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Sample records for 26s proteasome function

  1. 26 S proteasomes function as stable entities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendil, Klavs B; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Tanaka, Keiji

    2002-01-01

    Most proteins in eukaryotic cells are degraded by 26-S proteasomes, usually after being conjugated to ubiquitin. In the absence of ATP, 26-S proteasomes fall apart into their two sub-complexes, 20-S proteasomes and PA700, which reassemble upon addition of ATP. Conceivably, 26-S proteasomes...... dissociate and reassemble during initiation of protein degradation in a ternary complex with the substrate, as in the dissociation-reassembly cycles found for ribosomes and the chaperonin GroEL/GroES. Here we followed disassembly and assembly of 26-S proteasomes in cell extracts as the exchange of PA700...... subunits between mouse and human 26-S proteasomes. Compared to the rate of proteolysis in the same extract, the disassembly-reassembly cycle was much too slow to present an obligatory step in a degradation cycle. It has been suggested that subunit S5a (Mcb1, Rpn10), which binds poly-ubiquitin substrates...

  2. Proteins interacting with the 26S proteasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, R; Gordon, C

    2004-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the multi-protein protease that recognizes and degrades ubiquitinylated substrates targeted for destruction by the ubiquitin pathway. In addition to the well-documented subunit organization of the 26S holoenzyme, it is clear that a number of other proteins transiently...... associate with the 26S complex. These transiently associated proteins confer a number of different roles such as substrate presentation, cleavage of the multi-ubiquitin chain from the protein substrate and turnover of misfolded proteins. Such activities are essential for the 26S proteasome to efficiently...

  3. Transferring substrates to the 26S proteasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Seeger, Michael; Gordon, Colin

    2003-01-01

    protein specifically target it for degradation by the 26S proteasome, a huge multi-subunit protein complex found in all eukaryotic cells. Recent reports have clarified some of the molecular mechanisms involved in the transfer of ubiquitinated substrates from the ubiquitination machinery to the proteasome....... This novel substrate transportation step in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway seems to occur either directly or indirectly via certain substrate-recruiting proteins and appears to involve chaperones....

  4. Mammalian 26S proteasomes remain intact during protein degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegenburg, Franziska; Seeger, Michael; Saeki, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that degradation of polyubiquitylated proteins is coupled to dissociation of 26S proteasomes. In contrast, using several independent types of experiments, we find that mammalian proteasomes can degrade polyubiquitylated proteins without disassembling. Thus, immobilized, (35)S...

  5. Identification of nitric oxide as an endogenous inhibitor of 26S proteasomes in vascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Liu

    Full Text Available The 26S proteasome plays a fundamental role in almost all eukaryotic cells, including vascular endothelial cells. However, it remains largely unknown how proteasome functionality is regulated in the vasculature. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO synthase (eNOS-derived NO is known to be essential to maintain endothelial homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to establish the connection between endothelial NO and 26S proteasome functionality in vascular endothelial cells. The 26S proteasome reporter protein levels, 26S proteasome activity, and the O-GlcNAcylation of Rpt2, a key subunit of the proteasome regulatory complex, were assayed in 26S proteasome reporter cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, and mouse aortic tissues isolated from 26S proteasome reporter and eNOS knockout mice. Like the other selective NO donors, NO derived from activated eNOS (by pharmacological and genetic approach increased O-GlcNAc modification of Rpt2, reduced proteasome chymotrypsin-like activity, and caused 26S proteasome reporter protein accumulation. Conversely, inactivation of eNOS reversed all the effects. SiRNA knockdown of O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT, the key enzyme that catalyzes protein O-GlcNAcylation, abolished NO-induced effects. Consistently, adenoviral overexpression of O-GlcNAcase (OGA, the enzyme catalyzing the removal of the O-GlcNAc group, mimicked the effects of OGT knockdown. Finally, compared to eNOS wild type aortic tissues, 26S proteasome reporter mice lacking eNOS exhibited elevated 26S proteasome functionality in parallel with decreased Rpt2 O-GlcNAcylation, without changing the levels of Rpt2 protein. In conclusion, the eNOS-derived NO functions as a physiological suppressor of the 26S proteasome in vascular endothelial cells.

  6. Phosphorylation of ATPase subunits of the 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, G G; Murray, R Z; Pappin, D; Rivett, A J

    1998-07-01

    The 26S proteasome complex plays a major role in the non-lysosomal degradation of intracellular proteins. Purified 26S proteasomes give a pattern of more than 40 spots on 2D-PAGE gels. The positions of subunits have been identified by mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides and by immunoblotting with subunit-specific antipeptide antibodies. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteasomes immunoprecipitated from [32P]phosphate-labelled human embryo lung L-132 cells revealed the presence of at least three major phosphorylated polypeptides among the regulatory subunits as well as the C8 and C9 components of the core 20S proteasome. Comparison with the positions of the regulatory polypeptides revealed a minor phosphorylated form to be S7 (MSS1). Antibodies against S4, S6 (TBP7) and S12 (MOV34) all cross-reacted at the position of major phosphorylated polypeptides suggesting that several of the ATPase subunits may be phosphorylated. The phosphorylation of S4 was confirmed by double immunoprecipitation experiments in which 26S proteasomes were immunoprecipitated as above and dissociated and then S4 was immunoprecipitated with subunit-specific antibodies. Antibodies against the non-ATPase subunit S10, which has been suggested by others to be phosphorylated, did not coincide with the position of a phosphorylated polypeptide. Some differences were observed in the 2D-PAGE pattern of proteasomes immunoprecipitated from cultured cells compared to purified rat liver 26S proteasomes suggesting possible differences in subunit compositions of 26S proteasomes.

  7. Structural characterization of the interaction of Ubp6 with the 26S proteasome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aufderheide, Antje; Beck, Florian; Stengel, Florian; Hartwig, Michaela; Schweitzer, Andreas; Pfeifer, Günter; Goldberg, Alfred L; Sakata, Eri; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Förster, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the 26S proteasome is responsible for the regulated degradation of intracellular proteins. Several cofactors interact transiently with this large macromolecular machine and modulate its function. The deubiquitylating enzyme ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 6 [Ubp6;

  8. Structural analysis of the 26S proteasome by cryoelectron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Stephan; Mihalache, Oana; Beck, Florian; Hegerl, Reiner; Korinek, Andreas; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2007-02-01

    The 26S proteasome is the key enzyme of intracellular protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. It is a multisubunit complex of 2.5 MDa confining the proteolytic action to an inner compartment with tightly controlled access. Structural studies of this intriguing molecular machine have been hampered by its intrinsic instability and its dynamics. Here we have used an unconventional approach to obtain a three-dimensional structure of the holocomplex uncompromised by preparation-induced alterations and unbiased by any starting model. We have performed a tomographic reconstruction, followed by averaging over approx. 150 individual reconstructions, of Drosophila 26S proteasomes suspended in a thin layer of amorphous ice.

  9. Viruses and the 26S proteasome: hacking into destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Lawrence; Pim, David; Thomas, Miranda

    2003-08-01

    The discovery that the human papillomavirus E6 oncoprotein could direct the ubiquitination and degradation of the p53 tumour suppressor at the 26S proteasome was the beginning of a new view on virus-host interactions. A decade later, a plethora of viral proteins have been shown to direct host-cell proteins for proteolytic degradation. These activities are required for various aspects of the virus life-cycle from entry, through replication and enhanced cell survival, to viral release. As with oncogenes and cell-cycle control, the study of apparently simple viruses has provided a wealth of information on the function of a whole class of cellular proteins whose function is arguably as important as that of the kinases: the ubiquitin-protein ligases.

  10. Toward an Integrated Structural Model of the 26S Proteasome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the end point of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and degrades ubiquitylated substrates. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP), where degradation occurs, and the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which ensures substrate specificity of degradation. Whereas the CP is resolved to atomic resolution, the architecture of the RP is largely unknown. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the current structural knowledge on the RP, including structures of the RP subunits, physical protein-protein interactions, and cryoelectron microscopy data. These data allowed us to compute an atomic model for the CP-AAA-ATPase subcomplex. In addition to this atomic model, further subunits can be mapped approximately, which lets us hypothesize on the substrate path during its degradation. PMID:20467039

  11. Toward an integrated structural model of the 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    The 26S proteasome is the end point of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and degrades ubiquitylated substrates. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP), where degradation occurs, and the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which ensures substrate specificity of degradation. Whereas the CP is resolved to atomic resolution, the architecture of the RP is largely unknown. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the current structural knowledge on the RP, including structures of the RP subunits, physical protein-protein interactions, and cryoelectron microscopy data. These data allowed us to compute an atomic model for the CP-AAA-ATPase subcomplex. In addition to this atomic model, further subunits can be mapped approximately, which lets us hypothesize on the substrate path during its degradation.

  12. Localization of the regulatory particle subunit Sem1 in the 26S proteasome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, Stefan; Sakata, Eri; Beck, Florian; Pathare, Ganesh R.; Schnitger, Jérôme; Nágy, Istvan; Baumeister, Wolfgang, E-mail: baumeist@bichem.mpg.de; Förster, Friedrich, E-mail: foerster@bichem.mpg.de

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •26S proteasome subunit Sem1 was mapped using cryo-EM and cross-linking data. •C-terminal helix of Sem1 located near winged helix motif of Rpn7. •N-terminal part of Sem1 tethers Rpn7, Rpn3 and lid helical bundle. •Sem1 binds differently to PCI-domains of proteasome subunit Rpn7 and TREX-2 subunit Thp1. -- Abstract: The ubiquitin–proteasome system is responsible for regulated protein degradation in the cell with the 26S proteasome acting as its executive arm. The molecular architecture of this 2.5 MDa complex has been established recently, with the notable exception of the small acidic subunit Sem1. Here, we localize the C-terminal helix of Sem1 binding to the PCI domain of the subunit Rpn7 using cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstruction of proteasomes purified from yeast cells with sem1 deletion. The approximate position of the N-terminal region of Sem1 bridging the cleft between Rpn7 and Rpn3 was inferred based on site-specific cross-linking data of the 26S proteasome. Our structural studies indicate that Sem1 can assume different conformations in different contexts, which supports the idea that Sem1 functions as a molecular glue stabilizing the Rpn3/Rpn7 heterodimer.

  13. Insights into the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Stephan; Beck, Florian; Scheres, Sjors H W; Korinek, Andreas; Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Mihalache, Oana; Sun, Na; Nagy, István; Sali, Andrej; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Carazo, Jose-Maria; Mann, Matthias; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-07-21

    Cryo-electron microscopy in conjunction with advanced image analysis was used to analyze the structure of the 26S proteasome and to elucidate its variable features. We have been able to outline the boundaries of the ATPase module in the "base" part of the regulatory complex that can vary in its position and orientation relative to the 20S core particle. This variation is consistent with the "wobbling" model that was previously proposed to explain the role of the regulatory complex in opening the gate in the alpha-rings of the core particle. In addition, a variable mass near the mouth of the ATPase ring has been identified as Rpn10, a multiubiquitin receptor, by correlating the electron microscopy data with quantitative mass spectrometry.

  14. Insights into the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Stephan; Beck, Florian; Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Korinek, Andreas; Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Mihalache, Oana; Sun, Na; Nagy, István; Sali, Andrej; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Carazo, Jose-Maria; Mann, Matthias; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy in conjunction with advanced image analysis was used to analyze the structure of the 26S proteasome and to elucidate its variable features. We have been able to outline the boundaries of the ATPase module in the “base” part of the regulatory complex that can vary in its position and orientation relative to the 20S core particle. This variation is consistent with the “wobbling” model that was previously proposed to explain the role of the regulatory complex in opening the gate in the α-rings of the core particle. In addition, a variable mass near the mouth of the ATPase ring has been identified as Rpn10, a multiubiquitin receptor, by correlating the electron microscopy data with quantitative mass spectrometry. PMID:19581588

  15. NOXA, a sensor of proteasome integrity, is degraded by 26S proteasomes by an ubiquitin-independent pathway that is blocked by MCL-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craxton, A; Butterworth, M; Harper, N; Fairall, L; Schwabe, J; Ciechanover, A; Cohen, G M

    2012-09-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub)-mediated proteasome-dependent proteolysis is critical in regulating multiple biological processes including apoptosis. We show that the unstructured BH3-only protein, NOXA, is degraded by an Ub-independent mechanism requiring 19S regulatory particle (RP) subunits of the 26S proteasome, highlighting the possibility that other unstructured proteins reported to be degraded by 20S proteasomes in vitro may be bona fide 26S proteasome substrates in vivo. A lysine-less NOXA (NOXA-LL) mutant, which is not ubiquitinated, is degraded at a similar rate to wild-type NOXA. Myeloid cell leukemia 1, but not other anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins, stabilizes NOXA by interaction with the NOXA BH3 domain. Depletion of 19S RP subunits, but not alternate proteasome activator REG subunits, increases NOXA half-life in vivo. A NOXA-LL mutant, which is not ubiquitinated, also requires an intact 26S proteasome for degradation. Depletion of the 19S non-ATPase subunit, PSMD1 induces NOXA-dependent apoptosis. Thus, disruption of 26S proteasome function by various mechanisms triggers the rapid accumulation of NOXA and subsequent cell death strongly implicating NOXA as a sensor of 26S proteasome integrity.

  16. Non-26S Proteasome Proteolytic Role of Ubiquitin in Plant Endocytosis and Endosomal Trafficking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miaomiao Tian; Qi Xie

    2013-01-01

    The 76 amino acid protein ubiquitin (Ub) is highly conserved in all eukaryotic species.It plays important roles in many cellular processes by covalently attaching to the target proteins.The best known function of Ub is marking substrate proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome.In fact,other consequences of ubiquitination have been discovered in yeast and mammals,such as membrane trafficking,DNA repair,chromatin modification,and protein kinase activation.The common mechanism underlying these processes is that Ub serves as a signal to sort proteins to the vacuoles or lysosomes for degradation as opposed to 26S proteasome-dependent degradation.To date,several reports have indicated that a similar function of Ub also exists in plants.This review focuses on a summary and analysis of the recent research progress on Ub acting as a signal to mediate endocytosis and endosomal trafficking in plants.

  17. Thioredoxin Txnl1/TRP32 Is a Redox-active Cofactor of the 26 S Proteasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine M; Klausen, Louise Kjær; Prag, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large proteolytic machine, which degrades most intracellular proteins. We found that thioredoxin, Txnl1/TRP32, binds to Rpn11, a subunit of the regulatory complex of the human 26S proteasome. Txnl1 is abundant, metabolically stable and widely expressed and is present...... in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Txnl1 has thioredoxin activity with a redox potential of about -250 mV. Mutant Txnl1 with one active site cysteine replaced by serine formed disulfide bonds to eEF1A1, a substrate-recruiting factor of the 26S proteasome. eEF1A1 is therefore a likely physiological substrate...

  18. Purification and characterization of 26S proteasomes from human and mouse spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, C P; Hutchon, S P; Hendil, K; Tanaka, K; Fishel, S; Mayer, R J

    1997-12-01

    We purified by fractionation on 10-40% glycerol gradients, 26S proteasomes from normal human spermatozoa. These proteasomes, which participate in the ATP-dependent degradation of ubiquitinated proteins, share a similar sedimentation coefficient to those purified from other human tissues. Fluorogenic peptide assays reveal they have chymotrypsin, trypsin and peptidyl-glutamyl-like peptide hydrolysing activities; the chymotrypsin activity is ablated by the specific 26S proteasome inhibitor MG132. Confirmation that these large proteases are 26S proteasomes is provided by detection of the 20S proteasome subunits HC2, XAPC7, RN3 and Z and regulatory ATPases MSS1, TBP1, SUG1 and SUG2 by Western analyses with monoclonal antisera. These antigens are found only in the gradient fractions enriched in proteolytic activities. We have also shown that, although mature spermatozoa from mice have considerably reduced amounts of a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) and ubiquitin-protein conjugates in comparison with less mature germ cells, they retain relatively high values of 26S proteasome activity. This suggests that proteasomes may have further roles to play in normal sperm physiology.

  19. Structural studies of the 26S proteasome and its interaction with Ubp6 by cryo-electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Aufderheide, Antje Renate

    2017-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a macromolecular complex responsible for the degradation of proteins. In this thesis, the structural basis of the reciprocal regulation between the 26S proteasome and its most important interacting protein, the deubiquitylating enzyme Ubp6, was analyzed by single particle cryo-electron microscopy. To study the structure of the 26S proteasome in more detail an image processing workflow was implemented that yielded a 3.9 Å resolution reconstruction of the human 26S proteas...

  20. DBC2 resistance is achieved by enhancing 26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Denise; Yoshihara, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Masaaki

    2007-08-31

    Tumor suppressor gene DBC2 stops growth of tumor cells through regulation of CCND1. Interference of CCND1 down-regulation prevented growth arrest caused by DBC2 [T. Yoshihara, D. Collado, M. Hamaguchi, Cyclin D1 down-regulation is essential for DBC2's tumor suppressor function, Biochemical and biophysical research communications 358 (2007) 1076-1079]. It was also noted that DBC2 resistant cells eventually arose after repeated induction of DBC2 with muristerone A treatment [M. Hamaguchi, J.L. Meth, C. Von Klitzing, W. Wei, D. Esposito, L. Rodgers, T. Walsh, P. Welcsh, M.C. King, M.H. Wigler, DBC2, a candidate for a tumor suppressor gene involved in breast cancer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 13647-13652]. In order to elucidate the mechanism of resistance acquisition, we analyzed DBC2 sensitive and resistant cells derived from the same progenitor cells (T-47D). We discovered that DBC2 protein was abundantly expressed in the sensitive cells when DBC2 was induced. In contrast, it was undetectable by western blot analysis in the resistant cells. We confirmed that the inducible gene expression system was responsive in both cells by detecting induced GFP. Additionally, inhibition of 26S proteasome by MG132 revealed production of DBC2 protein in the resistant cells. These findings indicate that the resistant T-47D cells survive DBC2 induction by rapid destruction of DBC2 through 26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation.

  1. NOXA, a sensor of proteasome integrity, is degraded by 26S proteasomes by an ubiquitin-independent pathway that is blocked by MCL-1

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub)-mediated proteasome-dependent proteolysis is critical in regulating multiple biological processes including apoptosis. We show that the unstructured BH3-only protein, NOXA, is degraded by an Ub-independent mechanism requiring 19S regulatory particle (RP) subunits of the 26S proteasome, highlighting the possibility that other unstructured proteins reported to be degraded by 20S proteasomes in vitro may be bona fide 26S proteasome substrates in vivo. A lysine-less NOXA (NOXA-LL) ...

  2. Structure of the 26S proteasome from Schizosaccharomyces pombe at subnanometer resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Stefan; Beck, Florian; Sakata, Eri; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Beck, Martin; Aebersold, Ruedi; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Nickell, Stephan

    2010-12-01

    The structure of the 26S proteasome from Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been determined to a resolution of 9.1 Å by cryoelectron microscopy and single particle analysis. In addition, chemical cross-linking in conjunction with mass spectrometry has been used to identify numerous residue pairs in close proximity to each other, providing an array of spatial restraints. Taken together these data clarify the topology of the AAA-ATPase module in the 19S regulatory particle and its spatial relationship to the α-ring of the 20S core particle. Image classification and variance analysis reveal a belt of high "activity" surrounding the AAA-ATPase module which is tentatively assigned to the reversible association of proteasome interacting proteins and the conformational heterogeneity among the particles. An integrated model is presented which sheds light on the early steps of protein degradation by the 26S complex.

  3. Automated cryoelectron microscopy of "single particles" applied to the 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Stephan; Beck, Florian; Korinek, Andreas; Mihalache, Oana; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Plitzko, Jürgen M

    2007-06-19

    The 26S proteasome is a large molecular machine with a central role in intracellular protein degradation in eukaryotes. The 2.5 MDa complex, which is built from two copies each of more than 30 different subunits, is labile and prone to dissociation into subcomplexes. Hence it is difficult if not impossible, to obtain structurally homogeneous preparations and, as a consequence, it is very cumbersome to obtain large numbers of images of the holocomplex. In this communication, we describe an automated procedure for the acquisition of large data sets of cryoelectron micrographs. The application of this procedure to the 26S proteasome from Drosophila has allowed us to determine the three-dimensional structure of the complex to a resolution of 2.9 nm and the prospects for further improvements are good.

  4. Tau-driven 26S proteasome impairment and cognitive dysfunction can be prevented early in disease by activating cAMP-PKA signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myeku, Natura; Clelland, Catherine L; Emrani, Sheina; Kukushkin, Nikolay V; Yu, Wai Haung; Goldberg, Alfred L; Duff, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) degrades misfolded proteins including those implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated the effects of tau accumulation on proteasome function in a mouse model of tauopathy and in a cross to a UPS reporter mouse (line Ub-G76V-GFP). Accumulation of insoluble tau was associated with a decrease in the peptidase activity of brain 26S proteasomes, higher levels of ubiquitinated proteins and undegraded Ub-G76V-GFP. 26S proteasomes from mice with tauopathy were physically associated with tau and were less active in hydrolyzing ubiquitinated proteins, small peptides and ATP. 26S proteasomes from normal mice incubated with recombinant oligomers or fibrils also showed lower hydrolyzing capacity in the same assays, implicating tau as a proteotoxin. Administration of an agent that activates cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling led to attenuation of proteasome dysfunction, probably through proteasome subunit phosphorylation. In vivo, this led to lower levels of aggregated tau and improvements in cognitive performance.

  5. Near-atomic resolution structural model of the yeast 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Florian; Unverdorben, Pia; Bohn, Stefan; Schweitzer, Andreas; Pfeifer, Günter; Sakata, Eri; Nickell, Stephan; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Villa, Elizabeth; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Förster, Friedrich

    2012-09-11

    The 26S proteasome operates at the executive end of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Here, we present a cryo-EM structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 26S proteasome at a resolution of 7.4 Å or 6.7 Å (Fourier-Shell Correlation of 0.5 or 0.3, respectively). We used this map in conjunction with molecular dynamics-based flexible fitting to build a near-atomic resolution model of the holocomplex. The quality of the map allowed us to assign α-helices, the predominant secondary structure element of the regulatory particle subunits, throughout the entire map. We were able to determine the architecture of the Rpn8/Rpn11 heterodimer, which had hitherto remained elusive. The MPN domain of Rpn11 is positioned directly above the AAA-ATPase N-ring suggesting that Rpn11 deubiquitylates substrates immediately following commitment and prior to their unfolding by the AAA-ATPase module. The MPN domain of Rpn11 dimerizes with that of Rpn8 and the C-termini of both subunits form long helices, which are integral parts of a coiled-coil module. Together with the C-terminal helices of the six PCI-domain subunits they form a very large coiled-coil bundle, which appears to serve as a flexible anchoring device for all the lid subunits.

  6. Uch2/Uch37 is the major deubiquitinating enzyme associated with the 26S proteasome in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stone, Miranda; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Seeger, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Conjugation of proteins to ubiquitin plays a central role for a number of cellular processes including endocytosis, DNA repair and degradation by the 26S proteasome. However, ubiquitination is reversible as a number of deubiquitinating enzymes mediate the disassembly of ubiquitin-protein conjugates....... Some deubiquitinating enzymes are associated with the 26S proteasome contributing to and regulating the particle's activity. Here, we characterise fission yeast Uch2 and Ubp6, two proteasome associated deubiquitinating enzymes. The human orthologues of these enzymes are known as Uch37 and Usp14......, respectively. We report that the subunit Uch2/Uch37 is the major deubiquitinating enzyme associated with the fission yeast 26S proteasome. In contrast, the activity of Ubp6 appears to play a more regulatory and/or structural role involving the proteasome subunits Mts1/Rpn9, Mts2/Rpt2 and Mts3/Rpn12, as Ubp6...

  7. Txl1 and Txc1 are co-factors of the 26S proteasome in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine M; Jensen, Camilla; Kriegenburg, Franziska

    2011-01-01

    and thereby equips proteasomes with redox capabilities. Here, we characterize the fission yeast orthologue of Txnl1, called Txl1. Txl1 associates with the 26S proteasome via its C-terminal domain. This domain is also found in the uncharacterized protein, Txc1, which was also found to interact with 26S...... proteasomes. A txl1 null mutant, but not a txc1 null, displayed a synthetic growth defect with cut8, encoding a protein that tethers the proteasome to the nuclear membrane. Txc1 is present throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus, whereas Txl1 co-localizes with 26S proteasomes in both wild-type cells and in cut8...

  8. Fission yeast 26S proteasome mutants are multi-drug resistant due to stabilization of the Pap1transcription factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penney, Mary; Samejima, Itaru; Wilkinson, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    that most of the mutants were in essential genes encoding various 26S proteasome subunits. We found that the proteasome mutants are multi-drug resistant due to stabilization of the stress-activated transcription factor Pap1. We show that the ubiquitylation and ultimately the degradation of Pap1 depend...

  9. Compensatory role of the Nrf2-ARE pathway against paraquat toxicity: Relevance of 26S proteasome activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Matsushima, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Takamori; Takada-Takatori, Yuki; Akaike, Akinori; Kume, Toshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Oxidative stress and the ubiquitin-proteasome system play a key role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. Although the herbicide paraquat is an environmental factor that is involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease, the role of 26S proteasome in paraquat toxicity remains to be determined. Using PC12 cells overexpressing a fluorescent protein fused to the proteasome degradation signal, we report here that paraquat yielded an inhibitory effect on 26S proteasome activity without an obvious decline in 20S proteasome activity. Relative low concentrations of proteasome inhibitors caused the accumulation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which is targeted to the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and activated the antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent transcription. Paraquat also upregulated the protein level of Nrf2 without increased expression of Nrf2 mRNA, and activated the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Consequently, paraquat induced expression of Nrf2-dependent ARE-driven genes, such as γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, catalase, and hemeoxygenase-1. Knockdown of Nrf2 or inhibition of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase and catalase exacerbated paraquat-induced toxicity, whereas suppression of hemeoxygenase-1 did not. These data indicate that the compensatory activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway via inhibition of 26S proteasome serves as part of a cellular defense mechanism to protect against paraquat toxicity.

  10. Proteomics of the 26S proteasome in Spodoptera frugiperda cells infected with the nucleopolyhedrovirus, AcMNPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyupina, Yulia V; Zatsepina, Olga G; Serebryakova, Marina V; Erokhov, Pavel A; Abaturova, Svetlana B; Kravchuk, Oksana I; Orlova, Olga V; Beljelarskaya, Svetlana N; Lavrov, Andrey I; Sokolova, Olga S; Mikhailov, Victor S

    2016-06-01

    Baculoviruses are large DNA viruses that infect insect species such as Lepidoptera and are used in biotechnology for protein production and in agriculture as insecticides against crop pests. Baculoviruses require activity of host proteasomes for efficient reproduction, but how they control the cellular proteome and interact with the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) of infected cells remains unknown. In this report, we analyzed possible changes in the subunit composition of 26S proteasomes of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9), cells in the course of infection with the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). 26S proteasomes were purified from Sf9 cells by an immune affinity method and subjected to 2D gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and Mascot search in bioinformatics databases. A total of 34 homologues of 26S proteasome subunits of eukaryotic species were identified including 14 subunits of the 20S core particle (7 α and 7 β subunits) and 20 subunits of the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP contained homologues of 11 of RPN-type and 6 of RPT-type subunits, 2 deubiquitinating enzymes (UCH-14/UBP6 and UCH-L5/UCH37), and thioredoxin. Similar 2D-gel maps of 26S proteasomes purified from uninfected and AcMNPV-infected cells at 48hpi confirmed the structural integrity of the 26S proteasome in insect cells during baculovirus infection. However, subtle changes in minor forms of some proteasome subunits were detected. A portion of the α5(zeta) cellular pool that presumably was not associated with the proteasome underwent partial proteolysis at a late stage in infection.

  11. Basic leucine zipper protein Cnc-C is a substrate and transcriptional regulator of the Drosophila 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Kristian Björk; Beskow, Anne; Lundin, Daniel; Davis, Monica M; Young, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    While the 26S proteasome is a key proteolytic complex, little is known about how proteasome levels are maintained in higher eukaryotic cells. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Drosophila melanogaster that was used to identify transcription factors that may play a role in maintaining levels of the 26S proteasome. We used an RNAi library against 993 Drosophila transcription factor genes to identify genes whose suppression in Schneider 2 cells stabilized a ubiquitin-green fluorescent protein reporter protein. This screen identified Cnc (cap 'n' collar [CNC]; basic region leucine zipper) as a candidate transcriptional regulator of proteasome component expression. In fact, 20S proteasome activity was reduced in cells depleted of cnc. Immunoblot assays against proteasome components revealed a general decline in both 19S regulatory complex and 20S proteasome subunits after RNAi depletion of this transcription factor. Transcript-specific silencing revealed that the longest of the seven transcripts for the cnc gene, cnc-C, was needed for proteasome and p97 ATPase production. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the role of Cnc-C in activation of transcription of genes encoding proteasome components. Expression of a V5-His-tagged form of Cnc-C revealed that the transcription factor is itself a proteasome substrate that is stabilized when the proteasome is inhibited. We propose that this single cnc gene in Drosophila resembles the ancestral gene family of mammalian nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related transcription factors, which are essential in regulating oxidative stress and proteolysis.

  12. Implication of altered proteasome function in alcoholic liver injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The proteasome is a major protein-degrading enzyme,which catalyzes degradation of oxidized and aged proteins, signal transduction factors and cleaves peptides for antigen presentation. Proteasome exists in the equilibrium of 26S and 20S particles. Proteasome function is altered by ethanol metabolism, depending on oxidative stress levels: low oxidative stress induces proteasome activity, while high oxidative stress reduces it. The proposed mechanisms for modulation of proteasome activity are related to oxidative modification of proteasomal proteins with primary and secondary products derived from ethanol oxidation.Decreased proteolysis by the proteasome results in the accumulation of insoluble protein aggregates, which cannot be degraded by proteasome and which further inhibit proteasome function. Mallory bodies, a common signature of alcoholic liver diseases, are formed by liver cells, when proteasome is unable to remove cytokeratins.Proteasome inhibition by ethanol also promotes the accumulation of pro-apoptotic factors in mitochondria of ethanol-metabolizing liver cells that are normally degraded by proteasome. In addition, decreased proteasome function also induces accumulation of the negative regulators of cytokine signaling (Ⅰ-κB and SOCS), thereby blocking cytokine signal transduction.Finally, ethanol-elicited blockade of interferon type 1 and 2 signaling and decreased proteasome function impairs generation of peptides for MHC class Ⅰ-restricted antigen presentation.

  13. Erythropoietic defect associated with reduced cell proliferation in mice lacking the 26S proteasome shuttling factor Rad23b

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Bergink (Steven); A.F. Theil (Arjan); W. Toussaint (Wendy); I.M. de Cuyper (Iris); D.I. Kulu (Divine); T. Clapes (Thomas); R. van der Linden (Reinier); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); E.P. Mul (Eric); F.P. van Alphen (Floris); J.A. Marteijn (Jurgen); T. van Gent (Teus); A. Maas (Alex); C. Robin (Catherine); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.R. Mitchell (James); L. Gutiérrez (Laura)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractRad23a and Rad23b proteins are linked to nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) via association with the DNA damage recognition protein xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) are and known to be implicated in protein turnover by the 26S proteasome. Rad23b-null mice are NER proficient, likely

  14. Erythropoietic Defect Associated with Reduced Cell Proliferation in Mice Lacking the 26S Proteasome Shuttling Factor Rad23b

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, Steven; Theil, Arjan F.; Toussaint, Wendy; De Cuyper, Iris M.; Kulu, Divine I.; Clapes, Thomas; van der Linden, Reinier; Demmers, Jeroen A.; Mul, Eric P.; van Alphen, Floris P.; Marteijn, Jurgen A.; van Gent, Teus; Maas, Alex; Robin, Catherine; Philipsen, Sjaak; Vermeulen, Wim; Mitchell, James R.; Gutierrez, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Rad23a and Rad23b proteins are linked to nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) via association with the DNA damage recognition protein xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) are and known to be implicated in protein turnover by the 26S proteasome. Rad23b-null mice are NER proficient, likely due to the r

  15. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, Friedrich [Department of Structural Biology, Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, D-82152 Martinsried (Germany); Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, and California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3), University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco (United States); Lasker, Keren [Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, and California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3), University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco (United States); Blavatnik School of Computer Science, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan [Department of Structural Biology, Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, D-82152 Martinsried (Germany); Sali, Andrej [Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, and California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3), University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco (United States); Baumeister, Wolfgang, E-mail: baumeist@biochem.mpg.de [Department of Structural Biology, Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, D-82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2009-10-16

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners.

  16. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-10-16

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners.

  17. The Role of Ubiquitin and the 26S Proteasome in Plant Abiotic Stress Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone L Sophia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin is a small, highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed eukaryotic protein with immensely important and diverse regulatory functions. A well-studied function of ubiquitin is its role in selective proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS. The UPS has emerged as an integral player in plant response and adaptation to environmental stresses such as drought, salinity, cold and nutrient deprivation. The UPS has also been shown to influence the production and signal transduction of stress-related hormones such as abscisic acid. Understanding UPS function has centered mainly on defining the role of E3 ubiquitin ligases, which are the substrate-recruiting component of the ubiquitination pathway. The recent identification of stress signaling/regulatory proteins that are the subject of ubiquitin-dependent degradation has increased our knowledge of how the UPS facilitate responses to adverse environmental conditions. A brief overview is provided on role of the UPS in modulating protein stability during abiotic stress signaling. E3 ubiquitin ligases for which stress-related substrate proteins have been identified are discussed.

  18. Differential roles of the COOH termini of AAA subunits of PA700 (19 S regulator) in asymmetric assembly and activation of the 26 S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, Thomas G; Kumar, Brajesh; Thompson, David; Slaughter, Clive A; DeMartino, George N

    2008-11-14

    The 26 S proteasome is an energy-dependent protease that degrades proteins modified with polyubiquitin chains. It is assembled from two multi-protein subcomplexes: a protease (20 S proteasome) and an ATPase regulatory complex (PA700 or 19 S regulatory particle) that contains six different AAA family subunits (Rpt1 to -6). Here we show that binding of PA700 to the 20 S proteasome is mediated by the COOH termini of two (Rpt2 and Rpt5) of the six Rpt subunits that constitute the interaction surface between the subcomplexes. COOH-terminal peptides of either Rpt2 or Rpt5 bind to the 20 S proteasome and activate hydrolysis of short peptide substrates. Simultaneous binding of both COOH-terminal peptides had additive effects on peptide substrate hydrolysis, suggesting that they bind to distinct sites on the proteasome. In contrast, only the Rpt5 peptide activated hydrolysis of protein substrates. Nevertheless, the COOH-terminal peptide of Rpt2 greatly enhanced this effect, suggesting that proteasome activation is a multistate process. Rpt2 and Rpt5 COOH-terminal peptides cross-linked to different but specific subunits of the 20 S proteasome. These results reveal critical roles of COOH termini of Rpt subunits of PA700 in the assembly and activation of eukaryotic 26 S proteasome. Moreover, they support a model in which Rpt subunits bind to dedicated sites on the proteasome and play specific, nonequivalent roles in the asymmetric assembly and activation of the 26 S proteasome.

  19. HIV-1 replication through hHR23A-mediated interaction of Vpr with 26S proteasome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Li

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Vpr is a virion-associated protein. Its activities link to viral pathogenesis and disease progression of HIV-infected patients. In vitro, Vpr moderately activates HIV-1 replication in proliferating T cells, but it is required for efficient viral infection and replication in vivo in non-dividing cells such as macrophages. How exactly Vpr contributes to viral replication remains elusive. We show here that Vpr stimulates HIV-1 replication at least in part through its interaction with hHR23A, a protein that binds to 19S subunit of the 26S proteasome and shuttles ubiquitinated proteins to the proteasome for degradation. The Vpr-proteasome interaction was initially discovered in fission yeast, where Vpr was shown to associate with Mts4 and Mts2, two 19S-associated proteins. The interaction of Vpr with the 19S subunit of the proteasome was further confirmed in mammalian cells where Vpr associates with the mammalian orthologues of fission yeast Mts4 and S5a. Consistently, depletion of hHR23A interrupts interaction of Vpr with proteasome in mammalian cells. Furthermore, Vpr promotes hHR23A-mediated protein-ubiquitination, and down-regulation of hHR23A using RNAi significantly reduced viral replication in non-proliferating MAGI-CCR5 cells and primary macrophages. These findings suggest that Vpr-proteasome interaction might counteract certain host restriction factor(s to stimulate viral replication in non-dividing cells.

  20. The relation of muscle protein degradation and 26S proteasome%肌肉蛋白降解与蛋白酶复合体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭银玲

    2004-01-01

    The ubiquitin-dependent 20s/26s proteasome system is the capital pathway of exo-lyso-some proteolysis within eukaryotic cell. Under conditions of denervation, starvation, glucocorticoid, infection,tumor, bum and so on, the proteasome system was stimulated tofast. Glucocorticoid, insulin, thyroid honnone,TNFα and IL-1β degrade protein, which results in muscle lose cle protein degradation and the proteasome system. Inhibition or activation of the proteasome system was approved to be a novel means of treatment with cachexia and negative nitrogen balance.

  1. 26S Proteasome regulation of Ankrd1/CARP in adult rat ventricular myocytes and human microvascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaras, Susan E. [Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Chen, Billy [Molecular Medicine Program, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Koch, Stephen R. [Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Sawyer, Douglas B.; Lim, Chee Chew [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Davidson, Jeffrey M., E-mail: jeff.davidson@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Research Service, Veterans Affairs Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 26S proteasome regulates Ankrd1 levels in cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ankrd1 protein degrades 60-fold faster in endothelial cells than cardiomyocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential degradation appears related to nuclear vs. sarcolemmal localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cell density shows uncoupling of Ankrd1 mRNA and protein levels. -- Abstract: Ankyrin repeat domain 1 protein (Ankrd1), also known as cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP), increases dramatically after tissue injury, and its overexpression improves aspects of wound healing. Reports that Ankrd1/CARP protein stability may affect cardiovascular organization, together with our findings that the protein is crucial to stability of the cardiomyocyte sarcomere and increased in wound healing, led us to compare the contribution of Ankrd1/CARP stability to its abundance. We found that the 26S proteasome is the dominant regulator of Ankrd1/CARP degradation, and that Ankrd1/CARP half-life is significantly longer in cardiomyocytes (h) than endothelial cells (min). In addition, higher endothelial cell density decreased the abundance of the protein without affecting steady state mRNA levels. Taken together, our data and that of others indicate that Ankrd1/CARP is highly regulated at multiple levels of its expression. The striking difference in protein half-life between a muscle and a non-muscle cell type suggests that post-translational proteolysis is correlated with the predominantly structural versus regulatory role of the protein in the two cell types.

  2. PUB22 and PUB23 U-BOX E3 ligases directly ubiquitinate RPN6, a 26S proteasome lid subunit, for subsequent degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Seok Keun; Bae, Hansol; Ryu, Moonyoung

    2015-01-01

    and PUB23, two U-box E3 ligase homologs, tether ubiquitins to 19S proteasome regulatory particle (RP) subunit RPN6, leading to its degradation. RPN6 was identified as an interacting substrate of PUB22 by yeast two-hybrid screening, and in vitro pull-down assay confirmed that RPN6 interacts not only......, these results solidify a notion that PUB22 and PUB23 can alter the activity of 26S proteasome in response to drought stress....

  3. Autophagic Turnover of Inactive 26S Proteasomes in Yeast Is Directed by the Ubiquitin Receptor Cue5 and the Hsp42 Chaperone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S. Marshall

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The autophagic clearance of 26S proteasomes (proteaphagy is an important homeostatic mechanism within the ubiquitin system that modulates proteolytic capacity and eliminates damaged particles. Here, we define two proteaphagy routes in yeast that respond to either nitrogen starvation or particle inactivation. Whereas the core autophagic machineries required for Atg8 lipidation and vesiculation are essential for both routes, the upstream Atg1 kinase participates only in starvation-induced proteaphagy. Following inactivation, 26S proteasomes become extensively modified with ubiquitin. Although prior studies with Arabidopsis implicated RPN10 in tethering ubiquitylated proteasomes to ATG8 lining the autophagic membranes, yeast proteaphagy employs the evolutionarily distinct receptor Cue5, which simultaneously binds ubiquitin and Atg8. Proteaphagy of inactivated proteasomes also requires the oligomeric Hsp42 chaperone, suggesting that ubiquitylated proteasomes are directed by Hsp42 to insoluble protein deposit (IPOD-type structures before encapsulation. Together, Cue5 and Hsp42 provide a quality control checkpoint in yeast directed at recycling dysfunctional 26S proteasomes.

  4. Functions of the Proteasome on Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Tyler S.; Tansey, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome is a large self-compartmentalized protease complex that recognizes, unfolds, and destroys ubiquitylated substrates. Proteasome activities are required for a host of cellular functions, and it has become clear in recent years that one set of critical actions of the proteasome occur on chromatin. In this review, we discuss some of the ways in which proteasomes directly regulate the structure and function of chromatin and chromatin regulatory proteins, and how this influences gene transcription. We discuss lingering controversies in the field, the relative importance of proteolytic versus non-proteolytic proteasome activities in this process, and highlight areas that require further investigation. Our intention is to show that proteasomes are involved in major steps controlling the expression of the genetic information, that proteasomes use both proteolytic mechanisms and ATP-dependent protein remodeling to accomplish this task, and that much is yet to be learned about the full spectrum of ways that proteasomes influence the genome. PMID:25422899

  5. Functions of the Proteasome on Chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler S. McCann

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The proteasome is a large self-compartmentalized protease complex that recognizes, unfolds, and destroys ubiquitylated substrates. Proteasome activities are required for a host of cellular functions, and it has become clear in recent years that one set of critical actions of the proteasome occur on chromatin. In this review, we discuss some of the ways in which proteasomes directly regulate the structure and function of chromatin and chromatin regulatory proteins, and how this influences gene transcription. We discuss lingering controversies in the field, the relative importance of proteolytic versus non-proteolytic proteasome activities in this process, and highlight areas that require further investigation. Our intention is to show that proteasomes are involved in major steps controlling the expression of the genetic information, that proteasomes use both proteolytic mechanisms and ATP-dependent protein remodeling to accomplish this task, and that much is yet to be learned about the full spectrum of ways that proteasomes influence the genome.

  6. A pilot study to investigate the role of the 26S proteasome in radiotherapy resistance and loco-regional recurrence following breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfadl, Dalia; Hodgkinson, Victoria C; Long, Ervine D; Scaife, Lucy; Drew, Philip J; Lind, Michael J; Cawkwell, Lynn

    2011-08-01

    Breast conserving therapy is a currently accepted method for managing patients with early stage breast cancer. However, approximately 7% of patients may develop loco-regional tumour recurrence within 5 years. We previously reported that expression of the 26S proteasome may be associated with radio-resistance. Here we aimed to analyse the 26S proteasome in a pilot series of early breast cancers and correlate the findings with loco-regional recurrence. Fourteen patients with early breast cancer who developed loco-regional recurrence within 4 years of completing breast conserving therapy were selected according to strict criteria and compared with those from 14 patients who were disease-free at 10 years. Decreased expression of the 26S proteasome was significantly associated with radio-resistance, manifested as the development of a loco-regional recurrence within 4 years of breast conserving therapy (p = 0.018). This small pilot study provides further suggestion that the 26S proteasome may be associated with response to radiotherapy.

  7. The 26S Proteasome Degrades the Soluble but Not the Fibrillar Form of the Yeast Prion Ure2p In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    Full Text Available Yeast prions are self-perpetuating protein aggregates that cause heritable and transmissible phenotypic traits. Among these, [PSI+] and [URE3] stand out as the most studied yeast prions, and result from the self-assembly of the translation terminator Sup35p and the nitrogen catabolism regulator Ure2p, respectively, into insoluble fibrillar aggregates. Protein quality control systems are well known to govern the formation, propagation and transmission of these prions. However, little is known about the implication of the cellular proteolytic machineries in their turnover. We previously showed that the 26S proteasome degrades both the soluble and fibrillar forms of Sup35p and affects [PSI+] propagation. Here, we show that soluble native Ure2p is degraded by the proteasome in an ubiquitin-independent manner. Proteasomal degradation of Ure2p yields amyloidogenic N-terminal peptides and a C-terminal resistant fragment. In contrast to Sup35p, fibrillar Ure2p resists proteasomal degradation. Thus, structural variability within prions may dictate their ability to be degraded by the cellular proteolytic systems.

  8. Quaternary structure of the ATPase complex of human 26S proteasomes determined by chemical cross-linking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, R; Tanaka, K; Hendil, K B

    2001-01-01

    -linking, immunoprecipitation, and blotting, we have determined that the ATPases are organized in the order S6-S6'-S10b-S8-S4-S7. Additionally, we found cross-links between the ATPase S10b and the 20S proteasome subunit alpha6. Together with the previously known interaction between S8 and alpha1 and between S4 and alpha7...

  9. Effects of Radiation on Proteasome Function in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    peroxiredoxin 1 dynein, cytoplasmic, heavy polypeptide 1 annexin I Beta 5-tubulin thioredoxin-like 1 Tubulin alpha-1A chain annexin A2 isoform...online), which is a substrate of the 26S proteasome (34), and negative for the differentiation mark- ers GFAP and neuron-specific class III -tubulin...and neuron-specific class III -tubulin, indicating that they had undergone differentiation (Figure 2, D–F). Similarly, spheres derived from the U343

  10. Mechanisms promoting and inhibiting the process of proteasomal degradation of cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedrycz Agnieszka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Defects in the process of degradation of unneeded cellular proteins underlie many diseases. This article discusses one of the most important systems of removal of abnormal proteins. It describes the process of ubiquitination of proteins for proteasome degradation. It also describes the structure of the 26S and 20S proteasomes and the mechanism of ubiquitin-proteasome system. Proteasome proteolytic system is highly specialized and organized. Protease-proteasome 26S is particularly important for proper cell functioning. It recognizes and degrades marked proteins. Inhibition of proteasome pathway leads to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  11. How the ubiquitin proteasome system regulates the regulators of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ee, Gary; Lehming, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system plays an important role in transcription. Monoubiquitination of activators is believed to aid their function, while the 26S proteasomal degradation of repressors is believed to restrict their function. What remains controversial is the question of whether the degradation of activators aids or restricts their function.

  12. Proteasome Activity Is Affected by Fluctuations in Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbardella, Diego; Tundo, Grazia Raffaella; Sciandra, Francesca; Bozzi, Manuela; Gioia, Magda; Ciaccio, Chiara; Tarantino, Umberto; Brancaccio, Andrea; Coletta, Massimo; Marini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-Degrading-Enzyme (IDE) is a Zn2+-dependent peptidase highly conserved throughout evolution and ubiquitously distributed in mammalian tissues wherein it displays a prevalent cytosolic localization. We have recently demonstrated a novel Heat Shock Protein-like behaviour of IDE and its association with the 26S proteasome. In the present study, we examine the mechanistic and molecular features of IDE-26S proteasome interaction in a cell experimental model, extending the investigation also to the effect of IDE on the enzymatic activities of the 26S proteasome. Further, kinetic investigations indicate that the 26S proteasome activity undergoes a functional modulation by IDE through an extra-catalytic mechanism. The IDE-26S proteasome interaction was analyzed during the Heat Shock Response and we report novel findings on IDE intracellular distribution that might be of critical relevance for cell metabolism.

  13. Proteasome Activity Is Affected by Fluctuations in Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Sbardella

    Full Text Available Insulin-Degrading-Enzyme (IDE is a Zn2+-dependent peptidase highly conserved throughout evolution and ubiquitously distributed in mammalian tissues wherein it displays a prevalent cytosolic localization. We have recently demonstrated a novel Heat Shock Protein-like behaviour of IDE and its association with the 26S proteasome. In the present study, we examine the mechanistic and molecular features of IDE-26S proteasome interaction in a cell experimental model, extending the investigation also to the effect of IDE on the enzymatic activities of the 26S proteasome. Further, kinetic investigations indicate that the 26S proteasome activity undergoes a functional modulation by IDE through an extra-catalytic mechanism. The IDE-26S proteasome interaction was analyzed during the Heat Shock Response and we report novel findings on IDE intracellular distribution that might be of critical relevance for cell metabolism.

  14. Antioxidants block proteasome inhibitor function in endometrial carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobet, David; Eritja, Nuria; Encinas, Mario; Sorolla, Anabel; Yeramian, Andree; Schoenenberger, Joan Antoni; Llombart-Cussac, Antonio; Marti, Rosa M; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavier

    2008-02-01

    We have recently demonstrated that proteasome inhibitors can be effective in inducing apoptotic cell death in endometrial carcinoma cell lines and primary culture explants. Increasing evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species are responsible for proteasome inhibitor-induced cell killing. Antioxidants can thus block apoptosis (cell death) triggered by proteasome inhibition. Here, we have evaluated the effects of different antioxidants (edaravone and tiron) on endometrial carcinoma cells treated with aldehyde proteasome inhibitors (MG-132 or ALLN), the boronic acid-based proteasome inhibitor (bortezomib) and the epoxyketone, epoxomicin. We show that tiron specifically inhibited the cytotoxic effects of bortezomib, whereas edaravone inhibited cell death caused by aldehyde-based proteasome inhibitors. We have, however, found that edaravone completely inhibited accumulation of ubiquitin and proteasome activity decrease caused by MG-132 or ALLN, but not by bortezomib. Conversely, tiron inhibited the ubiquitin accumulation and proteasome activity decrease caused by bortezomib. These results suggest that edaravone and tiron rescue cells of proteasome inhibitors from cell death, by inhibiting blockade of proteasome caused by MG-132 and ALLN or bortezomib, respectively. We also tested other antioxidants, and we found that vitamin C inhibited bortezomib-induced cell death. Similar to tiron, vitamin C inhibited cell death by blocking the ability of bortezomib to inhibit the proteasome. Until now, all the antioxidants that blocked proteasome inhibitor-induced cell death also blocked the proteasome inhibitor mechanism of action.

  15. Mapping subunit contacts in the regulatory complex of the 26 S proteasome. S2 and S5b form a tetramer with ATPase subunits S4 and S7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbea, C; Taillandier, D; Rechsteiner, M

    2000-01-14

    The 19 S regulatory complex (RC) of the 26 S proteasome is composed of at least 18 different subunits, including six ATPases that form specific pairs S4-S7, S6-S8, and S6'-S10b in vitro. One of the largest regulatory complex subunits, S2, was translated in reticulocyte lysate containing [(35)S]methionine and used to probe membranes containing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separated RC subunits. S2 bound to two ATPases, S4 and S7. Association of S2 with regulatory complex subunits was also assayed by co-translation and sedimentation. S2 formed an immunoprecipitable heterotrimer upon co-translation with S4 and S7. The non-ATPase S5b also formed a ternary complex with S4 and S7 and the three proteins assembled into a tetramer with S2. Neither S2 nor S5b formed complexes with S6'-S10b dimers or with S6-S8 oligomers. The use of chimeric ATPases demonstrated that S2 binds the NH(2)-terminal region of S4 and the COOH-terminal two-thirds of S7. Conversely, S5b binds the COOH-terminal two-thirds of S4 and to S7's NH(2)-terminal region. The demonstrated association of S2 with ATPases in the mammalian 19 S regulatory complex is consistent with and extends the recent finding that the yeast RC is composed of two subcomplexes, the lid and the base (Glickman, M. H., Rubin, D. M., Coux, O., Wefes, I., Pfeifer, G., Cejka, Z., Baumeister, W., Fried, V. A., and Finley, D. (1998) Cell 94, 615-623).

  16. Proteasome function is not impaired in healthy aging of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniard, Anne; Ballweg, Korbinian; Lukas, Christina; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2015-10-01

    Aging is the progressive loss of cellular function which inevitably leads to death. Failure of proteostasis including the decrease in proteasome function is one hallmark of aging. In the lung, proteasome activity was shown to be impaired in age-related diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, little is known on proteasome function during healthy aging. Here, we comprehensively analyzed healthy lung aging and proteasome function in wildtype, proteasome reporter and immunoproteasome knockout mice. Wildtype mice spontaneously developed senile lung emphysema while expression and activity of proteasome complexes and turnover of ubiquitinated substrates was not grossly altered in lungs of aged mice. Immunoproteasome subunits were specifically upregulated in the aged lung and the caspase-like proteasome activity concomitantly decreased. Aged knockout mice for the LMP2 or LMP7 immunoproteasome subunits showed no alteration in proteasome activities but exhibited typical lung aging phenotypes suggesting that immunoproteasome function is dispensable for physiological lung aging in mice. Our results indicate that healthy aging of the lung does not involve impairment of proteasome function. Apparently, the reserve capacity of the proteostasis systems in the lung is sufficient to avoid severe proteostasis imbalance during healthy aging.

  17. Muscarinic 2 Receptors Modulate Cardiac Proteasome Function in a Protein Kinase G-dependent Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Ranek, Mark J.; Kost, Curtis K.; Hu, Chengjun; Martin, Douglas S.; Wang, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    Proteasome function insufficiency and inadequate protein quality control are strongly implicated in a large subset of cardiovascular disease and may play an important role in their pathogenesis. Protein degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system can be physiologically regulated. Cardiac muscarinic 2 (M2) receptors were pharmacologically interrogated in intact mice and cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). Proteasome-mediated proteolysis was measured with a surrogate misfolde...

  18. A mammalian nervous-system-specific plasma membrane proteasome complex that modulates neuronal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Kapil V; Margolis, Seth S

    2017-04-01

    In the nervous system, rapidly occurring processes such as neuronal transmission and calcium signaling are affected by short-term inhibition of proteasome function. It is unclear how proteasomes are able to acutely regulate such processes, as this action is inconsistent with their canonical role in proteostasis. Here we describe a mammalian nervous-system-specific membrane proteasome complex that directly and rapidly modulates neuronal function by degrading intracellular proteins into extracellular peptides that can stimulate neuronal signaling. This proteasome complex is closely associated with neuronal plasma membranes, exposed to the extracellular space, and catalytically active. Selective inhibition of the membrane proteasome complex by a cell-impermeable proteasome inhibitor blocked the production of extracellular peptides and attenuated neuronal-activity-induced calcium signaling. Moreover, we observed that membrane-proteasome-derived peptides were sufficient to induce neuronal calcium signaling. Our discoveries challenge the prevailing notion that proteasomes function primarily to maintain proteostasis, and highlight a form of neuronal communication that takes place through a membrane proteasome complex.

  19. Chaperone-assisted assembly of the proteasome core particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Ana C; Ramos, Paula C; Dohmen, R Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    The 26S proteasome is a non-lysosomal protease in the cytosol and nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Its main function is to mediate ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. The 26S proteasome is a multimeric complex composed by the 20S proteasome CP (core particle) and the 19S RPs (regulatory particles). Although the atomic structure of the 26S proteasome has not yet been determined, high-resolution structures are available for its CP. Studies on the complicated assembly pathway of the proteasome have revealed that it involves an unprecedented number of dedicated chaperones. Assembly of the CP alone involves three conserved proteasome-assembly chaperones [PAC1-PAC2, PAC3-PAC4 and UMP1 (ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis 1)]. Whereas the two heterodimeric PACs have been implicated in the formation of rings of the seven distinct alpha subunits, UMP1 is important for the formation and dimerization of proteasome precursor complexes containing beta subunits. Dimerization coincides with the incorporation of the last beta subunit (beta7). Additional modules important for the assembly of precursor complexes and their dimerization reside in the beta subunits themselves, either as transient or as permanent extensions. Particularly important domains are the propeptide of beta5 and the C-terminal extensions of beta2 and beta7. Upon maturation of the active sites by autocatalytic processing, UMP1 is degraded by the native proteasome.

  20. Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Arai, Naoko; Tanaka, Keiji, E-mail: tanaka-kj@igakuken.or.jp; Saeki, Yasushi, E-mail: saeki-ys@igakuken.or.jp

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •We succeeded to control the proteasome localization by the anchor-away technique. •Nuclear proteasome-depleted cells showed a lethal phenotype. •Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in dividing cells. -- Abstract: The 26S proteasome is an essential protease complex responsible for the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotic cells. In rapidly proliferating yeast cells, proteasomes are mainly localized in the nucleus, but the biological significance of the proteasome localization is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the proteasome localization and the functions by the anchor-away technique, a ligand-dependent sequestration of a target protein into specific compartment(s). Anchoring of the proteasome to the plasma membrane or the ribosome resulted in conditional depletion of the nuclear proteasomes, whereas anchoring to histone resulted in the proteasome sequestration into the nucleus. We observed that the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in all the proteasome-targeted cells, suggesting that both the nuclear and cytoplasmic proteasomes have proteolytic functions and that the ubiquitinated proteins are produced and degraded in each compartment. Consistent with previous studies, the nuclear proteasome-depleted cells exhibited a lethal phenotype. In contrast, the nuclear sequestration of the proteasome resulted only in a mild growth defect, suggesting that the cytoplasmic proteasomes are not basically indispensable for cell growth in rapidly growing yeast cells.

  1. Localization of the proteasomal ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 by electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Eri; Bohn, Stefan; Mihalache, Oana; Kiss, Petra; Beck, Florian; Nagy, Istvan; Nickell, Stephan; Tanaka, Keiji; Saeki, Yasushi; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2012-01-31

    Two canonical subunits of the 26S proteasome, Rpn10 and Rpn13, function as ubiquitin (Ub) receptors. The mutual arrangement of these subunits--and all other non-ATPase subunits--in the regulatory particle is unknown. Using electron cryomicroscopy, we calculated difference maps between wild-type 26S proteasome from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and deletion mutants (rpn10Δ, rpn13Δ, and rpn10Δrpn13Δ). These maps allowed us to localize the two Ub receptors unambiguously. Rpn10 and Rpn13 mapped to the apical part of the 26S proteasome, above the N-terminal coiled coils of the AAA-ATPase heterodimers Rpt4/Rpt5 and Rpt1/Rpt2, respectively. On the basis of the mutual positions of Rpn10 and Rpn13, we propose a model for polyubiquitin binding to the 26S proteasome.

  2. Emerging Role of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System in the Control of Shoot Apical Meristem Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elisabetta Di Giacomo; Giovanna Serino; Giovanna Frugis

    2013-01-01

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) is a population of undifferentiated cells at the tip of the shoot axis that establishes early during plant embryogenesis and gives rise to all shoot organs throughout the plant's life.A plethora of different families of transcription factors (TFs) play a key role in establishing the equilibrium between cell differentiation and stem cell maintenance in the SAM.Fine tuning of these regulatory proteins is crucial for a proper and fast SAM response to environmental and hormonal cues,and for development progression.One effective way to rapidly inactivate TFs involves regulated proteolysis by the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system (UPS).However,a possible role of UPS-dependent protein degradation in the regulation of key SAM TFs has not been thoroughly investigated.Here,we summarize recent evidence supporting a role for the UPS in SAM maintenance and function.We integrate this survey with an in silico analysis of publicly-available microarray databases which identified ubiquitin ligases that are expressed in specific areas within the SAM,suggesting that they may regulate or act downstream of meristem-specific factors.

  3. Melittin restores proteasome function in an animal model of ALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang Min

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a paralyzing disorder characterized by the progressive degeneration and death of motor neurons and occurs both as a sporadic and familial disease. Mutant SOD1 (mtSOD1 in motor neurons induces vulnerability to the disease through protein misfolding, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, cytoskeletal abnormalities, defective axonal transport- and growth factor signaling, excitotoxicity, and neuro-inflammation. Melittin is a 26 amino acid protein and is one of the components of bee venom which is used in traditional Chinese medicine to inhibit of cancer cell proliferation and is known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects. The purpose of the present study was to determine if melittin could suppress motor neuron loss and protein misfolding in the hSOD1G93A mouse, which is commonly used as a model for inherited ALS. Meltittin was injected at the 'ZuSanLi' (ST36 acupuncture point in the hSOD1G93A animal model. Melittin-treated animals showed a decrease in the number of microglia and in the expression level of phospho-p38 in the spinal cord and brainstem. Interestingly, melittin treatment in symptomatic ALS animals improved motor function and reduced the level of neuron death in the spinal cord when compared to the control group. Furthermore, we found increased of α-synuclein modifications, such as phosphorylation or nitration, in both the brainstem and spinal cord in hSOD1G93A mice. However, melittin treatment reduced α-synuclein misfolding and restored the proteasomal activity in the brainstem and spinal cord of symptomatic hSOD1G93A transgenic mice. Our research suggests a potential functional link between melittin and the inhibition of neuroinflammation in an ALS animal model.

  4. Lifelong maintenance of composition, function and cellular/subcellular distribution of proteasomes in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellavista, Elena; Martucci, Morena; Vasuri, Francesco; Santoro, Aurelia; Mishto, Michele; Kloss, Alexander; Capizzi, Elisa; Degiovanni, Alessio; Lanzarini, Catia; Remondini, Daniel; Dazzi, Alessandro; Pellegrini, Sara; Cescon, Matteo; Capri, Miriam; Salvioli, Stefano; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Dahlmann, Burkhardt; Grazi, Gian Luca; Franceschi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Owing to organ shortage, livers from old donors are increasingly used for transplantation. The function and duration of such transplanted livers are apparently comparable to those from young donors, suggesting that, despite some morphological and structural age-related changes, no major functional changes do occur in liver with age. We tested this hypothesis by performing a comprehensive study on proteasomes, major cell organelles responsible for proteostasis, in liver biopsies from heart-beating donors. Oxidized and poly-ubiquitin conjugated proteins did not accumulate with age and the three major proteasome proteolytic activities were similar in livers from young and old donors. Analysis of proteasomes composition showed an age-related increased of β5i/α4 ratio, suggesting a shift toward proteasomes containing inducible subunits and a decreased content of PA28α subunit, mainly in the cytosol of hepatocytes. Thus our data suggest that, proteasomes activity is well preserved in livers from aged donors, concomitantly with subtle changes in proteasome subunit composition which might reflect the occurrence of a functional remodelling to maintain an efficient proteostasis. Gender differences are emerging and they deserve further investigations owing to the different aging trajectories between men and women. Finally, our data support the safe use of livers from old donors for transplantation.

  5. Proteasomes: a complex story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendil, Klavs B; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    Protein degradation in eukaryotic cells is important for regulation of metabolism, progression through the division cycle, in cell signalling pathways, and in mammals also for generation of antigen fragments for presentation on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. Most cell proteins...... are degraded via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway where an elaborate enzyme system recognises the protein substrates and marks them for destruction by attachment of a chain of ubiquitin. The substrates are then bound to 26S proteasomes, unfolded, and threaded into the cylindrical central part of the 26S...... the substrates or release ubiquitin and glycans from them during degradation, stabilise proteasomes, regulate their cellular localisation, and modify their activity. It therefore appears that proteasomes are centres in macromolecular clusters, which degrade cell proteins in a tightly regulated manner....

  6. Proteasome Activation by Small Molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leestemaker, Yves; de Jong, Annemieke; Witting, Katharina F; Penning, Renske; Schuurman, Karianne; Rodenko, Boris; Zaal, Esther A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371570905; van de Kooij, Bert; Laufer, Stefan; Heck, Albert J R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332; Borst, Jannie; Scheper, Wiep; Berkers, Celia R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/329510916; Ovaa, Huib

    2017-01-01

    Drugs that increase 26S proteasome activity have potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. A chemical genetics screen of over 2,750 compounds using a proteasome activity probe as a readout in a high-throughput live-cell fluorescence-activated cell

  7. The effects of anti-DNA topoisomerase II drugs, etoposide and ellipticine, are modified in root meristem cells of Allium cepa by MG132, an inhibitor of 26S proteasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żabka, Aneta; Winnicki, Konrad; Polit, Justyna Teresa; Maszewski, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II), a highly specialized nuclear enzyme, resolves various entanglement problems concerning DNA that arise during chromatin remodeling, transcription, S-phase replication, meiotic recombination, chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. The genotoxic effects of two Topo II inhibitors known as potent anti-cancer drugs, etoposide (ETO) and ellipticine (EPC), were assayed in root apical meristem cells of Allium cepa. Despite various types of molecular interactions between these drugs and DNA-Topo II complexes at the chromatin level, which have a profound negative impact on the genome integrity (production of double-strand breaks, chromosomal bridges and constrictions, lagging fragments of chromosomes and their uneven segregation to daughter cell nuclei), most of the elicited changes were apparently similar, regarding both their intensity and time characteristics. No essential changes between ETO- and EPC-treated onion roots were noticed in the frequency of G1-, S-, G2-and M-phase cells, nuclear morphology, chromosome structures, tubulin-microtubule systems, extended distribution of mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites of histone H3, and the induction of apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD). However, the important difference between the effects induced by the ETO and EPC concerns their catalytic activities in the presence of MG132 (proteasome inhibitor engaged in Topo II-mediated formation of cleavage complexes) and relates to the time-variable changes in chromosomal aberrations and AL-PCD rates. This result implies that proteasome-dependent mechanisms may contribute to the course of physiological effects generated by DNA lesions under conditions that affect the ability of plant cells to resolve topological problems that associated with the nuclear metabolic activities.

  8. 1.15 Å resolution structure of the proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 PDZ domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Chingakham R. [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan [University of Kansas, Del Shankel Structural Biology Center, Lawrence, KS 66047 (United States); Chowdhury, Wasimul Q.; Geanes, Eric S. [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Battaile, Kevin P. [IMCA-CAT Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Building 435A, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Roelofs, Jeroen, E-mail: jroelofs@ksu.edu [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2014-03-25

    The proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 binds to the proteasome subunit Rpt5 using its PDZ domain. The structure of the Nas2 PDZ domain has been determined. The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa protease dedicated to the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this complex containing 66 polypeptides is assisted by at least nine proteasome-specific chaperones. One of these, Nas2, binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported. This structure will provide a basis for further insights regarding the structure and function of Nas2 in proteasome assembly.

  9. Proteasome inhibition slightly improves cardiac function in mice with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossarek, Saskia; Singh, Sonia R; Geertz, Birgit; Schulz, Herbert; Reischmann, Silke; Hübner, Norbert; Carrier, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    A growing line of evidence indicates a dysfunctional ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in cardiac diseases. Anti-hypertrophic effects and improved cardiac function have been reported after treatment with proteasome inhibitors in experimental models of cardiac hypertrophy. Here we tested whether proteasome inhibition could also reverse the disease phenotype in a genetically-modified mouse model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), which carries a mutation in Mybpc3, encoding the myofilament protein cardiac myosin-binding protein C. At 7 weeks of age, homozygous mutant mice (KI) have 39% higher left ventricular mass-to-body-weight ratio and 29% lower fractional area shortening (FAS) than wild-type (WT) mice. Both groups were treated with epoxomicin (0.5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 1 week via osmotic minipumps. Epoxomicin inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity by ~50% in both groups. All parameters of cardiac hypertrophy (including the fetal gene program) were not affected by epoxomicin treatment in both groups. In contrast, FAS was 12% and 35% higher in epoxomicin-treated than vehicle-treated WT and KI mice, respectively. To identify which genes or pathways could be involved in this positive effect, we performed a transcriptome analysis in KI and WT neonatal cardiac myocytes, treated or not with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (1 μM, 24 h). This revealed 103 genes (four-fold difference; 5% FDR) which are commonly regulated in both KI and WT cardiac myocytes. Thus, even in genetically-modified mice with manifest HCM, proteasome inhibition showed beneficial effects, at least with regard to cardiac function. Targeting the UPS in cardiac diseases remains therefore a therapeutic option.

  10. Modelling Proteasome and Proteasome Regulator Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Liepe

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteasomes are key proteases involved in a variety of processes ranging from the clearance of damaged proteins to the presentation of antigens to CD8+ T-lymphocytes. Which cleavage sites are used within the target proteins and how fast these proteins are degraded have a profound impact on immune system function and many cellular metabolic processes. The regulation of proteasome activity involves different mechanisms, such as the substitution of the catalytic subunits, the binding of regulatory complexes to proteasome gates and the proteasome conformational modifications triggered by the target protein itself. Mathematical models are invaluable in the analysis; and potentially allow us to predict the complex interactions of proteasome regulatory mechanisms and the final outcomes of the protein degradation rate and MHC class I epitope generation. The pioneering attempts that have been made to mathematically model proteasome activity, cleavage preference variation and their modification by one of the regulatory mechanisms are reviewed here.

