developed in Quaternary deposits, mostly at the contact of slabs or irregular bodies of cemented glacial or glaciofluvial deposits: conglomerates and sandstones, with unconsolidated deposits, mostly sands, gravels and clays. So far, 20 such caves have been recorded in Polish Lowlands. Most caves are only several meters long, the largest one is over 60 m long. Regardless of their origins, the character of host rocks is the reason that processes leading to their formation are simultaneously the destroying processes. Thus, the studied caves, as well as other caves of this region, are unstable, gradually evolving objects. The changes taking place in them are continuous and intense enough, therefore the documentation of their shape with the greatest possible accuracy and resolution becomes crucial. Such possibility can provide the technique of laser scanning. In 2014 three caves, including one recently discovered, were scanned using the TLS. Measurements of caves and their surroundings were conducted in May and July 2014 with a scanner RIEGL VZ-4000. Point clouds from several scanner positions were combined using the module Multi Station Adjustment in the RiSCAN software. This module allows to connect point clouds from successive positions without any objects of reference. After the merger of point clouds from individual positions and their filtration, a collection of several million points was obtained. The number of points projected on the wall was over 20 000 per m2. The using of TLS enabled to present the morphometric features impossible to obtain using traditional methods. High density of the point clouds allows registering even small details on the cave walls, as well as monitoring leaching, falling, grinding and flaking processes taking place in them. Thus, the most important advantage of the TLS is

  1. Ultra high-speed micromachining of transparent materials using high PRF ultrafast lasers and new resonant scanning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harth, F.; Piontek, M. C.; Herrmann, T.; L'huillier, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Irradiation of focused laser pulses to transparent materials leads to structural changes and can be used for the fabrication of e.g. LED light guiding components. In these applications both small spot sizes and a high lateral resolution in the μm range are absolutely essential. In order to achieve the industrially required throughput of nearly one million laser markings per second, ultrafast lasers with 100 W of average power and pulse repetition frequencies of several MHz are required. Laser machining of polymers additionally necessitates a wide spatial separation of the markings to avoid heat accumulation effects. Therefore, neither commercially available galvanometer based nor Polygon based scanners with their limited scan speed can be used for beam deflection. In our work, we developed an experimental setup based

  2. Terrestrial laser scanning of anthropogenic beach berms for urban flood defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, B. F.; Schubert, J.; Gallien, T.; Shakeri Majd, M.

    2013-12-01

    Globally, over 20 million people reside below present high tide levels and as many as 200 million are vulnerable to flooding during extreme events. In California, coastal flooding is driven by a combination of factors such as high astronomical tides, waves, storm surge, and other fluctuations such as those caused by the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and climate change is likely to exacerbate those factors testing the limits of coastal flood defenses. Beaches provide natural flood protection during storms by mitigating the effects of high water levels and wave runup, and a process known as beach berming can be used to temporarily enhance the ability of beaches to withstand overtopping. In cases where beaches serve as primary protection for development, anthropogenic berms may represent an attractive management option for temporarily addressing future flood hazards. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) or lidar has emerged as a valuable technology for capturing the three dimensional geometry of complex surfaces and objects, and in the context of coastal flood prediction mobile TLS could prove invaluable by quickly mapping beach topography before an imminent flood threat and reducing associated uncertainties in coastal flood forecasting systems. The research presented here highlights the results of a field campaign to document the initial conditions and dynamic erosion of anthropogenic berms using TLS. On three occasions in February and March of 2012, a prototype berm was constructed on the foreshore of the city of Newport Beach, CA at low tide, and was scanned to document its initial shape, and then scanned in near-continuous fashion with the rising tide to characterize its subsequent erosion. The purpose is two-fold: (1) to measure the performance of the TLS system relative to accuracy and assess strengths and drawbacks that are likely to bear on the suitability of this technology to support flood prediction as described above, and (2) to develop a better

  3. Permanent 3D laser scanning system for an active landslide in Gresten (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canli, Ekrem; Höfle, Bernhard; Hämmerle, Martin; Benni, Thiebes; Glade, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) have widely been used for high spatial resolution data acquisition of topographic features and geomorphic analyses. Existing applications encompass different landslides including rockfall, translational or rotational landslides, debris flow, but also coastal cliff erosion, braided river evolution or river bank erosion. The main advantages of TLS are (a) the high spatial sampling density of XYZ-measurements (e.g. 1 point every 2-3 mm at 10 m distance), particularly in comparison with the low data density monitoring techniques such as GNSS or total stations, (b) the millimeter accuracy and precision of the range measurement to centimeter accuracy of the final DEM, and (c) the highly dense area-wide scanning that enables to look through vegetation and to measure bare ground. One of its main constraints is the temporal resolution of acquired data due to labor costs and time requirements for field campaigns. Thus, repetition measurements are generally performed only episodically. However, for an increased scientific understanding of the processes as well as for early warning purposes, we present a novel permanent 3D monitoring setup to increase the temporal resolution of TLS measurements. This accounts for different potential monitoring deliverables such as volumetric calculations, spatio-temporal movement patterns, predictions and even alerting. This system was installed at the active Salcher landslide in Gresten (Austria) that is situated in the transition zone of the Gresten Klippenbelt (Helvetic) and the Flyschzone (Penninic). The characteristic lithofacies are the Gresten Beds of Early Jurassic age that are covered by a sequence of marly and silty beds with intercalated sandy limestones. Permanent data acquisition can be implemented into our workflow with any long-range TLS system offering fully automated capturing. We utilize an Optech ILRIS-3D scanner. The time interval between two scans is currently set to 24 hours, but can be

  4. Applicability of confocal laser scanning microscopy for evaluation and monitoring of cutaneous wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne; Bob, Adrienne; Terhorst, Dorothea; Ulrich, Martina; Fluhr, Joachim; Mendez, Gil; Roewert-Huber, Hans-Joachim; Stockfleth, Eggert; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard

    2012-07-01

    There is a high demand for noninvasive imaging techniques for wound assessment. In vivo reflectance confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an innovative optical technique for noninvasive evaluation of normal and diseased skin in vivo at near cellular resolution. This study was designed to test the feasibility of CLSM for noninvasive analysis of cutaneous wound healing in 15 patients (7 male/8 female), including acute and chronic, superficial and deep dermal skin wounds. A commercially available CLSM system was used for the assessment of wound bed and wound margins in order to obtain descriptive cellular and morphological parameters of cutaneous wound repair noninvasively and over time. CLSM was able to visualize features of cutaneous wound repair in epidermal and superficial dermal wounds, including aspects of inflammation, neovascularisation, and tissue remodelling in vivo. Limitations include the lack of mechanic fixation of the optical system on moist surfaces restricting the analysis of chronic skin wounds to the wound margins, as well as a limited optical resolution in areas of significant slough formation. By describing CLSM features of cutaneous inflammation, vascularisation, and epithelialisation, the findings of this study support the role of CLSM in modern wound research and management.

  5. APPLICATION OF LASER SCANNING SURVEYING TO ROCK SLOPES RISK ASSESSMENT ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Corsetti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The methods for understanding rock instability mechanisms and for evaluating potential destructive scenarios are of great importance in risk assessment analysis dedicated to the establishment of appropriate prevention and mitigation actions. When the portion of the unstable rock mass is very large, effective actions to counteract the risks are complex and expensive. In these conditions, an optimal risk management cannot ignore procedures able to faster and accurately acquire i geometrical data for modeling the geometry of the rock walls and implementing reliable forecasting models and ii monitoring data able to describe the magnitude and the direction of deformation processes. These data contributes to the prediction of the behavior of a landslide if the measurements are acquired frequently and reliable numerical models can be implemented. Innovative geomatic techniques, based on GPS, Terrestrial Laser Scanning Surveying (TLS, automated total station and satellite and ground SAR Interferometry, have been recently applied to define the geometry and monitoring the displacements of unstable slopes. Among these, TLS is mainly adopted to generate detailed 3D models useful to reconstruct rock wall geometry by contributing to the estimation of geo-mechanical parameters, that is orientation, persistence and apparent spacing of rock discontinuities. Two examples of applications of TLS technique to the analysis of a large front in a quarry and of a rock shoulder of a dam are presented.