  11. Changes in proteasome structure and function caused by HAMLET in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Lotta; Aits, Sonja; Onnerfjord, Patrik; Trulsson, Maria; Storm, Petter; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-01-01

    Proteasomes control the level of endogenous unfolded proteins by degrading them in the proteolytic core. Insufficient degradation due to altered protein structure or proteasome inhibition may trigger cell death. This study examined the proteasome response to HAMLET, a partially unfolded protein-lipid complex, which is internalized by tumor cells and triggers cell death. HAMLET bound directly to isolated 20S proteasomes in vitro and in tumor cells significant co-localization of HAMLET and 20S proteasomes was detected by confocal microscopy. This interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation from extracts of HAMLET-treated tumor cells. HAMLET resisted in vitro degradation by proteasomal enzymes and degradation by intact 20S proteasomes was slow compared to fatty acid-free, partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin. After a brief activation, HAMLET inhibited proteasome activity in vitro and in parallel a change in proteasome structure occurred, with modifications of catalytic (beta1 and beta5) and structural subunits (alpha2, alpha3, alpha6 and beta3). Proteasome inhibition was confirmed in extracts from HAMLET-treated cells and there were indications of proteasome fragmentation in HAMLET-treated cells. The results suggest that internalized HAMLET is targeted to 20S proteasomes, that the complex resists degradation, inhibits proteasome activity and perturbs proteasome structure. We speculate that perturbations of proteasome structure might contribute to the cytotoxic effects of unfolded protein complexes that invade host cells.

  12. Bioinformatic analysis of functional differences between the immunoproteasome and the constitutive proteasome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesmir, C.; Noort, V. van; Boer, R.J. de; Hogeweg, P.

    2003-01-01

    Intracellular proteins are degraded largely by proteasomes. In cells stimulated with gamma interferon, the active proteasome subunits are replaced by "immuno" subunits that form immunoproteasomes. Phylogenetic analysis of the immunosubunits has revealed that they evolve faster than their

  13. Molecular characterization of 26S proteasome regulatory subunit in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... 2The Persian Gulf Tropical and Infectious disease Research Center. Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr,. Iran. 3Division of Molecular Biology, Department of Medical Mycology and ... INTRODUCTION.

  14. Proteasome inhibition as a novel therapeutic target in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, S Vincent; Richardson, Paul G; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2005-01-20

    The 26S proteasome is a large intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate-dependent protease that identifies and degrades proteins tagged for destruction by the ubiquitin system. The orderly degradation of cellular proteins is critical for normal cell cycling and function, and inhibition of the proteasome pathway results in cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Dysregulation of this enzymatic system may also play a role in tumor progression, drug resistance, and altered immune surveillance, making the proteasome an appropriate and novel therapeutic target in cancer. Bortezomib (formerly known as PS-341) is the first proteasome inhibitor to enter clinical practice. It is a boronic aid dipeptide that binds directly with and inhibits the enzymatic complex. Bortezomib has recently shown significant preclinical and clinical activity in several cancers, confirming the therapeutic value of proteasome inhibition in human malignancy. It was approved in 2003 for the treatment of advanced multiple myeloma (MM), with approximately one third of patients with relapsed and refractory MM showing significant clinical benefit in a large clinical trial. Its mechanism of action is partly mediated through nuclear factor-kappa B inhibition, resulting in apoptosis, decreased angiogenic cytokine expression, and inhibition of tumor cell adhesion to stroma. Additional mechanisms include c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and effects on growth factor expression. Several clinical trials are currently ongoing in MM as well as several other malignancies. This article discusses proteasome inhibition as a novel therapeutic target in cancer and focuses on the development, mechanism of action, and current clinical experience with bortezomib.

  15. Genetics of Proteasome Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldrin V. Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteasome is a large, multiple subunit complex that is capable of degrading most intracellular proteins. Polymorphisms in proteasome subunits are associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and cancer. One polymorphism in the proteasome gene PSMA6 (−8C/G is associated with three different diseases: type 2 diabetes, myocardial infarction, and coronary artery disease. One type of proteasome, the immunoproteasome, which contains inducible catalytic subunits, is adapted to generate peptides for antigen presentation. It has recently been shown that mutations and polymorphisms in the immunoproteasome catalytic subunit PSMB8 are associated with several inflammatory and autoinflammatory diseases including Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, CANDLE syndrome, and intestinal M. tuberculosis infection. This comprehensive review describes the disease-related polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with human diseases and the physiological modulation of proteasome function by these polymorphisms. Given the large number of subunits and the central importance of the proteasome in human physiology as well as the fast pace of detection of proteasome polymorphisms associated with human diseases, it is likely that other polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with diseases will be detected in the near future. While disease-associated polymorphisms are now readily discovered, the challenge will be to use this genetic information for clinical benefit.

  16. Spatial arrangement and functional role of α subunits of proteasome activator PA28 in hetero-oligomeric form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Masaaki, E-mail: sugiyama@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Sahashi, Hiroki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Kurimoto, Eiji [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Faculty of Pharmacy, Meijo University, Nagoya 468-8503 (Japan); Takata, Shin-ichi [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yagi, Hirokazu; Kanai, Keita; Sakata, Eri [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Minami, Yasufumi [Department of Biotechnology, Maebashi Institute of Technology, Gunma 371-0816 (Japan); Tanaka, Keiji [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Kato, Koichi, E-mail: kkatonmr@ims.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787 (Japan); Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787 (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Homologous α and β subunits are alternatively arranged in the PA28 heptameric ring. ► The flexible loops of the three α subunits surround the site of substrate entry. ► The loops serve as gatekeepers that selectively hinder passage of longer peptides. - Abstract: A major form of proteasome activator PA28 is a heteroheptamer composed of interferon-γ-inducible α and β subunits, which share approximately 50% amino acid identity and possess distinct insert loops. This activator forms a complex with the 20S proteasome and thereby stimulates proteasomal degradation of peptides in an ATP-independent manner, giving rise to smaller antigenic peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. In this study, we performed biophysical and biochemical characterization of the structure and function of the PA28 hetero-oligomer. Deuteration-assisted small-angle neutron scattering demonstrated three α and four β subunits are alternately arranged in the heptameric ring. In this arrangement, PA28 loops surround the central pore of the heptameric ring (site for peptide entry). Activating the 20S proteasome with a PA28 mutant that lacked the α subunit loops cleaved model substrates longer than a nonapeptide with better efficiency when compared to wild-type PA28. Based on these data, we hypothesize that the flexible PA28 loops act as gatekeepers, which function to select the length of peptide substrates to be transported between the proteolytic chamber and the extra-proteasomal medium.

  17. Proteasome activity and subunit composition in endometrial hyperplasia and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Spirina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In endometrial hyperplasia the total proteasome activity was not changed however the 26S proteasome activity was increased in comparison with the normal tissues. In endometrial cancer the high total proteasome activity and activities of 26S and 20S proteasomes wer e revealed. The changes in proteasome activities were correlated with the decreased content of α1α2α3α5α6α7 proteasome subunits and increased con- tents of LMP2, LMP7 and PA28β proteasome subunits compared to that in nonaltered tissues. Low content of α1α2α3α5α6α7 proteasome subunits was revealed at the second stage of cancer patients in comparison with that at the first stage.

  18. Base-CP proteasome can serve as a platform for stepwise lid formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zanlin; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; Kleifeld, Oded; Mansour, Wissam; Nakasone, Mark A.; Castaneda, Carlos A.; Dixon, Emma K.; Fushman, David; Reis, Noa; Pick, Elah; Glickman, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    26S proteasome, a major regulatory protease in eukaryotes, consists of a 20S proteolytic core particle (CP) capped by a 19S regulatory particle (RP). The 19S RP is divisible into base and lid sub-complexes. Even within the lid, subunits have been demarcated into two modules: module 1 (Rpn5, Rpn6, Rpn8, Rpn9 and Rpn11), which interacts with both CP and base sub-complexes and module 2 (Rpn3, Rpn7, Rpn12 and Rpn15) that is attached mainly to module 1. We now show that suppression of RPN11 expression halted lid assembly yet enabled the base and 20S CP to pre-assemble and form a base-CP. A key role for Regulatory particle non-ATPase 11 (Rpn11) in bridging lid module 1 and module 2 subunits together is inferred from observing defective proteasomes in rpn11–m1, a mutant expressing a truncated form of Rpn11 and displaying mitochondrial phenotypes. An incomplete lid made up of five module 1 subunits attached to base-CP was identified in proteasomes isolated from this mutant. Re-introducing the C-terminal portion of Rpn11 enabled recruitment of missing module 2 subunits. In vitro, module 1 was reconstituted stepwise, initiated by Rpn11–Rpn8 heterodimerization. Upon recruitment of Rpn6, the module 1 intermediate was competent to lock into base-CP and reconstitute an incomplete 26S proteasome. Thus, base-CP can serve as a platform for gradual incorporation of lid, along a proteasome assembly pathway. Identification of proteasome intermediates and reconstitution of minimal functional units should clarify aspects of the inner workings of this machine and how multiple catalytic processes are synchronized within the 26S proteasome holoenzymes. PMID:26182356

  19. Aaptamine, an alkaloid from the sponge Aaptos suberitoides, functions as a proteasome inhibitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Yamanokuchi, R.; Yoshitomi, M; Sato, K.; Ikeda, T.; Rotinsulu, H.; Mangindaan, R.E.P.; de Voogd, N.J.; van Soest, R.W.M.; Yokosawa, H.

    2010-01-01

    Aaptamine (1), isoaaptamine (2), and demethylaaptamine (3) were isolated from the marine sponge Aaptossuberitoides collected in Indonesia as inhibitors of the proteasome. They inhibited the chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities of the proteasome with IC50 values of 1.6-4.6 μg/mL, while they

  20. Plant ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and its role in gibberellin signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Wang; Xing Wang Deng

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in plants,like in other eukaryotes,targets numerous intracellular regulators and thus modulates almost every aspect of growth and development.The well-known and best-characterized outcome of ubiquitination is mediating target protein degradation via the 26S proteasome,which represents the major selective protein degradation pathway conserved among eukaryotes.In this review,we will discuss the molecular composition,regulation and function of plant UPS,with a major focus on how DELLA protein degradation acts as a key in gibberellin signal transduction and its implication in the regulation of plant growth.

  1. Proteasome inhibition improves diaphragm function in an animal model for COPD.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, H.W.H. van; Ottenheijm, C.A.C.; Ennen, L.; Linkels, M.; Dekhuijzen, R.; Heunks, L.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Diaphragm muscle weakness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recent studies indicate that increased contractile protein degradation by the proteasome contributes to diaphragm weakness in patients with COPD. The aim of

  2. 17-DMAG ameliorates polyglutamine-mediated motor neuron degeneration through well-preserved proteasome function in an SBMA model mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokui, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Waza, Masahiro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Minamiyama, Makoto; Doi, Hideki; Tanaka, Keiji; Hamazaki, Jun; Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2009-03-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is the principal protein degradation system that tags and targets short-lived proteins, as well as damaged or misfolded proteins, for destruction. In spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), the androgen receptor (AR), an Hsp90 client protein, is such a misfolded protein that tends to aggregate in neurons. Hsp90 inhibitors promote the degradation of Hsp90 client proteins via the UPS. In a transgenic mouse model of SBMA, we examined whether a functioning UPS is preserved, if it was capable of degrading polyglutamine-expanded mutant AR, and what might be the therapeutic effects of 17-(dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), an oral Hsp90 inhibitor. Ubiquitin-proteasomal function was well preserved in SBMA mice and was even increased during advanced stages when the mice developed severe phenotypes. Administration of 17-DMAG markedly ameliorated motor impairments in SBMA mice without detectable toxicity and reduced amounts of monomeric and nuclear-accumulated mutant AR. Mutant AR was preferentially degraded in the presence of 17-DMAG in both SBMA cell and mouse models when compared with wild-type AR. 17-DMAG also significantly induced Hsp70 and Hsp40. Thus, 17-DMAG would exert a therapeutic effect on SBMA via preserved proteasome function.

  3. Biochemical and toxicological evaluation of nano-heparins in cell functional properties, proteasome activation and expression of key matrix molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperigkou, Zoi; Karamanou, Konstantina; Afratis, Nikolaos A; Bouris, Panagiotis; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Belmiro, Celso L R; Pavão, Mauro S G; Vynios, Dimitrios H; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-01-05

    The glycosaminoglycan heparin and its derivatives act strongly on blood coagulation, controlling the activity of serine protease inhibitors in plasma. Nonetheless, there is accumulating evidence highlighting different anticancer activities of these molecules in numerous types of cancer. Nano-heparins may have great biological significance since they can inhibit cell proliferation and invasion as well as inhibiting proteasome activation. Moreover, they can cause alterations in the expression of major modulators of the tumor microenvironment, regulating cancer cell behavior. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of two nano-heparin formulations: one isolated from porcine intestine and the other from the sea squirt Styela plicata, on a breast cancer cell model. We determined whether these nano-heparins are able to affect cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion, as well as proteasome activity and the expression of extracellular matrix molecules. Specifically, we observed that nano-Styela compared to nano-Mammalian analogue has higher inhibitory role on cell proliferation, invasion and proteasome activity. Moreover, nano-Styela regulates cell apoptosis, expression of inflammatory molecules, such as IL-6 and IL-8 and reduces the expression levels of extracellular matrix macromolecules, such as the proteolytic enzymes MT1-MMP, uPA and the cell surface proteoglycans syndecan-1 and -2, but not on syndecan-4. The observations reported in the present article indicate that nano-heparins and especially ascidian heparin are effective agents for heparin-induced effects in critical cancer cell functions, providing an important possibility in pharmacological targeting.

  4. Bioinformatic analysis of functional differences between the immunoproteasome and the constitutive proteasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesmir, Can; van Noort, V.; de Boer, R.J.;

    2003-01-01

    not yet been quantified how different the specificity of two forms of the proteasome are. The main question, which still lacks direct evidence, is whether the immunoproteasome generates more MHC ligands. Here we use bioinformatics tools to quantify these differences and show that the immunoproteasome...

  5. Probing proteasome activity and function : cancer diagnostics and mechanism of antigen processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkers, Celia Rosita

    2010-01-01

    In cells, proteins are continuously synthesized and degraded to control protein levels and thereby regulate a wide variety of biochemical processes. The proteasome is the main cellular degradation machinery, responsible for the degradation of key proteins involved in the regulation of a wide range

  6. A heterodimeric complex that promotes the assembly of mammalian 20S proteasomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirano, Yoko; Hendil, Klavs B.; Yashiroda, Hideki;

    2005-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a multisubunit protease responsible for regulated proteolysis in eukaryotic cells 1, 2 . It comprises one catalytic 20S proteasome and two axially positioned 19S regulatory complexes 3 . The 20S proteasome is composed of 28 subunits arranged in a cylindrical particle as four...

  7. Regulators of the proteasome pathway, Uch37 and Rpn13, play distinct roles in mouse development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Al-Shami

    Full Text Available Rpn13 is a novel mammalian proteasomal receptor that has recently been identified as an amplification target in ovarian cancer. It can interact with ubiquitin and activate the deubiquitinating enzyme Uch37 at the 26S proteasome. Since neither Rpn13 nor Uch37 is an integral proteasomal subunit, we explored whether either protein is essential for mammalian development and survival. Deletion of Uch37 resulted in prenatal lethality in mice associated with severe defect in embryonic brain development. In contrast, the majority of Rpn13-deficient mice survived to adulthood, although they were smaller at birth and fewer in number than wild-type littermates. Absence of Rpn13 produced tissue-specific effects on proteasomal function: increased proteasome activity in adrenal gland and lymphoid organs, and decreased activity in testes and brain. Adult Rpn13(-/- mice reached normal body weight but had increased body fat content and were infertile due to defective gametogenesis. Additionally, Rpn13(-/- mice showed increased T-cell numbers, resembling growth hormone-mediated effects. Indeed, serum growth hormone and follicular stimulating hormone levels were significantly increased in Rpn13(-/- mice, while growth hormone receptor expression was reduced in the testes. In conclusion, this is the first report characterizing the physiological roles of Uch37 and Rpn13 in murine development and implicating a non-ATPase proteasomal protein, Rpn13, in the process of gametogenesis.

  8. Proteasomal Inhibition Restores Biological Function of Mis-sense Mutated Dysferlin in Patient-derived Muscle Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azakir, Bilal A.; Di Fulvio, Sabrina; Kinter, Jochen; Sinnreich, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Dysferlin is a transmembrane protein implicated in surface membrane repair of muscle cells. Mutations in dysferlin cause the progressive muscular dystrophies Miyoshi myopathy, limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, and distal anterior compartment myopathy. Dysferlinopathies are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, and many patients with this disease harbor mis-sense mutations in at least one of their two pathogenic DYSF alleles. These patients have significantly reduced or absent dysferlin levels in skeletal muscle, suggesting that dysferlin encoded by mis-sense alleles is rapidly degraded by the cellular quality control system. We reasoned that mis-sense mutated dysferlin, if salvaged from degradation, might be biologically functional. We used a dysferlin-deficient human myoblast culture harboring the common R555W mis-sense allele and a DYSF-null allele, as well as control human myoblast cultures harboring either two wild-type or two null alleles. We measured dysferlin protein and mRNA levels, resealing kinetics of laser-induced plasmalemmal wounds, myotube formation, and cellular viability after treatment of the human myoblast cultures with the proteasome inhibitors lactacystin or bortezomib (Velcade). We show that endogenous R555W mis-sense mutated dysferlin is degraded by the proteasomal system. Inhibition of the proteasome by lactacystin or Velcade increases the levels of R555W mis-sense mutated dysferlin. This salvaged protein is functional as it restores plasma membrane resealing in patient-derived myoblasts and reverses their deficit in myotube formation. Bortezomib and lactacystin did not cause cellular toxicity at the regimen used. Our results raise the possibility that inhibition of the degradation pathway of mis-sense mutated dysferlin could be used as a therapeutic strategy for patients harboring certain dysferlin mis-sense mutations. PMID:22318734

  9. Proteasomal inhibition restores biological function of mis-sense mutated dysferlin in patient-derived muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azakir, Bilal A; Di Fulvio, Sabrina; Kinter, Jochen; Sinnreich, Michael

    2012-03-23

    Dysferlin is a transmembrane protein implicated in surface membrane repair of muscle cells. Mutations in dysferlin cause the progressive muscular dystrophies Miyoshi myopathy, limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, and distal anterior compartment myopathy. Dysferlinopathies are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, and many patients with this disease harbor mis-sense mutations in at least one of their two pathogenic DYSF alleles. These patients have significantly reduced or absent dysferlin levels in skeletal muscle, suggesting that dysferlin encoded by mis-sense alleles is rapidly degraded by the cellular quality control system. We reasoned that mis-sense mutated dysferlin, if salvaged from degradation, might be biologically functional. We used a dysferlin-deficient human myoblast culture harboring the common R555W mis-sense allele and a DYSF-null allele, as well as control human myoblast cultures harboring either two wild-type or two null alleles. We measured dysferlin protein and mRNA levels, resealing kinetics of laser-induced plasmalemmal wounds, myotube formation, and cellular viability after treatment of the human myoblast cultures with the proteasome inhibitors lactacystin or bortezomib (Velcade). We show that endogenous R555W mis-sense mutated dysferlin is degraded by the proteasomal system. Inhibition of the proteasome by lactacystin or Velcade increases the levels of R555W mis-sense mutated dysferlin. This salvaged protein is functional as it restores plasma membrane resealing in patient-derived myoblasts and reverses their deficit in myotube formation. Bortezomib and lactacystin did not cause cellular toxicity at the regimen used. Our results raise the possibility that inhibition of the degradation pathway of mis-sense mutated dysferlin could be used as a therapeutic strategy for patients harboring certain dysferlin mis-sense mutations.

  10. Functional alterations of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in motor neurons of a mouse model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheroni, Cristina; Marino, Marianna; Tortarolo, Massimo; Veglianese, Pietro; De Biasi, Silvia; Fontana, Elena; Zuccarello, Laura Vitellaro; Maynard, Christa J; Dantuma, Nico P; Bendotti, Caterina

    2009-01-01

    In familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and in rodent models of the disease, alterations in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) may be responsible for the accumulation of potentially harmful ubiquitinated proteins, leading to motor neuron death. In the spinal cord of transgenic mice expressing the familial ALS superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene mutation G93A (SOD1G93A), we found a decrease in constitutive proteasome subunits during disease progression, as assessed by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. In parallel, an increased immunoproteasome expression was observed, which correlated with a local inflammatory response due to glial activation. These findings support the existence of proteasome modifications in ALS vulnerable tissues. To functionally investigate the UPS in ALS motor neurons in vivo, we crossed SOD1G93A mice with transgenic mice that express a fluorescently tagged reporter substrate of the UPS. In double-transgenic Ub(G76V)-GFP /SOD1G93A mice an increase in Ub(G76V)-GFP reporter, indicative of UPS impairment, was detectable in a few spinal motor neurons and not in reactive astrocytes or microglia, at symptomatic stage but not before symptoms onset. The levels of reporter transcript were unaltered, suggesting that the accumulation of Ub(G76V)-GFP was due to deficient reporter degradation. In some motor neurons the increase of Ub(G76V)-GFP was accompanied by the accumulation of ubiquitin and phosphorylated neurofilaments, both markers of ALS pathology. These data suggest that UPS impairment occurs in motor neurons of mutant SOD1-linked ALS mice and may play a role in the disease progression.

  11. Basic Leucine Zipper Protein Cnc-C Is a Substrate and Transcriptional Regulator of the Drosophila 26S Proteasome▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Kristian Björk; Beskow, Anne; Lundin, Daniel; Davis, Monica M.; Young, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    While the 26S proteasome is a key proteolytic complex, little is known about how proteasome levels are maintained in higher eukaryotic cells. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Drosophila melanogaster that was used to identify transcription factors that may play a role in maintaining levels of the 26S proteasome. We used an RNAi library against 993 Drosophila transcription factor genes to identify genes whose suppression in Schneider 2 cells stabilized a ubiquitin-green fluorescent protein reporter protein. This screen identified Cnc (cap 'n’ collar [CNC]; basic region leucine zipper) as a candidate transcriptional regulator of proteasome component expression. In fact, 20S proteasome activity was reduced in cells depleted of cnc. Immunoblot assays against proteasome components revealed a general decline in both 19S regulatory complex and 20S proteasome subunits after RNAi depletion of this transcription factor. Transcript-specific silencing revealed that the longest of the seven transcripts for the cnc gene, cnc-C, was needed for proteasome and p97 ATPase production. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the role of Cnc-C in activation of transcription of genes encoding proteasome components. Expression of a V5-His-tagged form of Cnc-C revealed that the transcription factor is itself a proteasome substrate that is stabilized when the proteasome is inhibited. We propose that this single cnc gene in Drosophila resembles the ancestral gene family of mammalian nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related transcription factors, which are essential in regulating oxidative stress and proteolysis. PMID:21149573

  12. Multiple sclerosis autoantigen myelin basic protein escapes control by ubiquitination during proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogurov, Alexey; Kudriaeva, Anna; Kuzina, Ekaterina; Smirnov, Ivan; Bobik, Tatyana; Ponomarenko, Natalia; Kravtsova-Ivantsiv, Yelena; Ciechanover, Aaron; Gabibov, Alexander

    2014-06-20

    The vast majority of cellular proteins are degraded by the 26S proteasome after their ubiquitination. Here, we report that the major component of the myelin multilayered membrane sheath, myelin basic protein (MBP), is hydrolyzed by the 26S proteasome in a ubiquitin-independent manner both in vitro and in mammalian cells. As a proteasomal substrate, MBP reveals a distinct and physiologically relevant concentration range for ubiquitin-independent proteolysis. Enzymatic deimination prevents hydrolysis of MBP by the proteasome, suggesting that an abnormally basic charge contributes to its susceptibility toward proteasome-mediated degradation. To our knowledge, our data reveal the first case of a pathophysiologically important autoantigen as a ubiquitin-independent substrate of the 26S proteasome.

  13. Role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in nervous system function and disease: using C. elegans as a dissecting tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Márcio S; Duarte, Carlos B; Maciel, Patrícia

    2012-08-01

    In addition to its central roles in protein quality control, regulation of cell cycle, intracellular signaling, DNA damage response and transcription regulation, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays specific roles in the nervous system, where it contributes to precise connectivity through development, and later assures functionality by regulating a wide spectrum of neuron-specific cellular processes. Aberrations in this system have been implicated in the etiology of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we provide an updated view on the UPS and highlight recent findings concerning its role in normal and diseased nervous systems. We discuss the advantages of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans as a tool to unravel the major unsolved questions concerning this biochemical pathway and its involvement in nervous system function and dysfunction, and expose the new possibilities, using state-of-the-art techniques, to assess UPS function using this model system.

  14. Proteasomes in lungs from organ donors and patients with end-stage pulmonary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, T A; Bach, H H; Gamelli, R L; Love, R B; Majetschak, M

    2014-01-01

    Proteasomes appear to be involved in the pathophysiology of various acute and chronic lung diseases. Information on the human lung proteasome in health and disease, however, is sparse. Therefore, we studied whether end-stage pulmonary diseases are associated with alterations in lung 20S/26S proteasome content, activity and 20S subunit composition. Biopsies were obtained from donor lungs (n=7) and explanted lungs from patients undergoing lung transplantation because of end stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; n=7), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, n=7) and pulmonary sarcoidosis (n=5). 20S/26S proteasomes in lung extracts were quantified by ELISA, chymotrypsin-like proteasome peptidase activities measured and 20S proteasome beta subunits analyzed by Western blot. As compared with donor lungs, proteasome content was increased in IPF and sarcoidosis, but not in COPD. The relative distribution of free 20S and 26S proteasomes was similar; 20S proteasome was predominant in all extracts. Proteasome peptidase activities in donor and diseased lungs were indistinguishable. All extracts contained a mixed composition of inducible 20S beta immuno-subunits and their constitutive counterparts; a disease associated distribution could not be identified. A higher content of lung proteasomes in IPF and pulmonary sarcoidosis may contribute to the pathophysiology of human fibrotic lung diseases.

  15. E6AP inhibits G-CSFR turnover and functions by promoting its ubiquitin-dependent proteasome degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Stuti; Kumar, Yogesh; Thacker, Gatha; Kapoor, Isha; Lochab, Savita; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Bhatt, Madan L B; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Trivedi, Arun Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR) plays a crucial role in regulating myeloid cell survival, proliferation, and neutrophilic granulocyte precursor cells maturation. Previously, we demonstrated that Fbw7α negatively regulates G-CSFR and its downstream signaling through ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation. However, whether additional ubiquitin ligases for G-CSFR exist is not known. Identifying multiple E3 ubiquitin ligases for G-CSFR shall improve our understanding of activation and subsequent attenuation of G-CSFR signaling required for differentiation and proliferation. Here, for the first time we demonstrate that E6 associated protein (E6AP), an E3 ubiquitin ligase physically associates with G-CSFR and targets it for ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation and thereby attenuates its functions. We further show that E6AP promoted G-CSFR degradation leads to reduced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) which is required for G-CSF dependent granulocytic differentiation. More importantly, our finding shows that E6AP also targets mutant form of G-SCFR (G-CSFR-T718), frequently observed in severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) patients that very often culminate to AML, however, at a quite slower rate than wild type G-CSFR. In addition, our data showed that knockdown of E6AP restores G-CSFR and its signaling thereby promoting granulocytic differentiation. Collectively, our data demonstrates that E6AP facilitates ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of G-CSFR leading to attenuation of its downstream signaling and inhibition of granulocytic differentiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of proteasome subunit beta type 6 (PSMB6) associated with deltamethrin resistance in mosquitoes by proteomic and bioassay analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Linchun; Ye, Yuting; Sun, Haibo; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Li; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Donghui; Ma, Lei; Shen, Bo; Zhu, Changliang

    2013-01-01

    Deltamethrin (DM) insecticides are currently being promoted worldwide for mosquito control, because of the high efficacy, low mammalian toxicity and less environmental impact. Widespread and improper use of insecticides induced resistance, which has become a major obstacle for the insect-borne disease management. Resistance development is a complex and dynamic process involving many genes. To better understand the possible molecular mechanisms involved in DM resistance, a proteomic approach was employed for screening of differentially expressed proteins in DM-susceptible and -resistant mosquito cells. Twenty-seven differentially expressed proteins were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS). Four members of the ubiquitin-proteasome system were significantly elevated in DM-resistant cells, suggesting that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may play an important role in DM resistance. Proteasome subunit beta type 6 (PSMB6) is a member of 20S proteasomal subunit family, which forms the proteolytic core of 26S proteasome. We used pharmaceutical inhibitor and molecular approaches to study the contributions of PSMB6 in DM resistance: the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 and bortezomib were used to suppress the proteasomal activity and siRNA was designed to block the function of PSMB6. The results revealed that both MG-132 and bortezomib increased the susceptibility in DM-resistant cells and resistance larvae. Moreover, PSMB6 knockdown decreased cellular viability under DM treatment. Taken together, our study indicated that PSMB6 is associated with DM resistance in mosquitoes and that proteasome inhibitors such as MG-132 or bortezomib are suitable for use as a DM synergist for vector control.

  17. Identification of proteasome subunit beta type 6 (PSMB6 associated with deltamethrin resistance in mosquitoes by proteomic and bioassay analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linchun Sun

    Full Text Available Deltamethrin (DM insecticides are currently being promoted worldwide for mosquito control, because of the high efficacy, low mammalian toxicity and less environmental impact. Widespread and improper use of insecticides induced resistance, which has become a major obstacle for the insect-borne disease management. Resistance development is a complex and dynamic process involving many genes. To better understand the possible molecular mechanisms involved in DM resistance, a proteomic approach was employed for screening of differentially expressed proteins in DM-susceptible and -resistant mosquito cells. Twenty-seven differentially expressed proteins were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and mass spectrometry (MS. Four members of the ubiquitin-proteasome system were significantly elevated in DM-resistant cells, suggesting that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may play an important role in DM resistance. Proteasome subunit beta type 6 (PSMB6 is a member of 20S proteasomal subunit family, which forms the proteolytic core of 26S proteasome. We used pharmaceutical inhibitor and molecular approaches to study the contributions of PSMB6 in DM resistance: the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 and bortezomib were used to suppress the proteasomal activity and siRNA was designed to block the function of PSMB6. The results revealed that both MG-132 and bortezomib increased the susceptibility in DM-resistant cells and resistance larvae. Moreover, PSMB6 knockdown decreased cellular viability under DM treatment. Taken together, our study indicated that PSMB6 is associated with DM resistance in mosquitoes and that proteasome inhibitors such as MG-132 or bortezomib are suitable for use as a DM synergist for vector control.

  18. Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wioletta Romaniuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Proteasomes are multisubunit enzyme complexes. They contain three enzymatic active sites which are termed chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like. The elementary function of the proteasomes is degradation of damaged proteins. Proteasome inhibition leads to accumulation of damaged protein, which leads to caspase activation and cell death. This relationship is used in cancer therapy. Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib belongs to the second generation of drugs, which was approved by the US FDA in 2012. Currently in the study phase there are four new inhibitors: ixazomib (MLN9780/MLN2238, delanzomib (CEP-18770, oprozomib (ONX0912/PR-047 and marizomib (NPI-0052.

  19. Combined inhibition of proteasome and autophagy: A novel cancer therapeutic approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-xing Ding

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1 Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a major degradation system for short-lived proteins. Proteins to be degraded are labeled with ubiquitin, and the ubiquitinated proteins are degraded by the 26S proteasome complex. The degradation is thus specifically targeted to a fraction of proteins. Prompt removal of these proteins is critical to the precise and timely regulation of intracellular signaling involved in multiple cellular processes, including cell proliferation and cell death.

  20. Molecular shredders: how proteasomes fulfill their role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groll, Michael; Clausen, Tim

    2003-12-01

    The 20S proteasome is a large, cylinder-shaped protease that is found in all domains of life and plays a crucial role in cellular protein turnover. It has multiple catalytic centers located within the hollow cavity of a molecular cage. This architecture prevents unwanted degradation of endogenous proteins and promotes processive degradation of substrates by restricting the dissociation of partially digested polypeptides. Although this kind of self-compartmentalization is generally conserved, the proteasomes of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes show many differences in architecture, subunit composition and regulation. The structure of the 20S proteasome and its inherent role in the regulation of proteasome function are gradually being elucidated.

  1. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and Its Role in Inflammatory and Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingsong Wang; Michael A. Maldonado

    2006-01-01

    Protein degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome system is the major pathway of non-lysosomal proteolysis of intracellular proteins. It plays important roles in a variety of fundamental cellular processes such as regulation of cell cycle progression, division, development and differentiation, apoptosis, cell trafficking, and modulation of the immune and inflammatory responses. The central element of this system is the covalent linkage of ubiquitin to targeted proteins, which are then recognized by the 26S proteasome, an adenosine triphosphate-dependent,multi-catalytic protease. Damaged, oxidized, or misfolded proteins as well as regulatory proteins that control many critical cellular functions are among the targets of this degradation process. Aberration of this system leads to the dysregulation of cellular homeostasis and the development of multiple diseases. In this review, we described the basic biochemistry and molecular biology of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and its complex role in the development of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In addition, therapies and potential therapeutic targets related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system are discussed as well. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2006;3(4):255-261.

  2. Identification and Characterisation of a Proteasome -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine Mølgaard

    is responsible for the degradation of most intracellular proteins. To sustain its function, the proteasome is supported by a still increasing number of interacting proteins or co-factors. In the work presented here, two new proteasome interacting proteins are identified and characterised in humans...

  3. Proteasomal degradation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α is mediated by Homer-3 via the proteasomal S8 ATPase: Signal transduction and synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Khosrow; Baalman, Kelli; Teng, Yanfen; Mee, Maureen P; Dawson, Simon P; Wang, Hongmin; De Biasi, Mariella; Mayer, R John

    2012-07-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) fine-tune the efficacy of synaptic transmission. This unique feature makes mGluRs potential targets for the treatment of various CNS disorders. There is ample evidence to show that the ubiquitin proteasome system mediates changes in synaptic strength leading to multiple forms of synaptic plasticity. The present study describes a novel interaction between post-synaptic adaptors, long Homer-3 proteins, and one of the 26S proteasome regulatory subunits, the S8 ATPase, that influences the degradation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α (mGluR1α). We have shown that the two human long Homer-3 proteins specifically interact with human proteasomal S8 ATPase. We identified that mGluR1α and long Homer-3s immunoprecipitate with the 26S proteasome both in vitro and in vivo. We further found that the mGluR1α receptor can be ubiquitinated and degraded by the 26S proteasome and that Homer-3A facilitates this process. Furthermore, the siRNA mediated silencing of Homer-3 led to increased levels of total and plasma membrane-associated mGluR1α receptors. These results suggest that long Homer-3 proteins control the degradation of mGluR1α receptors by shuttling ubiquitinated mGluR-1α receptors to the 26S proteasome via the S8 ATPase which may modulate synaptic transmission.

  4. Cereblon inhibits proteasome activity by binding to the 20S core proteasome subunit beta type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Min; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2012-10-26

    In humans, mutations in the gene encoding cereblon (CRBN) are associated with mental retardation. Although CRBN has been investigated in several cellular contexts, its function remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CRBN plays a role in regulating the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Heterologous expression of CRBN inhibited proteasome activity in a human neuroblastoma cell line. Furthermore, proteasome subunit beta type 4 (PSMB4), the β7 subunit of the 20S core complex, was identified as a direct binding partner of CRBN. These findings suggest that CRBN may modulate proteasome activity by directly interacting with the β7 subunit.

  5. Selective increase of in vivo firing frequencies in DA SN neurons after proteasome inhibition in the ventral midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Mahalakshmi; Kern, Beatrice; Vogel, Simone; Klose, Verena; Schneider, Gaby; Roeper, Jochen

    2014-09-01

    The impairment of protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is present in sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), and might play a key role in selective degeneration of vulnerable dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN). Further evidence for a causal role of dysfunctional UPS in familial PD comes from mutations in parkin, which results in a loss of function of an E3-ubiquitin-ligase. In a mouse model, genetic inactivation of an essential component of the 26S proteasome lead to widespread neuronal degeneration including DA midbrain neurons and the formation of alpha-synuclein-positive inclusion bodies, another hallmark of PD. Studies using pharmacological UPS inhibition in vivo had more mixed results, varying from extensive degeneration to no loss of DA SN neurons. However, it is currently unknown whether UPS impairment will affect the neurophysiological functions of DA midbrain neurons. To answer this question, we infused a selective proteasome inhibitor into the ventral midbrain in vivo and recorded single DA midbrain neurons 2 weeks after the proteasome challenge. We found a selective increase in the mean in vivo firing frequencies of identified DA SN neurons in anesthetized mice, while those in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were unaffected. Our results demonstrate that a single-hit UPS inhibition is sufficient to induce a stable and selective hyperexcitability phenotype in surviving DA SN neurons in vivo. This might imply that UPS dysfunction sensitizes DA SN neurons by enhancing 'stressful pacemaking'.

  6. Interplay between Molecular Chaperones and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Targeting of Misfolded Proteins for Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben Guldahl

    interacting with purified 26S proteasomes, and the subsequent characterization of two novel proteasome interacting proteins. The third study was aimed at analyzing the chaperone-assisted pathway leading to degradation of misfolded kinetochore proteins in S. pombe. In this study chaperones, E2s, E3s and DUBs...

  7. Subunit-selective proteasome activity profiling uncovers uncoupled proteasome subunit activities during bacterial infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Misas-villamil, Johana C.; Burgh, Van Der Aranka M.; Grosse-holz, Friederike; Bach-pages, Marcel; Kovács, Judit; Kaschani, Farnusch; Schilasky, Sören; Emon, Asif E.K.; Ruben, Mark; Kaiser, Markus; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; Hoorn, van der Renier A.L.

    2017-01-01

    The proteasome is a nuclear-cytoplasmic proteolytic complex involved in nearly all regulatory pathways in plant cells. The three different catalytic activities of the proteasome can have different functions, but tools to monitor and control these subunits selectively are not yet available in plant

  8. PaCS Is a Novel Cytoplasmic Structure Containing Functional Proteasome and Inducible by Cytokines/Trophic Factors

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A variety of ubiquitinated protein-containing cytoplasmic structures has been reported, from aggresomes to aggresome-like induced structures/sequestosomes or particle-rich cytoplasmic structures (PaCSs) that we recently observed in some human diseases. Nevertheless, the morphological and cytochemical patterns of the different structures remain largely unknown thus jeopardizing their univocal identification. Here, we show that PaCSs resulted from proteasome and polyubiquitinated protein accumu...

  9. Regulation of the Response to Radiotherapy and Hyperthermia in Prostate Cancer by the 26s Proteasome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    and hair follicles, undergo rapid ’interphase death’ within hours of irradiation. Interphase death is now acknowledged to represent rapid apoptosis...any. Gynaecomastia caused by HAART has been reported Received: 10 January 2002;’acc ted: 15 January 2002. for several drugs, e.g. efavirenz

  10. PaCS is a novel cytoplasmic structure containing functional proteasome and inducible by cytokines/trophic factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Sommi

    Full Text Available A variety of ubiquitinated protein-containing cytoplasmic structures has been reported, from aggresomes to aggresome-like induced structures/sequestosomes or particle-rich cytoplasmic structures (PaCSs that we recently observed in some human diseases. Nevertheless, the morphological and cytochemical patterns of the different structures remain largely unknown thus jeopardizing their univocal identification. Here, we show that PaCSs resulted from proteasome and polyubiquitinated protein accumulation into well-demarcated, membrane-free, cytoskeleton-poor areas enriched in glycogen and glycosaminoglycans. A major requirement for PaCS detection by either electron or confocal microscopy was the addition of osmium to aldehyde fixatives. However, by analyzing living cells, we found that proteasome chymotrypsin-like activity concentrated in well-defined cytoplasmic structures identified as PaCSs by ultrastructural morphology and immunocytochemistry of the same cells. PaCSs differed ultrastructurally and cytochemically from sequestosomes which may coexist with PaCSs. In human dendritic or natural killer cells, PaCSs were induced in vitro by cytokines/trophic factors during differentiation/activation from blood progenitors. Our results provide evidence that PaCS is indeed a novel distinctive cytoplasmic structure which may play a critical role in the ubiquitin-proteasome system response to immune, infectious or proneoplastic stimuli.

  11. Inhibition of 26S protease regulatory subunit 7 (MSS1 suppresses neuroinflammation.

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    Wei Bi

    Full Text Available Recently, researchers have focused on immunosuppression induced by rifampicin. Our previous investigation found that rifampicin was neuroprotective by inhibiting the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, thereby suppressing microglial activation. In this study, using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and mass spectrometry (MS, we discovered that 26S protease regulatory subunit 7 (MSS1 was decreased in rifampicin-treated microglia. Western blot analysis verified the downregulation of MSS1 expression by rifampicin. As it is indicated that the modulation of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system (UPS with proteasome inhibitors is efficacious for the treatment of neuro-inflammatory disorders, we next hypothesized that silencing MSS1 gene expression might inhibit microglial inflammation. Using RNA interference (RNAi, we showed significant reduction of IkBα degradation and NF-kB activation. The production of lipopolysaccharides-induced pro-inflammatory mediators such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase-2, and prostaglandin E(2 were also reduced by MSS1 gene knockdown. Taken together, our findings suggested that rifampicin inhibited microglial inflammation by suppressing MSS1 protein production. Silencing MSS1 gene expression decreased neuroinflammation. We concluded that MSS1 inhibition, in addition to anti-inflammatory rifampicin, might represent a novel mechanism for the treatment of neuroinflammatory disorders.

  12. Essential function of the N-termini tails of the proteasome for the gating mechanism revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hisashi

    2014-09-01

    Proteasome is involved in the degradation of proteins. Proteasome activators bind to the proteasome core particle (CP) and facilitate opening a gate of the CP, where Tyr8 and Asp9 in the N-termini tails of the CP form the ordered open gate. In a double mutant (Tyr8Gly/Asp9Gly), the N-termini tails are disordered and the stabilized open-gate conformation cannot be formed. To understand the gating mechanism of the CP for the translocation of the substrate, four different molecular dynamics simulations were carried out: ordered- and Tyr8Gly/Asp9Gly disordered-gate models of the CP complexed with an ATP-independent PA26 and ordered- and disordered-gate models of the CP complexed with an ATP-dependent PAN-like activator. The free-energies of the translocation of a polypeptide substrate moving through the gate were estimated. In the ordered-gate models, the substrate in the activator was more stable than that in the CP. The conformational entropy of the N-termini tails of the CP was larger when the substrate was in the activator than in the CP. In the disordered-gate models, the substrate in the activator was more destabilized than in the ordered-gate models. The mutated N-termini tails became randomized and their increased conformational entropy could no longer increase further even when the substrate was in the activator, meaning the randomized N-termini tails had lost the ability to stabilize the substrate in the activator. Thus, it was concluded that the dynamics of the N-termini tails entropically play a key role in the translocation of the substrate. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Discovery of novel interacting partners of PSMD9, a proteasomal chaperone: Role of an Atypical and versatile PDZ-domain motif interaction and identification of putative functional modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangith, Nikhil; Srinivasaraghavan, Kannan; Sahu, Indrajit; Desai, Ankita; Medipally, Spandana; Somavarappu, Arun Kumar; Verma, Chandra; Venkatraman, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    PSMD9 (Proteasome Macropain non-ATPase subunit 9), a proteasomal assembly chaperone, harbors an uncharacterized PDZ-like domain. Here we report the identification of five novel interacting partners of PSMD9 and provide the first glimpse at the structure of the PDZ-domain, including the molecular details of the interaction. We based our strategy on two propositions: (a) proteins with conserved C-termini may share common functions and (b) PDZ domains interact with C-terminal residues of proteins. Screening of C-terminal peptides followed by interactions using full-length recombinant proteins, we discovered hnRNPA1 (an RNA binding protein), S14 (a ribosomal protein), CSH1 (a growth hormone), E12 (a transcription factor) and IL6 receptor as novel PSMD9-interacting partners. Through multiple techniques and structural insights, we clearly demonstrate for the first time that human PDZ domain interacts with the predicted Short Linear Sequence Motif (SLIM) at the C-termini of the client proteins. These interactions are also recapitulated in mammalian cells. Together, these results are suggestive of the role of PSMD9 in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and editing, hormone and receptor activity and protein translation. Our proof-of-principle experiments endorse a novel and quick method for the identification of putative interacting partners of similar PDZ-domain proteins from the proteome and for discovering novel functions. PMID:25009770

  14. Discovery of novel interacting partners of PSMD9, a proteasomal chaperone: Role of an Atypical and versatile PDZ-domain motif interaction and identification of putative functional modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Sangith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PSMD9 (Proteasome Macropain non-ATPase subunit 9, a proteasomal assembly chaperone, harbors an uncharacterized PDZ-like domain. Here we report the identification of five novel interacting partners of PSMD9 and provide the first glimpse at the structure of the PDZ-domain, including the molecular details of the interaction. We based our strategy on two propositions: (a proteins with conserved C-termini may share common functions and (b PDZ domains interact with C-terminal residues of proteins. Screening of C-terminal peptides followed by interactions using full-length recombinant proteins, we discovered hnRNPA1 (an RNA binding protein, S14 (a ribosomal protein, CSH1 (a growth hormone, E12 (a transcription factor and IL6 receptor as novel PSMD9-interacting partners. Through multiple techniques and structural insights, we clearly demonstrate for the first time that human PDZ domain interacts with the predicted Short Linear Sequence Motif (SLIM at the C-termini of the client proteins. These interactions are also recapitulated in mammalian cells. Together, these results are suggestive of the role of PSMD9 in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and editing, hormone and receptor activity and protein translation. Our proof-of-principle experiments endorse a novel and quick method for the identification of putative interacting partners of similar PDZ-domain proteins from the proteome and for discovering novel functions.

  15. Use of proteasome inhibitors in anticancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Schmitt

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to cellular function has brought it to the forefront in the search for new anticancer therapies. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has proven promising in targeting various human cancers. The approval of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib for clinical treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma has validated the ubiquitin-proteasome as a rational target. Bortezomib has shown positive results in clinical use but some toxicity and side effects, as well as resistance, have been observed, indicating that further development of novel, less toxic drugs is necessary. Because less toxic drugs are necessary and drug development can be expensive and time-consuming, using existing drugs that can target the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in new applications, such as cancer therapy, may be effective in expediting the regulatory process and bringing new drugs to the clinic. Toward this goal, previously approved drugs, such as disulfiram, as well as natural compounds found in common foods, such as green tea polyphenol (--EGCG and the flavonoid apigenin, have been investigated for their possible proteasome inhibitory and cell death inducing abilities. These compounds proved quite promising in preclinical studies and have now moved into clinical trials, with preliminary results that are encouraging. In addition to targeting the catalytic activity of the proteasome pathway, upstream regulators, such as the 19S regulatory cap, as well as E1, E2, and E3, are now being investigated as potential drug targets. This review outlines the development of novel proteasome inhibitors from preclinical to clinical studies, highlighting their abilities to inhibit the tumor proteasome and induce apoptosis in several human cancers.

  16. Sestrin 2 protein regulates platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (Pdgfrβ) expression by modulating proteasomal and Nrf2 transcription factor functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasovic, Ana; Kurrle, Nina; Sürün, Duran; Heidler, Juliana; Husnjak, Koraljka; Poser, Ina; Schnütgen, Frank; Scheibe, Susan; Seimetz, Michael; Jaksch, Peter; Hyman, Anthony; Weissmann, Norbert; von Melchner, Harald

    2015-04-10

    We recently identified the antioxidant protein Sestrin 2 (Sesn2) as a suppressor of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (Pdgfrβ) signaling and Pdgfrβ signaling as an inducer of lung regeneration and injury repair. Here, we identified Sesn2 and the antioxidant gene inducer nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) as positive regulators of proteasomal function. Inactivation of Sesn2 or Nrf2 induced reactive oxygen species-mediated proteasomal inhibition and Pdgfrβ accumulation. Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic HeLa and mouse embryonic stem cells stably expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged Sesn2 at nearly endogenous levels, we also showed that Sesn2 physically interacts with 2-Cys peroxiredoxins and Nrf2 albeit under different reductive conditions. Overall, we characterized a novel, redox-sensitive Sesn2/Pdgfrβ suppressor pathway that negatively interferes with lung regeneration and is up-regulated in the emphysematous lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  17. Cooperation of multiple chaperones required for the assembly of mammalian 20S proteasomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirano, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Iemura, S.;

    2006-01-01

    The 20S proteasome is a catalytic core of the 26S proteasome, a central enzyme in the degradation of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins. It is composed of 14 distinct gene products that form four stacked rings of seven subunits each, a1-7ß1-7ß1-7a1-7. It is reported that the biogenesis of mammalian 20...

  18. Ubiquitin-proteasome system involvement in Huntington’s disease

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    Zaira eOrtega

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is a genetic autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat in the huntingtin (htt gene. This triplet expansion encodes a polyglutamine stretch (polyQ in the N-terminus of the high molecular weight (348-kDa and ubiquitously expressed protein huntingtin (htt. Normal individuals have between 6 and 35 CAG triplets, while expansions longer than 40 repeats lead to HD. The onset and severity of the disease depend on the length of the polyQ tract: the longer the polyQ is, the earlier the disease begins and the more severe the symptoms are. One of the main histopathological hallmarks of HD is the presence of intraneuronal proteinaceous inclusion bodies (IBs, whose prominent and invariant feature is the presence of Ubiquitin (Ub; therefore, they can be detected with anti-ubiquitin and anti-proteasome antibodies. This, together with the observation that mutations in components of the Ubiquitin Proteasome system (UPS give rise to some neurodegenerative diseases, suggests that UPS impairment may be causative of HD. Even though the link between disrupted Ub homeostasis and protein aggregation to HD is undisputed, the functional significance of these correlations and their mechanistic implications remains unresolved. Moreover, there is no consistent evidence documenting an accompanying decrease in levels of free Ub or disruption of Ub pool dynamics in neurodegenerative disease or models thus suggesting that the Ub-conjugate accumulation may be benign and just underlie lesion in 26S function. In this chapter we will elaborate on the different studies that have been performed using different experimental approaches, in order to shed light to this matter.

  19. Proteasome inhibition enhances resistance to DNA damage via upregulation of Rpn4-dependent DNA repair genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Dmitry S; Spasskaya, Daria S; Tutyaeva, Vera V; Mironov, Alexander S; Karpov, Vadim L

    2013-09-17

    The 26S proteasome is an ATP-dependent multi-subunit protease complex and the major regulator of intracellular protein turnover and quality control. However, its role in the DNA damage response is controversial. We addressed this question in yeast by disrupting the transcriptional regulation of the PRE1 proteasomal gene. The mutant strain has decreased proteasome activity and is hyper-resistant to various DNA-damaging agents. We found that Rpn4-target genes MAG1, RAD23, and RAD52 are overexpressed in this strain due to Rpn4 stabilisation. These genes represent three different pathways of base excision, nucleotide excision and double strand break repair by homologous recombination (DSB-HR). Consistently, the proteasome mutant displays increased DSB-HR activity. Our data imply that the proteasome may have a negative role in DNA damage response.

  20. The 20S proteasome as an assembly platform for the 19S regulatory complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendil, Klaus Aksel Bjørner; Kriegenburg, Franziska; Tanaka, Keiji

    2009-01-01

    26S proteasomes consist of cylindrical 20S proteasomes with 19S regulatory complexes attached to the ends. Treatment with high concentrations of salt causes the regulatory complexes to separate into two sub-complexes, the base, which is in contact with the 20S proteasome, and the lid, which...... is the distal part of the 19S complex. Here, we describe two assembly intermediates of the human regulatory complex. One is a dimer of the two ATPase subunits, Rpt3 and Rpt6. The other is a complex of nascent Rpn2, Rpn10, Rpn11, Rpn13, and Txnl1, attached to preexisting 20S proteasomes. This early assembly...... complex does not yet contain Rpn1 or any of the ATPase subunits of the base. Thus, assembly of 19S regulatory complexes takes place on preexisting 20S proteasomes, and part of the lid is assembled before the base....

  1. Elevated proteasome capacity extends replicative lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Undine Kruegel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is characterized by the accumulation of damaged cellular macromolecules caused by declining repair and elimination pathways. An integral component employed by cells to counter toxic protein aggregates is the conserved ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS. Previous studies have described an age-dependent decline of proteasomal function and increased longevity correlates with sustained proteasome capacity in centenarians and in naked mole rats, a long-lived rodent. Proof for a direct impact of enhanced proteasome function on longevity, however, is still lacking. To determine the importance of proteasome function in yeast aging, we established a method to modulate UPS capacity by manipulating levels of the UPS-related transcription factor Rpn4. While cells lacking RPN4 exhibit a decreased non-adaptable proteasome pool, loss of UBR2, an ubiquitin ligase that regulates Rpn4 turnover, results in elevated Rpn4 levels, which upregulates UPS components. Increased UPS capacity significantly enhances replicative lifespan (RLS and resistance to proteotoxic stress, while reduced UPS capacity has opposing consequences. Despite tight transcriptional co-regulation of the UPS and oxidative detoxification systems, the impact of proteasome capacity on lifespan is independent of the latter, since elimination of Yap1, a key regulator of the oxidative stress response, does not affect lifespan extension of cells with higher proteasome capacity. Moreover, since elevated proteasome capacity results in improved clearance of toxic huntingtin fragments in a yeast model for neurodegenerative diseases, we speculate that the observed lifespan extension originates from prolonged elimination of damaged proteins in old mother cells. Epistasis analyses indicate that proteasome-mediated modulation of lifespan is at least partially distinct from dietary restriction, Tor1, and Sir2. These findings demonstrate that UPS capacity determines yeast RLS by a mechanism that is distinct

  2. The proteasome stress regulon is controlled by a pair of NAC transcription factors in arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteotoxic stress is mitigated by a variety of mechanisms, including activation of the unfolded protein response and coordinated increases in protein chaperones and activities that direct proteolysis such as the 26S proteasome. Using RNA-seq analyses combined with either chemical inhibitors or mut...

  3. Activity-based proteasome profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Nan

    2013-01-01

    The work described in this thesis is mainly focusing on setting up and application of a quantitative activity‐based proteasome profiling method. Chapter 1 provides a general introduction on the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and activity‐based proteasome profiling. Chapter 2 is a literature

  4. Lysine Ubiquitination and Acetylation of Human Cardiac 20S Proteasomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Edward; Choi, Howard JH; Ng, Dominic CM; Meyer, David; Fang, Caiyun; Li, Haomin; Wang, Ding; Zelaya, Ivette M; Yates, John R; Lam, Maggie PY

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Altered proteasome functions are associated with multiple cardiomyopathies. While the proteasome targets poly-ubiquitinated proteins for destruction, it itself is modifiable by ubiquitination. We aim to identify the exact ubiquitination sites on cardiac proteasomes and examine whether they are also subject to acetylations. Experimental design Assembled cardiac 20S proteasome complexes were purified from five human hearts with ischemic cardiomyopathy, then analyzed by high-resolution MS to identify ubiquitination and acetylation sites. We developed a library search strategy that may be used to complement database search in identifying PTM in different samples. Results We identified 63 ubiquitinated lysines from intact human cardiac 20S proteasomes. In parallel, 65 acetylated residues were also discovered, 39 of which shared with ubiquitination sites. Conclusion and clinical relevance This is the most comprehensive characterization of cardiac proteasome ubiquitination to-date. There are significant overlaps between the discovered ubiquitination and acetylation sites, permitting potential crosstalk in regulating proteasome functions. The information presented here will aid future therapeutic strategies aimed at regulating the functions of cardiac proteasomes. PMID:24957502

  5. A novel link between the proteasome pathway and the signal transduction pathway of the Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs

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    Kim Richard H

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intracellular signaling events of the Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs involve the R-Smad family members Smad1, Smad5, Smad8 and the Co-Smad, Smad4. Smads are currently considered to be DNA-binding transcriptional modulators and shown to recruit the master transcriptional co-activator CBP/p300 for transcriptional activation. SNIP1 is a recently discovered novel repressor of CBP/p300. Currently, the detailed molecular mechanisms that allow R-Smads and Co-Smad to co-operatively modulate transcription events are not fully understood. Results Here we report a novel physical and functional link between Smad1 and the 26S proteasome that contributes to Smad1- and Smad4-mediated transcriptional regulation. Smad1 forms a complex with a proteasome β subunit HsN3 and the ornithine decarboxylase antizyme (Az. The interaction is enhanced upon BMP type I receptor activation and occur prior to the incorporation of HsN3 into the mature 20S proteasome. Furthermore, BMPs trigger the translocation of Smad1, HsN3 and Az into the nucleus, where the novel CBP/p300 repressor protein SNIP1 is further recruited to Smad1/HsN3/Az complex and degraded in a Smad1-, Smad4- and Az-dependent fashion. The degradation of the CBP/p300 repressor SNIP1 is likely an essential step for Smad1-, Smad4-mediated transcriptional activation, since increased SNIP1 expression inhibits BMP-induced gene responses. Conclusions Our studies thus add two additional important functional partners of Smad1 into the signaling web of BMPs and also suggest a novel mechanism for Smad1 and Smad4 to co-modulate transcription via regulating proteasomal degradation of CBP/p300 repressor SNIP1.

  6. Proteins Directly Interacting with Mammalian 20S Proteasomal Subunits and Ubiquitin-Independent Proteasomal Degradation

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    Raúl Sánchez-Lanzas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian 20S proteasome is a heterodimeric cylindrical complex (α7β7β7α7, composed of four rings each composed of seven different α or β subunits with broad proteolytic activity. We review the mammalian proteins shown to directly interact with specific 20S proteasomal subunits and those subjected to ubiquitin-independent proteasomal degradation (UIPD. The published reports of proteins that interact with specific proteasomal subunits, and others found on interactome databases and those that are degraded by a UIPD mechanism, overlap by only a few protein members. Therefore, systematic studies of the specificity of the interactions, the elucidation of the protein regions implicated in the interactions (that may or may not be followed by degradation and competition experiments between proteins known to interact with the same proteasomal subunit, are needed. Those studies should provide a coherent picture of the molecular mechanisms governing the interactions of cellular proteins with proteasomal subunits, and their relevance to cell proteostasis and cell functioning.

  7. [Characterization of the extracellular proteasomes and its interacting proteins by iTRAQ mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaĭkova, Iu Ia; Kulichkova, V A; Ermolaeva, Iu B; Bottrill, A; Barlev, N A; Tsimokha, A S

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the extracellular proteasomes by isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantifications (iTRAQ) mass spectrometry has been carried out. Here we show a standard set of 26S proteasomal subunits in the composition of the extracellular proteasomes. Moreover, extracellular proteasomes have a number of PA200 activators, which, as previously thought, are localized in the cell nucleus. Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of subunits of the extracellular proteasomes were revealed by iTRAQ mass spectrometry. For the first time we have identified several ubiquitination and acetylation sites on subunits alpha2 (K196), alpha4 (K189 and K234), alpha6 (K217), and Rpn6 (A2). We have revealed a large number of proteasome-interacting proteins that are involved in various cell processes, such as transcription, DNA repair, translation, cytoskeletal proteins and the proteins of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Immunoblot analysis has confirmed the interactions between purified extracellular proteasomes and nine proteins which were randomly selected from the set of interacting proteins.

  8. A proteasome inhibitor confers cardioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüss, Hartmut; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Neumann, Joachim

    2002-04-01

    In several cell types, proteasome inhibitors like carbobenzoxyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-leucinal (MG132) induce the 72 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp72) and exert cell protective effects. However, data in cardiomyocytes are currently lacking. We investigated the effects of MG132 in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. MG132 time- and concentration-dependently induced Hsp72 and Hsp32 at mRNA and protein levels. Although Hsp60 mRNA was induced, Hsp60 protein levels were not altered. MG132 activated p38 MAP kinase already after 0.5 h. Hsp mRNA induction started after 2 h of MG132 treatment. Subsequently, Hsp72 and Hsp32 protein levels were increased after 4 h. SB202190, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, concentration-dependently attenuated MG132-induced Hsp72-and Hsp32-elevations (by 59% and 41%, respectively, at 1 microM SB202190). In contrast, herbimycin A, a known inductor of Hsp72 in cardiomyocytes, enhanced the MG132-induced Hsp72 and Hsp32 expression even further: additionally applied 2 microM herbimycin A induced Hsp72 and Hsp32 about 2-fold higher than 1 microM MG132 alone. MG132 (1 microM) decreased the hyperthermia- or hydrogen peroxide-induced release of lactate dehydrogenase by 45% and by 35%, respectively (P<0.05, n=5). MG132 (1 microM) prolonged the spontaneous beating time of cardiomyocytes at 46 degrees C from 5+/-2 min (control hyperthermia) to 28+/-5 min (P<0.05, n=4). Thus, inhibition of the proteasome function by MG132 protects cardiomyocytes against hyperthermic or oxidative injury. This protective effect and Hsp induction were abolished by 1 microM SB202190. Proteasome inhibition results in p38 MAP kinase-dependent induction of Hsp72 and Hsp32 and might be a novel cardioprotective modality.

  9. Sequence analysis of β-subunit genes of the 20S proteasome in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma treated with bortezomib or dexamethasone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.I. Lichter (David); H. Danaee (Hadi); M.D. Pickard (Michael); O. Tayber (Olga); M. Sintchak (Michael); H. Shi (Hongliang); P.G. Richardson (Paul Gerard); J. Cavenagh (Jamie); J. Bladé (Joan); T. Facon (Thierry); R. Niesvizky; M. Alsina (Melissa); W. Dalton (William); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); S. Lonial (Sagar); H. van de Velde (Helgi); D. Ricci (Deborah); D.-L. Esseltine (Dixie-Lee); W.L. Trepicchio (William); G. Mulligan (George); K.C. Anderson (Kenneth Carl)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractVariations within proteasome β (PSMB) genes, which encode the β subunits of the 20S proteasome, may affect proteasome function, assembly, and/or binding of proteasome inhibitors. To investigate the potential association between PSMB gene variants and treatment-emergent resistance to bort

  10. A binuclear complex constituted by diethyldithiocarbamate and copper(I) functions as a proteasome activity inhibitor in pancreatic cancer cultures and xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jinbin; Liu, Luming; Yue, Xiaoqiang; Chang, Jinjia; Shi, Weidong; Hua, Yongqiang

    2013-12-15

    It is a therapeutic strategy for cancers including pancreatic to inhibit proteasome activity. Disulfiram (DSF) may bind copper (Cu) to form a DSF-Cu complex. DSF-Cu is capable of inducing apoptosis in cancer cells by inhibiting proteasome activity. DSF is rapidly converted to diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) within bodies. Copper(II) absorbed by bodies is reduced to copper(I) when it enters cells. We found that DDTC and copper(I) could form a binuclear complex which might be entitled DDTC-Cu(I), and it had been synthesized by us in the laboratory. This study is to investigate the anticancer potential of this complex on pancreatic cancer and the possible mechanism. Pancreatic cancer cell lines, SW1990, PANC-1 and BXPC-3 were used for in vitro assays. Female athymic nude mice grown SW1990 xenografts were used as animal models. Cell counting kit-8 (cck-8) assay and flow cytometry were used for analyzing apoptosis in cells. A 20S proteasome assay kit was used in proteasome activity analysis. Western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used in tumor sample analysis. The results suggest that DDTC-Cu(I) inhibit pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and proteasome activity in vitro and in vivo. Accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, and increased p27 as well as decreased NF-κB expression were detected in tumor tissues of DDTC-Cu(I)-treated group. Our data indicates that DDTC-Cu(I) is an effective proteasome activity inhibitor with the potential to be explored as a drug for pancreatic cancer.

  11. Peptide-based proteasome inhibitors in anticancer drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micale, Nicola; Scarbaci, Kety; Troiano, Valeria; Ettari, Roberta; Grasso, Silvana; Zappalà, Maria

    2014-09-01

    The identification of the key role of the eukaryotic 26S proteasome in regulated intracellular proteolysis and its importance as a target in many pathological conditions wherein the proteasomal activity is defective (e.g., malignancies, autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, etc.) prompted several research groups to the development of specific inhibitors of this multicatalytic complex with the aim of obtaining valid drug candidates. In regard to the anticancer therapy, the peptide boronate bortezomib (Velcade®) represents the first molecule approved by FDA for the treatment of multiple myeloma in 2003 and mantle cell lymphoma in 2006. Since then, a plethora of molecules targeting the proteasome have been identified as potential anticancer agents and a few of them reached clinical trials or are already in the market (i.e., carfilzomib; Kyprolis®). In most cases, the design of new proteasome inhibitors (PIs) takes into account a proven peptide or pseudopeptide motif as a base structure and places other chemical entities throughout the peptide skeleton in such a way to create an efficacious network of interactions within the catalytic sites. The purpose of this review is to provide an in-depth look at the current state of the research in the field of peptide-based PIs, specifically those ones that might find an application as anticancer agents.

  12. Inhibition of proteasome activity, nuclear factor-KappaB translocation and cell survival by the antialcoholism drug disulfiram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövborg, Henrik; Oberg, Fredrik; Rickardson, Linda; Gullbo, Joachim; Nygren, Peter; Larsson, Rolf

    2006-03-15

    The proteasome pathway is an important target for anticancer drug development. Here, we identify the antialcoholism drug disulfiram and its analogue pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) as inhibitors of the 26S proteasome activity in a cell-based screening assay. As expected for proteasome inhibitors, these compounds also inhibited TNF-alpha-induced nuclear factor-KappaB (NF-KappaB) translocation and were cytotoxic. Disulfiram was more cytotoxic against chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells compared to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at clinically achievable concentrations. Proteasome and NF-KappaB inhibition were achieved with a potency in the same range as that of the clinically used proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Disulfiram was also able to induce accumulation of p27(Kip1) and to prolong the half-life of c-Myc, both targets for proteasome-dependent degradation. It is concluded that the previously observed antitumoral and NF-KappaB inhibiting activity of disulfiram and PDTC could be attributed to their inhibition of the 26S proteasome.

  13. The proteasome and epigenetics: zooming in on histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Svitlana V; Hegde, Ashok N

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome is a structural complex of many proteins that degrades substrates marked by covalent linkage to ubiquitin. Many years of research has shown a role for ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated proteolysis in synaptic plasticity and memory mainly in degrading synaptic, cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins. Recent work indicates that the proteasome has wider proteolytic and non-proteolytic roles in processes such as histone modifications that affect synaptic plasticity and memory. In this review, we assess the evidence gathered from neuronal as well as non-neuronal cell types regarding the function of the proteasome in positive or negative regulation of posttranslational modifications of histones, such as acetylation, methylation and ubiquitination. We discuss the critical roles of the proteasome in clearing excess histone proteins in various cellular contexts and the possible non-proteolytic functions in regulating transcription of target genes. In addition, we summarize the current literature on diverse chromatin-remodeling machineries, such as histone acetyltransferases, deacetylates, methyltransferases and demethylases, as targets for proteasomal degradation across experimental models. Lastly, we provide a perspective on how proteasomal regulation of histone modifications may modulate synaptic plasticity in the nervous system.

  14. Kinase inhibition, competitive binding and proteasomal degradation: resolving the molecular function of the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linossi, Edmond M; Nicholson, Sandra E

    2015-07-01

    The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family of proteins are key negative regulators of cytokine and growth factor signaling. They act at the receptor complex to modulate the intracellular signaling cascade, preventing excessive signaling and restoring homeostasis. This regulation is critical to the normal cessation of signaling, highlighted by the complex inflammatory phenotypes exhibited by mice deficient in SOCS1 or SOCS3. These two SOCS proteins remain the best characterized of the eight family members (CIS, SOCS1-7), and in particular, we now possess a sound understanding of the mechanism of action for SOCS3. Here, we review the mechanistic role of the SOCS proteins and identify examples where clear, definitive data have been generated and discuss areas where the information is less clear. From this functional viewpoint, we discuss how the SOCS proteins achieve exquisite and specific regulation of cytokine signaling and highlight outstanding questions regarding the function of the less well-studied SOCS family members.