  6. Fast and Robust STEM Reconstruction in Complex Environments Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Hollaus, M.; Puttonen, E.; Pfeifer, N.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) is an effective tool in forest research and management. However, accurate estimation of tree parameters still remains challenging in complex forests. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm for stem modeling in complex environments. This method does not require accurate delineation of stem points from the original point cloud. The stem reconstruction features a self-adaptive cylinder growing scheme. This algorithm is tested for a landslide region in the federal state of Vorarlberg, Austria. The algorithm results are compared with field reference data, which show that our algorithm is able to accurately retrieve the diameter at breast height (DBH) with a root mean square error (RMSE) of ~1.9 cm. This algorithm is further facilitated by applying an advanced sampling technique. Different sampling rates are applied and tested. It is found that a sampling rate of 7.5% is already able to retain the stem fitting quality and simultaneously reduce the computation time significantly by ~88%.

  7. Towards Automated Characterization of Canopy Layering in Mixed Temperate Forests Using Airborne Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reik Leiterer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Canopy layers form essential structural components, affecting stand productivity and wildlife habitats. Airborne laser scanning (ALS provides horizontal and vertical information on canopy structure simultaneously. Existing approaches to assess canopy layering often require prior information about stand characteristics or rely on pre-defined height thresholds. We developed a multi-scale method using ALS data with point densities >10 pts/m2 to determine the number and vertical extent of canopy layers (canopylayer, canopylength, seasonal variations in the topmost canopy layer (canopytype, as well as small-scale heterogeneities in the canopy (canopyheterogeneity. We first tested and developed the method on a small forest patch (800 ha and afterwards tested transferability and robustness of the method on a larger patch (180,000 ha. We validated the approach using an extensive set of ground data, achieving overall accuracies >77% for canopytype and canopyheterogeneity, and >62% for canopylayer and canopylength. We conclude that our method provides a robust characterization of canopy layering supporting automated canopy structure monitoring.

  8. Combining confocal laser scanning microscopy with serial section reconstruction in the study of adult neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico eLuzzati

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Current advances in imaging techniques have extended the possibility of visualizing small structures within large volumes of both fixed and live specimens without sectioning. These techniques have contributed valuable information to study neuronal plasticity in the adult brain. However, technical limits still hamper the use of these approaches to investigate neurogenic regions located far from the ventricular surface such as parenchymal neurogenic niches, or the scattered neuroblasts induced by brain lesions. Here, we present a method to combine confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM and serial section reconstruction in order to reconstruct large volumes of brain tissue at cellular resolution. In this method a series of thick sections are imaged with CLSM and the resulting stacks of images are registered and 3D reconstructed. This approach is based on existing freeware software and can be performed on ordinary laboratory personal computers (PC. By using this technique we have investigated the morphology and spatial organization of a group of doublecortin (DCX+ neuroblasts located in the lateral striatum of the late post-natal guinea pig. The 3D study unravelled a complex network of long and poorly ramified cell processes, often fascicled and mostly oriented along the internal capsule fibre bundles. These data support CLSM serial section reconstruction as a reliable alternative to the whole mount approaches to analyze cyto-architectural features of adult germinative niches.

  9. Determination of the thickness and structure of the skin barrier by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Astner, S.; Patzelt, A.; Knorr, F.; Sterry, W.; Antoniou, Ch

    2008-04-01

    Normal skin barrier function is an essential aspect of skin homeostasis and regeneration. Dynamic inflammatory, proliferative and neoplastic skin processes such as wound healing, psoriasis and contact dermatitis are associated with a significant disruption of the skin barrier. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in evaluating cosmetic and pharmacologic products for their ability to restore these protective properties. The gold standard for characterization of barrier function has been the measurement of the transepidermal water loss, however the disadvantage of this method is its interference with several endogenous and exogenous factors such as hydration, perspiration and topically applied substances. This study was aimed to test the clinical applicability of a fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM) for a systematic morphologic analysis of the structure, integrity and thickness of the stratum corneum in 10 otherwise healthy volunteers. The influence of skin treatment with commercial moisturizing cream on skin barrier function was evaluated in serial non-invasive examinations. Our findings showed that in vivo LSM may represent a simple and efficient method for the characterization of skin barrier properties, such as the thickness and hydration of the stratum corneum.