  15. Detection of antibodies to the 20s proteasome by ELISA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karin Meinike; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup;

    2013-01-01

    The presence of antibodies against the 20S proteasome has been correlated with diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but no definite association has been established. In order to investigate this further, we optimized an ELISA for proteasome antibodies...... and applied it to test a total of 324 serum and plasma samples from MS patients, SLE patients, and healthy controls. Our results yield a functional and reliable assay but no correlation between the amount of proteasome antibodies present and the development of MS or SLE could be established....

  16. A binuclear complex constituted by diethyldithiocarbamate and copper(I) functions as a proteasome activity inhibitor in pancreatic cancer cultures and xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jinbin, E-mail: hanjinbin@gmail.com [Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shanghai Clinical Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences/Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Liu, Luming, E-mail: llm1010@163.com [Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Yue, Xiaoqiang [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chang, Jinjia [Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Medical Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shi, Weidong; Hua, Yongqiang [Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2013-12-15

    It is a therapeutic strategy for cancers including pancreatic to inhibit proteasome activity. Disulfiram (DSF) may bind copper (Cu) to form a DSF–Cu complex. DSF–Cu is capable of inducing apoptosis in cancer cells by inhibiting proteasome activity. DSF is rapidly converted to diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) within bodies. Copper(II) absorbed by bodies is reduced to copper(I) when it enters cells. We found that DDTC and copper(I) could form a binuclear complex which might be entitled DDTC–Cu(I), and it had been synthesized by us in the laboratory. This study is to investigate the anticancer potential of this complex on pancreatic cancer and the possible mechanism. Pancreatic cancer cell lines, SW1990, PANC-1 and BXPC-3 were used for in vitro assays. Female athymic nude mice grown SW1990 xenografts were used as animal models. Cell counting kit-8 (cck-8) assay and flow cytometry were used for analyzing apoptosis in cells. A 20S proteasome assay kit was used in proteasome activity analysis. Western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used in tumor sample analysis. The results suggest that DDTC–Cu(I) inhibit pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and proteasome activity in vitro and in vivo. Accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, and increased p27 as well as decreased NF-κB expression were detected in tumor tissues of DDTC–Cu(I)-treated group. Our data indicates that DDTC–Cu(I) is an effective proteasome activity inhibitor with the potential to be explored as a drug for pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • A new structure of DDTC–Cu(I) was reported for the first time. • DDTC–Cu(I) dissolved directly in water was for in vitro and in vivo uses. • DDTC–Cu(I) demonstrated significant anticancer effect in vitro and in vivo. • DDTC–Cu(I) is capable of inhibiting proteasome activity in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Proteasome expression and activity in cancer and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2017-03-01

    Proteasome is a multi-protein organelle that participates in cellular proteostasis by destroying damaged or short-lived proteins in an organized manner guided by the ubiquitination signal. By being in a central place in the cellular protein complement homeostasis, proteasome is involved in virtually all cell processes including decisions on cell survival or death, cell cycle, and differentiation. These processes are important also in cancer, and thus, the proteasome is an important regulator of carcinogenesis. Cancers include a variety of cells which, according to the cancer stem cell theory, descend from a small percentage of cancer stem cells, alternatively termed tumor-initiating cells. These cells constitute the subsets that have the ability to propagate the whole variety of cancer and repopulate tumors after cytostatic therapies. Proteasome plays a role in cellular processes in cancer stem cells, but it has been found to have a decreased function in them compared to the rest of cancer cells. This article will discuss the transcriptional regulation of proteasome sub-unit proteins in cancer and in particular cancer stem cells and the relationship of the proteasome with the pluripotency that is the defining characteristic of stem cells. Therapeutic opportunities that present from the understanding of the proteasome role will also be discussed.

  18. Rational Design of Proteasome Inhibitors as Antimalarial Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Chapelain, Camille; Groll, Michael

    2016-05-23

    One life, two strategies: Crucial structural differences between the human and the Plasmodium falciparum proteasomes were recently identified. A combination of cryo-EM and functional characterization enabled the design of a selective antimalarial proteasome inhibitor that shows low toxicity in the host. When used with artemisinin, this ligand offers a new approach for the efficient treatment of malaria at all stages of the parasite lifecycle.

  19. The ubiquitin-proteasome system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipankar Nandi; Pankaj Tahiliani; Anujith Kumar; Dilip Chandu

    2006-03-01

    The 2004 Nobel Prize in chemistry for the discovery of protein ubiquitination has led to the recognition of cellular proteolysis as a central area of research in biology. Eukaryotic proteins targeted for degradation by this pathway are first ‘tagged’ by multimers of a protein known as ubiquitin and are later proteolyzed by a giant enzyme known as the proteasome. This article recounts the key observations that led to the discovery of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In addition, different aspects of proteasome biology are highlighted. Finally, some key roles of the UPS in different areas of biology and the use of inhibitors of this pathway as possible drug targets are discussed.

  20. A novel combination treatment for breast cancer cells involving BAPTA-AM and proteasome inhibitor bortezomib

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa/binding immunoglobulin protein (GRP78/BIP) is a well-known endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein regulating ER stress by facilitating protein folding, assembly and Ca2+ binding. GRP78 is also a member of the heat shock protein 70 gene family and induces tumor cell survival and resistance to chemotherapeutics. Bortezomib is a highly specific 26S proteasome inhibitor that has been approved as treatment for patients with multiple myeloma. The present study...

  1. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of proteasome inhibition in multiple myeloma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Ge

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib represents an important advance in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM. Bortezomib inhibits the activity of the 26S proteasome and induces cell death in a variety of tumor cells; however, the mechanism of cytotoxicity is not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the differential phosphoproteome upon proteasome inhibition by using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC in combination with phosphoprotein enrichment and LC-MS/MS analysis. In total 233 phosphoproteins were identified and 72 phosphoproteins showed a 1.5-fold or greater change upon bortezomib treatment. The phosphoproteins with expression alterations encompass all major protein classes, including a large number of nucleic acid binding proteins. Site-specific phosphopeptide quantitation revealed that Ser38 phosphorylation on stathmin increased upon bortezomib treatment, suggesting new mechanisms associated to bortezomib-induced apoptosis in MM cells. Further studies demonstrated that stathmin phosphorylation profile was modified in response to bortezomib treatment and the regulation of stathmin by phosphorylation at specific Ser/Thr residues participated in the cellular response induced by bortezomib. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our systematic profiling of phosphorylation changes in response to bortezomib treatment not only advanced the global mechanistic understanding of the action of bortezomib on myeloma cells but also identified previously uncharacterized signaling proteins in myeloma cells.

  2. Proteasome Inhibition Promotes Parkin-Ubc13 Interaction and Lysine 63-Linked Ubiquitination

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, which normally identifies and degrades unwanted intracellular proteins, is thought to underlie neurodegeneration. Supporting this, mutations of Parkin, a ubiquitin ligase, are associated with autosomal recessive parkinsonism. Remarkably, Parkin can protect neurons against a wide spectrum of stress, including those that promote proteasome dysfunction. Although the mechanism underlying the preservation of proteasome function by Parkin is hitherto u...

  3. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Andrew Rodriguez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24mg/kg (14 ppm rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome.

  4. The capture proteasome assay (CAPA) to evaluate subtype-specific proteasome inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Nathalie; Abi Habib, Joanna; Van den Eynde, Benoît J

    2015-09-01

    We recently developed a new assay to measure proteasome activity in vitro (CAPA for capture proteasome assay) [1], based on proteasome capture on an antibody-coated plate. When used with lysates originating from cells expressing either standard proteasome, immunoproteasome or intermediate proteasomes β5i or β1i-β5i, this assay allows the individual monitoring of the chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like and caspase-like activities of the corresponding proteasome subtypes. The efficiency and specificity of four proteasome inhibitors were studied using the CAPA assay, demonstrating the potential of this assay for the development of subtype-specific proteasome inhibitors.

  5. Evidence for an Independent 26-s Microseismic Source near the Vanuatu Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangfang; Ni, Sidao

    2014-09-01

    The 26 s peak in the ambient seismic noise spectrum is persistently excited and observed at stations globally. Using noise cross-correlation functions (NCFs), the location suggests that the source could be situated in the Gulf of Guinea and Fiji Basin. However, the Fiji Basin was proposed to be the mirror site (near antipode) of the Gulf of Guinea source instead of an independent source, assuming that the surface waves more efficiently propagate along the major-arc paths of oceanic movements. To investigate the propagation of the Rayleigh waves along continental and oceanic paths, we analyzed the surface wave data recorded from an earthquake near the Gulf of Guinea and found that Rayleigh waves travel along continental minor-arc paths more efficiently than along oceanic major-arc paths. We then located the source in the western Pacific Ocean from group velocities measured with earthquake data by using the travel time misfit in NCFs after calibration and concluded that the source is in the Vanuatu Islands. Moreover, the temporal variation of the 26 s microseismic peak observed in the western Pacific seismic stations is very different from that in stations near the Gulf of Guinea, which suggests that they are excited by independent sources. Therefore, the Vanuatu source should be an independent microseismic source. As it is close to volcanoes in the Vanuatu islands, the Pacific 26 s microseismic source might be excited by magmatic processes, which are also responsible for very-long-period volcanic tremors.

  6. Relative Contribution of Prolyl Hydroxylase-Dependent and -Independent Degradation of HIF-1alpha by Proteasomal Pathways in Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomna Badawi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is a key regulator in hypoxia and can determine the fate of brain cells during ischemia. However, the mechanism of HIF-1 regulation is still not fully understood in ischemic brains. We tested a hypothesis that both the 26S and the 20S proteasomal pathways were involved in HIF-1α degradation under ischemic conditions. Using in vitro ischemic model (oxygen and glucose deprivation and a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion, we tested effects of inhibitors of proteasomes and prolyl hydroxylase (PHD on HIF-1α stability and brain injury in cerebral ischemia. We observed that 30 and 60 min of oxygen-glucose deprivation significantly increased the 20S proteasomal activity. We demonstrated that proteasome inhibitors increased HIF-1α stabilization and cell viability and were more effective than PHD inhibitors in primary cultured cortical neurons exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation. Furthermore, the administration of the proteasome inhibitor, epoxomicin, to mice resulted in smaller infarct size and brain edema than a PHD inhibitor. Our results indicate that 20S proteasomes are involved in HIF-1α degradation in ischemic neurons and that proteasomal inhibition provides more HIF-1α stabilization and neuroprotection than PHD inhibition in cerebral ischemia.

  7. Involvement of Proteasome and Macrophages M2 in the Protection Afforded by Telmisartan against the Acute Myocardial Infarction in Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Di Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the involvement of proteasome and macrophages M2 in the protection afforded by telmisartan against the acute myocardial infarction in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rats with metabolic syndrome. ZDF rats were treated for three weeks with telmisartan at doses of 7 and 12 mg/kg/day. After treatment, rats were subjected to a 25 min occlusion of the left descending coronary artery followed by 2 h reperfusion (I/R. At the end of the I/R period, biochemical, immunohistochemical, and echocardiographic evaluations were done. Telmisartan treatment (7 mg/kg and 12 mg/kg reduced the myocardial infarct size, the expression of proteasome subunits 20S and 26S, and the protein ubiquitin within the heart. The compound has led to an increased M2 macrophage phenotype within the cardiac specimens and a modification of the cardiac cytokine and chemokine profile. This was functionally translated in improved cardiac performance as evidenced by echography after 2 h reperfusion. 7 mg/kg/day telmisartan was sufficient to improve the left ventricular ejection fraction LVEF of the rat heart recorded after I/R (e.g., vehicle 38 ± 2.2%; telmisartan 54 ± 2.7% and was sufficient to improve the diastolic function and the myocardial performance index up to values of 0.6 ± 0.01 measured after I/R.

  8. Involvement of Proteasome and Macrophages M2 in the Protection Afforded by Telmisartan against the Acute Myocardial Infarction in Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats with Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Filippo, C.; Rossi, C.; Ferraro, B.; Maisto, R.; De Angelis, A.; Ferraraccio, F.; Rotondo, A.; D'Amico, M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the involvement of proteasome and macrophages M2 in the protection afforded by telmisartan against the acute myocardial infarction in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats with metabolic syndrome. ZDF rats were treated for three weeks with telmisartan at doses of 7 and 12 mg/kg/day. After treatment, rats were subjected to a 25 min occlusion of the left descending coronary artery followed by 2 h reperfusion (I/R). At the end of the I/R period, biochemical, immunohistochemical, and echocardiographic evaluations were done. Telmisartan treatment (7 mg/kg and 12 mg/kg) reduced the myocardial infarct size, the expression of proteasome subunits 20S and 26S, and the protein ubiquitin within the heart. The compound has led to an increased M2 macrophage phenotype within the cardiac specimens and a modification of the cardiac cytokine and chemokine profile. This was functionally translated in improved cardiac performance as evidenced by echography after 2 h reperfusion. 7 mg/kg/day telmisartan was sufficient to improve the left ventricular ejection fraction LVEF of the rat heart recorded after I/R (e.g., vehicle 38 ± 2.2%; telmisartan 54 ± 2.7%) and was sufficient to improve the diastolic function and the myocardial performance index up to values of 0.6 ± 0.01 measured after I/R. PMID:25110402

  9. Proteasome Inhibition Suppresses Dengue Virus Egress in Antibody Dependent Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milly M Choy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV is a cause of significant global health burden, with an estimated 390 million infections occurring annually. However, no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatment for dengue is available. DENV interacts with host cell factors to complete its life cycle although this virus-host interplay remains to be fully elucidated. Many studies have identified the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP to be important for successful DENV production, but how the UPP contributes to DENV life cycle as host factors remains ill defined. We show here that proteasome inhibition decouples infectious virus production from viral RNA replication in antibody-dependent infection of THP-1 cells. Molecular and imaging analyses in β-lactone treated THP-1 cells suggest that proteasome function does not prevent virus assembly but rather DENV egress. Intriguingly, the licensed proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, is able to inhibit DENV titers at low nanomolar drug concentrations for different strains of all four serotypes of DENV in primary monocytes. Furthermore, bortezomib treatment of DENV-infected mice inhibited the spread of DENV in the spleen as well as the overall pathological changes. Our findings suggest that preventing DENV egress through proteasome inhibition could be a suitable therapeutic strategy against dengue.

  10. Targeting proteasome ubiquitin receptor Rpn13 in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y; Ray, A; Li, S; Das, D S; Tai, Y T; Carrasco, R D; Chauhan, D; Anderson, K C

    2016-09-01

    Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is an effective therapy for relapsed and newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM); however, dose-limiting toxicities and the development of resistance can limit its long-term utility. Recent research has focused on targeting ubiquitin receptors upstream of 20S proteasome, with the aim of generating less toxic therapies. Here we show that 19S proteasome-associated ubiquitin receptor Rpn13 is more highly expressed in MM cells than in normal plasma cells. Rpn13-siRNA (small interfering RNA) decreases MM cell viability. A novel agent RA190 targets Rpn13 and inhibits proteasome function, without blocking the proteasome activity or the 19S deubiquitylating activity. CRISPR/Cas9 Rpn13-knockout demonstrates that RA190-induced activity is dependent on Rpn13. RA190 decreases viability in MM cell lines and patient MM cells, inhibits proliferation of MM cells even in the presence of bone marrow stroma and overcomes bortezomib resistance. Anti-MM activity of RA190 is associated with induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis and unfolded protein response-related apoptosis. MM xenograft model studies show that RA190 is well tolerated, inhibits tumor growth and prolongs survival. Combining RA190 with bortezomib, lenalidomide or pomalidomide induces synergistic anti-MM activity. Our preclinical data validates targeting Rpn13 to overcome bortezomib resistance, and provides the framework for clinical evaluation of Rpn13 inhibitors, alone or in combination, to improve patient outcome in MM.

  11. Radiosensitizing effect of PSMC5, a 19S proteasome ATPase, in H460 lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Ji-Hye [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 01812 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Hong Shik [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 01812 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Life Science, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jae [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Jeong-Hwa [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 01812 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Woo [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ji-Young; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, In-Chul [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 01812 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sang-Gu, E-mail: sgh63@kcch.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 01812 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-01

    The function of PSMC5 (proteasome 26S subunit, ATPase 5) in tumors, particularly with respect to cancer radioresistance, is not known. Here, we identified PSMC5 as a novel radiosensitivity biomarker, demonstrating that radiosensitive H460 cells were converted to a radioresistance phenotype by PSMC5 depletion. Exposure of H460 cells to radiation induced a marked accumulation of cell death-promoting reactive oxygen species, but this effect was blocked in radiation-treated H460 PSMC5-knockdown cells through downregulation of the p53-p21 pathway. Interestingly, PSMC5 depletion in H460 cells enhanced both AKT activation and MDM2 transcription, thereby promoting the degradation of p53 and p21 proteins. Furthermore, specific inhibition of AKT with triciribine or knockdown of MDM2 with small interfering RNA largely restored p21 expression in PSMC5-knockdown H460 cells. Our data suggest that PSMC5 facilitates the damaging effects of radiation in radiation-responsive H460 cancer cells and therefore may serve as a prognostic indicator for radiotherapy and molecular targeted therapy in lung cancer patients. - Highlights: • PSMC5 is a radiation-sensitive biomarker in H460 cells. • PSMC5 depletion inhibits radiation-induced apoptosis in H460 cells. • PSMC5 knockdown blocks ROS generation through inhibition of the p53-p21 pathway. • PSMC5 knockdown enhances p21 degradation via AKT-dependent MDM2 stabilization.

  12. Sperm proteasomes degrade sperm receptor on the egg zona pellucida during mammalian fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn W Zimmerman

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research, the mechanism by which the fertilizing spermatozoon penetrates the mammalian vitelline membrane, the zona pellucida (ZP remains one of the unexplained fundamental events of human/mammalian development. Evidence has been accumulating in support of the 26S proteasome as a candidate for echinoderm, ascidian and mammalian egg coat lysin. Monitoring ZP protein degradation by sperm during fertilization is nearly impossible because those few spermatozoa that penetrate the ZP leave behind a virtually untraceable residue of degraded proteins. We have overcome this hurdle by designing an experimentally consistent in vitro system in which live boar spermatozoa are co-incubated with ZP-proteins (ZPP solubilized from porcine oocytes. Using this assay, mimicking sperm-egg interactions, we demonstrate that the sperm-borne proteasomes can degrade the sperm receptor protein ZPC. Upon coincubation with motile spermatozoa, the solubilized ZPP, which appear to be ubiquitinated, adhered to sperm acrosomal caps and induced acrosomal exocytosis/formation of the acrosomal shroud. The degradation of the sperm receptor protein ZPC was assessed by Western blotting band-densitometry and proteomics. A nearly identical pattern of sperm receptor degradation, evident already within the first 5 min of coincubation, was observed when the spermatozoa were replaced with the isolated, enzymatically active, sperm-derived proteasomes. ZPC degradation was blocked by proteasomal inhibitors and accelerated by ubiquitin-aldehyde(UBAL, a modified ubiquitin protein that stimulates proteasomal proteolysis. Such a degradation pattern of ZPC is consistent with in vitro fertilization studies, in which proteasomal inhibitors completely blocked fertilization, and UBAL increased fertilization and polyspermy rates. Preincubation of intact zona-enclosed ova with isolated active sperm proteasomes caused digestion, abrasions and loosening of the exposed zonae, and

  13. Sperm proteasomes degrade sperm receptor on the egg zona pellucida during mammalian fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Shawn W; Manandhar, Gaurishankar; Yi, Young-Joo; Gupta, Satish K; Sutovsky, Miriam; Odhiambo, John F; Powell, Michael D; Miller, David J; Sutovsky, Peter

    2011-02-23

    Despite decades of research, the mechanism by which the fertilizing spermatozoon penetrates the mammalian vitelline membrane, the zona pellucida (ZP) remains one of the unexplained fundamental events of human/mammalian development. Evidence has been accumulating in support of the 26S proteasome as a candidate for echinoderm, ascidian and mammalian egg coat lysin. Monitoring ZP protein degradation by sperm during fertilization is nearly impossible because those few spermatozoa that penetrate the ZP leave behind a virtually untraceable residue of degraded proteins. We have overcome this hurdle by designing an experimentally consistent in vitro system in which live boar spermatozoa are co-incubated with ZP-proteins (ZPP) solubilized from porcine oocytes. Using this assay, mimicking sperm-egg interactions, we demonstrate that the sperm-borne proteasomes can degrade the sperm receptor protein ZPC. Upon coincubation with motile spermatozoa, the solubilized ZPP, which appear to be ubiquitinated, adhered to sperm acrosomal caps and induced acrosomal exocytosis/formation of the acrosomal shroud. The degradation of the sperm receptor protein ZPC was assessed by Western blotting band-densitometry and proteomics. A nearly identical pattern of sperm receptor degradation, evident already within the first 5 min of coincubation, was observed when the spermatozoa were replaced with the isolated, enzymatically active, sperm-derived proteasomes. ZPC degradation was blocked by proteasomal inhibitors and accelerated by ubiquitin-aldehyde(UBAL), a modified ubiquitin protein that stimulates proteasomal proteolysis. Such a degradation pattern of ZPC is consistent with in vitro fertilization studies, in which proteasomal inhibitors completely blocked fertilization, and UBAL increased fertilization and polyspermy rates. Preincubation of intact zona-enclosed ova with isolated active sperm proteasomes caused digestion, abrasions and loosening of the exposed zonae, and significantly reduced

  14. Disulfiram promotes the conversion of carcinogenic cadmium to a proteasome inhibitor with pro-apoptotic activity in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lihua; Yang, Huanjie; Chen, Di; Cui, Cindy; Dou, Q Ping

    2008-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is involved in various cellular processes, including transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies suggest the potential use of proteasome inhibitors as anticancer drugs. Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental pollutant that has been classified as a human carcinogen. Recent study in our laboratory suggested that the clinically used anti-alcoholism drug disulfiram (DSF) could form a complex with tumor cellular copper, resulting in inhibition of the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity and induction of cancer cell apoptosis. In the current study, we report, for the first time, that DSF is able to convert the carcinogen Cd to a proteasome-inhibitor and cancer cell apoptosis inducer. Although the DSF-Cd complex inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC(50) value of 32 micromol/L, this complex was much more potent in inhibiting the chymotrypsin-like activity of prostate cancer cellular 26S proteasome. Inhibition of cellular proteasome activity by the DSF-Cd complex resulted in the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the natural proteasome substrate p27, which was followed by activation of calpain and induction of apoptosis. Importantly, human breast cancer MCF10DCIS cells were much more sensitive to the DSF-Cd treatment than immortalized but non-tumorigenic human breast MCF-10A cells, demonstrating that the DSF-Cd complex could selectively induce proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in human tumor cells. Our work suggests the potential use of DSF for treatment of cells with accumulated levels of carcinogen Cd.

  15. Proteasome Inhibitors with Photocontrolled Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Mickel J.; Velema, Willem A.; de Bruin, Gerjan; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Feringa, Ben L.

    2014-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors are widely used in cancer treatment as chemotherapeutic agents. However, their employment often results in severe side effects, due to their non-specific cytotoxicity towards healthy tissue. This problem might be overcome by using a photopharmacological approach, that is, by

  16. Prolonged Proteasome Inhibition Cyclically Upregulates Oct3/4 and Nanog Gene Expression, but Reduces Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Colony Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Elizabeth Z.; Staszkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Power, Rachel A.; Kilroy, Gail; Kirk-Ballard, Heather; Barnes, Christian W.; Strickler, Karen L.; Rim, Jong S.; Harkins, Lettie L.; Gao, Ru; Kim, Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is ample evidence that the ubiquitin–proteasome system is an important regulator of transcription and its activity is necessary for maintaining pluripotency and promoting cellular reprogramming. Moreover, proteasome activity contributes to maintaining the open chromatin structure found in pluripotent stem cells, acting as a transcriptional inhibitor at specific gene loci generally associated with differentiation. The current study was designed to understand further the role of proteasome inhibition in reprogramming and its ability to modulate endogenous expression of pluripotency-related genes and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) colony formation. Herein, we demonstrate that acute combinatorial treatment with the proteasome inhibitors MG101 or MG132 and the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) increases gene expression of the pluripotency marker Oct3/4, and that MG101 alone is as effective as VPA in the induction of Oct3/4 mRNA expression in fibroblasts. Prolonged proteasome inhibition cyclically upregulates gene expression of Oct3/4 and Nanog, but reduces colony formation in the presence of the iPSC induction cocktail. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the 26S proteasome is an essential modulator in the reprogramming process. Its inhibition enhances expression of pluripotency-related genes; however, efficient colony formation requires proteasome activity. Therefore, discovery of small molecules that increase proteasome activity might lead to more efficient cell reprogramming and generation of pluripotent cells. PMID:25826722

  17. 20S proteasome activation promotes life span extension and resistance to proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Georgila, Konstantina; Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Gonos, Efstathios S

    2015-02-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is one of the nodal points that need to be preserved to retain physiologic cellular/organismal balance. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the removal of both normal and damaged proteins, with the proteasome being the downstream effector. The proteasome is the major cellular protease with progressive impairment of function during aging and senescence. Despite the documented age-retarding properties of proteasome activation in various cellular models, simultaneous enhancement of the 20S core proteasome content, assembly, and function have never been reported in any multicellular organism. Consequently, the possible effects of the core proteasome modulation on organismal life span are elusive. In this study, we have achieved activation of the 20S proteasome at organismal level. We demonstrate enhancement of proteasome levels, assembly, and activity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, resulting in life span extension and increased resistance to stress. We also provide evidence that the observed life span extension is dependent on the transcriptional activity of Dauer formation abnormal/Forkhead box class O (DAF-16/FOXO), skinhead-1 (SKN-1), and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) factors through regulation of downstream longevity genes. We further show that the reported beneficial effects are not ubiquitous but they are dependent on the genetic context. Finally, we provide evidence that proteasome core activation might be a potential strategy to minimize protein homeostasis deficiencies underlying aggregation-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that 20S core proteasome up-regulation in terms of both content and activity is feasible in a multicellular eukaryotic organism and that in turn this modulation promotes extension of organismal health span and life span.

  18. Disulfiram promotes the conversion of carcinogenic cadmium to a proteasome inhibitor with pro-apoptotic activity in human cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lihua; Yang, Huanjie; Chen, Di; Cui, Cindy; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitinproteasome system is involved in various cellular processes, including transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies suggest the potential use of proteasome inhibitors as anticancer drugs. Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental pollutant that has been classified as a human carcinogen. Recent study in our laboratory suggested that the clinically used anti-alcoholism drug disulfiram (DSF) could form a complex with tumor cellular copper, resulting in inhibition of the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity and induction of cancer cell apoptosis. In the current study, we report, for the first time, that DSF is able to convert the carcinogen Cd to a proteasome-inhibitor and cancer cell apoptosis inducer. Although the DSF–Cd complex inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC50 value of 32 μmol/L, this complex was much more potent in inhibiting the chymotrypsin-like activity of prostate cancer cellular 26S proteasome. Inhibition of cellular proteasome activity by the DSF–Cd complex resulted in the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the natural proteasome substrate p27, which was followed by activation of calpain and induction of apoptosis. Importantly, human breast cancer MCF10DCIS cells were much more sensitive to the DSF–Cd treatment than immortalized but non-tumorigenic human breast MCF-10A cells, demonstrating that the DSF–Cd complex could selectively induce proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in human tumor cells. Our work suggests the potential use of DSF for treatment of cells with accumulated levels of carcinogen Cd. PMID:18304598

  19. The proteasomal subunit Rpn6 is a molecular clamp holding the core and regulatory subcomplexes together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, Ganesh Ramnath; Nagy, István; Bohn, Stefan; Unverdorben, Pia; Hubert, Agnes; Körner, Roman; Nickell, Stephan; Lasker, Keren; Sali, Andrej; Tamura, Tomohiro; Nishioka, Taiki; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Bracher, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Proteasomes execute the degradation of most cellular proteins. Although the 20S core particle (CP) has been studied in great detail, the structure of the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which prepares ubiquitylated substrates for degradation, has remained elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of one of the RP subunits, Rpn6, and we describe its integration into the cryo-EM density map of the 26S holocomplex at 9.1 Å resolution. Rpn6 consists of an α-solenoid-like fold and a proteasome COP9/signalosome eIF3 (PCI) module in a right-handed suprahelical configuration. Highly conserved surface areas of Rpn6 interact with the conserved surfaces of the Pre8 (alpha2) and Rpt6 subunits from the alpha and ATPase rings, respectively. The structure suggests that Rpn6 has a pivotal role in stabilizing the otherwise weak interaction between the CP and the RP.

  20. The role of the proteasome for therapy of incurable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Bubko

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Proteins constitute the basic building elements of living organisms. Proteins have a limited lifetime in a cell. The so called “half-life period” of proteins is diverse and lasts from several minutes to several days. Regulatory proteins appear in a cell for a definite time and are short-lived. The proteins responsible for basic cell functions are stable and long-lived. Once their functions are fulfilled or because of their surfeit or damage, proteins are eliminated by degradation. Transformation processes of proteins are precisely controlled. There is also a strict association between protein metabolism and the energetic state of a cell. The main proteolytic cell systems are lysosomal and proteasome ones. The first (lysosomes function in a simple and transparent way. The second system (proteasomes is highly organized; by using ubiquitin it delivers “molecular label” and sends a marked protein for degradation. Efficient degradation of cellular proteins by the UPS route (ubiquitin – proteasome system is essential for signal transduction, transcription adjustment, response to stress and control of receptors’ activity. The dysfunction of the UPS route is crucial in the development of tumors, neurodegenerative diseases and diseases of immunological and infectious origin. Therefore, it is a challenge to elaborate methods of pharmacological intervention within this system involving, for example, the use of specific, low molecular-weight proteasome inhibitors and enzymes catalyzing the ubiquitination process. The article presents a review of advances in the field, including description of the lysosomal protein degradation route, proteasome model, and the phenomenon of protein aggregation. The summary of the experience on applied therapies, which use the processes of protein degradation as a basis, were also presented.

  1. Inhibition of the host proteasome facilitates papaya ringspot virus accumulation and proteosomal catalytic activity is modulated by viral factor HcPro.

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    Nandita Sahana

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system plays an essential role not only in maintaining protein turnover, but also in regulating many other plant responses, including plant-pathogen interactions. Previous studies highlighted different roles of the 20S proteasome in plant defense during virus infection, either indirectly through viral suppressor-mediated degradation of Argonaute proteins, affecting the RNA interference pathway, or directly through modulation of the proteolytic and RNase activity of the 20S proteasome, a component of the 20S proteasome, by viral proteins, affecting the levels of viral proteins and RNAs. Here we show that MG132, a cell permeable proteasomal inhibitor, caused an increase in papaya ringspot virus (PRSV accumulation in its natural host papaya (Carica papaya. We also show that the PRSV HcPro interacts with the papaya homologue of the Arabidopsis PAA (α1 subunit of the 20S proteasome, but not with the papaya homologue of Arabidopsis PAE (α5 subunit of the 20S proteasome, associated with the RNase activity, although the two 20S proteasome subunits interacted with each other. Mutated forms of PRSV HcPro showed that the conserved KITC54 motif in the N-terminal domain of HcPro was necessary for its binding to PAA. Co-agroinfiltration assays demonstrated that HcPro expression mimicked the action of MG132, and facilitated the accumulation of bothtotal ubiquitinated proteins and viral/non-viral exogenous RNA in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. These effects were not observed by using an HcPro mutant (KITS54, which impaired the HcPro - PAA interaction. Thus, the PRSV HcPro interacts with a proteasomal subunit, inhibiting the action of the 20S proteasome, suggesting that HcPro might be crucial for modulating its catalytic activities in support of virus accumulation.

  2. The Proteasome Inhibitor MG-132 Protects Hypoxic SiHa Cervical Carcinoma Cells after Cyclic Hypoxia/Reoxygenation from Ionizing Radiation

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    Frank Pajonk

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Transient hypoxia and subsequent reoxygenation are common phenomena in solid tumors that greatly influence the outcome of radiation therapy. This study was designed to determine how varying cycles of hypoxia/reoxygenation affect the response of cervical carcinoma cells irradiated under oxic and hypoxic conditions and whether this could be modulated by proteasome inhibition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Plateau-phase SiHa cervical carcinoma cells in culture were exposed to varying numbers of 30-minute cycles of hypoxia/reoxygenation directly before irradiation under oxic or hypoxic conditions. 26S Proteasome activity was blocked by addition of MG-132. Clonogenic survival was measured by a colonyforming assay. RESULTS: Under oxic conditions, repeated cycles of hypoxia/reoxygenation decreased the clonogenic survival of SiHa cells. This effect was even more pronounced after the inhibition of 26S proteasome complex. In contrast, under hypoxic conditions, SiHa cells were radioresistant, as expected, but this was increased by proteasome inhibition. CONCLUSIONS: Proteasome inhibition radiosensitizes oxygenated tumor cells but may also protect tumor cells from ionizing radiation under certain hypoxic conditions.

  3. Proteasome inhibitor treatment in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fawzia Bardag-Gorce

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress, generated by chronic ethanol consumption, is a major cause of hepatotoxicity and liver injury. Increased production of oxygen-derived free radicals due to ethanol metabolism by CYP2E1 is principally located in the cytoplasm and in the mitochondria, which does not only injure liver cells, but also other vital organs, such as the heart and the brain. Therefore, there is a need for better treatment to enhance the antioxidant response elements. To date, there is no established treatment to attenuate high levels of oxidative stress in the liver of alcoholic patients. To block this oxidative stress, proteasome inhibitor treatment has been found to significantly enhance the antioxidant response elements of hepatocytes exposed to ethanol. Recent studies have shown in an experimental model of alcoholic liver disease that proteasome inhibitor treatment at low dose has cytoprotective effects against ethanol-induced oxidative stress and liver steatosis. The beneficial effects of proteasome inhibitor treatment against oxidative stress occurred because antioxidant response elements (glutathione peroxidase 2, superoxide dismutase 2, glutathione synthetase, glutathione reductase, and GCLC) were upregulated when rats fed alcohol were treated with a low dose of PS-341 (Bortezomib, Velcade(r)). This is an important finding because proteasome inhibitor treatment up-regulated reactive oxygen species removal and glutathione recycling enzymes, while ethanol feeding alone down-regulated these antioxidant elements. For the first time, it was shown that proteasome inhibition by a highly specific and reversible inhibitor is different from the chronic ethanol feeding-induced proteasome inhibition. As previously shown by our group, chronic ethanol feeding causes a complex dysfunction in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which affects the proteasome system, as well as the ubiquitination system. The beneficial effects of proteasome inhibitor treatment in alcoholic liver disease

  4. The Ubiquitin–Proteasome System of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Finley, Daniel; Ulrich, Helle D; Sommer, Thomas; Kaiser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Protein modifications provide cells with exquisite temporal and spatial control of protein function. Ubiquitin is among the most important modifiers, serving both to target hundreds of proteins for rapid degradation by the proteasome, and as a dynamic signaling agent that regulates the function of covalently bound proteins. The diverse effects of ubiquitylation reflect the assembly of structurally distinct ubiquitin chains on target proteins. The resulting ubiquitin code is interpreted by an ...

  5. Proteasome inhibition induces both antioxidant and hb f responses in sickle cell disease via the nrf2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullarkat, Vinod; Meng, Zhuo; Tahara, Stanley M; Johnson, Cage S; Kalra, Vijay K

    2014-01-01

    Oxidant stress is implicated in the manifestations of sickle cell disease including hemolysis and vascular occlusion. Strategies to induce antioxidant response as well as Hb F (α2γ2) have the potential to ameliorate the severity of sickle cell disease. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NFE2L2 or Nrf2) is a transcription factor that regulates antioxidant enzymes as well as γ-globin transcription. The Nrf2 in the cytoplasm is bound to its adapter protein Keap-1 that targets Nrf2 for proteasomal degradation, thereby preventing its nuclear translocation. We examined whether inhibiting the 26S proteasome using the clinically applicable proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and MLN 9708 would promote nuclear translocation of Nrf2, and thereby induce an antioxidant response and as well as Hb F in sickle cell disease. Proteasome inhibitors induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and thereby increased Nrf2-dependent antioxidant enzyme transcripts, elevated cellular glutathione (GSH) levels and γ-globin transcripts as well as Hb F levels in the K562 cell line and also in erythroid burst forming units (BFU-E) generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of sickle cell disease patients. These responses were abolished by siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nrf2. Proteasome inhibitors, especially newer oral agents such as MLN9708 have the potential to be readily translated to clinical trials in sickle cell disease with the dual end points of antioxidant response and Hb F induction.

  6. Role of the Proteasome in Excitotoxicity-Induced Cleavage of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armelão, Mário; Herrmann, Dennis; Pimentel, Diogo O.; Leal, Graciano; Caldeira, Margarida V.; Bahr, Ben A.; Bengtson, Mário; Almeida, Ramiro D.; Duarte, Carlos B.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase is responsible for synthesizing GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter, and exists in two isoforms—GAD65 and GAD67. The enzyme is cleaved under excitotoxic conditions, but the mechanisms involved and the functional consequences are not fully elucidated. We found that excitotoxic stimulation of cultured hippocampal neurons with glutamate leads to a time-dependent cleavage of GAD65 and GAD67 in the N-terminal region of the proteins, and decrease the corresponding mRNAs. The cleavage of GAD67 was sensitive to the proteasome inhibitors MG132, YU102 and lactacystin, and was also abrogated by the E1 ubiquitin ligase inhibitor UBEI-41. In contrast, MG132 and UBEI-41 were the only inhibitors tested that showed an effect on GAD65 cleavage. Excitotoxic stimulation with glutamate also increased the amount of GAD captured in experiments where ubiquitinated proteins and their binding partners were isolated. However, no evidences were found for direct GADs ubiquitination in cultured hippocampal neurons, and recombinant GAD65 was not cleaved by purified 20S or 26S proteasome preparations. Since calpains, a group of calcium activated proteases, play a key role in GAD65/67 cleavage under excitotoxic conditions the results suggest that GADs are cleaved after ubiquitination and degradation of an unknown binding partner by the proteasome. The characteristic punctate distribution of GAD65 along neurites of differentiated cultured hippocampal neurons was significantly reduced after excitotoxic injury, and the total GAD activity measured in extracts from the cerebellum or cerebral cortex at 24h postmortem (when there is a partial cleavage of GADs) was also decreased. The results show a role of the UPS in the cleavage of GAD65/67 and point out the deregulation of GADs under excitotoxic conditions, which is likely to affect GABAergic neurotransmission. This is the first time that the UPS has been implicated in the events triggered during excitotoxicity

  7. Role of the proteasome in excitotoxicity-induced cleavage of glutamic acid decarboxylase in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio S Baptista

    Full Text Available Glutamic acid decarboxylase is responsible for synthesizing GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter, and exists in two isoforms--GAD65 and GAD67. The enzyme is cleaved under excitotoxic conditions, but the mechanisms involved and the functional consequences are not fully elucidated. We found that excitotoxic stimulation of cultured hippocampal neurons with glutamate leads to a time-dependent cleavage of GAD65 and GAD67 in the N-terminal region of the proteins, and decrease the corresponding mRNAs. The cleavage of GAD67 was sensitive to the proteasome inhibitors MG132, YU102 and lactacystin, and was also abrogated by the E1 ubiquitin ligase inhibitor UBEI-41. In contrast, MG132 and UBEI-41 were the only inhibitors tested that showed an effect on GAD65 cleavage. Excitotoxic stimulation with glutamate also increased the amount of GAD captured in experiments where ubiquitinated proteins and their binding partners were isolated. However, no evidences were found for direct GADs ubiquitination in cultured hippocampal neurons, and recombinant GAD65 was not cleaved by purified 20S or 26S proteasome preparations. Since calpains, a group of calcium activated proteases, play a key role in GAD65/67 cleavage under excitotoxic conditions the results suggest that GADs are cleaved after ubiquitination and degradation of an unknown binding partner by the proteasome. The characteristic punctate distribution of GAD65 along neurites of differentiated cultured hippocampal neurons was significantly reduced after excitotoxic injury, and the total GAD activity measured in extracts from the cerebellum or cerebral cortex at 24h postmortem (when there is a partial cleavage of GADs was also decreased. The results show a role of the UPS in the cleavage of GAD65/67 and point out the deregulation of GADs under excitotoxic conditions, which is likely to affect GABAergic neurotransmission. This is the first time that the UPS has been implicated in the events triggered during

  8. Proteasome inhibition promotes Parkin-Ubc13 interaction and lysine 63-linked ubiquitination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace G Y Lim

    Full Text Available Disruption of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, which normally identifies and degrades unwanted intracellular proteins, is thought to underlie neurodegeneration. Supporting this, mutations of Parkin, a ubiquitin ligase, are associated with autosomal recessive parkinsonism. Remarkably, Parkin can protect neurons against a wide spectrum of stress, including those that promote proteasome dysfunction. Although the mechanism underlying the preservation of proteasome function by Parkin is hitherto unclear, we have previously proposed that Parkin-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination (which is usually uncoupled from the proteasome may serve to mitigate proteasomal stress by diverting the substrate load away from the machinery. By means of linkage-specific antibodies, we demonstrated here that proteasome inhibition indeed promotes K63-linked ubiquitination of proteins especially in Parkin-expressing cells. Importantly, we further demonstrated that the recruitment of Ubc13 (an E2 that mediates K63-linked polyubiquitin chain formation exclusively by Parkin is selectively enhanced under conditions of proteasomal stress, thus identifying a mechanism by which Parkin could promote K63-linked ubiquitin modification in cells undergoing proteolytic stress. This mode of ubiquitination appears to facilitate the subsequent clearance of Parkin substrates via autophagy. Consistent with the proposed protective role of K63-linked ubiquitination in times of proteolytic stress, we found that Ubc13-deficient cells are significantly more susceptible to cell death induced by proteasome inhibitors compared to their wild type counterparts. Taken together, our study suggests a role for Parkin-mediated K63 ubiquitination in maintaining cellular protein homeostasis, especially during periods when the proteasome is burdened or impaired.

  9. Differential Regulation of the Autophagy and Proteasome Pathways in Skeletal Muscles in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stana, Flavia; Vujovic, Marija; Mayaki, Dominique; Leduc-Gaudet, Jean-Philippe; Leblanc, Philippe; Huck, Laurent; Hussain, Sabah N A

    2017-09-01

    Skeletal muscle fiber atrophy develops in response to severe sepsis, but it is unclear as to how the proteolytic pathways that are involved in its development are differentially regulated. We investigated the link between sepsis-induced fiber atrophy and activation of the proteasome and autophagy pathways and whether the degree of activation is more severe and sustained in limb muscles than it is in the diaphragm. Randomized controlled experiment. Animal research laboratory. Adult male C57/BL6 mice. Two groups of animals were studied. The sepsis group was subjected to a cecal ligation and perforation technique, whereas the control (sham) group was subjected to abdominal surgery without cecal ligation and perforation. Measurements for both groups were performed 24, 48, and 96 hours after the surgical procedure. Atrophy was quantified in the diaphragm and tibialis anterior by measuring fiber diameter. Autophagy was evaluated using electron microscopic detection of autophagosomes and by measuring LC3B protein lipidation and autophagy-related protein expressions. Proteasomal degradation was quantified by measuring chymotrypsin-like activity of the 26S proteasome and messenger RNA expressions of muscle-specific E3 ligases. Sepsis triggered transient fiber atrophy in the diaphragm that lasted for 24 hours and prolonged atrophy in the tibialis anterior that persisted for 96 hours. The autophagy and proteasome pathways were activated in both muscles at varying intensities over the time course of sepsis. Activation was more pronounced in the tibialis anterior than in the diaphragm. Sepsis inhibited the V-Akt thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 and complex 1 of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathways and stimulated the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway in both muscles. Sepsis triggers more severe and sustained muscle fiber atrophy in limb muscles when compared with respiratory muscle. This response is associated with enhanced proteasomal and autophagic proteolytic pathway

  10. Reduced Levels of Proteasome Products in a Mouse Striatal Cell Model of Huntington's Disease.

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    Sayani Dasgupta

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease is the result of a long polyglutamine tract in the gene encoding huntingtin protein, which in turn causes a large number of cellular changes and ultimately results in neurodegeneration of striatal neurons. Although many theories have been proposed, the precise mechanism by which the polyglutamine expansion causes cellular changes is not certain. Some evidence supports the hypothesis that the long polyglutamine tract inhibits the proteasome, a multiprotein complex involved in protein degradation. However, other studies report normal proteasome function in cells expressing long polyglutamine tracts. The controversy may be due to the methods used to examine proteasome activity in each of the previous studies. In the present study, we measured proteasome function by examining levels of endogenous peptides that are products of proteasome cleavage. Peptide levels were compared among mouse striatal cell lines expressing either 7 glutamines (STHdhQ7/Q7 or 111 glutamines in the huntingtin protein, either heterozygous (STHdhQ7/Q111 or homozygous (STHdhQ111/Q111. Both of the cell lines expressing huntingtin with 111 glutamines showed a large reduction in nearly all of the peptides detected in the cells, relative to levels of these peptides in cells homozygous for 7 glutamines. Treatment of STHdhQ7/Q7 cells with proteasome inhibitors epoxomicin or bortezomib also caused a large reduction in most of these peptides, suggesting that they are products of proteasome-mediated cleavage of cellular proteins. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that proteasome function is impaired by the expression of huntingtin protein containing long polyglutamine tracts.

  11. Role of the ubiquitin proteasome system in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder. Although a subject of intense research, the etiology of PD remains poorly understood. Recently, several lines of evidence have implicated an intimate link between aberrations in the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and PD pathogenesis. Derangements of the UPS, which normally functions as a type of protein degradation machinery, lead to alterations in protein homeostasis that could conceivably promote th...

  12. Effects of ethanol on the proteasome interacting proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fawzia; Bardag-Gorce

    2010-01-01

    Proteasome dysfunction has been repeatedly reported in alcoholic liver disease. Ethanol metabolism endproducts affect the structure of the proteasome, and, therefore, change the proteasome interaction with its regulatory complexes 19S and PA28, as well as its interacting proteins. Chronic ethanol feeding alters the ubiquitin-proteasome activity by altering the interaction between the 19S and the 20S proteasome interaction. The degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins is thus decreased and leads to accum...

  13. Puromycin induces SUMO and ubiquitin redistribution upon proteasome inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Hotaru [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Saitoh, Hisato, E-mail: hisa@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-07-29

    We have previously reported the co-localization of O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying a role for the ubiquitin family in sequestering OP-puromycylated immature polypeptides to the nucleus during impaired proteasome activity. Here, we found that as expected puromycin induced SUMO-1/2/3 accumulation with ubiquitin at multiple nuclear foci in HeLa cells when co-exposed to MG132. Co-administration of puromycin and MG132 also facilitated redistribution of PML and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 concurrently with SUMO-2/3. As removal of the drugs from the medium led to disappearance of the SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin nuclear foci, our findings indicated that nuclear assembly/disassembly of SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin was pharmacologically manipulable, supporting our previous observation on OP-Puro, which predicted the ubiquitin family function in sequestrating aberrant proteins to the nucleus. -- Highlights: •Puromycin exhibits the O-propargyl-puromycin effect. •Puromycin induces SUMO redistribution upon proteasome inhibition. •Ubiquitin and RNF4 accumulate at PML-nuclear bodies with SUMO-2/3. •The ubiquitin family may function in nuclear sequestration of immature proteins.

  14. The 19S proteasome is directly involved in the regulation of heterochromatin spreading in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hogyu David; Choi, Yoonjung; Kim, Minhoo; Kang, Keunsoo; Urano, Takeshi; Lee, Daeyoup

    2017-08-07

    Cumulative evidence suggests that non-proteolytic functions of the proteasome are involved in transcriptional regulation, mRNA export and ubiquitin-dependent histone modification, and thereby modulate the intracellular levels of regulatory proteins implicated in controlling key cellular functions. To date, the non-proteolytic roles of the proteasome have been mainly investigated in euchromatin; their effects on heterochromatin are largely unknown. Here, using fission yeast as a model, we randomly mutagenized the subunits of the 19S proteasome subcomplex, and sought to uncover a direct role of the proteasome in heterochromatin regulation. We identified a non-proteolytic allele, rpt4-1. Experiments performed using rpt4-1 cells revealed that the proteasome is involved in the regulation of heterochromatin spreading to prevent its uncontrolled invasion into neighboring euchromatin regions. Intriguingly, the phenotype of the non-proteolytic rpt4-1 mutant resembled that of epe1Δ cells, which lack the Epe1 protein that counteracts heterochromatin spreading. Both mutants exhibited variegated gene-silencing phenotypes across yeast colonies, spreading of heterochromatin, bypassing of the requirement for RNAi in heterochromatin formation at the outer repeat region (otr), and upregulation of RNA polymerase II. Further analysis revealed Mst2, another factor that antagonizes heterochromatin spreading, may function redundantly with Rpt4. These observations suggest that the 19S proteasome may be involved in modulating the activities of Epe1 and Mst2. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the proteasome appears to have a heterochromatin-regulating function that is independent of its canonical function in proteolysis. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Recognition of Client Proteins by the Proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Houqing; Matouschek, Andreas

    2017-05-22

    The ubiquitin proteasome system controls the concentrations of regulatory proteins and removes damaged and misfolded proteins from cells. Proteins are targeted to the protease at the center of this system, the proteasome, by ubiquitin tags, but ubiquitin is also used as a signal in other cellular processes. Specificity is conferred by the size and structure of the ubiquitin tags, which are recognized by receptors associated with the different cellular processes. However, the ubiquitin code remains ambiguous, and the same ubiquitin tag can target different proteins to different fates. After binding substrate protein at the ubiquitin tag, the proteasome initiates degradation at a disordered region in the substrate. The proteasome has pronounced preferences for the initiation site, and its recognition represents a second component of the degradation signal.

  16. Molecular study on copper-mediated tumor proteasome inhibition and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Chen, Di; Zhang, Xia; Cui, Qiuzhi; Fan, Yuhua; Bi, Caifeng; Dou, Q Ping

    2010-07-01

    The metal ion copper is a cofactor essential for maintaining normal biological and physical functions in human beings. High copper levels have been found in variety of tumor tissues and are involved in tumor angiogenesis processes. The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an important role in cell growth and apoptosis and has been shown as a novel target for cancer therapy. We previously reported that some organic copper complexes can inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity and induce apoptosis in human cancer cells and xenograft models. In the current study, we investigated the effect of oxidation status of copper, Cu(I) or Cu(II), on inhibition of proteasome activity, induction of apoptosis, and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human cancer cells. We report four major findings here: i) both Cu(I) and Cu(II) could inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified 20S proteasome, but Cu(I) was more potent than Cu(II), ii) purified 20S proteasome protein was able to reduce Cu(II) to Cu(I), suggesting that Cu(I) is the oxidation status of copper that directly reacts with the proteasome, iii) when complexed with the copper ligand neocuproine, Cu(I) showed higher ability to induce ROS production in cancer cells, compared with Cu(II), iv) addition of a ROS scavenger in the cancer cell culture-blocked copper-induced ROS generation, but did not overcome copper-mediated proteasome-inhibitory and cell death-inducing events, demonstrating the ROS-independent proteasome-inhibitory property of copper complexes.

  17. Computational prediction of cleavage using proteasomal in vitro digestion and MHC I ligand data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-feng LU; Hao SHENG; Yi ZHANG; Zhi-yang LI

    2013-01-01

    Proteasomes are responsible for the production of the majority of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes.Hence,it is important to identify correctly which peptides will be generated by proteasomes from an unknown protein.However,the pool of proteasome cleavage data used in the prediction algorithms,whether from major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I ligand or in vitro digestion data,is not identical to in vivo proteasomal digestion products.Therefore,the accuracy and reliability of these models still need to be improved.In this paper,three types of proteasomal cleavage data,constitutive proteasome (cCP),immunoproteasome (iCP) in vitro cleavage,and MHC I ligandv data,were used for training cleave-site predictive methods based on the kernel-function stabilized matrix method (KSMM).The predictive accuracies of the KSMM+pair coefficients were 75.0%,72.3%,and 83.1% for cCP,iCP,and MHC I ligand data,respectively,which were comparable to the results from support vector machine (SVM).The three proteasomal cleavage methods were combined in turn with MHC I-peptide binding predictions to model MHC I-peptide processing and the presentation pathway.These integrations markedly improved MHC I peptide identification,increasing area under the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve (AUC) values from 0.82 to 0.91.The results suggested that both MHC I ligand and proteasomal in vitro degradation data can give an exact simulation of in vivo processed digestion.The information extracted from cCP and iCP in vitro cleavage data demonstrated that both cCP and iCP are selective in their usage of peptide bonds for cleavage.

  18. The Nrf1 CNC-bZIP protein is regulated by the proteasome and activated by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepelev, Nikolai L; Bennitz, Joshua D; Huang, Ting; McBride, Skye; Willmore, William G

    2011-01-01

    Nrf1 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45 subunit-related factor 1) is a transcription factor mediating cellular responses to xenobiotic and pro-oxidant stress. Nrf1 regulates the transcription of many stress-related genes through the electrophile response elements (EpREs) located in their promoter regions. Despite its potential importance in human health, the mechanisms controlling Nrf1 have not been addressed fully. We found that proteasomal inhibitors MG-132 and clasto-lactacystin-β-lactone stabilized the protein expression of full-length Nrf1 in both COS7 and WFF2002 cells. Concomitantly, proteasomal inhibition decreased the expression of a smaller, N-terminal Nrf1 fragment, with an approximate molecular weight of 23 kDa. The EpRE-luciferase reporter assays revealed that proteasomal inhibition markedly inhibited the Nrf1 transactivational activity. These results support earlier hypotheses that the 26 S proteasome processes Nrf1 into its active form by removing its inhibitory N-terminal domain anchoring Nrf1 to the endoplasmic reticulum. Immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Nrf1 is ubiquitinated and that proteasomal inhibition increased the degree of Nrf1 ubiquitination. Furthermore, Nrf1 protein had a half-life of approximately 5 hours in COS7 cells. In contrast, hypoxia (1% O(2)) significantly increased the luciferase reporter activity of exogenous Nrf1 protein, while decreasing the protein expression of p65, a shorter form of Nrf1, known to act as a repressor of EpRE-controlled gene expression. Finally, the protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid activated Nrf1 reporter activity, while the latter was repressed by the PKC inhibitor staurosporine. Collectively, our data suggests that Nrf1 is controlled by several post-translational mechanisms, including ubiquitination, proteolytic processing and proteasomal-mediated degradation as well as by its phosphorylation status. © 2011 Chepelev et al.

  19. The ubiquitin-proteasome system in spongiform degenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, Brandi R; Li, Lian; Chin, Lih-Shen

    2008-12-01

    Spongiform degeneration is characterized by vacuolation in nervous tissue accompanied by neuronal death and gliosis. Although spongiform degeneration is a hallmark of prion diseases, this pathology is also present in the brains of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, diffuse Lewy body disease, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and Canavan's spongiform leukodystrophy. The shared outcome of spongiform degeneration in these diverse diseases suggests that common cellular mechanisms must underlie the processes of spongiform change and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. Immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissues reveals increased ubiquitin immunoreactivity in and around areas of spongiform change, suggesting the involvement of ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction in the pathogenesis of spongiform neurodegeneration. The link between aberrant ubiquitination and spongiform neurodegeneration has been strengthened by the discovery that a null mutation in the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase mahogunin ring finger-1 (Mgrn1) causes an autosomal recessively inherited form of spongiform neurodegeneration in animals. Recent studies have begun to suggest that abnormal ubiquitination may alter intracellular signaling and cell functions via proteasome-dependent and proteasome-independent mechanisms, leading to spongiform degeneration and neuronal cell death. Further elucidation of the pathogenic pathways involved in spongiform neurodegeneration should facilitate the development of novel rational therapies for treating prion diseases, HIV infection, and other spongiform degenerative disorders.

  20. The XPB subunit of repair/transcription factor TFIIH directly interacts with SUG1, a subunit of the 26S proteasome and putative transcription factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Weeda (Geert); M. Rossignol; R.A. Fraser; G.S. Winkler (Sebastiaan); W. Vermeulen (Wim); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); L. Ma (Libin); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractMutations in the basal transcription initiation/DNA repair factor TFIIH are responsible for three human disorders: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), cockayne syndrome (CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The non-repair features of CS and TTD are thought to be due to a partial inactivation of th

  1. Structure of a Blm10 Complex Reveals Common Mechanisms for Proteasome Binding and Gate Opening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadre-Bazzaz, K.; Robinson, H.; Whitby, F. G.; Formosa, T.; Hill, C. P.

    2010-03-12

    The proteasome is an abundant protease that is critically important for numerous cellular pathways. Proteasomes are activated in vitro by three known classes of proteins/complexes, including Blm10/PA200. Here, we report a 3.4 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a proteasome-Blm10 complex, which reveals that Blm10 surrounds the proteasome entry pore in the 1.2 MDa complex to form a largely closed dome that is expected to restrict access of potential substrates. This architecture and the observation that Blm10 induces a disordered proteasome gate structure challenge the assumption that Blm10 functions as an activator of proteolysis in vivo. The Blm10 C terminus binds in the same manner as seen for 11S activators and inferred for 19S/PAN activators and indicates a unified model for gate opening. We also demonstrate that Blm10 acts to maintain mitochondrial function. Consistent with the structural data, the C-terminal residues of Blm10 are needed for this activity.

  2. Architecture and Molecular Mechanism of PAN, the Archaeal Proteasome Regulatory ATPase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medalia, Noa; Beer, Avital; Zwickl, Peter; Mihalache, Oana; Beck, Martin; Medalia, Ohad; Navon, Ami

    2009-01-01

    In Archaea, an hexameric ATPase complex termed PAN promotes proteins unfolding and translocation into the 20 S proteasome. PAN is highly homologous to the six ATPases of the eukaryotic 19 S proteasome regulatory complex. Thus, insight into the mechanism of PAN function may reveal a general mode of action mutual to the eukaryotic 19 S proteasome regulatory complex. In this study we generated a three-dimensional model of PAN from tomographic reconstruction of negatively stained particles. Surprisingly, this reconstruction indicated that the hexameric complex assumes a two-ring structure enclosing a large cavity. Assessment of distinct three-dimensional functional states of PAN in the presence of adenosine 5′-O-(thiotriphosphate) and ADP and in the absence of nucleotides outlined a possible mechanism linking nucleotide binding and hydrolysis to substrate recognition, unfolding, and translocation. A novel feature of the ATPase complex revealed in this study is a gate controlling the “exit port” of the regulatory complex and, presumably, translocation into the 20 S proteasome. Based on our structural and biochemical findings, we propose a possible model in which substrate binding and unfolding are linked to structural transitions driven by nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, whereas translocation into the proteasome only depends upon the presence of an unfolded substrate and binding but not hydrolysis of nucleotide. PMID:19363223

  3. Sperm proteasome degrades egg envelope glycoprotein ZP1 during fertilization of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasanami, Tomohiro; Sugiura, Kenichi; Tokumoto, Toshinobu; Yoshizaki, Norio; Dohra, Hideo; Nishio, Shunsuke; Mizushima, Shusei; Hiyama, Gen; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    2012-10-01

    At the time of fertilization, the extracellular matrix surrounding avian oocytes, termed the perivitelline membrane (pvm), is hydrolyzed by a sperm-borne protease, although the actual protease that is responsible for the digestion of the pvm remains to be identified. Here, we show evidence that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is functional in the fertilization of Japanese quail. The activities for the induction of the acrosome reaction and binding to ZP3 as revealed by ligand blotting of purified serum ZP1 are similar to those of pvm ZP1. Western blot analysis of purified ZP1 and ZP3 by the use of the anti-ubiquitin antibody showed that only pvm ZP1 was reactive to the antibody. In vitro penetration assay of the sperm on the pvm indicated that fragments of ZP1 and intact ZP3 were released from the pvm. Western blot analysis using the anti-20S proteasome antibody and ultrastructural analysis showed that immunoreactive proteasome was localized in the acrosomal region of the sperm. Inclusion of specific proteasome inhibitor MG132 in the incubation mixture, or depletion of extracellular ATP by the addition of apyrase, efficiently suppressed the sperm perforation of the pvm. These results demonstrate for the first time that the sperm proteasome is important for fertilization in birds and that the extracellular ubiquitination of ZP1 might occur during its transport via blood circulation.

  4. Ubiquitin-proteasome system in cardiac dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Mearini, Giulia; Schlossarek, Saskia; Willis, Monte S.; Carrier, Lucie

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitin-proteasome system in cardiac dysfunction correspondance: Corresponding author. Tel.: +49 40 42803 7208; fax: +49 40 42803 5925. (Carrier, Lucie) (Carrier, Lucie) Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology--> , University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf--> , Hamburg--> - GERMANY (Mearini, Giulia) Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and...

  5. Therapeutic proteasome inhibition in experimental acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tamás Letoha; Tamás Takács; Liliána Z Fehér; László Pecze; Csaba Somlai; Ilona Varga; József Kaszaki; Gábor Tóth; Csaba Vizier; László Tiszlavicz

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To establish the therapeutic potential of proteasome inhibition, we examined the therapeutic effects of MG132 (Z-Leu-Leu-Leu-aldehyde) in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis.METHODS: Pancreatitis was induced in rats by two hourly intraperitoneal (ip) injections of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK; 2 × 100 μg/kg) and the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (10 mg/kg ip) was administered 30 min after the second CCK injection. Animals were sacrificed 4 h after the first injection of CCK.RESULTS: Administering the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (at a dose of 10 mg/kg, ip) 90 min after the onset of pancreatic inflammation induced the expression of cell-protective 72 kDa heat shock protein (HSP72) and decreased DNA-binding of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB).Furthermore MG132 treatment resulted in milder inflammatory response and cellular damage, as revealed by improved laboratory and histological parameters of pancreatitis and associated oxidative stress.CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that proteasome inhibition might be beneficial not only for the prevention,but also for the therapy of acute pancreatitis.

  6. A Fluorescent Broad-Spectrum Proteasome Inhibitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdoes, Martijn; Florea, Bogdan I.; Menendez-Benito, Victoria; Maynard, Christa J.; Witte, Martin D.; Linden, Wouter A. van der; Nieuwendijk, Adrianus M.C.H. van den; Hofmann, Tanja; Berkers, Celia R.; Leeuwen, Fijs W.B. van; Groothuis, Tom A.; Leeuwenburgh, Michiel A.; Ovaa, Huib; Neefjes, Jacques J.; Filippov, Dmitri V.; Marel, Gijs A. van der; Dantuma, Nico P.; Overkleeft, Herman S.

    2006-01-01

    The proteasome is an essential evolutionary conserved protease involved in many regulatory systems. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterization of the activity-based, fluorescent, and cell-permeable inhibitor Bodipy TMR-Ahx3L3VS (MV151), which specifically targets all active subunits of the

  7. Pri sORF peptides induce selective proteasome-mediated protein processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanet, J; Benrabah, E; Li, T; Pélissier-Monier, A; Chanut-Delalande, H; Ronsin, B; Bellen, H J; Payre, F; Plaza, S

    2015-09-18

    A wide variety of RNAs encode small open-reading-frame (smORF/sORF) peptides, but their functions are largely unknown. Here, we show that Drosophila polished-rice (pri) sORF peptides trigger proteasome-mediated protein processing, converting the Shavenbaby (Svb) transcription repressor into a shorter activator. A genome-wide RNA interference screen identifies an E2-E3 ubiquitin-conjugating complex, UbcD6-Ubr3, which targets Svb to the proteasome in a pri-dependent manner. Upon interaction with Ubr3, Pri peptides promote the binding of Ubr3 to Svb. Ubr3 can then ubiquitinate the Svb N terminus, which is degraded by the proteasome. The C-terminal domains protect Svb from complete degradation and ensure appropriate processing. Our data show that Pri peptides control selectivity of Ubr3 binding, which suggests that the family of sORF peptides may contain an extended repertoire of protein regulators.

  8. Pulse treatment with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib inhibits osteoclast resorptive activity in clinically relevant conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boissy, P; Levin Andersen, Thomas; Lund, T

    2008-01-01

    Myeloma bone disease is due to bone degradation by osteoclasts, and absence of repair by bone forming osteoblasts. Recent observations suggest that the anti-myeloma drug bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, stimulates bone formation and may inhibit bone resorption. Here, we tested bortezomib...... on cultured osteoclasts in conditions mimicking the pulse treatment used in the clinic, thereby avoiding continuous proteasome inhibition and unselective toxicity. A 3h pulse with 25nM bortezomib followed by a 3-day culture in its absence markedly inhibited osteoclast activity as evaluated through bone...... resorption, TRAcP release, and RANKL-induced NF-kappaB translocation into nuclei, an event dependent on proteasomes and critical for osteoclast function. The effect on TRAcP was maximal during the first 24h post-pulse, and then tended to subside. Importantly, applying this pulse treatment to cultured myeloma...

  9. Gambogic Acid Is a Tissue-Specific Proteasome Inhibitor In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofen Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gambogic acid (GA is a natural compound derived from Chinese herbs that has been approved by the Chinese Food and Drug Administration for clinical trials in cancer patients; however, its molecular targets have not been thoroughly studied. Here, we report that GA inhibits tumor proteasome activity, with potency comparable to bortezomib but much less toxicity. First, GA acts as a prodrug and only gains proteasome-inhibitory function after being metabolized by intracellular CYP2E1. Second, GA-induced proteasome inhibition is a prerequisite for its cytotoxicity and anticancer effect without off-targets. Finally, because expression of the CYP2E1 gene is very high in tumor tissues but low in many normal tissues, GA could therefore produce tissue-specific proteasome inhibition and tumor-specific toxicity, with clinical significance for designing novel strategies for cancer treatment.

  10. Redox control of 20S proteasome gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gustavo M; Netto, Luis E S; Simões, Vanessa; Santos, Luiz F A; Gozzo, Fabio C; Demasi, Marcos A A; Oliveira, Cristiano L P; Bicev, Renata N; Klitzke, Clécio F; Sogayar, Mari C; Demasi, Marilene

    2012-06-01

    The proteasome is the primary contributor in intracellular proteolysis. Oxidized or unstructured proteins can be degraded via a ubiquitin- and ATP-independent process by the free 20S proteasome (20SPT). The mechanism by which these proteins enter the catalytic chamber is not understood thus far, although the 20SPT gating conformation is considered to be an important barrier to allowing proteins free entrance. We have previously shown that S-glutathiolation of the 20SPT is a post-translational modification affecting the proteasomal activities. The goal of this work was to investigate the mechanism that regulates 20SPT activity, which includes the identification of the Cys residues prone to S-glutathiolation. Modulation of 20SPT activity by proteasome gating is at least partially due to the S-glutathiolation of specific Cys residues. The gate was open when the 20SPT was S-glutathiolated, whereas following treatment with high concentrations of dithiothreitol, the gate was closed. S-glutathiolated 20SPT was more effective at degrading both oxidized and partially unfolded proteins than its reduced form. Only 2 out of 28 Cys were observed to be S-glutathiolated in the proteasomal α5 subunit of yeast cells grown to the stationary phase in glucose-containing medium. We demonstrate a redox post-translational regulatory mechanism controlling 20SPT activity. S-glutathiolation is a post-translational modification that triggers gate opening and thereby activates the proteolytic activities of free 20SPT. This process appears to be an important regulatory mechanism to intensify the removal of oxidized or unstructured proteins in stressful situations by a process independent of ubiquitination and ATP consumption. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1183-1194.

  11. Dynamic recruitment of active proteasomes into polyglutamine initiated inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper-Krom, Sabine; Juenemann, Katrin; Jansen, Anne H; Wiemhoefer, Anne; van den Nieuwendijk, Rianne; Smith, Donna L; Hink, Mark A; Bates, Gillian P; Overkleeft, Hermen; Ovaa, Huib; Reits, Eric

    2014-01-03

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease are hallmarked by neuronal intracellular inclusion body formation. Whether proteasomes are irreversibly recruited into inclusion bodies in these protein misfolding disorders is a controversial subject. In addition, it has been proposed that the proteasomes may become clogged by the aggregated protein fragments, leading to impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here, we show by fluorescence pulse-chase experiments in living cells that proteasomes are dynamically and reversibly recruited into inclusion bodies. As these recruited proteasomes remain catalytically active and accessible to substrates, our results challenge the concept of proteasome sequestration and impairment in Huntington's disease, and support the reported absence of proteasome impairment in mouse models of Huntington's disease. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  12. Legionella metaeffector exploits host proteasome to temporally regulate cognate effector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Kubori

    Full Text Available Pathogen-associated secretion systems translocate numerous effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells to coordinate cellular processes important for infection. Spatiotemporal regulation is therefore important for modulating distinct activities of effectors at different stages of infection. Here we provide the first evidence of "metaeffector," a designation for an effector protein that regulates the function of another effector within the host cell. Legionella LubX protein functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that hijacks the host proteasome to specifically target the bacterial effector protein SidH for degradation. Delayed delivery of LubX to the host cytoplasm leads to the shutdown of SidH within the host cells at later stages of infection. This demonstrates a sophisticated level of coevolution between eukaryotic cells and L. pneumophila involving an effector that functions as a key regulator to temporally coordinate the function of a cognate effector protein.