  10. Scanning a microhabitat: plant-microbe interactions revealed by confocal laser microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano eCardinale

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available No plant or cryptogam exists in nature without microorganisms associated with its tissues. Plants as microbial hosts are puzzles of different microhabitats, each of them colonized by specifically adapted microbiomes. The interactions with such microorganisms have drastic effects on the host fitness. Since the last 20 years, the combination of microscopic tools and molecular approaches contributed to new insights into microbe-host interactions. Particularly, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM facilitated the exploration of microbial habitats and allowed the observation of host-associated microorganisms in situ with an unprecedented accuracy. Here I present an overview of the progresses made in the study of the interactions between microorganisms and plants or plant-like organisms, focusing on the role of CLSM for the understanding of their significance. I critically discuss risks of misinterpretation when procedures of CLSM are not properly optimized. I also review approaches for quantitative and statistical analyses of CLSM images, the combination with other molecular and microscopic methods, and suggest the re-evaluation of natural autofluorescence. In this review, technical aspects were coupled with scientific outcomes, to facilitate the readers in identifying possible CLSM applications in their research or to expand their existing potential. The scope of this review is to highlight the importance of confocal microscopy in the study of plant-microbe interactions and also to be an inspiration for integrating microscopy with molecular techniques in future researches of microbial ecology.

  11. Simultaneous Detection and Tracking of Pedestrian from Panoramic Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wen; Vallet, Bruno; Schindler, Konrad; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Pedestrian traffic flow estimation is essential for public place design and construction planning. Traditional data collection by human investigation is tedious, inefficient and expensive. Panoramic laser scanners, e.g. Velodyne HDL-64E, which scan surroundings repetitively at a high frequency, have been increasingly used for 3D object tracking. In this paper, a simultaneous detection and tracking (SDAT) method is proposed for precise and automatic pedestrian trajectory recovery. First, the dynamic environment is detected using two different methods, Nearest-point and Max-distance. Then, all the points on moving objects are transferred into a space-time (x, y, t) coordinate system. The pedestrian detection and tracking amounts to assign the points belonging to pedestrians into continuous trajectories in space-time. We formulate the point assignment task as an energy function which incorporates the point evidence, trajectory number, pedestrian shape and motion. A low energy trajectory will well explain the point observations, and have plausible trajectory trend and length. The method inherently filters out points from other moving objects and false detections. The energy function is solved by a two-step optimization process: tracklet detection in a short temporal window; and global tracklet association through the whole time span. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can automatically recover the pedestrians trajectories with accurate positions and low false detections and mismatches.

  12. In vivo laser scanning microscopic investigation of the decontamination of hazardous substances from the human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stimulation of the penetration of topically applied substances into the skin is a topic of intensive dermatological and pharmacological research. In this context, it was found that in addition to the intercellular penetration, the follicular penetration also represents an efficient penetration pathway. The hair follicles act as a long-term reservoir for topically applied substances. They are surrounded by all important target structures, such as blood capillaries, stem and dendritic cells. Therefore, the hair follicles, as well as the skin, need to be protected from hazardous substances. The traditional method of decontamination after respective accidental contacts consists of an intensive washing of the skin. However, during this mechanical procedure, the substances can be pushed even deeper into the hair follicles. In the present study, absorbent materials were applied to remove a fluorescent model substance from the skin without inducing mechanical stress. The results were compared to the decontamination effects obtained by intensive washing. Investigations were performed by means of in vivo laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The comparison revealed that decontamination with absorbent materials is more effective than decontamination with washing processes

  13. Tree Root System Characterization and Volume Estimation by Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Quantitative Structure Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Smith

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The accurate characterization of three-dimensional (3D root architecture, volume, and biomass is important for a wide variety of applications in forest ecology and to better understand tree and soil stability. Technological advancements have led to increasingly more digitized and automated procedures, which have been used to more accurately and quickly describe the 3D structure of root systems. Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS have successfully been used to describe aboveground structures of individual trees and stand structure, but have only recently been applied to the 3D characterization of whole root systems. In this study, 13 recently harvested Norway spruce root systems were mechanically pulled from the soil, cleaned, and their volumes were measured by displacement. The root systems were suspended, scanned with TLS from three different angles, and the root surfaces from the co-registered point clouds were modeled with the 3D Quantitative Structure Model to determine root architecture and volume. The modeling procedure facilitated the rapid derivation of root volume, diameters, break point diameters, linear root length, cumulative percentages, and root fraction counts. The modeled root systems underestimated root system volume by 4.4%. The modeling procedure is widely applicable and easily adapted to derive other important topological and volumetric root variables.

  14. Improved Correction Method for Water-Refracted Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data Acquired in the Mountain Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, N.; Asano, Y.; Moribe, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Detailed information of underwater topography is required for better understanding and prediction of water and sediment transport in a mountain channel. Recent research showed promising utility of green-wavelength Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) for measuring submerged stream-bed structure in fluvial environment. However, difficulty in acquiring reliable underwater data has been remained in the part of mountain channel where water surface has some gradient. Since horizontal water surface was a major premise for the existing water refraction correction method, significant error was resulted in such area. Therefore, this paper presents a modified method to correct water-refracted TLS data acquired over mountain channel with complex water-surface slope. Applicability of the modified method was validated using the field data and compared with the existing correction method and non-corrected data. The results showed that the modified method has much smaller error with RMSE value of 3 mm than the existing method (RMSE = 10 mm) and non-corrected data (RMSE = 23 mm). Presented method successfully corrected water-refracted TLS data acquired over sloped channel. This would enable us to quantitatively measure whole units of complex mountain channels, and help us to understand water dynamics better in the area.

  15. Use of naturally available reference targets to calibrate airborne laser scanning intensity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vain, Ants; Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Litkey, Paula

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the possibility of calibrating airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data, using land targets typically available in urban areas. For this purpose, a test area around Espoonlahti Harbor, Espoo, Finland, for which a long time series of ALS campaigns is available, was selected. Different target samples (beach sand, concrete, asphalt, different types of gravel) were collected and measured in the laboratory. Using tarps, which have certain backscattering properties, the natural samples were calibrated and studied, taking into account the atmospheric effect, incidence angle and flying height. Using data from different flights and altitudes, a time series for the natural samples was generated. Studying the stability of the samples, we could obtain information on the most ideal types of natural targets for ALS radiometric calibration. Using the selected natural samples as reference, the ALS points of typical land targets were calibrated again and examined. Results showed the need for more accurate ground reference data, before using natural samples in ALS intensity data calibration. Also, the NIR camera-based field system was used for collecting ground reference data. This system proved to be a good means for collecting in situ reference data, especially for targets with inhomogeneous surface reflection properties.

  16. Use of Naturally Available Reference Targets to Calibrate Airborne Laser Scanning Intensity Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Litkey

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the possibility of calibrating airborne laser scanning (ALS intensity data, using land targets typically available in urban areas. For this purpose, a test area around Espoonlahti Harbor, Espoo, Finland, for which a long time series of ALS campaigns is available, was selected. Different target samples (beach sand, concrete, asphalt, different types of gravel were collected and measured in the laboratory. Using tarps, which have certain backscattering properties, the natural samples were calibrated and studied, taking into account the atmospheric effect, incidence angle and flying height. Using data from different flights and altitudes, a time series for the natural samples was generated. Studying the stability of the samples, we could obtain information on the most ideal types of natural targets for ALS radiometric calibration. Using the selected natural samples as reference, the ALS points of typical land targets were calibrated again and examined. Results showed the need for more accurate ground reference data, before using natural samples in ALS intensity data calibration. Also, the NIR camera-based field system was used for collecting ground reference data. This system proved to be a good means for collecting in situ reference data, especially for targets with inhomogeneous surface reflection properties.