  13. Breaking It Down: The Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Neuronal Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Hamilton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS is most widely known for its role in intracellular protein degradation; however, in the decades since its discovery, ubiquitination has been associated with the regulation of a wide variety of cellular processes. The addition of ubiquitin tags, either as single moieties or as polyubiquitin chains, has been shown not only to mediate degradation by the proteasome and the lysosome, but also to modulate protein function, localization, and endocytosis. The UPS plays a particularly important role in neurons, where local synthesis and degradation work to balance synaptic protein levels at synapses distant from the cell body. In recent years, the UPS has come under increasing scrutiny in neurons, as elements of the UPS have been found to regulate such diverse neuronal functions as synaptic strength, homeostatic plasticity, axon guidance, and neurite outgrowth. Here we focus on recent advances detailing the roles of the UPS in regulating the morphogenesis of axons, dendrites, and dendritic spines, with an emphasis on E3 ubiquitin ligases and their identified regulatory targets.

  14. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein interactions with the ubiquitin proteasome system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Marissa M; Slagle, Betty L

    2014-11-24

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes acute and chronic hepatitis, and the latter is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV encodes a 17-kDa regulatory protein, HBx, which is required for virus replication. Although the precise contribution(s) of HBx to virus replication is unknown, many viruses target cellular pathways to create an environment favorable for virus replication. The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is a major conserved cellular pathway that controls several critical processes in the cell by regulating the levels of proteins involved in cell cycle, DNA repair, innate immunity, and other processes. We summarize here the interactions of HBx with components of the UPS, including the CUL4 adaptor DDB1, the cullin regulatory complex CSN, and the 26S proteasome. Understanding how these protein interactions benefit virus replication remains a challenge due to limited models in which to study HBV replication. However, studies from other viral systems that similarly target the UPS provide insight into possible strategies used by HBV.

  15. The 11S Proteasomal Activator REGγ Impacts Polyglutamine-Expanded Androgen Receptor Aggregation and Motor Neuron Viability through Distinct Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill M. Yersak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is caused by expression of a polyglutamine (polyQ-expanded androgen receptor (AR. The inefficient nuclear proteasomal degradation of the mutant AR results in the formation of nuclear inclusions containing amino-terminal fragments of the mutant AR. PA28γ (also referred to as REGγ is a nuclear 11S-proteasomal activator with limited proteasome activation capabilities compared to its cytoplasmic 11S (PA28α, PA28β counterparts. To clarify the role of REGγ in polyQ-expanded AR metabolism, we carried out genetic and biochemical studies in cell models of SBMA. Overexpression of REGγ in a PC12 cell model of SBMA increased polyQ-expanded AR aggregation and contributed to polyQ-expanded AR toxicity in the presence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT. These effects of REGγ were independent of its association with the proteasome and may be due, in part, to the decreased binding of polyQ-expanded AR by the E3 ubiquitin-ligase MDM2. Unlike its effects in PC12 cells, REGγ overexpression rescued transgenic SBMA motor neurons from DHT-induced toxicity in a proteasome binding-dependent manner, suggesting that the degradation of a specific 11S proteasome substrate or substrates promotes motor neuron viability. One potential substrate that we found to play a role in mutant AR toxicity is the splicing factor SC35. These studies reveal that, depending on the cellular context, two biological roles for REGγ impact cell viability in the face of polyQ-expanded AR; a proteasome binding-independent mechanism directly promotes mutant AR aggregation while a proteasome binding-dependent mechanism promotes cell viability. The balance between these functions likely determines REGγ effects on polyQ-expanded AR-expressing cells.

  16. 18α-Glycyrrhetinic Acid Proteasome Activator Decelerates Aging and Alzheimer's Disease Progression in Caenorhabditis elegans and Neuronal Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaevgeniou, Nikoletta; Sakellari, Marianthi; Jha, Sweta; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Holmberg, Carina I.; Gonos, Efstathios S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Proteasomes are constituents of the cellular proteolytic networks that maintain protein homeostasis through regulated proteolysis of normal and abnormal (in any way) proteins. Genetically mediated proteasome activation in multicellular organisms has been shown to promote longevity and to exert protein antiaggregation activity. In this study, we investigate whether compound-mediated proteasome activation is feasible in a multicellular organism and we dissect the effects of such approach in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression. Results: Feeding of wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans with 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18α-GA; a previously shown proteasome activator in cell culture) results in enhanced levels of proteasome activities that lead to a skinhead-1- and proteasome activation-dependent life span extension. The elevated proteasome function confers lower paralysis rates in various AD nematode models accompanied by decreased Aβ deposits, thus ultimately decelerating the progression of AD phenotype. More importantly, similar positive results are also delivered when human and murine cells of nervous origin are subjected to 18α-GA treatment. Innovation: This is the first report of the use of 18α-GA, a diet-derived compound as prolongevity and antiaggregation factor in the context of a multicellular organism. Conclusion: Our results suggest that proteasome activation with downstream positive outcomes on aging and AD, an aggregation-related disease, is feasible in a nongenetic manipulation manner in a multicellular organism. Moreover, they unveil the need for identification of antiaging and antiamyloidogenic compounds among the nutrients found in our normal diet. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 855–869. PMID:26886723

  17. Proteomics-based study on asthenozoospermia: differential expression of proteasome alpha complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siva, Archana Bharadwaj; Kameshwari, Duvvuri Butchi; Singh, Vaibhav; Pavani, Kadupu; Sundaram, Curam Sreenivasacharlu; Rangaraj, Nandini; Deenadayal, Mamata; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2010-07-01

    With a view to understand the molecular basis of sperm motility, we have tried to establish the human sperm proteome by two-dimensional PAGE MALDI MS/MS analysis. We report identification of 75 different proteins in the human spermatozoa. Comparative proteome analysis was carried out for asthenozoospermic and normozoospermic patients to understand the molecular basis of sperm motility. Analysis revealed eight proteins (including one unidentified) with altered intensity between the groups. Differential proteins distributed into three functional groups: 'energy and metabolism' (triose-phosphate isomerase, glycerol kinase 2, testis specific isoform and succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid co-enzyme A transferase 1, mitochondrial precursor); 'movement and organization' (tubulin beta 2C and tektin 1) and 'protein turnover, folding and stress response' (proteasome alpha 3 subunit and heat shock-related 70 kDa protein 2). It was interesting to note that although the proteins falling in the functional group of 'energy and metabolism' are higher in the asthenozoospermic patients, the other two functional groups contain proteins, which are higher in the normozoospermic samples. Validation of results carried out for proteasome alpha 3 subunit by immunoblotting and confocal microscopy, confirmed significant changes in intensity of proteasome alpha 3 subunit in asthenozoospermic samples when compared with normozoospermic controls. Significant positive correlation too was found between proteasome alpha 3 subunit levels and rapid, linear progressive motility of the spermatozoa. In our understanding, this data would contribute appreciably to the presently limited information available about the proteins implicated in human sperm motility.

  18. Normoxic destabilization of ATF-4 depends on proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wottawa, M; Köditz, J; Katschinski, D M

    2010-04-01

    Hypoxia-inducible gene expression is an important physiological adaptive mechanism in response to a decreased oxygen supply. We have recently described an oxygen- and prolyl-4-hydroxylase (PHD)3-dependent stabilization of the activating transcription factor 4 (ATF-4). The aim of the present study was to examine if the normoxic destabilization of ATF-4 is regulated by oxygen-dependent proteasomal degradation. We determined poly-ubiquitination of ATF-4 in normoxia compared to hypoxia by immunoprecipitation and immunoblots. Furthermore, we analysed the expression of the ATF-4 target gene GADD153 as a function of oxygen concentration. ATF-4 protein levels were not detectable in normoxia. Normoxic degradation correlated with an oxygen-dependent poly-ubiquitination of ATF-4, which was hindered by hypoxic incubation of the cells. As a result of hypoxia, GADD153 was expressed. The hypoxic GADD153 expression was attenuated or increased by transfecting the cells with ATF-4 siRNA or PHD3 siRNA respectively. Our results demonstrate the involvement of oxygen-dependent proteasomal degradation of ATF-4 in the hypoxia-induced expression of GADD153. Taken together, hypoxia/PHD3-regulated stabilization of ATF-4 by hindering oxygen-dependent degradation may play a critical role in linking cell fate decisions to oxygen availability.

  19. Synergistic apoptosis induction in leukemic cells by the phosphatase inhibitor salubrinal and proteasome inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes C A Drexler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells adapt to endoplasmic reticulum (ER-stress by arresting global protein synthesis while simultaneously activating specific transcription factors and their downstream targets. These processes are mediated in part by the phosphorylation-dependent inactivation of the translation initiation factor eIF2alpha. Following restoration of homeostasis protein synthesis is resumed when the serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PP1 dephosphorylates and reactivates eIF2alpha. Proteasome inhibitors, used to treat multiple myeloma patients evoke ER-stress and apoptosis by blocking the ER-associated degradation of misfolded proteins (ERAD, however, the role of eIF2alpha phosphorylation in leukemic cells under conditions of proteasome inhibitor-mediated ER stress is currently unclear. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bcr-Abl-positive and negative leukemic cell lines were used to investigate the functional implications of PP1-related phosphatase activities on eIF2alpha phosphorylation in proteasome inhibitor-mediated ER stress and apoptosis. Rather unexpectedly, salubrinal, a recently identified PP1 inhibitor capable to protect against ER stress in various model systems, strongly synergized with proteasome inhibitors to augment apoptotic death of different leukemic cell lines. Salubrinal treatment did not affect the phosphorlyation status of eIF2alpha. Furthermore, the proapoptotic effect of salubrinal occurred independently from the chemical nature of the proteasome inhibitor, was recapitulated by a second unrelated phosphatase inhibitor and was unaffected by overexpression of a dominant negative eIF2alpha S51A variant that can not be phosphorylated. Salubrinal further aggravated ER-stress and proteotoxicity inflicted by the proteasome inhibitors on the leukemic cells since characteristic ER stress responses, such as ATF4 and CHOP synthesis, XBP1 splicing, activation of MAP kinases and eventually apoptosis were efficiently abrogated by the

  20. Cereblon is recruited to aggresome and shows cytoprotective effect against ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, Naoya; Wakabayashi, Satoru; Matsumoto, Kodai; Yamada, Haruka; Asahi, Toru

    2015-09-04

    Cereblon (CRBN) is encoded by a candidate gene for autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability (ID). The nonsense mutation, R419X, causes deletion of 24 amino acids at the C-terminus of CRBN, leading to mild ID. Although abnormal CRBN function may be associated with ID disease onset, its cellular mechanism is still unclear. Here, we examine the role of CRBN in aggresome formation and cytoprotection. In the presence of a proteasome inhibitor, exogenous CRBN formed perinuclear inclusions and co-localized with aggresome markers. Endogenous CRBN also formed perinuclear inclusions under the same condition. Treatment with a microtubule destabilizer or an inhibitor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of CRBN blocked formation of CRBN inclusions. Biochemical analysis showed CRBN containing inclusions were high-molecular weight, ubiquitin-positive. CRBN overexpression in cultured cells suppressed cell death induced by proteasome inhibitor. Furthermore, knockdown of endogenous CRBN in cultured cells increased cell death induced by proteasome inhibitor, compared with control cells. Our results show CRBN is recruited to aggresome and has functional roles in cytoprotection against ubiquitin-proteasome system impaired condition.

  1. Inhibition of Interjacent Ribonucleic Acid (26S) Synthesis in Cells Infected by Sindbis Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheele, Christina M.; Pfefferkorn, E. R.

    1969-01-01

    The interrelationship of viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) and protein synthesis in cells infected by Sindbis virus was investigated. When cultures were treated with puromycin early in the course of infection, the synthesis of interjacent RNA (26S) was preferentially inhibited. A similar result was obtained by shifting cells infected by one temperature-sensitive mutant defective in RNA synthesis from the permissive (29 C) to the nonpermissive (41.5 C) temperature. Under both conditions, the viral RNA produced appeared to be fully active biologically. Once underway, the synthesis of viral RNA in wild-type Sindbis infections did not require concomitant protein synthesis. PMID:5817400

  2. Prospective Iterative Trial of Proteasome Inhibitor‐Based Desensitization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woodle, E. S; Shields, A. R; Ejaz, N. S; Sadaka, B; Girnita, A; Walsh, R. C; Alloway, R. R; Brailey, P; Cardi, M. A; Abu Jawdeh, B. G; Roy‐Chaudhury, P; Govil, A; Mogilishetty, G

    2015-01-01

    A prospective, iterative trial of five proteasome inhibitor (bortezomib)‐based desensitization regimens demonstrates that these regimens can provide significant reductions in HLA antibodies with substantial durability...

  3. The proteasome and the degradation of oxidized proteins: Part III—Redox regulation of the proteasomal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Jung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we review shortly the current knowledge on the regulation of the proteasomal system during and after oxidative stress. After addressing the components of the proteasomal system and the degradation of oxidatively damaged proteins in part I and II of this series, we address here which changes in activity undergo the proteasome and the ubiquitin-proteasomal system itself under oxidative conditions. While several components of the proteasomal system undergo direct oxidative modification, a number of redox-regulated events are modulating the proteasomal activity in a way it can address the major tasks in an oxidative stress situation: the removal of oxidized proteins and the adaptation of the cellular metabolism to the stress situation.

  4. The proteasome and the degradation of oxidized proteins: part III-Redox regulation of the proteasomal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhn, Tobias Jung Annika; Grune, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review shortly the current knowledge on the regulation of the proteasomal system during and after oxidative stress. After addressing the components of the proteasomal system and the degradation of oxidatively damaged proteins in part I and II of this series, we address here which changes in activity undergo the proteasome and the ubiquitin-proteasomal system itself under oxidative conditions. While several components of the proteasomal system undergo direct oxidative modification, a number of redox-regulated events are modulating the proteasomal activity in a way it can address the major tasks in an oxidative stress situation: the removal of oxidized proteins and the adaptation of the cellular metabolism to the stress situation.

  5. Karyotypes, heterochromatin, and physical mapping of 18S-26S rDNA in Cactaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Las Peñas, M L; Urdampilleta, J D; Bernardello, G; Forni-Martins, E R

    2009-01-01

    Karyotype analyses in members of the four Cactaceae subfamilies were performed. Numbers and karyotype formula obtained were: Pereskioideae = Pereskiaaculeata(2n = 22; 10 m + 1 sm), Maihuenioideae = Maihuenia patagonica (2n = 22, 9 m + 2 sm; 2n = 44, 18 m + 4 sm), Opuntioideae = Cumulopuntia recurvata(2n = 44; 20 m + 2 sm), Cactoideae = Acanthocalycium spiniflorum (2n = 22; 10 m + 1 sm),Echinopsis tubiflora (2n = 22; 10 m + 1 sm), Trichocereus candicans (2n = 22, 22 m). Chromosomes were small, the average chromosome length was 2.3 mum. Diploid species and the tetraploid C. recurvata had one terminal satellite, whereas the remaining tetraploid species showed four satellited chromosomes. Karyotypes were symmetrical. No CMA(-)/DAPI(+) bands were detected, but CMA(+)/DAPI(-) bands associated with NOR were always found. Pericentromeric heterochromatin was found in C. recurvata, A. spiniflorum, and the tetraploid cytotype of M. patagonica. The locations of the 18S-26S rDNA sites in all species coincided with CMA(+)/DAPI(-) bands; the same occurred with the sizes and numbers of signals for each species. This technique was applied for the first time in metaphase chromosomes in cacti. NOR-bearing pair no.1 may be homeologous in all species examined. In Cactaceae, the 18S-26S loci seem to be highly conserved.

  6. Redox modulation of cellular metabolism through targeted degradation of signaling proteins by the proteasome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-02-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the 20S proteasome plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis through the selective degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins. This adaptive stress response is distinct from ubiquitin-dependent pathways in that oxidized proteins are recognized and degraded in an ATP-independent mechanism, which can involve the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Like the regulatory complexes 19S and 11S REG, Hsp90 tightly associates with the 20S proteasome to mediate the recognition of aberrant proteins for degradation. In the case of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin, proteasomal degradation results from the oxidation of a single surface exposed methionine (i.e., Met145); oxidation of the other eight methionines has a minimal effect on the recognition and degradation of calmodulin by the proteasome. Since cellular concentrations of calmodulin are limiting, the targeted degradation of this critical signaling protein under conditions of oxidative stress will result in the downregulation of cellular metabolism, serving as a feedback regulation to diminish the generation of reactive oxygen species. The targeted degradation of critical signaling proteins, such as calmodulin, can function as sensors of oxidative stress to downregulate global rates of metabolism and enhance cellular survival.

  7. Production of proteasome inhibitor syringolin A by the endophyte Rhizobium sp. strain AP16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudnik, Alexey; Bigler, Laurent; Dudler, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Syringolin A, the product of a mixed nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase encoded by the syl gene cluster, is a virulence factor secreted by certain Pseudomonas syringae strains. Together with the glidobactins produced by a number of beta- and gammaproteobacterial human and animal pathogens, it belongs to the syrbactins, a structurally novel class of proteasome inhibitors. In plants, proteasome inhibition by syringolin A-producing P. syringae strains leads to the suppression of host defense pathways requiring proteasome activity, such as the ones mediated by salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Here we report the discovery of a syl-like gene cluster with some unusual features in the alphaproteobacterial endophyte Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 that encodes a putative syringolin A-like synthetase whose components share 55% to 65% sequence identity (72% to 79% similarity) at the amino acid level. As revealed by average nucleotide identity (ANI) calculations, this strain likely belongs to the same species as biocontrol strain R. rhizogenes K84 (formely known as Agrobacterium radiobacter K84), which, however, carries a nonfunctional deletion remnant of the syl-like gene cluster. Here we present a functional analysis of the syl-like gene cluster of Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 and demonstrate that this endophyte synthesizes syringolin A and some related minor variants, suggesting that proteasome inhibition by syrbactin production can be important not only for pathogens but also for endophytic bacteria in the interaction with their hosts.

  8. Age-related dysfunctions of the autophagy lysosomal pathway in hippocampal pyramidal neurons under proteasome stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilán, Elena; Pintado, Cristina; Gavilan, Maria P; Daza, Paula; Sánchez-Aguayo, Inmaculada; Castaño, Angélica; Ruano, Diego

    2015-05-01

    Autophagy plays a key role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, and autophagy deregulation gives rise to severe disorders. Many of the signaling pathways regulating autophagy under stress conditions are still poorly understood. Using a model of proteasome stress in rat hippocampus, we have characterized the functional crosstalk between the ubiquitin proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosome pathway, identifying also age-related modifications in the crosstalk between both proteolytic systems. Under proteasome inhibition, both autophagy activation and resolution were efficiently induced in young but not in aged rats, leading to restoration of protein homeostasis only in young pyramidal neurons. Importantly, proteasome stress inhibited glycogen synthase kinase-3β in young but activated in aged rats. This age-related difference could be because of a dysfunction in the signaling pathway of the insulin growth factor-1 under stress situations. Present data highlight the potential role of glycogen synthase kinase-3β in the coordination of both proteolytic systems under stress situation, representing a key molecular target to sort out this deleterious effect.

  9. Production of Proteasome Inhibitor Syringolin A by the Endophyte Rhizobium sp. Strain AP16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Laurent; Dudler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Syringolin A, the product of a mixed nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase encoded by the syl gene cluster, is a virulence factor secreted by certain Pseudomonas syringae strains. Together with the glidobactins produced by a number of beta- and gammaproteobacterial human and animal pathogens, it belongs to the syrbactins, a structurally novel class of proteasome inhibitors. In plants, proteasome inhibition by syringolin A-producing P. syringae strains leads to the suppression of host defense pathways requiring proteasome activity, such as the ones mediated by salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Here we report the discovery of a syl-like gene cluster with some unusual features in the alphaproteobacterial endophyte Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 that encodes a putative syringolin A-like synthetase whose components share 55% to 65% sequence identity (72% to 79% similarity) at the amino acid level. As revealed by average nucleotide identity (ANI) calculations, this strain likely belongs to the same species as biocontrol strain R. rhizogenes K84 (formely known as Agrobacterium radiobacter K84), which, however, carries a nonfunctional deletion remnant of the syl-like gene cluster. Here we present a functional analysis of the syl-like gene cluster of Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 and demonstrate that this endophyte synthesizes syringolin A and some related minor variants, suggesting that proteasome inhibition by syrbactin production can be important not only for pathogens but also for endophytic bacteria in the interaction with their hosts. PMID:24727275

  10. FISH Loci of 18-26s rDNA in Four Gossypium Species%四个棉种18-26s rDNA荧光原位杂交

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kunbo WANG; Chunying WANG; Shu BIE; Guoli SONG; Maoxue LI

    2002-01-01

    @@ Detection of specific nucleic acid sequences such as RNA or DNA in chromosomes by in situ hybridization has important applications in many areas of biology. The genes encoding 18-26s rRNA are located nucleus organizer regions (NORs) in plant chromosomes. Fluorescent in situ hybridization ( FISH ) with 18-26s rDNA as probe to somatic chromosomes may directly provide insight into genetic mapping and then,by comparisons with karyotypes, physical loci of NORs of the genome.

  11. Paradoxical resistance of multiple myeloma to proteasome inhibitors by decreased levels of 19S proteasomal subunits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acosta-Alvear, Diego; Cho, Min Y; Wild, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hallmarks of cancer, including rapid growth and aneuploidy, can result in non-oncogene addiction to the proteostasis network that can be exploited clinically. The defining example is the exquisite sensitivity of multiple myeloma (MM) to 20S proteasome inhibitors, such as carfilzomib. However, MM...

  12. The ubiquitin-proteasome system in glioma cell cycle control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlachostergios Panagiotis J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A major determinant of cell fate is regulation of cell cycle. Tight regulation of this process is lost during the course of development and progression of various tumors. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS constitutes a universal protein degradation pathway, essential for the consistent recycling of a plethora of proteins with distinct structural and functional roles within the cell, including cell cycle regulation. High grade tumors, such as glioblastomas have an inherent potential of escaping cell cycle control mechanisms and are often refractory to conventional treatment. Here, we review the association of UPS with several UPS-targeted proteins and pathways involved in regulation of the cell cycle in malignant gliomas, and discuss the potential role of UPS inhibitors in reinstitution of cell cycle control.

  13. The effect of peptidic and non-peptidic proteasome inhibitors on the biological properties of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Saleem, Sahreena; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    The treatment of Acanthamoeba infections remains problematic, suggesting that new targets and/or chemotherapeutic agents are needed. Bioassay-guided screening of drugs that are clinically-approved for non-communicable diseases against opportunistic eukaryotic pathogens is a viable strategy. With known targets and mode of action, such drugs can advance to clinical trials at a faster pace. Recently Bortezomib (proteasome inhibitor) has been approved by FDA in the treatment of multiple myeloma. As proteasomal pathways are well known regulators of a variety of eukaryotic cellular functions, the overall aim of the present study was to study the effects of peptidic and non-peptidic proteasome inhibitors on the biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype, in vitro. Zymographic assays revealed that inhibition of proteasome had detrimental effects on the extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. Proteasome inhibition affected A. castellanii growth (using amoebistatic assays), but not viability of A. castellanii. Importantly, proteasome inhibitors affected encystation as determined by trophozoite transformation into the cyst form, as well as excystation, as determined by cyst transformation into the trophozoite form. The ability of proteasome inhibitor to block Acanthamoeba differentiation is significant, as it presents a major challenge in the successful treatment of Acanthamoeba infection. As these drugs are used clinically against non-communicable diseases, the findings reported here have the potential to be tested in a clinical setting against amoebic infections.

  14. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-02-15

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design.

  15. Intermediate filament transcription in astrocytes is repressed by proteasome inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middeldorp, Jinte; Kamphuis, Willem; Sluijs, Jacqueline A.; Achoui, Dalila; Leenaars, Cathalijn H. C.; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.; van Tijn, Paula; Fischer, David F.; Berkers, Celia; Ovaa, Huib; Quinlan, Roy A.; Hol, Elly M.

    2009-01-01

    Increased expression of the astrocytic intermediate filament protein glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a characteristic of astrogliosis. This process occurs in the brain during aging and neurodegeneration and coincides with impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system. Inhibition of the proteasome impairs protein degradation; therefore, we hypothesized that the increase in GFAP may be the result of impaired proteasomal activity in astrocytes. We investigated the effect of proteasome inhibitors on GFAP expression and other intermediate filament proteins in human astrocytoma cells and in a rat brain model for astrogliosis. Extensive quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot analysis resulted unexpectedly in a strong decrease of GFAP mRNA to Hol, E. M. Intermediate filament transcription in astrocytes is repressed by proteasome inhibition. PMID:19332645

  16. Specificity of the proteasome cleavage to the antigen protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In the MHC classⅠmolecule binding antigenic peptides processing and presentation pathway,the ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a key role in degrading the protein substrate.For the purpose of studying the specificities of proteasomal cleavage sites,partial least squares method is used to predict the proteasomal cleavage sites,and the predictive accuracy of the model is 82.8%.The specificities of the cleavage sites and the adjacent positions come from the contribution of the amino acids of the samples to the cleavage sites,showing the information of proteasome interacting with antigen protein.It demonstrates that the proteasome cleaving to target protein is selective,but not random.

  17. Prediction of proteasome cleavage motifs by neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesimir, C.; Nussbaum, A.K.; Schild, H.

    2002-01-01

    We present a predictive method that can simulate an essential step in the antigen presentation in higher vertebrates, namely the step involving the proteasomal degradation of polypeptides into fragments which have the potential to bind to MHC Class I molecules. Proteasomal cleavage prediction...... algorithms published so far were trained on data from in vitro digestion experiments with constitutive proteasomes. As a result, they did not take into account the characteristics of the structurally modified proteasomes-often called immunoproteasomes-found in cells stimulated by gamma-interferon under...... physiological conditions. Our algorithm has been trained not only on in vitro data, but also on MHC Class I ligand data, which reflect a combination of immunoproteasome and constitutive proteasome specificity. This feature, together with the use of neural networks, a non-linear classification technique, make...

  18. Changes in Activity and Kinetic Properties of the Proteasome in Different Rat Organs during Development and Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petersen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteasome is considered the most important proteolytic system for removal of damaged proteins with aging. Using fluorogenic peptide substrates, the chymotrypsin-like, the trypsin-like, and the peptidylglutamyl peptidase activities of the proteasome were measured in the soluble fractions of liver, brain, and lens rat homogenates. Specific activity was significantly decreased in liver and brain homogenates with maturation of the animal, that is, from newborn (7 days old to fertile rats (2–4 months old. Rat lens homogenate exhibited an increase in activity with maturation and also with aging. Chymotrypsin-like activity was stimulated by calcium and this proteolytic activity was significantly decreased with maturation of the rat brain. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km increased with age in rat liver and lens, indicating a loss of affinity for its substrates by the proteasome in the animal with maturation and aging. The present data suggest that the loss of function of the proteasome with maturation may be due to structural changes of the proteasome or a decreased content of regulatory components.

  19. Probing the proteasome cavity in three steps: bio-orthogonal photo-reactive suicide substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurink, Paul P; Florea, Bogdan I; Van der Marel, Gijs A; Kessler, Benedikt M; Overkleeft, Herman S

    2010-12-21

    Tri-functional activity-based protein probes that encompass an electrophilic trap, a photo-reactive group and a bio-orthogonal ligation handle are described. With these, and in a three-step chemical proteomics approach, proteasomal catalytic sites are covalently and irreversibly modified, followed by photocrosslinking of these to flanking subunits and Staudinger-Bertozzi ligation for visualization and identification of the resulting conjugates.

  20. Lamins, laminopathies and disease mechanisms: Possible role for proteasomal degradation of key regulatory proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Veena K Parnaik; Pankaj Chaturvedi; B H Muralikrishna

    2011-08-01

    Lamins are major structural proteins of the nucleus and are essential for nuclear integrity and organization of nuclear functions. Mutations in the human lamin genes lead to highly degenerative genetic diseases that affect a number of different tissues such as muscle, adipose or neuronal tissues, or cause premature ageing syndromes. New findings on the role of lamins in cellular signalling pathways, as well as in ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation, have given important insights into possible mechanisms of pathogenesis.

  1. Two waves of proteasome-dependent protein degradation in the hippocampus are required for recognition memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Luciana S; Dornelles, Arethuza S; Petry, Fernanda S; Falavigna, Lucio; Dargél, Vinicius A; Köbe, Luiza M; Aguzzoli, Cristiano; Roesler, Rafael; Schröder, Nadja

    2015-04-01

    Healthy neuronal function and synaptic modification require a concert of synthesis and degradation of proteins. Increasing evidence indicates that protein turnover mediated by proteasome activity is involved in long-term synaptic plasticity and memory. However, its role in different phases of memory remains debated, and previous studies have not examined the possible requirement of protein degradation in recognition memory. Here, we show that the proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin (LAC), infused into the CA1 area of the hippocampus at two specific time points during consolidation, impairs 24-retention of memory for object recognition in rats. Administration of LAC after retrieval did not affect retention. These findings provide the first evidence for a requirement of proteasome activity in recognition memory, indicate that protein degradation in the hippocampus is necessary during selective time windows of memory consolidation, and further our understanding of the role of protein turnover in memory formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 15-Deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 modifies components of the proteasome and inhibits inflammatory responses in human endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Marcone

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available 15-Deoxy-delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 is an electrophilic lipid mediator derived from PGD2 with potent anti-inflammatory effects. These are likely to be due to the covalent modification of cellular proteins, via a reactive α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group in its cyclopentenone ring. This study was carried out to identify novel cellular target(s for covalent modification by 15d-PGJ2 and to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of the prostaglandin on endothelial cells. The data presented here show that 15d-PGJ2 modifies and inhibits components of the proteasome and consequently inhibits the activation of the NF-kB pathway in response to TNF-a. This, in turn, inhibits the adhesion and migration of monocytes toward activated endothelial cells, by reducing the expression of adhesion molecules and chemokines in the endothelial cell. The effects are consistent with the covalent modification of 13 proteins in the 19S particle of the proteasome identified by mass spectrometry and the suppression of proteasome function, and were similar to the effects seen with a known proteasome inhibitor (MG132. The ubiquitin-proteasome system has been implicated in the regulation of several inflammatory processes and the observation that 15d-PGJ2 profoundly affects the proteasome functions in human endothelial cell suggests that 15d-PGJ2 may regulate the progression of inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis.

  3. Redox control of the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegenburg, Franziska; Poulsen, Esben G; Koch, Annett

    2011-01-01

    is characteristic of many diseases and during aging. To counter the adverse effects of oxidative stress, cells can initiate an antioxidative response in an attempt to repair the damage, or rapidly channel the damaged proteins for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Recent studies have shown...... that elements of the oxidative stress response and the UPS are linked on many levels. To manage the extra burden of misfolded proteins, the UPS is induced by oxidative stress, and special proteasome subtypes protect cells against oxidative damage. In addition, the proteasome is directly associated...

  4. APP and APLP1 are degraded through autophagy in response to proteasome inhibition in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fangfang; van Laar, Theo; Huang, Huizhe; Zhang, Long

    2011-05-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) is a key protein in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Both APP and its paralogue APLP1 (amyloid beta precursor-like protein 1) have multiple functions in cell adhesion and proliferation. Previously it was thought that autophagy is a novel beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ)-generating pathway activated in AD. However, the protein proteolysis of APLP1 is still largely unknown. The present study shows that APLP1 is rapidly degraded in neuronal cells in response to stresses, such as proteasome inhibition. Activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress by proteasome inhibitors induces autophagy, causing reduction of mature APLP1/APP. Blocking autophagy or JNK stress kinase rescues the protein expression for both APP and APLP1. Therefore, our results suggest that APP/APLP1 is degraded through autophagy and the APLP1 proteolysis is mainly mediated by autophagy-lysosome pathway.

  5. Regulation of SUMO2 Target Proteins by the Proteasome in Human Cells Exposed to Replication Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bursomanno, Sara; McGouran, Joanna F; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2015-01-01

    In human cells, SUMO2 is predominantly conjugated to target proteins in response to cellular stress. Previous studies suggested that proteins conjugated to SUMO2, but not to SUMO1, could be regulated by the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome system. Hence, we set out to understand the role of the prot......In human cells, SUMO2 is predominantly conjugated to target proteins in response to cellular stress. Previous studies suggested that proteins conjugated to SUMO2, but not to SUMO1, could be regulated by the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome system. Hence, we set out to understand the role...... of genome instability, which is suggested to drive tumorigenesis and possibly aging, our data will facilitate future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology....

  6. Prediction of a common structural scaffold for proteasome lid, COP9-signalosome and eIF3 complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Kay

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 'lid' subcomplex of the 26S proteasome and the COP9 signalosome (CSN complex share a common architecture consisting of six subunits harbouring a so-called PCI domain (proteasome, CSN, eIF3 at their C-terminus, plus two subunits containing MPN domains (Mpr1/Pad1 N-terminal. The translation initiation complex eIF3 also contains PCI- and MPN-domain proteins, but seems to deviate from the 6+2 stoichiometry. Initially, the PCI domain was defined as the region of detectable sequence similarity between the components mentioned above. Results During an exhaustive bioinformatical analysis of proteasome components, we detected multiple instances of tetratrico-peptide repeats (TPR in the N-terminal region of most PCI proteins, suggesting that their homology is not restricted to the PCI domain. We also detected a previously unrecognized PCI domain in the eIF3 component eIF3k, a protein whose 3D-structure has been determined recently. By using profile-guided alignment techniques, we show that the structural elements found in eIF3k are most likely conserved in all PCI proteins, resulting in a structural model for the canonical PCI domain. Conclusion Our model predicts that the homology domain PCI is not a true domain in the structural sense but rather consists of two subdomains: a C-terminal 'winged helix' domain with a key role in PCI:PCI interaction, preceded by a helical repeat region. The TPR-like repeats detected in the N-terminal region of PCI proteins most likely form an uninterrupted extension of the repeats found within the PCI domain boundaries. This model allows an interpretation of several puzzling experimental results.

  7. Conservation of the Nrf2-Mediated Gene Regulation of Proteasome Subunits and Glucose Metabolism in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Thanh Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Keap1-Nrf2 system is an evolutionarily conserved defense mechanism against oxidative and xenobiotic stress. Besides the exogenous stress response, Nrf2 has been found to regulate numerous cellular functions, including protein turnover and glucose metabolism; however, the evolutionary origins of these functions remain unknown. In the present study, we searched for novel target genes associated with the zebrafish Nrf2 to answer this question. A microarray analysis of zebrafish embryos that overexpressed Nrf2 revealed that 115 candidate genes were targets of Nrf2, including genes encoding proteasome subunits and enzymes involved in glucose metabolism. A real-time quantitative PCR suggested that the expression of 3 proteasome subunits (psma3, psma5, and psmb7 and 2 enzymes involved in glucose metabolism (pgd and fbp1a were regulated by zebrafish Nrf2. We thus next examined the upregulation of these genes by an Nrf2 activator, diethyl maleate, using Nrf2 mutant zebrafish larvae. The results of real-time quantitative PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization showed that all of these 5 genes were upregulated by diethyl maleate treatment in an Nrf2-dependent manner, especially in the liver. These findings implied that the Nrf2-mediated regulation of the proteasome subunits and glucose metabolism is evolutionarily conserved among vertebrates.

  8. Reciprocal regulation of cilia and autophagy via the MTOR and proteasome pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shixuan; Livingston, Man J; Su, Yunchao; Dong, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Primary cilium is an organelle that plays significant roles in a number of cellular functions ranging from cell mechanosensation, proliferation, and differentiation to apoptosis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular function in biology and indispensable for cellular homeostasis. Both cilia and autophagy have been linked to different types of genetic and acquired human diseases. Their interaction has been suggested very recently, but the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. We examined autophagy in cells with suppressed cilia and measured cilium length in autophagy-activated or -suppressed cells. It was found that autophagy was repressed in cells with short cilia. Further investigation showed that MTOR activation was enhanced in cilia-suppressed cells and the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin could largely reverse autophagy suppression. In human kidney proximal tubular cells (HK2), autophagy induction was associated with cilium elongation. Conversely, autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ) as well as bafilomycin A1 (Baf) led to short cilia. Cilia were also shorter in cultured atg5-knockout (KO) cells and in atg7-KO kidney proximal tubular cells in mice. MG132, an inhibitor of the proteasome, could significantly restore cilium length in atg5-KO cells, being concomitant with the proteasome activity. Together, the results suggest that cilia and autophagy regulate reciprocally through the MTOR signaling pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  9. What do we really know about the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle atrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoe, R. T.; Goldberg, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Studies of many different rodent models of muscle wasting have indicated that accelerated proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is the principal cause of muscle atrophy induced by fasting, cancer cachexia, metabolic acidosis, denervation, disuse, diabetes, sepsis, burns, hyperthyroidism and excess glucocorticoids. However, our understanding about how muscle proteins are degraded, and how the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is activated in muscle under these conditions, is still very limited. The identities of the important ubiquitin-protein ligases in skeletal muscle, and the ways in which they recognize substrates are still largely unknown. Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that one set of ubquitination enzymes, E2(14K) and E3(alpha), which are responsible for the 'N-end rule' system of ubiquitination, plays an important role in muscle, especially in catabolic states. However, their functional significance in degrading different muscle proteins is still unclear. This review focuses on the many gaps in our understanding of the functioning of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle atrophy, and highlights the strengths and limitations of the different experimental approaches used in such studies.

  10. The ubiquitin-proteasome system in cardiac dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearini, Giulia; Schlossarek, Saskia; Willis, Monte S; Carrier, Lucie

    2008-12-01

    Since proteins play crucial roles in all biological processes, the finely tuned equilibrium between their synthesis and degradation regulates cellular homeostasis. Controlling the quality of proteome informational content is essential for cell survival and function. After initial synthesis, membrane and secretory proteins are modified, folded, and assembled in the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas other proteins are synthesized and processed in the cytosol. Cells have different protein quality control systems, the molecular chaperones, which help protein folding and stabilization, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and lysosomes, which degrade proteins. It has generally been assumed that UPS and lysosomes are regulated independently and serve distinct functions. The UPS degrades both cytosolic, nuclear proteins, and myofibrillar proteins, whereas the lysosomes degrade most membrane and extracellular proteins by endocytosis as well as cytosolic proteins and organelles via autophagy. Over the last two decades, the UPS has been increasingly recognized as a major system in several biological processes including cell proliferation, adaptation to stress and cell death. More recently, activation or impairment of the UPS has been reported in cardiac disease and recent evidence indicate that autophagy is a key mechanism to maintain cardiac structure and function. This review mainly focuses on the UPS and its various components in healthy and diseased heart, but also summarizes recent data suggesting parallel activation of the UPS and autophagy in cardiac disease.

  11. Ubiquitin/proteasome pathway regulates levels of retinoic acid receptor gamma and retinoid X receptor alpha in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjelal, M; Wang, Z; Voorhees, J J; Fisher, G J

    2000-04-15

    Repeated exposure of human skin to solar UV radiation leads to premature aging (photoaging) and skin cancer. UV-induced skin damage can be ameliorated by all-trans retinoic acid treatment. The actions of retinoic acid in skin keratinocytes are mediated primarily by nuclear retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARgamma) and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha). We found that exposure of cultured primary human keratinocytes to UV irradiation (30 mJ/cm2) substantially reduced (50-90%) RARgamma and RXRalpha mRNA and protein within 8 h. The rates of disappearance of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after UV exposure or treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide were similar. UV irradiation did not increase the rate of breakdown of RARgamma or RXRalpha but rather reduced their rate of synthesis. The addition of proteasome inhibitors MG132 and LLvL, but not the lysosomal inhibitor E64, prevented loss of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after exposure of keratinocytes to either UV radiation or cycloheximide. Soluble extracts from nonirradiated or UV-irradiated keratinocytes possessed similar levels of proteasome activity that degraded RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins in vitro. Furthermore, RARgamma and RXRalpha were polyubiquitinated in intact cells. RXRalpha was found to contain two proline, glutamate/aspartate, serine, and threonine (PEST) motifs, which confer rapid turnover of many short-lived regulatory proteins that are degraded by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. However, the PEST motifs in RXRalpha did not function to regulate its stability, because deletion of the PEST motifs individually or together did not alter ubiquitination or proteasome-mediated degradation of RXRalpha. These results demonstrate that loss of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after UV irradiation results from degradation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Taken together, the data here indicate that ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated breakdown is an important mechanism regulating the levels of

  12. Dynamic recruitment of active proteasomes into polyglutamine initiated inclusion bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper-Krom, S.; Juenemann, K.; Jansen, A.H.; Wiemhoefer, A.; van den Nieuwendijk, R.; Smith, D.L.; Hink, M.A.; Bates, G.P.; Overkleeft, H.; Ovaa, H.; Reits, E.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease are hallmarked by neuronal intracellular inclusion body formation. Whether proteasomes are irreversibly recruited into inclusion bodies in these protein misfolding disorders is a controversial subject. In addition, it has been proposed that th

  13. Predicting proteasomal cleavage sites: a comparison of available methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxova, P.; Buus, S.; Brunak, Søren

    2003-01-01

    The proteasome plays an essential role in the immune responses of vertebrates. By degrading intercellular proteins from self and non-self, the proteasome produces the majority of the peptides that are presented to cytotoxic T cells (CTL). There is accumulating evidence that the C......-terminal, in particular, of CTL epitopes is cleaved precisely by the proteasome, whereas the N-terminal is produced with an extension, and later trimmed by peptidases in the cytoplasm and in the endoplasmic reticulum. Recently, three publicly available methods have been developed for prediction of the specificity...... of the proteasome. Here, we compare the performance of these methods on a large set of CTL epitopes. The best method, NetChop at www.cbs.dtu.dk/Services/NetChop, can capture similar to70% of the C-termini correctly. This result suggests that the predictions can still be improved, particularly if more quantitative...

  14. Antitumorigenic effect of proteasome inhibitors on insulinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, Joachim; Allaman-Pillet, Nathalie; Karlsen, Allan E

    2004-01-01

    Malignant insulinoma is a critical cancer form with a poor prognosis. Because cure by surgery is infrequent, effective chemotherapy is in demand. Induction of cell death in tumor cells by proteasome inhibitors is emerging as a potential strategy in cancer therapy. Here we investigated whether...... inhibition of the proteasome has an antitumorigenic potential in insulinoma cells. Exposure of mouse betaTC3 insulinoma cells to the proteasome inhibitor N-Acetyl-Leu-Leu-Nle-CHO (ALLN) reduced cell viability, activated caspase-3, induced apoptosis, and suppressed insulin release. Treatment with ALLN also...... resulted in phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and an increase in in vitro phosphorylation of c-jun. In insulinoma cells with impaired JNK signaling, ALLN-induced apoptosis was significantly suppressed. Another proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin, also stimulated JNK activation, caused...

  15. Urea-containing peptide boronic acids as potent proteasome inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li-Qiang; Yuan, Xia; Wu, Xing-Yu; Li, Ri-Dong; Xu, Bo; Cheng, Qing; Liu, Zhen-Ming; Zhou, Tian-Yan; An, Hao-Yun; Wang, Xin; Cheng, Tie-Ming; Ge, Ze-Mei; Cui, Jing-Rong; Li, Run-Tao

    2017-01-05

    A novel class of urea-containing peptide boronic acids as proteasome inhibitors was designed by introducing a urea scaffold to replace an amido bond. Compounds were synthesized and their antitumor activities were evaluated. After two rounds of optimizations, the compound I-14 was found to be a potent proteasome inhibitor. Compared with Bortezomib, I-14 showed higher potency against the chymotrypsin-like activity of human 20S proteasome (IC50 < 1 pM), similar potency against four different cancer cell lines (IC50 < 10 nM), and better pharmacokinetic profile. Furthermore, I-14 significantly inhibited tumor growth in Bel7404 mouse xenograft model. The excellent proteasome inhibition by I-14 was rationalized through docking and molecular dynamics studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Anti-tumor Action and Clinical Application of Proteasome Inhibitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yong-ming; YU Mei-xia; LONG Hui; HUANG Shi-ang

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway mediates the degradation of cell protein,and cell cycle,gene translation and expression,antigen presentation and inflammatory development.Proteasome inhibitor Call inhibit growth and proliferation of tumor cell,induce apoptosis and reverse multipledrug resistance of tumor cell,increase the sensitivity of other chemomerapeutic drugs and radiotherapy,and is a novel class of potent anti-tumor agents.

  17. Reconfiguration of the proteasome during chaperone-mediated assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyeon; Li, Xueming; Kim, Ho Min; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Tian, Geng; Hoyt, Martin A.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Zolkiewski, Michal; Coffino, Philip; Roelofs, Jeroen; Cheng, Yifan; Finley, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The proteasomal ATPase ring, comprising Rpt1-Rpt6, associates with the heptameric α ring of the proteasome core particle (CP) in the mature proteasome, with the Rpt C-terminal tails inserting into pockets of the α ring1–4. Rpt ring assembly is mediated by four chaperones, each binding a distinct Rpt subunit5–10. We report that the base subassembly of the proteasome, which includes the Rpt ring, forms a high affinity complex with the CP. This complex is subject to active dissociation by the chaperones Hsm3, Nas6, and Rpn14. Chaperone-mediated dissociation was abrogated by a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog, indicating that chaperone action is coupled to nucleotide hydrolysis by the Rpt ring. Unexpectedly, synthetic Rpt tail peptides bound α pockets with poor specificity, except for Rpt6, which uniquely bound the α2/α3 pocket. Although the Rpt6 tail is not visualized within an α pocket in mature proteasomes2–4, it inserts into the α2/α3 pocket in the base-CP complex and is important for complex formation. Thus, the Rpt-CP interface is reconfigured when the lid complex joins the nascent proteasome to form the mature holoenzyme. PMID:23644457

  18. Proteasome dysfunction induces muscle growth defects and protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Warita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masaaki; Tateyama, Maki; Ando, Risa; Izumi, Rumiko; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Ito, Hidefumi; Urushitani, Makoto; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-12-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways are the two major routes of protein and organelle clearance. The role of the proteasome pathway in mammalian muscle has not been examined in vivo. In this study, we report that the muscle-specific deletion of a crucial proteasomal gene, Rpt3 (also known as Psmc4), resulted in profound muscle growth defects and a decrease in force production in mice. Specifically, developing muscles in conditional Rpt3-knockout animals showed dysregulated proteasomal activity. The autophagy pathway was upregulated, but the process of autophagosome formation was impaired. A microscopic analysis revealed the accumulation of basophilic inclusions and disorganization of the sarcomeres in young adult mice. Our results suggest that appropriate proteasomal activity is important for muscle growth and for maintaining myofiber integrity in collaboration with autophagy pathways. The deletion of a component of the proteasome complex contributed to myofiber degeneration and weakness in muscle disorders that are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal inclusions.

  19. Proteasome dysfunction induces muscle growth defects and protein aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Warita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masaaki; Tateyama, Maki; Ando, Risa; Izumi, Rumiko; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Ito, Hidefumi; Urushitani, Makoto; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin–proteasome and autophagy–lysosome pathways are the two major routes of protein and organelle clearance. The role of the proteasome pathway in mammalian muscle has not been examined in vivo. In this study, we report that the muscle-specific deletion of a crucial proteasomal gene, Rpt3 (also known as Psmc4), resulted in profound muscle growth defects and a decrease in force production in mice. Specifically, developing muscles in conditional Rpt3-knockout animals showed dysregulated proteasomal activity. The autophagy pathway was upregulated, but the process of autophagosome formation was impaired. A microscopic analysis revealed the accumulation of basophilic inclusions and disorganization of the sarcomeres in young adult mice. Our results suggest that appropriate proteasomal activity is important for muscle growth and for maintaining myofiber integrity in collaboration with autophagy pathways. The deletion of a component of the proteasome complex contributed to myofiber degeneration and weakness in muscle disorders that are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal inclusions. PMID:25380823

  20. Proteomic characterization of an isolated fraction of synthetic proteasome inhibitor (PSI-induced inclusions in PC12 cells might offer clues to aggresomes as a cellular defensive response against proteasome inhibition by PSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xing'an

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cooperation of constituents of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS with chaperone proteins in degrading proteins mediate a wide range of cellular processes, such as synaptic function and neurotransmission, gene transcription, protein trafficking, mitochondrial function and metabolism, antioxidant defence mechanisms, and apoptotic signal transduction. It is supposed that constituents of the UPS and chaperone proteins are recruited into aggresomes where aberrant and potentially cytotoxic proteins may be sequestered in an inactive form. Results To determinate the proteomic pattern of synthetic proteasome inhibitor (PSI-induced inclusions in PC12 cells after proteasome inhibition by PSI, we analyzed a fraction of PSI-induced inclusions. A proteomic feature of the isolated fraction was characterized by identification of fifty six proteins including twenty previously reported protein components of Lewy bodies, twenty eight newly identified proteins and eight unknown proteins. These proteins, most of which were recognized as a profile of proteins within cellular processes mediated by the UPS, a profile of constituents of the UPS and a profile of chaperone proteins, are classed into at least nine accepted categories. In addition, prolyl-4-hydroxylase beta polypeptide, an endoplasmic reticulum member of the protein disulfide isomerase family, was validated in the developmental process of PSI-induced inclusions in the cells. Conclusions It is speculated that proteomic characterization of an isolated fraction of PSI-induced inclusions in PC12 cells might offer clues to appearance of aggresomes serving as a cellular defensive response against proteasome inhibition.

  1. Role of the ubiquitin proteasome system in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Kah-Leong

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parkinson's disease (PD is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder. Although a subject of intense research, the etiology of PD remains poorly understood. Recently, several lines of evidence have implicated an intimate link between aberrations in the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS and PD pathogenesis. Derangements of the UPS, which normally functions as a type of protein degradation machinery, lead to alterations in protein homeostasis that could conceivably promote the toxic accumulation of proteins detrimental to neuronal survival. Not surprisingly, various cellular and animal models of PD that are based on direct disruption of UPS function reproduce the most prominent features of PD. Although persuasive, new developments in the past few years have in fact raised serious questions about the link between the UPS and PD. Here I review current thoughts and controversies about their relationship and discuss whether strategies aimed at mitigating UPS dysfunction could represent rational ways to intervene in the disease. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com.

  2. MiR-200c regulates Noxa expression and sensitivity to proteasomal inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Mikael; Haneklaus, Moritz; Harada, Masako; Grandér, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic p53 target Noxa is a BH3-only protein that antagonizes the function of selected anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. While much is known regarding the transcriptional regulation of Noxa, its posttranscriptional regulation remains relatively unstudied. In this study, we therefore investigated whether Noxa is regulated by microRNAs. Using a screen combining luciferase reporters, bioinformatic target prediction analysis and microRNA expression profiling, we identified miR-200c as a negative regulator of Noxa expression. MiR-200c was shown to repress basal expression of Noxa, as well as Noxa expression induced by various stimuli, including proteasomal inhibition. Luciferase reporter experiments furthermore defined one miR-200c target site in the Noxa 3'UTR that is essential for this direct regulation. In spite of the miR-200c:Noxa interaction, miR-200c overexpression led to increased sensitivity to the clinically used proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib in several cell lines. This apparently contradictory finding was reconciled by the fact that in cells devoid of Noxa expression, miR-200c overexpression had an even more pronounced positive effect on apoptosis induced by proteasomal inhibition. Together, our data define miR-200c as a potentiator of bortezomib-induced cell death. At the same time, we show that miR-200c is a novel negative regulator of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Noxa.

  3. MiR-200c regulates Noxa expression and sensitivity to proteasomal inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Lerner

    Full Text Available The pro-apoptotic p53 target Noxa is a BH3-only protein that antagonizes the function of selected anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. While much is known regarding the transcriptional regulation of Noxa, its posttranscriptional regulation remains relatively unstudied. In this study, we therefore investigated whether Noxa is regulated by microRNAs. Using a screen combining luciferase reporters, bioinformatic target prediction analysis and microRNA expression profiling, we identified miR-200c as a negative regulator of Noxa expression. MiR-200c was shown to repress basal expression of Noxa, as well as Noxa expression induced by various stimuli, including proteasomal inhibition. Luciferase reporter experiments furthermore defined one miR-200c target site in the Noxa 3'UTR that is essential for this direct regulation. In spite of the miR-200c:Noxa interaction, miR-200c overexpression led to increased sensitivity to the clinically used proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib in several cell lines. This apparently contradictory finding was reconciled by the fact that in cells devoid of Noxa expression, miR-200c overexpression had an even more pronounced positive effect on apoptosis induced by proteasomal inhibition. Together, our data define miR-200c as a potentiator of bortezomib-induced cell death. At the same time, we show that miR-200c is a novel negative regulator of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Noxa.

  4. VRK1 regulates Cajal body dynamics and protects coilin from proteasomal degradation in cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, Lara; Sanz-García, Marta; Vinograd-Byk, Hadar; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Lazo, Pedro A

    2015-06-12

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are nuclear organelles associated with ribonucleoprotein functions and RNA maturation. CBs are assembled on coilin, its main scaffold protein, in a cell cycle dependent manner. The Ser-Thr VRK1 (vaccinia-related kinase 1) kinase, whose activity is also cell cycle regulated, interacts with and phosphorylates coilin regulating assembly of CBs. Coilin phosphorylation is not necessary for its interaction with VRK1, but it occurs in mitosis and regulates coilin stability. Knockdown of VRK1 or VRK1 inactivation by serum deprivation causes a loss of coilin phosphorylation in Ser184 and of CBs formation, which are rescued with an active VRK1, but not by kinase-dead VRK1. The phosphorylation of coilin in Ser184 occurs during mitosis before assembly of CBs. Loss of coilin phosphorylation results in disintegration of CBs, and of coilin degradation that is prevented by proteasome inhibitors. After depletion of VRK1, coilin is ubiquitinated in nuclei, which is partly mediated by mdm2, but its proteasomal degradation occurs in cytosol and is prevented by blocking its nuclear export. We conclude that VRK1 is a novel regulator of CBs dynamics and stability in cell cycle by protecting coilin from ubiquitination and degradation in the proteasome, and propose a model of CB dynamics.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a novel endogenous inhibitor of the proteasome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaochong Li (New York Medical Coll., Valhalla (United States) State Univ. of New York, Brooklyn (United States)); Gu, M.; Etlinger, J.D. (New York Medical Coll., Valhalla (United States))

    1991-10-08

    A novel endogenous inhibitor of the proteasome (high molecular weight multicatalytic protease) has been isolated and characterized from human erythrocytes. After purification by ion-exchange and sizing chromatography, the inhibitor displayed a native molecular mass of approximately 200 kDa and contained a single subunit of 50 kDa with an isoelectric point of 6.9. Although the inhibitor noncompetitively blocks proteolysis of (methyl-{sup 14}C)-{alpha}-casein and inhibits hydrolysis of Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-AMC, it did not affect hydrolysis of other peptide substrates, such as MeOSuc-Phe-Leu-Phe-MNA and Z-Ala-Arg-Arg-MNA. To further characterize the 50-kDa inhibitor, a monoclonal antibody (MI-8) was generated that showed specific binding upon Western blot analysis of both native PAGE and SDS-PAGE. Immunoprecipitation with MI-8 specifically removed inhibitor activity against the proteasome. The 50-kDa inhibitor is distinct from a previously described 40-kDa inhibitor of the proteasome on the basis of lack of cross-reactivity with MI-8 and dissimilar peptide digest patterns. It is suggested that these endogenous inhibitors may have a role in ATP/ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and/or other cellular functions involving this protease.

  6. Ubiquitin-Proteasome System Inhibition Promotes Long-Term Depression and Synaptic Tagging/Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Korte, Martin; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2016-06-01

    A balance of protein synthesis and degradation is critical for the dynamic regulation and implementation of long-term memory storage. The role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in regulating the plasticity at potentiated synapses is well studied, but its roles in depressed synaptic populations remain elusive. In this study, we probed the possibility of regulating the UPS by inhibiting the proteasome function during the induction of protein synthesis-independent form of hippocampal long-term depression (early-LTD), an important component of synaptic plasticity. Here, we show that protein degradation is involved in early-LTD induction and interfering with this process facilitates early-LTD to late-LTD. We provide evidence here that under the circumstances of proteasome inhibition brain-derived neurotrophic factor is accumulated as plasticity-related protein and it drives the weakly depressed or potentiated synapses to associativity. Thus, UPS inhibition promotes LTD and establishes associativity between weakly depressed or potentiated synapses through the mechanisms of synaptic tagging/capture or cross-capture.

  7. Green tea polyphenols block the anticancer effects of bortezomib and other boronic acid-based proteasome inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Encouse B; Lam, Philip Y; Kardosh, Adel; Gaffney, Kevin J; Cadenas, Enrique; Louie, Stan G; Petasis, Nicos A; Chen, Thomas C; Schönthal, Axel H

    2009-06-04

    The anticancer potency of green tea and its individual components is being intensely investigated, and some cancer patients already self-medicate with this "miracle herb" in hopes of augmenting the anticancer outcome of their chemotherapy. Bortezomib (BZM) is a proteasome inhibitor in clinical use for multiple myeloma. Here, we investigated whether the combination of these compounds would yield increased antitumor efficacy in multiple myeloma and glioblastoma cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Unexpectedly, we discovered that various green tea constituents, in particular (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and other polyphenols with 1,2-benzenediol moieties, effectively prevented tumor cell death induced by BZM in vitro and in vivo. This pronounced antagonistic function of EGCG was evident only with boronic acid-based proteasome inhibitors (BZM, MG-262, PS-IX), but not with several non-boronic acid proteasome inhibitors (MG-132, PS-I, nelfinavir). EGCG directly reacted with BZM and blocked its proteasome inhibitory function; as a consequence, BZM could not trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress or caspase-7 activation, and did not induce tumor cell death. Taken together, our results indicate that green tea polyphenols may have the potential to negate the therapeutic efficacy of BZM and suggest that consumption of green tea products may be contraindicated during cancer therapy with BZM.

  8. Inhibition of TRIP1/S8/hSug1, a component of the human 19S proteasome, enhances mitotic apoptosis induced by spindle poisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroshi Y; Gorbsky, Gary J

    2006-01-01

    Mitotic spindle poisons (e.g., Taxol and vinblastine), used as chemotherapy drugs, inhibit mitotic spindle function, activate the mitotic spindle checkpoint, arrest cells in mitosis, and then cause cell death by mechanisms that are poorly understood. By expression cloning, we identified a truncated version of human TRIP1 (also known as S8, hSug1), an AAA (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) family ATPase subunit of the 19S proteasome regulatory complex, as an enhancer of spindle poison-mediated apoptosis. Stable expression of the truncated TRIP1/S8/hSug1 in HeLa cells [OP-TRIP1(88-406)] resulted in a decrease of measurable cellular proteasome activity, indicating that OP-TRIP1(88-406) had a dominant-negative effect on proteasome function. OP-TRIP1(88-406) revealed an increased apoptotic response after treatment with spindle poisons or with proteasome inhibitors. The increased apoptosis coincided with a significant decrease in expression of BubR1, a kinase required for activation and maintenance of the mitotic spindle checkpoint in response to treatment with spindle poisons. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of TRIP1/S8/hSug1 resulted in a reduction of general proteasome activity and an increase in mitotic index. The siRNA treatment also caused increased cell death after spindle poison treatment. These results indicate that inhibition of TRIP1/S8/hSug1 function by expression of a truncated version of the protein or by siRNA-mediated suppression enhances cell death in response to spindle poison treatment. Current proteasome inhibitor drugs in trial as anticancer agents target elements of the 20S catalytic subcomplex. Our results suggest that targeting the ATPase subunits in 19S regulatory complex in the proteasome may enhance the antitumor effects of spindle poisons.

  9. Parkin promotes proteasomal degradation of misregulated BAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Zeynep; Funk, Kathrin; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Todt, Franziska; Zerbes, Ralf M; Oelgeklaus, Aline; Tanaka, Atsushi; van der Laan, Martin; Edlich, Frank

    2017-09-01

    The pro-apoptotic BCL-2 protein BAX commits human cells to apoptosis by permeabilizing the outer mitochondrial membrane. BAX activation has been suggested to require the separation of helix α5 from α6 - the 'latch' from the 'core' domain - among other conformational changes. Here, we show that conformational changes in this region impair BAX translocation to the mitochondria and retrotranslocation back into the cytosol, and therefore BAX inhibition, but not activation. Redirecting misregulated BAX to the mitochondria revealed an alternative mechanism of BAX inhibition. The E3 ligase parkin, which is known to trigger mitochondria-specific autophagy, ubiquitylates BAX K128 and targets the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 protein for proteasomal degradation. Retrotranslocation-deficient BAX is completely degraded in a parkin-dependent manner. Although only a minor pool of endogenous BAX escapes retrotranslocation into the cytosol, parkin-dependent targeting of misregulated BAX on the mitochondria provides substantial protection against BAX apoptotic activity. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Proteasome inhibition mediates p53 reactivation and anti-cancer activity of 6-gingerol in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Namrata; Duggal, Shivali; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Porwal, Konica; Srivastava, Vikas Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Bhatt, M L B; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-12-22

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) expressing E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is known to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 through proteasomal degradation in cervical cancers. Therefore, use of small molecules for inhibition of proteasome function and induction of p53 reactivation is a promising strategy for induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. The polyphenolic alkanone, 6-Gingerol (6G), present in the pungent extracts of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has shown potent anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities against a variety of cancers. In this study we explored the molecular mechanism of action of 6G in human cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. 6G potently inhibited proliferation of the HPV positive cervical cancer cells. 6G was found to: (i) inhibit the chymotrypsin activity of proteasomes, (ii) induce reactivation of p53, (iii) increase levels of p21, (iv) induce DNA damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest, (v) alter expression levels of p53-associated apoptotic markers like, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and (vi) potentiate the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. 6G treatment induced significant reduction of tumor volume, tumor weight, proteasome inhibition and p53 accumulation in HeLa xenograft tumor cells in vivo. The 6G treatment was devoid of toxic effects as it did not affect body weights, hematological and osteogenic parameters. Taken together, our data underscores the therapeutic and chemosensitizing effects of 6G in the management and treatment of cervical cancer.

  11. Development and evaluation of a sandwich ELISA for quantification of the 20S proteasome in human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutaud, Dominique; Aubry, Laurent; Henry, Laurent

    2002-01-01

    Because quantification of the 20S proteasome by functional activity measurements is difficult and inaccurate, we have developed an indirect sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for quantification of the 20S proteasome in human plasma. This sandwich ELISA uses a combination...... of a monoclonal antibody (mcp 20) recognizing the C2-beta subunit of human 20S proteasome (Mr˜30,000) and a polyclonal rabbit anti-20S antibody which labels different subunits of the complex. The detection limit of the assay was established as 10 ng/ml (n=10, mean of zero standard+2 S.D.) and the recovery rate...... ranged from 96% to 104%. The within-run and between-run coefficients of variation (CV) ranges were 2.8–3.3 and 3.0–3.4, respectively. Using serial dilutions of plasma to which various amounts of purified 20S proteasome were added, a linear dose–response was observed between 102 and 2050 ng...

  12. Sulforaphane enhances proteasomal and autophagic activities in mice and is a potential therapeutic reagent for Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanying; Hettinger, Casey L; Zhang, Dong; Rezvani, Khosrow; Wang, Xuejun; Wang, Hongmin

    2014-05-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is impaired in Huntington's disease, a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring compound, has been shown to stimulate UPS activity in cell cultures. To test whether sulforaphane enhances UPS function in vivo, we treated UPS function reporter mice ubiquitously expressing the green fluorescence protein (GFP) fused to a constitutive degradation signal that promotes its rapid degradation in the conditions of a healthy UPS. The modified GFP is termed GFP UPS reporter (GFPu). We found that both GFPu and ubiquitinated protein levels were significantly reduced and the three peptidase activities of the proteasome were increased in the brain and peripheral tissues of the mice. Interestingly, sulforaphane treatment also enhanced autophagy activity in the brain and the liver. To further examine whether sulforaphane promotes mutant huntingtin (mHtt) degradation, we treated Huntington's disease cells with sulforaphane and found that sulforaphane not only enhanced mHtt degradation but also reduced mHtt cytotoxicity. Sulforaphane-mediated mHtt degradation was mainly through the UPS pathway as the presence of a proteasome inhibitor abolished this effect. Taken together, these data indicate that sulforaphane activates protein degradation machineries in both the brain and peripheral tissues and may be a therapeutic reagent for Huntington's disease and other intractable disorders. Accumulation of mutant huntingtin (mHtt) protein causes Huntington's disease (HD). Sulforaphane (SFN), a naturally occurring compound, increased proteasome and autophagy activities in vivo and enhanced mHtt turnover and cell survival in HD cell models. SFN-mediated mHtt degradation is mainly through the proteasome pathway. These data suggest that SFN can be a therapeutic reagent for treating HD and other intractable disorders. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Clioquinol - a novel copper-dependent and independent proteasome inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmer, A D

    2011-03-01

    Clioquinol (5-chloro-7-iodo-quinolin-8-ol) was used in the 1950's-1970's as an oral anti-parasitic agent. More recently, studies have demonstrated that Clioquinol displays preclinical efficacy in the treatment of malignancy. Its anti-cancer activity relates, at least in part, to its ability to inhibit the proteasome through mechanisms dependent and independent of its ability to bind heavy metals such as copper. By acting as a metal ionophore Clioquinol transports metal ions from the extracellular environment into the cell and mobilizes weakly bound intracellular stores. It then directs the metal to the proteasome resulting in disruption of this enzymatic complex. In addition, Clioquinol is capable of directly inhibiting the proteasome at higher concentrations. Thus, Clioquinol represents a novel therapeutic strategy to inhibit the proteasome. Given the prior toxicology and pharmacology studies, Clioquinol could be rapidly repositioned for a new anti-cancer indication. This review highlights the mechanism of action of Clioquinol as a proteasome inhibitor. In addition, it discusses the human pharmacology and toxicology studies and how this information would guide a phase I clinical trial of this agent for patients with malignancy.

  14. Degradation of pro-insulin-receptor proteins by proteasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Miguel; Velasco, Eduardo; Kumate, Jesús

    2004-01-01

    Type-2 diabetes is characterized by hyperinsulinemia, peripheral insulin resistance, and diminished tyrosine phosphorylation activity. It has been recently shown that proteasomes are implicated in the degradation of the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) but not in that of the insulin receptor (IR). However, it is unknown whether proteasomes are involved in pro-IR degradation. We used CHO-IR and the 3T3-L1 cells treated with insulin at different concentrations and compared the proteasome activity of IRS-1, IR, and pro-IR degradation either in presence or in absence of lactacystin. A total of 100 nM of insulin allowed degradation of IRS-1 after 6 h of incubation. At 1,000 nM of insulin, pro-IR degradation began at 1 h of incubation, similar to IRS-1 degradation. Surprisingly, at a higher concentration (10 microM) of insulin, a drastic decrease of proteins was observed from the first minute of incubation. This activity was blocked by lactacystin, a specific proteasome inhibitor. According to these results, we propose that pro-IR is degraded by proteasomes.

  15. [Features of immune proteasome expression in the development of rat central nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, A Sh; Liupina, Iu V; Abaturova, S B; Sharova, N P

    2014-01-01

    Formation of the central nervous system in ontogeny and function in adult mammals are controlled by universal ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic system. The aim of this work was to study the dynamics of expression of immune proteasomes in comparison with the dynamics of ChLA and CLA proteasome and expression of the transcription factor Zif268 in the structures of the brain (cortex, hippocampus, and brainstem) in embryonic (E19, E21 days of embryonic development) and early postnatal (P1, P3, P4, P5, P7, P15 days of post-natal development) development in rats. ChLA and CLA in clarified homogenates of rat brain structures were determined by hydrolysis of fluorogenic commercial oligopeptides Suc-LLVY-AMC and Z-LLG-AMC, respectively. In the cortex and hippocampus of the brain was observed upregulation of immune subunits LMP7 during the active formation of biochemical mediatory structure and efferent neuronal projections at the period P7-P15. In the cerebral cortex during this period ChLA and CLA also are increased. In all structures of the brain the LMP2 immune subunits content was significantly increased at the period P7-P15. Contents of proteolytic constitutive subunit β1 in all structures decreased by P4 compare to P1 levels and was increased on P15 relative to the P1 levels. However, the level of expression of proteolytic constitutive subunit β5 increased in cortex, hippocampus and brainstem from E21 and reached maximum values on P3, P5 and P1, respectively with a sharp decrease to P7 in all studied structures. In all structures expression of LM P2 immune subunits and β1 constitutive subunits increased simultaneously with LMP7 immune subunits and sharply on P15. Also shown a positive correlation of increased expression regulator PA28 and constitutive β5 subunits in the hippocampus during the period P3-P5 and in the brainstem at the period P1-P5. The peculiarity of the studied brain regions during P7-P15 of rat early development is a correlation of expression of

  16. Regulation of STIM1 and SOCE by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Keil

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS mediates the majority of protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. The UPS has recently emerged as a key degradation pathway involved in synapse development and function. In order to better understand the function of the UPS at synapses we utilized a genetic and proteomic approach to isolate and identify novel candidate UPS substrates from biochemically purified synaptic membrane preparations. Using these methods, we have identified Stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1. STIM1 is as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER calcium sensor that has been shown to regulate store-operated Ca(2+ entry (SOCE. We have characterized STIM1 in neurons, finding STIM1 is expressed throughout development with stable, high expression in mature neurons. As in non-excitable cells, STIM1 is distributed in a membranous and punctate fashion in hippocampal neurons. In addition, a population of STIM1 was found to exist at synapses. Furthermore, using surface biotinylation and live-cell labeling methods, we detect a subpopulation of STIM1 on the surface of hippocampal neurons. The role of STIM1 as a regulator of SOCE has typically been examined in non-excitable cell types. Therefore, we examined the role of the UPS in STIM1 and SOCE function in HEK293 cells. While we find that STIM1 is ubiquitinated, its stability is not altered by proteasome inhibitors in cells under basal conditions or conditions that activate SOCE. However, we find that surface STIM1 levels and thapsigargin (TG-induced SOCE are significantly increased in cells treated with proteasome inhibitors. Additionally, we find that the overexpression of POSH (Plenty of SH3's, an E3 ubiquitin ligase recently shown to be involved in the regulation of Ca(2+ homeostasis, leads to decreased STIM1 surface levels. Together, these results provide evidence for previously undescribed roles of the UPS in the regulation of STIM1 and SOCE function.

  17. Origin and inheritance of group I introns in 26S rRNA genes of Gaeumannomyces graminis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M K

    1997-06-01

    Studies of the distribution of the three group I introns (intron A, intron T, and intron AT) in the 26S rDNA of Gaeumannomyces graminis had suggested that they were transferred to a common ancestor of G. graminis var. avenae and var. tritici after it had branched off from var. graminis. Intron AT and intron A exhibited vertical inheritance and coevolved in concert with their hosts. Intron loss could occur after its acquisition. Loss of any one of the three introns could occur in var. tritici whereas only loss of intron T had been found in the majority of var. avenae isolates. The existence of isolates of var. tritici and var. avenae with three introns suggested that intron loss could be reversed by intron acquisition and that the whole process is a dynamic one. This process of intron acquisition and intron loss reached different equilibrium points for different varieties and subgroups, which explained the irregular distribution of these introns in G. graminis. Each of the three group I introns was more closely related to other intron sequences that share the same insertion point in the 26S rDNA than to each other. These introns in distantly related organisms appeared to have a common ancestry. This system had provided a good model for studies on both the lateral transfer and common ancestry of group I introns in the 26S rRNA genes.

  18. The use of activity based protein profiling to study proteasome biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paniagua Soriano, Guillem

    2016-01-01

    The work described in this thesis focuses on the characterization of proteasome directed activity-based probes (ABPs) as well as on the adaptation mechanisms that make multiple myeloma derived cell lines resistant against proteasome inhibitors (PIs).

  19. Dieldrin induces ubiquitin-proteasome dysfunction in alpha-synuclein overexpressing dopaminergic neuronal cells and enhances susceptibility to apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Faneng; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G

    2005-10-01

    Exposure to pesticides is implicated in the etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The organochlorine pesticide dieldrin is one of the environmental chemicals potentially linked to PD. Because recent evidence indicates that abnormal accumulation and aggregation of alpha-synuclein and ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction can contribute to the degenerative processes of PD, in the present study we examined whether the environmental pesticide dieldrin impairs proteasomal function and subsequently promotes apoptotic cell death in rat mesencephalic dopaminergic neuronal cells overexpressing human alpha-synuclein. Overexpression of wild-type alpha-synuclein significantly reduced the proteasomal activity. Dieldrin exposure dose-dependently (0-70 microM) decreased proteasomal activity, and 30 microM dieldrin inhibited activity by more than 60% in alpha-synuclein cells. Confocal microscopic analysis of dieldrin-treated alpha-synuclein cells revealed that alpha-synuclein-positive protein aggregates colocalized with ubiquitin protein. Further characterization of the aggregates with the autophagosomal marker mondansyl cadaverine and the lysosomal marker and dot-blot analysis revealed that these protein oligomeric aggregates were distinct from autophagosomes and lysosomes. The dieldrin-induced proteasomal dysfunction in alpha-synuclein cells was also confirmed by significant accumulation of ubiquitin protein conjugates in the detergent-insoluble fraction. We found that proteasomal inhibition preceded cell death after dieldrin treatment and that alpha-synuclein cells were more sensitive than vector cells to the toxicity. Furthermore, measurement of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation confirmed the enhanced sensitivity of alpha-synuclein cells to dieldrin-induced apoptosis. Together, our results suggest that increased expression of alpha-synuclein predisposes dopaminergic cells to proteasomal dysfunction, which can be further exacerbated by environmental exposure to certain

  20. An extracellular proteasome releases endostatin from human collagen XVIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss-Pistilli, Maria L V; Schuppan, Detlef; Barroso, Madalena M S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Farias, Shirley; Lery, Letícia; Bauer, Michael; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria A; Coelho-Sampaio, Tatiana

    2017-02-01

    Endostatin is a potent anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor protein capable of regressing tumors without inducing acquired resistance. Since it is a fragment of the parental molecule, collagen XVIII, its endogenous production depends on the activity of a specific proteolytic enzyme. While such an enzyme has been described in mice, a human counterpart has not been identified so far. Here, we searched for this enzyme by using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptide containing the cleavage site of human collagen XVIII. We found that the cleavage activity was present in various murine and human tumor cells but not in untransformed cells. It was ascribed to a large protein complex identified as an extracellular form of proteasome 20S. Since circulating proteasome 20S has recently emerged as an important marker of tumor progression, the possibility of proteasomes controlling the production of angiostatic endostatin may inspire the development of new anticancer therapies.

  1. Adrenergic stress reveals septal hypertrophy and proteasome impairment in heterozygous Mybpc3-targeted knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossarek, Saskia; Schuermann, Friederike; Geertz, Birgit; Mearini, Giulia; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Carrier, Lucie

    2012-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by asymmetric septal hypertrophy and is often caused by mutations in MYBPC3 gene encoding cardiac myosin-binding protein C. In contrast to humans, who are already affected at the heterozygous state, mouse models develop the phenotype mainly at the homozygous state. Evidence from cell culture work suggested that altered proteasome function contributes to the pathogenesis of HCM. Here we tested in two heterozygous Mybpc3-targeted mouse models whether adrenergic stress unmasks a specific cardiac phenotype and proteasome dysfunction. The first model carries a human Mybpc3 mutation (Het-KI), the second is a heterozygous Mybpc3 knock-out (Het-KO). Both models were compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Mice were treated with a combination of isoprenaline and phenylephrine (ISO/PE) or NaCl for 1 week. Whereas ISO/PE induced left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) with increased posterior wall thickness to a similar extent in all groups, it increased septum thickness only in Het-KI and Het-KO. ISO/PE did not affect the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity or β5-subunit protein level in Het-KO or wild-type mice (WT). In contrast, both parameters were markedly lower in Het-KI and negatively correlated with the degree of LVH in Het-KI only. In conclusion, adrenergic stress revealed septal hypertrophy in both heterozygous mouse models of HCM, but proteasome dysfunction only in Het-KI mice, which carry a mutant allele and closely mimic human HCM. This supports the hypothesis that proteasome impairment contributes to the pathophysiology of HCM.

  2. Menin missense mutants encoded by the MEN1 gene that are targeted to the proteasome: restoration of expression and activity by CHIP siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaff, Lucie; Vanbellinghen, Jean-François; Kanazawa, Ippei; Kwak, Hayeon; Garfield, Natasha; Vautour, Line; Hendy, Geoffrey N

    2012-02-01

    In multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) characterized by tumors of parathyroid, enteropancreas, and anterior pituitary, missense mutations in the MEN1 gene product, menin, occur in a subset of cases. The mutant proteins are degraded by the proteasome. However, whether their expression and activity can be restored is not known. Our objective was to functionally characterize a panel of 16 menin missense mutants, including W423R and S443Y identified in new MEN1 families, with respect to protein stability, targeting to the proteasome and restoration of expression by proteasome inhibitors and expression and function by small interfering RNA technology. Flag-tagged wild-type (WT) and missense menin mutant expression vectors were transiently transfected in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and/or rat insulinoma (Rin-5F) cells. The majority of mutants were short-lived, whereas WT menin was stable. Proteasome inhibitors MG132 and PS-341 and inhibition of the chaperone, heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70), or the ubiquitin ligase, COOH terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP), by specific small interfering RNA, restored the levels of the mutants, whereas that of WT menin was largely unaffected. Inhibition of CHIP restored the ability of mutants to mediate normal functions of menin: TGF-β up-regulation of the promoters of its target genes, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p15 and p21 as well as TGF-β inhibition of cell numbers. When the levels of missense menin mutants that are targeted to the proteasome are normalized they may function similarly to WT menin. Potentially, targeting specific components of the proteasome chaperone pathway could be beneficial in treating a subset of MEN1 cases.

  3. 26S rDNA序列分析法鉴定开菲尔发酵液中的酵母菌%Identification of Yeast Strains in Kefir Fermented Broth by 26S rDNA Sequence Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范佳; 武伟伟; 李艳

    2014-01-01

    Sequence analysis of 26S rDNA D1/D2 region was applied to identify the yeast strains involved in traditional Kefir fermented broth in Inner Mongolia for the purpose of laying the foundation for selecting proper yeast strains for featured fermented milk drink. Firstly, yeast strains were isolated from Kefir fermented broth, then their colony morphology and cell microscopic morphology were observed, and finally, sequence analysis of 26S rDNA D1/D2 region was carried out. The results showed that, 36 yeast strains in total were isolated and they belonged to five mor-phological types, after DNA extraction, PCR amplification of 26S rDNA D1/D2 region, restriction digestion, sequence analysis and homology comparison, all the yeast stains were further identified at the species level including Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Candida zeylanoides, Pichia fer-mentans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii. The yeast strains isolated from traditional Kefir fermented broth had the poten-tials for the fermentation of featured fermented milk drink.%利用26S rDNA D1/D2区序列分析法鉴定了内蒙古牧区传统开菲尔发酵液中的酵母菌,为筛选可发酵特色乳酒的酵母菌奠定基础。对所分离纯化得的酵母菌进行菌落特征和细胞显微形态区分,在形态鉴定基础上,选择代表菌进行26S rDNA D1/D2区序列分子鉴定。结果表明,共分离到36株酵母菌,形态聚类为5类,经DNA提取、26S rDNA D1/D2区PCR扩增、酶切、基因序列分析和同源性比对,鉴定为5种分子类型的酵母菌,分别为胶红酵母菌(Rhodotorula mucilaginosa)、诞沫假丝酵母菌(Candida zeylanoides)、发酵毕赤酵母菌(Pichia fermentans)、酿酒酵母菌(Saccharomyces cerevisiae)、有孢圆酵母菌(Torulaspora delbrueckii)。传统开菲尔发酵液中分离到的酿酒酵母,具有可发酵特色乳酒的潜质。

  4. Chaperone-dependent E3 ligase CHIP ubiquitinates and mediates proteasomal degradation of soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tian; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Zeng, Jingmin; Antonova, Galina N; Snead, Connie; Venema, Richard C; Fulton, David; Qian, Shuibing; Patterson, Cam; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Catravas, John D

    2007-11-01

    The nitric oxide receptor soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) exists in multimeric protein complexes, including heat shock protein (HSP) 90 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Inhibition of HSP90 by geldanamycin causes proteasomal degradation of sGC protein. In this study, we have investigated whether COOH terminus of heat shock protein 70-interacting protein (CHIP), a co-chaperone molecule that is involved in protein folding but is also a chaperone-dependent ubiquitin E3 ligase, could play a role in the process of degradation of sGC. Transient overexpression of CHIP in COS-7 cells degraded heterologous sGC in a concentration-related manner; this downregulation of sGC was abrogated by the proteasome inhibitor MG-132. Transfection of tetratricopeptide repeats and U-box domain CHIP mutants attenuated sGC degradation, suggesting that both domains are indispensable for CHIP function. Results from immunoprecipitation and indirect immunofluorescent microscopy experiments demonstrated that CHIP is associated with sGC, HSP90, and HSP70 in COS-7 cells. Furthermore, CHIP increased the association of HSP70 with sGC. In in vitro ubiquitination assays using purified proteins and ubiquitin enzymes, E3 ligase CHIP directly ubiquitinated sGC; this ubiquitination was potentiated by geldanamycin in COS-7 cells, followed by proteasomal degradation. In rat aortic smooth muscle cells, endogenous sGC was also degraded by adenovirus-infected wild-type CHIP but not by the chaperone interaction-deficient K30A CHIP, whereas CHIP, but not K30A, attenuated sGC expression in, and nitric oxide donor-induced relaxation of, rat aortic rings, suggesting that CHIP plays a regulatory role under physiological conditions. This study reveals a new mechanism for the regulation of sGC, an important mediator of cellular and vascular function.

  5. Isoform-specific proteasomal degradation of Rbfox3 during chicken embryonic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kee K.; Adelstein, Robert S.; Kawamoto, Sachiyo, E-mail: kawamots@mail.nih.gov

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Protein stability of Rbfox3 splice isoforms is differentially regulated. • Rbfox3-d31, an Rbfox3 isoform lacking the RRM, is highly susceptible to degradation. • The protein stability of Rbfox3-d31 is regulated by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • Rbfox3-d31 inhibits the nuclear localization of Rbfox2. • Rbfox3-d31 inhibits the splicing activity of Rbfox2. - Abstract: Rbfox3, a neuron-specific RNA-binding protein, plays an important role in neuronal differentiation during development. An isoform Rbfox3-d31, which excludes the 93-nucleotide cassette exon within the RNA recognition motif of chicken Rbfox3, has been previously identified. However, the cellular functions of Rbfox3-d31 remain largely unknown. Here we find that Rbfox3-d31 mRNA is highly expressed during the early developmental stages of the chicken embryo, while Rbfox3-d31 protein is barely detected during the same stage due to its rapid degradation mediated by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Importantly, this degradation is specific to the Rbfox3-d31 isoform and it does not occur with full-length Rbfox3. Furthermore, suppression of Rbfox3-d31 protein degradation with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 attenuates the splicing activity of another Rbfox family member Rbfox2 by altering the subcellular localization of Rbfox2. These results suggest that Rbfox3-d31 functions as a repressor for the splicing activity of the Rbfox family and its protein level is regulated in an isoform-specific manner in vivo.

  6. Proteasomal regulation of caspase-8 in cancer cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiandalo, Michael V; Schwarze, Steven R; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that proteasome inhibition sensitizes TRAIL resistant prostate cancer cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis via stabilization of the active p18 subunit of caspase-8. The present study investigated the impact of proteasome inhibition on caspase-8 stability, ubiquitination, trafficking, and activation in cancer cells. Using caspase-8 deficient neuroblastoma (NB7) cells for reconstituting non-cleavable mutant forms of caspase-8, we demonstrated that the non-cleavable forms of caspase-8 are capable of inducing apoptosis comparably to wild-type caspase-8, in response to proteasome inhibitor and GST-TRAIL. Moreover in the LNCaP human prostate cancer cells, caspase-8 polyubiquitination occurs after TRAIL stimulation and caspase-8 processing. Subcellular fractionation analysis revealed caspase-8 activity in both cytosol and plasma membrane fractions in both NB7 reconstituted caspase-8 cell lines, as well the LNCaP prostate cancer cells. The present results suggest that caspase-8 stabilization through proteasome inhibition leads to reactivation of the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis and identify E3 ligase mediating caspase-8 polyubiquitination, as a novel molecular target. Inhibition of this E3 ligase in combination with TRAIL towards restoring apoptosis signaling activation may have potential therapeutic significance in resistant tumors.

  7. Proteasome inhibitors as experimental therapeutics of autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbrugge, Sue Ellen; Scheper, Rik J; Lems, Willem F; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Jansen, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Current treatment strategies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) consisting of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs or biological agents are not always effective, hence driving the demand for new experimental therapeutics. The antiproliferative capacity of proteasome inhibitors (PIs) has received consid

  8. Synthetic tools to illuminate matrix metalloproteinase and proteasome activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurink, Paulus Petrus

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the design, synthesis and application of chemical tools for the activity-based protein profiling of proteases, with the main focus on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the proteasome. The use of photoaffinity labeling is described and the thesis starts with an extensive

  9. The Proteasome and Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet-Costa, Vicent; Pomatto, Laura Corrales-Diaz; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that is projected to exceed more than 100 million cases worldwide by 2050. Aging is considered the primary risk factor for some 90% of Alzheimer's cases but a significant 10% of patients suffer from aggressive, early-onset forms of the disease. There is currently no effective Alzheimer's treatment and this, coupled with a growing aging population, highlights the necessity to understand the mechanism(s) of disease initiation and propagation. A major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease pathology is the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates (an early marker of Alzheimer's disease), and neurofibrillary tangles, comprising the hyper-phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein Tau. Recent Advances: Protein oxidation is frequently invoked as a potential factor in the progression of Alzheimer's disease; however, whether it is a cause or a consequence of the pathology is still being debated. The Proteasome complex is a major regulator of intracellular protein quality control and an essential proteolytic enzyme for the processing of both Aβ and Tau. Recent studies have indicated that both protein oxidation and excessive phosphorylation may limit Proteasomal processing of Aβ and Tau in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the Proteasome may be a key factor in understanding the development of Alzheimer's disease pathology; however, its significance is still very much under investigation. Discovering how the proteasome is affected, regulated, or dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease could be a valuable tool in the efforts to understand and, ultimately, eradicate the disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 886-901.

  10. Muscle atrophy, ubiquitin-proteasome, and autophagic pathways in dysferlinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanin, Marina; Nascimbeni, Anna C; Angelini, Corrado

    2014-09-01

    Muscle fiber atrophy and the molecular pathways underlying this process have not been investigated in dysferlinopathy patients. In 22 muscles from dysferlinopathy patients we investigated fiber atrophy by morphometry and ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagic pathways using protein and/or transcriptional analysis of atrophy- and autophagy-related genes (MuRF1, atrogin1, LC3, p62, Bnip3). Dysferlinopathy showed significant fiber atrophy and higher MuRF-1 protein and mRNA levels, which correlated with fiber size, suggesting activation of the atrophy program by proteasome induction. Some of the MuRF-1 upregulation and proteasome induction may be attributed to the prominent regeneration found. A potential role of impaired autophagy was suggested by p62-positive protein aggregates in atrophic fibers and significantly higher levels of LC3-II and p62 proteins and overexpression of p62 and Bnip3 mRNA. Damaged muscle fibers and prominent inflammatory changes may also enhance autophagy due to the insufficient level of proteasomal degradation of mutant dysferlin. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Synthetic tools to illuminate matrix metalloproteinase and proteasome activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurink, Paulus Petrus

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the design, synthesis and application of chemical tools for the activity-based protein profiling of proteases, with the main focus on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the proteasome. The use of photoaffinity labeling is described and the thesis starts with an extensive outl

  12. The ubiquitin proteasome system in glia and its role in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Anne H P; Reits, Eric A J; Hol, Elly M

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is crucial for intracellular protein homeostasis and for degradation of aberrant and damaged proteins. The accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease, leading to the hypothesis that proteasomal impairment is contributing to these diseases. So far, most research related to the UPS in neurodegenerative diseases has been focused on neurons, while glial cells have been largely disregarded in this respect. However, glial cells are essential for proper neuronal function and adopt a reactive phenotype in neurodegenerative diseases, thereby contributing to an inflammatory response. This process is called reactive gliosis, which in turn affects UPS function in glial cells. In many neurodegenerative diseases, mostly neurons show accumulation and aggregation of ubiquitinated proteins, suggesting that glial cells may be better equipped to maintain proper protein homeostasis. During an inflammatory reaction, the immunoproteasome is induced in glia, which may contribute to a more efficient degradation of disease-related proteins. Here we review the role of the UPS in glial cells in various neurodegenerative diseases, and we discuss how studying glial cell function might provide essential information in unraveling mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. The ubiquitin proteasome system in glia and its role in neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne H.P. Jansen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS is crucial for intracellular protein homeostasis and for degradation of aberrant and damaged proteins. The accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease, leading to the hypothesis that proteasomal impairment is contributing to these diseases. So far, most research related to the UPS in neurodegenerative diseases has been focused on neurons, while glial cells have been largely disregarded in this respect. However, glial cells are essential for proper neuronal functioning and adopt a reactive phenotype in neurodegenerative diseases, thereby contributing to an inflammatory response. This process is called reactive gliosis, which in turn affects UPS functioning in glial cells. In many neurodegenerative diseases, mostly neurons show accumulation and aggregation of ubiquitinated proteins, suggesting that glial cells may be better equipped to maintain proper protein homeostasis. During an inflammatory reaction, the immunoproteasome is induced in glia, which may contribute to a more efficient degradation of disease-related proteins. Here we review the role of the UPS in glial cells in various neurodegenerative diseases, and we discuss how studying glial cell functioning might provide essential information in unraveling mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Def defines a conserved nucleolar pathway that leads p53 to proteasome-independent degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Tao; Hui Shi; Yihong Guan; Delai Huang; Ye Chen; David P Lane; Jun Chen

    2013-01-01

    p53 protein turnover through the ubiquitination pathway is a vital mechanism in the regulation of its transcriptional activity; however,little is known about p53 turnover through proteasome-independent pathway(s).The digestive organ expansion factor (Def) protein is essential for the development of digestive organs.In zebrafish,loss of function of defselectively upregulates the expression of p53 response genes,which raises a question as to what is the relationship between Def and p53.We report here that Def is a nucleolar protein and that loss of function of defleads to the upregulation of p53 protein,which surprisingly accumulates in the nucleoli.Our extensive studies have demonstrated that Def can mediate the degradation of p53 protein and that this process is independent of the proteasome pathway,but dependent on the activity of Calpain3,a cysteine protease.Our findings define a novel nucleolar pathway that regulates the turnover function of p53,which will advance our understanding of p53's role in organogenesis and tumorigenesis.

  15. THE UBIQUITIN-PROTEASOME SYSTEM: POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC TARGETS FOR ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE AND SPINAL CORD INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing eGong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS is a crucial protein degradation system in eukaryotes. Herein we will review advances in the understanding of the role of several proteins of the UPS in Alzheimer’s disease (AD and functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI. The UPS consists of many factors that include E3 ubiquitin ligases, ubiquitin hydrolases, ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like molecules, and the proteasome itself. An extensive body of work links UPS dysfunction with AD pathogenesis and progression. More recently, the UPS has been shown to have vital roles in recovery of function after SCI. The ubiquitin hydrolase Uch-L1 has been proposed to increase cellular levels of mono-ubiquitin and hence to increase rates of protein turnover by the UPS. A low Uch-L1 level has been linked with Aß accumulation in AD and reduced neuroregeneration after SCI. One likely mechanism for these beneficial effects of Uch-L1 is reduced turnover of the PKA regulatory subunit and, consequently, reduced signaling via CREB. The neuron-specific F-box protein Fbx2 ubiquitinates ß-secretase thus targeting it for proteasomal degradation and reducing generation of Aß. Both Uch-L1 and Fbx2 improve synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in mouse AD models. The role of Fbx2 after SCI has not been examined, but abolishing ß-secretase reduces neuronal recovery after SCI, associated with reduced myelination. UBB+1, which arises through a frame-shift mutation in the ubiquitin gene that adds 19 amino acids to the C-terminus of ubiquitin, inhibits proteasomal function and is associated with increased neurofibrillary tangles in patients with AD, Pick’s disease and Downs syndrome. These advances in understanding of the roles of the UPS in AD and SCI raise new questions but, also, identify attractive and exciting targets for potential, future therapeutic interventions.

  16. The homeodomain transcription factor Hoxa2 interacts with and promotes the proteasomal degradation of the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase RCHY1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Bergiers

    Full Text Available Hox proteins are conserved homeodomain transcription factors known to be crucial regulators of animal development. As transcription factors, the functions and modes of action (co-factors, target genes of Hox proteins have been very well studied in a multitude of animal models. However, a handful of reports established that Hox proteins may display molecular activities distinct from gene transcription regulation. Here, we reveal that Hoxa2 interacts with 20S proteasome subunits and RCHY1 (also known as PIRH2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets p53 for degradation. We further show that Hoxa2 promotes proteasome-dependent degradation of RCHY1 in an ubiquitin-independent manner. Correlatively, Hoxa2 alters the RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and promotes p53 stabilization. Together, our data establish that Hoxa2 can regulate the proteasomal degradation of RCHY1 and stabilization of p53.

  17. Therapeutic potential of proteasome inhibitors in congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Jean-Marc; Duchartre, Yann; Costet, Pierre; Lalanne, Magalie; Ged, Cécile; Lain, Ana; Millet, Oscar; de Verneuil, Hubert; Richard, Emmanuel

    2013-11-05

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) deficiency resulting in massive porphyrin accumulation in blood cells, which is responsible for hemolytic anemia and skin photosensitivity. Among the missense mutations actually described up to now in CEP patients, the C73R and the P248Q mutations lead to a profound UROS deficiency and are usually associated with a severe clinical phenotype. We previously demonstrated that the UROS(C73R) mutant protein conserves intrinsic enzymatic activity but triggers premature degradation in cellular systems that could be prevented by proteasome inhibitors. We show evidence that the reduced kinetic stability of the UROS(P248Q) mutant is also responsible for increased protein turnover in human erythroid cells. Through the analysis of EGFP-tagged versions of UROS enzyme, we demonstrate that both UROS(C73R) and UROS(P248Q) are equally destabilized in mammalian cells and targeted to the proteasomal pathway for degradation. We show that a treatment with proteasomal inhibitors, but not with lysosomal inhibitors, could rescue the expression of both EGFP-UROS mutants. Finally, in CEP mice (Uros(P248Q/P248Q)) treated with bortezomib (Velcade), a clinically approved proteasome inhibitor, we observed reduced porphyrin accumulation in circulating RBCs and urine, as well as reversion of skin photosensitivity on bortezomib treatment. These results of medical importance pave the way for pharmacologic treatment of CEP disease by preventing certain enzymatically active UROS mutants from early degradation by using proteasome inhibitors or chemical chaperones.

  18. Proteasome nuclear import mediated by Arc3 can influence efficient DNA damage repair and mitosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera, Rodrigo; Sha, Zhe; Vadakkan, Tegy J.;

    2010-01-01

    Proteasomes must remove regulatory molecules and abnormal proteins throughout the cell, but how proteasomes can do so efficiently remains unclear. We have isolated a subunit of the Arp2/3 complex, Arc3, which binds proteasomes. When overexpressed, Arc3 rescues phenotypes associated with proteasom...

  19. 复发性外阴阴道念珠菌病菌种的26S rDNA序列分析%Analysis on recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis monilia germs of 26S rDNA sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迟绍琴; 许瑞环; 李康; 黄兴国; 陈亦微

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨基于核糖体基因26S rDNA D1/D2区序列分析法在临床酵母菌菌种鉴定中的应用.方法 收集来源于复发性外阴阴道念珠菌病分泌物标本93株,PCR扩增其26S rDNA D1/D2区,对扩增产物进行序列测定和分析,并与基因库中的基因序列进行同源性比对.结果 所有菌株均鉴定到种,同源性达99%和100%,同属于真菌双核亚界、子囊菌门、酵母菌科的3个属,89株为candida,3株为Kodamaea,1株为Pichia.其中candida中有7个种,38株candida glabrata,23株 candida albicans,16株candida parapsolisis,9株candida metapdilosis,1株candida orthopsilisis,1株 candida tropicalis,1株candida nivariensis;3株Kodamaea ohmeri;1株Pichia kudriavzevii.结论 复发性外阴阴道念珠菌病的病原体主要为candida属的candida glabrata、candida albicans 和candida parapsolisis,非candida albicans占75.27%是其特征;26SrDNA D1/D2区序列分析为临床酵母菌的分子水平鉴定提供了一种准确、可行的方法.%Objective To explore the ribosomes gene based on 26S rDNA D1/D2 area sequence analysis method in the clinical application of yeast strain identification. Methods To collect from recurrent genital vaginal moniiiosis secretion specimens of 93 plants,PCR amplification its 26S rDNA D1/D2 area,the amplification products scries were determined and analyzed,and the genetic sequences with gene pool than homology. Results All strains arc identification to the kind,the homology of 99% and 100%, belong to the fung, dikarya, ascomycota, saccharomycctaccac of this three genera,89 strains for Candida,3 strains for Kodamaca,for Pichia 1 strain. One of seven kinds of Candida,38 strains Candida glabrata, Candida albicans 23 strains, 16 strains Candida parapsolisis, 9 of Candida mctapdilosis, Candida orthopsilisis 1 strain,Candida tropicalis 1 strain, 1 strain Candida nivaricnsis;3 strains Kodamaca ohmcri;Pichia kudriavzevii 1 strain. Conclusion Recurrent genital vaginal moniliosis pathogen of

  20. Hydrogen peroxide down-regulates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor content through proteasome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Garrido, A; Boyano-Adánez, M C; Alique, M; Calleros, L; Serrano, I; Griera, M; Rodríguez-Puyol, D; Griendling, K K; Rodríguez-Puyol, M

    2009-11-15

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is implicated in the regulation of signaling pathways leading to changes in vascular smooth muscle function. Contractile effects produced by H(2)O(2) are due to the phosphorylation of myosin light chain kinase triggered by increases in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) from intracellular stores or influx of extracellular Ca(2+). One mechanism for mobilizing such stores involves the phosphoinositide pathway. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) by binding to a family of receptors (IP(3)Rs) on the endoplasmic-sarcoplasmic reticulum that act as ligand-gated Ca(2+) channels. IP(3)Rs can be rapidly ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome, causing a decrease in cellular IP(3)R content. In this study we show that IP(3)R(1) and IP(3)R(3) are down-regulated when vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are stimulated by H(2)O(2), through an increase in proteasome activity. Moreover, we demonstrate that the decrease in IP(3)R by H(2)O(2) is accompanied by a reduction in calcium efflux induced by IP(3) in VSMC. Also, we observed that angiotensin II (ANGII) induces a decrease in IP(3)R by activation of NADPH oxidase and that preincubation with H(2)O(2) decreases ANGII-mediated calcium efflux and planar cell surface area in VSMC. The decreased IP(3) receptor content observed in cells was also found in aortic rings, which exhibited a decreased ANGII-dependent contraction after treatment with H(2)O(2). Altogether, these results suggest that H(2)O(2) mediates IP(3)R down-regulation via proteasome activity.

  1. Effects of Radiation on Proteasome Function in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    concentration of 80 µ M in 1% DMSO. Proteolytic activities were continuously monitored by measuring the release of the fluorescent group, 7- amido -4...tumor micro-environmental stress , including stress induced by ionizing radiation. Acquisition of stem cell traits by CD133-negative, non...CSCs, and as to whether it reflects a state of bioenergetic stress rather than stemness [55–57]. Recent data on neural stem cells even sug- gest the

  2. Interaction of hHR23 with S5a. The ubiquitin-like domain of hHR23 mediates interaction with S5a subunit of 26 S proteasome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Hiyama; M. Yokoi; C. Masutani; K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); T. Maekawa; K. Tanaka (Kiyoji); F. Hanaoka (Fumio); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1999-01-01

    textabstracthHR23B is one of two human homologs of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene product RAD23 and a component of a protein complex that specifically complements the NER defect of xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C) cell extracts in vitro. Alth

  3. Ubiquitin-Proteasome-Collagen (CUP Pathway in Preterm Premature Rupture of Fetal Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinliang Zhao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB occurs before 37 gestational weeks, with preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM and spontaneous preterm labor (sPTL as the predominant adverse outcomes. Previously, we identified altered expression of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs and message RNAs (mRNAs related to the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS in human placentas following pregnancy loss and PTB. We therefore hypothesized that similar mechanisms might underlie PPROM. In the current study, nine pairs of ubiquitin-proteasome-collagen (CUP pathway–related mRNAs and associated lncRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in PPROM and sPTL. Pathway analysis showed that the functions of their protein products were inter-connected by ring finger protein. Twenty variants including five mutations were identified in CUP-related genes in sPTL samples. Copy number variations were found in COL19A1, COL28A1, COL5A1, and UBAP2 of sPTL samples. The results reinforced our previous findings and indicated the association of the CUP pathway with the development of sPTL and PPROM. This association was due not only to the genetic variation, but also to the epigenetic regulatory function of lncRNAs. Furthermore, the findings suggested that the loss of collagen content in PPROM could result from degradation and/or suppressed expression of collagens.

  4. A mental retardation-linked nonsense mutation in cereblon is rescued by proteasome inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoqiang; Jiang, Xiaogang; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2013-10-11

    A nonsense mutation in cereblon (CRBN) causes autosomal recessive nonsyndromic mental retardation. Cereblon is a substrate receptor for the Cullin-RING E3 ligase complex and couples the ubiquitin ligase to specific ubiquitination targets. The CRBN nonsense mutation (R419X) results in a protein lacking 24 amino acids at its C terminus. Although this mutation has been linked to mild mental retardation, the mechanism by which the mutation affects CRBN function is unknown. Here, we used biochemical and mass spectrometric approaches to explore the function of this mutant. We show that the protein retains its ability to assemble into a Cullin-RING E3 ligase complex and catalyzes the ubiquitination of CRBN-target proteins. However, we find that this mutant exhibits markedly increased levels of autoubiquitination and is more readily degraded by the proteasome than the wild type protein. We also show that the level of the mutant protein can be restored by a treatment of cells with a clinically utilized proteasome inhibitor, suggesting that this agent may be useful for the treatment of mental retardation associated with the CRBN R419X mutation. These data demonstrate that enhanced autoubiquitination and degradation account for the defect in CRBN activity that leads to mental retardation.

  5. New insights to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) mechanism during spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Cong-Cong; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2013-04-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complicated and highly ordered process which begins with the differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells and ends with the formation of mature sperm. After meiosis, several morphological changes occur during spermatogenesis. During spermatogenesis, many proteins and organelles are degraded, and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) plays a key role in the process which facilitates the formation of condensed sperm. UPP contains various indispensable components: ubiquitin, ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2, ubiquitin ligase enzyme E3 and proteasomes. At some key stages of spermatogenesis, such as meiosis, acrosome biogenesis, and spermatozoa maturation, the ubiquitin-related components (including deubiquitination enzymes) exert positive and active functions. Generally speaking, deficient UPP will block spermatogenesis which may induce infertility at various degrees. Although ubiquitination during spermatogenesis has been widely investigated, further detailed aspects such as the mechanism of ubiquitination during the formation of midpiece and acrosome morphogenesis still remains unknown. The present review will overview current progress on ubiquitination during spermatogenesis, and will provide some suggestions for future studies on the functions of UPP components during spermatogenesis.

  6. The possible role of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the development of atherosclerosis in diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sasso Ferdinando

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have reviewed the impact of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS on atherosclerosis progression of diabetic patients. A puzzle of many pieces of evidence suggests that UPS, in addition to its role in the removal of damaged proteins, is involved in a number of biological processes including inflammation, proliferation and apoptosis, all of which constitute important characteristics of atherosclerosis. From what can be gathered from the very few studies on the UPS in diabetic cardiovascular diseases published so far, the system seems to be functionally active to a different extent in the initiation, progression, and complication stage of atherosclerosis in the diabetic people. Further evidence for this theory, however, has to be given, for instance by specifically targeted antagonism of the UPS. Nonetheless, this hypothesis may help us understand why diverse therapeutic interventions, which have in common the ability to reduce ubiquitin-proteasome activity, can impede or delay the onset of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD. People with type 2 diabetes are disproportionately affected by CVD, compared with those without diabetes 1. The prevalence, incidence, and mortality from all forms of CVD (myocardial infarction, cerebro-vascular disease and congestive heart failure are strikingly increased in persons with diabetes compared with those withoutdiabetes 2. Furthermore, diabetic patients have not benefited by the advances in the management of obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension that have resulted in a decrease in mortality for coronary heart disease (CHD patients without diabetes 3. Nevertheless, these risk factors do not fully explain the excess risk for CHD associated with diabetes 45. Thus, the determinants of progression of atherosclerosis in persons with diabetes must be elucidated. Beyond the major risk factors, several studies have demonstrated that such factors, strictly related to diabetes, as insulin

  7. Interaction between misfolded PrP and the ubiquitin-proteasome system in prion-mediated neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhu; Zhao, Deming; Yang, Lifeng

    2013-06-01

    Prion diseases are associated with the conformational conversion of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to pathological β-sheet isoforms (PrP(Sc)), which is the infectious agent beyond comprehension. Increasing evidence indicated that an unknown toxic gain of function of PrP(sc) underlies neuronal death. Conversely, strong evidence indicated that cellular prion protein might be directly cytotoxic by mediating neurotoxic signaling of β-sheet-rich conformers independent of prion replication. Furthermore, the common properties of β-sheet-rich isoform such as PrP(Sc) and β amyloid protein become the lynchpin that interprets the general pathological mechanism of protein misfolding diseases. Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in various protein misfolding diseases. However, the mechanisms of this impairment remain unknown in many cases. In prion disease, prion-infected mouse brains have increased levels of ubiquitin conjugates, which correlate with decreased proteasome function. Both PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) accumulate in cells after proteasome inhibition, which leads to increased cell death. A direct interaction between 20S core particle and PrP isoforms was demonstrated. Here we review the ability of misfolded PrP and UPS to affect each other, which might contribute to the pathological features of prion-mediated neurodegeneration.

  8. Interaction between misfolded PrP and the ubiquitin-proteasome system in prion-mediated neurodegeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Lin; Deming Zhao; Lifeng Yang

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are associated with the conformational conversion of cellular prion protein (PrPC) to pathological β-sheet isoforms (PrpSc),which is the infectious agent beyond comprehension.Increasing evidence indicated that an unknown toxic gain of function of PrPSc underlies neuronal death.Conversely,strong evidence indicated that cellular prion protein might be directly cytotoxic by mediating neurotoxic signaling of β-sheet-rich conformers independent of prion replication.Furthermore,the common properties of β-sheet-rich isoform such as PrPSc and β amyloid protein become the lynchpin that interprets the general pathological mechanism of protein misfolding diseases.Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in various protein misfolding diseases.However,the mechanisms of this impairment remain unknown in many cases.In prion disease,prioninfected mouse brains have increased levels of ubiquitin conjugates,which correlate with decreased proteasome function.Both PrPC and PrPsc accumulate in cells after proteasome inhibition,which leads to increased cell death.A direct interaction between 20S core particle and PrP isoforms was demonstrated.Here we review the ability of misfolded PrP and UPS to affect each other,which might contribute to the pathological features of prion-mediated neurodegeneration.

  9. Myofibrillar protein turnover: the proteasome and the calpains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goll, D E; Neti, G; Mares, S W; Thompson, V F

    2008-04-01

    Metabolic turnover of myofibrillar proteins in skeletal muscle requires that, before being degraded to AA, myofibrillar proteins be removed from the myofibril without disrupting the ability of the myofibril to contract and develop tension. Skeletal muscle contains 4 proteolytic systems in amounts such that they could be involved in metabolic protein turnover: 1) the lysosomal system, 2) the caspase system, 3) the calpain system, and 4) the proteasome. The catheptic proteases in lysosomes are not active at the neutral pH of the cell cytoplasm, so myofibrillar proteins would have to be degraded inside lysosomes if the lysosomal system were involved. Lysosomes could not engulf a myofibril without destroying it, so the lysosomal system is not involved to a significant extent in metabolic turnover of myofibrillar proteins. The caspases are not activated until initiation of apoptosis, and, therefore, it is unlikely that the caspases are involved to a significant extent in myofibrillar protein turnover. The calpains do not degrade proteins to AA or even to small peptides and do not catalyze bulk degradation of the sarcoplasmic proteins, so they cannot be the only proteolytic system involved in myofibrillar protein turnover. Research during the past 20 yr has shown that the proteasome is responsible for 80 to 90% of total intracellular protein turnover, but the proteasome degrades peptide chains only after they have been unfolded, so that they can enter the catalytic chamber of the proteasome. Thus, although the proteasome can degrade sarcoplasmic proteins, it cannot degrade myofibrillar proteins until they have been removed from the myofibril. It remains unclear how this removal is done. The calpains degrade those proteins that are involved in keeping the myofibrillar proteins assembled in myofibrils, and it was proposed over 30 yr ago that the calpains initiated myofibrillar protein turnover by disassembling the outer layer of proteins from the myofibril and releasing

  10. Role of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems in the Biology and Virulence of Protozoan Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, proteasomes perform crucial roles in many cellular pathways by degrading proteins to enforce quality control and regulate many cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, signal transduction, cell death, immune responses, metabolism, protein-quality control, and development. The catalytic heart of these complexes, the 20S proteasome, is highly conserved in bacteria, yeast, and humans. However, until a few years ago, the role of proteasomes in parasite biology was completely unknown. Here, we summarize findings about the role of proteasomes in protozoan parasites biology and virulence. Several reports have confirmed the role of proteasomes in parasite biological processes such as cell differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, and encystation. Proliferation and cell differentiation are key steps in host colonization. Considering the importance of proteasomes in both processes in many different parasites such as Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, and Entamoeba, parasite proteasomes might serve as virulence factors. Several pieces of evidence strongly suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is also a viable parasitic therapeutic target. Research in recent years has shown that the proteasome is a valid drug target for sleeping sickness and malaria. Then, proteasomes are a key organelle in parasite biology and virulence and appear to be an attractive new chemotherapeutic target.

  11. Structural Models for Interactions between the 20S Proteasome and Its PAN/19S Activators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadtmueller, B.; Ferrell, K; Whitby, F; Heroux, A; Robinson, H; Myszka, D; Hill, C

    2009-01-01

    Proteasome activity is regulated by sequestration of its proteolytic centers in a barrel-shaped structure that limits substrate access. Substrates enter the proteasome by means of activator complexes that bind to the end rings of proteasome alpha subunits and induce opening of an axial entrance/exit pore. The PA26 activator binds in a pocket on the proteasome surface using main chain contacts of its C-terminal residues and uses an internal activation loop to trigger gate opening by repositioning the proteasome Pro-17 reverse turn. Subunits of the unrelated PAN/19S activators bind with their C termini in the same pockets but can induce proteasome gate opening entirely from interactions of their C-terminal peptides, which are reported to cause gate opening by inducing a rocking motion of proteasome alpha subunits rather than by directly contacting the Pro-17 turn. Here we report crystal structures and binding studies of proteasome complexes with PA26 constructs that display modified C-terminal residues, including those corresponding to PAN. These findings suggest that PA26 and PAN/19S C-terminal residues bind superimposably and that both classes of activator induce gate opening by using direct contacts to residues of the proteasome Pro-17 reverse turn. In the case of the PAN and 19S activators, a penultimate tyrosine/phenylalanine residue contacts the proteasome Gly-19 carbonyl oxygen to stabilize the open conformation.

  12. Role of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems in the Biology and Virulence of Protozoan Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Christian; San Francisco, Juan; Gutiérrez, Bessy; González, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, proteasomes perform crucial roles in many cellular pathways by degrading proteins to enforce quality control and regulate many cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, signal transduction, cell death, immune responses, metabolism, protein-quality control, and development. The catalytic heart of these complexes, the 20S proteasome, is highly conserved in bacteria, yeast, and humans. However, until a few years ago, the role of proteasomes in parasite biology was completely unknown. Here, we summarize findings about the role of proteasomes in protozoan parasites biology and virulence. Several reports have confirmed the role of proteasomes in parasite biological processes such as cell differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, and encystation. Proliferation and cell differentiation are key steps in host colonization. Considering the importance of proteasomes in both processes in many different parasites such as Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, and Entamoeba, parasite proteasomes might serve as virulence factors. Several pieces of evidence strongly suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is also a viable parasitic therapeutic target. Research in recent years has shown that the proteasome is a valid drug target for sleeping sickness and malaria. Then, proteasomes are a key organelle in parasite biology and virulence and appear to be an attractive new chemotherapeutic target.

  13. BOR-syndrome-associated Eya1 mutations lead to enhanced proteasomal degradation of Eya1 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amna Musharraf

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human EYA1 gene have been associated with several human diseases including branchio-oto (BO and branchio-oto-renal (BOR syndrome, as well as congenital cataracts and ocular anterior segment anomalies. BOR patients suffer from severe malformations of the ears, branchial arches and kidneys. The phenotype of Eya1-heterozygous mice resembles the symptoms of human patients suffering from BOR syndrome. The Eya1 gene encodes a multifunctional protein that acts as a protein tyrosine phosphatase and a transcriptional coactivator. It has been shown that Eya1 interacts with Six transcription factors, which are also required for nuclear translocation of the Eya1 protein. We investigated the effects of seven disease-causing Eya1 missense mutations on Eya1 protein function, in particular cellular localization, ability to interact with Six proteins, and protein stability. We show here that the BOR-associated Eya1 missense mutations S454P, L472R, and L550P lead to enhanced proteasomal degradation of the Eya1 protein in mammalian cells. Moreover, Six proteins lead to a significant stabilization of Eya1, which is caused by Six-mediated protection from proteasomal degradation. In case of the mutant L550P, loss of interaction with Six proteins leads to rapid protein degradation. Our observations suggest that protein destabilization constitutes a novel disease causing mechanism for Eya1.

  14. Role of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Regulating Skin Pigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideya Ando

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Pigmentation of the skin, hair and eyes is regulated by tyrosinase, the critical rate-limiting enzyme in melanin synthesis by melanocytes. Tyrosinase is degraded endogenously, at least in part, by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS. Several types of inherited hypopigmentary diseases, such as oculocutaneous albinism and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, involve the aberrant processing and/or trafficking of tyrosinase and its subsequent degradation which can occur due to the quality-control machinery. Studies on carbohydrate modifications have revealed that tyrosinase in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is proteolyzed via ER-associated protein degradation and that tyrosinase degradation can also occur following its complete maturation in the Golgi. Among intrinsic factors that regulate the UPS, fatty acids have been shown to modulate tyrosinase degradation in contrasting manners through increased or decreased amounts of ubiquitinated tyrosinase that leads to its accelerated or decelerated degradation by proteasomes.

  15. Cylindrocyclophanes with Proteasome Inhibitory Activity from the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlipala, George E.; Sturdy, Megan; Krunic, Aleksej; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Shen, Qi; Porter, Kyle; Swanson, Steven M.; Orjala, Jimmy

    2010-01-01

    Material collected from a parkway in the city of Chicago afforded the isolation of a Nostoc species (UIC 10022A). The extract of this strain displayed significant inhibition of the 20S proteasome as well as antiproliferative activity against HT29, MCF7, NCI-H460, and SF268 cancer cell lines. A standardized dereplication protocol allowed for the rapid identification of three known (11-13) and nine new (1-9) chlorinated cylindrocyclophanes from less than 100 mg of organic extract. Scale-up isolation of 1-9 and 11-13 from a larger extract was guided by LC-UV-MS data. In addition, KBr enrichment of the culture media afforded the isolation of a brominated cylindrocyclophane (10). Biological evaluation of 1-5, 9, and 10-13 revealed a large range of activity against the 20S proteasome and allowed the determination of preliminary structure-activity relationships (SAR) of the cylindrocyclophane pharmacophore. PMID:20825206

  16. The Role of Ubiquitine Proteasome Pathway in Carcinogenesis

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    N.Ceren Sumer Turanligil

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin works as a marker protein which targets misfolded or injured proteins to cellular degradation. It brings the abnormal proteins to a subcellular organelle named proteasome and it maintains the degradation of proteins in limited lenghts of peptides by leaving the process withuout being changed. Mistakes in ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in various steps of carcinogenesis is known. In this review, we dealed with the effects of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP on carcinogenesis via intercellular signaling molecules like Ras, transcription factors like NF-kB, cytokines like TNF-alfa Tumor necrosis factor, protooncogenes like p53 and MDM2(murine double minute 2, components of cell cycle and DNA repair proteins like BRCA1. We also focused on the relationship of UPP on antigen presentation which is active in immune response and its place in the aetiology of colon cancer to provide a specific example. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(1.000: 36-55

  17. Proteasome inhibitors as experimental therapeutics of autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Verbrugge, Sue Ellen; Scheper, Rik J.; Lems, Willem F.; Tanja D de Gruijl; Jansen, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Current treatment strategies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) consisting of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs or biological agents are not always effective, hence driving the demand for new experimental therapeutics. The antiproliferative capacity of proteasome inhibitors (PIs) has received considerable attention given the success of their first prototypical representative, bortezomib (BTZ), in the treatment of B cell and plasma cell-related hematological malignancies. Therapeutic applicati...

  18. The proteasome activity in pancreas cells under experimental pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олеся Вадимовна Сокур

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The caspase-, chymotrypsin- and trypsin-like proteasomal activities in pancreas cells were investigated under the experimental pancreatitis. It has been shown the increase of ATF-independent chymotrypsin-like activity at reduction of trypsin-like and caspase-like activities. At the same time the reduction of trypsin-like activity was due to ATF-dependent hydrolysis, whereas the reduction of caspase-like activity was due to ATF-independent proteolysis

  19. Proteasomal degradation of TRIM5alpha during retrovirus restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher James Rold

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The host protein TRIM5alpha inhibits retroviral infection at an early post-penetration stage by targeting the incoming viral capsid. While the detailed mechanism of restriction remains unclear, recent studies have implicated the activity of cellular proteasomes in the restriction of retroviral reverse transcription imposed by TRIM5alpha. Here, we show that TRIM5alpha is rapidly degraded upon encounter of a restriction-susceptible retroviral core. Inoculation of TRIM5alpha-expressing human 293T cells with a saturating level of HIV-1 particles resulted in accelerated degradation of the HIV-1-restrictive rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha protein but not the nonrestrictive human TRIM5alpha protein. Exposure of cells to HIV-1 also destabilized the owl monkey restriction factor TRIMCyp; this was prevented by addition of the inhibitor cyclosporin A and was not observed with an HIV-1 virus containing a mutation in the capsid protein that relieves restriction by TRIMCyp IVHIV. Likewise, human TRIM5alpha was rapidly degraded upon encounter of the restriction-sensitive N-tropic murine leukemia virus (N-MLV but not the unrestricted B-MLV. Pretreatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors prevented the HIV-1-induced loss of both rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha and TRIMCyp proteins. We also detected degradation of endogenous TRIM5alpha in rhesus macaque cells following HIV-1 infection. We conclude that engagement of a restriction-sensitive retrovirus core results in TRIM5alpha degradation by a proteasome-dependent mechanism.

  20. Proteasomal degradation of TRIM5alpha during retrovirus restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher James Rold

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The host protein TRIM5alpha inhibits retroviral infection at an early post-penetration stage by targeting the incoming viral capsid. While the detailed mechanism of restriction remains unclear, recent studies have implicated the activity of cellular proteasomes in the restriction of retroviral reverse transcription imposed by TRIM5alpha. Here, we show that TRIM5alpha is rapidly degraded upon encounter of a restriction-susceptible retroviral core. Inoculation of TRIM5alpha-expressing human 293T cells with a saturating level of HIV-1 particles resulted in accelerated degradation of the HIV-1-restrictive rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha protein but not the nonrestrictive human TRIM5alpha protein. Exposure of cells to HIV-1 also destabilized the owl monkey restriction factor TRIMCyp; this was prevented by addition of the inhibitor cyclosporin A and was not observed with an HIV-1 virus containing a mutation in the capsid protein that relieves restriction by TRIMCyp IVHIV. Likewise, human TRIM5alpha was rapidly degraded upon encounter of the restriction-sensitive N-tropic murine leukemia virus (N-MLV but not the unrestricted B-MLV. Pretreatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors prevented the HIV-1-induced loss of both rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha and TRIMCyp proteins. We also detected degradation of endogenous TRIM5alpha in rhesus macaque cells following HIV-1 infection. We conclude that engagement of a restriction-sensitive retrovirus core results in TRIM5alpha degradation by a proteasome-dependent mechanism.

  1. A novel role for ATM in regulating proteasome-mediated protein degradation through suppression of the ISG15 conjugation pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence M Wood

    Full Text Available Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T is an inherited immunodeficiency disorder wherein mutation of the ATM kinase is responsible for the A-T pathogenesis. Although the precise role of ATM in A-T pathogenesis is still unclear, its function in responding to DNA damage has been well established. Here we demonstrate that in addition to its role in DNA repair, ATM also regulates proteasome-mediated protein turnover through suppression of the ISG15 pathway. This conclusion is based on three major pieces of evidence: First, we demonstrate that proteasome-mediated protein degradation is impaired in A-T cells. Second, we show that the reduced protein turnover is causally linked to the elevated expression of the ubiquitin-like protein ISG15 in A-T cells. Third, we show that expression of the ISG15 is elevated in A-T cells derived from various A-T patients, as well as in brain tissues derived from the ATM knockout mice and A-T patients, suggesting that ATM negatively regulates the ISG15 pathway. Our current findings suggest for the first time that proteasome-mediated protein degradation is impaired in A-T cells due to elevated expression of the ISG15 conjugation pathway, which could contribute to progressive neurodegeneration in A-T patients.

  2. 50Hz Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields Enhance Protein Carbonyl Groups Content in Cancer Cells: Effects on Proteasomal Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Eleuteri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic fields are an assessed cause of prolonging free radicals lifespan. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on protein oxidation and on the 20S proteasome functionality, the complex responsible for the degradation of oxidized proteins. Caco 2 cells were exposed, for 24–72 hours, to 1 mT, 50 Hz electromagnetic fields. The treatment induced a time-dependent increase both in cell growth and in protein oxidation, more evident in the presence of TPA, while no changes in cell viability were detected. Exposing the cells to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields caused a global activation of the 20S proteasome catalytic components, particularly evident at 72 hours exposure and in the presence of TPA. The finding that EGCG, a natural antioxidant compound, counteracted the field-related pro-oxidant effects demonstrates that the increased proteasome activity was due to an enhancement in intracellular free radicals.

  3. The enhancement of propyl gallate-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells by a proteasome inhibitor MG132.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Bo Ra; Park, Woo Hyun

    2011-03-01

    Propyl gallate (PG) used in processed food and medicinal preparations has been shown to induce cell death in normal and cancer cells. The inhibition of proteasome function has emerged as a useful strategy to maneuver apoptosis. Here, we investigated the combined effects of PG and MG132 (a proteasome inhibitor) on HeLa cells in relation to cell growth, cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH). PG induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in HeLa cells, accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ΔΨm), activation of caspase 3 and PARP cleavage. The levels of ROS and GSH depletion were increased in PG-treated HeLa cells. MG132 intensified apoptosis and PARP cleavage in PG-treated HeLa cells. MG132 also increased ROS levels including mitochondrial O2•-, MMP (ΔΨm) loss and GSH depletion in PG-treated HeLa cells. PG induced a G1 phase arrest of the cell cycle in HeLa cells, which was significantly prevented by MG132. MG132 alone inhibited HeLa cell growth via inducing the cell cycle arrests and triggering apoptosis. Conclusively, the inhibition of proteasome by MG132 plays a role as an enhancement factor in PG-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells via increasing ROS levels and GSH depletion.

  4. Chaperoning Proteins for Destruction: Diverse Roles of Hsp70 Chaperones and their Co-Chaperones in Targeting Misfolded Proteins to the Proteasome

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    Ayala Shiber

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones were originally discovered as heat shock-induced proteins that facilitate proper folding of proteins with non-native conformations. While the function of chaperones in protein folding has been well documented over the last four decades, more recent studies have shown that chaperones are also necessary for the clearance of terminally misfolded proteins by the Ub-proteasome system. In this capacity, chaperones protect misfolded degradation substrates from spontaneous aggregation, facilitate their recognition by the Ub ligation machinery and finally shuttle the ubiquitylated substrates to the proteasome. The physiological importance of these functions is manifested by inefficient proteasomal degradation and the accumulation of protein aggregates during ageing or in certain neurodegenerative diseases, when chaperone levels decline. In this review, we focus on the diverse roles of stress-induced chaperones in targeting misfolded proteins to the proteasome and the consequences of their compromised activity. We further discuss the implications of these findings to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of amyloid diseases.

  5. Clinical Use of Proteasome Inhibitors in the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma

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    Noah M. Merin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is an incurable hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of neoplastic plasma cells. The use of proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of MM has led to significant improvements in outcomes. This article reviews data on the use of the two approved proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib and carlfilzomib, as well as newer agents under development. Emphasis is placed on the clinical use of proteasome inhibitors, including management of side effects and combination with other agents.

  6. Particulate cytoplasmic structures with high concentration of ubiquitin-proteasome accumulate in myeloid neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased plasma levels of proteasome have been associated with various neoplasms, especially myeloid malignancies. Little is known of the cellular origin and release mechanisms of such proteasome. We recently identified and characterized a novel particulate cytoplasmic structure (PaCS) showing selective accumulation of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) components. PaCSs have been reported in some epithelial neoplasms and in two genetic disorders characterized by hematopoietic cell...

  7. Amyloid-β secretion, generation, and lysosomal sequestration in response to proteasome inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agholme, Lotta; Hallbeck, Martin; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2012-01-01

    that proteasome inhibition resulted in autophagy-dependent accumulation of Aβ in lysosomes, and increased levels of intracellular and secreted Aβ. The enhanced levels of Aβ could not be explained by increased amounts of AβPP. Instead, reduced degradation of the C-terminal fragment of AβPP (C99) by the proteasome....... Furthermore, proteasome inhibition caused a reduction in cellular viability, which was reverted by inhibition of autophagy. Dysfunction of the proteasome could cause lysosomal accumulation of Aβ, as well as increased generation and secretion of Aβ, which is partly facilitated by autophagy. As a decrease...

  8. Cardiac proteasome activity in muscle ring finger-1 null mice at rest and following synthetic glucocorticoid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwee, Darren T; Gomes, Aldrin V; Bodine, Sue C

    2011-11-01

    Muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) is a muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been implicated in the regulation of cardiac mass through its control of the ubiquitin proteasome system. While it has been suggested that MuRF1 is required for cardiac atrophy, a resting cardiac phenotype has not been reported in mice with a null deletion [knockout (KO)] of MuRF1. Here, we report that MuRF1 KO mice have significantly larger hearts than age-matched wild-type (WT) littermates at ≥ 6 mo of age and that loss of cardiac mass can occur in the absence of MuRF1. The objective of this study was to determine whether changes in proteasome activity were responsible for the cardiac phenotypes observed in MuRF1 KO mice. Cardiac function, architecture, and proteasome activity were analyzed at rest and following 28 days of dexamethasone (Dex) treatment in 6-mo-old WT and MuRF1 KO mice. Echocardiography demonstrated normal cardiac function in the enlarged hearts in MURF1 KO mice. At rest, heart mass and cardiomyocyte diameter were significantly greater in MuRF1 KO than in WT mice. The increase in cardiac size in MuRF1 KO mice was related to a decrease in proteasome activity and an increase in Akt signaling relative to WT mice. Dex treatment induced a significant loss of cardiac mass in MuRF1 KO, but not WT, mice. Furthermore, Dex treatment resulted in an increase in proteasome activity in KO, but a decrease in WT, mice. In contrast, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling decreased in MuRF1 KO mice and increased in WT mice in response to Dex treatment. These findings demonstrate that MuRF1 plays an important role in regulating cardiac size through alterations in protein turnover and that MuRF1 is not required to induce cardiac atrophy.

  9. A single-nucleotide deletion in the POMP 5' UTR causes a transcriptional switch and altered epidermal proteasome distribution in KLICK genodermatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlqvist, Johanna; Klar, Joakim; Tiwari, Neha; Schuster, Jens; Törmä, Hans; Badhai, Jitendra; Pujol, Ramon; van Steensel, Maurice A M; Brinkhuizen, Tjinta; Brinkhuijzen, Tjinta; Gijezen, Lieke; Chaves, Antonio; Tadini, Gianluca; Vahlquist, Anders; Dahl, Niklas

    2010-04-09

    KLICK syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive skin disorder characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma, linear hyperkeratotic papules, and ichthyosiform scaling. In order to establish the genetic cause of this disorder, we collected DNA samples from eight European probands. Using high-density genome-wide SNP analysis, we identified a 1.5 Mb homozygous candidate region on chromosome 13q. Sequence analysis of the ten annotated genes in the candidate region revealed homozygosity for a single-nucleotide deletion at position c.-95 in the proteasome maturation protein (POMP) gene, in all probands. The deletion is included in POMP transcript variants with long 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) and was associated with a marked increase of these transcript variants in keratinocytes from KLICK patients. POMP is a ubiquitously expressed protein and functions as a chaperone for proteasome maturation. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin biopsies from KLICK patients revealed an altered epidermal distribution of POMP, the proteasome subunit proteins alpha 7 and beta 5, and the ER stress marker CHOP. Our results suggest that KLICK syndrome is caused by a single-nucleotide deletion in the 5' UTR of POMP resulting in altered distribution of POMP in epidermis and a perturbed formation of the outermost layers of the skin. These findings imply that the proteasome has a prominent role in the terminal differentiation of human epidermis.

  10. Graded Proteasome Dysfunction in Caenorhabditis elegans Activates an Adaptive Response Involving the Conserved SKN-1 and ELT-2 Transcription Factors and the Autophagy-Lysosome Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Scott A; Maddux, Sarah K; Zhong, Yayu; Chinchankar, Meghna N; Ferguson, Annabel A; Ghazi, Arjumand; Fisher, Alfred L

    2016-02-01

    The maintenance of cellular proteins in a biologically active and structurally stable state is a vital endeavor involving multiple cellular pathways. One such pathway is the ubiquitin-proteasome system that represents a major route for protein degradation, and reductions in this pathway usually have adverse effects on the health of cells and tissues. Here, we demonstrate that loss-of-function mutants of the Caenorhabditis elegans proteasome subunit, RPN-10, exhibit moderate proteasome dysfunction and unexpectedly develop both increased longevity and enhanced resistance to multiple threats to the proteome, including heat, oxidative stress, and the presence of aggregation prone proteins. The rpn-10 mutant animals survive through the activation of compensatory mechanisms regulated by the conserved SKN-1/Nrf2 and ELT-2/GATA transcription factors that mediate the increased expression of genes encoding proteasome subunits as well as those mediating oxidative- and heat-stress responses. Additionally, we find that the rpn-10 mutant also shows enhanced activity of the autophagy-lysosome pathway as evidenced by increased expression of the multiple autophagy genes including atg-16.2, lgg-1, and bec-1, and also by an increase in GFP::LGG-1 puncta. Consistent with a critical role for this pathway, the enhanced resistance of the rpn-10 mutant to aggregation prone proteins depends on autophagy genes atg-13, atg-16.2, and prmt-1. Furthermore, the rpn-10 mutant is particularly sensitive to the inhibition of lysosome activity via either RNAi or chemical means. We also find that the rpn-10 mutant shows a reduction in the numbers of intestinal lysosomes, and that the elt-2 gene also plays a novel and vital role in controlling the production of functional lysosomes by the intestine. Overall, these experiments suggest that moderate proteasome dysfunction could be leveraged to improve protein homeostasis and organismal health and longevity, and that the rpn-10 mutant provides a unique

  11. Graded Proteasome Dysfunction in Caenorhabditis elegans Activates an Adaptive Response Involving the Conserved SKN-1 and ELT-2 Transcription Factors and the Autophagy-Lysosome Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Keith

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of cellular proteins in a biologically active and structurally stable state is a vital endeavor involving multiple cellular pathways. One such pathway is the ubiquitin-proteasome system that represents a major route for protein degradation, and reductions in this pathway usually have adverse effects on the health of cells and tissues. Here, we demonstrate that loss-of-function mutants of the Caenorhabditis elegans proteasome subunit, RPN-10, exhibit moderate proteasome dysfunction and unexpectedly develop both increased longevity and enhanced resistance to multiple threats to the proteome, including heat, oxidative stress, and the presence of aggregation prone proteins. The rpn-10 mutant animals survive through the activation of compensatory mechanisms regulated by the conserved SKN-1/Nrf2 and ELT-2/GATA transcription factors that mediate the increased expression of genes encoding proteasome subunits as well as those mediating oxidative- and heat-stress responses. Additionally, we find that the rpn-10 mutant also shows enhanced activity of the autophagy-lysosome pathway as evidenced by increased expression of the multiple autophagy genes including atg-16.2, lgg-1, and bec-1, and also by an increase in GFP::LGG-1 puncta. Consistent with a critical role for this pathway, the enhanced resistance of the rpn-10 mutant to aggregation prone proteins depends on autophagy genes atg-13, atg-16.2, and prmt-1. Furthermore, the rpn-10 mutant is particularly sensitive to the inhibition of lysosome activity via either RNAi or chemical means. We also find that the rpn-10 mutant shows a reduction in the numbers of intestinal lysosomes, and that the elt-2 gene also plays a novel and vital role in controlling the production of functional lysosomes by the intestine. Overall, these experiments suggest that moderate proteasome dysfunction could be leveraged to improve protein homeostasis and organismal health and longevity, and that the rpn-10 mutant

  12. PA28, an activator of the 20 S proteasome, is inactivated by proteolytic modification at its carboxyl terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C P; Willy, P J; Slaughter, C A; DeMartino, G N

    1993-10-25

    PA28, a protein activator of the 20 S proteasome, was previously identified in soluble extracts of bovine red blood cells (Ma, C.-P., Slaughter, C. A., and DeMartino, G. N. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 10515-10523). To determine whether this regulatory protein is as widely distributed as the proteasome, PA28 content and activity were examined in various eukaryotic tissues by immunoblot analysis and by functional assays of tissue extracts. PA28 protein was present in all sources examined. PA28 activity, however, was not detected in many of these sources, including those with the highest level of PA28 protein. To determine the biochemical basis of this result, PA28 was purified from extracts of rat liver, which had high levels of PA28 protein but no PA28 activity. The resulting purified PA28 had no detectable activity but had native and subunit molecular weights indistinguishable from the active PA28 of bovine red blood cells. Using the inactivation of purified PA28 as an assay, a protein that inactivated PA28 without altering its apparent molecular weight on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was identified, purified, and characterized from bovine liver. It had biochemical and catalytic characteristics similar to those of lysosomal carboxypeptidase B. When leupeptin, an inhibitor of lysosomal carboxypeptidase B, was included in the buffers used for the preparation of PA28, PA28 activity was detected in tissues which otherwise failed to demonstrate this activity. A similar result was obtained when extracts were prepared in a manner that minimized disruption of lysosomes. Other carboxypeptidases such as carboxypeptidase Y and pancreatic carboxypeptidase B also inactivated PA28 without altering its apparent molecular weight. Active PA28 binds to the proteasome to form a protease-activator complex that can be isolated after velocity sedimentation centrifugation through glycerol density gradients. Carboxypeptidase-inactivated PA28 failed to form such a complex

  13. Bifunctional anti-huntingtin proteasome-directed intrabodies mediate efficient degradation of mutant huntingtin exon 1 protein fragments.

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    David C Butler

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a fatal autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a trinucleotide (CAG(n repeat expansion in the coding sequence of the huntingtin gene, and an expanded polyglutamine (>37Q tract in the protein. This results in misfolding and accumulation of huntingtin protein (htt, formation of neuronal intranuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions, and neuronal dysfunction/degeneration. Single-chain Fv antibodies (scFvs, expressed as intrabodies that bind htt and prevent aggregation, show promise as immunotherapeutics for HD. Intrastriatal delivery of anti-N-terminal htt scFv-C4 using an adeno-associated virus vector (AAV2/1 significantly reduces the size and number of aggregates in HDR6/1 transgenic mice; however, this protective effect diminishes with age and time after injection. We therefore explored enhancing intrabody efficacy via fusions to heterologous functional domains. Proteins containing a PEST motif are often targeted for proteasomal degradation and generally have a short half life. In ST14A cells, fusion of the C-terminal PEST region of mouse ornithine decarboxylase (mODC to scFv-C4 reduces htt exon 1 protein fragments with 72 glutamine repeats (httex1-72Q by ~80-90% when compared to scFv-C4 alone. Proteasomal targeting was verified by either scrambling the mODC-PEST motif, or via proteasomal inhibition with epoxomicin. For these constructs, the proteasomal degradation of the scFv intrabody proteins themselves was reduced<25% by the addition of the mODC-PEST motif, with or without antigens. The remaining intrabody levels were amply sufficient to target N-terminal httex1-72Q protein fragment turnover. Critically, scFv-C4-PEST prevents aggregation and toxicity of httex1-72Q fragments at significantly lower doses than scFv-C4. Fusion of the mODC-PEST motif to intrabodies is a valuable general approach to specifically target toxic antigens to the proteasome for degradation.

  14. Inhibition of nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines in LPS-stimulated murine macrophages by resveratrol, a potent proteasome inhibitor

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    Qureshi Asaf A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altered immune function during ageing results in increased production of nitric oxide (NO and other inflammatory mediators. Recently, we have reported that NO production was inhibited by naturally-occurring proteasome inhibitors (quercetin, δ-tocotrienol, and riboflavin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, and thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages from C57BL/6 mice. In a continuous effort to find more potent, non-toxic, commercially available, naturally-occurring proteasome inhibitors that suppress inflammation, the present study was carried out to describe the inhibition of NF-κB activation and NO, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and iNOS expression by trans-resveratrol, trans-pterostilbene, morin hydrate, and nicotinic acid in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells and thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages from C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. Results The present results indicate that resveratrol, pterostilbene, and morin hydrate caused significant inhibition (>70% to 90%; P 40%; P 60%; P 40%; P P  Conclusions The present results clearly demonstrate that resveratrol and pterostilbene are particularly potent proteasome inhibitors that suppress expression of genes, and production of inflammatory products in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, and macrophages from C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. Resveratrol and pterostilbene which are present in grapes, blueberries, and red wine, have been implicated as contributing factors to the lower incidence of cardiovascular disease in the French population, despite their relatively high dietary fat intake. Consequently, it appears likely that the beneficial nutritional effects of resveratrol and pterostilbene are due at least in part, to their ability to inhibit NF-κB activation by the proteasome, thereby suppressing activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and iNOS genes, resulting in decreased secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and NO levels, in response to inflammatory stimuli

  15. [Chlamydia trachomatis proteasome protein as one of the significant pathogenicity factors of exciter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, D Iu; Zigangirova, N A

    2014-01-01

    Sex-related infections are a global problem. Such infections may lead to acute or chronic diseases. Chlamydia trachomatis is a dangerous and widespread pathogenicity factor that is not sensitive to conventional drugs and has no obvious symptoms. Protein CPAF is leading factor of pathogenesis. This protein inhibits the signaling pathways of host cell and supports long survival of the pathogen in the host cell. The goal of this work was to review general properties of the proteasome Chlamydia protein CPAF, its functions, and role in pathology. The role of protein CPAF in the anti-chlamydia immune reaction is discussed. The prospects of the development of promising anti-chlamydia vaccine, as well as new effective anti-chlamydia drugs are also discussed.

  16. Stability of zinc finger nuclease protein is enhanced by the proteasome inhibitor MG132.

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    Suresh Ramakrishna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs are powerful tools for gene therapy and genetic engineering. The characterization of ZFN protein stability and the development of simple methods to improve ZFN function would facilitate the application of this promising technology. However, the factors that affect ZFN protein stability and function are not yet clear. Here, we determined the stability and half-life of two ZFN proteins and examined the effect of MG132 (carbobenzoxyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-leucinal-Hl, a proteasome inhibitor, on ZFN-mediated gene modifications. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ZFN proteins were expressed in 293T cells after transfection of ZFN-encoding plasmids. We studied two ZFN pairs: Z-224, which targets the CCR5 gene, and K-230, which targets a region 230 kbp upstream of CCR5. Western blotting after treatment with cycloheximide showed that the half-life of these ZFN proteins was around two hours. An immunoprecipitation assay revealed that the ZFN interacts with ubiquitin molecules and undergoes polyubiquitination in vivo. Western blotting showed that the addition of MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, increased ZFN protein levels. Finally, a surrogate reporter assay and a T7E1 assay revealed that MG132 treatment enhanced ZFN-directed gene editing. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate ZFN protein stability and to show that a small molecule can increase ZFN activity. Our protein stability study should lay the foundation for further improvement of ZFN technology; as a first step, the use of the small molecule MG132 can enhance the efficiency of ZFN-mediated gene editing.

  17. A novel combination treatment for breast cancer cells involving BAPTA-AM and proteasome inhibitor bortezomib

    Science.gov (United States)

    YERLIKAYA, AZMI; ERDOĞAN, ELIF; OKUR, EMRAH; YERLIKAYA, ŞERIFE; SAVRAN, BIRCAN

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa/binding immunoglobulin protein (GRP78/BIP) is a well-known endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein regulating ER stress by facilitating protein folding, assembly and Ca2+ binding. GRP78 is also a member of the heat shock protein 70 gene family and induces tumor cell survival and resistance to chemotherapeutics. Bortezomib is a highly specific 26S proteasome inhibitor that has been approved as treatment for patients with multiple myeloma. The present study first examined the dose- and time-dependent effects of bortezomib on GRP78 expression levels in the highly metastatic mouse breast cancer 4T1 cell line using western blot analysis. The analysis results revealed that GRP78 levels were significantly increased by bortezomib at a dose as low as 10 nM. Time-dependent experiments indicated that the accumulation of GRP78 was initiated after a 24 h incubation period following the addition of 10 nM bortezomib. Subsequently, the present study determined the half maximal inhibitory concentration of intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM (13.6 µM) on 4T1 cells. The combination effect of BAPTA-AM and bortezomib on the 4T1 cells was investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and WST-1 assays and an iCELLigence system. The results revealed that the combination of 10 nM bortezomib + 5 µM BAPTA-AM is more cytotoxic compared with monotherapies, including 10 nM bortezomib, 1 µM BAPTA-AM and 5 µM BAPTA-AM. In addition, the present results revealed that bortezomib + BAPTA-AM combination causes cell death through the induction of apoptosis. The present results also revealed that bortezomib + BAPTA-AM combination-induced apoptosis is associated with a clear increase in the phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase/Jun amino-terminal kinase SAPK/JNK. Overall, the present results suggest that bortezomib and BAPTA-AM combination therapy may be a novel therapeutic strategy for breast cancer treatment

  18. Characterization of the proteasome from the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Franzetti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20S proteasome, comprising two subunits α and β, was purified from the extreme halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui, which grows only in saturated salt conditions. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the H. marismortui proteasome (Hm proteasome, obtained from negatively stained electron micrographs, is virtually identical to the structure of a thermophilic proteasome filtered to the same resolution. The stability of the Hm proteasome was found to be less salt-dependent than that of other halophilic enzymes previously described. The proteolytic activity of the Hm proteasome was investigated using the malate dehydrogenase from H. marismortui (HmMalDH as a model substrate. The HmMalDH denatures when the salt concentration is decreased below 2 M. Under these conditions, the proteasome efficiently cleaves HmMalDH during its denaturation process, but the fully denatured HmMalDH is poorly degraded. These in vitro experiments show that, at low salt concentrations, the 20S proteasome from halophilic archaea eliminates a misfolded protein.

  19. N-terminal acetylation and replicative age affect proteasome localization and cell fitness during aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deventer, S.J. van; Menendez-Benito, V.; Leeuwen, F van; Neefjes, J.

    2015-01-01

    Specific degradation of proteins is essential for virtually all cellular processes and is carried out predominantly by the proteasome. The proteasome is important for clearance of damaged cellular proteins. Damaged proteins accumulate over time and excess damaged proteins can aggregate and induce

  20. Secomycalolide A: A New Proteasome Inhibitor Isolated from a Marine Sponge of the Genus Mycale

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    Sachiko Tsukamoto

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A new oxazole-containing proteasome inhibitor, secomycalolide A, together with known mycalolide A and 30-hydroxymycalolide A, was isolated from a marine sponge of the genus Mycale. They showed proteasome inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 11-45 μg/mL.

  1. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome and mechanism of inhibition by a peptidyl boronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu,G.; Lin, G.; Wang, M.; Dick, L.; Xu, R.; Nathan, C.; Li, H.

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has the remarkable ability to resist killing by human macrophages. The 750 kDa proteasome, not available in most eubacteria except Actinomycetes, appears to contribute to Mtb's resistance. The crystal structure of the Mtb proteasome at 3.0 Angstroms resolution reveals a substrate-binding pocket with composite features of the distinct {beta}1, {beta}2 and {beta}5 substrate binding sites of eukaryotic proteasomes, accounting for the broad specificity of the Mtb proteasome towards oligopeptides described in the companion article [Lin et al. (2006), Mol Microbiol doi:10.1111/j.1365-2958.2005.05035.x]. The substrate entrance at the end of the cylindrical proteasome appears open in the crystal structure due to partial disorder of the a-subunit N-terminal residues. However, cryo-electron microscopy of the core particle reveals a closed end, compatible with the density observed in negative-staining electron microscopy that depended on the presence of the N-terminal octapeptides of the a-subunits in the companion article, suggesting that the Mtb proteasome has a gated structure. We determine for the first time the proteasomal inhibition mechanism of the dipeptidyl boronate N-(4-morpholine)carbonyl-{beta}-(1-naphthyl)-l-alanine-l-leucine boronic acid (MLN-273), an analogue of the antimyeloma drug bortezomib. The structure improves prospects for designing Mtb-specific proteasomal inhibitors as a novel approach to chemotherapy of tuberculosis.

  2. Distinct temporal requirements for autophagy and the proteasome in yeast meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fu-ping; Guo, Yue-shuai; Hu, Yang; Liu, Wei-xiao; Wang, Qian; Wang, Yuan-ting; Yu, Hai-Yan; Tang, Chao-ming; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Tao; Xie, Zhi-ping; Sha, Jia-hao; Guo, Xuejiang; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a special type of cellular renovation that involves 2 successive cell divisions and a single round of DNA replication. Two major degradation systems, the autophagy-lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome, are involved in meiosis, but their roles have yet to be elucidated. Here we show that autophagy mainly affects the initiation of meiosis but not the nuclear division. Autophagy works not only by serving as a dynamic recycling system but also by eliminating some negative meiotic regulators such as Ego4 (Ynr034w-a). In a quantitative proteomics study, the proteasome was found to be significantly upregulated during meiotic divisions. We found that proteasomal activity is essential to the 2 successive meiotic nuclear divisions but not for the initiation of meiosis. Our study defines the roles of autophagy and the proteasome in meiosis: Autophagy mainly affects the initiation of meiosis, whereas the proteasome mainly affects the 2 successive meiotic divisions.

  3. Expression and functions of proteases in vascular tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, H Earl; Zhao, Mingzhe; Beers, Eric P

    2012-05-01

    With the emergence of new models for wood formation and the increasing emphasis on improving the efficiency of cellulosic biofuel production, research on vascular tissue biology has intensified in recent years. Some of the most active areas of research focus on manipulating activity of enzymes in the cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin pathways. In addition, great strides have been made in the characterization of transcriptional networks controlling genes that affect differentiation, secondary cell wall synthesis and programmed cell death in xylem. Less attention has been devoted to the characterization of proteases that may be important regulators of post-translational events that affect vascular cell differentiation and function and cell wall composition. Several genes for proteases and components of the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway are upregulated in xylem and phloem and in cell culture systems for studying the differentiation of xylem tracheary elements (TEs). Although small molecule protease inhibitors have been used to explore the roles of proteases during the differentiation of cultured TEs, only a small number of vascular tissue-associated protease genes have been directly tested to determine whether they play roles in vascular tissue biology. In this report, we review roles for proteases in vascular cell differentiation and function as determined through the use of protease inhibitors and genetic analyses and conclude by identifying opportunities for future research in this area. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  4. Proteasome nuclear import mediated by Arc3 can influence efficient DNA damage repair and mitosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera, Rodrigo; Sha, Zhe; Vadakkan, Tegy J.

    2010-01-01

    . Proteasome nuclear import is reduced when Arc3 is inactivated, leading to hypersensitivity to DNA damage and inefficient cyclin-B degradation, two events occurring in the nucleus. These data suggest that proteasomes display Arc3-dependent mobility in the cell, and mobile proteasomes can efficiently access...

  5. Proteasomal Dysfunction Induced By Diclofenac Engenders Apoptosis Through Mitochondrial Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanullah, Ayeman; Upadhyay, Arun; Chhangani, Deepak; Joshi, Vibhuti; Mishra, Ribhav; Yamanaka, Koji; Mishra, Amit

    2017-05-01

    Diclofenac is the most commonly used phenylacetic acid derivative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that demonstrates significant analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory effects. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated anti-proliferative activity of NSAIDs and examined their apoptotic induction effects in different cancer cell lines. However, the precise molecular mechanisms by which these pharmacological agents induce apoptosis and exert anti-carcinogenic properties are not well known. Here, we have observed that diclofenac treatment induces proteasome malfunction and promotes accumulation of different critical proteasome substrates, including few pro-apoptotic proteins in cells. Exposure of diclofenac consequently elevates aggregation of various ubiquitylated misfolded proteins. Finally, we have shown that diclofenac treatment promotes apoptosis in cells, which could be because of mitochondrial membrane depolarization and cytochrome c release into cytosol. This study suggests possible beneficial insights of NSAIDs-induced apoptosis that may improve our existing knowledge in anti-proliferative interspecific strategies development. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1014-1027, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Epigenetics of proteasome inhibition in the liver of rats fed ethanol chronically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joan Oliva; Jennifer Dedes; Jun Li; Samuel W French; Fawzia Bardag-Gorce

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition, and the effects of proteasome inhibition in the regulation of epigenetic mechanisms. METHODS: Rats were fed ethanol for 1 mo using the Tsukamoto-French model and were compared to rats given the proteasome inhibitor PS-341 (Bortezomib, Velcade.) by intraperitoneal injection. Microarray analysis and real time PCR were performed and proteasome activity assays and Western blot analysis were performed using isolated nuclei. RESULTS: Chronic ethanol feeding caused a significant inhibition of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in the nucleus, which led to changes in the turnover of transcriptional factors, histone-modifying enzymes, and, therefore, affected epigenetic mechanisms. Chronic ethanol feeding was related to an increase in histone acetylation, and it is hypothesized that the proteasome proteolytic activity regulated histone modifications by controlling the stability of histone modifying enzymes, and, therefore, regulated the chromatin structure, allowing easy access to chromatin by RNA polymerase, and, thus, proper gene expression. Proteasome inhibition by PS-341 increased histone acetylation similar to chronic ethanol feeding. In addition, proteasome inhibition caused dramatic changes in hepatic remethylation reactions as there was a significant decrease in the enzymes responsible for the regeneration of S-adenosylmethionine, and, in particular, a significant decrease in the betainehomocysteine methyltransferase enzyme. This suggested that hypomethylation was associated with proteasome inhibition, as indicated by the decrease in histone methylation. CONCLUSION: The role of proteasome inhibition in regulating epigenetic mechanisms, and its link to liver injury in alcoholic liver disease, is thus a promising approach to study liver injury due to chronic ethanol consumption.

  7. The ubiquitin proteasome system plays a role in venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moushimi Amaya

    Full Text Available Many viruses have been implicated in utilizing or modulating the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS to enhance viral multiplication and/or to sustain a persistent infection. The mosquito-borne Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV belongs to the Togaviridae family and is an important biodefense pathogen and select agent. There are currently no approved vaccines or therapies for VEEV infections; therefore, it is imperative to identify novel targets for therapeutic development. We hypothesized that a functional UPS is required for efficient VEEV multiplication. We have shown that at non-toxic concentrations Bortezomib, a FDA-approved inhibitor of the proteasome, proved to be a potent inhibitor of VEEV multiplication in the human astrocytoma cell line U87MG. Bortezomib inhibited the virulent Trinidad donkey (TrD strain and the attenuated TC-83 strain of VEEV. Additional studies with virulent strains of Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV and Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV demonstrated that Bortezomib is a broad spectrum inhibitor of the New World alphaviruses. Time-of-addition assays showed that Bortezomib was an effective inhibitor of viral multiplication even when the drug was introduced many hours post exposure to the virus. Mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the VEEV capsid protein is ubiquitinated in infected cells, which was validated by confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation assays. Subsequent studies revealed that capsid is ubiquitinated on K48 during early stages of infection which was affected by Bortezomib treatment. This study will aid future investigations in identifying host proteins as potential broad spectrum therapeutic targets for treating alphavirus infections.

  8. The ER retention protein RER1 promotes alpha-synuclein degradation via the proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo-Jin; Ryu, Daniel; Parmar, Mayur; Giasson, Benoit I; McFarland, Nikolaus R

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of α-synuclein (αSyn) has been linked to endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) stress, defective intracellular protein/vesicle trafficking, and cytotoxicity. Targeting factors involved in ER-related protein processing and trafficking may, therefore, be a key to modulating αSyn levels and associated toxicity. Recently retention in endoplasmic reticulum 1 (RER1) has been identified as an important ER retrieval/retention factor for Alzheimer's disease proteins and negatively regulates amyloid-β peptide levels. Here, we hypothesized that RER1 might also play an important role in retention/retrieval of αSyn and mediate levels. We expressed RER1 and a C-terminal mutant RER1Δ25, which lacks the ER retention/retrieval function, in HEK293 and H4 neuroglioma cells. RER1 overexpression significantly decreased levels of both wild type and A30P, A53T, and E46K disease causal mutants of αSyn, whereas the RER1Δ25 mutant had a significantly attenuated effect on αSyn. RER1 effects were specific to αSyn and had little to no effect on either βSyn or the Δ71-82 αSyn mutant, which both lack the NAC domain sequence critical for synuclein fibrillization. Tests with proteasomal and macroautophagy inhibitors further demonstrate that RER1 effects on αSyn are primarily mediated through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. RER1 also appears to interact with the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4. RER1 in human diseased brain tissues co-localizes with αSyn-positive Lewy bodies. Together, these findings provide evidence that RER1 is a novel and potential important mediator of elevated αSyn levels. Further investigation of the mechanism of RER1 and downstream effectors on αSyn may yield novel therapeutic targets for modulation in Parkinson disease and related synucleinopathies.

  9. Regulation of TRAIL-Receptor Expression by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

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    Dhifaf Sarhan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand- receptor (TRAIL-R family has emerged as a key mediator of cell fate and survival. Ligation of TRAIL ligand to TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2 initiates the extrinsic apoptotic pathway characterized by the recruitment of death domains, assembly of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC, caspase activation and ultimately apoptosis. Conversely the decoy receptors TRAIL-R3 and TRAIL-R4, which lack the pro-apoptotic death domain, function to dampen the apoptotic response by competing for TRAIL ligand. The tissue restricted expression of the decoy receptors on normal but not cancer cells provides a therapeutic rational for the development of selective TRAIL-mediated anti-tumor therapies. Recent clinical trials using agonistic antibodies against the apoptosis-inducing TRAIL receptors or recombinant TRAIL have been promising; however the number of patients in complete remission remains stubbornly low. The mechanisms of TRAIL resistance are relatively unexplored but may in part be due to TRAIL-R down-regulation or shedding of TRAIL-R by tumor cells. Therefore a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying TRAIL resistance is required. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS has been shown to regulate TRAIL-R members suggesting that pharmacological inhibition of the UPS may be a novel strategy to augment TRAIL-based therapies and increase efficacies. We recently identified b-AP15 as an inhibitor of proteasome deubiquitinase (DUB activity. Interestingly, exposure of tumor cell lines to b-AP15 resulted in increased TRAIL-R2 expression and enhanced sensitivity to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis and cell death in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, targeting the UPS may represent a novel strategy to increase the cell surface expression of pro-apoptotic TRAIL-R on cancer cells and should be considered in clinical trials targeting TRAIL-receptors in cancer patients.

  10. A sporadic Parkinson disease model via silencing of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase component SKP1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman-Jacob, Tali; Reznichenko, Lydia; Youdim, Moussa B H; Mandel, Silvia A

    2009-11-20

    The aim of this study was to develop a new model of sporadic Parkinson disease (PD) based on silencing of the SKP1A gene, a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase complex, Skp1, Cullin 1, F-box protein, which was found to be highly decreased in the substantia nigra of sporadic PD patients. Initially, an embryonic mouse substantia nigra-derived cell line (SN4741 cells) was infected with short hairpin RNA lentiviruses encoding the murine transcript of the SKP1A gene or with scrambled vector. SKP1A silencing resulted in increased susceptibility to neuronal damages induced by the parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion and serum starvation, in parallel with a decline in the expression of the dopaminergic markers, dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter-2. SKP1A-deficient cells presented a delay in completion of the cell cycle and the inability to arrest at the G(0)/G(1) phase when induced to differentiate. Instead, the cells progressed through S phase, developing rounded aggregates with characteristics of aggresomes including immunoreactivity for gamma-tubulin, alpha-synuclein, ubiquitin, tyrosine hydroxylase, Hsc-70 (70-kDa heat shock cognate protein), and proteasome subunit, and culminating in a lethal phenotype. Conversely, stably enforced expression of wild type SKP1A duplicated the survival index of naïve SN4741 cells under proteasomal inhibition injury, suggesting a new structural role of SKP1 in dopaminergic neuronal function, besides its E3 ligase activity. These results link, for the first time, SKP1 to dopamine neuronal function and survival, suggesting an essential role in sporadic PD. In summary, this new model has reproduced to a significant extent the molecular alterations described in sporadic PD at the cellular level, implicating Skp1 as a potential modifier in sporadic PD neurodegeneration.

  11. A Sporadic Parkinson Disease Model via Silencing of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome/E3 Ligase Component SKP1A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman-Jacob, Tali; Reznichenko, Lydia; Youdim, Moussa B. H.; Mandel, Silvia A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new model of sporadic Parkinson disease (PD) based on silencing of the SKP1A gene, a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase complex, Skp1, Cullin 1, F-box protein, which was found to be highly decreased in the substantia nigra of sporadic PD patients. Initially, an embryonic mouse substantia nigra-derived cell line (SN4741 cells) was infected with short hairpin RNA lentiviruses encoding the murine transcript of the SKP1A gene or with scrambled vector. SKP1A silencing resulted in increased susceptibility to neuronal damages induced by the parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion and serum starvation, in parallel with a decline in the expression of the dopaminergic markers, dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter-2. SKP1A-deficient cells presented a delay in completion of the cell cycle and the inability to arrest at the G0/G1 phase when induced to differentiate. Instead, the cells progressed through S phase, developing rounded aggregates with characteristics of aggresomes including immunoreactivity for γ-tubulin, α-synuclein, ubiquitin, tyrosine hydroxylase, Hsc-70 (70-kDa heat shock cognate protein), and proteasome subunit, and culminating in a lethal phenotype. Conversely, stably enforced expression of wild type SKP1A duplicated the survival index of naïve SN4741 cells under proteasomal inhibition injury, suggesting a new structural role of SKP1 in dopaminergic neuronal function, besides its E3 ligase activity. These results link, for the first time, SKP1 to dopamine neuronal function and survival, suggesting an essential role in sporadic PD. In summary, this new model has reproduced to a significant extent the molecular alterations described in sporadic PD at the cellular level, implicating Skp1 as a potential modifier in sporadic PD neurodegeneration. PMID:19748892

  12. Melatonin-Induced Temporal Up-Regulation of Gene Expression Related to Ubiquitin/Proteasome System (UPS in the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C. Koyama

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing understanding that melatonin and the ubiquitin/ proteasome system (UPS interact to regulate multiple cellular functions. Post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination are important modulators of signaling processes, cell cycle and many other cellular functions. Previously, we reported a melatonin-induced upregulation of gene expression related to ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS in Plasmodium falciparum, the human malaria parasite, and that P. falciparum protein kinase 7 influences this process. This implies a role of melatonin, an indolamine, in modulating intraerythrocytic development of the parasite. In this report we demonstrate by qPCR analysis, that melatonin induces gene upregulation in nine out of fourteen genes of the UPS, consisting of the same set of genes previously reported, between 4 to 5 h after melatonin treatment. We demonstrate that melatonin causes a temporally controlled gene expression of UPS members.

  13. Chronic contractile activity upregulates the proteasome system in rabbit skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, G A; Neufer, P D; Chin, E R; DeMartino, G N

    2000-03-01

    Remodeling of skeletal muscle in response to altered patterns of contractile activity is achieved, in part, by the regulated degradation of cellular proteins. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a dominant pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. To test the role of this pathway in contraction-induced remodeling of skeletal muscle, we used a well-established model of continuous motor nerve stimulation to activate tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of New Zealand White rabbits for periods up to 28 days. Western blot analysis revealed marked and coordinated increases in protein levels of the 20S proteasome and two of its regulatory proteins, PA700 and PA28. mRNA of a representative proteasome subunit also increased coordinately in contracting muscles. Chronic contractile activity of TA also increased total proteasome activity in extracts, as measured by the hydrolysis of a proteasome-specific peptide substrate, and the total capacity of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as measured by the ATP-dependent hydrolysis of an exogenous protein substrate. These results support the potential role of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation in the contraction-induced remodeling of skeletal muscle.

  14. Proteasome activation during cardiac hypertrophy by the chaperone H11 Kinase/Hsp22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedhli, Nadia; Wang, Li; Wang, Qian; Rashed, Eman; Tian, Yimin; Sui, Xiangzhen; Madura, Kiran; Depre, Christophe

    2008-02-01

    The regulation of protein degradation by the proteasome during cardiac hypertrophy remains largely unknown. Also, the proteasome translocates to the nuclear periphery in response to cellular stress in yeast, which remains unexplored in mammals. The purpose of this study was to determine the quantitative and qualitative adaptation of the proteasome during stable cardiac hypertrophy. We measured proteasome activity, expression and sub-cellular distribution in a model of chronic cardiac hypertrophy induced by the stress-response chaperone H11 Kinase/Hsp22 (Hsp22). Over-expression of Hsp22 in a transgenic (TG) mouse leads to a 30% increase in myocyte cross-sectional area compared to wild-type (WT) mice (P hypertrophy in TG by 50% (P hypertrophy. Proteasome inhibitors also prevented the increase in rate of protein synthesis observed after over-expression of Hsp22 or upon addition of pro-hypertrophic stimuli. Hsp22-mediated cardiac hypertrophy promotes an increased expression and activity, and a subcellular redistribution of the proteasome. Inhibition of the proteasome reverses cardiac hypertrophy upon Hsp22 over-expression or upon stimulation by pro-hypertrophic hormones, and also blocks the stimulation of protein synthesis in these conditions.

  15. Peripheral proteasome and caspase activity in Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandini, F; Sinforiani, E; Pacchetti, C; Samuele, A; Bazzini, E; Zangaglia, R; Nappi, G; Martignoni, E

    2006-02-28

    Defects of the ubiquitin-proteasome (UP) system, a multicatalytic complex degrading polyubiquitinated proteins, may intervene in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by intracellular formation of protein aggregates such as Parkinson disease (PD) and Alzheimer disease (AD) by inducing proapoptotic conditions. The authors measured the activity of proteolytic UP core, proteasome 20S, and of proapoptotic caspase-3 and -9 in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) of PD and AD patients to establish whether changes in these systems are detectable peripherally. Proteasome 20S activity was reduced in PBLs of treated PD patients vs healthy controls (mean +/- SEM: 1.0 +/- 0.1 vs 2.3 +/- 0.2 nmol 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (AMC)/10(6) cells, p Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score) were inversely correlated with proteasome 20S activity and directly correlated with caspase-3 activity. An inverse correlation was also observed in PD patients between caspase-3 activity and proteasome 20S activity. No significant changes in proteasome 20S or caspase activity or correlations between biochemical and clinical variables were found in patients with AD. A decrease in proteasome activity, possibly related to caspase activation, is detectable in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with Parkinson disease but not patients with Alzheimer disease, suggesting that these variables may be considered for the development of peripheral biomarkers of Parkinson disease.

  16. Proteasome- and Ethanol-Dependent Regulation of HCV-Infection Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Osna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the role of the catabolism of HCV and signaling proteins in HCV protection and the involvement of ethanol in HCV-proteasome interactions. HCV specifically infects hepatocytes, and intracellularly expressed HCV proteins generate oxidative stress, which is further exacerbated by heavy drinking. The proteasome is the principal proteolytic system in cells, and its activity is sensitive to the level of cellular oxidative stress. Not only host proteins, but some HCV proteins are degraded by the proteasome, which, in turn, controls HCV propagation and is crucial for the elimination of the virus. Ubiquitylation of HCV proteins usually leads to the prevention of HCV propagation, while accumulation of undegraded viral proteins in the nuclear compartment exacerbates infection pathogenesis. Proteasome activity also regulates both innate and adaptive immunity in HCV-infected cells. In addition, the proteasome/immunoproteasome is activated by interferons, which also induce “early” and “late” interferon-sensitive genes (ISGs with anti-viral properties. Cleaving viral proteins to peptides in professional immune antigen presenting cells and infected (“target” hepatocytes that express the MHC class I-antigenic peptide complex, the proteasome regulates the clearance of infected hepatocytes by the immune system. Alcohol exposure prevents peptide cleavage by generating metabolites that impair proteasome activity, thereby providing escape mechanisms that interfere with efficient viral clearance to promote the persistence of HCV-infection.

  17. Analysis of the Protein Kinase A-Regulated Proteome of Cryptococcus neoformans Identifies a Role for the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Capsule Formation

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    J. M. H. Geddes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. The expression of virulence factors, including capsule and melanin, is in part regulated by the cyclic-AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway. In this study, we investigated the influence of PKA on the composition of the intracellular proteome to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the regulation that underpins virulence. Through quantitative proteomics, enrichment and bioinformatic analyses, and an interactome study, we uncovered a pattern of PKA regulation for proteins associated with translation, the proteasome, metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and virulence-related functions. PKA regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in C. neoformans showed a striking parallel with connections between PKA and protein degradation in chronic neurodegenerative disorders and other human diseases. Further investigation of proteasome function with the inhibitor bortezomib revealed an impact on capsule production as well as hypersusceptibility for strains with altered expression or activity of PKA. Parallel studies with tunicamycin also linked endoplasmic reticulum stress with capsule production and PKA. Taken together, the data suggest a model whereby expression of PKA regulatory and catalytic subunits and the activation of PKA influence proteostasis and the function of the endoplasmic reticulum to control the elaboration of the polysaccharide capsule. Overall, this study revealed both broad and conserved influences of the cAMP/PKA pathway on the proteome and identified proteostasis as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cryptococcosis.

  18. Activation of the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in skeletal muscle of cachectic rats bearing a hepatoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baracos, V. E.; DeVivo, C.; Hoyle, D. H.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Rats implanted with Yoshida ascites hepatoma (YAH) show a rapid and selective loss of muscle protein due mainly to a marked increase (63-95%) in the rate of protein degradation (compared with rates in muscles of pair-fed controls). To define which proteolytic pathways contribute to this increase, epitrochlearis muscles from YAH-bearing and control rats were incubated under conditions that modify different proteolytic systems. Overall proteolysis in either group of rats was not affected by removal of Ca2+ or by blocking the Ca(2+)-dependent proteolytic system. Inhibition of lysosomal function with methylamine reduced proteolysis (-12%) in muscles from YAH-bearing rats, but not in muscles of pair-fed rats. When ATP production was also inhibited, the remaining accelerated proteolysis in muscles of tumor-bearing rats fell to control levels. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins and a 27-kDa proteasome subunit in Western blot analysis. Levels of mRNA encoding components of proteolytic systems were quantitated using Northern hybridization analysis. Although their total RNA content decreased 20-38%, pale muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin mRNA (590-880%) and mRNA for multiple subunits of the proteasome (100-215%). Liver, kidney, heart, and brain showed no weight loss and no change in these mRNA species. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats also showed small increases (30-40%) in mRNA for cathepsins B and D, but not for calpain I or heat shock protein 70. Our findings suggest that accelerated muscle proteolysis and muscle wasting in tumor-bearing rats result primarily from activation of the ATP-dependent pathway involving ubiquitin and the proteasome.

  19. Proteasomal diseases are a new branch of autoinflammatory pathology

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    Evgeny Stanislavovich Fedorov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a new autoinflammatory disease entity that is proteasomal diseases. The latter include three nosological entities: Nakajo–Nishimura syndrome (NNS, Japanese autoinflammatory syndrome with lipodystrophy; chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE syndrome; joint contractures, muscular atrophy, microcytic anemia, and panniculitisinduced lipodystrophy (JMP syndrome. All the three conditions are caused by mutations in one PSMB8 gene encoding the immunoproteasome subunit β5i. Unlike other autoinflammatory syndromes that are mainly IL-1-dependent, the leading component of the pathogenesis of these diseases is IL-6/γ−interferonі system hyperactivation. These diseases are characterized by childhoodonset, retarded physical development, different skin and muscular lesions, lipodystrophy, joint contractures, and hypochromic anemia, as well as elevated levels of acutephase markers; autoimmune disorders may joint in time.

  20. The Role of Proteasome Inhibition in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

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    Mauricio Escobar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer therapy with current available chemotherapeutic agents is mainly palliative. For these and other reasons there is now a great interest to find targeted therapies that can be effective not only palliating lung cancer or decreasing treatment-related toxicity, but also giving hope to cure these patients. It is already well known that the ubiquitin-proteasome system like other cellular pathways is critical for the proliferation and survival of cancer cells; thus, proteosome inhibition has become a very attractive anticancer therapy. There are several phase I and phase II clinical trials now in non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer using this potential target. Most of the trials use bortezomib in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. This paper tends to make a state-of-the-art review based on the available literature regarding the use of bortezomib as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy in patients with lung cancer.

  1. Proteasome inhibitors induce apoptosis and reduce viral replication in primary effusion lymphoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Chiaki [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Higashi, Chizuka; Niinaka, Yasufumi [Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, Chuoh-shi 409-3898 (Japan); Yamada, Koji [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Noguchi, Kohji [Faculty of Pharmacy, Keio University, 1-5-30 Shiba-koen, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Fujimuro, Masahiro, E-mail: fuji2@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Misasagi-Shichonocho 1, Yamashinaku, Kyoto 607-8412 (Japan)

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Constitutive NF-{kappa}B signaling is essential for the survival and growth of PEL cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B signaling is upregulated by the proteasome-dependent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteasome inhibitors suppress NF-{kappa}B signaling and induce apoptosis in PEL cells through stabilization of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteasome inhibitors suppress viral replication in PEL cells during lytic KSHV infection. -- Abstract: Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an aggressive neoplasm caused by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). This study provides evidence that proteasomal activity is required for both survival of PEL cells stably harboring the KSHV genome and viral replication of KSHV. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of proteasome inhibitors on PEL cells. The proteasome inhibitors MG132, lactacystin, and proteasome inhibitor I dramatically inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of PEL cells through the accumulation of p21 and p27. Furthermore, proteasome inhibitors induced the stabilization of NF-{kappa}B inhibitory molecule (I{kappa}B{alpha}) and suppressed the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in PEL cells. The NF-{kappa}B specific inhibitor BAY11-7082 also induced apoptosis in PEL cells. The constitutive activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling is essential for the survival and growth of B cell lymphoma cells, including PEL cells. NF-{kappa}B signaling is upregulated by proteasome-dependent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. The suppression of NF-{kappa}B signaling by proteasome inhibitors may contribute to the induction of apoptosis in PEL cells. In addition, proteasome activity is required for KSHV replication in KSHV latently infected PEL cells. MG132 reduced the production of progeny virus from PEL cells at low concentrations, which do not affect PEL cell growth. These findings suggest that proteasome

  2. Removal of damaged proteins during ES cell fate specification requires the proteasome activator PA28

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernebring, Malin; Fredriksson, Asa; Liljevald, Maria

    2013-01-01

    In embryonic stem cells, removal of oxidatively damaged proteins is triggered upon the first signs of cell fate specification but the underlying mechanism is not known. Here, we report that this phase of differentiation encompasses an unexpected induction of genes encoding the proteasome activator...... PA28aß (11S), subunits of the immunoproteasome (20Si), and the 20Si regulator TNFa. This induction is accompanied by assembly of mature PA28-20S(i) proteasomes and elevated proteasome activity. Inhibiting accumulation of PA28a using miRNA counteracted the removal of damaged proteins demonstrating...

  3. Proteasome Inhibition Contributed to the Cytotoxicity of Arenobufagin after Its Binding with Na, K-ATPase in Human Cervical Carcinoma HeLa Cells.

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    Qingxi Yue

    Full Text Available Although the possibility of developing cardiac steroids/cardiac glycosides as novel cancer therapeutic agents has been recognized, the mechanism of their anticancer activity is still not clear enough. Toad venom extract containing bufadienolides, which belong to cardiac steroids, has actually long been used as traditional Chinese medicine in clinic for cancer therapy in China. The cytotoxicity of arenobufagin, a bufadienolide isolated from toad venom, on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was checked. And, the protein expression profile of control HeLa cells and HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin for 48 h was analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis, respectively. Differently expressed proteins in HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin were identified and the pathways related to these proteins were mapped from KEGG database. Computational molecular docking was performed to verify the binding of arenobufagin and Na, K-ATPase. The effects of arenobufagin on Na, K-ATPase activity and proteasome activity of HeLa cells were checked. The protein-protein interaction network between Na, K-ATPase and proteasome was constructed and the expression of possible intermediate proteins ataxin-1 and translationally-controlled tumor protein in HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin was then checked. Arenobufagin induced apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells. The cytotoxic effect of arenobufagin was associated with 25 differently expressed proteins including proteasome-related proteins, calcium ion binding-related proteins, oxidative stress-related proteins, metabolism-related enzymes and others. The results of computational molecular docking revealed that arenobufagin was bound in the cavity formed by the transmembrane alpha subunits of Na, K-ATPase, which blocked the pathway of extracellular Na+/K+ cation exchange and inhibited the function of ion exchange. Arenobufagin inhibited the activity of Na, K-ATPase and proteasome, decreased the

  4. Proteasome Inhibition Contributed to the Cytotoxicity of Arenobufagin after Its Binding with Na, K-ATPase in Human Cervical Carcinoma HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Qingxi; Zhen, Hong; Huang, Ming; Zheng, Xi; Feng, Lixing; Jiang, Baohong; Yang, Min; Wu, Wanying; Liu, Xuan; Guo, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Although the possibility of developing cardiac steroids/cardiac glycosides as novel cancer therapeutic agents has been recognized, the mechanism of their anticancer activity is still not clear enough. Toad venom extract containing bufadienolides, which belong to cardiac steroids, has actually long been used as traditional Chinese medicine in clinic for cancer therapy in China. The cytotoxicity of arenobufagin, a bufadienolide isolated from toad venom, on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was checked. And, the protein expression profile of control HeLa cells and HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin for 48 h was analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis, respectively. Differently expressed proteins in HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin were identified and the pathways related to these proteins were mapped from KEGG database. Computational molecular docking was performed to verify the binding of arenobufagin and Na, K-ATPase. The effects of arenobufagin on Na, K-ATPase activity and proteasome activity of HeLa cells were checked. The protein-protein interaction network between Na, K-ATPase and proteasome was constructed and the expression of possible intermediate proteins ataxin-1 and translationally-controlled tumor protein in HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin was then checked. Arenobufagin induced apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells. The cytotoxic effect of arenobufagin was associated with 25 differently expressed proteins including proteasome-related proteins, calcium ion binding-related proteins, oxidative stress-related proteins, metabolism-related enzymes and others. The results of computational molecular docking revealed that arenobufagin was bound in the cavity formed by the transmembrane alpha subunits of Na, K-ATPase, which blocked the pathway of extracellular Na+/K+ cation exchange and inhibited the function of ion exchange. Arenobufagin inhibited the activity of Na, K-ATPase and proteasome, decreased the expression of Na, K

  5. Detection of O-propargyl-puromycin with SUMO and ubiquitin by click chemistry at PML-nuclear bodies during abortive proteasome activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uozumi, Naoki; Matsumoto, Hotaru [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Saitoh, Hisato, E-mail: hisa@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-05-27

    The amino-nucleoside antibiotic, puromycin, acts by covalently linking to elongating polypeptide chains on ribosomes to generate prematurely terminated immature polypeptides. The trafficking of puromycin-conjugated (puromycylated) immature polypeptides within cell has, however, remained elusive. In this study, using O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro), the distribution of puromycylated polypeptides was assessed in HeLa cells by click chemistry. Under standard culture conditions, OP-Puro signals were detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus with the highest concentrations in the nucleolus. Intriguingly, when proteasome activities were aborted using MG132, OP-Puro signals began to accumulate at promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in addition to the nucleolus. We also found promiscuous association of OP-Puro signals with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at PML-NBs, but not at the nucleolus, during abortive proteasome activities. This study reveals a previously unknown distribution of OP-Puro that argues for a nuclear function in regulating immature protein homeostasis. -- Highlights: •Click chemistry detects O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) signals in the nucleus. •OP-Puro accumulates at PML-NBs during abortive proteasome activities. •SUMO and ubiquitin are promiscuously associated with OP-Puro at PML-NBs. •The nucleus may function in immature protein homeostasis.

  6. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Signal Peptide Uses a Novel p97-Dependent and Derlin-Independent Retrotranslocation Mechanism To Escape Proteasomal Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyewon Byun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple pathogens, including viruses and bacteria, manipulate endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD to avoid the host immune response and promote their replication. The betaretrovirus mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV encodes Rem, which is a precursor protein that is cleaved into a 98-amino-acid signal peptide (SP and a C-terminal protein (Rem-CT. SP uses retrotranslocation for ER membrane extraction and yet avoids ERAD by an unknown mechanism to enter the nucleus and function as a Rev-like protein. To determine how SP escapes ERAD, we used a ubiquitin-activated interaction trap (UBAIT screen to trap and identify transient protein interactions with SP, including the ERAD-associated p97 ATPase, but not E3 ligases or Derlin proteins linked to retrotranslocation, polyubiquitylation, and proteasomal degradation of extracted proteins. A dominant negative p97 ATPase inhibited both Rem and SP function. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that Rem, but not SP, is polyubiquitylated. Using both yeast and mammalian expression systems, linkage of a ubiquitin-like domain (UbL to SP or Rem induced degradation by the proteasome, whereas SP was stable in the absence of the UbL. ERAD-associated Derlin proteins were not required for SP activity. Together, these results suggested that Rem uses a novel p97-dependent, Derlin-independent retrotranslocation mechanism distinct from other pathogens to avoid SP ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation.

  7. ARF regulates the stability of p16 protein via REGγ-dependent proteasome degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Wang, Jingqiang; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2013-08-01

    The cell-cycle regulatory gene INK4A-ARF (CDKN2A) has two alternative transcripts that produce entirely different proteins, namely p14(ARF) and p16, which have complementary functions as regulators of p53 and pRB tumor suppressor pathways, respectively. The unusual organization of INK4A-ARF has long led to speculation of a need for coordinated regulation of p14(ARF) and p16. We now show that p14(ARF) (ARF) regulates the stability of p16 protein in human cancer cell lines, as well as in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In particular, ARF promotes rapid degradation of p16 protein, which is mediated by the proteasome and, more specifically, by interaction of ARF with one of its subunits, REGγ. Furthermore, this ARF-dependent destabilization of p16 can be abrogated by knockdown of REGγ or by pharmacologic blockade of its nuclear export. Thus, our findings have uncovered a novel crosstalk of 2 key tumor suppressors mediated by a REGγ-dependent mechanism. The ability of ARF to control p16 stability may influence cell-cycle function. The ability of ARF to control p16 stability may influence cell cycle function. Visual Overview: http://mcr.aacrjournals.org/content/current. ©2013 AACR.

  8. ELL targets c-Myc for proteasomal degradation and suppresses tumour growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Chi; Ji, Wei; Mei, Zhichao; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Dawei; Wang, Jing; Liu, Xing; Ouyang, Gang; Zhou, Jiangang; Xiao, Wuhan

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports that ELL (eleven–nineteen lysine-rich leukaemia) is a key regulator of transcriptional elongation, but the physiological function of Ell in mammals remains elusive. Here we show that ELL functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase and targets c-Myc for proteasomal degradation. In addition, we identify that UbcH8 serves as a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme in this pathway. Cysteine 595 of ELL is an active site of the enzyme; its mutation to alanine (C595A) renders the protein unable to promote the ubiquitination and degradation of c-Myc. ELL-mediated c-Myc degradation inhibits c-Myc-dependent transcriptional activity and cell proliferation, and also suppresses c-Myc-dependent xenograft tumour growth. In contrast, the ELL(C595A) mutant not only loses the ability to inhibit cell proliferation and xenograft tumour growth, but also promotes tumour metastasis. Thus, our work reveals a previously unrecognized function for ELL as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for c-Myc and a potential tumour suppressor. PMID:27009366

  9. Involvement of PML nuclear bodies in CBP degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Germain, Jonathan R; Chen, Jihong; Li, Qiao

    2008-11-01

    Transcriptional coactivator CBP is involved in the regulation of an array of biological processes including cellular differentiation, proliferation and survival. The function of CBP is critical for proper embryonic development and is relevant in cancer biology. Although much is known about the functional roles of CBP in these cellular processes, fewer studies have assessed what in turn regulates CBP activity per se. It has been reported that CBP colocalizes with PML bodies which are nuclear structures disrupted in acute promyelocytic leukemia. However, the biological relevance of CBP localization to PML nuclear bodies is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that histone deacetylase inhibitors such as valproic acid, a therapeutically relevant compound used for the treatment of epilepsy, modulates CBP activity. Valproic acid reduces the steady-state level of CBP by inducing CBP degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, while increasing the colocalization of CBP with ubiquitin nuclear speckles and with PML nuclear bodies. Our results suggest that PML nuclear bodies are nuclear sites involved in the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of CBP, providing novel insights in the regulation of CBP function and highlighting the relevance of its localization to PML nuclear bodies.

  10. Dysregulation of the (immuno)proteasome pathway in malformations of cortical development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Scheppingen, J.; Broekaart, D.W.M.; Scholl, T.; Zuidberg, M.R.J.; Anink, J.J.; Spliet, W.G.; van Rijen, P.C.; Czech, T.; Hainfellner, J.A.; Feucht, M.; Mühlebner, A.; van Vliet, E.A.; Aronica, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The proteasome is a multisubunit enzyme complex involved in protein degradation, which is essential for many cellular processes. During inflammation, the constitutive subunits are replaced by their inducible counterparts, resulting in the formation of the immunoproteasome. Methods: We

  11. Dysregulation of the (immuno)proteasome pathway in malformations of cortical development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Scheppingen, J; Broekaart, D W M; Scholl, T; Zuidberg, M R J; Anink, J J; Spliet, W G; van Rijen, P C; Czech, T; Hainfellner, J A; Feucht, M; Mühlebner, A; van Vliet, E.A.; Aronica, E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The proteasome is a multisubunit enzyme complex involved in protein degradation, which is essential for many cellular processes. During inflammation, the constitutive subunits are replaced by their inducible counterparts, resulting in the formation of the immunoproteasome. METHODS: We

  12. The effects of proteasome inhibitors on bone remodeling in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangari, Maurizio; Suva, Larry J

    2016-05-01

    Bone disease is a characteristic feature of multiple myeloma, a malignant plasma cell dyscrasia. In patients with multiple myeloma, the normal process of bone remodeling is dysregulated by aberrant bone marrow plasma cells, resulting in increased bone resorption, prevention of new bone formation, and consequent bone destruction. The ubiquitin-proteasome system, which is hyperactive in patients with multiple myeloma, controls the catabolism of several proteins that regulate bone remodeling. Clinical studies have reported that treatment with the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib reduces bone resorption and increases bone formation and bone mineral density in patients with multiple myeloma. Since the introduction of bortezomib in 2003, several next-generation proteasome inhibitors have also been used clinically, including carfilzomib, oprozomib, ixazomib, and delanzomib. This review summarizes the available preclinical and clinical evidence regarding the effect of proteasome inhibitors on bone remodeling in multiple myeloma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The ubiquitin proteasome system in glia and its role in neurodegenerative diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A.H.P.; Reits, E.A.J.; Hol, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is crucial for intracellular protein homeostasis and for degradation of aberrant and damaged proteins. The accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's,

  14. Aggresome-like structure induced by isothiocyanates is novel proteasome-dependent degradation machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Lixin, E-mail: lm293@georgetown.edu [Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Gan, Nanqin; Chung, Fung-Lung [Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057 (United States)

    2009-10-16

    Unwanted or misfolded proteins are either refolded by chaperones or degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). When UPS is impaired, misfolded proteins form aggregates, which are transported along microtubules by motor protein dynein towards the juxta-nuclear microtubule-organizing center to form aggresome, a single cellular garbage disposal complex. Because aggresome formation results from proteasome failure, aggresome components are degraded through the autophagy/lysosome pathway. Here we report that small molecule isothiocyanates (ITCs) can induce formation of aggresome-like structure (ALS) through covalent modification of cytoplasmic {alpha}- and {beta}-tubulin. The formation of ALS is related to neither proteasome inhibition nor oxidative stress. ITC-induced ALS is a proteasome-dependent assembly for emergent removal of misfolded proteins, suggesting that the cell may have a previously unknown strategy to cope with misfolded proteins.

  15. Validation of the 2nd Generation Proteasome Inhibitor Oprozomib for Local Therapy of Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Semren

    Full Text Available Proteasome inhibition has been shown to prevent development of fibrosis in several organs including the lung. However, effects of proteasome inhibitors on lung fibrosis are controversial and cytotoxic side effects of the overall inhibition of proteasomal protein degradation cannot be excluded. Therefore, we hypothesized that local lung-specific application of a novel, selective proteasome inhibitor, oprozomib (OZ, provides antifibrotic effects without systemic toxicity in a mouse model of lung fibrosis. Oprozomib was first tested on the human alveolar epithelial cancer cell line A549 and in primary mouse alveolar epithelial type II cells regarding its cytotoxic effects on alveolar epithelial cells and compared to the FDA approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BZ. OZ was less toxic than BZ and provided high selectivity for the chymotrypsin-like active site of the proteasome. In primary mouse lung fibroblasts, OZ showed significant anti-fibrotic effects, i.e. reduction of collagen I and α smooth muscle actin expression, in the absence of cytotoxicity. When applied locally into the lungs of healthy mice via instillation, OZ was well tolerated and effectively reduced proteasome activity in the lungs. In bleomycin challenged mice, however, locally applied OZ resulted in accelerated weight loss and increased mortality of treated mice. Further, OZ failed to reduce fibrosis in these mice. While upon systemic application OZ was well tolerated in healthy mice, it rather augmented instead of attenuated fibrotic remodelling of the lung in bleomycin challenged mice. To conclude, low toxicity and antifibrotic effects of OZ in pulmonary fibroblasts could not be confirmed for pulmonary fibrosis of bleomycin-treated mice. In light of these data, the use of proteasome inhibitors as therapeutic agents for the treatment of fibrotic lung diseases should thus be considered with caution.

  16. Mitochondrial and Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction in Ageing and Disease: Two Sides of the Same Coin?

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime M. Ross; Lars Olson; Giuseppe Coppotelli

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system have been described as two hallmarks of the ageing process. Additionally, both systems have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of many age-related diseases, particularly neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Interestingly, these two systems are closely interconnected, with the ubiquitin proteasome system maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis by regulating organelle dynamics, t...

  17. Immunofluorescent localization of ubiquitin and proteasomes in nucleolar vacuoles of soybean root meristematic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stępiński, D.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, using the immunofluorescent method, the immunopositive signals to ubiquitin and proteasomes in nucleoli of root meristematic cells of soybean seedlings have been observed. In fact, those signals were present exclusively in nucleolar vacuoles. No signals were observed in the nucleolar territory out of the nucleolar vacuoles or in the nucleoli without vacuoles. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) may act within the nucleoli of plants with high metabolic activities and may provi...

  18. Marizomib, a Proteasome Inhibitor for All Seasons: Preclinical Profile and a Framework for Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Potts, B.C.; Albitar, M.X.; Anderson, K C; Baritaki, S; Berkers, C.; Bonavida, B; Chandra, J.; Chauhan, D; Cusack, J.C.; Fenical, W.; Ghobrial, I M; Groll, M.; Jensen, P.R.; Lam, K. S.; Lloyd, G. K.

    2011-01-01

    The proteasome has emerged as an important clinically relevant target for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. Since the Food and Drug Administration approved the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (Velcade®) for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma, it has become clear that new inhibitors are needed that have a better therapeutic ratio, can overcome inherent and acquired bortezomib resistance and exhibit broader anti-cancer act...

  19. Proteasome inhibitors with pyrazole scaffolds from structure-based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Zachary; Kim, Keun-Sik; Lee, Do-Min; Kasam, Vinod; Baek, Si Eun; Lee, Kwang Hyun; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Ao, Lin; Carmony, Kimberly; Lee, Na-Ra; Zhou, Shou; Zhao, Qingquan; Jang, Yujin; Jeong, Hyun-Young; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Lee, Wooin; Kim, Dong-Eun; Kim, Kyung Bo

    2015-02-26

    We performed a virtual screen of ∼340 000 small molecules against the active site of proteasomes followed by in vitro assays and subsequent optimization, yielding a proteasome inhibitor with pyrazole scaffold. The pyrazole-scaffold compound displayed excellent metabolic stability and was highly effective in suppressing solid tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, the effectiveness of this compound was not negatively impacted by resistance to bortezomib or carfilzomib.

  20. Species-specific identification of Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts by fluorescently labeled DNA probes targeting the 26S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Christoph; König, Helmut; Fröhlich, Jürgen

    2007-09-01

    Sequencing of the complete 26S rRNA genes of all Dekkera/Brettanomyces species colonizing different beverages revealed the potential for a specific primer and probe design to support diagnostic PCR approaches and FISH. By analysis of the complete 26S rRNA genes of all five currently known Dekkera/Brettanomyces species (Dekkera bruxellensis, D. anomala, Brettanomyces custersianus, B. nanus and B. naardenensis), several regions with high nucleotide sequence variability yet distinct from the D1/D2 domains were identified. FISH species-specific probes targeting the 26S rRNA gene's most variable regions were designed. Accessibility of probe targets for hybridization was facilitated by the construction of partially complementary 'side'-labeled probes, based on secondary structure models of the rRNA sequences. The specificity and routine applicability of the FISH-based method for yeast identification were tested by analyzing different wine isolates. Investigation of the prevalence of Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts in the German viticultural regions Wonnegau, Nierstein and Bingen (Rhinehesse, Rhineland-Palatinate) resulted in the isolation of 37 D. bruxellensis strains from 291 wine samples.

  1. Characterisation of 20S Proteasome in Tritrichomonas foetus and Its Role during the Cell Cycle and Transformation into Endoflagellar Form.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pereira-Neves

    Full Text Available Proteasomes are intracellular complexes that control selective protein degradation in organisms ranging from Archaea to higher eukaryotes. These structures have multiple proteolytic activities that are required for cell differentiation, replication and maintaining cellular homeostasis. Here, we document the presence of the 20S proteasome in the protist parasite Tritrichomonas foetus. Complementary techniques, such as a combination of whole genome sequencing technologies, bioinformatics algorithms, cell fractionation and biochemistry and microscopy approaches were used to characterise the 20S proteasome of T. foetus. The 14 homologues of the typical eukaryotic proteasome subunits were identified in the T. foetus genome. Alignment analyses showed that the main regulatory and catalytic domains of the proteasome were conserved in the predicted amino acid sequences from T. foetus-proteasome subunits. Immunofluorescence assays using an anti-proteasome antibody revealed a labelling distributed throughout the cytosol as punctate cytoplasmic structures and in the perinuclear region. Electron microscopy of a T. foetus-proteasome-enriched fraction confirmed the presence of particles that resembled the typical eukaryotic 20S proteasome. Fluorogenic assays using specific peptidyl substrates detected presence of the three typical peptidase activities of eukaryotic proteasomes in T. foetus. As expected, these peptidase activities were inhibited by lactacystin, a well-known specific proteasome inhibitor, and were not affected by inhibitors of serine or cysteine proteases. During the transformation of T. foetus to endoflagellar form (EFF, also known as pseudocyst, we observed correlations between the EFF formation rates, increases in the proteasome activities and reduced levels of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. The growth, cell cycle and EFF transformation of T. foetus were inhibited after treatment with lactacystin in a dose-dependent manner. Lactacystin

  2. Fenretinide induces ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation of stearoyl-CoA desaturase in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, William; Kutty, R Krishnan; Duncan, Todd; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Kuo, Bryan C; Chapa, Krysten M; Redmond, T Michael

    2014-08-01

    Stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD, SCD1), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident protein and a rate-limiting enzyme in monounsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis, regulates cellular functions by controlling the ratio of saturated to monounsaturated fatty acids. Increase in SCD expression is strongly implicated in the proliferation and survival of cancer cells, whereas its decrease is known to impair proliferation, induce apoptosis, and restore insulin sensitivity. We examined whether fenretinide, (N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide, 4HPR), which induces apoptosis in cancer cells and recently shown to improve insulin sensitivity, can modulate the expression of SCD. We observed that fenretinide decreased SCD protein and enzymatic activity in the ARPE-19 human retinal pigment epithelial cell line. Increased expression of BiP/GRP78, ATF4, and GADD153 implicated ER stress. Tunicamycin and thapsigargin, compounds known to induce ER stress, also decreased the SCD protein. This decrease was completely blocked by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. In addition, PYR41, an inhibitor of ubiquitin activating enzyme E1, blocked the fenretinide-mediated decrease in SCD. Immunoprecipitation analysis using anti-ubiquitin and anti-SCD antibodies and the blocking of SCD loss by PYR41 inhibition of ubiquitination further corroborate that fenretinide mediates the degradation of SCD in human RPE cells via the ubiquitin-proteasome dependent pathway. Therefore, the effect of fenretinide on SCD should be considered in its potential therapeutic role against cancer, type-2 diabetes, and retinal diseases.

  3. Changes in autophagy, proteasome activity and metabolism to determine a specific signature for acute and chronic senescent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Stefania; Alessio, Nicola; Squillaro, Tiziana; Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Melone, Mariarosa A; Cipollaro, Marilena; Peluso, Gianfranco; Galderisi, Umberto

    2015-11-24

    A sharp definition of what a senescent cell is still lacking since we do not have in depth understanding of mechanisms that induce cellular senescence. In addition, senescent cells are heterogeneous, in that not all of them express the same genes and present the same phenotype. To further clarify the classification of senescent cells, hints may be derived by the study of cellular metabolism, autophagy and proteasome activity. In this scenario, we decided to study these biological features in senescence of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC). These cells contain a subpopulation of stem cells that are able to differentiate in mesodermal derivatives (adipocytes, chondrocytes, osteocytes). In addition, they can also contribute to the homeostatic maintenance of many organs, hence, their senescence could be very deleterious for human body functions. We induced MSC senescence by oxidative stress, doxorubicin treatment, X-ray irradiation and replicative exhaustion. The first three are considered inducers of acute senescence while extensive proliferation triggers replicative senescence also named as chronic senescence. In all conditions, but replicative and high IR dose senescence, we detected a reduction of the autophagic flux, while proteasome activity was impaired in peroxide-treated and irradiated cells. Differences were observed also in metabolic status. In general, all senescent cells evidenced metabolic inflexibility and prefer to use glucose as energy fuel. Irradiated cells with low dose of X-ray and replicative senescent cells show a residual capacity to use fatty acids and glutamine as alternative fuels, respectively. Our study may be useful to discriminate among different senescent phenotypes.

  4. NAC1 regulates the recruitment of the proteasome complex into dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haowei; Korutla, Laxminarayana; Champtiaux, Nicholas; Toda, Shigenobu; LaLumiere, Ryan; Vallone, Joseph; Klugmann, Matthias; Blendy, Julie A; Mackler, Scott A; Kalivas, Peter W

    2007-08-15

    Coordinated proteolysis of synaptic proteins is required for synaptic plasticity, but a mechanism for recruiting the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) into dendritic spines is not known. NAC1 is a cocaine-regulated transcriptional protein that was found to complex with proteins in the UPS, including cullins and Mov34. NAC1 and the proteasome were cotranslocated from the nucleus into dendritic spines in cortical neurons in response to proteasome inhibition or disinhibiting synaptic activity with bicuculline. Bicuculline also produced a progressive accumulation of the proteasome and NAC1 in the postsynaptic density. Recruitment of the proteasome into dendrites and postsynaptic density by bicuculline was prevented in neurons from mice harboring an NAC1 gene deletion or in neurons transfected with mutated NAC1 lacking the proteasome binding domain. These experiments show that NAC1 modulates the translocation of the UPS from the nucleus into dendritic spines, thereby suggesting a potential missing link in the recruitment of necessary proteolysis machinery for synaptic remodeling.

  5. Proteasome inhibition compromises direct retention of cytochrome P450 2C2 in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczesna-Skorupa, Elzbieta; Kemper, Byron

    2008-10-15

    To determine whether protein degradation plays a role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention of cytochromes P450, the effects of proteasomal inhibitors on the expression and distribution of green fluorescent protein chimeras of CYP2C2 and related proteins was examined. In transfected cells, expression levels of chimeras of full-length CYP2C2 and its cytosolic domain, but not its N-terminal transmembrane sequence, were increased by proteasomal inhibition. Redistribution of all three chimeras from the reticular ER into a perinuclear compartment and, in a subset of cells, also to the cell surface was observed after proteasomal inhibition. Redistribution was blocked by the microtubular inhibitor, nocodazole, suggesting that redistribution to the cell surface followed the conventional vesicular transport pathway. Similar redistributions were detected for BAP31, a CYP2C2 binding chaperone; CYP2E1 and CYP3A4, which are also degraded by the proteasomal pathway; and for cytochrome P450 reductase, which does not undergo proteasomal degradation; but not for the ER membrane proteins, sec61 and calnexin. Redistribution does not result from saturation of an ER retention "receptor" since in some cases protein levels were unaffected. Proteasomal inhibition may, therefore, alter ER retention by affecting a protein critical for ER retention, either directly, or indirectly by affecting the composition of the ER membranes.

  6. E2-25K SUMOylation inhibits proteasome for cell death during cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eun Il; Chung, Hae Won; Lee, Won Jea; Kim, Seo-Hyun; Kim, Hyunjoo; Choi, Seon-Guk; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) causes brain damage accompanied by ubiquitin accumulation and impairment of proteasome activity. In this study, we report that E2-25K, an E2-conjugating enzyme, is SUMOylated during oxidative stress and regulates cerebral I/R-induced damage. Knockdown of E2-25K expression protects against oxygen/glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R)-induced neuronal cell death, whereas ectopic expression of E2-25K stimulates it. Compared with the control mice, cerebral infarction lesions and behavioral/neurological disorders are ameliorated in E2-25K knockout mice during middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion. In particular, E2-25K is SUMOylated at Lys14 under oxidative stress, OGD/R and I/R to prompt cell death. Further, E2-25K downregulates the proteasome subunit S5a to impair proteasome complex and thus restrain proteasome activity under oxidative stress. This proteasome inhibitory activity of E2-25K is dependent on its SUMOylation. These results suggest that E2-25K has a crucial role in oxidative stress and cerebral I/R-induced damage through inhibiting proteasome via its SUMOylation. PMID:28032866

  7. A luminescence assay for natural product inhibitors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderwala, Amber; Porter, John

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) causes a large global burden of disease, with a high mortality rate in healthy and immuno-compromised patients. A number of molecular targets have been identified for treatment of this disease, including the Mtb proteasome. The Mtb proteasome enhances Mtb survival during nitrosative and oxidative stress in the latent, non-replicative phase. Therefore, Mtb proteasome inhibition could help to combat Mtb infections that do not respond to current therapies. To develop and validate a novel biochemical assay to assess Mtb proteasome activity in the presence of organic and aqueous plant test extracts. Fluorescence (photoluminescence) and luminescence (chemiluminescence) assays were investigated as potential methods to determine the robustness and repeatability for use in screening natural product extracts for Mtb proteasome inhibitors. The fluorescence assay, used widely for Mtb proteasome activity assays, was subject to interference due to the natural fluorescence of compounds in many of the extracts; there is little interference with the luminescence approach. As proof of principle, we used the luminescence assay to screen a small set of plant test extracts. Luminescence is the more suitable assay for assay of plant natural product extracts. The sensitivities of the luminescence and fluorescence assays are comparable. A Z'-factor of 0.58 for the luminescence assay makes it suitable for medium-to-high throughput screening efforts. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Effect of proteasome inhibitors on proliferation and apoptosis of human cutaneous melanoma-derived cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorolla, A; Yeramian, A; Dolcet, X; Pérez de Santos, A M; Llobet, D; Schoenenberger, J A; Casanova, J M; Soria, X; Egido, R; Llombart, A; Vilella, R; Matias-Guiu, X; Marti, R M

    2008-03-01

    Cutaneous malignant melanoma is an aggressive type of skin cancer which causes disproportionate mortality in young and middle-aged adults. Once disseminated, melanoma can be considered an incurable disease, highly resistant to standard antineoplastic treatment, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy. The proteasome represents a novel target for cancer therapy that can potentially be used in melanoma. To assess the effect of four structurally different proteasome inhibitors on human cutaneous melanoma-derived cell lines. Sixteen human cutaneous melanoma-derived cell lines which are original were obtained from patients who were treated by two of the authors. Cells were cultured, exposed to proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib, ALLN, MG-132 and epoxomicin) and then assayed for cell cycle and cell death analyses. Proteasome inhibitors inhibited the in vitro growth of melanoma cells, and this effect was due to a reduction in cell proliferation rate and an induction of both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent cell death. Moreover, release of apoptosis-inducing factor was observed in the presence of the broad-specificity caspase inhibitor BAF (Boc-D-fmk). In addition, the four different proteasome inhibitors induced caspase 2 processing. This study provides information regarding the in vitro effects of proteasome inhibitors on melanoma cell lines, and the molecular mechanisms involved. It also gives support to the future use of such inhibitors in the treatment of patients with melanoma, either administered alone or in combination with other drugs.

  9. Defective Proteasome Delivery of Polyubiquitinated Proteins by Ubiquilin-2 Proteins Containing ALS Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Chang

    Full Text Available Ubiquilin proteins facilitate delivery of ubiquitinated proteins to the proteasome for degradation. Interest in the proteins has been heightened by the discovery that gene mutations in UBQLN2 cause dominant inheritance of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. However, the mechanisms by which the mutations cause ALS are not known. Here we report on the underlying defect of ubiquilin-2 proteins containing ALS-linked mutations in affecting proteasome-mediated degradation. We found that overexpression of ubiquilin-2 proteins containing any one of five different ALS mutations slow degradation of Myc, a prototypic proteasome substrate. Examination of coprecipitating proteins indicated that the mutant proteins are generally capable of binding polyubiquitinated proteins, but defective in binding the proteasome. GST-pulldown studies revealed that many of the mutants bind weaker to the S5a subunit of the proteasome, compared with wild type (WT ubiquilin-2 protein. The results suggest the mutant proteins are unable to deliver their captured cargo to the proteasome for degradation, which presumably leads to toxicity. Quantification of cell death is consistent with this idea. Measurement of protein turnover further indicated the mutant proteins have longer half-lives than WT ubiquilin-2. Our studies provide novel insight into the mechanism by which ALS-linked mutations in UBQLN2 interfere with protein degradation.

  10. Proteasome (Prosome Subunit Variations during the Differentiation of Myeloid U937 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Henry

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available 20S proteasomes (prosomes/multicatalytic proteinase are protein particles built of 28 subunits in variable composition. We studied the changes in proteasome subunit composition during the differentiation of U937 cells induced by phorbol‐myristate‐acetate or retinoic acid plus 1,25‐dihydroxy‐cholecalciferol by western blot, flow cytometry and immuno‐fluorescence. p25K (C3, p27K (IOTA and p30/33K (C2 subunits were detected in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of undifferentiated cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated a biphasic decrease in proteasome subunits detection during differentiation induced by RA+VD. PMA caused an early transient decrease in these subunits followed by a return to their control level, except for p30/33K, which remained low. Immuno‐fluorescence also showed differences in the cytolocalization of the subunits, with a particular decrease in antigen labeling in the nucleus of RA+VD‐induced cells, and a scattering in the cytoplasm and a reorganization in the nucleus of PMA‐induced cells. Small amounts of proteasomal proteins were seen on the outer membrane of non‐induced cells; these membrane proteins disappeared when treated with RA+VD, whereas some increased on PMA‐induced cells. The differential changes in the distribution and type of proteasomes in RA+VD and PMA‐induced cells indicate that, possibly, 20S proteasomes may play a role in relation to the mechanisms of differentiation and the inducer used.

  11. Biochemical and Biophysical Characterization of Recombinant Yeast Proteasome Maturation Factor UMP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bebiana Sá-Moura

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein degradation is essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis. The proteasome is the central enzyme responsible for non-lysosomal protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Although proteasome assembly is not yet completely understood, a number of cofactors required for proper assembly and maturation have been identified. Ump1 is a short-lived maturation factor required for the efficient biogenesis of the 20S proteasome. Upon the association of the two precursor complexes, Ump1 is encased and is rapidly degraded after the proteolytic sites in the interior of the nascent proteasome are activated. In order to further understand the mechanisms behind proteasomal maturation, we expressed and purified yeast Ump1 in E. coli for biophysical and structural analysis.We show that recombinant Ump1 is purified as a mixture of different oligomeric species and that oligomerization is mediated by intermolecular disulfide bond formation involving the only cysteine residue present in the protein. Furthermore, a combination of bioinformatics tools, biochemical and structural analysis revealed that Ump1 shows characteristics of an intrinsically disordered protein, which might become structured only upon interaction with the proteasome subunits.

  12. FBXO32 Targets c-Myc for Proteasomal Degradation and Inhibits c-Myc Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Zhichao; Zhang, Dawei; Hu, Bo; Wang, Jing; Shen, Xian; Xiao, Wuhan

    2015-01-01

    FBXO32 (MAFbx/Atrogin-1) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is markedly up-regulated in muscle atrophy. Although some data indicate that FBXO32 may play an important role in tumorigenesis, the molecular mechanism of FBXO32 in tumorigenesis has been poorly understood. Here, we present evidence that FBXO32 targets the oncogenic protein c-Myc for ubiquitination and degradation through the proteasome pathway. Phosphorylation of c-Myc at Thr-58 and Ser-62 is dispensable for FBXO32 to induce c-Myc degradation. Mutation of the lysine 326 in c-Myc reduces c-Myc ubiquitination and prevents the c-Myc degradation induced by FBXO32. Furthermore, overexpression of FBXO32 suppresses c-Myc activity and inhibits cell growth, but knockdown of FBXO32 enhances c-Myc activity and promotes cell growth. Finally, we show that FBXO32 is a direct downstream target of c-Myc, highlighting a negative feedback regulation loop between c-Myc and FBXO32. Thus, FBXO32 may function by targeting c-Myc. This work explains the function of FBXO32 and highlights its mechanisms in tumorigenesis. PMID:25944903

  13. Dendrite Development Regulated by the Schizophrenia-Associated Gene FEZ1 Involves the Ubiquitin Proteasome System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito Watanabe

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Downregulation of the schizophrenia-associated gene DISC1 and its interacting protein FEZ1 positively regulates dendrite growth in young neurons. However, little is known about the mechanism that controls these molecules during neuronal development. Here, we identify several components of the ubiquitin proteasome system and the cell-cycle machinery that act upstream of FEZ1. We demonstrate that the ubiquitin ligase cell division cycle 20/anaphase-promoting complex (Cdc20/APC controls dendrite growth by regulating the degradation of FEZ1. Furthermore, dendrite growth is modulated by BubR1, whose known function so far has been restricted to control Cdc20/APC activity during the cell cycle. The modulatory function of BubR1 is dependent on its acetylation status. We show that BubR1 is deacetylated by Hdac11, thereby disinhibiting the Cdc20/APC complex. Because dendrite growth is affected both in hippocampal dentate granule cells and olfactory bulb neurons upon modifying expression of these genes, we conclude that the proposed mechanism governs neuronal development in a general fashion.

  14. Novel proteasome inhibitor ixazomib sensitizes neuroblastoma cells to doxorubicin treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoyu; Chen, Zhenghu; Hu, Ting; Wang, Long; Yu, Yang; Zhao, Yanling; Sun, Wenijing; Guan, Shan; Pang, Jonathan C.; Woodfield, Sarah E.; Liu, Qing; Yang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial malignant solid tumor seen in children and continues to lead to the death of many pediatric cancer patients. The poor outcome in high risk NB is largely attributed to the development of chemoresistant tumor cells. Doxorubicin (dox) has been widely employed as a potent anti-cancer agent in chemotherapeutic regimens; however, it also leads to chemoresistance in many cancer types including NB. Thus, developing novel small molecules that can overcome dox-induced chemoresistance is a promising strategy in cancer therapy. Here we show that the second generation proteasome inhibitor ixazomib (MLN9708) not only inhibits NB cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in vitro but also enhances dox-induced cytotoxicity in NB cells. Ixazomib inhibits dox-induced NF-κB activity and sensitizes NB cells to dox-induced apoptosis. More importantly, ixazomib demonstrated potent anti-tumor efficacy in vivo by enhancing dox-induced apoptosis in an orthotopic xenograft NB mouse model. Collectively, our study illustrates the anti-tumor efficacy of ixazomib in NB both alone and in combination with dox, suggesting that combination therapy including ixazomib with traditional therapeutic agents such as dox is a viable strategy that may achieve better outcomes for NB patients. PMID:27687684

  15. Association of Obesity with Proteasomal Gene Polymorphisms in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupca, Sarmite; Paramonova, Natalija; Sugoka, Olga; Rinkuza, Irena; Trapina, Ilva; Daugule, Ilva; Sipols, Alfred J.; Rumba-Rozenfelde, Ingrida

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain possible associations between childhood obesity, its anthropometric and clinical parameters, and three loci of proteasomal genes rs2277460 (PSMA6 c.-110C>A), rs1048990 (PSMA6 c.-8C>G), and rs2348071 (PSMA3 c. 543+138G>A) implicated in obesity-related diseases. Obese subjects included 94 otherwise healthy children in Latvia. Loci were genotyped and then analyzed using polymerase chain reactions, with results compared to those of 191 nonobese controls. PSMA3 SNP frequency differences between obese children and controls, while not reaching significance, suggested a trend. These differences, however, proved highly significant (P G SNP differences, while being nonsignificant, likewise suggested a trend in comparison to the nonobese controls. No PSMA6 c.-110C>A SNP differences were detected in the obese group or its subsets. Finally, PSMA3 SNP differences were significantly associated (P < 0.05) with circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) levels. Our results clearly implicate the PSMA3 gene locus as an obesity risk factor in those Latvian children with a family history of obesity. While being speculative, the clinical results are suggestive of altered circulatory LDL levels playing a possible role in the etiology of obesity in the young. PMID:24455213

  16. Association of Obesity with Proteasomal Gene Polymorphisms in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmite Kupca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to ascertain possible associations between childhood obesity, its anthropometric and clinical parameters, and three loci of proteasomal genes rs2277460 (PSMA6 c.-110C>A, rs1048990 (PSMA6 c.-8C>G, and rs2348071 (PSMA3 c. 543+138G>A implicated in obesity-related diseases. Obese subjects included 94 otherwise healthy children in Latvia. Loci were genotyped and then analyzed using polymerase chain reactions, with results compared to those of 191 nonobese controls. PSMA3 SNP frequency differences between obese children and controls, while not reaching significance, suggested a trend. These differences, however, proved highly significant (PG SNP differences, while being nonsignificant, likewise suggested a trend in comparison to the nonobese controls. No PSMA6 c.-110C>A SNP differences were detected in the obese group or its subsets. Finally, PSMA3 SNP differences were significantly associated (P<0.05 with circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL levels. Our results clearly implicate the PSMA3 gene locus as an obesity risk factor in those Latvian children with a family history of obesity. While being speculative, the clinical results are suggestive of altered circulatory LDL levels playing a possible role in the etiology of obesity in the young.

  17. Encapsulation of a proteasome inhibitor with gold-polysaccharide nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Sílvia Castro; Rocha, Sandra; Sampaio, Paula; Pereira, Maria Carmo; Coelho, Manuel A. N.

    2014-04-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles are potential effective systems for drug delivery in cancer therapy and diagnosis. Chitosan-gum arabic with entrapped gold nanoparticles were developed as a carrier for an anticancer drug bortezomib. The nanosystem was designed to enhance the proteasome inhibitor activity in pancreatic cell lines, S2-013 and hTERT-HPNE. The hydrodynamic diameter of chitosan-gum arabic-gold nanoparticles loaded with bortezomib is around 330 nm. Laser scanning confocal microscopy images show the uptake of the gold nanoparticle/bortezomib encapsulated in chitosan-gum arabic matrix and the fast internalization of these nano combinations into pancreatic cells. Cytotoxic assays assessed that positively charged nanosystems reduce the cell growth and cell proliferation of S2-013s, but the same effect was not observed in cytotoxic response in hTERT-HPNE cells. The outcomes of this study demonstrate the capacity of chitosan-gum arabic nanocarriers to deliver gold nanoparticles/anticancer drug and to increase the permeation and retention effect in S2-013 cells and minimize drug side effects in HPNE cells.

  18. Proteasome Particle-Rich Structures Are Widely Present in Human Epithelial Neoplasms: Correlative Light, Confocal and Electron Microscopy Study

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    A novel cytoplasmic structure has been recently characterized by confocal and electron microscopy in H. pylori-infected human gastric epithelium, as an accumulation of barrel-like proteasome reactive particles colocalized with polyubiquitinated proteins, H. pylori toxins and the NOD1 receptor. This proteasome particle-rich cytoplasmic structure (PaCS), a sort of focal proteasome hyperplasia, was also detected in dysplastic cells and was found to be enriched in SHP2 and ERK proteins, known to ...

  19. N,C-Capped dipeptides with selectivity for mycobacterial proteasome over human proteasomes: role of S3 and S1 binding pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gang; Chidawanyika, Tamutenda; Tsu, Christopher; Warrier, Thulasi; Vaubourgeix, Julien; Blackburn, Christopher; Gigstad, Kenneth; Sintchak, Michael; Dick, Lawrence; Nathan, Carl

    2013-07-10

    We identified N,C-capped dipeptides that are selective for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome over human constitutive and immunoproteasomes. Differences in the S3 and S1 binding pockets appeared to account for the species selectivity. The inhibitors can penetrate mycobacteria and kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis under nitrosative stress.

  20. A genetic suppressor of two dominant temperature-sensitive lethal proteasome mutants of Drosophila melanogaster is itself a mutated proteasome subunit gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuburger, Peter J; Saville, Kenneth J; Zeng, Jue; Smyth, Kerrie-Ann; Belote, John M

    2006-07-01

    Two dominant temperature-sensitive (DTS) lethal mutants of Drosophila melanogaster are Pros26(1) and Prosbeta2(1), previously known as DTS5 and DTS7. Heterozygotes for either mutant die as pupae when raised at 29 degrees , but are normally viable and fertile at 25 degrees . Previous studies have identified these as missense mutations in the genes encoding the beta6 and beta2 subunits of the 20S proteasome, respectively. In an effort to isolate additional proteasome-related mutants a screen for dominant suppressors of Pros26(1) was carried out, resulting in the identification of Pros25(SuDTS) [originally called Su(DTS)], a missense mutation in the gene encoding the 20S proteasome alpha2 subunit. Pros25(SuDTS) acts in a dominant manner to rescue both Pros26(1) and Prosbeta2(1) from their DTS lethal phenotypes. Using an in vivo protein degradation assay it was shown that this suppression occurs by counteracting the dominant-negative effect of the DTS mutant on proteasome activity. Pros25(SuDTS) is a recessive polyphasic lethal at ambient temperatures. The effects of these mutants on larval neuroblast mitosis were also examined. While Prosbeta2(1) shows a modest increase in the number of defective mitotic figures, there were no defects seen with the other two mutants, other than slightly reduced mitotic indexes.

  1. Interaction of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome and proteasome protein complexes with multiubiquitin chain-binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeger, Michael; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Wilkinson, Caroline R M

    2003-01-01

    Fission yeast Rhp23 and Pus1 represent two families of multiubiquitin chain-binding proteins that associate with the proteasome. We show that both proteins bind to different regions of the proteasome subunit Mts4. The binding site for Pus1 was mapped to a cluster of repetitive sequences also found...... in the proteasome subunit SpRpn2 and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) subunit Cut4. The putative role of Pus1 as a factor involved in allocation of ubiquitinylated substrates for the proteasome is discussed....

  2. Reactive nucleolar and Cajal body responses to proteasome inhibition in sensory ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanca, Ana; Casafont, Iñigo; Berciano, María T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2014-06-01

    The dysfunction of the ubiquitin proteasome system has been related to a broad array of neurodegenerative disorders in which the accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates causes proteotoxicity. The ability of proteasome inhibitors to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis has emerged as a powerful strategy for cancer therapy. Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor used as an antineoplastic drug, although its neurotoxicity frequently causes a severe sensory peripheral neuropathy. In this study we used a rat model of bortezomib treatment to study the nucleolar and Cajal body responses to the proteasome inhibition in sensory ganglion neurons that are major targets of bortezomib-induced neurotoxicity. Treatment with bortezomib induced dose-dependent dissociation of protein synthesis machinery (chromatolysis) and nuclear retention of poly(A) RNA granules resulting in neuronal dysfunction. However, as a compensatory response to the proteotoxic stress, both nucleoli and Cajal bodies exhibited reactive changes. These include an increase in the number and size of nucleoli, strong nucleolar incorporation of the RNA precursor 5'-fluorouridine, and increased expression of both 45S rRNA and genes encoding nucleolar proteins UBF, fibrillarin and B23. Taken together, these findings appear to reflect the activation of the nucleolar transcription in response to proteotoxic stress Furthermore, the number of Cajal bodies, a parameter related to transcriptional activity, increases upon proteasome inhibition. We propose that nucleoli and Cajal bodies are important targets in the signaling pathways that are activated by the proteotoxic stress response to proteasome inhibition. The coordinating activity of these two organelles in the production of snRNA, snoRNA and rRNA may contribute to neuronal survival after proteasome inhibition. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease.

  3. The Regulation of Tumor Suppressor p63 by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Armstrong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The protein p63 has been identified as a homolog of the tumor suppressor protein p53 and is capable of inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, or senescence. p63 has at least six isoforms, which can be divided into two major groups: the TAp63 variants that contain the N-terminal transactivation domain and the ΔNp63 variants that lack the N-terminal transactivation domain. The TAp63 variants are generally considered to be tumor suppressors involved in activating apoptosis and suppressing metastasis. ΔNp63 variants cannot induce apoptosis but can act as dominant negative inhibitors to block the function of TAp53, TAp73, and TAp63. p63 is rarely mutated in human tumors and is predominately regulated at the post-translational level by phosphorylation and ubiquitination. This review focuses primarily on regulation of p63 by the ubiquitin E-3 ligase family of enzymes via ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, and introduces a new key regulator of the p63 protein.

  4. Proteasomal degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in oocyte meiosis and fertilization in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabinova, Pavla; Kubelka, Michal; Susor, Andrej

    2011-10-01

    Gametogenesis and fertilization are the key events in sexual reproduction. In the female, meiosis results in a large oocyte that is competent for fertilization and fundamental for the success of early embryonic development. Progression through meiosis is monitored by fine regulatory mechanisms. In this review, we focus on one of the most well-known regulatory elements, the E3 ligase APC/C, which mediates proteolytic degradation of a number of important substrates via the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP). The UPP also indirectly regulates protein synthesis by affecting proteins involved in RNA metabolism, a process that is paramount for the transcriptionally silent oocyte. During the past few years, more evidence has accumulated to suggest that the UPP has an important role in zona pellucida penetration and gamete fusion in mammals. This review focuses on the function of the UPP in regulating oocyte meiotic maturation in mammals, with special attention to its role in chromosome segregation and polar body extrusion, its role in the acquisition of meiotic/developmental competence and recent advances in our understanding of the UPP role in fertilization.

  5. Proteasome-dependent degradation of replisome components regulates faithful DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseaulin, Laura C; Noguchi, Chiaki; Noguchi, Eishi

    2013-08-15

    The replication machinery, or the replisome, collides with a variety of obstacles during the normal process of DNA replication. In addition to damaged template DNA, numerous chromosome regions are considered to be difficult to replicate owing to the presence of DNA secondary structures and DNA-binding proteins. Under these conditions, the replication fork stalls, generating replication stress. Stalled forks are prone to collapse, posing serious threats to genomic integrity. It is generally thought that the replication checkpoint functions to stabilize the replisome and replication fork structure upon replication stress. This is important in order to allow DNA replication to resume once the problem is solved. However, our recent studies demonstrated that some replisome components undergo proteasome-dependent degradation during DNA replication in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our investigation has revealed the involvement of the SCF(Pof3) (Skp1-Cullin/Cdc53-F-box) ubiquitin ligase in replisome regulation. We also demonstrated that forced accumulation of the replisome components leads to abnormal DNA replication upon replication stress. Here we review these findings and present additional data indicating the importance of replisome degradation for DNA replication. Our studies suggest that cells activate an alternative pathway to degrade replisome components in order to preserve genomic integrity.

  6. Prospective iterative trial of proteasome inhibitor-based desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodle, E S; Shields, A R; Ejaz, N S; Sadaka, B; Girnita, A; Walsh, R C; Alloway, R R; Brailey, P; Cardi, M A; Abu Jawdeh, B G; Roy-Chaudhury, P; Govil, A; Mogilishetty, G

    2015-01-01

    A prospective iterative trial of proteasome inhibitor (PI)-based therapy for reducing HLA antibody (Ab) levels was conducted in five phases differing in bortezomib dosing density and plasmapheresis timing. Phases included 1 or 2 bortezomib cycles (1.3 mg/m(2) × 6-8 doses), one rituximab dose and plasmapheresis. HLA Abs were measured by solid phase and flow cytometry (FCM) assays. Immunodominant Ab (iAb) was defined as highest HLA Ab level. Forty-four patients received 52 desensitization courses (7 patients enrolled in multiple phases): Phase 1 (n = 20), Phase 2 (n = 12), Phase 3 (n = 10), Phase 4 (n = 5), Phase 5 (n = 5). iAb reductions were observed in 38 of 44 (86%) patients and persisted up to 10 months. In Phase 1, a 51.5% iAb reduction was observed at 28 days with bortezomib alone. iAb reductions increased with higher bortezomib dosing densities and included class I, II, and public antigens (HLA DRβ3, HLA DRβ4 and HLA DRβ5). FCM median channel shifts decreased in 11/11 (100%) patients by a mean of 103 ± 54 mean channel shifts (log scale). Nineteen out of 44 patients (43.2%) were transplanted with low acute rejection rates (18.8%) and de novo DSA formation (12.5%). In conclusion, PI-based desensitization consistently and durably reduces HLA Ab levels providing an alternative to intravenous immune globulin-based desensitization. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  7. Proteasome inhibition improves the muscle of laminin α2 chain-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmignac, Virginie; Quéré, Ronan; Durbeej, Madeleine

    2011-02-01

    Muscle atrophy, a significant characteristic of congenital muscular dystrophy with laminin α2 chain deficiency (also known as MDC1A), occurs by a change in the normal balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a key role in protein degradation in skeletal muscle cells. In order to identify new targets for drug therapy against MDC1A, we have investigated whether increased proteasomal degradation is a feature of MDC1A. Using the generated dy(3K)/dy(3K) mutant mouse model of MDC1A, we studied the expression of members of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in laminin α2 chain-deficient muscle, and we treated dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132. We show that members of the UPS are upregulated and that the global ubiquitination of proteins is raised in dystrophic limb muscles. Also, phosphorylation of Akt is diminished in diseased muscles. Importantly, proteasome inhibition significantly improves the dystrophic dy(3K)/dy(3K) phenotype. Specifically, treatment with MG-132 increases lifespan, enhances locomotive activity, enlarges muscle fiber diameter, reduces fibrosis, restores Akt phosphorylation and decreases apoptosis. These studies promote better understanding of the disease process in mice and could lead to a drug therapy for MDC1A patients.

  8. Repression of protein translation and mTOR signaling by proteasome inhibitor in colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, William Ka Kei, E-mail: wukakei@cuhk.edu.hk [Institute of Digestive Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Volta, Viviana [Molecular Histology and Cellular Growth Unit, DiBiT-San Raffaele Scientific Institute (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e della Vita (DiSAV), University of Eastern Piedmont (Italy); Cho, Chi Hin, E-mail: chcho@cuhk.edu.hk [Institute of Digestive Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wu, Ya Chun; Li, Hai Tao [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Yu, Le [Institute of Digestive Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Li, Zhi Jie [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu, E-mail: joesung@cuhk.edu.hk [Institute of Digestive Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2009-09-04

    Protein homeostasis relies on a balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a major catabolic pathway for protein degradation. In this respect, proteasome inhibition has been used therapeutically for the treatment of cancer. Whether inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor can repress protein translation via a negative feedback mechanism, however, is unknown. In this study, proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowered the proliferation of colon cancer cells HT-29 and SW1116. In this connection, MG-132 reduced the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at Ser2448 and Ser2481 and the phosphorylation of its downstream targets 4E-BP1 and p70/p85 S6 kinases. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 inhibited protein translation as evidenced by the reductions of {sup 35}S-methionine incorporation and polysomes/80S ratio. Knockdown of raptor, a structural component of mTOR complex 1, mimicked the anti-proliferative effect of MG-132. To conclude, we demonstrate that the inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor represses mTOR signaling and protein translation in colon cancer cells.

  9. Proteasome inhibitors attenuated cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy in H9c2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunjung; Park, Jinyoung; Kim, Eunice EunKyeong; Yoo, Young Sook; Song, Eun Joo

    2016-01-01

    The Ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays roles in protein degradation, cell cycle control, and growth and inflammatory cell signaling. Dysfunction of UPS in cardiac diseases has been seen in many studies. Cholesterol acts as an inducer of cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, the effect of proteasome inhibitors on the cholesterol-induced hypertrophic growth in H9c2 cells is examined in order to observe whether UPS is involved in cardiac hypertrophy. The treatment of proteasome inhibitors MG132 and Bortezomib markedly reduced cellular surface area and mRNA expression of β-MHC in cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, activated AKT and ERK were significantly attenuated by MG132 and Bortezomib in cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We demonstrated that cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy was suppressed by proteasome inhibitors. Thus, regulatory mechanism of cholesterol-induced cardiac hypertrophy by proteasome inhibitors may provide a new therapeutic strategy to prevent the progression of heart failure. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 270-275] PMID:26592933

  10. Antitumor effects of tyropeptin-boronic acid derivatives: New proteasome inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Isao; Abe, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takumi; Ohba, Shun-ichi; Yamazaki, Kanami; Dan, Shingo; Yamori, Takao; Masuda, Tohru; Nomoto, Akio

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome degrades numerous regulatory proteins that are critical for tumor growth. Thus, proteasome inhibitors are promising antitumor agents. New proteasome inhibitors, such as tyropeptins and tyropeptin-boronic acid derivatives, have a potent inhibitory activity. Here we report the antitumor effects of two new tyropeptin-boronic acid derivatives, AS-06 and AS-29. AS-06 and AS-29 significantly suppress the degradation of the proteasome-sensitive fluorescent proteins in HEK293PS cells, and induce the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in human multiple myeloma cells. We show that these derivatives also suppress the degradation of the NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α and the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in multiple myeloma cells, resulting in the inhibition of NF-κB activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that AS-06 and AS-29 induce apoptosis through the caspase-8 and caspase-9 cascades. In a xenograft mouse model, i.v. administration of tyropeptin-boronic acid derivatives inhibits proteasome in tumors and clearly suppresses tumor growth in mice bearing human multiple myeloma. Our results indicate that tyropeptin-boronic acid derivatives could be lead therapeutic agents against human multiple myeloma. PMID:25251038

  11. Mitochondrial Malfunctioning, Proteasome Arrest and Apoptosis in Cancer Cells by Focused Intracellular Generation of Oxygen Radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Postiglione

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Photofrin/photodynamic therapy (PDT at sub-lethal doses induced a transient stall in proteasome activity in surviving A549 (p53+/+ and H1299 (p53−/− cells as indicated by the time-dependent decline/recovery of chymotrypsin-like activity. Indeed, within 3 h of incubation, Photofrin invaded the cytoplasm and localized preferentially within the mitochondria. Its light activation determined a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and a reversible arrest in proteasomal activity. A similar result is obtained by treating cells with Antimycin and Rotenone, indicating, as a common denominator of this effect, the ATP decrease. Both inhibitors, however, were more toxic to cells as the recovery of proteasomal activity was incomplete. We evaluated whether combining PDT (which is a treatment for killing tumor cells, per se, and inducing proteasome arrest in the surviving ones with Bortezomib doses capable of sustaining the stall would protract the arrest with sufficient time to induce apoptosis in remaining cells. The evaluation of the mitochondrial membrane depolarization, residual proteasome and mitochondrial enzymatic activities, colony-forming capabilities, and changes in protein expression profiles in A549 and H1299 cells under a combined therapeutic regimen gave results consistent with our hypothesis.

  12. Reference: 460 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available leaves enhancer3 (ae3), which demonstrated pleiotropic plant phenotypes, including a defective adaxial identity...tterning. The proteolytic function of the Arabidopsis 26S proteasome is required for specifying leaf adaxial identity

  13. Loss of GSNOR1 Function Leads to Compromised Auxin Signaling and Polar Auxin Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ya-Fei; Wang, Da-Li; Wang, Chao; Culler, Angela Hendrickson; Kreiser, Molly A; Suresh, Jayanti; Cohen, Jerry D; Pan, Jianwei; Baker, Barbara; Liu, Jian-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Cross talk between phytohormones, nitric oxide (NO), and auxin has been implicated in the control of plant growth and development. Two recent reports indicate that NO promoted auxin signaling but inhibited auxin transport probably through S-nitrosylation. However, genetic evidence for the effect of S-nitrosylation on auxin physiology has been lacking. In this study, we used a genetic approach to understand the broader role of S-nitrosylation in auxin physiology in Arabidopsis. We compared auxin signaling and transport in Col-0 and gsnor1-3, a loss-of-function GSNOR1 mutant defective in protein de-nitrosylation. Our results showed that auxin signaling was impaired in the gsnor1-3 mutant as revealed by significantly reduced DR5-GUS/DR5-GFP accumulation and compromised degradation of AXR3NT-GUS, a useful reporter in interrogating auxin-mediated degradation of Aux/IAA by auxin receptors. In addition, polar auxin transport was compromised in gsnor1-3, which was correlated with universally reduced levels of PIN or GFP-PIN proteins in the roots of the mutant in a manner independent of transcription and 26S proteasome degradation. Our results suggest that S-nitrosylation and GSNOR1-mediated de-nitrosylation contribute to auxin physiology, and impaired auxin signaling and compromised auxin transport are responsible for the auxin-related morphological phenotypes displayed by the gsnor1-3 mutant.

  14. Successful treatment of refractory systemic lupus erythematosus using proteasome inhibitor bortezomib followed by belimumab: description of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöwall, C; Hjorth, M; Eriksson, P

    2017-01-01

    Although the putative therapeutic options for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are steadily increasing, refractory disease is indeed a major challenge to many clinicians and patients. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib - approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma since the beginning of this century - was recently reported successful in twelve cases of refractory SLE by German colleagues. Herein, we describe two Swedish SLE cases with refractory renal and pulmonary manifestations that were rescued by bortezomib as induction of remission followed by monthly doses of belimumab. The patients were carefully monitored with regard to disease activity and renal function. Anti-dsDNA and anti-C1q antibodies, complement proteins and lymphocyte subsets were analysed in consecutive samples. In December 2016, the patients had been in clinical remission post bortezomib administration for a period of 28 and 22 months, respectively. Potential benefits of using belimumab as maintenance therapy to prevent regeneration of autoreactive B cell clones are discussed.

  15. Determination of fruit origin by using 26S rDNA fingerprinting of yeast communities by PCR-DGGE: preliminary application to Physalis fruits from Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sheikha, Aly Farag; Condur, Ana; Métayer, Isabelle; Nguyen, Doan Duy Le; Loiseau, Gérard; Montet, Didier

    2009-10-01

    The determination of geographical origin is a demand of the traceability system of import-export food products. One hypothesis for tracing the source of a product is by global analysis of the microbial communities of the food and statistical linkage of this analysis to the geographical origin of the food. For this purpose, a molecular technique employing 26S rDNA profiles generated by PCR-DGGE was used to detect the variation in yeast community structures of three species of Physalis fruit (Physalis ixocarpa Brat, Physalis pubescens L, Physalis pruinosa L) from four Egyptian regions (Qalyoubia, Minufiya, Beheira and Alexandria Governments). When the 26S rDNA profiles were analysed by multivariate analysis, distinct microbial communities were detected. The band profiles of Physalis yeasts from different Governments were specific for each location and could be used as a bar code to discriminate the origin of the fruits. This method is a new traceability tool which provides fruit products with a unique biological bar code and makes it possible to trace back the fruits to their original location.

  16. Prefoldin Subunits Are Protected from Ubiquitin-Proteasome System-mediated Degradation by Forming Complex with Other Constituent Subunits*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Makoto; Tashiro, Erika; Kitaura, Hirotake; Maita, Hiroshi; Suto, Hiroo; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The molecular chaperone prefoldin (PFD) is a complex comprised of six different subunits, PFD1-PFD6, and delivers newly synthesized unfolded proteins to cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT to facilitate the folding of proteins. PFD subunits also have functions different from the function of the PFD complex. We previously identified MM-1α/PFD5 as a novel c-Myc-binding protein and found that MM-1α suppresses transformation activity of c-Myc. However, it remains unclear how cells regulate protein levels of individual subunits and what mechanisms alter the ratio of their activities between subunits and their complex. In this study, we found that knockdown of one subunit decreased protein levels of other subunits and that transfection of five subunits other than MM-1α into cells increased the level of endogenous MM-1α. We also found that treatment of cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, increased the level of transfected/overexpressed MM-1α but not that of endogenous MM-1α, indicating that overexpressed MM-1α, but not endogenous MM-1α, was degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Experiments using other PFD subunits showed that the UPS degraded a monomer of PFD subunits, though extents of degradation varied among subunits. Furthermore, the level of one subunit was increased after co-transfection with the respective subunit, indicating that there are specific combinations between subunits to be stabilized. These results suggest mutual regulation of protein levels among PFD subunits and show how individual subunits form the PFD complex without degradation. PMID:21478150

  17. The influence of proteasome inhibitor on the expression of cardiomyocytes damage markers after incubation with doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereszkiewicz Sylwia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to verify the thesis that the cardiotoxic effects of doxorubicin are connected with activation of the ubiquitin - proteasome pathway followed by protein degradation. The expression of myocardial damage markers - fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP was evaluated in rat fetal cardiomyocytes simultaneously treated with doxorubicin and the proteasome inhibitor - bortezomib. The level of H-FABP and BNP protein under the influence of doxorubicin was decreased below the detection threshold with unchanged (H-FABP or elevated (BNP mRNA expression level. Against the expectations, the inhibitor of proteasome did not abolish this effect. The observed abnormal expression of BNP and H-FABP protein after doxorubicin treatment makes their diagnostic significance in anthracycline cardiotoxicity questionable.

  18. Roles of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the effects of drugs of abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eMassaly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of its ability to regulate the abundance of selected proteins the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS plays an important role in neuronal and synaptic plasticity. As a result various stages of learning and memory depend on UPS activity. Drug addiction, another phenomenon that relies on neuroplasticity, shares molecular substrates with memory processes. However the necessity of proteasome-dependent protein degradation for the development of addiction has been poorly studied. Here we first review evidences from the literature that drugs of abuse regulate the expression and activity of the UPS system in the brain. We then provide a list of proteins which have been shown to be targeted to the proteasome following drug treatment and could thus be involved in neuronal adaptations underlying behaviors associated with drug use and abuse. Finally we describe the few studies that addressed the need for UPS-dependent protein degradation in animal models of addiction-related behaviors.

  19. Trypanocidal activity of the proteasome inhibitor and anti-cancer drug bortezomib

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    Wang Xia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The proteasome inhibitor and anti-cancer drug bortezomib was tested for in vitro activity against bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei. The concentrations of bortezomib required to reduce the growth rate by 50% and to kill all trypanosomes were 3.3 nM and 10 nM, respectively. In addition, bortezomib was 10 times more toxic to trypanosomes than to human HL-60 cells. Moreover, exposure of trypanosomes to 10 nM bortezomib for 16 h was enough to kill 90% of the parasites following incubation in fresh medium. However, proteasomal peptidase activities of trypanosomes exposed to bortezomib were only inhibited by 10% and 30% indicating that the proteasome is not the main target of the drug. The results suggest that bortezomib may be useful as drug for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis.

  20. Proteasome-based mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired bortezomib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilt, Leonie H. A. M.; Jansen, Gerrit; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; van Meerloo, Johan; Cloos, Jacqueline; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Chan, Elena T.; Kirk, Christopher J.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Kruyt, Frank A. E.

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, registered for Multiple Myeloma treatment, is currently explored for activity in solid tumors including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here we studied the proteasome-based mechanisms underlying intrinsic and acquired bortezomib resistance in NSCLC cells. Var

  1. Proteasome-based mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired bortezomib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilt, Leonie H. A. M.; Jansen, Gerrit; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; van Meerloo, Johan; Cloos, Jacqueline; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Chan, Elena T.; Kirk, Christopher J.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Kruyt, Frank A. E.

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, registered for Multiple Myeloma treatment, is currently explored for activity in solid tumors including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here we studied the proteasome-based mechanisms underlying intrinsic and acquired bortezomib resistance in NSCLC cells.

  2. Effects of an anticarcinogenic Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor on purified 20S proteasome and MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

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    Larissa da Costa Souza

    Full Text Available Proteasome inhibitors have been described as an important target for cancer therapy due to their potential to regulate the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the degradation pathway of cellular proteins. Here, we reported the effects of a Bowman-Birk-type protease inhibitor, the Black-eyed pea Trypsin/Chymotrypsin Inhibitor (BTCI, on proteasome 20S in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and on catalytic activity of the purified 20S proteasome from horse erythrocytes, as well as the structural analysis of the BTCI-20S proteasome complex. In vitro experiments and confocal microscopy showed that BTCI readily crosses the membrane of the breast cancer cells and co-localizes with the proteasome in cytoplasm and mainly in nucleus. Indeed, as indicated by dynamic light scattering, BTCI and 20S proteasome form a stable complex at temperatures up to 55°C and at neutral and alkaline pHs. In complexed form, BTCI strongly inhibits the proteolytic chymotrypsin-, trypsin- and caspase-like activities of 20S proteasome, indicated by inhibition constants of 10(-7 M magnitude order. Besides other mechanisms, this feature can be associated with previously reported cytostatic and cytotoxic effects of BTCI in MCF-7 breast cancer cells by means of apoptosis.

  3. Rapid Proteasomal Degradation of Mutant Proteins Is the Primary Mechanism Leading to Tumorigenesis in Patients With Missense AIP Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C.; Martucci, Federico; Morgan, Rhodri M. L.; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Tilley, Daniel; Ramos-Guajardo, Nancy; Iacovazzo, Donato; D'Acquisto, Fulvio; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2016-01-01

    Context: The pathogenic effect of mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene (AIPmuts) in pituitary adenomas is incompletely understood. We have identified the primary mechanism of loss of function for missense AIPmuts. Objective: This study sought to analyze the mechanism/speed of protein turnover of wild-type and missense AIP variants, correlating protein half-life with clinical parameters. Design and Setting: Half-life and protein–protein interaction experiments and cross-sectional analysis of AIPmut positive patients' data were performed in a clinical academic research institution. Patients: Data were obtained from our cohort of pituitary adenoma patients and literature-reported cases. Interventions: Protein turnover of endogenous AIP in two cell lines and fifteen AIP variants overexpressed in HEK293 cells was analyzed via cycloheximide chase and proteasome inhibition. Glutathione-S-transferase pull-down and quantitative mass spectrometry identified proteins involved in AIP degradation; results were confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and gene knockdown. Relevant clinical data was collected. Main Outcome Measures: Half-life of wild-type and mutant AIP proteins and its correlation with clinical parameters. Results: Endogenous AIP half-life was similar in HEK293 and lymphoblastoid cells (43.5 and 32.7 h). AIP variants were divided into stable proteins (median, 77.7 h; interquartile range [IQR], 60.7–92.9 h), and those with short (median, 27 h; IQR, 21.6–28.7 h) or very short (median, 7.7 h; IQR, 5.6–10.5 h) half-life; proteasomal inhibition rescued the rapid degradation of mutant proteins. The experimental half-life significantly correlated with age at diagnosis of acromegaly/gigantism (r = 0.411; P = .002). The FBXO3-containing SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex was identified as the E3 ubiquitin-ligase recognizing AIP. Conclusions: AIP is a stable protein, driven to ubiquitination by the SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex

  4. Crosstalk between the proteasome system and autophagy in the clearance of α-synuclein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang YANG; Ya-ping YANG; Cheng-jie MAO; Ling LIU; Hui-fen ZHENG; Li-fang HU; Chun-feng LIU

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that α-synuclein accumulation may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of the proteasome and autophagy pathways in the clearance of wild-type and mutant α-synuclein in PC12 cells.Methods:PC12 cells overexpressing either wild-type or A30P mutant α-synuclein were treated with the proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin,the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-MA and the macroautophagy activator rapamycin alone or in combination.The cell viability was assessed using MTT assay.Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis were used to detect the level of α-synuclein,LAMP-2A,E1 activase,and E2 ligase in the cells.Chymotrypsin-like proteasomal activity was measured using a commercial kit.Results:When the proteasome and macroautophagy in the wild-type and mutant cells were inhibited with epoxomicin and 3-MA,respectively,the cell viability was significantly decreased,and the α-synuclein level was increased.Both epoxomicin and 3-MA activated the chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) by increasing the level of the CMA-limiting enzyme LAMP-2A.Furthermore,3-MA or epoxomicin significantly decreased chymotrypsin-like proteasomal activity.3-MA or epoxomicin did not change E1 activase expression in either mutant or wild-type cells,but increased E2 ligase expression,especially when used together.Macroautophagy inducer rapamycin increased the cell viability and reduced epoxomicin-induced α-synuclein accumulation.Interestingly,CMA was also activated by rapamycin.Conclusion:Our results demonstrate the existence of complex crosstalk between different forms of autophagy and between autophagy and the proteasome pathway in the clearance of α-synuclein in PC12 cells.

  5. Cystein-specific ubiquitination protects the peroxisomal import receptor Pex5p against proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzkopff, Benjamin; Platta, Harald W; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-05-14

    Peroxisomal matrix protein import is mediated by dynamic import receptors, which cycle between the peroxisomal membrane and the cytosol. Proteins with a type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1) are bound by the import receptor Pex5p in the cytosol and guided to the peroxisomal membrane. After cargo translocation into the peroxisomal matrix, the receptor is released from the membrane back to the cytosol in an ATP-dependent manner by the AAA-type ATPases Pex1p and Pex6p. These mechanoenzymes recognize ubiquitinated Pex5p-species as substrates for membrane extraction. The PTS1-receptor is either polyubiquitinated via peptide-bonds at two certain lysines and results in proteasomal degradation, or monoubiquitinated via a thioester-bond at a conserved cysteine, which enables the recycling of Pex5p and further rounds of matrix protein import. To investigate the physiological relevance of the conserved N-terminal cysteine of Pex5p, the known target amino acids for ubiquitination were substituted by site-directed mutagenesis. In contrast to Pex5pC6A, Pex5pC6K turned out to be functional in PTS1 import and utilization of oleic acid, independent of the lysines at position 18 and 24. In contrast to wild-type Pex5p, Pex5pC6K displays an ubiquitination pattern, similar to the polyubiquitination pattern of Pex4p or Pex22p mutant strains. Moreover, Pex5pC6K displays a significantly reduced steady-state level when the deubiquitination enzyme Ubp15p is missing. Thus, our results indicate that not the cysteine residue but the position of ubiquitination is important for Pex5p function. The presence of the cysteine prevents polyubiquitination and rapid degradation of Pex5p.

  6. NIR is degraded by the anaphase-promoting complex proteasome pathway

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    Jeong Ho Myong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel INHAT Repressor (NIR is a histone acetylation inhibitor that can directly bind histone complexes and the tumor suppressors p53 and p63. Because NIR is mainly localized in the nucleolus and disappears from the nucleolus upon RNase treatment, it is thought to bind RNA or ribonucleoproteins. When NIR moves to the cytoplasm, it is immediately degraded; this degradation was blocked by MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. Furthermore, the central domain of NIR specifically bound APC-CCdh1. These data show that the stability of NIR is governed by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway.

  7. Computational analysis and modeling of cleavage by the immunoproteasome and the constitutive proteasome

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    Lafuente Esther M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteasomes play a central role in the major histocompatibility class I (MHCI antigen processing pathway. They conduct the proteolytic degradation of proteins in the cytosol, generating the C-terminus of CD8 T cell epitopes and MHCI-peptide ligands (P1 residue of cleavage site. There are two types of proteasomes, the constitutive form, expressed in most cell types, and the immunoproteasome, which is constitutively expressed in mature dendritic cells. Protective CD8 T cell epitopes are likely generated by the immunoproteasome and the constitutive proteasome, and here we have modeled and analyzed the cleavage by these two proteases. Results We have modeled the immunoproteasome and proteasome cleavage sites upon two non-overlapping sets of peptides consisting of 553 CD8 T cell epitopes, naturally processed and restricted by human MHCI molecules, and 382 peptides eluted from human MHCI molecules, respectively, using N-grams. Cleavage models were generated considering different epitope and MHCI-eluted fragment lengths and the same number of C-terminal flanking residues. Models were evaluated in 5-fold cross-validation. Judging by the Mathew's Correlation Coefficient (MCC, optimal cleavage models for the proteasome (MCC = 0.43 ± 0.07 and the immunoproteasome (MCC = 0.36 ± 0.06 were obtained from 12-residue peptide fragments. Using an independent dataset consisting of 137 HIV1-specific CD8 T cell epitopes, the immunoproteasome and proteasome cleavage models achieved MCC values of 0.30 and 0.18, respectively, comparatively better than those achieved by related methods. Using ROC analyses, we have also shown that, combined with MHCI-peptide binding predictions, cleavage predictions by the immunoproteasome and proteasome models significantly increase the discovery rate of CD8 T cell epitopes restricted by different MHCI molecules, including A*0201, A*0301, A*2402, B*0702, B*2705. Conclusions We have developed models that are specific

  8. Proteasome inhibition, the pursuit of new cancer therapeutics, and the adaptor molecule p130Cas

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    Anderson Kenneth C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current interest in proteasome inhibitors for cancer therapy has stimulated considerable research efforts to identify the molecular pathway to their cytotoxicity with a view to identifying the mechanisms of sensitivity and resistance as well as informing the development of new drugs. Zhao and Vuori describe this month in BMC Biology experiments indicating a novel role of the adaptor protein p130Cas in sensitivity to apoptosis induced not only by proteasome inhibitors but also by the unrelated drug doxorubicin. See research article: http:// http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/9/73

  9. Organic cadmium complexes as proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Bi, Caifeng; Buac, Daniela; Fan, Yuhua; Zhang, Xia; Zuo, Jian; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Nan; Dong, Lili; Dou, Q Ping

    2013-06-01

    Although cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental contaminant and human carcinogen, our studies indicate an organic Cd complex to be a potent inhibitor of proteasomal chymotrypsin-like (CT-like) activity, further capable of inducing apoptosis in a cancer cell-specific manner. It has been reported that the ligands indole-3-butyric acid (L1) and indole-3-propionic acid (L2) have cancer-fighting effects when tested in a rat carcinoma model. In addition, 3, 5-diaminobenzoic acid o-vanillin Schiff bases (L3) have high antimicrobial activity and a large number of Schiff base complexes have been reported to have proteasome-inhibitory activity. We therefore hypothesized that synthetic forms of Cd in combination with L1, L2 and L3 may have proteasome-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activities, which would be cancer cell-specific. To test this hypothesis, we have synthesized three novel Cd-containing complexes: [Cd2(C12H12O2N)4(H2O)2]·2H2O (Cd1), [Cd2(C11H10O2N)4(H2O)2]·2H2O (Cd2) and [Cd(C7H4N2O2)(C8H6O2)2]·2H2O (Cd3), by using these three ligands. We sought out to characterize and assess the proteasome-inhibitory and anti-proliferative properties of these three Cd complexes in human breast cancer cells. Cd1, Cd2 and Cd3 were found to effectively inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified 20S proteasome with IC50 values of 2.6, 3.0 and 3.3 μΜ, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of cancer cell proliferation also correlated with this effect. As a result of proteasomal shutdown, the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the proteasome target IκB-α protein as well as induction of apoptosis were observed. To account for the cancer specificity of this effect, immortalized, non-tumorigenic breast MCF10A cells were used under the same experimental conditions. Our results indicate that MCF10A cells are much less sensitive to the Cd1, Cd2 and Cd3 complexes when compared to MDA MB 231 breast cancer cells. Therefore, our study suggests that these Cd organic

  10. Involvement of a eukaryotic-like ubiquitin-related modifier in the proteasome pathway of the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Rana S.; Bray, Sian M.; Blackwood, John K.; Kilkenny, Mairi L.; Coelho, Matthew A.; Foster, Benjamin M.; Li, Shurong; Howard, Julie A.; Pellegrini, Luca; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Deery, Michael J.; Robinson, Nicholas P.

    2015-09-01

    In eukaryotes, the covalent attachment of ubiquitin chains directs substrates to the proteasome for degradation. Recently, ubiquitin-like modifications have also been described in the archaeal domain of life. It has subsequently been hypothesized that ubiquitin-like proteasomal degradation might also operate in these microbes, since all archaeal species utilize homologues of the eukaryotic proteasome. Here we perform a structural and biochemical analysis of a ubiquitin-like modification pathway in the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. We reveal that this modifier is homologous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-related modifier Urm1, considered to be a close evolutionary relative of the progenitor of all ubiquitin-like proteins. Furthermore we demonstrate that urmylated substrates are recognized and processed by the archaeal proteasome, by virtue of a direct interaction with the modifier. Thus, the regulation of protein stability by Urm1 and the proteasome in archaea is likely representative of an ancient pathway from which eukaryotic ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis has evolved.

  11. Trafficking defect and proteasomal degradation contribute to the phenotype of a novel KCNH2 long QT syndrome mutation.

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    Anton Mihic

    Full Text Available The Kv11.1 (hERG K+ channel plays a fundamental role in cardiac repolarization. Missense mutations in KCNH2, the gene encoding Kv11.1, cause long QT syndrome (LQTS and frequently cause channel trafficking-deficiencies. This study characterized the properties of a novel KCNH2 mutation discovered in a LQT2 patient resuscitated from a ventricular fibrillation arrest. Proband genotyping was performed by SSCP and DNA sequencing. The electrophysiological and biochemical properties of the mutant channel were investigated after expression in HEK293 cells. The proband manifested a QTc of 554 ms prior to electrolyte normalization. Mutation analysis revealed an autosomal dominant frameshift mutation at proline 1086 (P1086fs+32X; 3256InsG. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that wild-type Kv11.1 and mutant channels coassemble. Western blot showed that the mutation did not produce mature complex-glycosylated Kv11.1 channels and coexpression resulted in reduced channel maturation. Electrophysiological recordings revealed mutant channel peak currents to be similar to untransfected cells. Co-expression of channels in a 1∶1 ratio demonstrated dominant negative suppression of peak Kv11.1 currents. Immunocytochemistry confirmed that mutant channels were not present at the plasma membrane. Mutant channel trafficking rescue was attempted by incubation at reduced temperature or with the pharmacological agents E-4031. These treatments did not significantly increase peak mutant currents or induce the formation of mature complex-glycosylated channels. The proteasomal inhibitor lactacystin increased the protein levels of the mutant channels demonstrating proteasomal degradation, but failed to induce mutant Kv11.1 protein trafficking. Our study demonstrates a novel dominant-negative Kv11.1 mutation, which results in degraded non-functional channels leading to a LQT2 phenotype.

  12. Proteasome activator complex PA28 identified as an accessible target in prostate cancer by in vivo selection of human antibodies

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    Sánchez-Martín, David; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge; Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Ximénez-Embún, Pilar; Fernández-Periáñez, Rodrigo; Martín, M. Teresa; Molina-Privado, Irene; Ruppen-Cañás, Isabel; Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Cañamero, Marta; Cuesta, Ángel M.; Compte, Marta; Kremer, Leonor; Bellas, Carmen; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Guijarro-Muñoz, Irene; Sanz, Laura; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Antibody cancer therapies rely on systemically accessible targets and suitable antibodies that exert a functional activity or deliver a payload to the tumor site. Here, we present proof-of-principle of in vivo selection of human antibodies in tumor-bearing mice that identified a tumor-specific antibody able to deliver a payload and unveils the target antigen. By using an ex vivo enrichment process against freshly disaggregated tumors to purge the repertoire, in combination with in vivo biopanning at optimized phage circulation time, we have identified a human domain antibody capable of mediating selective localization of phage to human prostate cancer xenografts. Affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry analysis showed that the antibody recognizes the proteasome activator complex PA28. The specificity of soluble antibody was confirmed by demonstrating its binding to the active human PA28αβ complex. Whereas systemically administered control phage was confined in the lumen of blood vessels of both normal tissues and tumors, the selected phage spread from tumor vessels into the perivascular tumor parenchyma. In these areas, the selected phage partially colocalized with PA28 complex. Furthermore, we found that the expression of the α subunit of PA28 [proteasome activator complex subunit 1 (PSME1)] is elevated in primary and metastatic human prostate cancer and used anti-PSME1 antibodies to show that PSME1 is an accessible marker in mouse xenograft tumors. These results support the use of PA28 as a tumor marker and a potential target for therapeutic intervention in prostate cancer. PMID:23918357

  13. Dysfunction of constitutive and inducible ubiquitin-proteasome system in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: implication for protein aggregation and immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendotti, Caterina; Marino, Marianna; Cheroni, Cristina; Fontana, Elena; Crippa, Valeria; Poletti, Angelo; De Biasi, Silvia

    2012-05-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is the major intracellular proteolytic mechanism controlling the degradation of misfolded/abnormal proteins. A common hallmark in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and in other neurodegenerative disorders is the accumulation of misfolded/abnormal proteins into the damaged neurons, leading to the formation of cellular inclusions that are mostly ubiquitin-positive. Although proteolysis is a complex mechanism requiring the participation of different pathways, the abundant accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins strongly suggests an important contribution of UPS to these neuropathological features. The use of cellular and animal models of ALS, particularly those expressing mutant SOD1, the gene mutation most represented in familiar ALS, has provided significant evidence for a role of UPS in protein inclusions formation and motor neuron death. This review will specifically discuss this piece of evidence and provide suggestions of potential strategies for therapeutic intervention. We will also discuss the finding that, unlike the constitutive proteasome subunits, the inducible subunits are overexpressed early during disease progression in SOD1 mice models of ALS. These subunits form the immunoproteasome and generate peptides for the major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, suggesting a role of this system in the immune responses associated with the pathological features of ALS. Since recent discoveries indicate that innate and adaptive immunity may influence the disease process, in this review we will also provide evidence of a possible connection between immune-inflammatory reactions and UPS function, in the attempt to better understand the etiopathology of ALS and to identify appropriate targets for novel treatment strategies of this devastating disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prefoldin Plays a Role as a Clearance Factor in Preventing Proteasome Inhibitor-induced Protein Aggregation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Akira; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Takekoshi, Yuka; Shimizu, Takashi; Kitaura, Hirotake; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Prefoldin is a molecular chaperone composed of six subunits, PFD1–6, and prevents misfolding of newly synthesized nascent polypeptides. Although it is predicted that prefoldin, like other chaperones, modulates protein aggregation, the precise function of prefoldin against protein aggregation under physiological conditions has never been elucidated. In this study, we first established an anti-prefoldin monoclonal antibody that recognizes the prefoldin complex but not its subunits. Using this antibody, it was found that prefoldin was localized in the cytoplasm with dots in co-localization with polyubiquitinated proteins and that the number and strength of dots were increased in cells that had been treated with lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, and thapsigargin, an inducer of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Knockdown of prefoldin increased the level of SDS-insoluble ubiquitinated protein and reduced cell viability in lactacystin and thapsigargin-treated cells. Opposite results were obtained in prefoldin-overexpressed cells. It has been reported that mice harboring a missense mutation L110R of MM-1α/PFD5 exhibit neurodegeneration in the cerebellum. Although the prefoldin complex containing L110R MM-1α was properly formed in vitro and in cells derived from L110R MM-1α mice, the levels of ubiquitinated proteins and cytotoxicity were higher in L110R MM-1α cells than in wild-type cells under normal conditions and were increased by lactacystin and thapsigargin treatment, and growth of L110R MM-1α cells was attenuated. Furthermore, the polyubiquitinated protein aggregation level was increased in the brains of L110R MM-1α mice. These results suggest that prefoldin plays a role in quality control against protein aggregation and that dysfunction of prefoldin is one of the causes of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23946485

  15. Cigarette smoke induces endoplasmic reticulum stress response and proteasomal dysfunction in human alveolar epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somborac-Bacura, Anita; van der Toorn, Marco; Franciosi, Lorenza; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Zanic-Grubisic, Tihana; Bischoff, Rainer; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Cigarette smoke (CS) causes oxidative stress and severe damage to proteins in the lungs. One of the main systems to protect cells from the accumulation of damaged proteins is the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In th

  16. Nuclear effects of ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition in liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fawzia Bardag-Gorce

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol ingestion causes alteration in several cellular mechanisms, and leads to inflammation, apoptosis,immunological response defects, and fibrosis. These phenomena are associated with significant changes in the epigenetic mechanisms, and subsequently,to liver cell memory. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is one of the vital pathways in the cell that becomes dysfunctionial as a result of chronic ethanol consumption. Inhibition of the proteasome activity in the nucleus causes changes in the turnover of transcriptional factors, histone modifying enzymes,and therefore, affects epigenetic mechanisms.Alcohol consumption has been associated with an increase in histone acetylation and a decrease in histone methylation, which leads to gene expression changes. DNA and histone modifications that result from ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition are key players in regulating gene expression, especially genes involved in the cell cycle, immunological responses,and metabolism of ethanol. The present review highlights the consequences of ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition in the nucleus of liver cells that are chronically exposed to ethanol.

  17. Defective regulation of the ubiquitin/proteasome system in the hypothalamus of obese male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacio-Souza, Leticia M; Bombassaro, Bruna; Pascoal, Livia B; Portovedo, Mariana A; Razolli, Daniela S; Coope, Andressa; Victorio, Sheila C; de Moura, Rodrigo F; Nascimento, Lucas F; Arruda, Ana P; Anhe, Gabriel F; Milanski, Marciane; Velloso, Licio A

    2014-08-01

    In both human and experimental obesity, inflammatory damage to the hypothalamus plays an important role in the loss of the coordinated control of food intake and energy expenditure. Upon prolonged maintenance of increased body mass, the brain changes the defended set point of adiposity, and returning to normal weight becomes extremely difficult. Here we show that in prolonged but not in short-term obesity, the ubiquitin/proteasome system in the hypothalamus fails to maintain an adequate rate of protein recycling, leading to the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins. This is accompanied by an increased colocalization of ubiquitin and p62 in the arcuate nucleus and reduced expression of autophagy markers in the hypothalamus. Genetic protection from obesity is accompanied by the normal regulation of the ubiquitin/proteasome system in the hypothalamus, whereas the inhibition of proteasome or p62 results in the acceleration of body mass gain in mice exposed for a short period to a high-fat diet. Thus, the defective regulation of the ubiquitin/proteasome system in the hypothalamus may be an important mechanism involved in the progression and autoperpetuation of obesity.

  18. Atrophy, hypertrophy, and hypoxemia induce transcriptional regulators of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the rat heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    In skeletal muscle, transcript levels of proteins regulating the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) increase with atrophy and decrease with hypertrophy. Whether the same is true for heart muscle is not known. We set out to characterize the transcriptional profile of regulators of the UPS during atrop...

  19. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 interacts with alpha3 subunit of proteasome and modulates its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Osinska, Magdalena; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S

    2011-02-25

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), a multifunctional protein, is an important physiological regulator of fibrinolysis, extracellular matrix homeostasis, and cell motility. Recent observations show that PAI-1 may also be implicated in maintaining integrity of cells, especially with respect to cellular proliferation or apoptosis. In the present study we provide evidence that PAI-1 interacts with proteasome and affects its activity. First, by using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that the α3 subunit of proteasome directly interacts with PAI-1. Then, to ensure that the PAI-1-proteasome complex is formed in vivo, both proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from endothelial cells and identified with specific antibodies. The specificity of this interaction was evidenced after transfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins with anti-PAI-1 antibodies. Subsequently, cellular distribution of the PAI-1-proteasome complexes was established by immunogold staining and electron microscopy analyses. Both proteins appeared in a diffuse cytosolic pattern but also could be found in a dense perinuclear and nuclear location. Furthermore, PAI-1 induced formation of aggresomes freely located in endothelial cytoplasm. Increased PAI-1 expression abrogated degradation of degron analyzed after cotransfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and pd2EGFP-N1 and prevented degradation of p53 as well as IκBα, as evidenced both by confocal microscopy and Western immunoblotting.

  20. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Interacts with α3 Subunit of Proteasome and Modulates Its Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Osinska, Magdalena; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S.

    2011-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), a multifunctional protein, is an important physiological regulator of fibrinolysis, extracellular matrix homeostasis, and cell motility. Recent observations show that PAI-1 may also be implicated in maintaining integrity of cells, especially with respect to cellular proliferation or apoptosis. In the present study we provide evidence that PAI-1 interacts with proteasome and affects its activity. First, by using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that the α3 subunit of proteasome directly interacts with PAI-1. Then, to ensure that the PAI-1-proteasome complex is formed in vivo, both proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from endothelial cells and identified with specific antibodies. The specificity of this interaction was evidenced after transfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins with anti-PAI-1 antibodies. Subsequently, cellular distribution of the PAI-1-proteasome complexes was established by immunogold staining and electron microscopy analyses. Both proteins appeared in a diffuse cytosolic pattern but also could be found in a dense perinuclear and nuclear location. Furthermore, PAI-1 induced formation of aggresomes freely located in endothelial cytoplasm. Increased PAI-1 expression abrogated degradation of degron analyzed after cotransfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and pd2EGFP-N1 and prevented degradation of p53 as well as IκBα, as evidenced both by confocal microscopy and Western immunoblotting. PMID:21135093

  1. Proteasome activity influences UV-mediated subnuclear localization changes of NPM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Henna M; Bai, Baoyan; Matilainen, Olli; Colis, Laureen; Peltonen, Karita; Laiho, Marikki

    2013-01-01

    UV damage activates cellular stress signaling pathways, causes DNA helix distortions and inhibits transcription by RNA polymerases I and II. In particular, the nucleolus, which is the site of RNA polymerase I transcription and ribosome biogenesis, disintegrates following UV damage. The disintegration is characterized by reorganization of the subnucleolar structures and change of localization of many nucleolar proteins. Here we have queried the basis of localization change of nucleophosmin (NPM), a nucleolar granular component protein, which is increasingly detected in the nucleoplasm following UV radiation. Using photobleaching experiments of NPM-fluorescent fusion protein in live human cells we show that NPM mobility increases after UV damage. However, we show that the increase in NPM nucleoplasmic abundance after UV is independent of UV-activated cellular stress and DNA damage signaling pathways. Unexpectedly, we find that proteasome activity affects NPM redistribution. NPM nucleolar expression was maintained when the UV-treated cells were exposed to proteasome inhibitors or when the expression of proteasome subunits was inhibited using RNAi. However, there was no evidence of increased NPM turnover in the UV damaged cells, or that ubiquitin or ubiquitin recycling affected NPM localization. These findings suggest that proteasome activity couples to nucleolar protein localizations in UV damage stress.

  2. Role of Proteasome-Dependent Protein Degradation in Long-Term Operant Memory in "Aplysia"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Lisa C.; Gardner, Jacob S.; Gandour, Catherine E.; Krishnan, Harini C.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the in vivo role of protein degradation during intermediate (ITM) and long-term memory (LTM) in "Aplysia" using an operant learning paradigm. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 inhibited the induction and molecular consolidation of LTM with no effect on ITM. Remarkably, maintenance of steady-state protein levels through…

  3. The ubiquitin proteasome system in Huntington's disease and the spinocerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubinsztein David C

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Huntington's disease and several of the spinocerebellar ataxias are caused by the abnormal expansion of a CAG repeat within the coding region of the disease gene. This results in the production of a mutant protein with an abnormally expanded polyglutamine tract. Although these disorders have a clear monogenic cause, each polyglutamine expansion mutation is likely to cause the dysfunction of many pathways and processes within the cell. It has been proposed that the ubiquitin proteasome system is impaired in polyglutamine expansion disorders and that this contributes to pathology. However, this is controversial with some groups demonstrating decreased proteasome activity in polyglutamine expansion disorders, some showing no change in activity and others demonstrating an increase in proteasome activity. It remains unknown whether the ubiquitin proteasome system is a feasible therapeutic target in these disorders. Here we review the conflicting results obtained from different assays performed in a variety of different systems. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com.

  4. The co-chaperone p23 is degraded by caspases and the proteasome during apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Jens; Berchtold, Martin Werner

    2005-01-01

    treatment. Caspase inhibition protected p23 from degradation in several cell lines. In addition, recombinant caspase-3 and 8 cleaved p23 at Asp 142 generating a degradation product of 18 kDa as seen in apoptotic cells. Truncated p23 is further degraded in a proteasome dependent process during apoptosis...

  5. Role of Proteasome-Dependent Protein Degradation in Long-Term Operant Memory in "Aplysia"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Lisa C.; Gardner, Jacob S.; Gandour, Catherine E.; Krishnan, Harini C.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the in vivo role of protein degradation during intermediate (ITM) and long-term memory (LTM) in "Aplysia" using an operant learning paradigm. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 inhibited the induction and molecular consolidation of LTM with no effect on ITM. Remarkably, maintenance of steady-state protein levels through…

  6. Proteasome inhibition for treatment of leishmaniasis, Chagas disease and sleeping sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Shilpi; Nagle, Advait S.; Biggart, Agnes; Lai, Yin H.; Liang, Fang; Davis, Lauren C.; Barnes, S. Whitney; Mathison, Casey J. N.; Myburgh, Elmarie; Gao, Mu-Yun; Gillespie, J. Robert; Liu, Xianzhong; Tan, Jocelyn L.; Stinson, Monique; Rivera, Ianne C.; Ballard, Jaime; Yeh, Vince; Groessl, Todd; Federe, Glenn; Koh, Hazel X. Y.; Venable, John D.; Bursulaya, Badry; Shapiro, Michael; Mishra, Pranab K.; Spraggon, Glen; Brock, Ansgar; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Rao, Srinivasa P. S.; Wen, Ben G.; Walker, John R.; Tuntland, Tove; Molteni, Valentina; Glynne, Richard J.; Supek, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, and sleeping sickness affect 20 million people worldwide and lead to more than 50,000 deaths annually1. The diseases are caused by infection with the kinetoplastid parasites Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp., respectively. These parasites have similar biology and genomic sequence, suggesting that all three diseases could be cured with drug(s) modulating the activity of a conserved parasite target2. However, no such molecular targets or broad spectrum drugs have been identified to date. Here we describe a selective inhibitor of the kinetoplastid proteasome (GNF6702) with unprecedented in vivo efficacy, which cleared parasites from mice in all three models of infection. GNF6702 inhibits the kinetoplastid proteasome through a non-competitive mechanism, does not inhibit the mammalian proteasome or growth of mammalian cells, and is well-tolerated in mice. Our data provide genetic and chemical validation of the parasite proteasome as a promising therapeutic target for treatment of kinetoplastid infections, and underscore the possibility of developing a single class of drugs for these neglected diseases. PMID:27501246

  7. High Levels of Serum Ubiquitin and Proteasome in a Case of HLA-B27 Uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Settimio; Gesualdo, Carlo; Maisto, Rosa; Trotta, Maria Consiglia; Di Carluccio, Nadia; Brigida, Annalisa; Di Iorio, Valentina; Testa, Francesco; Simonelli, Francesca; D’Amico, Michele; Di Filippo, Clara

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe a case of high serum levels of ubiquitin and proteasome in a woman under an acute attack of autoimmune uveitis. The woman was 52 years old, diagnosed as positive for the Human leukocyte antigen-B27 gene, and came to our observation in January 2013 claiming a severe uveitis attack that involved the right eye. During the acute attack of uveitis, this woman had normal serum biochemical parameters but higher levels of serum ubiquitin and proteasome 20S subunit, with respect to a healthy volunteer matched for age and sex. These levels correlated well with the clinical score attributed to uveitis. After the patient was admitted to therapy, she received oral prednisone in a de-escalation protocol (doses from 50 to 5 mg/day) for four weeks. Following this therapy, she had an expected reduction of clinical signs and score for uveitis, but concomitantly she had a reduction of the serum levels of ubiquitin, poliubiquitinated proteins (MAb-FK1) and proteasome 20S activity. Therefore, a role for ubiquitin and proteasome in the development of human autoimmune uveitis has been hypothesized. PMID:28245629

  8. High Levels of Serum Ubiquitin and Proteasome in a Case of HLA-B27 Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Settimio; Gesualdo, Carlo; Maisto, Rosa; Trotta, Maria Consiglia; Di Carluccio, Nadia; Brigida, Annalisa; Di Iorio, Valentina; Testa, Francesco; Simonelli, Francesca; D'Amico, Michele; Di Filippo, Clara

    2017-02-26

    In this paper, the authors describe a case of high serum levels of ubiquitin and proteasome in a woman under an acute attack of autoimmune uveitis. The woman was 52 years old, diagnosed as positive for the Human leukocyte antigen-B27 gene, and came to our observation in January 2013 claiming a severe uveitis attack that involved the right eye. During the acute attack of uveitis, this woman had normal serum biochemical parameters but higher levels of serum ubiquitin and proteasome 20S subunit, with respect to a healthy volunteer matched for age and sex. These levels correlated well with the clinical score attributed to uveitis. After the patient was admitted to therapy, she received oral prednisone in a de-escalation protocol (doses from 50 to 5 mg/day) for four weeks. Following this therapy, she had an expected reduction of clinical signs and score for uveitis, but concomitantly she had a reduction of the serum levels of ubiquitin, poliubiquitinated proteins (MAb-FK1) and proteasome 20S activity. Therefore, a role for ubiquitin and proteasome in the development of human autoimmune uveitis has been hypothesized.

  9. Inhibition of proteasomal degradation of rpn4 impairs nonhomologous end-joining repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghong Ju

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The proteasome homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by a negative feedback circuit in which the transcription factor Rpn4 induces the proteasome genes and is rapidly degraded by the assembled proteasome. The integrity of the Rpn4-proteasome feedback loop is critical for cell viability under stressed conditions. We have demonstrated that inhibition of Rpn4 degradation sensitizes cells to DNA damage, particularly in response to high doses of DNA damaging agents. The underlying mechanism, however, remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using yeast genetics and biochemical approach we show that inhibition of Rpn4 degradation displays a synthetic growth defect with deletion of the MEC1 checkpoint gene and sensitizes several checkpoint mutants to DNA damage. In addition, inhibition of Rpn4 degradation leads to a defect in repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ. The expression levels of several key NHEJ genes are downregulated and the recruitment of Yku70 to a DSB is reduced by inhibition of Rpn4 degradation. We find that Rpn4 and the proteasome are recruited to a DSB, suggesting their direct participation in NHEJ. Inhibition of Rpn4 degradation may result in a concomitant delay of release of Rpn4 and the proteasome from a DSB. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides the first evidence for the role of proteasomal degradation of Rpn4 in NHEJ.

  10. Calpains and proteasomes mediate degradation of ryanodine receptors in a model of cardiac ischemic reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrozo, Zully; Sánchez, Gina; Torrealba, Natalia; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Fernández, Carolina; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio; Donoso, Paulina

    2010-03-01

    Type-2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2)--the calcium release channels of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum--have a central role in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. In the heart, ischemia/reperfusion causes a rapid and significant decrease in RyR2 content but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are not fully understood. We have studied the involvement of three proteolytic systems--calpains, the proteasome and autophagy--on the degradation of RyR2 in rat neonatal cardiomyocyte cultures subjected to simulated ischemia/reperfusion (sI/R). We found that 8h of ischemia followed by 16h of reperfusion decreased RyR2 content by 50% without any changes in RyR2 mRNA. Specific inhibitors of calpains and the proteasome prevented the decrease of RyR2 caused by sI/R, implicating both pathways in its degradation. Proteasome inhibitors also prevented the degradation of calpastatin, the endogenous calpain inhibitor, hindering the activation of calpain induced by calpastatin degradation. Autophagy was activated during sI/R as evidenced by the increase in LC3-II and beclin-1, two proteins involved in autophagosome generation, and in the emergence of GFP-LC3 containing vacuoles in adenovirus GFP-LC3 transduced cardiomyocytes. Selective autophagy inhibition, however, induced even further RyR2 degradation, making unlikely the participation of autophagy in sI/R-induced RyR2 degradation. Our results suggest that calpain activation as a result of proteasome-induced degradation of calpastatin initiates RyR2 proteolysis, which is followed by proteasome-dependent degradation of the resulting RyR2 fragments. The decrease in RyR2 content during ischemia/reperfusion may be relevant to the decrease of heart contractility after ischemia.

  11. Syrbactin Structural Analog TIR-199 Blocks Proteasome Activity and Induces Tumor Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, André S; Opoku-Ansah, John; Ibarra-Rivera, Tannya R; Yco, Lisette P; Ambadi, Sudhakar; Roberts, Christopher C; Chang, Chia-En A; Pirrung, Michael C

    2016-04-15

    Multiple myeloma is an aggressive hematopoietic cancer of plasma cells. The recent emergence of three effective FDA-approved proteasome-inhibiting drugs, bortezomib (Velcade®), carfilzomib (Kyprolis®), and ixazomib (Ninlaro®), confirms that proteasome inhibitors are therapeutically useful against neoplastic disease, in particular refractory multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. This study describes the synthesis, computational affinity assessment, and preclinical evaluation of TIR-199, a natural product-derived syrbactin structural analog. Molecular modeling and simulation suggested that TIR-199 covalently binds each of the three catalytic subunits (β1, β2, and β5) and revealed key interaction sites. In vitro and cell culture-based proteasome activity measurements confirmed that TIR-199 inhibits the proteasome in a dose-dependent manner and induces tumor cell death in multiple myeloma and neuroblastoma cells as well as other cancer types in the NCI-60 cell panel. It is particularly effective against kidney tumor cell lines, with >250-fold higher anti-tumor activities than observed with the natural product syringolin A. In vivo studies in mice revealed a maximum tolerated dose of TIR-199 at 25 mg/kg. The anti-tumor activity of TIR-199 was confirmed in hollow fiber assays in mice. Adverse drug reaction screens in a kidney panel revealed no off-targets of concern. This is the first study to examine the efficacy of a syrbactin in animals. Taken together, the results suggest that TIR-199 is a potent new proteasome inhibitor with promise for further development into a clinical drug for the treatment of multiple myeloma and other forms of cancer.

  12. Mmi1, the yeast homologue of mammalian TCTP, associates with stress granules in heat-shocked cells and modulates proteasome activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Rinnerthaler

    Full Text Available As we have shown previously, yeast Mmi1 protein translocates from the cytoplasm to the outer surface of mitochondria when vegetatively growing yeast cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Here we analyzed the effect of heat stress on Mmi1 distribution. We performed domain analyses and found that binding of Mmi1 to mitochondria is mediated by its central alpha-helical domain (V-domain under all conditions tested. In contrast, the isolated N-terminal flexible loop domain of the protein always displays nuclear localization. Using immunoelectron microscopy we confirmed re-location of Mmi1 to the nucleus and showed association of Mmi1 with intact and heat shock-altered mitochondria. We also show here that mmi1Δ mutant strains are resistant to robust heat shock with respect to clonogenicity of the cells. To elucidate this phenotype we found that the cytosolic Mmi1 holoprotein re-localized to the nucleus even in cells heat-shocked at 40°C. Upon robust heat shock at 46°C, Mmi1 partly co-localized with the proteasome marker Rpn1 in the nuclear region as well as with the cytoplasmic stress granules defined by Rpg1 (eIF3a. We co-localized Mmi1 also with Bre5, Ubp3 and Cdc48 which are involved in the protein de-ubiquitination machinery, protecting protein substrates from proteasomal degradation. A comparison of proteolytic activities of wild type and mmi1Δ cells revealed that Mmi1 appears to be an inhibitor of the proteasome. We conclude that one of the physiological functions of the multifunctional protein module, Mmi1, is likely in regulating degradation and/or protection of proteins thereby indirectly regulating the pathways leading to cell death in stressed cells.

  13. HUWE1 interacts with BRCA1 and promotes its degradation in the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, v. 444, isse 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaozhen [Department of Cell Biology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Institute of Systems Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Yi, Juan; Yan, Kaowen; Wang, Yaqing; Zhu, Baili; Kuang, Jingyu; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha [Department of Cell Biology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Shao, Genze, E-mail: gzshao@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Cell Biology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Institute of Systems Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The 2000–2634aa region of HUWE1 mediates the interaction with BRCA1 degron. • HUWE1 promotes the degradation of BRCA1 through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • HUWE1 expression is inversely correlated with BRCA1 in breast cancer cells. • RNAi inhibition of HUWE1 confers increased resistance of MCF-10F cells to IR and MMC. - Abstract: The cellular BRCA1 protein level is essential for its tumor suppression activity and is tightly regulated through multiple mechanisms including ubiquitn–proteasome system. E3 ligases are involved to promote BRCA1 for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we identified HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein involved in the control of BRCA1 protein level. HUWE1 binds BRCA1 through its N-terminus degron domain. Depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA-mediated interference significantly increases BRCA1 protein levels and prolongs the half-life of BRCA1. Moreover, exogenous expression of HUWE1 promotes BRCA1 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, which could explain an inverse correlation between HUWE1 and BRCA1 levels in MCF10F, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Consistent with a functional role for HUWE1 in regulating BRCA1-mediated cellular response to DNA damage, depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA confers increased resistance to ionizing radiation and mitomycin. These data indicate that HUWE1 is a critical negative regulator of BRCA1 and suggest a new molecular mechanism for breast cancer pathogenesis.

  14. HUWE1 interacts with BRCA1 and promotes its degradation in the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, v. 444 issue 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaozhen [Department of Cell Biology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Institute of Systems Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Yi, Juan; Yan, Kaowen; Wang, Yaqing; Zhu, Baili; Kuang, Jingyu; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha [Department of Cell Biology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Shao, Genze, E-mail: gzshao@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Cell Biology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Institute of Systems Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • The 2000–2634 aa region of HUWE1 mediates the interaction with BRCA1 degron. • HUWE1 promotes the degradation of BRCA1 through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • HUWE1 expression is inversely correlated with BRCA1 in breast cancer cells. • RNAi inhibition of HUWE1 confers increased resistance of MCF-10F cells to IR and MMC. - Abstract: The cellular BRCA1 protein level is essential for its tumor suppression activity and is tightly regulated through multiple mechanisms including ubiquitn–proteasome system. E3 ligases are involved to promote BRCA1 for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we identified HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein involved in the control of BRCA1 protein level. HUWE1binds BRCA1 through its N-terminus degron domain. Depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA-mediated interference significantly increases BRCA1 protein levels and prolongs the half-life of BRCA1. Moreover, exogenous expression of HUWE1 promotes BRCA1 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, which could explain an inverse correlation between HUWE1 and BRCA1 levels in MCF10F, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Consistent with a functional role for HUWE1 in regulating BRCA1-mediated cellular response to DNA damage, depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA confers increased resistance to ionizing radiation and mitomycin. These data indicate that HUWE1 is a critical negative regulator of BRCA1 and suggest a new molecular mechanism for breast cancer pathogenesis.

  15. Increased Polyubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of a Munc18-1 Disease-Linked Mutant Causes Temperature-Sensitive Defect in Exocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Martin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Munc18-1 is a critical component of the core machinery controlling neuroexocytosis. Recently, mutations in Munc18-1 leading to the development of early infantile epileptic encephalopathy have been discovered. However, which degradative pathway controls Munc18-1 levels and how it impacts on neuroexocytosis in this pathology is unknown. Using neurosecretory cells deficient in Munc18, we show that a disease-linked mutation, C180Y, renders the protein unstable at 37°C. Although the mutated protein retains its function as t-SNARE chaperone, neuroexocytosis is impaired, a defect that can be rescued at a lower permissive temperature. We reveal that Munc18-1 undergoes K48-linked polyubiquitination, which is highly increased by the mutation, leading to proteasomal, but not lysosomal, degradation. Our data demonstrate that functional Munc18-1 levels are controlled through polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The C180Y disease-causing mutation greatly potentiates this degradative pathway, rendering Munc18-1 unable to facilitate neuroexocytosis, a phenotype that is reversed at a permissive temperature.

  16. 泛素蛋白酶体途径在运动骨骼肌领域的研究进展%The Progress of the Research on Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway of Skeletal Muscle in Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱荣

    2012-01-01

    泛素蛋白酶体途径由泛素、蛋白泛素化相关酶、26S蛋白酶体等成分组成,通过高度有序的降解过程,将细胞内错误折叠、衰老、损伤、突变的蛋白和修饰酶等分解成小分子肽,维持胞内蛋白质水平。目前发现,一次运动可引起骨骼肌途径活性升高,而重复运动可以降低途径活性,其机制尚不明确,大致可通过不依赖途径的信号通路(FOXO,p38)和依赖途径的信号通路(MyoD,NF-κB)上调可诱导的途径成分(泛素、E2/E3、蛋白酶体亚基),激活途径,引起蛋白质降解,但还需要更进一步去证实。%Components of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway(UPP) include ubiquitin,protein ubiquitination enzymes and 26S proteasome.The misfolding,aging,damage,mutation protein,and modification enzymes broke into small peptides through its highly ordered process,which maintain the intracellular protein level.The Activity of UPP could be increased in skeletal muscle after once exercise,but could be decreased after repetitive exercises.The mechanism is not clear.It could act via pathway independent signals(FOXO,p38) and pathway dependent signals(MyoD,NF-κB) to upregulate inducible pathway elements(ubiquitin,E2/E3 proteins and proteasome subunits),to active pathway,which cause protein degradation.But the detailed regulatory mechanism requires further study.

  17. Short communication: Evaluation of the microbiota of kefir samples using metagenetic analysis targeting the 16S and 26S ribosomal DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Leclercq, M; Nezer, C; Crevecoeur, S; Ferauche, C; Detry, E; Delcenserie, V; Daube, G

    2015-06-01

    Milk kefir is produced by fermenting milk in the presence of kefir grains. This beverage has several benefits for human health. The aim of this experiment was to analyze 5 kefir grains (and their products) using a targeted metagenetic approach. Of the 5 kefir grains analyzed, 1 was purchased in a supermarket, 2 were provided by the Ministry of Agriculture (Namur, Belgium), and 2 were provided by individuals. The metagenetic approach targeted the V1-V3 fragment of the 16S ribosomal (r)DNA for the grains and the resulting beverages at 2 levels of grain incorporation (5 and 10%) to identify the bacterial species population. In contrast, the 26S rDNA pyrosequencing was performed only on kefir grains with the aim of assessing the yeast populations. In parallel, pH measurements were performed on the kefir obtained from the kefir grains using 2 incorporation rates. Regarding the bacterial population, 16S pyrosequencing revealed the presence of 20 main bacterial species, with a dominance of the following: Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Gluconobacter frateurii, Lactobacillus kefiri, Acetobacter orientalis, and Acetobacter lovaniensis. An important difference was noticed between the kefir samples: kefir grain purchased from a supermarket (sample E) harbored a much higher proportion of several operational taxonomic units of Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. This sample of grain was macroscopically different from the others in terms of size, apparent cohesion of the grains, structure, and texture, probably associated with a lower level of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens. The kefir (at an incorporation rate of 5%) produced from this sample of grain was characterized by a lower pH value (4.5) than the others. The other 4 samples of kefir (5%) had pH values above 5. Comparing the kefir grain and the kefir, an increase in the population of Gluconobacter in grain sample B was observed. This was also the case for Acetobacter orientalis

  18. Comprehensive study of proteasome inhibitors against Plasmodium falciparum laboratory strains and field isolates from Gabon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kremsner Peter G

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to almost all available antimalarial drugs necessitates the search for new chemotherapeutic compounds. The ubiquitin/proteasome system plays a major role in overall protein turnover, especially in fast dividing eukaryotic cells including plasmodia. Previous studies show that the 20S proteasome is expressed and catalytically active in plasmodia and treatment with proteasome inhibitors arrests parasite growth. This is the first comprehensive screening of proteasome inhibitors with different chemical modes of action against laboratory strains of P. falciparum. Subsequently, a selection of inhibitors was tested in field isolates from Lambaréné, Gabon. Methods Epoxomicin, YU101, YU102, MG132, MG115, Z-L3-VS, Ada-Ahx3-L3-VS, lactacystin, bortezomib (Velcade®, gliotoxin, PR11 and PR39 were tested and compared to chloroquine- and artesunate-activities in a standardized in vitro drug susceptibility assay against P. falciparum laboratory strains 3D7, D10 and Dd2. Freshly obtained field isolates from Lambaréné, Gabon, were used to measure the activity of chloroquine, artesunate, epoxomicin, MG132, lactacystin and bortezomib. Parasite growth was detected through histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2 production. Raw data were fitted by a four-parameter logistic model and individual inhibitory concentrations (50%, 90%, and 99% were calculated. Results Amongst all proteasome inhibitors tested, epoxomicin showed the highest activity in chloroquine-susceptible (IC50: 6.8 nM [3D7], 1.7 nM [D10] and in chloroquine-resistant laboratory strains (IC50: 10.4 nM [Dd2] as well as in field isolates (IC50: 8.5 nM. The comparator drug artesunate was even more active (IC50: 1.0 nM, whereas all strains were chloroquine-resistant (IC50: 113 nM. Conclusion The peptide α',β'-epoxyketone epoxomicin is highly active against P. falciparum regardless the grade of the parasite's chloroquine

  19. Physical mapping of 5S and 18S-5.8S-26S RNA gene families in polyploid series of Cenchrus ciliaris Linnaeus, 1771 (Poaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Kharrat-Souissi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L., Poaceae is one of the most important pasturage grasses due to its high productivity and good forage qualities. This species possess a high adaptability to bioclimatic constraints of arid zones and may be used for the restoration of degraded arid ecosystems. Tunisian populations present three ploidy levels (4x, 5x and 6x with a basic chromosome number x=9. This study reported for the first time the distribution of the ribosomal genes (rRNA for pentaploid and hexaploid cytotypes of C. ciliaris. Molecular cytogenetic study using double fluorescence in situ hybridization has shown that the two rDNA families, 5S and 18S-5.8S-26S (18S, displayed intraspecific variation in number of loci among different ploidy levels. Each ploidy level was characterized by specific number of both 5S and 18S rDNA loci (two loci in tetraploid, five in pentaploid and six in hexaploid level. For three studied cytotypes (4x, 5x and 6x all 5S rDNA loci were localized on the subcentromeric region of chromosomes, while 18S loci were situated on the telomeric region of short chromosome arms. Data of the FISH experiments show proportional increase of ribosomal loci number during polyploidization processes.

  20. Physical mapping of 5S and 18S-5.8S-26S RNA gene families in polyploid series of Cenchrus ciliaris Linnaeus, 1771 (Poaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharrat-Souissi, Amina; Siljak-Yakovlev, Sonja; Pustahija, Fatima; Chaieb, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L., Poaceae) is one of the most important pasturage grasses due to its high productivity and good forage qualities. This species possess a high adaptability to bioclimatic constraints of arid zones and may be used for the restoration of degraded arid ecosystems. Tunisian populations present three ploidy levels (4x, 5x and 6x) with a basic chromosome number x=9. This study reported for the first time the distribution of the ribosomal genes (rRNA) for pentaploid and hexaploid cytotypes of Cenchrus ciliaris. Molecular cytogenetic study using double fluorescence in situ hybridization has shown that the two rDNA families, 5S and 18S-5.8S-26S (18S), displayed intraspecific variation in number of loci among different ploidy levels. Each ploidy level was characterized by specific number of both 5S and 18S rDNA loci (two loci in tetraploid, five in pentaploid and six in hexaploid level). For three studied cytotypes (4x, 5x and 6x) all 5S rDNA loci were localized on the subcentromeric region of chromosomes, while 18S loci were situated on the telomeric region of short chromosome arms. Data of the FISH experiments show proportional increase of ribosomal loci number during polyploidization processes. PMID:24260668

  1. Salinosporamides A and B Inhibit Proteasome Activity and Delay the Degradation of N-end Rule Model Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seungkyun; Bang, Daein; Choi, Wonhoon; Lee, Minjae [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seonghwan; Oh, Dongchan [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The proteasome, which is highly evolutionarily conserved, is responsible for the degradation of most short-lived proteins in cells. Small-molecule inhibitors targeting the proteasome's degradative activity have been extensively developed as lead compounds for various human diseases. An exemplified molecule is bortezomib, which was approved by FDA in 2003 for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Here, using transiently and stably expressed N-end rule model substrates in mammalian cells, we evaluated and identified that salinosporamide A and salinosporamide B effectively inhibited the proteasomal degradation. Considering that a variety of proteasome substrates are implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases, they have the potential to be clinically applicable as therapeutic agents.

  2. Modulation of BAG3 Expression and Proteasomal Activity by sAPPα Does Not Require Membrane-Tethered Holo-APP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Arpita; Milosch, Nelli; Antonietti, Patrick; Baumkötter, Frederik; Zymny, Andreas; Müller, Ulrike C; Kins, Stefan; Hajieva, Parvana; Behl, Christian; Kögel, Donat

    2016-11-01

    Maintenance of intracellular proteostasis is essential for neuronal function, and emerging data support the view that disturbed proteostasis plays an important role in brain aging and the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). sAPPalpha (sAPPα), the extracellularly secreted N-terminal alpha secretase cleavage product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), has an established function in neuroprotection. Recently, we provided evidence that membrane-bound holo-APP functionally cooperates with sAPPα to mediate neuroprotection via activation of the Akt survival signaling pathway and sAPPα directly affects proteostasis. Here, we demonstrate that in addition to its anti-apoptotic function, sAPPα has effects on neuronal proteostasis under conditions of proteasomal stress. In particular, recombinant sAPPα significantly suppressed MG132-triggered expression of the co-chaperone BAG3 and aggresome formation, and it partially rescued proteasomal activity in a dose-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. In analogy, sAPPα was able to inhibit MG132-induced BAG3 expression in primary hippocampal neurons. Strikingly, these sAPPα-induced changes were unaltered in APP-depleted SH-SY5Y cells and APP-deficient neurons, demonstrating that holo-APP is not required for this particular function of sAPPα. Importantly, recombinant sAPPbeta (sAPPβ) failed to modulate BAG3 expression and proteostasis in APP-proficient wild-type (wt) cells, indicating that these biological effects are highly selective for sAPPα. In conclusion, we demonstrate that modulation of proteostasis is a distinct biological function of sAPPα and does not require surface-bound holo-APP. Our data shed new light on the physiological functions of APP and the interplay between APP processing and proteostasis during brain aging.

  3. Small interfering RNA targeting mcl-1 enhances proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis in various solid malignant tumors

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    Zhou Wei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a promising approach for anticancer strategies. Recently, we found Bik accumulation in cancer cell lines after they were treated with bortezomib. However, recent evidence indicates that proteasome inhibitors may also induce the accumulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. The current study was designed to analyze the levels of several anti-apoptotic members of Bcl-2 family in different human cancer cell lines after they were treated with proteasome inhibitors. Methods Different human cancer cell lines were treated with proteasome inhibitors. Western blot were used to investigate the expression of Mcl-1 and activation of mitochondrial apoptotic signaling. Cell viability was investigated using SRB assay, and induction of apoptosis was measured using flow cytometry. Results We found elevated Mcl-1 level in human colon cancer cell lines DLD1, LOVO, SW620, and HCT116; human ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3; and human lung cancer cell line H1299, but not in human breast cancer cell line MCF7 after they were treated with bortezomib. This dramatic Mcl-1 accumulation was also observed when cells were treated with other two proteasome inhibitors, MG132 and calpain inhibitor I (ALLN. Moreover, our results showed Mcl-1 accumulation was caused by stabilization of the protein against degradation. Reducing Mcl-1 accumulation by Mcl-1 siRNA reduced Mcl-1 accumulation and enhanced proteasome inhibitor-induced cell death and apoptosis, as evidenced by the increased cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase. Conclusions Our results showed that it was not only Bik but also Mcl-1 accumulation during the treatment of proteasome inhibitors, and combining proteasome inhibitors with Mcl-1 siRNA would enhance the ultimate anticancer effect suggesting this combination might be a more effective strategy for cancer therapy.

  4. Assessment of the direct and indirect effects of MPP+ and dopamine on the human proteasome: implications for Parkinson's disease aetiology

    OpenAIRE

    Caneda-Ferrón, B; Girolamo, De, A.; Costa, T; Beck, KE; Layfield, R; Billett, EE

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial impairment, glutathione depletion and oxidative stress have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD), linked recently to proteasomal dysfunction. Our study analysed how these factors influence the various activities of the proteasome in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells treated with the PD mimetics MPP+ (a complex 1 inhibitor) or dopamine. Treatment with these toxins led to dose- and time-dependent reductions in ATP and glutathione and also chymotrypsin-li...

  5. Proteasome activity is important for replication recovery, CHK1 phosphorylation and prevention of G2 arrest after low-dose formaldehyde

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    Ortega-Atienza, Sara; Green, Samantha E.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly, E-mail: anatoly_zhitkovich@brown.edu

    2015-07-15

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a human carcinogen with numerous sources of environmental and occupational exposures. This reactive aldehyde is also produced endogenously during metabolism of drugs and other processes. DNA–protein crosslinks (DPCs) are considered to be the main genotoxic lesions for FA. Accumulating evidence suggests that DPC repair in high eukaryotes involves proteolysis of crosslinked proteins. Here, we examined a role of the main cellular proteolytic machinery proteasomes in toxic responses of human lung cells to low FA doses. We found that transient inhibition of proteasome activity increased cytotoxicity and diminished clonogenic viability of FA-treated cells. Proteasome inactivation exacerbated suppressive effects of FA on DNA replication and increased the levels of the genotoxic stress marker γ-H2AX in normal human cells. A transient loss of proteasome activity in FA-exposed cells also caused delayed perturbations of cell cycle, which included G2 arrest and a depletion of S-phase populations at FA doses that had no effects in control cells. Proteasome activity diminished p53-Ser15 phosphorylation but was important for FA-induced CHK1 phosphorylation, which is a biochemical marker of DPC proteolysis in replicating cells. Unlike FA, proteasome inhibition had no effect on cell survival and CHK1 phosphorylation by the non-DPC replication stressor hydroxyurea. Overall, we obtained evidence for the importance of proteasomes in protection of human cells against biologically relevant doses of FA. Biochemically, our findings indicate the involvement of proteasomes in proteolytic repair of DPC, which removes replication blockage by these highly bulky lesions. - Highlights: • Proteasome inhibition enhances cytotoxicity of low-dose FA in human lung cells. • Active proteasomes diminish replication-inhibiting effects of FA. • Proteasome activity prevents delayed G2 arrest in FA-treated cells. • Proteasome inhibition exacerbates replication stress by FA in

  6. Species-genomic relationships among the tribasic diploid and polyploid Carthamus taxa based on physical mapping of active and inactive 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S ribosomal RNA gene families, and the two tandemly repeated DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Renuka; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Tandon, Rajesh; Rao, Satyawada Rama; Raina, Soom Nath

    2013-05-25

    In the genus Carthamus (2n=20, 22, 24, 44, 64; x=10, 11, 12), most of the homologues within and between the chromosome complements are difficult to be identified. In the present work, we used fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) to determine the chromosome distribution of the two rRNA gene families, and the two isolated repeated DNA sequences in the 14 Carthamus taxa. The distinctive variability in the distribution, number and signal intensity of hybridisation sites for 18S-26S and 5S rDNA loci could generally distinguish the 14 Carthamus taxa. Active 18S-26S rDNA sites were generally associated with NOR loci on the nucleolar chromosomes. The two A genome taxa, C. glaucus ssp. anatolicus and C. boissieri with 2n=20, and the two botanical varieties of B genome C. tinctorius (2n=24) had diagnostic FISH patterns. The present results support the origin of C. tinctorius from C. palaestinus. FISH patterns of C. arborescens vis-à-vis the other taxa indicate a clear division of Carthamus taxa into two distinct lineages. Comparative distribution and intensity pattern of 18S-26S rDNA sites could distinguish each of the tetraploid and hexaploid taxa. The present results indicate that C. boissieri (2n=20) is one of the genome donors for C. lanatus and C. lanatus ssp. lanatus (2n=44), and C. lanatus is one of the progenitors for the hexaploid (2n=64) taxa. The association of pCtKpnI-2 repeated sequence with rRNA gene cluster (orphon) in 2-10 nucleolar and non-nucleolar chromosomes and the consistent occurrence of pCtKpnI-1 repeated sequence at the subtelomeric region in all the taxa analysed indicate some functional role of these sequences.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif Protein Enhances the Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP) and Reduces Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Antigen Presentation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Ely, Kenneth H.; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A.; Green, William R.; Enelow, Richard I.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8+ T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation. PMID:24247241

  8. Detection of O-propargyl-puromycin with SUMO and ubiquitin by click chemistry at PML-nuclear bodies during abortive proteasome activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uozumi, Naoki; Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-05-27

    The amino-nucleoside antibiotic, puromycin, acts by covalently linking to elongating polypeptide chains on ribosomes to generate prematurely terminated immature polypeptides. The trafficking of puromycin-conjugated (puromycylated) immature polypeptides within cell has, however, remained elusive. In this study, using O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro), the distribution of puromycylated polypeptides was assessed in HeLa cells by click chemistry. Under standard culture conditions, OP-Puro signals were detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus with the highest concentrations in the nucleolus. Intriguingly, when proteasome activities were aborted using MG132, OP-Puro signals began to accumulate at promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in addition to the nucleolus. We also found promiscuous association of OP-Puro signals with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at PML-NBs, but not at the nucleolus, during abortive proteasome activities. This study reveals a previously unknown distribution of OP-Puro that argues for a nuclear function in regulating immature protein homeostasis.

  9. Epidermal Growth Factor Cytoplasmic Domain Affects ErbB Protein Degradation by the Lysosomal and Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Human Cancer Cells

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    Aleksandra Glogowska

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic domains of EGF-like ligands, including EGF cytoplasmic domain (EGFcyt, have important biological functions. Using specific constructs and peptides of human EGF cytoplasmic domain, we demonstrate that EGFcyt facilitates lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation, and this coincided with growth inhibition of human thyroid and glioma carcinoma cells. EGFcyt and exon 22–23-encoded peptide (EGF22.23 enhanced procathepsin B (procathB expression and procathB-mediated lysosomal degradation of EGFR/ErbB1 as determined by inhibitors for procathB and the lysosomal ATPase inhibitor BafA1. Presence of mbEGFctF, EGFcyt, EGF22.23, and exon 23-encoded peptides suppressed the expression of the deubiqitinating enzyme ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1. This coincided with hyperubiquitination of total cellular proteins and ErbB1/2 and reduced proteasome activity. Upon small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of endogenously expressed UCH-L1, a similar hyperubiquitinylation phenotype, reduced ErbB1/2 content, and attenuated growth was observed. The exon 23-encoded peptide region of EGFcyt was important for these biologic actions. Structural homology modeling of human EGFcyt showed that this molecular region formed an exposed surface loop. Peptides derived from this EGFcyt loop structure may aid in the design of novel peptide therapeutics aimed at inhibiting growth of cancer cells.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif protein enhances the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and reduces major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Ely, Kenneth H; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A; Green, William R; Enelow, Richard I; Stanton, Bruce A

    2014-01-03

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8(+) T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation.

  11. The ubiquitin–proteasome system and signal transduction pathways regulating Epithelial Mesenchymal transition of cancer

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    Voutsadakis Ioannis A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epithelial to Mesenchymal transition (EMT in cancer, a process permitting cancer cells to become mobile and metastatic, has a signaling hardwire forged from development. Multiple signaling pathways that regulate carcinogenesis enabling characteristics in neoplastic cells such as proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and angiogenesis are also the main players in EMT. These pathways, as almost all cellular processes, are in their turn regulated by ubiquitination and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS. Ubiquitination is the covalent link of target proteins with the small protein ubiquitin and serves as a signal to target protein degradation by the proteasome or to other outcomes such as endocytosis, degradation by the lysosome or specification of cellular localization. This paper reviews signal transduction pathways regulating EMT and being regulated by ubiquitination.

  12. CHIP facilitates ubiquitination of inducible nitric oxide synthase and promotes its proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Kong, Xiuqin; Fu, Jin; Xu, Yimiao; Fang, Shuping; Hua, Peng; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2009-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is responsible for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis from l-arginine in response to inflammatory mediators. It is reported that iNOS is degraded mainly by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in RAW264.7 cells and human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. In this study, we showed that iNOS was ubiquitinated and degraded dependent on CHIP (COOH terminus of heat shock protein 70-interacting protein), a chaperone-dependent ubiquitin ligase. The results from overexpression and RNAi experiments demonstrated that CHIP decreased the protein level of iNOS, shortened the half-life of iNOS and attenuated the production of NO. Furthermore, CHIP promoted ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of iNOS by associating with iNOS. These results suggest that CHIP plays an important role in regulation iNOS activity.

  13. Mitochondrial and Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction in Ageing and Disease: Two Sides of the Same Coin?

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    Jaime M. Ross

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system have been described as two hallmarks of the ageing process. Additionally, both systems have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of many age-related diseases, particularly neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Interestingly, these two systems are closely interconnected, with the ubiquitin proteasome system maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis by regulating organelle dynamics, the proteome, and mitophagy, and mitochondrial dysfunction impairing cellular protein homeostasis by oxidative damage. Here, we review the current literature and argue that the interplay of the two systems should be considered in order to better understand the cellular dysfunction observed in ageing and age-related diseases. Such an approach may provide valuable insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the ageing process, and further discovery of treatments to counteract ageing and its associated diseases. Furthermore, we provide a hypothetical model for the heterogeneity described among individuals during ageing.

  14. Retinoblastoma protein co-purifies with proteasomal insulin-degrading enzyme: Implications for cell proliferation control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radulescu, Razvan T., E-mail: ratura@gmx.net [Molecular Concepts Research (MCR), Muenster (Germany); Duckworth, William C. [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Levy, Jennifer L. [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Fawcett, Janet, E-mail: janet.fawcett@va.gov [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2010-04-30

    Previous investigations on proteasomal preparations containing insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; EC 3.4.24.56) have invariably yielded a co-purifying protein with a molecular weight of about 110 kDa. We have now found both in MCF-7 breast cancer and HepG2 hepatoma cells that this associated molecule is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Interestingly, the amount of RB in this protein complex seemed to be lower in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells, indicating a higher (cytoplasmic) protein turnover in the former vs. the latter cells. Moreover, immunofluorescence showed increased nuclear localization of RB in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells. Beyond these subtle differences between these distinct tumor cell types, our present study more generally suggests an interplay between RB and IDE within the proteasome that may have important growth-regulatory consequences.

  15. Involvement of proteasome alpha-subunit PSMA7 in hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, M; Beger, C; Welch, P J; Barber, J R; Manns, M P; Wong-Staal, F

    2001-12-01

    Ribozymes are small catalytic RNA molecules that can be engineered to enzymatically cleave RNA transcripts in a sequence-specific fashion and thereby inhibit expression and function of the corresponding gene product. With their simple structures and site-specific cleavage activity, they have been exploited as potential therapeutic agents in a variety of human disorders, including hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We have designed a hairpin ribozyme (Rz3'X) targeting the HCV minus-strand replication intermediate at position 40 within the 3'X tail. Surprisingly, Rz3'X was found to induce ganciclovir (GCV)-resistant colonies in a bicistronic cellular reporter system with HCV internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-dependent translation of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK). Rz3'X-transduced GCV-resistant HeLa reporter cells showed substantially reduced IRES-mediated HCV core protein translation compared with control vector-transduced cells. Since these reporter systems do not contain the HCV 3'X tail sequences, the results indicate that Rz3'X probably exerted an inhibitory effect on HCV IRES activity fortuitously through another gene target. A novel technique of ribozyme cleavage-based target gene identification (cleavage-specific amplification of cDNA ends) (M. Krüger, C. Beger, P. J. Welch, J. R. Barber, and F. Wong-Staal, Nucleic Acids Res. 29:e94, 2001) revealed that human 20S proteasome alpha-subunit PSMA7 mRNA was a target RNA recognized and cleaved by Rz3'X. We then showed that additional ribozymes directed against PSMA7 RNA inhibited HCV IRES activity in two assay systems: GCV resistance in the HeLa IRES TK reporter cell system and a transient transfection assay performed with a bicistronic Renilla-HCV IRES-firefly luciferase reporter in Huh7 cells. In contrast, ribozymes were inactive against IRES of encephalomyocarditis virus and human rhinovirus. Additionally, proteasome inhibitor MG132 exerted a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on HCV IRES

  16. The proteasomal Rpn11 metalloprotease suppresses tombusvirus RNA recombination and promotes viral replication via facilitating assembly of the viral replicase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Barajas, Daniel; Nagy, Peter D

    2015-03-01

    RNA viruses co-opt a large number of cellular proteins that affect virus replication and, in some cases, viral genetic recombination. RNA recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Tombusviruses and a yeast model host are used to identify cellular factors affecting RNA virus replication and RNA recombination. In this study, we have examined the role of the conserved Rpn11p metalloprotease subunit of the proteasome, which couples deubiquitination and degradation of proteasome substrates, in tombusvirus replication and recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and plants. Depletion or mutations of Rpn11p lead to the rapid formation of viral RNA recombinants in combination with reduced levels of viral RNA replication in yeast or in vitro based on cell extracts. Rpn11p interacts with the viral replication proteins and is recruited to the viral replicase complex (VRC). Analysis of the multifunctional Rpn11p has revealed that the primary role of Rpn11p is to act as a "matchmaker" that brings the viral p92(pol) replication protein and the DDX3-like Ded1p/RH20 DEAD box helicases into VRCs. Overexpression of Ded1p can complement the defect observed in rpn11 mutant yeast by reducing TBSV recombination. This suggests that Rpn11p can suppress tombusvirus recombination via facilitating the recruitment of the cellular Ded1p helicase, which is a strong suppressor of viral recombination, into VRCs. Overall, this work demonstrates that the co-opted Rpn11p, which is involved in the assembly of the functional proteasome, also functions in the proper assembly of the tombusvirus VRCs. RNA viruses evolve rapidly due to genetic changes based on mutations and RNA recombination. Viral genetic recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and facilitates adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Cellular factors affect viral RNA recombination, although the role

  17. Proteasome-independent degradation of HIV-1 in naturally non-permissive human placental trophoblast cells

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    Barré-Sinoussi Françoise

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human placenta-derived cell line BeWo has been demonstrated to be restrictive to cell-free HIV-1 infection. BeWo cells are however permissive to infection by VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1, which enters cells by a receptor-independent mechanism, and to infection by HIV-1 via a cell-to-cell route. Results Here we analysed viral entry in wild type BeWo (CCR5+, CXCR4+ and BeWo-CD4+ (CD4+, CCR5+, CXCR4+ cells. We report that HIV-1 internalisation is not restricted in either cell line. Levels of internalised p24 antigen between VSV-G HIV-1 pseudotypes and R5 or X4 virions were comparable. We next analysed the fate of internalised virions; X4 and R5 HIV-1 virions were less stable over time in BeWo cells than VSV-G HIV-1 pseudotypes. We then investigated the role of the proteasome in restricting cell-free HIV-1 infection in BeWo cells using proteasome inhibitors. We observed an increase in the levels of VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 infection in proteasome-inhibitor treated cells, but the infection by R5-Env or X4-Env pseudotyped virions remains restricted. Conclusion Collectively these results suggest that cell-free HIV-1 infection encounters a surface block leading to a non-productive entry route, which either actively targets incoming virions for non-proteasomal degradation, and impedes their release into the cytoplasm, or causes the inactivation of mechanisms essential for viral replication.

  18. Proteasome inhibitor MG-132 induces C6 glioma cell apoptosis via oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-hai FAN; Yi HOU; Fan-kai MENG; Xiao-fei WANG; Yi-nan LUO; Peng-fei GE

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Proteasome inhibitors have been found to suppress gtioma cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, but the mechanisms are not fully elucidated. In this study we investigated the mechanisms underlying the apoptosis induced by the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 in glioma cells.Methods: C6 glioma cells were used. MTF assay was used to analyze cell proliferation. Proteasome activity was assayed using Succi-nyI-LLVY-AMC, and intracellular ROS level was evaluated with the redox-sensitive dye DCFH-DA. Apoptosis was detected using fluores-cence and transmission electron microscopy as well as flow cytometry. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins was investigated using Western blot analysis.Results: MG-132 inhibited C6 glioma cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner (the IC value at 24 h was 18.5 μmol/L). MG-132 (18.5 μmol/L) suppressed the proteasome activity by about 70% at 3 h. It induced apoptosis via down-regulation of antiapop-totic proteins Bcl-2 and XlAP0 up-regulation of pro-apoptotic protein Bax and caspase-3, and production of cleaved C-terminal 85 kDa PARP). It also caused a more than 5-fold increase of reactive oxygen species. Tiron (1 mmol/L) effectively blocked oxidative stress induced by MG-132 (18.5 pmol/L), attenuated proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in C6 glioma cells, and reversed the expression pattern of apoptosis-related proteins.Conclusion: MG-132 induced apoptosis of C6 glioma cells via the oxidative stress.

  19. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is a novel therapeutic agent for focal radiation-induced osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Abhishek; Wang, Luqiang; Young, Tiffany; Zhong, Leilei; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Levine, Michael A; Cengel, Keith; Liu, X Sherry; Zhang, Yejia; Pignolo, Robert J; Qin, Ling

    2017-08-31

    Bone atrophy and its related fragility fractures are frequent, late side effects of radiotherapy in cancer survivors and have a detrimental impact on their quality of life. In another study, we showed that parathyroid hormone 1-34 and anti-sclerostin antibody attenuates radiation-induced bone damage by accelerating DNA repair in osteoblasts. DNA damage responses are partially regulated by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. In the current study, we examined whether proteasome inhibitors have similar bone-protective effects against radiation damage. MG132 treatment greatly reduced radiation-induced apoptosis in cultured osteoblastic cells. This survival effect was owing to accelerated DNA repair as revealed by γH2AX foci and comet assays and to the up-regulation of Ku70 and DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit, essential DNA repair proteins in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Administration of bortezomib (Bzb) reversed the loss of trabecular bone structure and strength in mice at 4 wk after focal radiation. Histomorphometry revealed that Bzb significantly increased the number of osteoblasts and activity in the irradiated area and suppressed the number and activity of osteoclasts, regardless of irradiation. Two weeks of Bzb treatment accelerated DNA repair in bone-lining osteoblasts and thus promoted their survival. Meanwhile, it also inhibited bone marrow adiposity. Taken together, we demonstrate a novel role of proteasome inhibitors in treating radiation-induced osteoporosis.-Chandra, A., Wang, L., Young, T., Zhong, L., Tseng, W.-J., Levine, M. A., Cengel, K., Liu, X. S., Zhang, Y., Pignolo, R. J., Qin, L. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is a novel therapeutic agent for focal radiation-induced osteoporosis. © FASEB.

  20. alpha-Synuclein budding yeast model: toxicity enhanced by impaired proteasome and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nijee; Brandis, Katrina A; Herrera, Sara K; Johnson, Brandon E; Vaidya, Tulaza; Shrestha, Ruja; Debburman, Shubhik K

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that results from the selective loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Misfolding and aggregation of the protein alpha-synuclein, oxidative damage, and proteasomal impairment are all hypotheses for the molecular cause of this selective neurotoxicity. Here, we describe a Saccharomyces cerevisiae model to evaluate the misfolding, aggregation, and toxicity-inducing ability of wild-type alpha-synuclein and three mutants (A30P, A53T, and A30P/A53T), and we compare regulation of these properties by dysfunctional proteasomes and by oxidative stress. We found prominent localization of wild-type and A53T alpha-synuclein near the plasma membrane, supporting known in vitro lipid-binding ability. In contrast, A30P was mostly cytoplasmic, whereas A30P/A53T displayed both types of fluorescence. Surprisingly, alpha-synuclein was not toxic to several yeast strains tested. When yeast mutants for the proteasomal barrel (doa3-1) were evaluated, delayed alpha-synuclein synthesis and membrane association were observed; yeast mutant for the proteasomal cap (sen3-1) exhibited increased accumulation and aggregation of alpha-synuclein. Both sen3-1and doa3-1 mutants exhibited synthetic lethality with alpha-synuclein. When yeasts were challenged with an oxidant (hydrogen peroxide), alpha-synuclein was extremely lethal to cells that lacked manganese superoxide dismutase Mn-SOD (sod2Delta) but not to cells that lacked copper, zinc superoxide dismutase Cu,Zn-SOD (sod1Delta). Despite the toxicity, sod2Delta cells never displayed intracellular aggregates of alpha-synuclein. We suggest that the toxic alpha-synuclein species in yeast are smaller than the visible aggregates, and toxicity might involve alpha-synuclein membrane association. Thus, yeasts have emerged effective organisms for characterizing factors and mechanisms that regulate alpha-synuclein toxicity.

  1. Molecular Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of SNIPER(ER) That Induces Proteasomal Degradation of ERα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuhira, Keiichiro; Demizu, Yosuke; Hattori, Takayuki; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Shibata, Norihito; Kurihara, Masaaki; Naito, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of protein stability using small molecules has a great potential for both basic research and clinical therapy. Based on our protein knockdown technology, we recently developed a novel small molecule SNIPER(ER) that targets the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This chapter describes the design and synthesis of SNIPER(ER) compounds, and methods for the evaluation of their activity in cellular system.

  2. Synergy between proteasome inhibitors and imatinib mesylate in chronic myeloid leukemia.

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    Zheng Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resistance developed by leukemic cells, unsatisfactory efficacy on patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML at accelerated and blastic phases, and potential cardiotoxity, have been limitations for imatinib mesylate (IM in treating CML. Whether low dose IM in combination with agents of distinct but related mechanisms could be one of the strategies to overcome these concerns warrants careful investigation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We tested the therapeutic efficacies as well as adverse effects of low dose IM in combination with proteasome inhibitor, Bortezomib (BOR or proteasome inhibitor I (PSI, in two CML murine models, and investigated possible mechanisms of action on CML cells. Our results demonstrated that low dose IM in combination with BOR exerted satisfactory efficacy in prolongation of life span and inhibition of tumor growth in mice, and did not cause cardiotoxicity or body weight loss. Consistently, BOR and PSI enhanced IM-induced inhibition of long-term clonogenic activity and short-term cell growth of CML stem/progenitor cells, and potentiated IM-caused inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis of BCR-ABL+ cells. IM/BOR and IM/PSI inhibited Bcl-2, increased cytoplasmic cytochrome C, and activated caspases. While exerting suppressive effects on BCR-ABL, E2F1, and beta-catenin, IM/BOR and IM/PSI inhibited proteasomal degradation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, leading to a re-activation of this important negative regulator of BCR-ABL. In addition, both combination therapties inhibited Bruton's tyrosine kinase via suppression of NFkappaB. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that combined use of tyrosine kinase inhibitor and proteasome inhibitor might be helpful for optimizing CML treatment.

  3. Effects of inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway on human primary leukemic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰雨; 张学敏; 杨平地; 胡美茹; 于鸣; 杨怡; 沈倍奋

    2002-01-01

    Though there were a lot of reports about the totally different responses to the inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in different kinds of cell lines, much less has been known about the responses in primary human leukemic cells. In this study, the effects of inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway on human bone marrow (BM) mononuclear cells (MNCs) obtained from 10 normal persons and 8 leukemia patients were examined. The results showed that the responses obviously varied individually. Among them, BM MNCs in 3 cases of leukemic patients were extremely sensitive, demonstrated by that >90% cells were induced to undergo apoptosis within 24 h, but MNCs in 10 cases of normal persons showed resistance to the inhibition and no apoptosis was observed. Furthermore, Western blots revealed that the Bcl-2 expression was relatively high in the sensitive primary leukemia cells, and especially the cleavage of 26 ku Bcl-2 into a 22 ku fragment occurred during the induction of apoptosis. In contrast, the Bcl-2 expression was either undetectable or detectable but no cleavage of that above was observed in the cells insensitive to the inhibition of the pathway (including BM MNCs in normal persons). Together with the observations on the leukemic cell lines, these findings suggested the correlation of the specific cleavage of Bcl-2 into a shortened fragment with the sensitivity of cells to the inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, which provides clues to the further understanding of the mechanisms of that dramatically different responses existing in different kinds of cells to the inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

  4. Down-regulation of Flt-1 gene expression by the proteasome inhibitor MG262.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezquita, J; Mezquita, B; Pau, M; Mezquita, C

    2003-08-15

    The mechanisms involved in the anti-angiogenic actions of the proteasome inhibitors are poorly understood. Here, we report that the gene expression of the VEGF receptor Flt-1 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1) was down-regulated by the reversible proteasome inhibitor MG262 in explant cultures of the developing chicken pecten oculi, a vascular organ consisting of endothelial cells, pericytes, and macrophages. In addition, the inhibitor prevented the induction of Flt-1 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in macrophages and down-regulated the expression of Flt-1 after LPS induction. Flt-1 gene expression was also down regulated by MG262 in cultures of human microvascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, a transcript of Flt-1, coding for a soluble form of the receptor (sFlt-1) with anti-angiogenic properties, was not down-regulated in the same extent. Only a small decrease in the expression of VEGF and Ang-2 was detected in the pecten oculi upon inhibition of the proteasome, while no major changes were observed in the expression of other angiogenic molecules, such as KDR or Ang-1. Since recent experiments have demonstrated the importance of anti-Flt-1 therapy in the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, retinal angiogenesis, arthritis, and atherosclerosis (Luttun et al. [2002]: Nat Med 8:831-840), our observation on down-regulation of Flt-1 in microvascular endothelial cells and macrophages by MG262 supports the postulated role of the proteasome inhibitors as potential candidates for therapeutic modulation of angiogenesis and inflammation. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Regulation of Mitochondrial Genome Inheritance by Autophagy and Ubiquitin-Proteasome System: Implications for Health, Fitness, and Fertility

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    Won-Hee Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria, the energy-generating organelles, play a role in numerous cellular functions including adenosine triphosphate (ATP production, cellular homeostasis, and apoptosis. Maternal inheritance of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA is universally observed in humans and most animals. In general, high levels of mitochondrial heteroplasmy might contribute to a detrimental effect on fitness and disease resistance. Therefore, a disposal of the sperm-derived mitochondria inside fertilized oocytes assures normal preimplantation embryo development. Here we summarize the current research and knowledge concerning the role of autophagic pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent proteolysis in sperm mitophagy in mammals, including humans. Current data indicate that sperm mitophagy inside the fertilized oocyte could occur along multiple degradation routes converging on autophagic clearance of paternal mitochondria. The influence of assisted reproductive therapies (ART such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, mitochondrial replacement (MR, and assisted fertilization of oocytes from patients of advanced reproductive age on mitochondrial function, inheritance, and fitness and for the development and health of ART babies will be of particular interest to clinical audiences. Altogether, the study of sperm mitophagy after fertilization has implications in the timing of evolution and developmental and reproductive biology and in human health, fitness, and management of mitochondrial disease.

  6. Regulation of mitochondrial genome inheritance by autophagy and ubiquitin-proteasome system: implications for health, fitness, and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Hee; Ballard, John William Oman; Yi, Young-Joo; Sutovsky, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria, the energy-generating organelles, play a role in numerous cellular functions including adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, cellular homeostasis, and apoptosis. Maternal inheritance of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is universally observed in humans and most animals. In general, high levels of mitochondrial heteroplasmy might contribute to a detrimental effect on fitness and disease resistance. Therefore, a disposal of the sperm-derived mitochondria inside fertilized oocytes assures normal preimplantation embryo development. Here we summarize the current research and knowledge concerning the role of autophagic pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent proteolysis in sperm mitophagy in mammals, including humans. Current data indicate that sperm mitophagy inside the fertilized oocyte could occur along multiple degradation routes converging on autophagic clearance of paternal mitochondria. The influence of assisted reproductive therapies (ART) such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), mitochondrial replacement (MR), and assisted fertilization of oocytes from patients of advanced reproductive age on mitochondrial function, inheritance, and fitness and for the development and health of ART babies will be of particular interest to clinical audiences. Altogether, the study of sperm mitophagy after fertilization has implications in the timing of evolution and developmental and reproductive biology and in human health, fitness, and management of mitochondrial disease.

  7. Curcumin Promotes KLF5 Proteasome Degradation through Downregulating YAP/TAZ in Bladder Cancer Cells

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    Yang Gao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available KLF5 (Krüppel-like factor 5 plays critical roles in normal and cancer cell proliferation through modulating cell cycle progression. In this study, we demonstrated that curcumin targeted KLF5 by promoting its proteasome degradation, but not by inhibiting its transcription in bladder cancer cells. We also demonstrated that lentivirus-based knockdown of KLF5 inhibited cancer cell growth, while over-expression of a Flag-tagged KLF5 could partially reverse the effects of curcumin on cell growth and cyclin D1 expression. Furthermore, we found that curcumin could down-regulate the expression of Hippo pathway effectors, YAP and TAZ, which have been reported to protect KLF5 protein from degradation. Indeed, knockdown of YAP by small interfering RNA caused the attenuation of KLF5 protein, but not KLF5 mRNA, which was reversed by co-incubation with proteasome inhibitor. A xenograft assay in nude mice finally proved the potent inhibitory effects of curcumin on tumor growth and the pro-proliferative YAP/TAZ/KLF5/cyclin D1 axis. Thus, our data indicates that curcumin promotes KLF5 proteasome-dependent degradation through targeting YAP/TAZ in bladder cancer cells and also suggests the therapeutic potential of curcumin in the treatment of bladder cancer.

  8. Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the cerebellum of aging Ts65Dn mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necchi, Daniela; Lomoio, Selene; Scherini, Elda

    2011-12-01

    In the cerebellum of adult-aging Ts65Dn mice, a murine model of Down syndrome, Purkinje cells undergo degeneration. Searching for the cause of Purkinje cell degeneration, we have studied the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in the cerebellum of aging Ts65Dn mice. Inhibition of UPS is sufficient to induce neuron degeneration and death. Proteasome chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity was reduced by 35% in the cerebellum of Ts65Dn mice in comparison with euploid animals. Accordingly, Western blot analysis of ubiquitin showed an increase in ubiquitinated proteins. Immunocytochemistry for ubiquitin revealed strongly positive intranuclear inclusions in Purkinje cells and large neurons of cerebellar nuclei. The Western blot analysis of ubiquitin in nuclear protein extracts confirmed the increase of ubiquitinated proteins in the cell nuclei. After FUS immunocytochemistry, large intranuclear inclusions were visible in Purkinje cells and large neurons of cerebellar nuclei in Ts65Dn mice. Together, data indicate a possible role for proteasome inhibition in the cerebellar neurodegeneration in Ts65Dn mice.

  9. Discovery of new [Formula: see text] proteasome inhibitors using a knowledge-based computational screening approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Rukmankesh; Chib, Reena; Munagala, Gurunadham; Yempalla, Kushalava Reddy; Khan, Inshad Ali; Singh, Parvinder Pal; Khan, Farrah Gul; Nargotra, Amit

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria cause deadly infections in patients [Corrected]. The rise of multidrug resistance associated with tuberculosis further makes the situation worse in treating the disease. M. tuberculosis proteasome is necessary for the pathogenesis of the bacterium validated as an anti-tubercular target, thus making it an attractive enzyme for designing Mtb inhibitors. In this study, a computational screening approach was applied to identify new proteasome inhibitor candidates from a library of 50,000 compounds. This chemical library was procured from the ChemBridge (20,000 compounds) and the ChemDiv (30,000 compounds) databases. After a detailed analysis of the computational screening results, 50 in silico hits were retrieved and tested in vitro finding 15 compounds with [Formula: see text] values ranging from 35.32 to 64.15 [Formula: see text]M on lysate. A structural analysis of these hits revealed that 14 of these compounds probably have non-covalent mode of binding to the target and have not reported for anti-tubercular or anti-proteasome activity. The binding interactions of all the 14 protein-inhibitor complexes were analyzed using molecular docking studies. Further, molecular dynamics simulations of the protein in complex with the two most promising hits were carried out so as to identify the key interactions and validate the structural stability.

  10. Augmentation of fear extinction by D-cycloserine is blocked by proteasome inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Sheng-Chun; Lin, Hui-Ching; Gean, Po-Wu

    2008-12-01

    D-Cycloserine (DCS) has been shown to facilitate extinction of conditioned fear in rats and to improve fear reduction of social phobia and fear of heights in human studies. Here, we investigate the mechanism of DCS effect by measuring internalized GluR1 and GluR2 using cell-surface biotinylation techniques. DCS selectively increased NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic response without affecting AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic response. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) when applied in the presence of DCS induced GluR1 and GluR2 internalization in the amygdala slices. Proteasome inhibitors block DCS facilitation of LFS-induced depotentiation and a reduction in surface levels of GluR1 and GluR2. Furthermore, DCS in combination with LFS reduced cellular levels of PSD-95 and synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP97), which were also blocked by proteasome inhibitors. In the in vivo experiments, DCS-induced reduction of fear-potentiated startle and reversal of conditioning-induced increase in surface expression of GluR1 were blocked by proteasome inhibitors. DCS-treated rats fail to exhibit reinstatement after US-alone presentations. These results suggest that DCS facilitates receptor internalization in the presence of extinction training, resulting in augmented reduction of startle potentiation.

  11. The Ginkgo biloba Extract EGb 761 Modulates Proteasome Activity and Polyglutamine Protein Aggregation

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    Marcel Stark

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The standardized Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761 has well-described antioxidative activities and effects on different cytoprotective signaling pathways. Consequently, a potential use of EGb 761 in neurodegenerative diseases has been proposed. A common characteristic feature of a variety of such disorders is the pathologic formation of protein aggregates, suggesting a crucial role for protein homeostasis. In this study, we show that EGb 761 increased the catalytic activity of the proteasome and enhanced protein degradation in cultured cells. We further investigated this effect in a cellular model of Huntington’s disease (HD by employing cells expressing pathologic variants of a polyglutamine protein (polyQ protein. We show that EGb 761 affected these cells by (i increasing proteasome activity and (ii inducing a more efficient degradation of aggregation-prone proteins. These results demonstrate a novel activity of EGb 761 on protein aggregates by enhancing proteasomal protein degradation, suggesting a therapeutic use in neurodegenerative disorders with a disturbed protein homeostasis.

  12. The effects of proteasome inhibitor lactacystin on mouse oocyte meiosis and first cleavage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Xin; PENG An; WANG Yongchao; TANG Zuoqing

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the effects of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) on mouse oocyte meiosis and cleavage, oocytes undergoing maturation and parthenogenetic activation and 1-cell embryos were treated with lactacystin, a specific inhibitor of proteasome. The results indicared that the rate of GVBD was not influenced by the treatment, but polar body extrusion, parthenogenesis and first cleavage were inhibited. Immunofluorescent staining using anti β-tubulin antibody indicated that the continuous treatment of lactacystin from GV stage disorganized microtubules and spindle assembly. When metaphase stage oocytes were treated with the drug,the already formed spindle structure was not affected, but the oocytes were arrested at metaphases. The 1-cell embryos were arrested at interphase or metaphase of first mitosis when they were incubated in the drug. Proteasome regulatory subunit PA700 was located in the spindle region, as indicated by immunofluorescence. These results suggest that UPP has effects on the process of oocyte meiosis and early cleavage in many aspects, including normal organization of spindle at prophase and segregation of chromosomes at anaphase for normal meiosis.

  13. Integrated analysis of microarray data of atherosclerotic plaques: modulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a typical complex multi-factorial disease and many molecules at different levels and pathways were involved in its development. Some studies have investigated the dysregulation in atherosclerosis at mRNA, miRNA or DNA methylation level, respectively. However, to our knowledge, the studies that integrated these data and revealed the abnormal networks of atherosclerosis have not been reported. Using microarray technology, we analyzed the omics data in atherosclerosis at mRNA, miRNA and DNA methylation levels. Our results demonstrated that the global DNA methylation and expression of miRNA/mRNA were significantly decreased in atherosclerotic plaque than in normal vascular tissue. The interaction network constructed using the integrative data revealed many genes, cellular processes and signaling pathways which were widely considered to play crucial roles in atherosclerosis and also revealed some genes, miRNAs or signaling pathways which have not been investigated in atherosclerosis until now (e.g. miR-519d and SNTB2. Moreover, the overall protein ubiquitination in atherosclerotic plaque was significantly increased. The proteasome activity was increased early but decreased in advanced atherosclerosis. Our study revealed many classic and novel genes and miRNAs involved in atherosclerosis and indicated the effects of ubiquitin-proteasome system on atherosclerosis might be closely related to the course of atherosclerosis. However, the efficacy of proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of atherosclerosis still needs more research.

  14. Compromised proteasome degradation elevates neuronal nitric oxide synthase levels and induces apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Philip Y; Cadenas, Enrique

    2008-10-15

    The significance of impairment of proteasome activity in PC12 cells was examined in connection with nitrative/nitrosative stress and apoptotic cell death. Treatment of differentiated PC12 cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, elicited a dose- and time-dependent increase in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) protein levels, decreased cell viability, and increased cytotoxicity. Viability and cytotoxicity were ameliorated by L-NAME (a broad NOS inhibitor). Nitric oxide/peroxynitrite formation was increased upon treatment of PC12 cells with MG132 and decreased upon treatment with the combination of MG132 and 7-NI (a specific inhibitor of nNOS). The decreases in cell viability appeared to be effected by an activation of JNK and its effect on mitochondrial Bcl-x(L) phosphorylation. These effects are strengthened by the activation of caspase-9 along with increased caspase-3 activity upon treatment of PC12 cells with MG132. These results suggest that impairment of proteasome activity and consequent increases in nNOS levels lead to a nitrative stress that involves the coordinated response of JNK cytosolic signaling and mitochondrion-driven apoptotic pathways.

  15. Synthesis and biological activity of peptide proline-boronic acids as proteasome inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Liqiang; Wen, Yanzhao; Li, Ridong; Xu, Bo; Ge, Zemei; Wang, Xin; Cheng, Tieming; Cui, Jingrong; Li, Runtao

    2017-08-01

    On the basis of the application of proline-boronic acid as pharmacophore in the kinase inhibitors and our previous research results, using proline-boronic acid as warhead, two series of peptide proline-boronic acids, dipeptide proline-boronic acids (I) and tripeptide proline-boronic acids (II), were designed and synthesized. All the synthesized compounds were first evaluated for their biological activity against MGC803 cell, and then, the best compound II-7 was selected to test its anti-tumor spectrum on six human tumor cell lines and proteasome inhibition against three subunits. The results indicated that series II have much better biological activities than series I. The compound II-7 exhibited not only excellent biological activities with IC50 values of nM level in both cell and proteasome models, but also much better subunit selectivity. Thus, proline-boronic acid as warhead is reasonable in the design of proteasome inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analyzing proteasomal subunit expression reveals Rpt4 as a prognostic marker in stage II colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer is the key to improving survival rates and as such a need exists to identify patients who may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. The dysregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been implicated in oncogenesis and cancer cell survival, and proteasome inhibitors are in clinical use for a number of malignancies including multiple myeloma. In our study, we examined the protein expression of several key components of the UPS in colorectal cancer using immunohistochemistry to determine expression levels of ubiquitinylated proteins and the proteasomal subunits, 20S core and Rpt4 in a cohort of 228 patients with colon cancer. Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that neither the intensity of either ubiquitinylated proteins or the 20S core was predictive in either Stage II or III colon cancer for disease free survival or overall survival. In contrast, in Stage II patients increased Rpt4 staining was significantly associated with disease free survival (Cox proportional hazard ratio 0.605; p = 0.0217). Our data suggest that Rpt4 is an independent prognostic variable for Stage II colorectal cancer and may aid in the decision of which patients undergo adjuvant chemotherapy.

  17. Different Stability and Proteasome-Mediated Degradation Rate of SMN Protein Isoforms.

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    Denise Locatelli

    Full Text Available The key pathogenic steps leading to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, a genetic disease characterized by selective motor neuron degeneration, are not fully clarified. The full-length SMN protein (FL-SMN, the main protein product of the disease gene SMN1, plays an established role in the cytoplasm in snRNP biogenesis ultimately leading to mRNA splicing within the nucleus. It is also involved in the mRNA axonal transport. However, to what extent the impairment of these two SMN functions contributes to SMA pathogenesis remains unknown. A shorter SMN isoform, axonal-SMN or a-SMN, with more specific axonal localization, has been discovered, but whether it might act in concert with FL-SMN in SMA pathogenesis is not known. As a first step in defining common or divergent intracellular roles of FL-SMN vs a-SMN proteins, we here characterized the turn-over of both proteins and investigated which pathway contributed to a-SMN degradation. We performed real time western blot and confocal immunofluorescence analysis in easily controllable in vitro settings. We analyzed co-transfected NSC34 and HeLa cells and cell clones stably expressing both a-SMN and FL-SMN proteins after specific blocking of transcript or protein synthesis and inhibition of known intracellular degradation pathways. Our data indicated that whereas the stability of both FL-SMN and a-SMN transcripts was comparable, the a-SMN protein was characterized by a much shorter half-life than FL-SMN. In addition, as already demonstrated for FL-SMN, the Ub/proteasome pathway played a major role in the a-SMN protein degradation. We hypothesize that the faster degradation rate of a-SMN vs FL-SMN is related to the protection provided by the protein complex in which FL-SMN is assembled. The diverse a-SMN vs FL-SMN C-terminus may dictate different protein interactions and complex formation explaining the different localization and role in the neuronal compartment, and the lower expression and stability of a-SMN.

  18. Impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway by methyl N-(6-phenylsulfanyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)carbamate leads to a potent cytotoxic effect in tumor cells: a novel antiproliferative agent with a potential therapeutic implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Nilambra; Mukhopadhyay, Tapas

    2012-08-31

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in proteasome inhibitors as a novel class of anticancer drugs. We report that fenbendazole (FZ) (methyl N-(6-phenylsulfanyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)carbamate) exhibits a potent growth-inhibitory activity against cancer cell lines but not normal cells. We show here, using fluorogenic substrates, that FZ treatment leads to the inhibition of proteasomal activity in the cells. Succinyl-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-methylcoumarinamide (MCA), benzyloxycarbonyl-Leu-Leu-Glu-7-amido-4-MCA, and t-butoxycarbonyl-Gln-Ala-Arg-7-amido-4-MCA fluorescent derivatives were used to assess chymotrypsin-like, post-glutamyl peptidyl-hydrolyzing, and trypsin-like protease activities, respectively. Non-small cell lung cancer cells transiently transfected with an expression plasmid encoding pd1EGFP and treated with FZ showed an accumulation of the green fluorescent protein in the cells due to an increase in its half-life. A number of apoptosis regulatory proteins that are normally degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway like cyclins, p53, and IκBα were found to be accumulated in FZ-treated cells. In addition, FZ induced distinct ER stress-associated genes like GRP78, GADD153, ATF3, IRE1α, and NOXA in these cells. Thus, treatment of human NSCLC cells with fenbendazole induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, reactive oxygen species production, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and cytochrome c release that eventually led to cancer cell death. This is the first report to demonstrate the inhibition of proteasome function and induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress/reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis in human lung cancer cell lines by fenbendazole, which may represent a new class of anticancer agents showing selective toxicity against cancer cells.

  19. A New Isolate of the Genus Malassezia Based on the Sequence Analysis of 26S and ITS1 in Ribosomal DNA

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    Hossein Mirhendi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Malassezia species considered to be the etiological agents of pityriasis versicolor andMalassezia follicolitis in humans. Recently, on the basis of molecular data, four new specieswere added to the genus. In total, 11 species have been described and accepted sofar. In this study we describe a new isolate of Malassezia based on the nucleotide sequenceof 26SrDNA and ITS1 regions, as the accepted critical markers for description ofthe species.The yeast was isolated from a hamster. Two primer pairs, one for amplification of D1/D2-26Sr DNA and another for the ITS1 region were used in PCR. The PCR products weresequenced and analyzed to compare with other similar sequences which are already depositedin the GenBank. The 26SrDNA PCR product was also digested with the restrictionenzyme CfoI.Malassezia-specific universal primer pairs successfully amplified the 26srDNA and ITS1regions of the new isolate, providing a single PCR product of about 580 and 280 basepairs, respectively. After digestion of the 26s PCR product with the enzyme CfoI, a uniqueand different RFLP pattern was observed. Sequence analysis of D1/D226s and ITS1 regionswere compared with the same regions in all already described Malassezia species,which implied a different and unique new sequences. The phylogenetic tree of both regionsshowed that the isolate could be a different Malassezia isolate.Regarding the new RFLP pattern of D1/D226SrDBA and the unique nucleotide sequence ofboth D1/D2 26SrDNA and ITS1 regions, we propose the isolate to be a new Malassezia.

  20. Inhibition of autophagy induced by proteasome inhibition increases cell death in human SHG-44 glioma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-fei GE; Ji-zhou ZHANG; Xiao-fei WANG; Fan-kai MENG; Wen-chen LI; Yong-xin LUAN; Feng LING; Yi-nan LUO

    2009-01-01

    Aim:The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and lysosome-dependent macroautophagy (autophagy) are two major intracellular pathways for protein degradation.Recent studies suggest that proteasome inhibitors may reduce tumor growth and activate autophagy.Due to the dual roles of autophagy in tumor cell survival and death,the effect of autophagy on the destiny of glioma cells remains unclear.In this study,we sought to investigate whether inhibition of the proteasome can induce autophagy and the effects of autophagy on the fate of human SHG-44 glioma cells.Methods:The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 was used to induce autophagy in SHG-44 glioma cells,and the effect of autophagy on the survival of SHG-44 glioma cells was investigated using an autophagy inhibitor 3-MA.Cell viability was measured by MTT assay.Apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry.The expression of autophagy related proteins was determined by Western blot.Results:MG-132 inhibited cell proliferation,induced cell death and cell cycle arrest at G~JM phase,and activated autophagy in SHG-44 glioma cells.The expression of autophagy-related Beclin-1 and LC3-1 was significantly up-regulated and part of LC3-1 was converted into LC3-11.However,when SHG-44 glioma cells were co-treated with MG-132 and 3-MA,the cells became less viable,but cell death and cell numbers at G2/M phase increased.Moreover,the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles was decreased,the expression of Beclin-1 and LC3 was significantly down-regulated and the conversion of LC3-11 from LC3-1 was also inhibited.Conclusion:Inhibition of the proteasome can induce autophagy in human SHG-44 glioma cells,and inhibition of autophagy increases cell death.This discovery may shed new light on the effect of autophagy on modulating the fate of SHG-44 glioma cells.