  17. Quantitative characterization of the surface topography of rolled sheets by laser scanning microscopy and fourier transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjønnes, Liv

    1996-08-01

    The surface of twin-roll cast aluminum sheets undergoes dramatic changes during cold rolling. This is mainly due to variables in the roll gap, topography of the rolls, lubrication, material properties, and in particular the initial structure and topography of the cast sheet. Therefore, it is important to have means to quantitatively describe the changes in the surface structure of each pass and from pass to pass in order to optimize the desired final surface structure. To achieve this, the laser scanning microscope (LSM) with its confocal technique has been employed to image the three-dimensional (3-D) topography and to digitize the image for further computer analysis. The digitization of the image is primarily motivated by the need to introduce a Fourier transformation of the surface topography. The method is effective in describing qualitative periodic trends in the surface features. Information is gained on the shape and periodicities as well as roughness directionality. For instance, grooves and cross hatches and their remnants can be followed from one pass to the other. Important characteristics of the surface topography such as rolling ridges and shingles can also easily be characterized.

  18. Combined Use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning and IR Thermography Applied to a Historical Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Costanzo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of architectural heritage usually requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a variety of specialist expertise and techniques. Nevertheless, destructive techniques should be avoided, wherever possible, in order to preserve the integrity of the historical buildings, therefore the development of non-destructive and non-contact techniques is extremely important. In this framework, a methodology for combining the terrestrial laser scanning and the infrared thermal images is proposed, in order to obtain a reconnaissance of the conservation state of a historical building. The proposed case study is represented by St. Augustine Monumental Compound, located in the historical centre of the town of Cosenza (Calabria, South Italy. Adopting the proposed methodology, the paper illustrates the main results obtained for the building test overlaying and comparing the collected data with both techniques, in order to outline the capabilities both to detect the anomalies and to improve the knowledge on health state of the masonry building. The 3D model, also, allows to provide a reference model, laying the groundwork for implementation of a monitoring multisensor system based on the use of non-destructive techniques.

  19. Real-time blind deconvolution of retinal images in adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2011-06-01

    With the use of adaptive optics (AO), the ocular aberrations can be compensated to get high-resolution image of living human retina. However, the wavefront correction is not perfect due to the wavefront measure error and hardware restrictions. Thus, it is necessary to use a deconvolution algorithm to recover the retinal images. In this paper, a blind deconvolution technique called Incremental Wiener filter is used to restore the adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images. The point-spread function (PSF) measured by wavefront sensor is only used as an initial value of our algorithm. We also realize the Incremental Wiener filter on graphics processing unit (GPU) in real-time. When the image size is 512 × 480 pixels, six iterations of our algorithm only spend about 10 ms. Retinal blood vessels as well as cells in retinal images are restored by our algorithm, and the PSFs are also revised. Retinal images with and without adaptive optics are both restored. The results show that Incremental Wiener filter reduces the noises and improve the image quality.

  20. The application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology by in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, W. Z.; Xu, A. E.; Xu, J.; Bi, Z. G.; Shang, Y. B.; Ren, Q. S.

    2010-08-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) allows noninvasive visualization of human skin in vivo, without needing to fix or section the tissue. Melanocytes and pigmented keratinocytes at the level of the basal layer form bright dermal papillary rings which are readily amenable to identify in confocal images. Our purpose was to explore the role of dermal papillary rings in assessment of lesion location, the diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. Seventy-one patients were imaged with the VivaScope 1500 reflectance confocal microscope provided by Lucid, Inc. The results indicate that dermal papillary rings can assess the location of lesion; the application of dermal papillary rings can provide diagnostic support and differential diagnosis for vitiligo, nevus depigmentosus, tinea versicolor, halo nevus, common nevi, and assess the therapeutic efficacy of NBUVB phototherapy plus topical 0.1 percent tacrolimus ointment for vitiligo. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the dermal papillary rings play an important role in the assessment the location of lesion, diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. CLSM may be a promising tool for noninvasive examination in dermatology. However, larger studies are needed to expand the application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology.