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Sample records for 20th hadron collider

  1. The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium in Evian

    CERN Multimedia

    Ludwik Dobrzynski and Emmanuel Tsesmelis

    The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian from 16 to 20 November 2009. The Hadron Collider Physics Symposium series has been a major forum for presentations of physics at the Tevatron over the past two decades. The merger of the former Topical Conference on Hadron Collider Physics with the LHC Symposium in 2005 brought together the Tevatron and LHC communities in a single forum. The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian, on the shores of Lake Geneva, from 16-20 November 2009, some 17 years after the historic ECFA-CERN Evian meeting in March 1992 when Expressions of Interest for LHC detectors were presented for the first time. The 2009 event was organized jointly by CERN and the French high-energy physics community (CNRS-IN2P3 and CEA-IRFU). More than 170 people registered for this symposium. This year’s symposium was held at an important time for both the Tevatron and the LHC. It stimulated the completion of analyses for a significant Tevatron data sam...

  2. Hadron Colliders and Hadron Collider Physics Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisov D.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes main developments of the hadron colliders and physics results obtained since their inception around forty years ago. The increase in the collision energy of over two orders of magnitude and even larger increases in luminosity provided experiments with unique data samples. Developments of full acceptance detectors, particle identification and analysis methods provided fundamental discoveries and ultra-precise measurements which culminated in the completion and in depth verification of the Standard Model. Hadron Collider Physics symposium provided opportunities for those working at hadron colliders to share results of their research since 1979 and helped greatly to develop the field of particle physics.

  3. Hadron Colliders and Hadron Collider Physics Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes main developments of the hadron colliders and physics results obtained since their inception around forty years ago. The increase in the collision energy of over two orders of magnitude and even larger increases in luminosity provided experiments with unique data samples. Developments of full acceptance detectors, particle identification and analysis methods provided fundamental discoveries and ultra-precise measurements which culminated in the completion and in depth verification of the Standard Model. Hadron Collider Physics symposium provided opportunities for those working at hadron colliders to share results of their research since 1979 and helped greatly to develop the field of particle physics.

  4. Hadron collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs

  5. Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In the spring 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine at CERN (the European Particle Physics laboratory) will be switched on for the first time. The huge machine is housed in a circular tunnel, 27 km long, excavated deep under the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1,5 page)

  6. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  7. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Wright, Alison

    2007-01-01

    "We are on the threshold of a new era in particle-physics research. In 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - the hightest-energy accelerator ever built - will come into operation at CERN, the European labortory that straddles the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1/2 page)

  8. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Juettner Fernandes, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    What really happened during the Big Bang? Why did matter form? Why do particles have mass? To answer these questions, scientists and engineers have worked together to build the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world: the Large Hadron Collider. Includes glossary, websites, and bibliography for further reading. Perfect for STEM connections. Aligns to the Common Core State Standards for Language Arts. Teachers' Notes available online.

  9. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon

    2012-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavour spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing large electron–positron (LEP) collider tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8 m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of a two-in-one magnet, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact two-in-one structure was essential for the LHC owing to the limited space available in the existing LEP collider tunnel and the cost. The second was a bold move to the use of superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor.

  10. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e+-e- collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2γ at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines

  11. Bottomonium production in hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner Mariotto, C; Ingelman, G; 10.1142/S0217732304013532

    2004-01-01

    Production of bottomonium in hadronic collisions is studied in the framework of the soft colour approach. We report some results for production of Upsilon in the Tevatron and predictions for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  12. Bottomonium production in hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner Mariotto, C. [Universidade de Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia]. E-mail: mariotto@if.ufrgs.br; Gay Ducati, M.B. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Fenomenologia de Particulas em Altas Energias; Ingelman, G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). High Energy Physics

    2004-07-01

    Production of bottomonium in hadronic collisions is studied in the framework of the soft colour approach. We report some results for production of {upsilon} in the Tevatron and predictions for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC). (author)

  13. High energy hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The more novel and important design considerations and features of high energy hadron colliders (pp or p anti p) are discussed. The paper does not attempt to be sufficient for making a complete design, but contains enough references to other papers necessary for doing so. Formulas are generally given without derivation, and notations are not consistent from section to section. For most formulas the derivation is transparent although the mathematics may be lengthy. Whenever obscure, an explanation of the procedure for derivation will be given in physical terms. Detailed mathematical derivations can be found in the references. 10 references

  14. Physics at future hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U. Baur et al.

    2002-12-23

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  15. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  16. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument.

  17. Physics at hadron colliders: Experimental view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegrist, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    The physics of the hadron-hadron collider experiment is considered from an experimental point of view. The problems encountered in determination of how well the standard model describes collider results are discussed. 53 refs., 58 figs.

  18. QCD at high-luminosity hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hautmann, F

    2016-01-01

    This talk gives a brief introduction to open questions in jet physics and QCD which come to the fore in the high-luminosity regime characterizing the upcoming phase of the Large Hadron Collider and future hadron colliders.

  19. Hard QCD at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moch, S.

    2008-02-15

    We review the status of QCD at hadron colliders with emphasis on precision predictions and the latest theoretical developments for cross sections calculations to higher orders. We include an overview of our current information on parton distributions and discuss various Standard Model reactions such as W{sup {+-}}/Z-boson, Higgs boson or top quark production. (orig.)

  20. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument. It is being constructed by the European Organization for Nuclear Research, one of the world's largest particle physics laboratories.

  1. The very large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This paper reviews the purposes to be served by a very large hadron collider and the organization and coordination of efforts to bring it about. There is some discussion of magnet requirements and R&D and the suitability of the Fermilab site.

  2. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    't Hooft, Gerardus; Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert; Brüning, Oliver Sim; Collier, Paul; Stapnes, Steinar; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Stachel, Johanna; Lederman, Leon Max

    2007-01-01

    Several articles about the LHC: The Making of the standard model; high-energy colliders and the rise of the standard model; How the LHC came to be; Building a behemoth; Detector challenges at the LHC; Beyond the standard model with the LHC; The quest for the quark-gluon plasma; The God particle et al. (42 pages

  3. Why Large Hadron Collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D P Roy

    2011-05-01

    I discuss LHC physics in the historical perspective of the progress in particle physics. After a recap of the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics, I discuss the high energy colliders leading up to LHC and their role in the discovery of these SM particles. Then I discuss the two main physics issues of LHC, i.e. Higgs mechanism and supersymmetry. I briefly touch upon Higgs and SUSY searches at LHC along with their cosmological implications.

  4. Exotic Hadron Bound State Production at Hadronic Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Yi; Liu, Yan-Rui; Meng, Lu; Si, Zon-Guo; Zhang, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The non-relativistic wave function framework is applied to study the production and decay of the exotic hadrons which can be effectively described as bound states of other hadrons. The ingredient hadron production can be calculated by event generators. We investigate the production of exotic hadrons in the multiproduction processes at high energy hadronic colliders with the help of the event generators. We illustrate the crucial information such as their momentum distributions and production rate for the measurements at the large hadron collider. This study provides crucial information for the measurements of the relevant exotic hadrons.

  5. Testing Saturation at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Marquet, C

    2003-01-01

    We extend the saturation models a la Golec-Biernat and Wusthoff to cross-sections of hard processes initiated by virtual-gluon probes separated by large rapidity intervals at hadron colliders. We derive their analytic expressions and apply them to physical examples, such as saturation effects for Mueller-Navelet jets. By comparison to gamma*-gamma* cross-sections we find a more abrupt transition to saturation. We propose to study observables with a potentially clear saturation signal and to use heavy vector and flavored mesons as alternative virtual-gluon probes.

  6. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Albert De Roeck

    2012-10-01

    New results on top quark production are presented from four hadron collider experiments: CDF and D0 at the Tevatron, and ATLAS and CMS at the LHC. Cross-sections for single top and top pair production are discussed, as well as results on the top–antitop production asymmetry and searches for new physics including top quarks. The results are based on data samples of up to 5.4 fb-1 for the Tevatron experiments and 1.1 fb−1 for the LHC experiments.

  7. High Energy Hadron Colliders - Report of the Snowmass 2013 Frontier Capabilities Hadron Collider Study Group

    OpenAIRE

    Barletta, William; Battaglia, Marco; Klute, Markus; Mangano, Michelangelo; Prestemon, Soren; Rossi, Lucio; Skands, Peter

    2013-01-01

    High energy hadron colliders have been the tools for discovery at the highest mass scales of the energy frontier from the SppS, to the Tevatron and now the LHC. This report reviews future hadron collider projects from the high luminosity LHC upgrade to a 100 TeV hadron collider in a large tunnel, the underlying technology challenges and R&D directions and presents a series of recommendations for the future development of hadron collider research and technology.

  8. Bilepton production at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, B.; Grégoire, T.; London, D.; Marleau, L.; Nadeau, H.

    1999-04-01

    We examine, as model-independently as possible, the production of bileptons at hadron colliders. When a particular model is necessary or useful, we choose the 3-3-1 model. We consider a variety of processes: qq¯-->Y++Y--, ud¯-->Y++Y-, ūd-->Y+Y--, qq¯-->Y++e-e-, qq¯-->φ++φ--, ud¯-->φ++φ-, and ūd-->φ+φ--, where Y and φ are vector and scalar bileptons, respectively. Given the present low-energy constraints, we find that, at the Fermilab Tevatron, vector bileptons are unobservable, while light scalar bileptons (Mφ<~300 GeV) are just barely observable. At the CERN LHC, the reach is extended considerably: vector bileptons of mass MY<~1 TeV are observable, as are scalar bileptons of mass Mφ<~850 GeV.

  9. Whither colliders after the Large Hadron Collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rolf-Dieter Heuer

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy as well as upgrades to the LHC (luminosity and energy) and to its injectors. This may be complemented by a linear electron–positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and by the International Linear Collider, by a high-energy electron– proton machine, the LHeC, and/or by a muon collider. This contribution describes the various future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining the key messages for the way forward.

  10. Preparing for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Appleton, Owen

    2007-01-01

    "Processing data for the Large Hadron Collider, the next-generation particle accelerator under construction at CERN, Switzerland, is one of the driving forces for development of Grid technology." (1 page)

  11. Top Quark Studies at Hadron Colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Sinervo, Pekka K.

    1996-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b-quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DZero collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yield...

  12. Academic Training Lecture: Jets at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Programme 30, 31 March and 1 April  2011 from 11:00 to 12:00 -  Bldg. 40-S2-A01 - Salle Andersson Jets at Hadron Colliders by Gavin Salam These three lectures will discuss how jets are defined at hadron colliders, the physics that is responsible for the internal structure of jets and the ways in which an understanding of jets may help in searches for new particles at the LHC.

  13. Forward physics of hadronic colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These lectures were given at the Baikal Summer School on Physics of Elementary Particles and Astrophysics in July 2012. They can be viewed as a concise introduction to hadronic diffraction, to the physics of the pomeron and related topics

  14. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinervo, P.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  15. Single sneutrino production at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chaichian, Masud; Huitu, K; Roy, S; Yu, Z; Chaichian, Masud; Datta, Anindya; Huitu, Katri; Roy, Sourov; Yu, Zenghui

    2004-01-01

    We study the production of a single sneutrino in association with one or two $b$-quarks at hadron colliders, in the framework of an R-parity violating supersymmetric model. We find that at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) four $b$ final states are promising with efficient b-tagging. $l^+l'^-$ decay modes of the sneutrino can also be viable for detection at the LHC. However, the branching ratio for rare $\\gamma\\gamma$ decay channel is too small to be seen.

  16. Introduction to quantum chromodynamics at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    William B Kilgore

    2011-05-01

    A basic introduction to the application of QCD at hadron colliders is presented. I briefly review the phenomenological and theoretical origins of QCD, and then discuss factorization and infrared safety, parton distributions, the computation of hard scattering amplitudes and applications of perturbative QCD.

  17. Supersymmetric particle production at hadron colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Krämer, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The theoretical status of MSSM particle production at the hadron colliders Tevatron and LHC is reviewed, including next-to-leading order supersymmetric QCD corrections. The higher-order corrections significantly reduce the theoretical uncertainty and lead to a rise of the lower bounds on supersymmetric particle masses, as demonstrated for the case of top-squark and gaugino pair production at the Tevatron.

  18. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film "Angels and Demons." In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society…

  19. Experiments at future hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes signatures and backgrounds for processes in high-energy hadronic collisions, particularly at the SSC. It includes both signatures for new particles -- t quarks, Higgs bosons, new Ζ' bosons, supersymmetric particles, and technicolor particles -- and other experiments which might be done. It is based on the 1990 Snowmass Workshop and on work contained in the Expressions of Interest submitted to the SSC. 46 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  20. B Physics Theory for Hadron Colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Buchalla, G. , Cata, O. , Rahn, R.

    2008-01-01

    A short overview of theoretical methods for B physics at hadron colliders is presented. The main emphasis is on the theory of two-body hadronic B decays, which provide a rich field of investigation in particular for the Tevatron and the LHC. The subject holds both interesting theoretical challenges as well as many opportunities for flavor studies and new physics tests. A brief review of the current status and recent developments is given. A few additional topics in B physics are also mentioned.

  1. 1st Large Hadron Collider Physics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Juste, A; Martínez, M; Riu, I; Sorin, V

    2013-01-01

    The conference is the result of merging two series of international conferences, "Physics at Large Hadron Collider" (PLHC2012) and "Hadron Collider Physics Symposium" (HCP2012). With a program devoted to topics such as the Standard Model and Beyond, the Higgs Boson, Supersymmetry, Beauty and Heavy Ion Physics, the conference aims at providing a lively forum for discussion between experimenters and theorists of the latest results and of new ideas. LHCP 2013 will be hosted by IFAE (Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies) in Barcelona (Spain), and will take place from May 13 to 18, 2013. The venue will be the Hotel Catalonia Plaza, Plaza España (Barcelona). More information will be posted soon. For questions, please contact lhcp2013@ifae.es.

  2. Large Hadron Collider commissioning and first operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, S

    2012-02-28

    A history of the commissioning and the very successful early operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The accident that interrupted the first commissioning, its repair and the enhanced protection system put in place are fully described. The LHC beam commissioning and operational performance are reviewed for the period from 2010 to mid-2011. Preliminary plans for operation and future upgrades for the LHC are given for the short and medium term.

  3. String Resonances at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Dai, De-Chang; Feng, Wan-Zhe; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lust, Dieter; Stojkovic, Dejan; Taylor, Tomasz R

    2014-01-01

    [Abridged] We consider extensions of the standard model based on open strings ending on D-branes. Assuming that the fundamental string mass scale M_s is in the TeV range and that the theory is weakly coupled, we discuss possible signals of string physics at the upcoming HL-LHC run (3000 fb^{-1}) with \\sqrt{s} = 14 TeV, and at potential future pp colliders, HE-LHC and VLHC, operating at \\sqrt{s} = 33 and 100 TeV, respectively. In such D-brane constructions, the dominant contributions to full-fledged string amplitudes for all the common QCD parton subprocesses leading to dijets and \\gamma + jet are completely independent of the details of compactification, and can be evaluated in a parameter-free manner. We make use of these amplitudes evaluated near the first (n=1) and second (n=2) resonant poles to determine the discovery potential for Regge excitations of the quark, the gluon, and the color singlet living on the QCD stack. We show that for string scales as large as 7.1 TeV (6.1 TeV), lowest massive Regge exc...

  4. String resonances at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Antoniadis, Ignatios; Dai, De-Chang; Feng, Wan-Zhe; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lüst, Dieter; Stojkovic, Dejan; Taylor, Tomasz R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider extensions of the standard model based on open strings ending on D-branes, with gauge bosons due to strings attached to stacks of D-branes and chiral matter due to strings stretching between intersecting D-branes. Assuming that the fundamental string mass scale Ms is in the TeV range and that the theory is weakly coupled, we discuss possible signals of string physics at the upcoming HL-LHC run (integrated luminosity =3000 fb-1) with a center-of-mass energy of √s =14 TeV and at potential future pp colliders, HE-LHC and VLHC, operating at √s =33 and 100 TeV, respectively (with the same integrated luminosity). In such D-brane constructions, the dominant contributions to full-fledged string amplitudes for all the common QCD parton subprocesses leading to dijets and γ +jet are completely independent of the details of compactification and can be evaluated in a parameter-free manner. We make use of these amplitudes evaluated near the first (n=1) and second (n=2) resonant poles to determine the discovery potential for Regge excitations of the quark, the gluon, and the color singlet living on the QCD stack. We show that for string scales as large as 7.1 TeV (6.1 TeV) lowest massive Regge excitations are open to discovery at the ≥5σ in dijet (γ +jet) HL-LHC data. We also show that for n=1 the dijet discovery potential at HE-LHC and VLHC exceedingly improves: up to 15 TeV and 41 TeV, respectively. To compute the signal-to-noise ratio for n=2 resonances, we first carry out a complete calculation of all relevant decay widths of the second massive level string states (including decays into massless particles and a massive n=1 and a massless particle), where we rely on factorization and conformal field theory techniques. Helicity wave functions of arbitrary higher spin massive bosons are also constructed. We demonstrate that for string scales Ms≲10.5 TeV (Ms≲28 TeV) detection of n =2 Regge recurrences at HE-LHC (VLHC) would become the smoking gun for D

  5. Ntuples for NLO Events at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bern, Z; Cordero, F Febres; Hoeche, S; Ita, H; Kosower, D A; Maitre, D

    2014-01-01

    We present an event-file format for the dissemination of next-to-leading-order (NLO) predictions for QCD processes at hadron colliders. The files contain all information required to compute generic jet-based infrared-safe observables at fixed order (without showering or hadronization), and to recompute observables with different factorization and renormalization scales. The files also make it possible to evaluate cross sections and distributions with different parton distribution functions. This in turn makes it possible to estimate uncertainties in NLO predictions of a wide variety of observables without recomputing the short-distance matrix elements. The event files allow a user to choose among a wide range of commonly-used jet algorithms and jet-size parameters. We provide event files for a $W$ or $Z$ boson accompanied by up to four jets, and for pure-jet events with up to four jets. The files are for the Large Hadron Collider with a center of mass energy of 7 or 8 TeV. A C++ library along with a Python in...

  6. Black holes at the Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, S; Landsberg, G

    2001-10-15

    If the scale of quantum gravity is near TeV, the CERN Large Hadron Collider will be producing one black hole (BH) about every second. The decays of the BHs into the final states with prompt, hard photons, electrons, or muons provide a clean signature with low background. The correlation between the BH mass and its temperature, deduced from the energy spectrum of the decay products, can test Hawking's evaporation law and determine the number of large new dimensions and the scale of quantum gravity. PMID:11690198

  7. Geneva University - Kinematics at Hadron Colliders - POSTPONED!!!

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The seminar is postponed.Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 12 décembre 2007 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Kinematics at Hadron Colliders by Prof. Drew Baden, University of Maryland Information: http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer: J.-S. Graulich

  8. Higgs physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rohini M Godbole

    2011-05-01

    In this talk I shall begin by summarizing the importance of the Higgs physics studies at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). I shall then give a short description of the pre-LHC constraints on the Higgs mass and the theoretical predictions for the LHC along with a discussion of the current experimental results, ending with prospects in the near future at the LHC. I have added to the writeup, recent experimental results from the LHC which have become available since the time of the workshop.

  9. Measuring supersymmetry at the large hadron collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B C Allanach

    2003-02-01

    The large hadron collider (LHC) should have the ability to detect supersymmetric particles if low-energy supersymmetry solves the hierarchy problem. Studies of the LHC detection reach, and the ability to measure properties of supersymmetric particles are currently underway. We highlight some of these, such as the reach in minimal supergravity space and correlation with a fine-tuning parameter, precision measurements of edge variables, anomaly- or gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. Supersymmetry with baryon-number violation seems at first glance more difficult to detect, but proves to be possible by using leptons from cascade decays.

  10. Next generation IR magnets for hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, R; Cozzolino, J P; Escallier, J; Ganetis, G; Harrison, M; Wanderer, P J

    2003-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is developing "React & Wind" designs and technology for building long high field accelerator magnets. This paper presents the R&D program for interaction region (IR) magnets made with "Rutherford" cable for the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This paper will introduce a few new end design concepts that make the bend radius of the cable in the end independent of the coil aperture. These designs are suitable for building magnets with "React & Wind" technology. (6 refs).

  11. Searching for Top Squark at Hadron Colliders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jin-Min(杨金民); Young Bing-Lin

    2002-01-01

    In this talk we briefly summarise our recent study (hep-ph/0007165) on searching for top squark at hadron colliders. The light top-squark (stop) if produced in hadron colliders in the form of the t1t1 pair and decaying through the likely decay chain t1→X+b followed by X→X0ff′, can mimic closely a top quark event when the mass of the stop is close to that of the top quark. Because of the much lower production rate, the stop event can be buried under the top quark event sample. In order to uncover the stop event, specific selection cuts need to be applied. Through Monte Carlo simulation with suitable kinematic cuts, we found that such stop event can be extracted from the top quark sample and detected by the top counting experiments in the upcoming upgraded Tevatron and LHC. However, because of the small statistics of the Run 1 of the Tevatron, the stop signal remains hidden at Run 1.

  12. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the LCH workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentation and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol. 1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol. 2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol. 3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  13. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the LHC workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentaiton and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol. 1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol. 2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol. 3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  14. Large hadron collider workshop. Proceedings. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the LHC workshop at Aachen was to discuss the 'discovery potential' of a high-luminosity hadron collider (the Large Hadron Collider) and to define the requirements of the detectors. Of central interest was whether a Higgs particle with mass below 1 TeV could be seen using detectors potentially available within a few years from now. Other topics included supersymmetry, heavy quarks, excited gauge bosons, and exotica in proton-proton collisions, as well as physics to be observed in electron-proton and heavy-ion collisions. A large part of the workshop was devoted to the discussion of instrumental and detector concepts, including simulation, signal processing, data acquisition, tracking, calorimetry, lepton identification and radiation hardness. The workshop began with parallel sessions of working groups on physics and instrumentation and continued, in the second half, with plenary talks giving overviews of the LHC project and the SSC, RHIC, and HERA programmes, summaries of the working groups, presentations from industry, and conclusions. Vol.1 of these proceedings contains the papers presented at the plenary sessions, Vol.2 the individual contributions to the physics sessions, and Vol.3 those to the instrumentation sessions. (orig.)

  15. Mass reach scaling for future hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of any future hadron collider is to discover new physics (NP) associated with a high mass scale, M, beyond the range of the LHC. In order to maintain the same relative mass reach for rate-limited NP, M / √(s), as √(s) increases, Richter recently reminded us that the required integrated luminosity obtainable at future hadron colliders (FHC) must grow rapidly, ∝s, in the limit of naive scaling. This would imply, e.g., a ∝50-fold increase in the required integrated luminosity when going from the 14 TeV LHC to a FHC with √(s) = 100 TeV, an increase that would prove quite challenging on many different fronts. In this paper we point out, due to the scaling violations associated with the evolution of the parton density functions (PDFs) and the running of the strong coupling, αs, that the actual luminosity necessary in order to maintain any fixed value of the relative mass reach is somewhat greater than this scaling result indicates. However, the actual values of the required luminosity scaling are found to be dependent upon the detailed nature of the NP being considered. Here we elucidate this point explicitly by employing several specific benchmark examples of possible NP scenarios and briefly discuss the (relatively weak) search impact in each case if these luminosity goals are not met. (orig.)

  16. Illuminating New Electroweak States at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Ahmed; Shuve, Brian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Our proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. We demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.

  17. Illuminating new electroweak states at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Our proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. We demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.

  18. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Adzic, P; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Allanach, B; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Bruning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Caldwell, A; Cetinkaya, V; Chekelian, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; Roeck, A.De; d'Enterria, D; DiNezza, P; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Glazov, A; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jensen, E; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klees, R; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kraemer, M; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Milhano, J G; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinolfi, L; Rizvi, E; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schaefer, M; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; South, D; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Kate, H.Ten; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Thompson, P; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Ullrich, T; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F; CERN. Geneva. LHeC Department

    2012-01-01

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and electron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100) fb$^{-1}$. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  19. Triplet Higgs boson at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The novel feature of a Higgs-triplet representation is a nonzero tree-level coupling of H+W-Z, which is absent in all Higgs-doublet models. We study the associated production of a singly-charged Higgs boson of the Higgs-triplet representation with a W or Z boson at hadron colliders, followed by the H+→W+Z decay. We find that the 2l+4j final state gives an interesting level of signal with a negligible background, plus it allows a full mass reconstruction of the charged-Higgs boson. The cover range of the charged-Higgs mass is between 110 and 200 GeV. (author)

  20. Genesis of the Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chris Llewellyn

    2015-01-13

    This paper describes the scientific, technical and political genesis of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It begins with an outline of the early history of the LHC, from first thoughts and accelerator and detector developments that underwrote the project, through the first studies of the LHC and its scientific potential and the genesis of the experimental programme, to the presentation of the proposal to build the LHC to the CERN Council in December 1993. The events that led to the proposal to build the LHC in two stages, which was approved in December 1994, are then described. Next, the role of non-Member State contributions and of the agreement that CERN could take loans, which allowed single stage construction to be approved in December 1996, despite a cut in the Members' contributions, are explained. The paper concludes by identifying points of potential relevance for the approval of possible future large particle physics projects.

  1. Meeting of the Large Hadron Collider Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Provisional Agenda for the 111th meeting of the Large Hadron Collider Committee to be held on Wednesday and Thursday, 26-27 September 2012. Open Session: Wednesday, 26 September at 9 a.m. in the Main Auditorium (Bldg. 500-1-001)  09.00 - 09.20    LHC Machine Status Report  09.30 - 10.00    ATLAS Status Report  10.10 - 10.40    CMS Status Report  10.50 - 11.10    COFFEE BREAK 11.10 - 11.40    LHCb Status Report 11.50 - 12.20   ALICE Status Report 12.30 - 12.50   TOTEM Status Report 13.00 - 13.20   LHCf Status Report

  2. QCD and jets at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapeta, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We review various aspects of jet physics in the context of hadron colliders. We start by discussing the definitions and properties of jets and recent development in this area. We then consider the question of factorization for processes with jets, in particular for cases in which jets are produced in special configurations, like for example in the region of forward rapidities. We review numerous perturbative methods for calculating predictions for jet processes, including the fixed-order calculations as well as various matching and merging techniques. We also discuss the questions related to non-perturbative effects and the role they play in precision jet studies. We describe the status of calculations for processes with jet vetoes and we also elaborate on production of jets in forward direction. Throughout the article, we present selected comparisons between state-of-the-art theoretical predictions and the data from the LHC.

  3. Weak mixing angle measurements at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Di Simone, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Talk will cover weak mixing angle measurements at hadron colliders ATLAS and CMS in particular. ATLAS has measured the forward-backward asymmetry for the neutral current Drell Yan process in a wide mass range around the Z resonance region using dielectron and dimuon final states with $\\sqrt{s}$ =7 TeV data. For the dielectron channel, the measurement includes electrons detected in the forward calorimeter which extends the covered phase space. The result is then used to extract a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle. Uncertainties from the limited knowledge on the parton distribution functions in the proton constitute a significant part of the uncertainty and a dedicated study is performed to obtain a PDF set describing W and Z data measured previously by ATLAS. Similar studies from CMS will be reported.

  4. The Large Hadron Collider, a personal recollection

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, L

    2014-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavor spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing LEP tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of an idea first proposed by Bob Palmer at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1978, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact 2-in-1 structure was essential for the LHC due to both the limited space available in the existing Large Electron-Positron collider tunnel and the cost. The second innovation was the bold move to use superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor. In this article, no attempt is made to give a comprehensive review of the machine design. This can be found in the LHC Design Report {[}1], w...

  5. Large Hadron Collider slideshow shows future of physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Kramer, S E

    2007-01-01

    "The European organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) has been building the Large Hadron Collider for many years, but it's finally taking shape and prepping to operate at full power in 2008." (1/2 page)

  6. The ATLAS experiment at the CERN large hadron collider

    OpenAIRE

    Çetin, Serkant Ali; ATLAS Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS detector as installed in its experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN is described in this paper. A brief overview of the expected performance of the detector when the Large Hadron Collider begins operation is also presented.

  7. Transverse Diagnostics For High Energy Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Castro Carballo, Maria Elena

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a circular synchrotron accelerator that will explore new Physics at the higher energies ever achieved, aiming to find the Higgs boson. The LHC is being built at CERN and by 2007 it will be ready to produce head-on collisions of protons at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. The employment of superconducting magnets for achieving high energies, the high luminosity required for physics, the limited dynamic aperture and the large energy stored in the beams will make the machine very challenging to operate, especially during the injection process and the energy ramp. Two particular problems will be a high sensitivity to beam losses and a relatively poor field quality requiring the use of many types of magnetic correction elements. This may lead to the inclusion of certain beam measurements in feedback loops, making special demands on the control system. The injection and acceleration of the LHC proton beams without particle losses and emittance blow up will require an accurate co...

  8. Luminosity Measurement at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Caron, B L; Pinfold, J L

    2006-01-01

    Two novel methods of measuring the luminosity delivered to the ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider experiments are presented. The production of $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ pair via two photon interactions and single $W^{\\pm}/Z^{0}$ boson production are evaluated as methods for the measurement and monitoring of the proton-proton luminosity at the LHC. The characteristics of the $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ pairs from coherent $\\gamma \\gamma$ interactions are examined for both matrix element and equivalent photon based monte carlo generators with subsequent simulation of the ATLAS detector effects. The application of specific kinematic and vertex fit requirements is shown to offer a strong method of isolating signal from background and in turn yield an accurate offline measurement of the delivered luminosity via the pure QED process. The choice of kinematic cuts is shown to reduce the overall uncertainty in the method by limiting the size of corrections to the two photon interaction cross section to the level of 1\\%. B...

  9. Large hadron collider project in CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the latest scientific project in the world of particle physics launched by European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) nearby Geneva. The construction of the main components of this complex synchrotron ring where two proton beams will be accelerated up to energies of 7.7 TeV and then brought into collision, is well underway and the first installation of these components is expected to take place by the end of 2000. As a successor of the existing LEP machine and taking over a significant part of its infrastructure, when completed and commissioned in 2005, the LHG complex represent the most sophisticated and the largest project ever undertaken in the world of science. This machine has an ambitious task to offer the most contemporary and highest quality programmes in particle physics for scientists from all over the world. Its design and construction make use of the latest achievements in modern technologies, material sciences, engineering, computers, electronics and employing world wide experts and specialists of various profiles. At the same time, the LHC project ought to enable CERN and European scientists to maintain the world leading role in the field of particle physics in the next century. (author)

  10. Tune variations in the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquilina, N. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Malta, Msida (Malta); Giovannozzi, M.; Lamont, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Sammut, N. [University of Malta, Msida (Malta); Steinhagen, R. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Todesco, E., E-mail: ezio.todesco@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Wenninger, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-04-01

    The horizontal and vertical betatron tunes of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) mainly depend on the strength of the quadrupole magnets, but are also affected by the quadrupole component in the main dipoles. In case of systematic misalignments, the sextupole component from the main dipoles and sextupole corrector magnets also affect the tunes due to the feed down effect. During the first years of operation of the LHC, the tunes have been routinely measured and corrected through either a feedback or a feed forward system. In this paper, the evolution of the tunes during injection, ramp and flat top are reconstructed from the beam measurements and the settings of the tune feedback loop and of the feed forward corrections. This gives the obtained precision of the magnetic model of the machine with respect to quadrupole and sextupole components. Measurements at the injection plateau show an unexpected large decay whose origin is not understood. This data is discussed together with the time constants and the dependence on previous cycles. We present results of dedicated experiments that show that this effect does not originate from the decay of the main dipole component. During the ramp, the tunes drift by about 0.022. It is shown that this is related to the precision of tracking the quadrupole field in the machine and this effect is reduced to about 0.01 tune units during flat top.

  11. CP violation in the B mesons at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CP violation measurements are a good way to test the validity of the Standard Model where CP violation phenomena are described by the CKM mechanism. A selection of recent measurements of CP violating observables in the decays of beauty hadrons performed at the hadronic colliders is presented.

  12. Supersymmetry status and phenomenology at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alexander Belyaev

    2009-01-01

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has a great chance to finally reveal supersymmetry which remains a compelling theory for over 30 years in spite of lack of its discovery. It might be around the corner the present LHC era with sensitive dark matter search experiments and international linear collider hopefully coming up in the near future.

  13. The Very Large Hadron Collider: The farthest energy frontier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, William A.

    2001-06-21

    The Very Large Hadron Collider (or Eloisatron) represents what may well be the final step on the energy frontier of accelerator-based high energy physics. While an extremely high luminosity proton collider at 100-200 TeV center of mass energy can probably be built in one step with LHC technology, that machine would cost more than what is presently politically acceptable. This talk summarizes the strategies of collider design including staged deployment, comparison with electron-positron colliders, opportunities for major innovation, and the technical challenges of reducing costs to manageable proportions. It also presents the priorities for relevant R and D for the next few years.

  14. Academic Training Lecture: Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Regular Programme 21, 22, 23 & 24 June 2010 from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500-1-001 Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders by Dr. Karl Jakobs (University of Freiburg) In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and ...

  15. FCC Based Lepton-Hadron and Photon-Hadron Colliders: Luminosity and Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Acar, Y C; Beser, S; Karadeniz, H; Kaya, U; Oner, B B; Sultansoy, S

    2016-01-01

    Construction of future electron-positron colliders (or dedicated electron linac) and muon colliders (or dedicated muon ring) tangential to Future Circular Collider (FCC) will give opportunity to utilize highest energy proton and nucleus beams for lepton-hadron and photon-hadron collisions. Luminosity values of FCC based ep, \\mup, eA, \\muA, \\gammap and \\gammaA colliders are estimated. Multi-TeV center of mass energy ep colliders based on the FCC and linear colliders (LC) are considered in detail. Parameters of upgraded versions of the FCC proton beam are determined to optimize luminosity of electron-proton collisions keeping beam-beam effects in mind. Numerical calculations are performed using a currently being developed collision point simulator. It is shown that L_{ep}\\sim10^{32}\\,cm^{-2}s^{-1} can be achieved with LHeC-like upgrade of the FCC parameters.

  16. Production of electroweak bosons at hadron colliders: theoretical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Mangano, Michelangelo L

    2016-01-01

    Since the W and Z discovery, hadron colliders have provided a fertile ground, in which continuously improving measurements and theoretical predictions allow to precisely determine the gauge boson properties, and to probe the dynamics of electroweak and strong interactions. This article will review, from a theoretical perspective, the role played by the study, at hadron colliders, of electroweak boson production properties, from the better understanding of the proton structure, to the discovery and studies of the top quark and of the Higgs, to the searches for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model.

  17. Production of Electroweak Bosons at Hadron Colliders: Theoretical Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Michelangelo L.

    2016-10-01

    Since the W± and Z0 discovery, hadron colliders have provided a fertile ground, in which continuously improving measurements and theoretical predictions allow to precisely determine the gauge boson properties, and to probe the dynamics of electroweak and strong interactions. This article will review, from a theoretical perspective, the role played by the study, at hadron colliders, of electroweak boson production properties, from the better understanding of the proton structure, to the discovery and studies of the top quark and of the Higgs, to the searches for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model.

  18. The Higgs boson discovery at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Roger

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the field of Higgs boson physics. It offers the first in-depth review of the complete results in connection with the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider and based on the full dataset for the years 2011 to 2012. The fundamental concepts and principles of Higgs physics are introduced and the important searches prior to the advent of the Large Hadron Collider are briefly summarized. Lastly, the discovery and first mensuration of the observed particle in the course of the CMS experiment are discussed in detail and compared to the results obtained in the ATLAS experiment.

  19. Four-Lepton Resonance at the Large Hadron Collider

    OpenAIRE

    Barger, Vernon; Lee, Hye-Sung

    2011-01-01

    A spin-1 weakly interacting vector boson, Z', is predicted by many new physics theories. Searches at colliders for such a Z' resonance typically focus on lepton-antilepton or top-antitop events. Here we present a novel channel with a Z' resonance that decays to 4 leptons, but not to 2 leptons, and discuss its possible discovery at the Large Hadron Collider. This baryonic gauge boson is well motivated in a supersymmetry framework.

  20. Jet Reconstruction and Spectroscopy at Hadron Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellettini, Giorgio

    2011-11-01

    Dear colleagues and friends, Major new particle discoveries were made in the past by exploring the mass spectrum of lepton pairs. These searches still have great potential. However, new particle searches are now being extended to masses larger than the W, Z mass. More and more decay channels open up and the branching ratios into lepton pairs are reduced. Also, physics may dictate that states with heavy bosons and quarks become dominant. Examples are the decay of top quarks, and the expected final states of the standard model Higgs boson. Supersymmetry in any of its wide spectrum of models predicts intrigued final states where jets are major observables. To reconstruct masses and to study the dynamics of these states one must exploit the energy-momentum four-vectors of jets. Past experiments at the CERN SPS collider, at HERA, at LEP and now at the Tevatron collider and at LHC, have studied how best to reconstruct hadron jets. However, originally the role of jets in searching for new physics was primarily to sense new parton contact interactions by means of increased large pt tails in inclusive jet spectra, or studying jet events with large missing Et, or measuring branching ratios into jets of different flavour. These studies did not require as accurate a measure of jet four-momenta as needed in new particle searches in multi-jets final states. Figure 1 Figure 1. W, Z associated production in CDF events with large Et, miss and 2 jets. Consider for example (figure 1) the mass spectrum of dijets in events with large missing Et recently measured by CDF [1]. Trigger and analysis cuts were chosen so as to favour production of heavy boson pairs, with decay of one Z boson into neutrinos tagging the event and another W or Z boson decaying into jets. Associated production of boson pairs is observed, but the dijet mass resolution does not allow the separation of W from Z. A broad agreement of the overall observed rate with expectation is found, but a comparative study of the

  1. TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2013-10-20

    This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of √ s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of √ s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

  2. Resummed Results for Hadron Collider Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAslan Heather

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Event shapes are invaluable QCD tools for theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. We revise the definition of these observables in e+e− annihilation and in hadron collisions, and give a review of the state-of-the-art results for their resummation. Then we detail how recent work on the re-summation of event shapes in electron-positron annihilation can provide us with the tools to extend resummation of generic hadronic event shapes to NNLL accuracy. We match our findings to fixed-order results at NNLO accuracy, showing the sizeable effects of resummation in the relevant regions of phase space.

  3. Resummed Results for Hadron Collider Observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAslan, Heather

    2016-07-01

    Event shapes are invaluable QCD tools for theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. We revise the definition of these observables in e+e- annihilation and in hadron collisions, and give a review of the state-of-the-art results for their resummation. Then we detail how recent work on the re-summation of event shapes in electron-positron annihilation can provide us with the tools to extend resummation of generic hadronic event shapes to NNLL accuracy. We match our findings to fixed-order results at NNLO accuracy, showing the sizeable effects of resummation in the relevant regions of phase space.

  4. The future of the Large Hadron Collider and CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2012-02-28

    This paper presents the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its current scientific programme and outlines options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy, as well as upgrades to the LHC and its injectors. This may be followed by a linear electron-positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider collaborations, or by a high-energy electron-proton machine. This contribution describes the past, present and future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward.

  5. CERN completes magnet set for Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "CERN, the European Oganization for Nuclear Research, took delivery of the last superconducting main magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) on Monday, completint the full set of 1624 main magnets required to build the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator."

  6. Large Hadron Collider project to study the origins of matter

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "The Scientific Information Port (PIC), a technological centre located on the campus of the UAB, recently started work on the first stage of the European project Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator in the world, which has the aim of reproducing conditions similar to those produced during the Big Bang in order to study the origins of matter." (1/2 page)

  7. CERN to start Large Hadron Collider november 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is expected to provide its first collisions in November 2007, CERN has announced. A two-month run at 0.9 TeV is planned for 2007 to test the accelerating and detecting equipment, and a full power run at 14 TeV is expected in the spring of 2008."

  8. Model independent spin determination at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelhaeuser, Lisa

    2012-04-25

    By the end of the year 2011, both the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider have recorded around 5 inverse femtobarns of data at an energy of 7 TeV. There are only vague hints from the already analysed data towards new physics at the TeV scale. However, one knows that around this scale, new physics should show up so that theoretical issues of the standard model of particle physics can be cured. During the last decades, extensions to the standard model that are supposed to solve its problems have been constructed, and the corresponding phenomenology has been worked out. As soon as new physics is discovered, one has to deal with the problem of determining the nature of the underlying model. A first hint is of course given by the mass spectrum and quantum numbers such as electric and colour charges of the new particles. However, there are two popular model classes, supersymmetric models and extradimensional models, which can exhibit almost equal properties at the accessible energy range. Both introduce partners to the standard model particles with the same charges and thus one needs an extended discrimination method. From the origin of these partners arises a relevant difference: The partners constructed in extradimensional models have the same spin as their standard model partners while in Supersymmetry they differ by spin 1/2. These different spins have an impact on the phenomenology of the two models. For example, one can exploit the fact that the total cross sections are affected, but this requires a very good knowledge of the couplings and masses involved. Another approach uses angular distributions depending on the particle spins. A prevailing method based on this idea uses the invariant mass distribution of the visible particles in decay chains. One can relate these distributions to the spin of the particle mediating the decay since it reflects itself in the highest power of the invariant mass s{sub ff} of the adjacent particles. In this thesis

  9. Model independent spin determination at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the end of the year 2011, both the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider have recorded around 5 inverse femtobarns of data at an energy of 7 TeV. There are only vague hints from the already analysed data towards new physics at the TeV scale. However, one knows that around this scale, new physics should show up so that theoretical issues of the standard model of particle physics can be cured. During the last decades, extensions to the standard model that are supposed to solve its problems have been constructed, and the corresponding phenomenology has been worked out. As soon as new physics is discovered, one has to deal with the problem of determining the nature of the underlying model. A first hint is of course given by the mass spectrum and quantum numbers such as electric and colour charges of the new particles. However, there are two popular model classes, supersymmetric models and extradimensional models, which can exhibit almost equal properties at the accessible energy range. Both introduce partners to the standard model particles with the same charges and thus one needs an extended discrimination method. From the origin of these partners arises a relevant difference: The partners constructed in extradimensional models have the same spin as their standard model partners while in Supersymmetry they differ by spin 1/2. These different spins have an impact on the phenomenology of the two models. For example, one can exploit the fact that the total cross sections are affected, but this requires a very good knowledge of the couplings and masses involved. Another approach uses angular distributions depending on the particle spins. A prevailing method based on this idea uses the invariant mass distribution of the visible particles in decay chains. One can relate these distributions to the spin of the particle mediating the decay since it reflects itself in the highest power of the invariant mass sff of the adjacent particles. In this thesis we

  10. Model independent spin determination at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelhaeuser, Lisa

    2012-04-25

    By the end of the year 2011, both the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider have recorded around 5 inverse femtobarns of data at an energy of 7 TeV. There are only vague hints from the already analysed data towards new physics at the TeV scale. However, one knows that around this scale, new physics should show up so that theoretical issues of the standard model of particle physics can be cured. During the last decades, extensions to the standard model that are supposed to solve its problems have been constructed, and the corresponding phenomenology has been worked out. As soon as new physics is discovered, one has to deal with the problem of determining the nature of the underlying model. A first hint is of course given by the mass spectrum and quantum numbers such as electric and colour charges of the new particles. However, there are two popular model classes, supersymmetric models and extradimensional models, which can exhibit almost equal properties at the accessible energy range. Both introduce partners to the standard model particles with the same charges and thus one needs an extended discrimination method. From the origin of these partners arises a relevant difference: The partners constructed in extradimensional models have the same spin as their standard model partners while in Supersymmetry they differ by spin 1/2. These different spins have an impact on the phenomenology of the two models. For example, one can exploit the fact that the total cross sections are affected, but this requires a very good knowledge of the couplings and masses involved. Another approach uses angular distributions depending on the particle spins. A prevailing method based on this idea uses the invariant mass distribution of the visible particles in decay chains. One can relate these distributions to the spin of the particle mediating the decay since it reflects itself in the highest power of the invariant mass s{sub ff} of the adjacent particles. In this thesis

  11. Charged Hadron Multiplicity Distribution at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reviews facts and problems concerning charge hadron production in high energy collisions. Main emphasis is laid on the qualitative and quantitative description of general characteristics and properties observed for charged hadrons produced in such high energy collisions. Various features of available experimental data, for example, the variations of charged hadron multiplicity and pseudorapidity density with the mass number of colliding nuclei, center-of-mass energies, and the collision centrality obtained from heavy-ion collider experiments, are interpreted in the context of various theoretical concepts and their implications. Finally, several important scaling features observed in the measurements mainly at RHIC and LHC experiments are highlighted in the view of these models to draw some insight regarding the particle production mechanism in heavy-ion collisions.

  12. Large Hadron Collider The Discovery Machine

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The mammoth machine, after a nine-year construction period, is scheduled (touch wood) to begin producing its beams of particles later this year. The commissioning process is planned to proceed from one beam to two beams to colliding beams; from lower energies to the terascale; from weaker test intensities to stronger ones suitable for producing data at useful rates but more difficult to control.

  13. Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics at Relativistic Collider Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Bratkovskaya, E L; Konchakovski, V P; Linnyk, O

    2011-01-01

    The novel Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics (PHSD) transport approach is applied to nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC energies with respect to differential hadronic spectra in comparison to available data. The PHSD approach is based on a dynamical quasiparticle model for partons (DQPM) matched to reproduce recent lattice-QCD results from the Wuppertal-Budapest group in thermodynamic equilibrium. The transition from partonic to hadronic degrees of freedom is described by covariant transition rates for the fusion of quark-antiquark pairs or three quarks (antiquarks), respectively, obeying flavor current-conservation, color neutrality as well as energy-momentum conservation. Our dynamical studies for heavy-ion collisions at relativistic collider energies are compared to earlier results from the Hadron-String Dynamics (HSD) approach - incorporating no explicit dynamical partonic phase - as well as to experimental data from the STAR, PHENIX, BRAHMS and PHOBOS collaborations for Au+Au collisions at the top RHIC energy...

  14. CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Applications are now open for the 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School, which will take place at CERN from 6 to 15 June 2007. The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic program and application procedure. The application deadline is 9 March 2007. The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, covered extensively the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be given on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be  supported by in-depth discussion sess...

  15. Main Parameters of Ilc-Tevatron Based Lepton-Hadron and Photon-Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Sultansoy, Saleh; Ciftci, Abbas K; Recepoglu, Erdal; Yavas, Omer

    2005-01-01

    The construction of the ILC tangential to Tevatron ring will give opportunity to investigate electron-proton, positron-proton, electron-antiproton, positron-antiproton interactions at 1 TeV center of mass energy. The analysis of the lepton-hadron collisions in these energy region is very important both for understanding of strong interaction dynamics and for adequate interpretation of future LHC and VLHC data. In addition, ILC-Tevatron collider will provide a possibility to realize photon-hadron collisions in the same energy region using Compton backscattered laser photon off ILC electron beam. Main parameters of these colliders are estimated and their physics search potential is briefly discussed.

  16. Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; Raychaudhari, Amitava

    2009-01-01

    In an epoch when particle physics is awaiting a major step forward, the Large Hydron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva will soon be operational. It will collide a beam of high energy protons with another similar beam circulation in the same 27 km tunnel but in the opposite direction, resulting in the production of many elementary particles some never created in the laboratory before. It is widely expected that the LHC will discover the Higgs boson, the particle which supposedly lends masses to all other fundamental particles. In addition, the question as to whether there is some new law of physics at such high energy is likely to be answered through this experiment. The present volume contains a collection of articles written by international experts, both theoreticians and experimentalists, from India and abroad, which aims to acquaint a non-specialist with some basic issues related to the LHC. At the same time, it is expected to be a useful, rudimentary companion of introductory exposition and technical expert...

  17. Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics at relativistic collider energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Linnyk, O.

    2011-04-01

    The novel Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics (PHSD) transport approach is applied to nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC energies with respect to differential hadronic spectra in comparison to available data. The PHSD approach is based on a dynamical quasiparticle model for partons (DQPM) matched to reproduce recent lattice-QCD results from the Wuppertal-Budapest group in thermodynamic equilibrium. The transition from partonic to hadronic degrees of freedom is described by covariant transition rates for the fusion of quark-antiquark pairs or three quarks (antiquarks), respectively, obeying flavor current-conservation, color neutrality as well as energy-momentum conservation. Our dynamical studies for heavy-ion collisions at relativistic collider energies are compared to earlier results from the Hadron-String Dynamics (HSD) approach - incorporating no explicit dynamical partonic phase - as well as to experimental data from the STAR, PHENIX, BRAHMS and PHOBOS Collaborations for Au + Au collisions at the top RHIC energy of √{s}=200 GeV. We find a reasonable reproduction of hadron rapidity distributions and transverse mass spectra and also a fair description of the elliptic flow of charged hadrons as a function of the centrality of the reaction and the transverse momentum p. Furthermore, an approximate quark-number scaling of the elliptic flow v of hadrons is observed in the PHSD results, too.

  18. Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics at relativistic collider energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratkovskaya, E.L., E-mail: Elena.Bratkovskaya@th.physik.uni-frankfurt.d [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, JWG Universitaet Frankfurt, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institut for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt University, D-60438 Frankfurt-am-Main (Germany); Cassing, W.; Konchakovski, V.P. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Linnyk, O. [Frankfurt Institut for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt University, D-60438 Frankfurt-am-Main (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    The novel Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics (PHSD) transport approach is applied to nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC energies with respect to differential hadronic spectra in comparison to available data. The PHSD approach is based on a dynamical quasiparticle model for partons (DQPM) matched to reproduce recent lattice-QCD results from the Wuppertal-Budapest group in thermodynamic equilibrium. The transition from partonic to hadronic degrees of freedom is described by covariant transition rates for the fusion of quark-antiquark pairs or three quarks (antiquarks), respectively, obeying flavor current-conservation, color neutrality as well as energy-momentum conservation. Our dynamical studies for heavy-ion collisions at relativistic collider energies are compared to earlier results from the Hadron-String Dynamics (HSD) approach - incorporating no explicit dynamical partonic phase - as well as to experimental data from the STAR, PHENIX, BRAHMS and PHOBOS Collaborations for Au + Au collisions at the top RHIC energy of {radical}(s)=200 GeV. We find a reasonable reproduction of hadron rapidity distributions and transverse mass spectra and also a fair description of the elliptic flow of charged hadrons as a function of the centrality of the reaction and the transverse momentum p{sub T}. Furthermore, an approximate quark-number scaling of the elliptic flow v{sub 2} of hadrons is observed in the PHSD results, too.

  19. Invisible Higgs decay at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi-Lei; Zhang, Chen; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2016-07-01

    The possibility that the 125 GeV Higgs boson may decay into invisible non-standard-model (non-SM) particles is theoretically and phenomenologically intriguing. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) to an invisibly decaying Higgs, in its proposed high-luminosity running mode. We focus on the neutral current Higgs production channel which offers more kinematical handles than its charged current counterpart. The signal contains one electron, one jet, and large missing energy. With a cut-based parton-level analysis, we estimate that if the h Z Z coupling is at its standard model (SM) value, then assuming an integrated luminosity of 1 ab-1 , the LHeC with the proposed 60 GeV electron beam (with -0.9 polarization) and 7 TeV proton beam is capable of probing Br (h →TE)=6 % at 2 σ level. Good lepton veto performance (especially hadronic τ veto) in the forward region is crucial to the suppression of the dominant W j e background. We also explicitly point out the important role that may be played by the LHeC in probing a wide class of exotic Higgs decay processes and emphasize the general function of lepton-hadron colliders in the precision study of new resonances after their discovery in hadron-hadron collisions.

  20. QCD threshold corrections for gluino pair production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenfeld, Ulrich [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany); Moch, Sven-Olaf; Pfoh, Torsten [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    We present the complete threshold enhanced predictions in QCD for the total cross section of gluino pair production at hadron colliders at next-to-next-to-leading order. Thanks to the computation of the required one-loop hard matching coefficients our results are accurate to the next-to-next-to-leading logarithm. In a brief phenomenological study we provide predictions for the total hadronic cross sections at the LHC and we discuss the uncertainties arising from scale variations and the parton distribution functions.

  1. Monotop phenomenology at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Agram, Jean-Laurent; Buttignol, Michael; Conte, Eric; Fuks, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    We investigate new physics scenarios where systems comprised of a single top quark accompanied by missing transverse energy, dubbed monotops, can be produced at the LHC. Following a simplified model approach, we describe all possible monotop production modes via an effective theory and estimate the sensitivity of the LHC, assuming 20 fb$^{-1}$ of collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, to the observation of a monotop state. Considering both leptonic and hadronic top quark decays, we show that large fractions of the parameter space are reachable and that new physics particles with masses ranging up to 1.5 TeV can leave hints within the 2012 LHC dataset, assuming moderate new physics coupling strengths.

  2. The standard model Higgs search at the large hadron collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satyaki Bhattacharya; on behalf of the CMS and the ATLAS Collaborations

    2007-11-01

    The experiments at the large hadron collider (LHC) will probe for Higgs boson in the mass range between the lower bound on the Higgs mass set by the experiments at the large electron positron collider (LEP) and the unitarity bound (∼ 1 TeV). Strategies are being developed to look for signatures of Higgs boson and measure its properties. In this paper results from full detector simulation-based studies on Higgs discovery from both ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC will be presented. Results of simulation studies on Higgs coupling measurement at LHC will be discussed.

  3. Working group report: Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D K Ghosh; A Nyffeler; V Ravindran

    2011-05-01

    This is a summary of the activities of the Physics at the LHC working group in the XIth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-XI) held at the Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, India in January 2010. We discuss the activities of each sub-working group on physics issues at colliders such as Tevatron and Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main issues discussed involve (1) results on W mass measurement and associated QCD uncertainties, (2) an attempt to understand the asymmetry measured at Tevatron in the top quark production, and (3) phenomenology of warped space dimension model.

  4. The Structure of Jets at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkoski, Andrew James [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Particle physics seeks to understand the interactions and properties of the fundamental particles. To gain understanding, there is an interplay between theory and experiment. Models are proposed to explain how particles behave and interact. These models make precise predictions that can be tested. Experiments are built and executed to measure the properties of these particles, providing necessary tests for the theories that attempt to explain the realm of fundamental particles. However, there is also another level of interaction between theory and experiment; the development of new experiments demands the study of how particles will behave with respect to the measured observables toward the goal of understanding the details and idiosyncrasies of the measurements very well. Only once these are well-modeled and understood can one be con dent that the data that are measured is trustworthy. The modeling and interpretation of the physics of a proton collider, such as the LHC, is the main topic of this thesis.

  5. Tracking study of hadron collider boosters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machida, S.; Bourianoff, G.; Huang, Y.; Mahale, N.

    1992-07-01

    A simulation code SIMPSONS (previously called 6D-TEASE T) of single- and multi-particle tracking has been developed for proton synchrotrons. The 6D phase space coordinates are calculated each time step including acceleration with an arbitrary ramping curve by integration of the rf phase. Space-charge effects are modelled by means of the Particle In Cell (PIC) method. We observed the transverse emittance growth around the injection energy of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) with and without second harmonic rf cavities which reduce peak line density. We also employed the code to see the possible transverse emittance deterioration around the transition energy in the Medium Energy Booster (MEB) and to estimate the emittance dilution due to an injection error of the MEB.

  6. The ALICE experiment at the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munhoz, Marcelo Gameiro [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the only experiment form the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) dedicated mainly to study relativistic heavy ion collisions. The experiment was optimized to measure a great variety of observables that allow us to study the properties of the Quark Gluon Plasma, a new state of nuclear matter where quarks and gluons are deconfined from hadrons. The enlightenment of such properties will provide great insight in the understanding of the strong interaction described by QCD. In this talk, I will present the ALICE experiment, the latest results obtained by the collaboration in the last 2 years and discuss the Brazilian participation in this very interesting and important international project. (author)

  7. Large hadron collider in the LEP tunnel. Proceedings. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Workshop, jointly organized by ECFA and CERN, took place at Lausanne and at CERN in March 1984 to study various options for a pp (or panti p) collider which might be installed at a later data alongside LEP in the LEP tunnel. Following the exploration of e+e- physics up to the highest energy now foreseeable, this would open up the opportunity to investigate hadron collisions in the new energy range of 10 to 20 TeV in the centre of mass. These proceedings put together the documents prepared in connection with this Workshop. They cover possible options for a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the LEP tunnel, the physics case as it stands at present, and studies of experimental possibilities in this energy range with luminosities as now considered. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  8. Beyond the Large Hadron Collider: a first look at cryogenics for CERN future circular colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Ph

    2015-01-01

    Following the first experimental discoveries at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the recent update of the European strategy in particle physics, CERN has undertaken an international study of possible future circular colliders beyond the LHC. The study, conducted with the collaborative participation of interested institutes world-wide, considers several options for very high energy hadron-hadron, electron-positron and hadron-electron colliders to be installed in a quasi-circular underground tunnel in the Geneva basin, with a circumference of 80 km to 100 km. All these machines would make intensive use of advanced superconducting devices, i.e. high-field bending and focusing magnets and/or accelerating RF cavities, thus requiring large helium cryogenic systems operating at 4.5 K or below. Based on preliminary sets of parameters and layouts for the particle colliders under study, we discuss the main challenges of their cryogenic systems and present first estimates of the cryogenic refrigeration capacities req...

  9. vh@nnlo - Higgs Strahlung at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Brein, Oliver; Zirke, Tom J E

    2012-01-01

    A numerical program for the evaluation of the inclusive cross section for associated Higgs production with a massive weak gauge boson at hadron colliders is described, sigma(pp/pbar p -> HV), V=W,Z. The calculation is performed in the framework of the Standard Model and includes next-to-next-to-leading order QCD as well as next-to-leading order electro-weak effects.

  10. Discriminating Supersymmetry and Black Holes at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Arunava

    2008-01-01

    We show how to differentiate the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model from black hole events at the Large Hadron Collider. Black holes are simulated with the CATFISH generator. Supersymmetry simulations use a combination of PYTHIA and ISAJET. Our study, based on event shape variables, visible and missing momenta, and analysis of dilepton events, demonstrates that supersymmetry and black hole events at the LHC can be easily discriminated.

  11. Learning to See at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The staged commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider presents an opportunity to map gross features of particle production over a significant energy range. I suggest a visual tool - event displays in (pseudo)rapidity-transverse-momentum space - as a scenic route that may help sharpen intuition, identify interesting classes of events for further investigation, and test expectations about the underlying event that accompanies large-transverse-momentum phenomena.

  12. High-dimensional Z' phenomenology at hadron colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Fuks, B.; van der Bij, J. J.; Q. Xu

    2008-01-01

    We study the phenomenology of a Z'-boson field coupled to hypercharge. The Z' propagator has a non-trivial K\\"all\\'en-Lehmann spectral density due to the mixing with a higher dimensional inert vector field. As a consequence detection possibilities at hadron colliders are reduced. We determine the range of parameters where this field can be studied at the Tevatron and the LHC through its production cross section via the Drell-Yan mechanism.

  13. W and Z Boson Production at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hays, C

    2009-01-01

    The electroweak theory has been tested to high precision, with measurements probing its predictions at the loop level. The current generation of particle accelerators will produce enough W and Z bosons through hadron collisions to significantly improve the accuracy of these measurements. I review the issues related to such production, with particular emphasis on associated uncertainties on the W boson mass, which has now been measured more precisely at the Tevatron than at the Large Electron Positron collider.

  14. Theory overview of electroweak physics at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, John M

    2016-01-01

    This contribution summarizes some of the important theoretical progress that has been made in the arena of electroweak physics at hadron colliders. The focus is on developments that have sharpened theoretical predictions for final states produced through electroweak processes. Special attention is paid to new results that have been presented in the last year, since LHCP2015, as well as on key issues for future measurements at the LHC.

  15. Electron lenses for the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari†, G; Bruce, R; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Salvachua Ferrando, B

    2014-01-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beamswhose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-bybunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beamcompensation, and for the demonstration of halo scrapingwith hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. A conceptual design was recently completed, and the project is moving towards a technical design in 2014–2015 for construction in 2015–2017, if needed, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing collimation needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of the...

  16. Electron Lenses for the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermilab; Valishev, Alexander [Fermilab; Bruce, Roderik [CERN; Redaelli, Stefano [CERN; Rossi, Adriana [CERN; Salvachua, Belen [CERN

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. This project is moving towards a technical design in 2014, with the goal to build the devices in 2015-2017, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles.

  17. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    June 6-15, 2007, CERN The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 9 MARCH 2007 The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, extensively covered the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school, to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be placed on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be supported by in-depth discussion sessions and will include the theory and phenomenology of hadron collisions, discovery physics topics, detector and analysis t...

  18. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN, Physics, Machine, Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphson, C

    2011-01-01

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new electron-hadron collider, the LHeC, in which electrons of $60$ to possibly $140$\\,GeV collide with LHC protons of $7000$\\,GeV. With an $ep$ design luminosity of about $10^{33}$\\,cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$, the Large Hadron Electron Collider exceeds the integrated luminosity collected at HERA by two orders of magnitude and the kinematic range by a factor of twenty in the four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering (DIS) measurements. These are projected to solve a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The LHeC thus becomes the world's cleanest high resolution microscope, designed to continue the path of deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering into unknown areas of physics and kinematics. The physics ...

  19. 3rd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    August 12-22, 2008, Fermilab The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 FEBRUARY 2008. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high-energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The third session of the summer school will focus on exposing young post-docs and advanced graduate students to broader theories and real data beyond what they’ve learned at their home institutions. Experts from across the globe will lecture on the theoretical and experimental foundations of hadron collider physics, host parallel discussion sessions and answer students’ questions. This year’s school will also have a greater focus on physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as more time for questions at the end of each lecture. The 2008 School will be held at ...

  20. Disambiguating seesaw models using invariant mass variables at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Kim, Doojin; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2016-01-01

    We propose ways to distinguish between different mechanisms behind the collider signals of TeV-scale seesaw models for neutrino masses using kinematic endpoints of invariant mass variables. We particularly focus on two classes of such models widely discussed in literature: (i) Standard Model extended by the addition of singlet neutrinos and (ii) Left-Right Symmetric Models. Relevant scenarios involving the same "smoking-gun" collider signature of dilepton plus dijet with no missing transverse energy differ from one another by their event topology, resulting in distinctive relationships among the kinematic endpoints to be used for discerning them at hadron colliders. These kinematic endpoints are readily translated to the mass parameters of the on-shell particles through simple analytic expressions which can be used for measuring the masses of the new particles. A Monte Carlo simulation with detector effects is conducted to test the viability of the proposed strategy in a realistic environment. Finally, we discuss the future prospects of testing these scenarios at the √{s}=14 and 100 TeV hadron colliders.

  1. Dark Matter Searches at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Hoh, Siew Yan; Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Bin Wan

    2015-01-01

    Dark Matter is a hypothetical particle proposed to explain the missing matter expected from the cosmological observation. The motivation of Dark Matter is overwhelming however as it is mainly deduced from its gravitational interaction, for it does little to pinpoint what Dark Matter really is. In WIMPs Miracle, weakly interactive massive particle being the Dark Matter candidate is correctly producing the current thermal relic density at weak scale, implying the possibility of producing and detecting it in Large Hadron Collider. Assuming WIMPs being the maverick particle within collider, it is expected to be pair produced in association with a Standard Model particle. The presence of the WIMPs pair is inferred from the Missing Transverse Energy (MET) which is the vector sum of the imbalance in the transverse momentum plane recoils a Standard Model Particle. The collider is able to produce light mass Dark Matter which the traditional detection fail to detect due to the small momentum transfer involved in the in...

  2. Disambiguating Seesaw Models using Invariant Mass Variables at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, P S Bhupal; Mohapatra, Rabindra N

    2015-01-01

    We propose ways to distinguish between different mechanisms behind the collider signals of TeV-scale seesaw models for neutrino masses using kinematic endpoints of invariant mass variables. We particularly focus on two classes of such models widely discussed in literature: (i) Standard Model extended by the addition of singlet neutrinos and (ii) Left-Right Symmetric Models. Relevant scenarios involving the same "smoking-gun" collider signature of dilepton plus dijet with no missing transverse energy differ from one another by their event topology, resulting in distinctive relationships among the kinematic endpoints to be used for discerning them at hadron colliders. These kinematic endpoints are readily translated to the mass parameters of the on-shell particles through simple analytic expressions which can be used for measuring the masses of the new particles. A Monte Carlo simulation with detector effects is conducted to test the viability of the proposed strategy in a realistic environment. Finally, we dis...

  3. Online track reconstruction at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real time event reconstruction plays a fundamental role in High Energy Physics experiments. Reducing the rate of data to be saved on tape from millions to hundreds per second is critical. In order to increase the purity of the collected samples, rate reduction has to be coupled with the capability to simultaneously perform a first selection of the most interesting events. A fast and efficient online track reconstruction is important to effectively trigger on leptons and/or displaced tracks from b-quark decays. This talk will be an overview of online tracking techniques in different HEP environments: we will show how H1 experiment at HERA faced the challenges of online track reconstruction implementing pattern matching and track linking algorithms on CAMs and FPGAs in the Fast Track Processor (FTT). The pattern recognition technique is also at the basis of the Silicon Vertex Trigger (SVT) at the CDF experiment at Tevatron: coupled to a very fast fitting phase, SVT allows to trigger on displaced tracks, thus greatly increasing the efficiency for the hadronic B decay modes. A recent upgrade of the SVT track fitter, the Giga-fitter, can perform more than 1 fit/ns and further improves the CDF online trigger capabilities at high luminosity. At SLHC, where luminosities will be 2 orders of magnitude greater than Tevatron, online tracking will be much more challenging: we will describe CMS future plans for a Level-1 track trigger and the Fast Tracker (FTK) processor at the ATLAS experiment, based on the Giga-fitter architecture and designed to provide high quality tracks reconstructed over the entire detector in time for a Level-2 trigger decision.luminosity. At SLHC, where luminosities will be 2 orders of magnitude greater than Tevatron, online tracking will be much more challenging: we will describe CMS future plans for a Level-1 track trigger and the Fast Tracker (FTK) processor at the Atlas experiment, based on the Giga-fitter architecture and designed to provide high

  4. Dark matter searches at the large hadron collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoh, S. Y.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-01-01

    Dark Matter is a hypothetical particle proposed to explain the missing matter expected from the cosmological observation. The motivation of Dark Matter is overwhelming however as it is mainly deduced from its gravitational interaction, for it does little to pinpoint what Dark Matter really is. In WIMPs Miracle, weakly interactive massive particle being the Dark Matter candidate is correctly producing the current thermal relic density at weak scale, implying the possibility of producing and detecting it in Large Hadron Collider. Assuming WIMPs being the maverick particle within collider, it is expected to be pair produced in association with a Standard Model particle. The presence of the WIMPs pair is inferred from the Missing Transverse Energy (MET) which is the vector sum of the imbalance in the transverse momentum plane recoils a Standard Model Particle. The collider is able to produce light mass Dark Matter which the traditional detection fail to detect due to the small momentum transfer involved in the interaction; on the other hand, the traditional detection is robust in detecting a higher Dark matter masses but the collider is suffered from the parton distribution function suppression. Topologically the processes are similar to the scattering processes in the direct detection thus complementary to the traditional Dark Matter detection. The collider searches are strongly motivated as the results are usually translated to the annihilation and scattering rates at more traditional Dark Matter-oriented experiments, thus a concordance approach is adapted. An overview of Dark Matter searches at the Large Hadron Collider will be covered in this paper.

  5. A 233 km Tunnel for Lepton and Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Summers, D J; Datta, A; Duraisamy, M; Luo, T; Lyons, G T

    2012-01-01

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of $e^+e^-$, $p \\bar{p}$, and $\\mu^+ \\mu^-$ collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV $e^+e^-$ colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV $e^+ e^-$ collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV $p \\bar{p}$ collider uses the high intensity Fermilab $\\bar{p}$ source, exploits high cross sections for $p \\bar{p}$ production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconduct...

  6. Transverse beams stability studies at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, Xavier; Pieloni, Tatiana

    2015-01-30

    A charged particle beam travelling at the speed of light produces large electromagnetic wake fields which, through interactions with its surroundings, act back on the particles in the beam. This coupled system may become unstable, resulting in a deterioration of the beam quality. Such effects play a major role in most existing storage rings, as they limit the maximum performance achievable. In a collider, the presence of a second beam significantly changes the dynamics, as the electromagnetic interactions of the two beams on each other are usually very strong and may, also, limit the collider performances. This thesis treats the coherent stability of the two beams in a circular collider, including the effects of the electromagnetic wake fields and of the beam-beam interactions, with particular emphasis on CERN's Large Hadron Collider. As opposed to other colliders, this machine features a large number of bunches per beam each experiencing multiple long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions. Existing models...

  7. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  8. Complementarity of the CERN Large Hadron Collider and the $e^+e^-$ International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, S Y

    2008-01-01

    The next-generation high-energy facilities, the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the prospective $e^+e^-$ International Linear Collider (ILC), are expected to unravel new structures of matter and forces from the electroweak scale to the TeV scale. In this report we review the complementary role of LHC and ILC in drawing a comprehensive and high-precision picture of the mechanism breaking the electroweak symmetries and generating mass, and the unification of forces in the frame of supersymmetry.

  9. Signatures for black hole production from hadronic observables at the Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) provides a way of solving the Hierarchy Problem which concerns the weakness of gravity compared with the strong and electro-weak forces. A consequence of LED is that miniature Black Holes (mini-BHs) may be produced at the Large Hadron Collider in p + p collisions. The present work uses the CHARYBDIS mini-BH generator code to simulate the hadronic signal which might be expected in a mid-rapidity particle tracking detector from the decay of these exotic objects if indeed they are produced. An estimate is also given for Pb+Pb collisions. (author)

  10. Precise Predictions for W + 3 Jet Production at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C.F.; /MIT, LNS; Bern, Z.; /UCLA; Dixon, L.J.; /SLAC; Cordero, F.Febres; /UCLA; Forde, D.; Gleisberg, T.; /SLAC; Ita, H.; /UCLA; Kosower, D.A.; /Saclay; Maitre, D.; /Durham U.

    2009-02-23

    We report on the first next-to-leading order QCD computation of W + 3-jet production in hadronic collisions including all partonic subprocesses. We compare the results with CDF data from the Tevatron, and find excellent agreement. The renormalization and factorization scale dependence is reduced substantially compared to leading-order calculations. The required one-loop matrix elements are computed using on-shell methods, implemented in a numerical program, BlackHat. We use the SHERPA package to generate the real-emission contributions and to integrate the various contributions over phase space. We use a leading-color (large-N{sub c}) approximation for the virtual part, which we confirm in W + 1,2-jet production to be valid to within three percent. The present calculation demonstrates the utility of on-shell methods for computing next-to-leading-order corrections to processes important to physics analyses at the Large Hadron Collider.

  11. The phenomenology of central exclusive production at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Harland-Lang, L A; Ryskin, M G; Stirling, W J

    2012-01-01

    Central exclusive production (CEP) processes in high-energy hadron-hadron collisions provide an especially clean environment in which to measure the nature and quantum numbers (in particular, the spin and parity) of new resonance states. Encouraged by the broad agreement between experimental measurements and theoretical predictions based on the Durham approach, we perform a detailed phenomenological analysis of diphoton and meson pair CEP final states, paying particular attention to the theoretical uncertainties in the predictions, including those from parton distribution functions, higher-order perturbative corrections, and non-perturbative and proton dissociation contributions. We present quantitative cross-section predictions for these CEP final states at the RHIC, Tevatron and LHC colliders.

  12. Design parameters for the Very Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, C S

    1999-01-01

    The goal of the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) is to extend the energy frontier beyond LHC. The proposed design center-of-mass energy for the VLHC pp collider is 100 TeV, with a luminosity of le34 cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. At present accelerator designs and calculations are being carried out for two different magnet technologies, one using superferric magnets at 2 Tesla (T), the other using high-field design with B>10 T. This paper summarizes the accelerator parameters for these two designs. We discuss the design parameters that have the largest effects on the performance of the accelerator and therefore need careful optimization. (11 refs).

  13. Large Hadron Collider (LHC) phenomenology, operational challenges and theoretical predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Gilles, Abelin R

    2013-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the highest-energy particle collider ever constructed and is considered "one of the great engineering milestones of mankind." It was built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) from 1998 to 2008, with the aim of allowing physicists to test the predictions of different theories of particle physics and high-energy physics, and particularly prove or disprove the existence of the theorized Higgs boson and of the large family of new particles predicted by supersymmetric theories. In this book, the authors study the phenomenology, operational challenges and theoretical predictions of LHC. Topics discussed include neutral and charged black hole remnants at the LHC; the modified statistics approach for the thermodynamical model of multiparticle production; and astroparticle physics and cosmology in the LHC era.

  14. The Large Hadron Collider Present Status and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    2001-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), due to be commissioned in 2005, will provide particle physics with the first laboratory tool to access the energy frontier above 1 TeV. In order to achieve this , protons must be accelerated and stored at 7 TeV, colliding with an unprecedented luminosity of 1034 cm-2 s-1. The 8.3 Tesla guide field is obtained using conventional NbTi technology cooled to below the lambda point of helium. Considerable modification of the infrastructure around the existing LEP tunnel is needed to house the LHC machine and detectors. The project is advancing according to schedule with most of the major hardware systems including cryogenics and magnets under construction. A brief status report is given and future prospects are discussed.

  15. nPDF constraints from the Large Hadron Electron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Helenius, Ilkka; Armesto, Nestor

    2016-01-01

    An updated analysis regarding the expected nuclear PDF constraints from the future Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) experiment is presented. The new study is based on a more flexible small-$x$ parametrization which provides less biased uncertainty estimates in the region where there are currently no data constraints. The effect of the LHeC is quantified by directly including a sample of pseudodata according to the expected precision of this planned experiment. As a result, a significant reduction of the small-$x$ uncertainties in sea quarks and gluons is observed.

  16. W±πt干 Associated Production at Large Hadron Collider

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGJin-Shu; PANQun-Na

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the production of a charged top pion in association with a W boson at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the context of the topcolor assisted technicolor model. We find that the cross section of pp → bb- → W±πt干 is roughly corresponding to the result of the process pp → bb- → W±πt干= in the minimal supersymmetric standard model, and for reasonable ranges of the parameters, the cross section can reach a few hundred fb. The W±πt干 signal should be clearly visible at LHC unless π t± is very heavy.

  17. ZZ production at hadron colliders in NNLO QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Cascioli, F; Grazzini, M; Kallweit, S; Maierhöfer, P; von Manteuffel, A; Pozzorini, S; Rathlev, D; Tancredi, L; Weihs, E

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first calculation of next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD corrections to the inclusive production of ZZ pairs at hadron colliders. Numerical results are presented for pp collisions with centre-of-mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$) ranging from 7 to 14 TeV. The NNLO corrections increase the NLO result by an amount varying from $11\\%$ to $17\\%$ as $\\sqrt{s}$ goes from 7 to 14 TeV. The loop-induced gluon fusion contribution provides about $60\\%$ of the total NNLO effect. When going from NLO to NNLO the scale uncertainties do not decrease and remain at the $\\pm 3\\%$ level.

  18. A high field magnet design for a future hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, R; Dietderich, D R; Gourlay, S A; Millos, G; McInturff, A D; Scanlan, R M; Ramberger, S; Russenschuck, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    US high energy physics community is exploring the possibilities of building a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) after the completion of LHC. This paper presents a high field magnet design option based on Nb/sub 3/Sn technology. A preliminary magnetic and mechanical design of a 14-16 T, 2-in-1 dipole based on the "common coil design" approach is presented. The computer code ROXIE has been upgraded to perform the field quality optimization of magnets based on the racetrack coil geometry. A magnet R&D program to investigate the issues related to high field magnet designs is also outlined. (10 refs).

  19. Single Top Quark Production via FCNC Couplings at Hadron Colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Han, T.; Hosch, M.; Whisnant, K.; Young, Bing-Lin; Zhang, X

    1998-01-01

    We calculate single top-quark production at hadron colliders via the chromo-magnetic flavor-changing neutral current couplings $\\bar tcg$ and $\\bar tug$. We find that the strength for the anomalous $\\bar tcg$ ($\\bar tug$) coupling may be probed to $\\kappa_c / \\Lambda = 0.092 {TeV}^{-1}$ ($\\kappa_u / \\Lambda = 0.026 {TeV}^{-1}$) at the Tevatron with $2 {fb}^{-1}$ of data and $\\kappa_c / \\Lambda = 0.013 {TeV}^{-1}$ ($\\kappa_u / \\Lambda = 0.0061 {TeV}^{-1}$) at the LHC with $10 {fb}^{-1}$ of dat...

  20. Single Top Quark Production via FCNC Couplings at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Han, T; Whisnant, K; Young Bing Lin; Zhang, X; Young, Bing-Lin

    1998-01-01

    We calculate single top-quark production at hadron colliders via the chromo-magnetic flavor-changing neutral current couplings $\\bar tcg$ and $\\bar tug$. We find that the strength for the anomalous $\\bar tcg$ ($\\bar tug$) coupling may be probed to $\\kappa_c / \\Lambda = 0.092 {TeV}^{-1}$ ($\\kappa_u / {TeV}^{-1}$) at the LHC with $10 {fb}^{-1}$ of data. The two couplings may be distinguished by a comparision of the single top signal with the direct top and top decay signals for these couplings.

  1. High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M..; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; He, P.; Hao, Y.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Pozdeyev, E.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2011-03-28

    We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.

  2. The higgsino-singlino world at the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Soo [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Ray, Tirtha Sankar [University of Melbourne, ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2015-02-01

    We consider light higgsinos and singlinos in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model at the large hadron collider. We assume that the singlino is the lightest supersymmetric particle and that the higgsino is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle with the remaining supersymmetric particles in the multi-TeV range. This scenario, which is motivated by the flavor and CP issues, provides a phenomenologically viable dark matter candidate and improved electroweak fit consistent with the measured Higgs mass. Here, the higgsinos decay into on (off)-shell gauge boson and the singlino. We consider the leptonic decay modes and the resulting signature is three isolated leptons and missing transverse energy which is known as the trilepton signal. We simulate the signal and the Standard Model backgrounds and present the exclusion region in the higgsino-singlino mass plane at the large hadron collider at √(s) = 14 TeV for an integrated luminosity of 300 fb{sup -1}. (orig.)

  3. Detector Development for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00367854; Gößling, Claus

    To maximise the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider, it will be upgraded to the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider in 2024. New detector challenges arise from the higher instantaneous luminosity and the higher particle flux. The new ATLAS Inner Tracker will replace the current tracking detector to be able to cope with these challenges. Many pixel detector technologies exist for particle tracking, but their suitability for the ATLAS Inner Tracker needs to be studied. Active high-voltage CMOS sensors, which are produced in industrialised processes, offer a fast readout and radiation tolerance. In this thesis the HV2FEI4v2 sensor, which is capacitively coupled to the ATLAS Pixel FE-I4 readout chip, is characterised for the usage in the outer layers of the ATLAS Inner Tracker. Key quantities of this prototype module are studied, such as the hit efficiency and the subpixel encoding. The early HV2FEI4v2 prototype shows promising results as a starting point for further module developments. Active CMO...

  4. FCC-hh Hadron Collider - Parameter Scenarios and Staging Options

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, F; Syphers, M J

    2015-01-01

    FCC-hh is a proposed future energy-frontier hadron collider, based on dipole magnets with a field around 16 T installed in a new tunnel with a circumference of about 100 km, which would provide proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 100 TeV, as well as heavy-ion collisions at the equivalent energy. The FCC-hh should deliver a high integrated proton-proton luminosity at the level of several 100 fb−1 per year, or more. The challenges for operating FCC-hh with high beam current and at high luminosity include the heat load from synchrotron radiation in a cold environment, the radiation from collision debris around the interaction region, and machine protection. In this paper, starting from the FCC-hh design baseline parameters we explore different approaches for increasing the integrated luminosity, and discuss the impact of key individual pa- rameters, such as the turnaround time. We also present some injector considerations and options for early hadron-collider operation.

  5. Improving Identification of Dijet Resonances at Hadron Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian; Yavin, Itay

    2015-01-01

    The experimental detection of resonances has played a vital role in the development of subatomic physics. The overwhelming multijet backgrounds at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) necessitate the invention of new techniques to identify resonances decaying into a pair of partons. In this Letter we introduce an observable that achieves a significant improvement in several key measurements at the LHC: the Higgs boson decay to a pair of b quarks; W±/Z0 vector-boson hadronic decay; and extensions of the standard model (SM) with a new hadronic resonance. Measuring the Higgs decay to b quarks is a central test of the fermion mass generation mechanism in the SM, whereas the W±/Z0 production rates are important observables of the electroweak sector. Our technique is effective in large parts of phase space where the resonance is mildly boosted and is particularly well suited for experimental searches dominated by systematic uncertainties, which is true of many analyses in the high-luminosity running of the LHC.

  6. Direct stau production at hadron colliders in cosmologically motivated scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Lindert, Jonas M; Trenkel, Maike K

    2011-01-01

    We calculate dominant cross section contributions for stau pair production at hadron colliders within the MSSM, taking into account left-right mixing of the stau eigenstates. We find that b-quark annihilation and gluon fusion can enhance the cross sections by more than one order of magnitude with respect to the Drell-Yan predictions. These additional production channels are not yet included in the common Monte Carlo analysis programs and have been neglected in experimental analyses so far. For long-lived staus, we investigate differential distributions and prospects for their stopping in the collider detectors. New possible strategies are outlined to determine the mass and width of the heavy CP-even Higgs boson H0. Scans of the relevant regions in the CMSSM are performed and predictions are given for the current experiments at the LHC and the Tevatron. The obtained insights allow us to propose collider tests of cosmologically motivated scenarios with long-lived staus that have an exceptionally small thermal r...

  7. Parton Distributions at a 100 TeV Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Rojo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton will be an essential input for the physics program of a future 100 TeV hadron collider. The unprecedented center-of-mass energy will require knowledge of PDFs in currently unexplored kinematical regions such as the ultra low-x region or the region of multi-TeV momentum transfers. In this contribution we briefly summarise the studies presented in the PDF section of the upcoming report on "Physics at a 100 TeV pp collider: Standard Model processes". First we map the PDF kinematical coverage in the $(x,Q^2)$ plane, quantify PDF uncertainties, and compute ratios of PDF luminosities between 100 TeV and 14 TeV. Then we show how the extreme kinematics of such collider lead to a number of remarkable PDF-related phenomena such as the top quark as a massless parton, an increased role of photon-initiated processes and the possible need of PDFs with high-energy resummation.

  8. The fast tracker processor for hadron collider triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Annovi, A; Bardi, A; Carosi, R; Dell'Orso, Mauro; D'Onofrio, M; Giannetti, P; Iannaccone, G; Morsani, E; Pietri, M; Varotto, G

    2001-01-01

    Perspectives for precise and fast track reconstruction in future hadron collider experiments are addressed. We discuss the feasibility of a pipelined highly parallel processor dedicated to the implementation of a very fast tracking algorithm. The algorithm is based on the use of a large bank of pre-stored combinations of trajectory points, called patterns, for extremely complex tracking systems. The CMS experiment at LHC is used as a benchmark. Tracking data from the events selected by the level-1 trigger are sorted and filtered by the Fast Tracker processor at an input rate of 100 kHz. This data organization allows the level-2 trigger logic to reconstruct full resolution tracks with transverse momentum above a few GeV and search for secondary vertices within typical level-2 times. (15 refs).

  9. $H^{+}H^{-}$ Pair Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Barrientos-Bendezu, A A

    2000-01-01

    We study the pair production of charged Higgs bosons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in the context of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model. We compare the contributions due to qq-bar annihilation at the tree level and gg fusion, which proceeds at one loop. At small or large values of tan(beta), H^+H^- production proceeds dominantly via bb-bar annihilation, due to Feynman diagrams involving neutral CP-even Higgs bosons and top quarks, which come in addition to the usually considered Drell-Yan diagrams. In the case of gg fusion, the squark loop contributions may considerably enhance the well-known quark loop contributions.

  10. Precise Predictions for Z + 4 Jets at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Ita, H; Dixon, L J; Cordero, F Febres; Kosower, D A; Maitre, D

    2012-01-01

    We present the cross section for production of a Z boson in association with four jets at the Large Hadron Collider, at next-to-leading order in the QCD coupling. When the Z decays to neutrinos, this process is a key irreducible background to many searches for new physics. Its computation has been made feasible through the development of the on-shell approach to perturbative quantum field theory. We present the total cross section for pp collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV, after folding in the decay of the Z boson, or virtual photon, to a charged-lepton pair. We also provide distributions of the transverse momenta of the four jets, and we compare cross sections and distributions to the corresponding ones for the production of a W boson with accompanying jets.

  11. Advances in Cryogenics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    1998-01-01

    After a decade of intensive R&D in the key technologies of high-field superconducting accelerator magnets and superfluid helium cryogenics, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has now fully entered its co nstruction phase, with the adjudication of major procurement contracts to industry. As concerns cryogenic engineering, this R&D program has resulted in significant developments in several fields, amon g which thermo-hydraulics of two-phase saturated superfluid helium, efficient cycles and machinery for large-capacity refrigeration at 1.8 K, insulation techniques for series-produced cryostats and mu lti-kilometre long distribution lines, large-current leads using high-temperature superconductors, industrial precision thermometry below 4 K, and novel control techniques applied to strongly non-line ar processes. We review the most salient advances in these domains.

  12. Doubly-charged particles at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Alloul, Adam; Fuks, Benjamin; de Traubenberg, Michel Rausch

    2013-01-01

    In this work we investigate the production and signatures of doubly-charged particles at the Large Hadron Collider. We start with the Standard Model particle content and representations and add generic doubly-charged exotic particles. We classify these doubly-charged states according to their spin, considering scalar, fermionic and vectorial fields, and according to their SU(2)L representation, being chosen to be either trivial, fundamental, or adjoint. We write the most general interactions between them and the Standard Model sector and study their production modes and possible decay channels. We then probe how they can most likely be observed and how particles with different spin and SU(2)L representations could be possibly distinguished.

  13. Direct measurement of the top quark charge at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, U.; Buice, M.; Orr, Lynne H.

    2001-11-01

    We consider photon radiation in t¯t events at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) as a tool to measure the electric charge of the top quark. We analyze the contributions of t¯tγ production and radiative top quark decays to pp(-)-->γl+/-νb¯bjj, assuming that both b quarks are tagged. With 20 fb-1 at the Tevatron, the possibility that the ``top quark'' discovered in run I is actually an exotic charge -4/3 quark can be ruled out at the ~95% confidence level. At the CERN LHC, it will be possible to determine the charge of the top quark with an accuracy of about 10%.

  14. Phenomenology of supersymmetric Z' decays at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Corcella, Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    I study the phenomenology of heavy neutral bosons Z', predicted in GUT-inspired U(1)' models, at the Large Hadron Collider. In particular, I investigate possible signatures due to Z' decays into superymmetric particles, such as chargino, neutralino and sneutrino pairs, leading to final states with charged leptons and missing energy. The analysis is carried out at sqrt{s}=14 TeV, for a few representative points of the parameter space of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, suitably modified to accommodate the extra Z' boson and consistent with the discovery of a Higgs-like boson with mass around 125 GeV. Results are presented for several observables and compared with those obtained for direct Z' decays into lepton pairs. For the sake of comparison, Z' production in the Sequential Standard Model and its supersymmetric decays are also investigated.

  15. In the loop Large Hadron Collider project - UK engineering firms

    CERN Document Server

    Wilks, N

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the latest measures being taken to boost the level of UK engineering firms' involvement in research at CERN (Centre for Nuclear Research), including its 27 km circular Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. Virtually all of the components on this complex project have had to be custom-made, usually in the form of collaboration. It is part of these collaborations that some UK firms have proved they can shine. However, despite the proven capabilities, the financial return continues to be less than the government's funding. Each of the 20 CERN member states provides funds in proportion to its GDP and the UK is the second largest financial contributor. UK firms become price-competitive where a contract calls for a degree of customisation or product development, project management and tight quality control. Development of the Particle Physics Grid, for dissemination and analysis of data from the LHC, continues to provide major supply opportunities for UK manufacturers.

  16. The Large Hadron Collider harvest of run 1

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive volume summarizes and structures the multitude of results obtained at the LHC in its first running period and draws the grand picture of today’s physics at a hadron collider. Topics covered are Standard Model measurements, Higgs and top-quark physics, flavour physics, heavy-ion physics and searches for super symmetry and other extensions of the Standard Model. Emphasis is placed on overview and presentation of the lessons learned. Chapters on detectors and the LHC machine and a thorough outlook into the future complement the book. The individual chapters are written by teams of expert authors working at the forefront of LHC research, typically one from each of the two multi-purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS and one from theory.

  17. Search for Higgs bosons at LEP2 and hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Trefzger, T M

    2001-01-01

    The search for the Higgs boson was one of the most relevant issues of the final years of LEP running at high energies. An excess of 3 sigma beyond the background expectation has been found, consistent with the production of the Higgs boson with a mass near 115 GeV/c/sup 2/. At the upgraded Tevatron and at LHC the search for the Higgs boson will continue. At the Tevatron Higgs bosons can be detected with masses up to 180 GeV with an assumed total integrated luminosity of 20 fb/sup -1/. LHC has the potential to discover the Higgs boson in many different decay channels for Higgs masses up to 1 TeV. It will be possible to measure Higgs boson parameters, such as mass, width, and couplings to fermions and bosons. The results from Higgs searches at LEP2 and the possibilities for searches at hadron colliders will be reviewed. (156 refs).

  18. Non-perturbative QCD effects in jets at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Dasgupta, Mrinal; Salam, Gavin P

    2008-01-01

    We discuss non-perturbative QCD contributions to jet observables, computing their dependence on the jet radius R, and on the colour and transverse momentum of the parton initiating the jet. We show, using analytic QCD models of power corrections as well as Monte Carlo simulations, that hadronisation corrections grow at small values of R, behaving as 1/R, while underlying event contributions grow with the jet area as R^2. We highlight the connection between hadronisation corrections to jets and those for event shapes in e^+e^- and DIS; we note the limited dependence of our results on the choice of jet algorithm; finally, we propose several measurements in the context of which to test or implement our predictions. The results presented here reinforce the motivation for the use of a range of R values, as well as a plurality of infrared-safe jet algorithms, in precision jet studies at hadron colliders.

  19. Threshold resummation for slepton-pair production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozzi, Giuseppe [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, Postfach 6980, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Fuks, Benjamin; Klasen, Michael [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier / CNRS-IN2P3, 53 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38026 Grenoble (France)

    2007-07-01

    We present a first and extensive study of threshold resummation effects for supersymmetric (SUSY) particle production at hadron colliders, focusing on Drell-Yan like slepton-pair and slepton-sneutrino associated production. After confirming the known next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections and generalizing the NLO SUSY-QCD corrections to the case of mixing squarks in the virtual loop contributions, we employ the usual Mellin N-space resummation formalism with the minimal prescription for the inverse Mellin-transform and improve it by re-summing 1/N-suppressed and a class of N-independent universal contributions. Numerically, our results increase the theoretical cross sections by 5 to 15% with respect to the NLO predictions and stabilize them by reducing the scale dependence from up to 20% at NLO to less than 10% with threshold resummation. (authors)

  20. Flavour physics and the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Valerie

    2012-02-28

    An exciting new era in flavour physics has just begun with the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb (where b stands for beauty) experiment, designed specifically to search for new phenomena in quantum loop processes and to provide a deeper understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetries at the most fundamental level, is producing many new and exciting results. It gives me great pleasure to describe a selected few of the results here-in particular, the search for rare B(0)(s)-->μ+ μ- decays and the measurement of the B(0)(s) charge-conjugation parity-violating phase, both of which offer high potential for the discovery of new physics at and beyond the LHC energy frontier in the very near future. PMID:22253243

  1. Precision Muon Tracking Detectors for High-Energy Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Gadow, Philipp; Kroha, Hubert; Richter, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Small-diameter muon drift tube (sMDT) chambers with 15 mm tube diameter are a cost-effective technology for high-precision muon tracking over large areas at high background rates as expected at future high-energy hadron colliders including HL-LHC. The chamber design and construction procedures have been optimized for mass production and provide sense wire positioning accuracy of better than 10 ?m. The rate capability of the sMDT chambers has been extensively tested at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility. It exceeds the one of the ATLAS muon drift tube (MDT) chambers, which are operated at unprecedentedly high background rates of neutrons and gamma-rays, by an order of magnitude, which is sufficient for almost the whole muon detector acceptance at FCC-hh at maximum luminosity. sMDT operational and construction experience exists from ATLAS muon spectrometer upgrades which are in progress or under preparation for LHC Phase 1 and 2.

  2. Flavour physics and the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Valerie

    2012-02-28

    An exciting new era in flavour physics has just begun with the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb (where b stands for beauty) experiment, designed specifically to search for new phenomena in quantum loop processes and to provide a deeper understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetries at the most fundamental level, is producing many new and exciting results. It gives me great pleasure to describe a selected few of the results here-in particular, the search for rare B(0)(s)-->μ+ μ- decays and the measurement of the B(0)(s) charge-conjugation parity-violating phase, both of which offer high potential for the discovery of new physics at and beyond the LHC energy frontier in the very near future.

  3. Effective models of new physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the start of the Large Hadron Collider runs, in 2010, particle physicists will be soon able to have a better understanding of the electroweak symmetry breaking. They might also answer to many experimental and theoretical open questions raised by the Standard Model. Surfing on this really favorable situation, we will first present in this thesis a highly model-independent parametrization in order to characterize the new physics effects on mechanisms of production and decay of the Higgs boson. This original tool will be easily and directly usable in data analysis of CMS and ATLAS, the huge generalist experiments of LHC. It will help indeed to exclude or validate significantly some new theories beyond the Standard Model. In another approach, based on model-building, we considered a scenario of new physics, where the Standard Model fields can propagate in a flat six-dimensional space. The new spatial extra-dimensions will be compactified on a Real Projective Plane. This orbifold is the unique six-dimensional geometry which possesses chiral fermions and a natural Dark Matter candidate. The scalar photon, which is the lightest particle of the first Kaluza-Klein tier, is stabilized by a symmetry relic of the six dimension Lorentz invariance. Using the current constraints from cosmological observations and our first analytical calculation, we derived a characteristic mass range around few hundred GeV for the Kaluza-Klein scalar photon. Therefore the new states of our Universal Extra-Dimension model are light enough to be produced through clear signatures at the Large Hadron Collider. So we used a more sophisticated analysis of particle mass spectrum and couplings, including radiative corrections at one-loop, in order to establish our first predictions and constraints on the expected LHC phenomenology. (author)

  4. Heavy ions: Results from the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapan K Nayak

    2012-10-01

    On November 8, 2010 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN collided the first stable beams of heavy ions (Pb on Pb) at the centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV/nucleon. The LHC worked exceedingly well during its one month of operation with heavy ions, delivering about 10 −1 of data, with peak luminosity reaching to $L_{O} = 2 × 10^{25}$ cm-2 s-1 towards the end of the run. Three experiments, ALICE, ATLAS and CMS, recorded their first heavy-ion data, which were analysed in a record time. The results of the multiplicity, flow, fluctuations and Bose–Einstein correlations indicate that the fireball formed in nuclear collisions at the LHC is hotter, lives longer, and expands to a larger size at freeze-out as compared to lower energies. We give an overview of these as well as new results on quarkonia and heavy flavour suppression, and jet energy loss.

  5. Department of Energy assessment of the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report summarizes the conclusions of the committee that assessed the cost estimate for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This proton-proton collider will be built at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics near Geneva, Switzerland. The committee found the accelerator-project cost estimate of 2.3 billion in 1995 Swiss francs, or about $2 billion US, to be adequate and reasonable. The planned project completion date of 2005 also appears achievable, assuming the resources are available when needed. The cost estimate was made using established European accounting procedures. In particular, the cost estimate does not include R and D, prototyping and testing, spare parts, and most of the engineering labor. Also excluded are costs for decommissioning the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP) that now occupies the tunnel, modifications to the injector system, the experimental areas, preoperations costs, and CERN manpower. All these items are assumed by CERN to be included in the normal annual operations budget rather than the construction budget. Finally, contingency is built into the base estimate, in contrast to Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that explicitly identify contingency. The committee`s charge, given by Dr. James F. Decker, Deputy Directory of the DOE Office of Energy Research, was to understand the basis for the LHC cost estimate, identify uncertainties, and judge the overall validity of the estimate, proposed schedule, and related issues. The committee met at CERN April 22--26, 1996. The assessment was based on the October 1995 LHC Conceptual Design Report or ``Yellow Book,`` cost estimates and formal presentations made by the CERN staff, site inspection, detailed discussions with LHC technical experts, and the committee members` considerable experience.

  6. Resummation for supersymmetric particle production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brensing, Silja Christine

    2011-05-10

    The search for supersymmetry is among the most important tasks at current and future colliders. Especially the production of coloured supersymmetric particles would occur copiously in hadronic collisions. Since these production processes are of high relevance for experimental searches accurate theoretical predictions are needed. Higher-order corrections in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) to these processes are dominated by large logarithmic terms due to the emission of soft gluons from initial-state and final-state particles. A systematic treatment of these logarithms to all orders in perturbation theory is provided by resummation methods. We perform the resummation of soft gluons at next-to-leading-logarithmic (NLL) accuracy for all possible production processes in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. In particular we consider pair production processes of mass-degenerate light-flavour squarks and gluinos as well as the pair production of top squarks and non-mass-degenerate bottom squarks. We present analytical results for all considered processes including the soft anomalous dimensions. Moreover numerical predictions for total cross sections and transverse-momentum distributions for both the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the Tevatron are presented. We provide an estimate of the theoretical uncertainty due to scale variation and the parton distribution functions. The inclusion of NLL corrections leads to a considerable reduction of the theoretical uncertainty due to scale variation and to an enhancement of the next-to-leading order (NLO) cross section predictions. The size of the soft-gluon corrections and the reduction in the scale uncertainty are most significant for processes involving gluino production. At the LHC, where the sensitivity to squark and gluino masses ranges up to 3 TeV, the corrections due to NLL resummation over and above the NLO predictions can be as high as 35 % in the case of gluino-pair production, whereas at the

  7. First electron-cloud studies at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, O; Arduini, G; Metral, E; Rumolo, G; Zimmermann, F; Maury Cuna, H

    2013-01-01

    During the beam commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with 150, 75, 50, and 25-ns bunch spacing, important electron-cloud effects, like pressure rise, cryogenic heat load, beam instabilities, or emittance growth, were observed. Methods have been developed to infer different key beam-pipe surface parameters by benchmarking simulations and pressure rise as well as heat-load observations. These methods allow us to monitor the scrubbing process, i.e., the reduction of the secondary emission yield as a function of time, in order to decide on the most appropriate strategies for machine operation. To better understand the influence of electron clouds on the beam dynamics, simulations have been carried out to examine both the coherent and the incoherent effects on the beam. In this paper we present the methodology and first results for the scrubbing monitoring process at the LHC. We also review simulated instability thresholds and tune footprints for beams of different emittance, interacting with an electr...

  8. Mirror mesons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Triantaphyllou, George

    2016-01-01

    The existence of mirror partners of Standard-Model fermions offers a viable alternative to a fundamental BEH mechanism, with the coupling corresponding to the gauged mirror generation symmetry becoming naturally strong at energies around 1 TeV. The resulting non-perturbative processes produce dynamical katoptron masses which might range from 0.1 to 1.15 TeV in a way circumventing usual problems with the S parameter. Moreover, they create mirror mesons belonging in two main groups, with masses differing from each other approximately by a factor of six and which might range approximately from 0.1 to 2.8 TeV. Since the corresponding phenomenology expected at hadron colliders is particularly rich, some interesting mirror-meson cross-sections are presented, something that might also lead to a deeper understanding of the underlying mirror fermion structure. Among other findings, results in principle compatible with indications from LHC concerning decays of new particles to two photons are analyzed.

  9. Commissioning and First Operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Ph

    2010-01-01

    After some fifteen years of construction, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was commissioned at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research in 2008. This high-energy particle accelerator of 26.7 km circumference – the largest scientific instrument ever built – brings into collision intense beams of protons and ions to probe the structure of matter and study the forces acting on its elementary components at the TeV scale, an order of magnitude higher than the previous stateof-the-art. To guide and focus its particle beams, the LHC uses several thousands high-field superconducting magnets operating in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. The project therefore constitutes a technological feat: all its components were developed, industrialized and series produced by industrial companies according to demanding specifications. Started as a CERN undertaking – by decision of the CERN Council and its twenty European member states – the project soon became global with special contributions from Canada, India, Jap...

  10. Anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations at the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, You

    One of the fundamental questions in the phenomenology of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is what the properties of matter are at the extreme densities and temperatures where quarks and gluons are in a new state of matter, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Collisions of high-energy heavy-ions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), allow us to create and study the properties of such a system in the laboratory. Anisotropic flow (vn) is strong evidence for the existence of QGP, and has been described as one of the most important observations measured in the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. In this thesis, the anisotropic flow of not only charged particles but also identified particles are presented. In addition, the investigations of correlations and fluctuations of both flow angle (symmetry plane) and magnitude were discussed. The main goal of this thesis is to understand the nature of anisotropic flow and its response to the initial geometry of the created system as well as its fluctuations.

  11. Large hadron collider (LHC) project quality assurance plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullo, Lisa; Karpenko, Victor; Robinson, Kem; Turner, William; Wong, Otis

    2002-09-30

    The LHC Quality Assurance Plan is a set of operating principles, requirements, and practices used to support Berkeley Lab's participation in the Large Hadron Collider Project. The LHC/QAP is intended to achieve reliable, safe, and quality performance in the LHC project activities. The LHC/QAP is also designed to fulfill the following objectives: (1) The LHC/QAP is Berkeley Lab's QA program document that describes the elements necessary to integrate quality assurance, safety management, and conduct of operations into the Berkeley Lab's portion of the LHC operations. (2) The LHC/QAP provides the framework for Berkeley Lab LHC Project administrators, managers, supervisors, and staff to plan, manage, perform, and assess their Laboratory work. (3) The LHC/QAP is the compliance document that conforms to the requirements of the Laboratory's Work Smart Standards for quality assurance (DOE O 414.1, 10 CFR 830.120), facility operations (DOE O 5480.19), and safety management (DOE P 450.4).

  12. Large hadron collider (LHC) project quality assurance plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LHC Quality Assurance Plan is a set of operating principles, requirements, and practices used to support Berkeley Lab's participation in the Large Hadron Collider Project. The LHC/QAP is intended to achieve reliable, safe, and quality performance in the LHC project activities. The LHC/QAP is also designed to fulfill the following objectives: (1) The LHC/QAP is Berkeley Lab's QA program document that describes the elements necessary to integrate quality assurance, safety management, and conduct of operations into the Berkeley Lab's portion of the LHC operations. (2) The LHC/QAP provides the framework for Berkeley Lab LHC Project administrators, managers, supervisors, and staff to plan, manage, perform, and assess their Laboratory work. (3) The LHC/QAP is the compliance document that conforms to the requirements of the Laboratory's Work Smart Standards for quality assurance (DOE O 414.1, 10 CFR 830.120), facility operations (DOE O 5480.19), and safety management (DOE P 450.4)

  13. Resolving gluon fusion loops at current and future hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Azatov, Aleksandr; Paul, Ayan; Salvioni, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive Higgs measurements at the LHC have limited resolution on the gluon fusion loops, being unable to distinguish the long-distance contributions mediated by the top quark from possible short-distance new physics effects. Using an Effective Field Theory (EFT) approach we compare several proposed methods to lift this degeneracy, including $t\\bar{t}h$ and boosted, off-shell and double Higgs production, and perform detailed projections to the High-Luminosity LHC and a future hadron collider. In addition, we revisit off-shell Higgs production. Firstly, we point out its sensitivity to modifications of the top-$Z$ couplings, and by means of a general analysis we show that the reach is comparable to that of tree-level processes such as $t\\bar{t}Z$ production. Implications for composite Higgs models are also discussed. Secondly, we assess the regime of validity of the EFT, performing an explicit comparison for a simple extension of the Standard Model containing one vector-like quark.

  14. Sextupole correction magnets for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Meinke, R B; Senti, M; Op de Beeck, W J; De Ryck, C; MacKay, W W

    1999-01-01

    About 2500 superconducting sextupole corrector magnets (MCS) are needed for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN to compensate persistent current sextupole fields of the main dipoles. The MCS is a cold bore magnet with iron yoke. The coils are made from a NbTi conductor, which is cooled to 1.9 K. In the original CERN design 6 individual sub-coils, made from a monolithic composite conductor, are assembled and spliced together to form the sextupole. The coils are individually wound around precision-machined central islands and stabilized with matching saddle pieces at both ends. The Advanced Magnet Lab, Inc. (AML) has produced an alternative design, which gives improved performance and reliability at reduced manufacturing cost. In the AML design, the magnet consists of three splice-free sub-coils, which are placed with an automated winding process into pockets of prefabricated G-11 support cylinders. Any assembly process of sub-coils with potential misalignment is eliminated. The AML magnet uses a Kapton-wra...

  15. Resolving gluon fusion loops at current and future hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azatov, Aleksandr; Grojean, Christophe; Paul, Ayan; Salvioni, Ennio

    2016-09-01

    Inclusive Higgs measurements at the LHC have limited resolution on the gluon fusion loops, being unable to distinguish the long-distance contributions mediated by the top quark from possible short-distance new physics effects. Using an Effective Field Theory (EFT) approach we compare several proposed methods to lift this degeneracy, including toverline{t}h and boosted, off-shell and double Higgs production, and perform detailed projections to the High-Luminosity LHC and a future hadron collider. In addition, we revisit off-shell Higgs production. Firstly, we point out its sensitivity to modifications of the top- Z couplings, and by means of a general analysis we show that the reach is comparable to that of tree-level processes such as toverline{t}Z production. Implications for composite Higgs models are also discussed. Secondly, we assess the regime of validity of the EFT, performing an explicit comparison for a simple extension of the Standard Model containing one vector-like quark.

  16. Superconducting Cable and Magnets for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a high energy, high luminosity particle accelerator under construction at CERN and it will be the largest application of superconductivity. Most of the existing 27 km underground tunnel will be filled with superconducting magnets, mainly 15 m long dipoles and 3 m long quadrupoles. These 1232 dipole and 400 quadrupole magnets as well as many other magnets, are wound with copper stabilized NbTi Rutherford cables and will be operated at 1.9 K by means of pressurized superfluid helium. The operating dipole field is 8.33 T; however the whole system is designed for possible operation up to 9 T. The coils are powered at about 12 kA and about 12 GJ of magnetic energy will be stored in superconducting devices. After a brief review of the main characteristics of the superconductors and of the magnets, the special measures taken to fulfill the mass production with the necessary accuracy are presented. The results on one third of the superconducting cable production and on the first f...

  17. Development of superconducting links for the Large Hadron Collider machine

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine, new superconducting lines are being developed for the feeding of the LHC magnets. The proposed electrical layout envisages the location of the power converters in surface buildings, and the transfer of the current from the surface to the LHC tunnel, where the magnets are located, via superconducting links containing tens of cables feeding different circuits and transferring altogether more than 150 kA. Depending on the location, the links will have a length ranging from 300 m to 500 m, and they will span a vertical distance of about 80 m. An overview of the R&D program that has been launched by CERN is presented, with special attention to the development of novel types of cables made from MgB 2 and high temperature superconductors (Bi-2223 and REBCO) and to the results of the tests performed on prototype links. Plans for future activities are presented, together with a timeline for potential future integration in the LHC machine.

  18. The Hunt for New Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Hadron Collider presents an unprecedented opportunity to probe the realm of new physics in the TeV region and shed light on some of the core unresolved issues of particle physics. These include the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass, the possible constituent of cold dark matter, new sources of CP violation needed to explain the baryon excess in the universe, the possible existence of extra gauge groups and extra matter, and importantly the path Nature chooses to resolve the hierarchy problem - is it supersymmetry or extra dimensions. Many models of new physics beyond the standard model contain a hidden sector which can be probed at the LHC. Additionally, the LHC will be a top factory and accurate measurements of the properties of the top and its rare decays will provide a window to new physics. Further, the LHC could shed light on the origin of neutralino masses if the new physics associated with their generation lies in the TeV region. Finally, the LHC is also a laboratory to test the hypothesis of TeV scale strings and D brane models. An overview of these possibilities is presented in the spirit that it will serve as a companion to the Technical Design Reports (TDRs) by the particle detector groups ATLAS and CMS to facilitate the test of the new theoretical ideas at the LHC. Which of these ideas stands the test of the LHC data will govern the course of particle physics in the subsequent decades.

  19. The Hunt for New Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Pran; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Dutta, Bhaskar; Feldman, Daniel; Liu, Zuowei; Han, Tao; Langacker, Paul; Mohapatra, Rabi; Valle, Jose; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Zerwas, Dirk; AbdusSalam, Shehu; Adam-Bourdarios, Claire; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Allanach, Benjamin; Altunkaynak, B; Anchordoqui, Luis A; Baer, Howard; Bajc, Borut; Buchmueller, O; Carena, M; Cavanaugh, R; Chang, S; Choi, Kiwoon; Csaki, C; Dawson, S; de Campos, F; De Roeck, A; Duhrssen, M; Eboli, O J.P; Ellis, J R; Flacher, H; Goldberg, H; Grimus, W; Haisch, U; Heinemeyer, S; Hirsch, M; Holmes, M; Ibrahim, Tarek; Isidori, G; Kane, Gordon; Kong, K; Lafaye, Remi; Landsberg, G; Lavoura, L; Lee, Jae Sik; Lee, Seung J; Lisanti, M; Lust, Dieter; Magro, M B; Mahbubani, R; Malinsky, M; Maltoni, Fabio; Morisi, S; Muhlleitner, M M; Mukhopadhyaya, B; Neubert, M; Olive, K A; Perez, Gilad; Perez, Pavel Fileviez; Plehn, T; Ponton, E; Porod, Werner; Quevedo, F; Rauch, M; Restrepo, D; Rizzo, T G; Romao, J C; Ronga, F J; Santiago, Jose; Schechter, J; Senjanovic, G; Shao, J; Spira, M; Stieberger, S; Sullivan, Zack; Tait, Tim M P; Tata, Xerxes; Taylor, T R; Toharia, M; Wacker, J; Wagner, C E.M; Wang, Lian-Tao; Weiglein, G; Zeppenfeld, D; Zurek, K

    2010-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider presents an unprecedented opportunity to probe the realm of new physics in the TeV region and shed light on some of the core unresolved issues of particle physics. These include the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass, the possible constituent of cold dark matter, new sources of CP violation needed to explain the baryon excess in the universe, the possible existence of extra gauge groups and extra matter, and importantly the path Nature chooses to resolve the hierarchy problem - is it supersymmetry or extra dimensions. Many models of new physics beyond the standard model contain a hidden sector which can be probed at the LHC. Additionally, the LHC will be a top factory and accurate measurements of the properties of the top and its rare decays will provide a window to new physics. Further, the LHC could shed light on the origin of neutralino masses if the new physics associated with their generation lies in the TeV region. Finally, the LHC is also a laboratory ...

  20. Search for invisibly decaying Higgs boson at Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Bansal; K Mazumdar; J B Singh

    2010-02-01

    In several scenarios of Beyond Standard Model physics, the invisible decay mode of the Higgs boson is an interesting possibility. The search strategy for an invisible Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), using weak boson fusion process, has been studied in detail, by taking into account all possible backgrounds. Realistic simulations have been used in the context of CMS experiment to devise a set of event selection criteria which eventually enhances the signal contribution compared to the background processes in characteristic distributions. In cut-based analysis, multi-jet background is found to overwhelm the signal in the finally selected sample. With an integrated luminosity of 10 fb-1, an upper limit of 36% on the branching ratio can be obtained for Higgs boson with a mass of 120 GeV/c2 for LHC energy of 14 TeV. Since the analysis essentially depends on the background estimation, detailed studies have been done to determine the background rates from real data.

  1. Measuring masses of semi-invisibly decaying particles pair produced at hadron colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Lester, Christopher G; Summers, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a variable useful for measuring masses of particles pair produced at hadron colliders, where each particle decays to one particle that is directly observable and another particle whose existence can only be inferred from missing transverse momenta. This variable is closely related to the transverse mass variable commonly used for measuring the $W$ mass at hadron colliders, and like the transverse mass our variable extracts masses in a reasonably model independent way. Without con...

  2. Extra dimension searches at hadron colliders to next-to-leading order-QCD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M C Kumar; Prakash Mathewes; V Ravindran

    2007-11-01

    The quantitative impact of NLO-QCD corrections for searches of large and warped extra dimensions at hadron colliders are investigated for the Drell-Yan process. The K-factor for various observables at hadron colliders are presented. Factorisation, renormalisation scale dependence and uncertainties due to various parton distribution functions are studied. Uncertainties arising from the error on experimental data are estimated using the MRST parton distribution functions.

  3. Signatures of the anomalous $Z\\gamma$ and $ZZ$ production at the lepton and hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Gounaris, George J; Renard, F M

    2000-01-01

    The possible form of the ZZZ, ZZ$\\gamma$ and $Z\\gamma \\gamma$ vertices which may be induced from some New Physics interactions is critically examined. Their signatures and the possibilities to study them, through ZZ and $Z\\gamma$ production, at the e^-e^+ Colliders LEP and LC and at the hadronic Colliders Tevatron and LHC, are investigated.

  4. Destination Universe: The Incredible Journey of a Proton in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    This brochure illustrates the incredible journey of a proton as he winds his way through the CERN accelerator chain and ends up inside the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC is CERN's flagship particle accelerator which can collide protons together at close to the speed of light, creating circumstances like those just seconds after the Big Bang.

  5. Destination Universe: The Incredible Journey of a Proton in the Large Hadron Collider (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    This brochure illustrates the incredible journey of a proton as he winds his way through the CERN accelerator chain and ends up inside the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC is CERN's flagship particle accelerator which can collide protons together at close to the speed of light, creating circumstances like those just seconds after the Big Bang.

  6. The CDF SVX: A silicon vertex detector for a hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A silicon microstrip vertex detector is being constructed as an upgrade to the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron-1 anti pp collider. This device, which is designed to operate in the hadron collider environment, should allow the tagging of long-lived heavy flavors produced in anti pp collisions. The mechanical and electronic design of this device are described in this paper. (orig.)

  7. CERN Library | Mario Campanelli presents "Inside CERN's Large Hadron Collider" | 16 March

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2016-01-01

    "Inside CERN's Large Hadron Collider" by Mario Campanelli. Presentation on Wednesday, 16 March at 4 p.m. in the Library (bldg 52-1-052) The book aims to explain the historical development of particle physics, with special emphasis on CERN and collider physics. It describes in detail the LHC accelerator and its detectors, describing the science involved as well as the sociology of big collaborations, culminating with the discovery of the Higgs boson.  Inside CERN's Large Hadron Collider  Mario Campanelli World Scientific Publishing, 2015  ISBN 9789814656641​

  8. Bottomonium production with statistical hadronization in heavy-ion collisions at collider energies

    CERN Document Server

    Byungsik, Hong

    2004-01-01

    We present the bottomonium production estimated by using the hybrid model that combines direct bb pair creation in hard scattering and a statistical hadronization of the deconfined quark-gluon plasma. Complete color screening and full equilibration of the deconfined quark matter is assumed in the quark-gluon plasma phase. An enhanced production of the Upsilon (1S) state is predicted at collider energies. However, a significant, difference between the RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) and the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) is expected in the centrality dependence of the Upsilon (1S) production. Normalizing the Upsilon (1S) production by the average number of binary collisions, we expect about a factor of five decrease from half-overlap to central collisions at the RHIC, but almost no change at the LHC. Plans for measuring the bottomonium production cross-sections in future collider experiments are summarized. (28 refs).

  9. Hangout With CERN: The Large Hadron Collider (S01E02)

    CERN Multimedia

    Kahle, Kate

    2012-01-01

    In this second Hangout with CERN "The Large Hadron Collider" ATLAS physicist Steven Goldfarb is joined by Giulia Papotti and Laurette Ponce from the CERN Control Centre, Despina Hatzifotiadou and Ken Read from the ALICE experiment, Achintya Rao and Roberto Rossin from the CMS experiment and Patrick Koppenburg from the LHCb experiment, as well as Jaana Nystrom from Finland and Liz Krane from the USA. This hangout answers questions about the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) received via #askCERN on Twitter and Google+ and via YouTube and Facebook comments. Recorded live on 8th November 2012.

  10. The Atlas detector: a general purpose experiment at the large hadron collider at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwindling, J. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d' Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee

    1996-07-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has designed a general purpose detector to be operated at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The design of the detector took into account the requirements from the physics and the constraints form the collider, but also the cost and technological aspects. It is supported by a large amount of detailed simulations and test activities. The following sections describe the various sub-detectors, starting from the inner tracker detectors which surround the interaction point, going through the electromagnetic (EM) and hadronic (HAD) calorimeters, and ending up with the external muon spectrometer and a few characteristics of the trigger system. (author)

  11. Top-quark pair production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, Valentin

    2011-12-08

    In this thesis we investigate several phenomenologically important properties of top-quark pair production at hadron colliders. We calculate double differential cross sections in two different kinematical setups, pair invariant-mass (PIM) and single-particle inclusive (1PI) kinematics. In pair invariant-mass kinematics we are able to present results for the double differential cross section with respect to the invariant mass of the top-quark pair and the top-quark scattering angle. Working in the threshold region, where the pair invariant mass M is close to the partonic center-of-mass energy {radical}(s), we are able to factorize the partonic cross section into different energy regions. We use renormalization-group (RG) methods to resum large threshold logarithms to next-to-next-to-leading-logarithmic (NNLL) accuracy. On a technical level this is done using effective field theories, such as heavy-quark effective theory (HQET) and soft-collinear effective theory (SCET). The same techniques are applied when working in 1PI kinematics, leading to a calculation of the double differential cross section with respect to transverse-momentum pT and the rapidity of the top quark. We restrict the phase-space such that only soft emission of gluons is possible, and perform a NNLL resummation of threshold logarithms. The obtained analytical expressions enable us to precisely predict several observables, and a substantial part of this thesis is devoted to their detailed phenomenological analysis. Matching our results in the threshold regions to the exact ones at next-to-leading order (NLO) in fixed-order perturbation theory, allows us to make predictions at NLO+NNLL order in RG-improved, and at approximate next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in fixed order perturbation theory. We give numerical results for the invariant mass distribution of the top-quark pair, and for the top-quark transverse-momentum and rapidity spectrum. We predict the total cross section, separately for both

  12. Quantitative Calculations for Black Hole Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bock, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    The framework of Large Extra Dimensions provides a way to explain why gravity is weaker compared to the other forces in nature. A consequence of this model is the possible production of D-dimensional Black Holes in high energy p-p collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. The present work uses the CATFISH Black Hole generator to study quantitatively how these events could be observed in the hadronic channel at mid-rapidity using a particle tracking detector.

  13. Diffractive Higgs boson production at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enberg, R; Ingelman, G; Kissavos, A; Tîmneanu, N

    2002-08-19

    Improved possibilities to find the Higgs boson in diffractive events, having less hadronic activity, depend on whether the cross section is large enough. Based on the soft color interaction models that successfully describe diffractive hard scattering at DESY HERA and the Fermilab Tevatron, we find that only a few diffractive Higgs events may be produced at the Tevatron, but we predict a substantial rate at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  14. Probing the Higgs sector of the minimal Left-Right symmetric model at future hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.; Zhang, Yongchao

    2016-05-01

    If neutrino masses arise from a TeV-scale minimal Left-Right seesaw model, the ensuing extended Higgs sector with neutral, singly and doubly-charged scalars has a plethora of implications for new Higgs boson searches beyond the Standard Model at future hadron colliders, such as the √{s} = 14 TeV High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) and the proposed √{s} = 100 TeV collider (FCC-hh or SPPC). In this article, we provide a glimpse of this new physics in the Higgs sector. Our discussion focuses on the minimal non-supersymmetric version of the Left-Right model with high-scale parity breaking but TeV-scale SU(2) R -breaking, a property desirable to suppress the type-II seesaw contribution to neutrino masses. We analyze the masses and couplings of the physical Higgs bosons in this model, and discuss their dominant production and decay modes at hadron colliders. We identify the best discovery channels for each of the non-SM Higgs bosons and estimate the expected SM backgrounds in these channels to derive the sensitivity reaches for the new Higgs sector at future hadron colliders under discussion. Following a rather conservative approach, we estimate that the heavy Higgs sector can be effectively probed up to 15 TeV at the √{s} = 100 TeV machine. We also discuss how the LR Higgs sector can be distinguished from other extended Higgs sectors.

  15. Future hadron colliders: From physics perspectives to technology R&D

    OpenAIRE

    Battaglia, Marco; Klute, Markus; Mangano, Michelangelo; Prestemon, Soren; Rossi, Lucio; Skands, Peter; Barletta, William A.

    2014-01-01

    High energy hadron colliders have been instrumental to discoveries in particle physics at the energy frontier and their role as discovery machines will remain unchallenged for the foreseeable future. The full exploitation of the LHC is now the highest priority of the energy frontier collider program. This includes the high luminosity LHC project which is made possible by a successful technology-readiness program for Nb[subscript 3]Sn superconductor and magnet engineering based on long-term hi...

  16. Production of exotic charmonium in $\\gamma \\gamma$ interactions at hadronic colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Moreira, B D; Goncalves, V P; Navarra, F S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the Exotic Charmonium (EC) production in $\\gamma \\gamma$ interactions present in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies as well as for the proposed energies of the Future Circular Collider (FCC). Our results demonstrate that the experimental study of these processes is feasible and can be used to constrain the theoretical decay widths and shed some light on the configuration of the considered multiquark states.

  17. Recognizing Critical Behavior amidst Minijets at the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolph C. Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition from quarks to hadrons in a heavy-ion collision at high energy is usually studied in two different contexts that involve very different transverse scales: local and nonlocal. Models that are concerned with the pT spectra and azimuthal anisotropy belong to the former, that is, hadronization at a local point in (η,ϕ space, such as the recombination model. The nonlocal problem has to do with quark-hadron phase transition where collective behavior through near-neighbor interaction can generate patterns of varying sizes in the (η,ϕ space. The two types of problems are put together in this paper both as brief reviews separately and to discuss how they are related to each other. In particular, we ask how minijets produced at LHC can affect the investigation of multiplicity fluctuations as signals of critical behavior. It is suggested that the existing data from LHC have sufficient multiplicities in small pT intervals to make the observation of distinctive features of clustering of soft particles, as well as voids, feasible that characterize the critical behavior at phase transition from quarks to hadrons, without any ambiguity posed by the clustering of jet particles.

  18. Discovering a Light Scalar or Pseudoscalar at The Large Hadron Collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The allowed standard model Higgs mass range has been reduced to a region between 114 and 130 GeV or above 500 GeV, at the 99% confidence level, since the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program started. Furthermore some of the experiments at Tevatron and LHC observe excesses that could arise from...

  19. The Large Hadron Collider project: organizational and financial matters (of physics at the terascale)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Engelen

    2012-01-01

    n this paper, I present a view of organizational and financial matters relevant for the successful construction and operation of the experimental set-ups at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva. Construction of these experiments was particularly c

  20. Smash! exploring the mysteries of the Universe with the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Latta, Sara

    2017-01-01

    What is the universe made of? At CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, scientists have searched for answers to this question using the largest machine in the world: the Large Hadron Collider. It speeds up tiny particles, then smashes them togetherand the collision gives researchers a look at the building blocks of the universe.

  1. CERN celebrating the Lowering of the final detector element for large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    In the early hours of the morning the final element of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector began the descent into its underground experimental cavern in preparation for the start-up of CERNs Large Hadron Collider (LHC) this summer. This is a pivotal moment for the CMS collaboration.

  2. Improving the discovery potential of charged Higgs bosons at the Tevatron and large hadron collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stefano Moretti

    2003-02-01

    We outline several improvements to the experimental analyses carried out at Tevatron (Run 2) or simulated in view of the large hadron collider (LHC) that could increase the scope of CDF/D0 and ATLAS/CMS in detecting charged Higgs bosons.

  3. Z-Z′ Mixing E˙ects at the Large Hadron Collider

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Andreev; Pankov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the expected sensitivity to Z′ boson e˙ects in the W ± boson pair production process at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The results of a model-dependent analysis of Z′ boson e˙ects are presented as constraints on the Z-Z′ mixing angle ˚ and Z′ boson mass.

  4. Large Hadron particle collider may not have its run this November

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), based at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, will not run in November this year as scheduled. The LHC was supposed to have a test run this yera, before switching on the scientific search for the Higgs boson in 2008."(1 page)

  5. 1 Go/s pour la grille de calcul du Large hadron collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Prevéraud, Jean-François

    2006-01-01

    The worldwide collaboration "Worldwide LHC computing grid (WLCG)", in which IN2P3 take part, has just announced a new record in the implementation of a computing grid for the Large Hadron Collider of CERN: a continuous flow of scientific data has been transferred on a worldwide infrastructure grid, with a flow up to sometimes 1 gigaoctet per second (1 page)

  6. CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School 2013 open for applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Mark your calendar for 28 August - 6 September 2013, when CERN will welcome students to the eighth CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School.   Experiments at hadron colliders will continue to provide our best tools for exploring physics at the TeV scale for some time. With the completion of the 7-8 TeV runs of the LHC, and the final results from the full Tevatron data sample becoming available, a new era in particle physics is beginning, heralded by the Higgs-like particle recently discovered at 125 GeV. To realize the full potential of these developments, CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the eighth edition, from 28 August to 6 September 2013. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school which particularly targets young postdocs in exper...

  7. The $B-L$ Supersymmetric Standard Model with Inverse Seesaw at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Khalil, S

    2015-01-01

    We review the TeV scale $B-L$ extension of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (BLSSM) where an inverse seesaw mechanism of light neutrino mass generation is naturally implemented and concentrate on its hallmark manifestations at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  8. Production of extra quarks at the Large Hadron Collider beyond the Narrow Width Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Moretti, Stefano; Panizzi, Luca; Prager, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of both finite width and interference (with background) in the production and decay of extra heavy quarks at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This dynamics is normally ignored in standard experimental searches and we assess herein the regions of validity of current approaches. Further, we discuss the configurations of masses, widths and couplings where the latter breaks down.

  9. One-loop helicity amplitudes for t anti t production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, Simon [The Niels Bohr International Academy and Discovery Center, Copenhagen (Denmark). Niels Bohr Inst.; Sattler, Ralf [Humboldt Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Yundin, Valery [Silesia Univ., Katowice (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    We present compact analytic expressions for all one-loop helicity amplitudes contributing to t anti t production at hadron colliders. Using recently developed generalised unitarity methods and a traditional Feynman based approach we produce a fast and flexible implementation. (ORIG.)

  10. Taking Energy to the Physics Classroom from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, the greatest experiment in history began. When in full operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate the greatest amount of information that has ever been produced in an experiment before. It will also reveal some of the most fundamental secrets of nature. Despite the enormous amount of information available on this…

  11. Precision calculations for top-quark pair production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecjak, Benjamin [Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Top-quark pair production is a benchmark process at hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and LHC. This talk covers precision QCD calculations of the total and differential pair-production cross sections, with an emphasis on results obtained from soft-gluon resummation.

  12. Precision calculations for gauge-boson pair production with a hadronic jet at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallweit, Stefan

    2008-11-21

    Gauge-boson pair-production processes with an additional hadronic jet are of particular interest as background to Higgs and new-physics searches at hadron colliders. Moreover, they enable - besides genuine gauge-boson pair production - a direct analysis of the non-Abelian gauge-boson self-interactions in the electroweak sector. In this work we provide precision calculations for the processes pp/p anti p {yields} VV+jet+X. In detail, corrections to WW+jet, ZZ+jet, and WZ+jet production are evaluated at next-to-leading-order in the strong coupling (NLO QCD). Particular care has to be taken when treating the infrared singularities arising in the virtual and real corrections. The FormCalc/LoopTools package is applied for the virtual corrections, where dimensionally regularized infrared-divergent integrals are added to the FF library which is used for the regular ones. The real-emission matrix elements are evaluated in terms of helicity amplitudes in the Weyl--van-der-Waerden formalism. The Catani--Seymour dipole subtraction formalism mediates the cancellation of infrared divergences between the two contributions. To perform the numerical integration a multi-channel Monte Carlo integrator is written in C++, which is designed to meet the requirements of integrating cross sections in the dipole subtraction formalism. For all gauge-boson assignments, the NLO QCD corrections significantly stabilize the artificial dependence of the leading-order (LO) cross sections on renormalization and factorization scales for Tevatron. For LHC, however, only a modest reduction of the scale dependence results unless a veto on a second hard jet is applied. Beyond investigating the production processes, leptonic decays of the gauge bosons are considered. To this end, a full amplitude calculation including resonant and non-resonant contributions to the leptonic final states, a simple narrow-width approximation (NWA), and an improved version of the NWA that takes into account spin correlations

  13. Precision calculations for gauge-boson pair production with a hadronic jet at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauge-boson pair-production processes with an additional hadronic jet are of particular interest as background to Higgs and new-physics searches at hadron colliders. Moreover, they enable - besides genuine gauge-boson pair production - a direct analysis of the non-Abelian gauge-boson self-interactions in the electroweak sector. In this work we provide precision calculations for the processes pp/p anti p → VV+jet+X. In detail, corrections to WW+jet, ZZ+jet, and WZ+jet production are evaluated at next-to-leading-order in the strong coupling (NLO QCD). Particular care has to be taken when treating the infrared singularities arising in the virtual and real corrections. The FormCalc/LoopTools package is applied for the virtual corrections, where dimensionally regularized infrared-divergent integrals are added to the FF library which is used for the regular ones. The real-emission matrix elements are evaluated in terms of helicity amplitudes in the Weyl--van-der-Waerden formalism. The Catani--Seymour dipole subtraction formalism mediates the cancellation of infrared divergences between the two contributions. To perform the numerical integration a multi-channel Monte Carlo integrator is written in C++, which is designed to meet the requirements of integrating cross sections in the dipole subtraction formalism. For all gauge-boson assignments, the NLO QCD corrections significantly stabilize the artificial dependence of the leading-order (LO) cross sections on renormalization and factorization scales for Tevatron. For LHC, however, only a modest reduction of the scale dependence results unless a veto on a second hard jet is applied. Beyond investigating the production processes, leptonic decays of the gauge bosons are considered. To this end, a full amplitude calculation including resonant and non-resonant contributions to the leptonic final states, a simple narrow-width approximation (NWA), and an improved version of the NWA that takes into account spin correlations are

  14. Preliminary design of the beam screen cooling for the Future Circular Collider of hadron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kotnig, C

    2015-01-01

    Following recommendations of the recent update of the European strategy in particle physics, CERN has undertaken an international study of possible future circular colliders beyond the LHC. This study considers an option for a very high energy (100 TeV) hadron-hadron collider located in a quasi-circular underground tunnel having a circumference of 80 to 100 km. The synchrotron radiation emitted by the high-energy hadron beam increases by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the LHC. To reduce the entropic load on the superconducting magnets' refrigeration system, beam screens are indispensable to extract the heat load at a higher temperature level. After illustrating the decisive constraints of the beam screen's refrigeration design, this paper presents a preliminary design of the length of a continuous cooling loop comparing helium and neon, for different cooling channel geometries with emphasis on the cooling length limitations and the exergetic efficiency.

  15. Proceedings of the Sixth International Workshop on Multiple Partonic Interactions at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Astalos, R; Bartalini, P; Belyaev, I; Bierlich, Ch; Blok, B; Buckley, A; Ceccopieri, F A; Cherednikov, I; Christiansen, J R; Ciangottini, D; Deak, M; Ducloue, B; Field, R; Gaunt, J R; Golec-Biernat, K; Goerlich, L; Grebenyuk, A; Gueta, O; Gunnellini, P; Helenius, I; Jung, H; Kar, D; Kepka, O; Klusek-Gawenda, M; Knutsson, A; Kotko, P; Krasny, M W; Kutak, K; Lewandowska, E; Lykasov, G; Maciula, R; Moraes, A M; Martin, T; Mitsuka, G; Motyka, L; Myska, M; Otwinowski, J; Pierog, T; Pleskot, V; Rinaldi, M; Schafer, W; Siodmok, A; Sjostrand, T; Snigirev, A; Stasto, A; Staszewski, R; Stebel, T; Strikman, M; Szczurek, A; Treleani, D; Trzebinski, M; van Haevermaet, H; van Hameren, A; van Mechelen, P; Waalewijn, W; Wang, W Y

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Partonic Interactions are often crucial for interpreting results obtained at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The quest for a sound understanding of the dynamics behind MPI - particularly at this time when the LHC is due to start its "Run II" operations - has focused the aim of this workshop. MPI@LHC2014 concentrated mainly on the phenomenology of LHC measurements whilst keeping in perspective those results obtained at previous hadron colliders. The workshop has also debated some of the state-of-the-art theoretical considerations and the modeling of MPI in Monte Carlo event generators. The topics debated in the workshop included: Phenomenology of MPI processes and multiparton distributions; Considerations for the description of MPI in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD); Measuring multiple partonic interactions; Experimental results on inelastic hadronic collisions: underlying event, minimum bias, forward energy flow; Monte Carlo generator development and tuning; Connections with low-x phenomena, diffractio...

  16. Unintegrated parton distributions and electroweak boson production at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Watt, G; Ryskin, M G

    2004-01-01

    We describe the use of doubly-unintegrated parton distributions in hadron-hadron collisions, using the (z,k_t)-factorisation prescription where the transverse momentum of the incoming parton is generated in the last evolution step. We apply this formalism to calculate the transverse momentum (P_T) distributions of produced W and Z bosons and compare the predictions to Tevatron Run 1 data. We find that the observed P_T distributions can be generated almost entirely by the leading order q_1 q_2 -> W,Z subprocesses, using known and universal doubly-unintegrated quark distributions. We also calculate the P_T distribution of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the LHC, where the dominant production mechanism is by gluon-gluon fusion.

  17. Saturation in two-hard-scale processes at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Marquet, C; Marquet, Cyrille

    2004-01-01

    A study of saturation effects in two-hard-scale hadronic processes such as Mueller-Navelet jets is presented. The cross-sections are expressed in the dipole framework while saturation is implemented via an extention of the Golec-Biernat and Wusthoff model. The transition to saturation is found to be more abrupt than in gamma*-gamma* cross-sections. Observables with a potentially clear saturation signal are proposed.

  18. Charge asymmetry of heavy quarks at hadron colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Kühn, Johann H.; Rodrigo García, Germán Vicente

    1998-01-01

    A sizeable difference in the differential production cross section of top and antitop quarks, respectively, is predicted for hadronically produced heavy quarks. It is of order $\\alpha_s$ and arises from the interference between charge odd and even amplitudes respectively. For the TEVATRON it amounts up to 15\\% for the differential distribution in suitable chosen kinematical regions. The resulting integrated forward-backward asymmetry of 4--5\\% could be measured in the next round of experiment...

  19. Measurement of → → inclusive process at Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Bansal; K Mazumdar; J B Singh

    2010-09-01

    In several scenarios of beyond Standard Model physics a new heavy resonance is invoked which may decay preferentially, to a pair of taus. Identification of the decay of Standard Model resonance to tau pairs at LHC via subsequent decays of the taus to leptons as well as hadrons is the first step towards the discovery. A method has been suggested to discriminate to tau pair to electron + muon final state against various backgrounds, for early phase of 14 TeV LHC.

  20. Recognizing Critical Behavior amidst Minijets at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Hwa, Rudolph C

    2014-01-01

    The transition from quarks to hadrons in a heavy-ion collision at high energy is usually studied in two different contexts that involve very different transverse scales: local and non-local. Models that are concerned with the $p_T$ spectra and azimuthal anisotropy belong to the former, i.e., hadronization at a local point in $(\\eta,\\phi)$ space, such as the recombination model. The non-local problem has to do with quark-hadron phase transition where collective behavior through near-neighbor interaction can generate patterns of varying sizes in the $(\\eta,\\phi)$ space. The two types of problems are put together in this paper both as brief reviews separately and to discuss how they are related to each other. In particular, we ask how minijets produced at LHC can affect the investigation of multiplicity fluctuations as signals of critical behavior. It is suggested that the existing data from LHC have sufficient multiplicities in small $p_T$ intervals to make feasible the observation of distinctive features of cl...

  1. Ultra-high-field magnets for future hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several new concepts in magnetic design and coil fabrication are being incorporated into designs for ultra-high field collider magnets: a 16 Tesla block-coil dual dipole, also using Nb3Sn cable, featuring simple pancake coil construction and face-loaded prestress geometry; a 330 T/m block-coil quadrupole; and a ∼ 20 Tesla pipe-geometry dual dipole, using A15 or BSCCO tape. Field design and fabrication issues are discussed for each magnet

  2. Observations of the beam-beam interaction in hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper has three parts. In the first part the basic beam-beam theory will be reviewed. Theoretical issues relevant to e+e- colliders will not be mentioned. In the second part we summarize the operational experiences at FERMILAB and CERN. In the last part of the paper, experiments on long-range beam-beam interactions in the TEVATRON are reviewed. (orig./BBOE)

  3. 62-TeV center of mass hadron collider with capability for super bunch beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryuji Yamada and Ken Takayama

    2001-08-22

    A 60 TeV center of mass hadron collider is proposed, which has capability of using Superbunch beam. With Superbunch beam, the luminosity is expected to be increased by a factor of 20, compared with conventional acceleration using RF cavities. This hadron collider will be built in two stages with a low field magnet ring first and a high field magnet ring later in the same tunnel. The low field magnet rig will be built with Pipetron scheme, with 7 TeV and 7 TeV proton beams, making a 14 TeV center of mass energy high luminosity collider, using Superbunch beams. In the second stage 10 Tesla high field magnets with twin beams, will be installed. It also utilizes Superbunch beams, realizing high luminosity collider. To accelerate Superbunch beams, the barrier bucket and acceleration induction cells will be used, which are made of induction cells, utilizing FINEMET material. The core loss of the FINEMET is estimated for the whole collider is estimated. The synchrotron radiation of the collider is also estimated. Merits of Superbunch beams over RF bunched beams for the high energy experiments is described.

  4. Low-cost hadron colliders at Fermilab: A discussion paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, G.W.; Malamud, E.

    1996-06-21

    New more economic approaches are required to continue the dramatic exponential rise in collider energies as represented by the well known Livingston plot. The old idea of low cost, low field iron dominated magnets in a small diameter pipe may become feasible in the next decade with dramatic recent advances in technology: (1) advanced tunneling technologies for small diameter, non human accessible tunnels, (2) accurate remote guidance systems for tunnel survey and boring machine steering, (3) high T{sub c} superconductors operating at liquid N{sub 2} or liquid H{sub 2} temperatures, (4) industrial applications of remote manipulation and robotics, (5) digitally multiplexed electronics to minimize cables, (6) achievement of high luminosities in p-p and p-{anti P} colliders. The goal of this paper is to stimulate continuing discussions on approaches to this new collider and to identify critical areas needing calculations, construction of models, proof of principle experiments, and full scale prototypes in order to determine feasibility and arrive at cost estimates.

  5. Precision Studies of Hadronic and Electro-Weak Interactions for Collider Physics. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yost, Scott A [The Citadel, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2014-04-02

    This project was directed toward developing precision computational tools for proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, focusing primarily on electroweak boson production and electroweak radiative corrections. The programs developed under this project carried the name HERWIRI, for High Energy Radiation With Infra-Red Improvements, and are the first steps in an ongoing program to develop a set of hadronic event generators based on combined QCD and QED exponentiation. HERWIRI1 applied these improvements to the hadronic shower, while HERWIRI2 will apply the electroweak corrections from the program KKMC developed for electron-positron scattering to a hadronic event generator, including exponentiated initial and final state radiation together with first-order electroweak corrections to the hard process. Some progress was also made on developing differential reduction techniques for hypergeometric functions, for application to the computation of Feynman diagrams.

  6. Production of doubly heavy-flavored hadrons at $e^+e^-$ colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Xu-Chang; Pan, Zan

    2015-01-01

    Production of the doubly heavy-flavored hadrons ($B_c$ meson, doubly heavy baryons $\\Xi_{cc}$, $\\Xi_{bc}$, $\\Xi_{bb}$, their excited states and antiparticles of them as well) at $e^+e^-$ colliders is investigated under two different approaches: $LO$ (leading order QCD complete calculation) and $LL$ (leading logarithm fragmentation calculation). The results for the production obtained by the approaches $LO$ and $LL$, including the angle distributions of the produced hadrons with unpolarized and polarized incoming beams, the behaviors on the energy fraction of the produced doubly heavy hadron and comparisons between the two approaches' results, are presented in terms of tables and figures. Thus characteristics of the production and uncertainties of the approaches are shown precisely, and it is concluded that only if the colliders run at the eneries around $Z$-pole (which may be called as $Z$-factories) and additionally the luminosity of the colliders is as high as possible then to study the doubly heavy hadrons...

  7. For Information: CERN-Fermilab2006 Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Applications are Now Open for the CERN-Fermilab2006 Hadron Collider Physics Summer School August 9-18, 2006 Please go to the school web site http://hcpss.fnal.gov/ and follow the links to the Application process. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS APRIL 8, 2006. Successful applicants and support awards will be announced shortly thereafter. Also available on the web is the tentative academic program of the school. The main goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers a broad picture of both the theoretical and experimental aspects of hadron collider physics. The emphasis of the first school will be on the physics potential of the first years of data taking at the LHC, and on the experimental and theoretical tools needed to exploit that potential. A series of lectures and informal discussions will include an introduction to the theoretical and phenomenological framework of hadron collisions, and current theoretical models of frontier physics, as...

  8. Production of doubly heavy-flavored hadrons at e+e- colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xu-Chang; Chang, Chao-Hsi; Pan, Zan

    2016-02-01

    Production of the doubly heavy-flavored hadrons (Bc meson, doubly heavy baryons Ξc c , Ξb c , Ξb b , their excited states, and antiparticles of them as well) at e+e- colliders is investigated under two different approaches: LO (leading-order QCD complete calculation) and LL (leading-logarithm fragmentation calculation). The results for the production obtained by the LO and LL approaches, including the angle distributions of the produced hadrons with unpolarized and polarized incoming beams, the behaviors on the energy fraction of the produced doubly heavy-flavored hadron, and comparisons of results between the two approaches, are presented in tables and figures. Thus, characteristics of the production and uncertainties of the approaches are shown precisely, and it is concluded that only if the colliders run at the energies around the Z pole (which may be called the Z factories) and the luminosity of the colliders is as high as possible is the study of the doubly heavy-flavored hadrons completely accessible.

  9. Future Hadron Colliders: from physics perspectives to technology R&D

    CERN Document Server

    Barletta, W; Klute, M; Mangano, M; Prestemon, S; Rossi, L; Skands, P

    2014-01-01

    High energy hadron colliders have been instrumental to discoveries in particle physics at the energy frontier and their role as discovery machines will remain unchallenged for the foreseeable future. The full exploitation of the LHC is now the highest priority of the energy frontier collider program. This includes the high luminosity LHC project which is made possible by a successful technology-readiness program for Nb3Sn superconductor and magnet engineering based on long-term high-field magnet R&D programs. These programs open the path towards collisions with luminosity of 5×1034 cm−2s−1 and represents the foundation to consider future proton colliders of higher energies. This paper discusses physics requirements, experimental conditions, technological aspects and design challenges for the development towards proton colliders of increasing energy and luminosity.

  10. Future hadron colliders: From physics perspectives to technology R and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, William [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Battaglia, Marco, E-mail: MBattaglia@lbl.gov [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Klute, Markus [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Mangano, Michelangelo [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Prestemon, Soren [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rossi, Lucio; Skands, Peter [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-11-11

    High energy hadron colliders have been instrumental to discoveries in particle physics at the energy frontier and their role as discovery machines will remain unchallenged for the foreseeable future. The full exploitation of the LHC is now the highest priority of the energy frontier collider program. This includes the high luminosity LHC project which is made possible by a successful technology-readiness program for Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor and magnet engineering based on long-term high-field magnet R and D programs. These programs open the path towards collisions with luminosity of 5×10{sup 34} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} and represents the foundation to consider future proton colliders of higher energies. This paper discusses physics requirements, experimental conditions, technological aspects and design challenges for the development towards proton colliders of increasing energy and luminosity.

  11. Jet and W/Z Production at Hadron Colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Cordero, Fernando Febres

    2010-01-01

    The start of the physics program at the LHC has added great impetus in the development of powerful theoretical tools to meet the many challenges that this collider brings. The production of jets and weak vector bosons is at the center of most analyses, from machine performance to new physics searches. In this talk we review some recent advances in the study of jets, in the computation of quantum corrections to processes with large jet multiplicity and their impact in W/Z+jets and W/Z+b-jets p...

  12. A BFKL Monte Carlo approach to jet production at hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Orr, L. H.; Stirling, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    The production of a pair of jets with large rapidity separation in hadron-hadron collisions, and of forward jets in deep inelastic scattering, can in principle be used to test the predictions of the BFKL equation. However in practice kinematic constraints lead to a strong suppression of BFKL effects for these processes. This is illustrated using a BFKL Monte Carlo approach.

  13. Observable Properties of Quark-Hadron Phase Transition at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Hwa, Rudolph C

    2016-01-01

    Quark-hadron phase transition is simulated by an event generator that incorporates the dynamical properties of contraction due to QCD confinement forces and randomization due to the thermal behavior of a large quark system on the edge of hadronization. Fluctuations of emitted pions in the $(\\eta,\\phi)$ space are analyzed using normalized factorial moments in a wide range of bin sizes. The scaling index $\

  14. Spectra of identified hadrons in Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transverse-momentum distributions of identified hadrons produced in Pb-Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are studied in the low and intermediate range for pTT∼3 GeV/c. A substantial portion of the jet energy is found to be lost to the dense medium before the partons emerge at the surface to undergo hadronization by recombination.

  15. Pair production of neutral Higgs bosons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Barrientos-Bendezu, A A

    2001-01-01

    We study the hadroproduction of two neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model, which provides a handle on the trilinear Higgs couplings. We include the contributions from quark-antiquark annihilation at the tree level and those from gluon-gluon fusion, which proceeds via quark and squark loops. We list compact results for the tree-level partonic cross sections and the squark loop amplitudes, and we confirm previous results for the quark loop amplitudes. We quantitatively analyze the hadronic cross sections at the CERN Large Hadron Collider assuming a favorable supergravity-inspired scenario.

  16. Associated production of Z and neutral Higgs bosons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniehl, Bernd A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Palisoc, Caesar P. [Univ. of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines). National Inst. of Physics

    2011-12-15

    We study the hadroproduction of a CP-even or CP-odd neutral Higgs boson in association with a Z boson in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) We include the contributions from quark-antiquark annihilation at the tree level and those from gluon-gluon fusion, which proceeds via quark and squark loops, and list compact analytic results. We quantitatively analyze the hadronic cross sections at the CERN Large Hadron Collider assuming a favorable supergravity-inspired MSSM scenario. (orig.)

  17. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremin, Igor M.

    2009-06-01

    The goals of the physics to be studied at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are very impressive. Four major experimental installations are ready to compete in obtaining and analyzing the data from high-energy hadron collisions. The main hope is to answer the most intricate questions ever asked concerning the most fundamental problems of matter and its fundamental forces and space structure. The design of the LHC and its four detectors is briefly described. We then review the main facts revealed previously by experimentalists at other accelerators. The most pertinent topics and the stage-by-stage plans for LHC investigations are discussed. Further prospects for high-energy physics are outlined.

  18. The LHCf detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriani, O; Bonechi, L; D' Alessandro, R [Universita degli Studi di Firenze and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Bongi, M; Grandi, M; Papini, P [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Castellini, G [IFAC CNR and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Faus, D A [IFIC, Centro Mixto CSIC-UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Fukui, K; Itow, Y; Mase, T; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Menjo, H [Solar-Terrestrial Environment laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Haguenauer, M [Ecole-Polytechnique, Paris (France); Kasahara, K; Mizuishi, M [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Macina, D; Perrot, A L [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Muraki, Y [Konan University, Kobe (Japan)], E-mail: Daniela.Macina@cern.ch (and others)

    2008-08-15

    LHCf is an experiment dedicated to the measurement of neutral particles emitted in the very forward region of LHC collisions. The physics goal is to provide data for calibrating the hadron interaction models that are used in the study of Extremely High-Energy Cosmic-Rays. This is possible since the laboratory equivalent collision energy of LHC is 10{sup 17} eV. Two LHCf detectors, consisting of imaging calorimeters made of tungsten plates, plastic scintillator and position sensitive sensors, are installed at zero degree collision angle {+-}140 m from an interaction point (IP). Although the lateral dimensions of these calorimeters are very compact, ranging from 20 mm x 20 mm to 40 mm x 40 mm, the energy resolution is expected to be better than 6% and the position resolution better than 0.2 mm for {gamma}-rays with energy from 100 GeV to 7 TeV. This has been confirmed by test beam results at the CERN SPS. These calorimeters can measure particles emitted in the pseudo rapidity range {eta} > 8.4. Detectors, data acquisition and electronics are optimized to operate during the early phase of the LHC commissioning with luminosity below 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. LHCf is expected to obtain data to compare with the major hadron interaction models within a week or so of operation at luminosity {approx} 10{sup 29} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. After {approx} 10 days of operation at luminosity {approx} 10{sup 29} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, the light output of the plastic scintillators is expected to degrade by {approx} 10% due to radiation damage. This degradation will be monitored and corrected for using calibration pulses from a laser.

  19. Inside CERN's Large Hadron Collider from the proton to the Higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Campanelli, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The book aims to explain the historical development of particle physics, with special emphasis on CERN and collider physics. It describes in detail the LHC accelerator and its detectors, describing the science involved as well as the sociology of big collaborations, culminating with the discovery of the Higgs boson. Readers are led step-by-step to understanding why we do particle physics, as well as the tools and problems involved in the field. It provides an insider's view on the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

  20. Search for hadron jets and large transverse momentum electrons at the SPS anti p p collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The search of high transverse momentum electrons needs the use of all the different elements of the UA2 detector; therefore the description of this search is a good way to understand the features of the apparatus, and its performance in a collider environment. We present a preliminary analysis of the UA2 data collected during the last Collider run (20 nb-1 integrated luminosity) with particular emphasis on large transverse momentum hadron jets and on electrons having the configuration expected from the decay of electroweak bosons

  1. Probing light-quark Yukawa couplings via hadronic event shapes at lepton colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel idea for probing the Higgs boson couplings through the measurement of hadronic event shape distributions in the decay of the Higgs boson at lepton colliders. The method provides a unique test of the Higgs boson couplings and of QCD effects in the decay of the Higgs boson. It can be used to directly probe the Yukawa couplings of the light quarks and to further test the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. From a case study for the proposed Circular Electron-Positron Collider, light-quark couplings with a strength greater than 8% of the bottom-quark Yukawa coupling in the standard model can be excluded.

  2. Higgs bosons, electroweak symmetry breaking, and the physics of the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, a 7 {circle_plus} 7 TeV proton-proton collider under construction at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva), will take experiments squarely into a new energy domain where mysteries of the electroweak interaction will be unveiled. What marks the 1-TeV scale as an important target? Why is understanding how the electroweak symmetry is hidden important to our conception of the world around us? What expectations do we have for the agent that hides the electroweak symmetry? Why do particle physicists anticipate a great harvest of discoveries within reach of the LHC?

  3. Higgs Bosons, Electroweak Symmetry Breaking, and the Physics of the Large Hadron Collider

    OpenAIRE

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, a 7 + 7 TeV proton-proton collider under construction at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva), will take experiments squarely into a new energy domain where mysteries of the electroweak interaction will be unveiled. What marks the 1-TeV scale as an important target? Why is understanding how the electroweak symmetry is hidden important to our conception of the world around us? What expectations do we have for the agent that hides the electrow...

  4. PDF uncertainties in Higgs production at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Djouadi, A; Djouadi, Abdelhak; Ferrag, Samir

    2004-01-01

    Using the new schemes provided by the CTEQ and MRST collaborations and by Alekhin, we analyse the uncertainties due to the parton distribution functions (PDFs) on the next-to-leading-order cross sections of the four main production processes of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the LHC and the Tevatron. In the Higgs mass range where the production rates are large enough, the spread in the uncertainties when the three sets of PDFs are compared is of about 15% in all processes and at both colliders. However, within one given set of PDFs, the deviations from the values obtained with the reference sets are much smaller, being of ${\\cal O}(5$%), except in the gluon--gluon fusion mechanism at relatively large Higgs boson masses, where they can reach the level of 10% (15%) at the LHC (Tevatron).

  5. TRADING STUDIES OF A VERY LARGE HADRON COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUGGIERO,A.G.

    1996-11-04

    The authors have shown that the design of the ELOISATRON can be approached in five separate steps. In this report they deal with the two major issues of the collider: the size and the strength of the superconducting magnets. The reference design of the SSC calls for a collider circumference of 86 km. It represents the largest size that until recently was judged feasible. The reference design of the LHC requires a bending field of 9 Tesla, that industries are presently determined to demonstrate. Clearly the large size of the project presents problem with magnet tolerances, and collider operation and management. The high field of the superconducting magnets needs to be demonstrated, and the high-field option in excess of 9 Tesla requires extensive research and development. It is obvious from the start that, if the ELOISATRON has to allow large beam energies, the circumference has also to be larger than that of the SSC, probably of few hundred kilometers. On the other end, Tevatron, RHIC and SSC type of superconducting magnets have been built and demonstrated on a large scale and proven to be cost effective and reliable. Their field, nevertheless, hardly can exceed a value of 7.5 Tesla, without major modifications that need to be studied. The LHC type of magnets may be capable of 9 Tesla, but they are being investigated presently by the European industries. It is desired that if one wants to keep the size of the ring under reasonable limits, a somewhat higher bending field is required for the ELOISATRON, especially if one wants also to take advantage of the synchrotron radiation effects. A field value of 13 Tesla, twice the value of the SSC superconducting magnets, has recently been proposed, but it clearly needs a robust program of research and development. This magnet will not probably be of the RHIC/SSC type and not even of the LHC type. It will have to be designed and conceived anew. In the following they examine two possible approaches. In the first approach

  6. Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders. [Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-23

    The work was directed in two complementary directions, the D0 experiment at Fermilab, and the GEM detector for the SSC. Efforts have been towards the data taking and analysis with the newly commissioned D0 detector at Fermilab in the {bar p}p Collider run that started in May 1992 and ended on June 1, 1993. We involved running and calibration of the calorimeter and tracking chambers, the second level trigger development, and various parts of the data analysis, as well as studies for the D0 upgrade planned in the second half of this decade. Another major accomplishment was the ``delivery`` of the Technical Design Report for the GEM SSC detector. Efforts to the overall detector and magnet design, design of the facilities, installation studies, muon system coordination, muon chamber design and tests, muon system simulation studies, and physics simulation studies. In this document we describe these activities separately.

  7. Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-23

    The work was directed in two complementary directions, the D0 experiment at Fermilab, and the GEM detector for the SSC. Efforts have been towards the data taking and analysis with the newly commissioned D0 detector at Fermilab in the [bar p]p Collider run that started in May 1992 and ended on June 1, 1993. We involved running and calibration of the calorimeter and tracking chambers, the second level trigger development, and various parts of the data analysis, as well as studies for the D0 upgrade planned in the second half of this decade. Another major accomplishment was the delivery'' of the Technical Design Report for the GEM SSC detector. Efforts to the overall detector and magnet design, design of the facilities, installation studies, muon system coordination, muon chamber design and tests, muon system simulation studies, and physics simulation studies. In this document we describe these activities separately.

  8. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The worlds largest vacuum system is working at CERN; El Large Hadron Collider (LHC). El sistema de vacio mas grande del mundo esta operando en el CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez y Carvajal, J. M.

    2010-07-01

    When the September 10, 2008, was put into service at CERN, the Large Hadron Collider, the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) particle accelerator Giant left the imagination of particle physicists High Energy, began the most ambitious experiment in the field of Particle Physics High Energy. It expected to lead to the discovery of the predicted Higgs boson or could reveal new physics beyond the Standard Model. (author)

  9. $W^+W^-$ + 3 Jet Production at the Large Hadron Collider in NLO QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Cordero, F Febres; Ita, H

    2015-01-01

    We present next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD predictions to $W^+W^-$ production in association with up to three jets at hadron colliders. We include contributions from couplings of the $W$ bosons to light quarks as well as trilinear vector couplings. These processes are used in vector-boson coupling measurements, are background to Higgs signals and are needed to constrain many new physics scenarios. For the first time NLO QCD predictions are shown for electroweak di-vector boson production with three jets at a hadron collider. We show total and differential cross sections for the LHC with proton center-of-mass energies of 8 and 13 TeV. To perform the calculation we employ on-shell and unitarity methods implemented in the BlackHat library along with the SHERPA package. We have produced event files that can be accessed for future dedicated studies.

  10. Probing gauge-phobic heavy Higgs bosons at high energy hadron colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ping Kuang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We study the probe of the gauge-phobic (or nearly gauge-phobic heavy Higgs bosons (GPHB at high energy hadron colliders including the 14 TeV LHC and the 50 TeV Super Proton–Proton Collider (SppC. We take the process pp→tt¯tt¯, and study it at the hadron level including simulating the jet formation and top quark tagging (with jet substructure. We show that, for a GPHB with MH<800 GeV, MH can be determined by adjusting the value of MH in the theoretical pT(b1 distribution to fit the observed pT(b1 distribution, and the resonance peak can be seen at the SppC for MH=800 GeV and 1 TeV.

  11. Thermal Photon Radiation in High Multiplicity p+Pb Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-02-19

    The collective behavior of hadronic particles has been observed in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. In this work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. The thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low p_{T} direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2-3 in 0%-1% p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermal photon enhancement can therefore serve as a signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems. PMID:26943529

  12. Hadronic forward scattering: Predictions for the Large Hadron Collider and cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Block, Martin M

    2006-01-01

    The status of hadron-hadron interactions is reviewed, with emphasis on the forward and near-forward scattering regions. From analyticity, Finite Energy Sum Rules are introduced from which new analyticity constraints are derived that exploit the many very accurate low energy experimental cross sections, i.e., they constrain the values of the asymptotic cross sections and their derivatives at low energies just above the resonance regions, allowing us new insights into duality. A new robust fitting technique is introduced in order to `clean up' large data samples that are contaminated by outliers. Using our analyticity constraints, new methods of fitting high energy hadronic data are introduced which result in much more precise estimates of the fit parameters, allowing accurate extrapolations to much higher energies. It's shown that the $\\gamma p$, $\\pi^\\pm p$ and nucleon-nucleon cross sections {\\em all} go asymptotically as $\\ln^2s$, saturating the Froissart bound, while conclusively ruling out $\\ln s$ and $s^{...

  13. Hadron multiplicities in Pb+Pb collisions at the large hadron collider and pomeron loop effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the pseudo-rapidity distribution of hadron multiplicities of high energy Pb+Pb collisions by using color glass condensate dynamics at LHC/ALICE in the fixed coupling case. It is found that after including the pomeron loop effects the charged hadron multiplicities at central rapidity are about 1500 for central Pb+Pb collisions, which are significantly smaller than the saturation based calculations, ∼1700 ÷ 2500 and compatible with that based on a study of multiplicities in the fragmentation region. (authors)

  14. Hadron Multiplicities in Pb+Pb Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider and Pomeron Loop Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the pseudo-rapidity distribution of hadron multiplicities of high energy Pb+Pb collisions by using color glass condensate dynamics at LHC/ALICE in the fixed coupling case. It is found that after including the pomeron loop effects the charged hadron multiplicities at central rapidity are about 1500 for central Pb+Pb collisions, which are significantly smaller than the saturation based calculations, ∼ 1700 ÷ 2500 and compatible with that based on a study of multiplicities in the fragmentation region. (nuclear physics)

  15. University of Tennessee deploys force10 C-series to analyze data from CERN's Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Force20 networks, the pioneer in building and securing reliable networks, today announced that the University of Tennessee physics department has deployed the C300 resilient switch to analyze data form CERN's Large Hadron Collider." (1 page)

  16. Toward particle-level filtering of individual collision events at the Large Hadron Collider and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    F. Colecchia

    2013-01-01

    Low-energy strong interactions are a major source of background at hadron colliders, and methods of subtracting the associated energy flow are well established in the field. Traditional approaches treat the contamination as diffuse, and estimate background energy levels either by averaging over large data sets or by restricting to given kinematic regions inside individual collision events. On the other hand, more recent techniques take into account the discrete nature of background, most nota...

  17. Probing Neutral Gauge Boson Self-interactions in ZZ Production at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, Ulrich

    2000-01-01

    A detailed analysis of ZZ production at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider is presented for general ZZZ and ZZ\\gamma couplings. Deviations from the Standard Model gauge theory structure for each of these can be parameterized in terms of two form factors which are severely restricted by unitarity at high energy. Achievable limits on these couplings are shown to be a dramatic improvement over the limits currently obtained by e^+e^- experiments.

  18. Probing neutral gauge boson self-interactions in ZZ production at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, U.; Rainwater, D.

    2000-12-01

    A detailed analysis of ZZ production at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider is presented for general ZZZ and ZZγ couplings. Deviations from the standard model gauge theory structure for each of these can be parametrized in terms of two form factors which are severely restricted by unitarity at high energy. Achievable limits on these couplings are shown to be a dramatic improvement over the limits currently obtained by e+e- experiments.

  19. Updated electron-cloud simulation results for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    OpenAIRE

    Furman, M.A.; Pivi, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents new simulation results for the power deposition from the electron cloud in the beam screen of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We pay particular attention to the sensitivity of the results to certain low-energy parameters of the secondary electron (SE)emission. Most of these parameters, which constitute an input to the simulation program, are extracted from recent measurements at CERN and SLAC.

  20. Physics at the high-energy frontier - the Large Hadron Collider project

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Robert; Evans, David; Gibson, Valerie; Nickerson, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), achieved its first particle collisions in late 2009 and is now running at 7 TeV, the highest energy ever attained in the laboratory, thereby opening the way for the search for many new phenomena. The aim of the meeting is to discuss the scientific, technical, sociological, political and financial challenges of bringing this huge international project to fruition.

  1. Nucleon Decay and Neutrino Experiments, Experiments at High Energy Hadron Colliders, and String Theor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chang Kee [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Douglas, Michaek [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Hobbs, John [State University of New York at Stony Brook; McGrew, Clark [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Rijssenbeek, Michael [State University of New York at Stony Brook

    2013-07-29

    This is the final report of the DOE grant DEFG0292ER40697 that supported the research activities of the Stony Brook High Energy Physics Group from November 15, 1991 to April 30, 2013. During the grant period, the grant supported the research of three Stony Brook particle physics research groups: The Nucleon Decay and Neutrino group, the Hadron Collider Group, and the Theory Group.

  2. Phenomenology of supersymmetric Z ′ decays at the Large Hadron Collider

    OpenAIRE

    Corcella, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    I study the phenomenology of heavy neutral bosons Z', predicted in GUT-inspired U(1)' models, at the Large Hadron Collider. In particular, I investigate possible signatures due to Z' decays into superymmetric particles, such as chargino, neutralino and sneutrino pairs, leading to final states with charged leptons and missing energy. The analysis is carried out at sqrt{s}=14 TeV, for a few representative points of the parameter space of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, suitably modif...

  3. Determining the structure of Higgs couplings at the CERN LargeHadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plehn, Tilman; Rainwater, David; Zeppenfeld, Dieter

    2002-02-01

    Higgs boson production via weak boson fusion at the CERN Large Hadron Collider has the capability to determine the dominant CP nature of a Higgs boson, via the tensor structure of its coupling to weak bosons. This information is contained in the azimuthal angle distribution of the two outgoing forward tagging jets. The technique is independent of both the Higgs boson mass and the observed decay channel.

  4. Left-Right Symmetry and Lepton Number Violation at the Large Hadron Electron Collider

    OpenAIRE

    Lindner, Manfred; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Rodejohann, Werner; Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the proposed Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) will provide a great opportunity to search for left-right symmetry and establish lepton number violation, complementing current and planned searches based on LHC data and neutrinoless double beta decay. We consider several plausible configurations for the LHeC -- including different electron energies and polarizations, as well as distinct values for the charge misidentification rate. Within left-right symmetric theories we determ...

  5. Probing Neutrino Oscillations in Supersymmetric Models at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    De Campos, F; Hirsch, M; Magro, M B; Porod, W; Restrepo, D; Valle, J W F

    2010-01-01

    The lightest supersymmetric particle may decay with branching ratios that correlate with neutrino oscillation parameters. In this case the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has the potential to probe the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle with sensitivity competitive to its low-energy determination by underground experiments. Under realistic detection assumptions, we identify the necessary conditions for the experiments at CERN's LHC to probe the simplest scenario for neutrino masses induced by minimal supergravity with bilinear R parity violation.

  6. Matter-Antimatter Asymmetry in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A

    2010-01-01

    The matter-antimatter asymmetry is one of the greatest challenges in the modern physics. The universe including this paper and even the reader him(her)self seems to be built up of ordinary matter only. Theoretically, the well-known Sakharov's conditions remain the solid framework explaining the circumstances that matter became dominant against the antimatter while the universe cools down and/or expands. On the other hand, the standard model for elementary particles apparently prevents at least two conditions out of them. In this work, we introduce a systematic study of the antiparticle-to-particle ratios measured in various $NN$ and $AA$ collisions over the last three decades. It is obvious that the available experimental facilities turn to be able to perform nuclear collisions, in which the matter-antimatter asymmetry raises from $\\sim 0%$ at AGS to $\\sim 100%$ at LHC. Assuming that the final state of hadronization in the nuclear collisions takes place along the freezeout line, which is defined by a constant...

  7. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School, June 6-15, 2007, CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 9 MARCH 2007. The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, covered extensively the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school, to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be placed on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be supported by in-depth discussion sessions and will include the theory and phenomenology of hadron collisions, discovery physics topics, detector and analysis techniques and tools...

  8. Beyond the LHC: A Conceptual Approach to a Future High Energy Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Syphers, M J; Peggs, S

    1996-01-01

    The concept of a post LHC hadron collider operating in the ra- diation damping regime was discussed in the DPF workshop on future hadron facilities[1]. To date hadron colliders have all op- erated in a state of insigni®cant damping, where phase space di- lution from any source results in a costly degradation of instanta- neous and thus integrated luminosity. The concept of using radi- ation damping to enhance the integrated luminosity results in an effective decoupling of the machine performance from the ini- tial beam parameters. By relying more heavily on the damping mechanism, the requirements for tight emittance control through the injector chain and during the collider ®ll process can be re- laxed allowing for less stringent injection ®eld quality and the possibilities for looser tolerances in many other aspects of the machine. In this paper we present some generic parameters and machine characteristics before examining options for lengthen- ing the standard cell (quadrupole and spool piece reduction...

  9. 3rd CERN-Fermilab HadronCollider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    EP Department

    2008-01-01

    August 12-22, 2008, Fermilab The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 FEBRUARY 2008. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high-energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The third session of the summer school will focus on exposing young post-docs and advanced graduate students to broader theories and real data beyond what they’ve learned at their home institutions. Experts from across the globe will lecture on the theoretical and experimental foundations of hadron collider physics, host parallel discussion sessions and answer students’ questions. This year’s school will also have a greater focus on physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as more time for questions at the end of each lecture. The 2008 School will be held at Fermilab. Further enquiries should ...

  10. Probing the Higgs Sector of the Minimal Left-Right Symmetric Model at Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, P S Bhupal; Zhang, Yongchao

    2016-01-01

    If neutrino masses arise from a TeV-scale minimal Left-Right seesaw model, the ensuing extended Higgs sector with neutral, singly and doubly-charged scalars has a plethora of implications for new Higgs boson searches beyond the Standard Model at future hadron colliders, such as the $\\sqrt s=14$ TeV LHC and the proposed $\\sqrt s=100$ TeV FCC-hh. In this article, we provide a glimpse of this new physics in the Higgs sector. Our discussion focuses on the minimal non-supersymmetric version of the Left-Right model with high-scale parity breaking but TeV-scale $SU(2)_R$-breaking, a property desirable in the non-supersymmetric version to suppress the type-II seesaw contribution to neutrino masses. We analyze the masses and couplings of the physical Higgs bosons in this model, and discuss their production and decay mechanisms at hadron colliders. We derive the sensitivity reach of the new Higgs sector at future hadron colliders under discussion and find that the heavy Higgs sector can be effectively probed up to abou...

  11. Revealing Partons in Hadrons: From the ISR to the SPS Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Darriulat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the structure of hadrons has developed during the seventies and early eighties from a few vague ideas to a precise theory, Quantum Chromodynamics, that describes hadrons as made of elementary partons (quarks and gluons). Deep inelastic scattering of electrons and neutrinos on nucleons and electron–positron collisions have played a major role in this development. Less well known is the role played by hadron collisions in revealing the parton structure, studying the dynamic of interactions between partons and offering an exclusive laboratory for the direct study of gluon interactions. The present article recalls the decisive contributions made by the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings and, later, the proton–antiproton SPS Collider to this chapter of physics.

  12. Collectivity of strange hadrons in small and large colliding systems with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Stephans, George Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Observation of a long-range, near-side, two-particle correlation (known as the ``Ridge") in high-multiplicity pp and pPb collisions opened up new opportunities of exploring novel QCD dynamics in small collision systems. CMS has excellent capabilities of reconstructing weakly decay strange hadrons such as $K^0_s$, $\\Lambda$ and $\\Xi^-$. Studies of strange hadron production and correlations in small colliding systems provide crucial insights to the physical origin of novel collective phenomena. New results of pT spectra and long-range two-particle correlations for charged particles and identified strange hadrons in high-multiplicity pp and pPb collisions are presented. The data at various collision energies for pp and pPb collisions are compared to those obtained in large PbPb colliding systems. A measurement of multi-paricle cumulant in pp and pPb is also presented to explore the collective nature of the long-range correlations.

  13. Physics perspectives of the ALICE experiment at the large hadron collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Massimo Masera

    2003-04-01

    The large hadron collider (LHC) under construction at CERN will deliver ion beams up to centre of mass energies of the order of 5.5 TeV per nucleon, in case of lead. If compared to the available facilities for the study of nucleus–nucleus collisions (SpS and RHIC), this represents a huge step forward in terms of both volume and energy density that can be attained in nuclear interactions. ALICE (a large ion collider experiment) is the only detector specifically designed for the physics of nuclear collisions at LHC, even though it can also study high cross-section processes occurring in proton–proton collisions. The main goal of the experiment is to observe and study the phase transition from hadronic matter to deconfined partonic matter (quark gluon plasma – QGP). ALICE is conceived as a general-purpose detector and will address most of the phenomena related to the QGP formation at LHC energies: for this purpose, a large fraction of the hadrons, leptons and photons produced in each interaction will be measured and identified.

  14. Aspects of pQCD at a 100 TeV future hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bothmann, Enrico; Krauss, Frank; Kuttimalai, Silvan; Schumann, Steffen; Thompson, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In this publication we consider particle production at a future circular hadron collider with 100 TeV centre of mass energy within the Standard Model, and in particular their QCD aspects. Accurate predictions for these processes pose severe theoretical challenges related to large hierarchies of scales and possible large multiplicities of final state particles. We investigate scaling patterns in multijet-production rates allowing to extrapolate predictions to very high final-state multiplicities. Furthermore, we consider large-area QCD jets and study the expectation for the mean number of subjets to be reconstructed from their constituents and confront these with analytical resummed predictions and with the expectation for boosted hadronic decays of top-quarks and W-bosons. We also discuss the validity of Higgs-Effective-Field-Theory in making predictions for Higgs-boson production in association with jets. Finally, we consider the case of New Physics searches at such a 100 TeV hadron-collider machine and disc...

  15. Aspects of perturbative QCD at a 100 TeV future hadron collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothmann, Enrico; Ferrarese, Piero; Krauss, Frank; Kuttimalai, Silvan; Schumann, Steffen; Thompson, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we consider particle production at a future circular hadron collider with 100 TeV center-of-mass energy within the Standard Model, and in particular their QCD aspects. Accurate predictions for these processes pose severe theoretical challenges related to large hierarchies of scales and possible large multiplicities of final-state particles. We investigate scaling patterns in multijet-production rates allowing to extrapolate predictions to very high final-state multiplicities. Furthermore, we consider large-area QCD jets and study the expectation for the mean number of subjets to be reconstructed from their constituents and confront these with analytical resummed predictions and with the expectation for boosted hadronic decays of top quarks and W bosons. We also discuss the validity of Higgs effective field theory in making predictions for Higgs-boson production in association with jets. Finally, we consider the case of new physics searches at such a 100 TeV hadron-collider machine and discuss the expectations for corresponding Standard-Model background processes.

  16. Heavy Majorana Neutrinos from $W\\gamma$ Fusion at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Alva, Daniel; Ruiz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Vector boson fusion processes become increasingly more important at higher collider energies and for probing larger mass scales due to collinear logarithmic enhancements of the cross section. In this context, we revisit the production of a hypothetic heavy Majorana neutrino $(N)$ at hadron colliders. Particular attention is paid to the fusion process $W\\gamma \\rightarrow N\\ell^{\\pm}$. We systematically categorize the contributions from an initial state photon in the elastic, inelastic, and deeply inelastic channels. Comparing with the leading channel via the Drell-Yan production $q \\bar{q}'\\rightarrow W^{*}\\rightarrow N\\ell^{\\pm}$ at NNLO in QCD, we find that the $W\\gamma$ fusion process becomes relatively more important at higher scales, surpassing the DY mechanism at $m_{N} \\sim 1 \\text{TeV} \\ (770 \\text{GeV})$ at the 14 TeV LHC (100 TeV VLHC). We investigate the inclusive heavy Majorana neutrino signal, including QCD corrections, and quantify the Standard Model backgrounds at future hadron colliders. We co...

  17. Literature in focus - The Large Hadron Collider: A Marvel of Technology

    CERN Multimedia

    Cecile Noels

    2009-01-01

    Inside an insulating vacuum chamber in a tunnel about 100 metres below the surface of the Franco-Swiss plain near Geneva, packets of protons whirl around the 27-km circumference of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a speed close to that of light, colliding every 25 nanoseconds at four beam crossing points. The products of these collisions, of which hundreds of billions will be produced each second, are observed and measured with the most advanced particle-detection technology, capable of tracking individual particles as they generate a signature track during their passage through the detectors. All this information is captured, filtered and piped to huge networks of microprocessors for analysis and study by an international team of physicists. When the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) comes on line in 2009, it will be the largest scientific experiment ever constructed, and the data it produces will lead to a new understanding of our Universe. Many thousands of scientists and engineers were behind the planning...

  18. Literature in focus - The Large Hadron Collider: A Marvel of Technology

    CERN Multimedia

    Cecile Noels

    Inside an insulating vacuum chamber in a tunnel about 100 metres below the surface of the Franco-Swiss plain near Geneva, packets of protons whirl around the 27-km circumference of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a speed close to that of light, colliding every 25 nanoseconds at four beam crossing points. The products of these collisions, of which hundreds of billions will be produced each second, are observed and measured with the most advanced particle-detection technology, capable of tracking individual particles as they generate a signature track during their passage through the detectors. All this information is captured, filtered and piped to huge networks of microprocessors for analysis and study by an international team of physicists. When the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) comes on line in 2009, it will be the largest scientific experiment ever constructed, and the data it produces will lead to a new understanding of our Universe. Many thousands of scientists and engineers were behind the planning...

  19. Quantum chromodynamics at high energy, theory and phenomenology at hadron colliders; Chromodynamique quantique a haute energie, theorie et phenomenologie appliquee aux collisions de hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquet, C

    2006-09-15

    When probing small distances inside a hadron, one can resolve its partonic constituents: quarks and gluons that obey the laws of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This substructure reveals itself in hadronic collisions characterized by a large momentum transfer: in such collisions, a hadron acts like a collection of partons whose interactions can be described in QCD. In a collision at moderate energy, a hadron looks dilute and the partons interact incoherently. As the collision energy increases, the parton density inside the hadron grows. Eventually, at some energy much bigger than the momentum transfer, one enters the saturation regime of QCD: the gluon density has become so large that collective effects are important. We introduce a formalism suitable to study hadronic collisions in the high-energy limit in QCD, and the transition to the saturation regime. In this framework, we derive known results that are needed to present our personal contributions and we compute different cross-sections in the context of hard diffraction and particle production. We study the transition to the saturation regime as given by the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. In particular we derive properties of its solutions.We apply our results to deep inelastic scattering and show that, in the energy range of the HERA collider, the predictions of high-energy QCD are in good agreement with the data. We also consider jet production in hadronic collisions and discuss the possibility to test saturation at the Large Hadron Collider. (author)

  20. Exclusive vector meson production with a leading neutron in photon - hadron interactions at hadronic colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, V P; Navarra, F S; Spiering, D

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study leading neutron production in photon - hadron interactions which take place in $pp$ and $pA$ collisions at large impact parameters. Using a model that describes the recent leading neutron data at HERA, we consider exclusive vector meson production in association with a leading neutron in $pp/pA$ collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. The total cross sections and rapidity distributions of $\\rho$, $\\phi$ and $J/\\Psi$ produced together with a leading neutron are computed. Our results indicate that the study of these processes is feasible and that it can be used to improve the understanding of leading neutron processes and of exclusive vector meson production.

  1. A new micro-strip tracker for the new generation of experiments at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinardo, Mauro E. [Univ. of Milan (Italy)

    2005-12-01

    This thesis concerns the development and characterization of a prototype Silicon micro-strip detector that can be used in the forward (high rapidity) region of a hadron collider. These detectors must operate in a high radiation environment without any important degradation of their performance. The innovative feature of these detectors is the readout electronics, which, being completely data-driven, allows for the direct use of the detector information at the lowest level of the trigger. All the particle hits on the detector can be readout in real-time without any external trigger and any particular limitation due to dead-time. In this way, all the detector information is available to elaborate a very selective trigger decision based on a fast reconstruction of tracks and vertex topology. These detectors, together with the new approach to the trigger, have been developed in the context of the BTeV R&D program; our aim was to define the features and the design parameters of an optimal experiment for heavy flavour physics at hadron colliders. Application of these detectors goes well beyond the BTeV project and, in particular, involves the future upgrades of experiments at hadron colliders, such as Atlas, CMS and LHCb. These experiments, indeed, are already considering for their future high-intensity runs a new trigger strategy a la BTeV. Their aim is to select directly at trigger level events containing Bhadrons, which, on several cases, come from the decay of Higgs bosons, Zo's or W±'s; the track information can also help on improving the performance of the electron and muon selection at the trigger level. For this reason, they are going to develop new detectors with practically the same characteristics as those of BTeV. To this extent, the work accomplished in this thesis could serve as guide-line for those upgrades.

  2. Production of the bottom analogs and the spin partner of the X(3872) at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the Monte Carlo event generator tools Pythia and Herwig, we simulate the production of bottom/charm meson and antimeson pairs at hadron colliders in proton-proton/antiproton collisions. With these results, we derive an order-of-magnitude estimate for the production rates of the bottom analogs and the spin partner of the X(3872) as hadronic molecules at the LHC and Tevatron experiments. We find that the cross sections for these processes are at the nb level, so that the current and future data sets from the Tevatron and LHC experiments offer a significant discovery potential. We further point out that the Xb/Xb2 should be reconstructed in the γΥ(nS)(n = 1, 2, 3), Υ(1S)π+π-π0, or χbJπ+π- instead of the Υ(nS)π+π- final states. (orig.)

  3. Detection of invisible particles at hadron collider experiments through the magnetic spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bentivegna, Marco; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Potamianos, Karolos

    2012-01-01

    The production of invisible particles plays great importance in high energy physics. Large part of interesting electroweak processes include production of neutrinos, while many new physics scenarios predict the existence of similarly weakly-interacting particles. In events with associated production of invisible particles and hadronic jets, the measurement of the imbalance in transverse momentum of the final state particles is the major leverage to reject the otherwise dominant source of backgrounds in hadron colliders, i.e. the generic production of many jets by QCD interactions. Here we discuss a novel technique which utilizes the information derived from the spectrometer, eventually coupled with the more straightforward calorimeter information, to infer the passage of invisible particles. We check the validity of this technique in data and Monte Carlo simulations in a broad range of topologies, starting from the simplest, with two jets in the final state, to the ones with very large jet multiplicities. We ...

  4. Probing charged Higgs boson couplings at a future circular hadron collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćakır, I. T.; Kuday, S.; Saygın, H.; Şenol, A.; ćakır, O.

    2016-07-01

    Many of the new physics models predict a light Higgs boson similar to the Higgs boson of the Standard Model (SM) and also extra scalar bosons. Beyond the search channels for a SM Higgs boson, the future collider experiments will explore additional channels that are specific to extended Higgs sectors. We study the charged Higgs boson production within the framework of two Higgs doublet models (THDM) in the proton-proton collisions at a future circular hadron collider (FCC-hh). With an integrated luminosity of Lint=500 fb-1 at very high energy frontier (√{s }=100 TeV ), we obtain a significant coverage of the parameter space and distinguish the charged Higgs-top-bottom interaction within the THDM or other new physics models with charged Higgs boson mass up to 1.5 TeV.

  5. Large Hadron Collider Physics (LHCP2017) conference | 15-20 May 2017 | Shanghai

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The fifth Annual Large Hadron Collider Physics will be held in Shanghai and hosted by Shanghai Jiao Tong University in the period of May 15-20, 2017. The main goal of the conference is to provide intense and lively discussions between experimenters and theorists in such research areas as the Standard Model Physics and Beyond, the Higgs Boson, Supersymmetry, Heavy Quark Physics and Heavy Ion Physics as well as to share a recent progress in the high luminosity upgrades and future colliders developments.     The LHCP2017 website: http://lhcp2017.physics.sjtu.edu.cn/ Event date: 15 - 20 May 2017 Location: Shanghai, China

  6. Signatures of the anomalous Zγ and ZZ production at lepton and hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounaris, G. J.; Layssac, J.; Renard, F. M.

    2000-04-01

    The possible form of new physics (NP) interactions affecting the ZZZ, ZZγ, and Zγγ vertices is critically examined. Their signatures and the possibilities to study them, through ZZ and Zγ production, at the CERN e-e+ colliders LEP and LC and at the hadronic colliders, the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LHC, are investigated. Experimental limits obtained or expected on each coupling are collected. A simple theoretical model based on virtual effects due to some heavy fermions is used for acquiring some guidance on the plausible forms of these NP vertices. In such a case specific relations among the various neutral couplings are predicted, which can be experimentally tested and possibly used to constrain the form of the responsible NP structure.

  7. Signatures of the anomalous Z gamma and ZZ production at lepton and hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Gounaris, George J; Renard, F M

    2000-01-01

    The possible form of new physics (NP) interactions affecting the ZZZ, ZZ gamma , and Z gamma gamma vertices is critically examined. Their signatures and the possibilities to study them, through ZZ and Z gamma production, at the CERN e/sup -/e/sup +/ colliders LEP and LC and at the hadronic colliders, the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN LHC, are investigated. Experimental limits obtained or expected on each coupling are collected. A simple theoretical model based on virtual effects due to some heavy fermions is used for acquiring some guidance on the plausible forms of these NP vertices. In such a case specific relations among the various neutral couplings are predicted, which can be experimentally tested and possibly used to constrain the form of the responsible NP structure. (21 refs).

  8. Weak Interactions in Top-Quark Pair Production at Hadron Colliders: An Update

    CERN Document Server

    Kühn, J H; Uwer, P

    2013-01-01

    Weak corrections for top-quark pair production at hadron colliders are revisited. Predictions for collider energies of 8 TeV, adopted to the present LHC run, and for 14 TeV, presumably relevant for the next round of LHC experiments, are presented. Kinematic regions with large momentum transfer are identified, where the corrections become large and may lead to strong distortions of differential distributions, thus mimicking anomalous top quark couplings. As a complementary case we investigate the threshold region, corresponding to configurations with small relative velocity between top and antitop quark, which is particularly sensitive to the top-quark Yukawa coupling. We demonstrate, that nontrivial upper limits on this coupling are well within reach of ongoing experiments.

  9. Overview of the Large Hadron Collider and of the ATLAS and CMS experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisati, Aleandro; Sharma, Vivek

    2016-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is the most powerful particle accelerator ever built. It has allowed the discovery of a Higgs boson with mass near 125 GeV in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. This chapter provides first an overview of the main characteristics of this collider, as well as a short description of the two general purpose experiments, ATLAS and CMS, which discovered in 2012 a Higgs boson with mass close to 125 GeV. This is followed by a summary of the main aspects of particle identification and reconstruction by these two detectors, together with a short presentation of the main analysis tools used to extract the LHC results of the Higgs boson(s) searches and measurements.

  10. Probing gluon number fluctuation effects in future electron-hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Amaral, J T; Kugeratski, M S

    2013-01-01

    The description of the QCD dynamics in the kinematical range which will be probed in the future electron - hadron colliders is still an open question. Although phenomenological studies indicate that the gluon number fluctuations, which are related to discreteness in the QCD evolution, are negligible at HERA, the magnitude of these effects for the next generation of colliders still should be estimated. In this paper we investigate inclusive and diffractive $ep$ observables considering a model for the physical scattering amplitude which describes the HERA data. Moreover, we estimate, for the first time, the contribution of the fluctuation effects for the nuclear structure functions. In the case of electron-proton collisions, our results indicate that the study of the longitudinal and diffractive structure functions can be useful to constrain the presence of gluon number fluctuations. In the case of electron-ion collisions, these effects are small.

  11. Test of Relativistic Gravity for Propulsion at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, Franklin

    2010-01-01

    A design is presented of a laboratory experiment that could test the suitability of relativistic gravity for propulsion of spacecraft to relativistic speeds. An exact time-dependent solution of Einstein's gravitational field equation confirms that even the weak field of a mass moving at relativistic speeds could serve as a driver to accelerate a much lighter payload from rest to a good fraction of the speed of light. The time-dependent field of ultrarelativistic particles in a collider ring is calculated. An experiment is proposed as the first test of the predictions of general relativity in the ultrarelativistic limit by measuring the repulsive gravitational field of bunches of protons in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The estimated `antigravity beam' signal strength at a resonant detector of each proton bunch is 3 nm/s2 for 2 ns during each revolution of the LHC. This experiment can be performed off-line, without interfering with the normal operations of the LHC.

  12. Predictions for the heavy-ion programme at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto, N

    2010-01-01

    I review the main predictions for the heavy-ion programme at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, as available in early March 2009. I begin by remembering the standard claims made in view of the experimental data measured at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN and at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the BNL. These claims will be used for later discussion of the new opportunities at the LHC. Next I review the generic, qualitative expectations for the LHC. Then I turn to quantitative predictions: First I analyze observables which characterize directly the medium produced in the collisions - bulk observables or soft probes -: multiplicities, collective flow, hadrochemistry at low transverse momentum, correlations and fluctuations. Second, I move to calibrated probes of the medium i.e. typically those whose expectation in the absence of any medium can be described in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) using perturbative techniques (pQCD), usually called hard probes. I discuss particle production...

  13. Boosting Higgs CP properties via VH production at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Rohini; Miller, David J.; Mohan, Kirtimaan; White, Chris D.

    2014-03-01

    We consider ZH and WH production at the Large Hadron Collider, where the Higgs decays to a bbbar pair. We use jet substructure techniques to reconstruct the Higgs boson and construct angular observables involving leptonic decay products of the vector bosons. These efficiently discriminate between the tensor structure of the HVV vertex expected in the Standard Model and that arising from possible new physics, as quantified by higher dimensional operators. This can then be used to examine the CP nature of the Higgs as well as CP mixing effects in the HZZ and HWW vertices separately.

  14. Boosting Higgs CP properties via VH Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Godbole, Rohini; Mohan, Kirtimaan; White, Chris D

    2013-01-01

    We consider ZH and WH production at the Large Hadron Collider, where the Higgs decays to a bb pair. We use jet substructure techniques to reconstruct the Higgs boson and construct angular observables involving leptonic decay products of the vector bosons. These efficiently discriminate between the tensor structure of the HVV vertex expected in the Standard Model and that arising from possible new physics, as quantified by higher dimensional operators. This can then be used to examine the CP nature of the Higgs as well as CP mixing effects in the HZZ and HWW vertices separately.

  15. Searches for the technicolor signatures via gg→W±π_t~(-+) at the Large Hadron Collider

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jin-Shu; SONG Tai-Ping; WANG Shuai-Wei; LU Gong-Ru

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we calculate the production of a charged top pion in association with a W boson via gg fusion at CERN's Large Hadron Collider in the context of the topcolor assisted technicolor model. We find that the total cross section of pp→gg→W±π_t~(-+) is several dozen femtobarns with reasonable values of the parameters, and the total cross section of pp→W±π_t~(-+) can reach a few hundred femtobarns when we consider the sum of the contributions of these two parton subprocesses, gg→W±π_t~(-+) and bb~-→W±π_t~(-+).

  16. Standard Model Higgs boson searches with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aleandro Nisati; on behalf of the ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-10-01

    The investigation of the mechanism responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking is one of the most important tasks of the scientific program of the Large Hadron Collider. The experimental results on the search of the Standard Model Higgs boson with 1 to 2 fb-1 of proton–proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector are presented and discussed. No significant excess of events is found with respect to the expectations from Standard Model processes, and the production of a Higgs boson is excluded at 95% Confidence Level for the mass regions 144–232, 256–282 and 296–466 GeV.

  17. Production of two Higgses at the Large Hadron Collider in CP-violating MSSM

    OpenAIRE

    Bandyopadhyay, Priyotosh; Huitu, Katri

    2011-01-01

    Production of two Higgs bosons is studied in a CP violating supersymmetric scenario at the Large Hadron Collider with $E_{cm}=14$ TeV. There exists a region where a very light Higgs $\\lesssim 50$ GeV could not be probed by LEP experiment. This leads to so called 'LEP hole' region. Recently LHC found a Higgs boson around $\\sim 125$ GeV, which severely constrains the possibility of having lighter Higgs bosons, which cannot be detected, i.e., buried Higgs, in this model. We investigate the possi...

  18. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment: Measuring Matter Antimatter Asymmetries at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Parkes, Chris; Gutierrez, J

    2015-01-01

    This document is the student manual for a third year undergraduate laboratory experiment at the University of Manchester. This project aims to measure a fundamental difference between the behaviour of matter and antimatter through the analysis of data collected by the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The three-body dmecays $B^\\pm \\rightarrow h^\\pm h^+ h^-$, where $h^\\pm$ is a $\\pi^\\pm$ or $K^\\pm$ are studied. The inclusive matter antimatter asymmetry is calculated, and larger asymmetries are searched for in localized regions of the phase-space.

  19. Diphoton signals in theories with large extra dimensions to NLO QCD at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M.C. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046 (India)], E-mail: mc.kumar@saha.ac.in; Mathews, Prakash [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)], E-mail: prakash.mathews@saha.ac.in; Ravindran, V. [Regional Centre for Accelerator-based Particle Physics, Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad (India)], E-mail: ravindra@mri.ernet.in; Tripathi, Anurag [Regional Centre for Accelerator-based Particle Physics, Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad (India)], E-mail: anurag@mri.ernet.in

    2009-02-09

    We present a full next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to diphoton production at the hadron colliders in both standard model and ADD model. The invariant mass and rapidity distributions of the diphotons are obtained using a semi-analytical two cut-off phase space slicing method which allows for a successful numerical implementation of various kinematical cuts used in the experiments. The fragmentation photons are systematically removed using smooth-cone-isolation cuts on the photons. The NLO QCD corrections not only stabilise the perturbative predictions but also enhance the production cross section significantly.

  20. Diphoton signals in theories with large extra dimensions to NLO QCD at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M. C.; Mathews, Prakash; Ravindran, V.; Tripathi, Anurag

    2009-02-01

    We present a full next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to diphoton production at the hadron colliders in both standard model and ADD model. The invariant mass and rapidity distributions of the diphotons are obtained using a semi-analytical two cut-off phase space slicing method which allows for a successful numerical implementation of various kinematical cuts used in the experiments. The fragmentation photons are systematically removed using smooth-cone-isolation cuts on the photons. The NLO QCD corrections not only stabilise the perturbative predictions but also enhance the production cross section significantly.

  1. Complementarity of Forward-Backward Asymmetry for discovery of Z' bosons at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Accomando, Elena; Fiaschi, Juri; Mimasu, Ken; Moretti, Stefano; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The Forward-Backward Asymmetry (AFB) in Z' physics is commonly only thought of as an observable which possibly allows one to profiling a Z' signal by distinguishing different models embedding such (heavy) spin-1 bosons. In this brief review, we examine the potential of AFB in setting bounds on or even discovering a Z' at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and proof that it might be a powerful tool for this purpose. We analyse two different scenarios: Z's with a narrow and wide width, respectively. We find that, in both cases, AFB can complement the conventional searches in accessing Z' signals traditionally based on cross section measurements only.

  2. Standard Model Precision Tests at Hadron Colliders: Theoretical Control on Drell-Yan Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After discussing the relevance of single-W and single-Z production processes at hadron colliders, we review the theoretical knowledge of Drell-Yan physics and present some preliminary results on the combination of electroweak and QCD corrections to a sample of observables of the process pp → W± → μ± + X at the LHC. Our phenomenological analysis shows that a high-precision knowledge of QCD and a careful combination of electroweak and strong contributions is mandatory in view of the anticipated LHC experimental accuracy. (author)

  3. Identification and Classification of Beam Loss Patterns in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Panagiotis, Theodoropoulos; Valentino, Gianluca; Redaelli, Stefano; Herbster, Mark

    The Large Hadron Collider, is the largest particle accelerator ever built, achieving record beam energy and beam intensity. Beam losses are unavoidable and can risk the safety of accelerator’s components. Beam loss maps are used to validate the collimation system, designed to protect the accelerator against beam losses. The complexity of this system requires well defined inspection methods and well defined case studies that ensure normal operation and efficient performance evaluation. In this work, enhancements are proposed to the existing validation methods with extensions towards automating the inspection mechanisms, introducing pattern recognition and statistical learning methods.

  4. Probing new physics in diphoton production with proton tagging at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Fichet, S; Kepka, O.; Lenzi, B.; Royon, C.; Saimpert, M.

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivities to anomalous quartic photon couplings at the Large Hadron Collider are estimated using diphoton production via photon fusion. The tagging of the protons proves to be a very powerful tool to suppress the background and unprecedented sensitivities down to $6 \\cdot 10^{-15}$\\gev$^{-4}$ are obtained, providing a new window on extra dimensions and strongly-interacting composite states in the multi-TeV range. Generic contributions to quartic photon couplings from charged and neutral particles with arbitrary spin are also presented.

  5. Kinematical Correlations for Higgs Boson Plus High P_{T} Jet Production at Hadron Colliders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Yuan, C-P; Yuan, Feng

    2015-05-22

    We investigate the effect of QCD resummation to kinematical correlations in the Higgs boson plus high transverse momentum (P(T)) jet events produced at hadron colliders. We show that at the complete one-loop order, the Collins-Soper-Sterman resummation formalism can be applied to derive the Sudakov form factor. We compare the singular behavior of resummation calculation to fixed order prediction in the case that a Higgs boson and high P(T) jet are produced nearly back to back in their transverse momenta, and find perfect agreement. The phenomenological importance of the resummation effect at the LHC is also demonstrated. PMID:26047222

  6. Lower limit on dark matter production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jonathan L; Su, Shufang; Takayama, Fumihiro

    2006-04-21

    We evaluate the prospects for finding evidence of dark matter production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We consider weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) and superWIMPs and characterize their properties through model-independent parametrizations. The observed relic density then implies lower bounds on dark matter production rates as functions of a few parameters. For WIMPs, the resulting signal is indistinguishable from background. For superWIMPs, however, this analysis implies significant production of metastable charged particles. For natural parameters, these rates may far exceed Drell-Yan cross sections and yield spectacular signals.

  7. W production at large transverse momentum at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Richard J; Kidonakis, Nikolaos; Sabio Vera, Agustín

    2005-11-25

    We study the production of W bosons at large transverse momentum in pp collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We calculate the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections to the differential cross section. We find that the NLO corrections provide a large increase to the cross section but, surprisingly, do not reduce the scale dependence relative to leading order (LO). We also calculate next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) soft-gluon corrections and find that, although they are small, they significantly reduce the scale dependence thus providing a more stable result.

  8. Story of a journey: Rutherford to the Large Hadron Collider and onwards

    CERN Document Server

    Godbole, Rohini M

    2010-01-01

    In this article, I set out arguments why the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) : the machine and the experiments with it, are a watershed for particle physics. I give a historical perspective of the essential link between development of particle accelerators and that in our knowledge of the laws governing interactions among the fundamental particles, showing how this journey has reached destination LHC. I explain how the decisions for the LHC design; the energy and number of particles in the beam, were arrived at. I will end by discussing the LHC physics agenda and the time line in which the particle physicists hope to achieve it.

  9. Direct Top Quark Production at Hadron Colliders as a Probe of New Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Hosch, M.; Whisnant, K.; Young, B. -L.

    1997-01-01

    We examine the effect of an anomalous flavor changing chromomagnetic moment which allows direct top quark production (two partons combining into an unaccompanied single top quark in the s-channel) at hadron colliders. We consider both t-c-g and t-u-g couplings. We find that the anomalous charm quark coupling parameter $\\kappa_c / \\Lambda$ can be measured down to $.06 TeV^{-1}(.009 TeV^{-1}$) at the Tevatron with the Main Injector upgrade(LHC). The anomalous up quark coupling parameter $\\kappa...

  10. Observable T_7 Lepton Flavor Symmetry at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Ma, Ernest; Okada, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    More often than not, models of flavor symmetry rely on the use of nonrenormalizable operators (in the guise of flavons) to accomplish the phenomenologically successful tribimaximal mixing of neutrinos. We show instead how a simple renormalizable two-parameter neutrino mass model of tribimaximal mixing can be constructed with the non-Abelian discrete symmetry T_7 and the gauging of B-L. This is also achieved without the addition of auxiliary symmetries and particles present in almost all other proposals. Most importantly, it is verifiable at the Large Hadron Collider.

  11. Observable T7 lepton flavor symmetry at the Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Khalil, Shaaban; Ma, Ernest; Okada, Hiroshi

    2011-04-01

    More often than not, models of flavor symmetry rely on the use of nonrenormalizable operators (in the guise of flavons) to accomplish the phenomenologically successful tribimaximal mixing of neutrinos. We show instead how a simple renormalizable two-parameter neutrino mass model of tribimaximal mixing can be constructed with the non-Abelian discrete symmetry T(7) and the gauging of B-L. This is also achieved without the addition of auxiliary symmetries and particles present in almost all other proposals. Most importantly, it is verifiable at the Large Hadron Collider.

  12. Constraints on four-fermion interactions from the t anti t charge asymmetry at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosello, M.P.; Vos, M. [IFIC (UVEG/CSIC), Valencia (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    The charge asymmetry in top quark production at hadron colliders is sensitive to beyond-the-Standard-Model four-fermion interactions. In this study we compare the sensitivity of t anti t cross-section and charge asymmetry measurements to effective operators describing four-fermion interactions and study the limits on the validity of this approach. A fit to a combination of Tevatron and LHC measurements yields stringent limits on the linear combinations C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} of the four-fermion effective operators. (orig.)

  13. Design and Installation Challenges of the Neutral Beam Absorbers for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Vélez, Óscar

    2005-01-01

    El CERN (Consejo Europeo de Investigación Nuclear) está construyendo su nuevo acelerador de partículas en la frontera franco-suiza. Actualmente en la fase de instalación, El Large Hadron Collider (LHC), con 26,7 kilómetros de longitud a 100 metros bajo tierra, será el mayor y más potente acelerador de partículas jamás construido. A su llegada al CERN, cada uno de casi 2000 imanes superconductores que formarán parte del acelerador debe ser verificado, ensamblado y transportado hasta ...

  14. The q{sub T} subtraction method for top-quark production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonciani, Roberto [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Catani, Stefano [INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Grazzini, Massimiliano; Sargsyan, Hayk; Torre, Alessandro [Universitaet Zuerich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    We consider QCD radiative corrections to top-quark pair production at hadron colliders. We use the q{sub T} subtraction formalism to perform a fully differential computation for this process. Our calculation is accurate up to the next-to-leading order in QCD perturbation theory and it includes all the flavour off-diagonal partonic channels at the next-to-next-to-leading order. We present a comparison of our numerical results with those obtained with the publicly available numerical programs MCFM and Top++. (orig.)

  15. Beam dynamics aspects of crab cavities in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Y P; Barranco, J; Tomás, R; Weiler, T; Zimmermann, F; Calaga, R; Morita, A

    2009-01-01

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The long-range beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing a crossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The use of crab cavities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may not only raise the luminosity, but it could also complicate the beam dynamics, e.g., crab cavities might not only cancel synchrobetatron resonances excited by the crossing angle but they could also excite new ones, they could reduce the dynamic aperture for off-momentum particles, they could influence the aperture and orbit...

  16. AGS 20th anniversary celebration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggett, N.V. (ed.)

    1980-05-22

    On May 22, 1980, a symposium was held at Brookhaven to celebrate the 20th birthday of the AGS, to recall its beginnings, and to review major discoveries that have been made with its beams. The talks at the symposium are recorded in this volume.

  17. AGS 20th anniversary celebration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On May 22, 1980, a symposium was held at Brookhaven to celebrate the 20th birthday of the AGS, to recall its beginnings, and to review major discoveries that have been made with its beams. The talks at the symposium are recorded in this volume

  18. Particle collider magnet failure blamed on faulty engineering Experts are still weighing whether the hitch will delay the start-up of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Researchers have identified the cause of a hiccup in the construction of the world's next top particle smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). During stress tests last week at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), a support structure tore loose from the housing of a keay ultracold magnet."(1 page)

  19. Studies of Machine Protections for Fast Crab Cavity Failures in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Yee Rendon, Bruce; Lopez, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Crab Cavities (CCs) play a main role in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) project for increasing the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Their successful installation at KEKB accelerator allowed reaching a peak luminosity of 2.1x10^34/cm^2/s. However, CCs have exhibited abrupt changes of phase and voltage during a time period of the order of a few LHC turns. If similar scenarios take place in the HL-LHC, considering the significant stored energy in the beam, CC failures represent a serious threat in regard to LHC machine protection. This thesis presents and discusses the effect of CC voltage or phase changes on a time interval similar to, or longer than, the one needed to dump the beam. The simulations assume a quasi-stationary state (QSS) distribution, before the failure is produced, in order to assess the particles losses for the HL-LHC. These distributions produce beam losses below the safe operation threshold for Gaussian tails, while, for non-Gaussian tails, they are on the sa...

  20. Heavy-Quark Associated Production with One Hard Photon at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartanto, Heribertus Bayu [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2013-01-01

    We present the calculation of heavy-quark associated production with a hard photon at hadron colliders, namely $pp(p\\bar p) → Q\\bar Q +X$γ (for $Q=t,b$), at Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We study the impact of NLO QCD corrections on the total cross section and several differential distributions at both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For $t\\bar t$γ production we observe a sizeable reduction of the renormalization and factorization scale dependence when the NLO QCD corrections are included, while for $b\\bar b$γ production a considerable scale dependence still persists at NLO in QCD. This is consistent with what emerges in similar processes involving $b$ quarks and vector bosons and we explain its origin in detail. For $b\\bar b$γ production we study both the case in which at least one $b$ jet and the case in which at least two $b$ jets are observed. We perform the $b\\bar b$γ calculation using the Four Flavor Number Scheme (4FNS) and compare the case where at least one $b$ jet is observed with the corresponding results from the Five Flavor Number Scheme (5FNS) calculation. Finally we compare our results for $p\\bar p →+b+X$γ with the Tevatron data.

  1. Lightening-like interactions in nuclear collisions at CERN large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Waged, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    A simple basic model for describing proton-nucleus (pA) and nucleus-nucleus (AA) collisions has been the intra-nuclear cascade model, where the interactions are simulated by a sequence of binary nucleon-nucleon (NN) collisions. This model helped to establish many scientific concepts and also creates the foundation for more modern simulation codes, especially at low and intermediate energies. In this paper, we present a new Monte Carlo model for pA and AA collisions at high CERN Large Hadron collider energies. The model implements HIJING code with a collective cascade recipe, that induces striking light-like effect in a large nucleus. A single collision (lightening) event is shown to be a complex process:A primary interacting nucleon passes its energy to the surrounding nucleons in a large nucleus. This new simulation code is shown to be good to reproduce the Large Hadron collider (LHC) data, especially the charged particle pseudorapidity density in p+Pb and Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energies.

  2. Supersymmetry, naturalness and the "fine-tuning price" of the Very Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Fowlie, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The absence of supersymmetry or other new physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has lead many to question naturalness arguments. With Bayesian statistics, we argue that natural models are most probable and that naturalness is not merely an aesthetic principle. We calculate a probabilistic measure of naturalness, the Bayesian evidence, for the Standard Model (SM) with and without quadratic divergences, confirming that the SM with quadratic divergences is improbable. We calculate the Bayesian evidence for the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) with naturalness priors in three cases: with only the $M_Z$ measurement; with the $M_Z$ measurement and LHC measurements; and with the $M_Z$ measurement, $m_h$ measurement and a hypothetical null result from a $\\sqrt{s}=100\\,\\text{TeV}$ Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) with $3000/\\text{fb}$. The "fine-tuning price" of the VLHC given LHC results would be $\\sim400$, which is slightly less than that of the LHC results given the electroweak scale ...

  3. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Ferrando, Belen Salvachua; Salvachua Ferrando, B

    2014-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the European FP7 HiLumi LHC Design Study, we are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were check...

  4. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Previtali, Valentina [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Valishev, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bruce, Roderik [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Redaelli, Stefano [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Rossi, Adriana [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Salvachua Ferrando, Belen [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  5. Fully automated precision predictions for heavy neutrino production mechanisms at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrande, Céline; Mattelaer, Olivier; Ruiz, Richard; Turner, Jessica

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by TeV-scale neutrino mass models, we propose a systematic treatment of heavy neutrino (N ) production at hadron colliders. Our simple and efficient modeling of the vector boson fusion (VBF) W±γ →N ℓ± and N ℓ±+nj signal definitions resolve collinear and soft divergences that have plagued past studies, and is applicable to other color-singlet processes, e.g., associated Higgs (W±h), sparticle (ℓ˜±νℓ˜),and charged Higgs (h±±h∓) production. We present, for the first time, a comparison of all leading N production modes, including both gluon fusion (GF) g g →Z*/h*→N ν ℓ (-) and VBF. We obtain fully differential results up to next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD accuracy using a Monte Carlo tool chain linking feynrules, nloct, and madgraph5_amc@nlo. Associated model files are publicly available. At the 14 TeV LHC, the leading order GF rate is small and comparable to the NLO N ℓ±+1 j rate; at a future 100 TeV Very Large Hadron Collider, GF dominates for mN=300 - 1500 GeV , beyond which VBF takes the lead.

  6. Phenomenology of the Higgs at the hadron colliders: from the standard model to supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis has been conducted in the context of one of the utmost important searches at current hadron colliders, that is the search for the Higgs boson, the remnant of the electroweak symmetry breaking. We wish to study the phenomenology of the Higgs boson in both the Standard Model (SM) framework and its minimal Supersymmetric extension (MSSM). After a review of the Standard Model in a first part and of the key reasons and ingredients for the supersymmetry in general and the MSSM in particular in a third part, we will present the calculation of the inclusive production cross sections of the Higgs boson in the main channels at the two current hadron colliders that are the Fermilab Tevatron collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), starting by the SM case in the second part and presenting the MSSM results, where we have 5 Higgs bosons and focusing on the two main production channels that are the gluon gluon fusion and the bottom quarks fusion, in the fourth part. The main output of this calculation is the extensive study of the various theoretical uncertainties that affect the predictions: the scale uncertainties which probe our ignorance of the higher-order terms in a fixed order perturbative calculation, the parton distribution functions (PDF) uncertainties and its related uncertainties from the value of the strong coupling constant, and the uncertainties coming from the use of an effective field theory to simplify the hard calculation. We then move on to the study of the Higgs decay branching ratios which are also affected by diverse uncertainties. We will present the combination of the production cross sections and decay branching fractions in some specific cases which will show interesting consequences on the total theoretical uncertainties. We move on to present the results confronted to experiments and show that the theoretical uncertainties have a significant impact on the inferred limits either in the SM search for the Higgs boson or on the MSSM

  7. Analysis of the Laser Calibration System for the CMS HCAL at CERN's Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebolo, Luis

    2005-11-01

    The European Organization for Nuclear Physics' (CERN) Large Hadron Collider uses the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector to measure collision products from proton-proton interactions. CMS uses a hadron calorimeter (HCAL) to measure the energy and position of quarks and gluons by reconstructing their hadronic decay products. An essential component of the detector is the calibration system, which was evaluated in terms of its misalignment, linearity, and resolution. In order to analyze the data, the authors created scripts in ROOT 5.02/00 and C++. The authors also used Mathematica 5.1 to perform complex mathematics and AutoCAD 2006 to produce optical ray traces. The misalignment of the optical components was found to be satisfactory; the Hybrid Photodiodes (HPDs) were confirmed to be linear; the constant, noise and stochastic contributions to its resolution were analyzed; and the quantum efficiency of most HPDs was determined to be approximately 40%. With a better understanding of the laser calibration system, one can further understand and improve the HCAL.

  8. Top-Quark Initiated Processes at High-Energy Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Tao; Westhoff, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    In hadronic collisions at high energies, the top-quark may be treated as a parton inside a hadron. Top-quark initiated processes become increasingly important since the top-quark luminosity can reach a few percent of the bottom-quark luminosity. In the production of a heavy particle $H$ with mass $m_H > m_t$, treating the top-quark as a parton allows us to resum large logarithms $\\log(m_{H}^{2}/m_{t}^{2}$) arising from collinear splitting in the initial state. We quantify the effect of collinear resummation at the 14-TeV LHC and a future 100-TeV hadron collider, focusing on the top-quark open-flavor process $gg\\to t\\bar t H$ in comparison with $t\\bar t \\to H$ and $tg\\rightarrow tH$ at the leading order (LO) in QCD. We employ top-quark parton distribution functions with appropriate collinear subtraction and power counting. We find that (1) Collinear resummation enhances the inclusive production of a heavy particle with $m_H\\approx$ 5 TeV (0.5 TeV) by more than a factor of two compared to the open-flavor proces...

  9. Searches for the technicolor signatures via gg ) W±+πtT at the Large Hadron Collider%Searches for the technicolor signatures via gg ) W±+πtT at the Large Hadron Collider

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄金书; 宋太平; 王帅伟; 鲁公儒

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we calculate the production of a charged top pion in association with a W boson via gg fusion at CERN's Large Hadron Collider in the context of the topcolor assisted technicolor model. We find that the total cross section of pp → gg → W±+πt

  10. 62-TeV center of mass hadron collider with superbunch beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, R. [FNAL, Batavia, IL (United States); Takayama, K.; Kishiro, J.; Wake, M.; Toyama, T.; Nakamura, E.; Shimosaki, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Watanabe, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    The scheme of a 62-TeV center of mass p-p collider with superbunch beams at Fermilab is proposed as a practical and realistically achievable future project. It will be built in two stages, using the same tunnel, first with a 2 Tesla low field magnet collider ring and later with a 10 Tesla high field magnet collider ring. Both low and high field magnets have twin bore apertures and will be installed in the tunnel with the circumference of 87.25 km. In each bore a proton beam is accelerated, using induction cavities to increase luminosity. In the first stage we install a 7 TeV accelerator ring with operating field of 2 Tesla, based on the superferric transmission-line design. This ring will be operated as a 14-TeV center of mass collider. This will have the same energy as the LHC, but it will have 15 times higher luminosity, namely 1.5x10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/sec. The estimated synchrotron radiation is negligible with this machine. The existing Fermilab accelerator system, including the 150 GeV main injector, will be used as the injector system. Its rough cost estimation and schedule for this first stage are presented. In the second stage proton beams are accelerated, also using induction cavities up to 31 TeV with the 10 Tesla dipole magnets. The counter circulating beams will collide with the 62-TeV center of mass energy. With the superbunch beams we can expect the luminosity can be increased more than the conventional method with RF cavities. It will be 5x10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/sec. In the second stage, the synchrotron radiation power will be about 12 W/m, which will be the limiting factor for beam intensity, and we need an elaborate beam screen. In appendix another hadron collider up to 90 to 100 TeV center of mass energy is attached. (author)

  11. Uniform description of bulk observables in the hydrokinetic model of A+A collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpenko, Iu. A.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.; Werner, K.

    2013-02-01

    A simultaneous description of hadronic yields; pion, kaon, and proton spectra; elliptic flows; and femtoscopy scales in the hydrokinetic model of A+A collisions is presented at different centralities for the top BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 2.76-TeV energies. The initial conditions are based on the Monte Carlo Glauber simulations. When going from RHIC to LHC energy in the model, the only parameters changed are the normalization of the initial entropy defined by the number of all charged particles in most central collisions, contribution to entropy from binary collisions, and barionic chemical potential. The hydrokinetic model is used in its hybrid version, which provides the correct match (at the isochronic hypersurface) of the decaying hadron matter evolution with hadronic ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics cascade. The results are compared with the standard hybrid models where hydrodynamics and hadronic cascade are matching just at the non-space-like hypersurface of chemical freeze-out or on the isochronic hypersurface. The modification of the particle-number ratios at LHC caused, in particular, by the particle annihilations at the afterburn stage is also analyzed.

  12. On the Deviation of the Standard Model Predictions in the Large Hadron Collider Experiments (Letters to Progress in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyakov A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The newest Large Hadron Collider experiments targeting the search for New Physics manifested the possibility of new heavy particles. Such particles are not predicted in the framework of Standard Model, however their existence is lawful in the framework of another model based on J. A.Wheeler’s geometrodynamcs.

  13. Design Concept and Parameters of a 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ Dipole Demonstrator for a 100 TEV Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlobin, A. V. [Fermilab; Andreev, N. [Fermilab; Barzi, E. [Fermilab; Kashikhin, V. V. [Fermilab; Novitski, I. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    FNAL has started the development of a 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ dipole demonstrator for a 100 TeV scale hadron collider. This paper describes the design concept and parameters of the 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ dipole demonstrator. The dipole magnetic, mechanical and quench protection concept and parameters are presented and discussed.

  14. The Large Hadron Collider project: organizational and financial matters (of physics at the terascale)

    CERN Document Server

    Engelen, Jos

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I present a view of organizational and financial matters relevant for the successful construction and operation of the experimental set-ups at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva. Construction of these experiments was particularly challenging: new detector technologies had to be developed; experimental set-ups that are larger and more complex than ever before had to be constructed; and larger collaborations than ever before had to be organized. Fundamental to the success were: the ‘reference’ provided by CERN, peer review, signed memoranda of understanding, well-organized resources review boards as an interface to the national funding agencies and collegial, but solidly organized, experimental collaborations.

  15. $W^{pm}H^{mp}$ Associated Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Barrientos-Bendezu, A A

    1999-01-01

    We study the production of a charged Higgs boson in association with a W boson at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in the context of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model. This production mechanism is particularly promising if the charged Higgs boson is too heavy to be generated by top-quark decay. We compare the contributions due to b b-bar annihilation at the tree level and gg fusion, which proceeds at one loop. Apart from the total cross section, we also consider distributions in transverse momentum and rapidity. We also assess the viability of W^+- H^-+ associated production at the Fermilab Tevatron after the installation of the Main Injector and the Recycler.

  16. Simulation of electron-cloud heat load for the cold arcs of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Maury Cuna, Humberto; Rumolo, Giovanni; Zimmermann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The heat load due to the electron cloud in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) cold arcs is a concern for its performance near and beyond nominal beam current. We report the results of simulation studies, which examine the electron-cloud induced heat load for different values of low-energy electron reflectivity and secondary emission yield at injection energy, as well as at beam energies of 4 TeV and 7 TeV, for two different bunch spacing: 25 ns and 50 ns. Benchmarking the simulations against heat-load observations at different beam energies and bunch spacings allows an estimate of the secondary emission yield in the cold arcs of the LHC and of its evolution as a function of time.

  17. Precise Predictions for W + 4 Jet Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, C F; Dixon, Lance J; Cordero, F Febres; Forde, D; Gleisberg, T; Ita, H; Kosower, D A; Maitre, D

    2011-01-01

    We present the first next-to-leading order QCD results for W + 4-jet production at hadron colliders. Total cross sections, as well as distributions in the jet transverse momenta and in the total transverse energy H_T are provided for the initial LHC energy of \\sqrt{s} = 7 TeV. We use a leading-color approximation, known to be accurate to 3% for W production with fewer jets. The virtual matrix elements and the most complicated real-emission matrix elements are handled by the BlackHat library, based on on-shell methods. The remaining parts of the calculation, including the integration over phase space, are performed by the SHERPA package.

  18. W±π(干)t Associated Production at Large Hadron Collider

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jin-Shu; PAN Qun-Na

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the production of a charged top pion in association with a W boson at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the context of the topcolor assisted technicolor model. We find that the cross section of pp → b(-b) → W±π(干)t is roughly corresponding to the result of the process pp → b(-b) → W±H(干) in the minimal supersymmetric standard model, and for reasonable ranges of the parameters, the cross section can reach a few hundred fo. The W±π(干)t signal should be clearly visible at LHC unless π±t is very heavy.

  19. eμ Production in R-Parity Violating Supersymmetric Model at Hadron Colliders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the lepton flavor violating productions (p-)p/pp → eμ + X in the framework of the R-parity violating (RPV) supersymmetric model at the Tevatron and the CERN large hadron collider (LHC). We present the total cross sections including the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections and the contribution from gluon-gluon fusion subprocess. Our numerical results show that the one-loop QCD corrections significantly increase the tree-level cross sections, and the variation of K factor is in the range between 1.28 (1.32) and 1.79 (1.58) at the Tevatron (LHC).We find that the QCD correction from the one-loop gluon-gluon fusion subprocess is remarkable at the LHC and should be taken into account.

  20. "Light" Higgs and warped models: Case for a Gigantic International Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, Amarjit

    2013-01-01

    The LHC seems to have made a monumental discovery, Higgs-like particle of mass around 125 GeV with properties akin to a Standard Model Higgs. In the context of a warped theory of flavor, which is theoretically very attractive, this suggests Kaluza-Klein particle masses are likely to be above 10 TeV except possibly for a radion. The interpretation of the SM-like Higgs from the perspective of other interesting beyond the SM scenarios is also likely that the relevant scale is higher than accessible to the LHC. In light of these developments, deeper understanding of flavor and other fundamental issues requires a gigantic international hadron collider [GIHC] perhaps with cm energy of $\\approx$ 100 TeV \\cite{2talks}. It is suggested that a {\\it global effort} should be made for constructing this machine for resolving many questions that SM cannot answer.

  1. Investigation of Injection Losses at the Large Hadron Collider with Diamond Based Particle Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, Oliver; Burkart, Florian; Dehning, Bernd; Griesmayer, Erich; Kain, Verena; Schmidt, Ruediger; Wollmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    During the operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2015, increased injection losses were observed. To minimize stress on accelerator components in the injection regions of the LHC and to guarantee an efficient operation these losses needed to be understood and possible mitigation techniques should be studied. Measurements with diamond particle detectors revealed the loss structure with ns-resolution for the first time. Based on these measurements, recaptured beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) surrounding the nominal bunch train was identified as the major contributor to the injection loss signals. Methods to reduce the recaptured beam in the SPS were successfully tested and verified with the diamond particle detectors. In this paper the detection and classification of LHC injection losses are described. The methods to reduce these losses and verification measurements are presented and discussed.

  2. Non-Standard ZZ Production with Leptonic Decays at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao

    2012-04-01

    The prospects of anomalous ZZγ and ZZZ triple gauge boson couplings are investigated at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through an excess of events in ZZ diboson production. Two such channels are selected and the tree level results including leptonic final states are discussed: ZZ → l1-l1+l2-l2+ and ZZ → l-l+νν¯(l, l1,2 = e, μ). The results in the full finite width method are compared with the narrow width approximation (NWA) method in detail. Besides the Z boson transverse momentum distributions, the azimuthal angle between the Z boson decay to fermions, ΔΦ, and their separations in the pseudo-rapidity-azimuthal angle plane, ΔR, as well as the sensitivity on anomalous couplings are displayed at the 14 TeV LHC.

  3. Willingness to pay for basic research: a contingent valuation experiment on the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Catalano, Gelsomina; Giffoni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of countries and institutions are investing in large-scale research infrastructures (RIs) and in basic research. Scientific discoveries, which are expected thanks to RIs, may have a non-use value, in analogy with environmental and cultural public goods. This paper provides, for the first time, an empirical estimation of the willingness to pay (WTP) for discoveries in basic research by the general public. We focus on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator worldwide, where in 2012 the Higgs boson was discovered. Nobody knows the practical value of such discovery, beyond knowledge per se. The findings of our study are based on a dichotomous choice contingent valuation (CV) survey carried out in line with the NOAA guidelines. The survey involved 1,022 undergraduate students enrolled in more than 30 different degrees (including the humanities) at five universities located in four countries (Italy, France, Spain, UK). We ask two main research questions: Which are the ...

  4. Data-driven estimation of neutral pileup particle multiplicity in high-luminosity hadron collider environments

    CERN Document Server

    Colecchia, Federico

    2015-01-01

    The upcoming operation regimes of the Large Hadron Collider are going to place stronger requirements on the rejection of particles originating from pileup, i.e. from interactions between other protons. For this reason, particle weighting techniques have recently been proposed in order to subtract pileup at the level of individual particles. We describe a choice of weights that, unlike others that rely on particle proximity, exploits the particle-level kinematic signatures of the high-energy scattering and of the pileup interactions. We illustrate the use of the weights to estimate the number density of neutral pileup particles inside individual events, and we elaborate on the complementarity between ours and other methods. We conclude by suggesting the idea of combining different sets of weights with a view to exploiting different features of the underlying processes for improved pileup subtraction at higher luminosity.

  5. Parton distribution functions probed in ultraperipheral collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, J; Brady, N; Clark, D B; Godat, E; Olness, F

    2016-01-01

    Vector meson production in ultra-peripheral pA and AA collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are very sensitive to Parton Distribution Functions (PDF) as well as to their leading-order, next-to-leading-order, and medium corrections. This process is a complimentary tool to explore the effects of different PDFs in particle production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus central collisions. Existing and forthcoming data available, e.g., from ALICE and CMS, may be used in conjunction with our theoretical predictions to constrain the PDFs. We make predictions for rapidity distributions and for cross sections of J/$\\psi$ , $\\psi(2S)$ and $\\Upsilon$ production at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV and $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5$ TeV. We use the second energy as representative for the Run 2 of PbPb collisions at the LHC.

  6. Role-Based Access Control for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Yastrebov, I

    2010-01-01

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest scientific instrument ever created. It was built with the intention of testing the most extreme conditions of the matter. Taking into account the significant dangers of LHC operations, European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) has developed multi-pronged approach for machine safety, including access control system. This system is based on role-based access control (RBAC) concept. It was designed to protect from accidental and unauthorized access to the LHC and injector equipment. This paper introduces the new model of the role-based access control developed at CERN and gives detailed mathematical description of it. We propose a new technique called dynamic authorization that allows deploying RBAC gradually in the large systems. Moreover, we show how the protection for the very large distributed equipment control system may be implemented in efficient way. This paper also describes motivation of the project, requirements and overview of the main components: au...

  7. The Radiological Situation in the Beam-Cleaning Sections of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Brugger, Markus; Stevenson, Graham

    2003-01-01

    This thesis contributes to radiological assessments of the design and operation of the Large Hadron Collider currently under construction at CERN. In particular, the scope of this thesis is to examine the beam cleaning insertions - two of the main loss regions of the LHC where beam particles which would otherwise cause unwanted losses at different places of the machine are purposely intercepted. Two critical issues with regard to the protection of personnel and environment are studied: remanent dose rates due to induced radioactivity and airborne radioactivity. Although a detailed estimate of remanent dose rates is important for an optimization of later maintenance interventions only very limited information on remanent dose rates to be expected around the collimators was available so far. This thesis is an attempt to extend the knowledge considerably, especially by applying a new calculational method. Since this new approach is used for the first time in the design of the LHC a careful benchmarking with expe...

  8. Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Large Hadron Collider to 2025 and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Florio, Massimo; Sirtori, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Social cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of projects has been successfully applied in different fields such as transport, energy, health, education, and environment, including climate change. It is often argued that it is impossible to extend the CBA approach to the evaluation of the social impact of research infrastructures, because the final benefit to society of scientific discovery is generally unpredictable. Here, we propose a quantitative approach to this problem, we use it to design an empirically testable CBA model, and we apply it to the the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the highest-energy accelerator in the world, currently operating at CERN. We show that the evaluation of benefits can be made quantitative by determining their value to users (scientists, early-stage researchers, firms, visitors) and non-users (the general public). Four classes of contributions to users are identified: knowledge output, human capital development, technological spillovers, and cultural effects. Benefits for non-users can be ...

  9. Beam-induced energy deposition issues in the Very Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, N V; Foster, G W

    2001-01-01

    Energy deposition issues are extremely important in the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) with huge energy stored in its 20 TeV (Stage-1) and 87.5 TeV (Stage-2) beams. The status of the VLHC design on these topics, and possible solutions of the problems are discussed. Protective measures are determined based on the operational and accidental beam loss limits for the prompt radiation dose at the surface, residual radiation dose, ground water activation, accelerator components radiation damage and quench stability. The beam abort and beam collimation systems are designed to protect accelerator from accidental and operational beam losses, IP region quadrupoles from irradiation by the products of beam-beam collisions, and to reduce the accelerator-induced backgrounds in the detectors. (7 refs).

  10. Empirical Bayes unfolding of elementary particle spectra at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Kuusela, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    We consider the so-called unfolding problem in experimental high energy physics, where the goal is to estimate the true spectrum of elementary particles given observations distorted by measurement error due to the limited resolution of a particle detector. This an important statistical inverse problem arising in the analysis of data at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Mathematically, the problem is formalized as one of estimating the intensity function of an indirectly observed Poisson point process. Particle physicists are particularly keen on unfolding methods that feature a principled way of choosing the regularization strength and allow for the quantification of the uncertainty inherent in the solution. Though there are many approaches that have been considered by experimental physicists, it can be argued that few -- if any -- of these deal with these two key issues in a satisfactory manner. In this paper, we propose to attack the unfolding problem within the framework of empirical Bayes estimation: we ...

  11. A clean signal for a top-like isosinglet fermion at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aarti Girdhar

    2013-12-01

    We predict a clean signal at the Large Hadron Collider ($\\sqrt{s} = 14$ TeV) for a scenario where there is a top-like, charge +2/3 vector-like isosinglet fermion. Such a quark, via mixing with the standard model top, can undergo decays via both flavour-changing Z-boson coupling and flavour-changing Yukawa interactions. We concentrate on the latter channel, and study the situation where, following its pair production, the heavy quark pair gives rise to two tops and two Higgs bosons. We show that when each Higgs decays in the $b\\bar{b}$ channel, there can be a rather distinct and background-free signal that can unveil the existence of the vector-like isosinglet quark of this kind.

  12. Calibration of the CMS Pixel Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Vami, Tamas Almos

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector is one of two general-purpose detectors that reconstruct the products of high energy particle interactions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The silicon pixel detector is the innermost component of the CMS tracking system. It determines the trajectories of charged particles originating from the interaction region in three points with high resolution enabling precise momentum and impact parameter measurements in the tracker. The pixel detector is exposed to intense ionizing radiation generated by particle collisions in the LHC. This irradiation could result in temporary or permanent malfunctions of the sensors and could decrease the efficiency of the detector. We have developed procedures in order to correct for these effects. In this paper, we present the types of malfunctions and the offline calibration procedures. We will also show the efficiency and the resolution of the detector in 2012.

  13. Design, Performance and Series Production of Superconducting Trim Quadrupoles for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Karppinen, M; Castro, J-M; Gaggero, G; Giloux, C; Lopes, H; Khare, P; Loche, L; Mazet, J; Mugnai, G; Puntambekar, A; Remondino, Vittorio; Rodrigues, D; Tassisto, M; Venturini-Delsolaro, W; Wolf, R

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be equipped with several thousands of superconducting corrector magnets. Among the largest ones are the superconducting trim quadrupoles (MQTL). These twin-aperture magnets with a total mass of up to 1700 kg have a nominal gradient of 129 T/m at 1.9 K and a magnetic length of 1.3 m. Sixty MQTL are required for the LHC, 36 operating at 1.9 K in and 24 operating at 4.5 K. The paper describes the design features, and reports the measured quench performance and magnetic field quality of the production magnets. The MQTL magnet production is shared between CERN and industry. This sharing is simplified due to the modular construction, common to all twin-aperture correctors.

  14. Precise Predictions for W 4 Jet Production at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C.F.; /MIT, LNS; Bern, Z.; /UCLA; Dixon, Lance J.; /CERN /SLAC; Cordero, F.Febres; /Simon Bolivar U.; Forde, D.; /CERN /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Gleisberg, T.; /SLAC; Ita, H.; /UCLA; Kosower, D.A.; /Saclay, SPhT; Maitre, D.; /Durham U.

    2010-09-14

    We present the first next-to-leading order QCD results for W + 4-jet production at hadron colliders. Total cross sections, as well as distributions in the jet transverse momenta and in the total transverse energy HT, are provided for the initial LHC energy of {radical}s = 7 TeV. We use a leading-color approximation, known to be accurate to 3% for W production with fewer jets. The virtual matrix elements and the most complicated real-emission matrix elements are handled by the BlackHat library, based on on-shell methods. The remaining parts of the calculation, including the integration over phase space, are performed by the SHERPA package.

  15. The discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisati, A.; Tonelli, G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper summarises the work done by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, and by the teams of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, that led to the discovery of a new particle, with mass near 125GeV and properties consistent with the ones predicted for the Standard Model Higgs boson. An overview of the Standard Model, with a description of the role of the Higgs boson in the theory, and a summary of the searches for this particle prior to the LHC operations is also given. The paper presents the results obtained by ATLAS and CMS from the analysis of the full data set produced in the first physics run of LHC. After a short discussion on the implications of the discovery, the future prospects for the precision study of the new particle are lastly discussed.

  16. Summary and highlights of the 14th Topical Conference on Hadron Collider Physics (HCP2002)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Womersley

    2002-11-13

    First of all, I would like to thank the scientific committee, the conference organizers, the University of Karlsruhe and the Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics, all of the speakers, and the conference secretariat, for making this an extremely well-organized and uniformly high-quality meeting. I would also like to thank all of the speakers who provided me with material for my talk before and during the conference. There is obviously no point in these proceedings in attempting to repeat all of the material from the individual contributions; by definition, these are all available earlier in this volume. In the written version, therefore, I will try to give a high level overview of the current state of hadron collider physics and to highlight the connections between the many presentations at this conference.

  17. Search for Supersymmetry using Heavy Flavour Jets with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tua, Alan

    The Standard Model of particle physics, despite being extremely successful, is not the ultimate description of physics. The nature of dark matter is not well described, unification of the forces is not achieved and the theory is plagued by a hierarchy problem. One of the proposed solutions to these issues is supersymmetry. This thesis describes numerous searches for supersymmetry carried out using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. In scenarios where R-parity is conserved, supersymmetric final states contain large amounts of missing transverse energy. Furthermore, should supersymmetry correctly describe Nature, the scalar partners of the third generation quarks might be the lightest scalar quarks. The searches reported here exploit these possibilities and make use of signatures which are rich in missing transverse energy and jets coming from heavy flavour quarks. Searches are carried out for direct pair production of third generation scalar quarks as well as gluino-mediated production of these p...

  18. Higgs self-coupling measurements at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Alan J. [Denys Wilkinson Building, Oxford (United Kingdom); Dolan, Matthew J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Englert, Christoph [Univ. of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ferreira de Lima, Enoque Danilo [Univ. of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Spannowsky, Michael [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-03

    An important physics goal of a possible next-generation high-energy hadron collider will be precision characterisation of the Higgs sector and electroweak symmetry breaking. A crucial part of understanding the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking is measuring the Higgs self-interactions. We study dihiggs production in proton-proton collisions at 100 TeV centre of mass energy in order to estimate the sensitivity such a machine would have to variations in the trilinear Higgs coupling around the Standard Model expectation. We focus on the bb¯γγ final state, including possible enhancements in sensitivity by exploiting dihiggs recoils against a hard jet. In conclusion, we find that it should be possible to measure the trilinear self-coupling with 40% accuracy given 3/ab and 12% with 30/ab of data.

  19. Massively Parallel Computing at the Large Hadron Collider up to the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lujan, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) continues its upward progression in energy and luminosity towards the planned High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) in 2025, the challenges of the experiments in processing increasingly complex events will also continue to increase. Improvements in computing technologies and algorithms will be a key part of the advances necessary to meet this challenge. Parallel computing techniques, especially those using massively parallel computing (MPC), promise to be a significant part of this effort. In these proceedings, we discuss these algorithms in the specific context of a particularly important problem: the reconstruction of charged particle tracks in the trigger algorithms in an experiment, in which high computing performance is critical for executing the track reconstruction in the available time. We discuss some areas where parallel computing has already shown benefits to the LHC experiments, and also demonstrate how a MPC-based trigger at the CMS experiment could not only improve perf...

  20. Black holes in many dimensions at the CERN large Hadron collider testing critical string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hewett, J L; Rizzo, T G; Hewett, JoAnne L.; Lillie, Ben; Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2005-01-01

    We consider black hole production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in a generic scenario with many extra dimensions where the standard model fields are confined to a brane. With ~20 dimensions the hierarchy problem is shown to be naturally solved without the need for large compactification radii. We find that in such a scenario the properties of black holes can be used to determine the number of extra dimensions, n. In particular, we demonstrate that measurements of the decay distributions of such black holes at the LHC can determine if n is significantly larger than 6 or 7 with high confidence and thus can probe one of the critical properties of string theory compactifications.

  1. Thermomechanical properties of the coil of the superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, K; Scandale, Walter; Todesco, Ezio; Tommasini, D

    2002-01-01

    The correct definition and measurement of the thermomechanical properties of the superconducting cable used in high-field magnets is crucial to study and model the behavior of the magnet coil from assembly to the operational conditions. In this paper, the authors analyze the superconducting coil of the main dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider. They describe an experimental setup for measuring the elastic modulus at room and at liquid nitrogen temperature and for evaluating the thermal contraction coefficient. The coils exhibit strong nonlinear stress-strain behavior characterized by hysteresis phenomena, which decreases from warm to cold temperature, and a thermal contraction coefficient, which depends on the stress applied to the cable during cooldown. (35 refs).

  2. Kalman-Filter-Based Particle Tracking on Parallel Architectures at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Cerati, Giuseppe; Lantz, Steven; McDermott, Kevin; Riley, Dan; Tadel, Matevž; Wittich, Peter; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Power density constraints are limiting the performance improvements of modern CPUs. To address this we have seen the introduction of lower-power, multi-core processors such as GPGPU, ARM and Intel MIC. To stay within the power density limits but still obtain Moore's Law performance/price gains, it will be necessary to parallelize algorithms to exploit larger numbers of lightweight cores and specialized functions like large vector units. Track finding and fitting is one of the most computationally challenging problems for event reconstruction in particle physics. At the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), for example, this will be by far the dominant problem. The need for greater parallelism has driven investigations of very different track finding techniques such as Cellular Automata or Hough Transforms. The most common track finding techniques in use today, however, are those based on the Kalman Filter. Significant experience has been accumulated with these techniques on real tracking detector sy...

  3. Testing the Littlest Higgs Model with T-parity at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Tobe, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT), we study the production processes of T-even (T_+) and T-odd (T_-) partners of the top quark at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We show that the signal events can be distinguished from the standard-model backgrounds, and that information about mass and mixing parameters of the top partners can be measured with relatively good accuracies. With the measurements of these parameters, we show that a non-trivial test of the LHT can be performed. We also discuss a possibility to reconstruct the thermal relic density of the lightest T-odd particle A_H using the LHC results, and show that the scenario where A_H becomes dark matter may be checked.

  4. Manufacturing and Installation of the Compound Cryogenic Distribution Line for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Riddone,, G; Bouillot, A; Brodzinski, K; Dupont, M; Fathallah, M; Fournel, JL; Gitton, E; Junker, S; Moussavi, H; Parente, C; Riddone, G

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) [1] currently under construction at CERN will make use of superconducting magnets operating in superfluid helium below 2 K. A compound cryogenic distribution line (QRL) will feed with helium at different temperatures and pressures the local elementary cooling loops in the cryomagnet strings. Low heat inleak to all temperature levels is essential for the overall LHC cryogenic performance. Following a competitive tendering, CERN adjudicated in 2001 the contract for the series line to Air Liquide (France). This paper recalls the main features of the technical specification and shows the project status. The basic choices and achievements for the industrialization phase of the series production are also presented, as well as the installation issues and status.

  5. Industrial Technology for Unprecented Energy and Luminosity The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    2004-01-01

    With over 3 billion Swiss francs procurement contracts under execution in industry and the installation of major technical systems in its first 3.3 km sector, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) construction is now in full swing at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The LHC is not only the most challenging particle accelerator, it is also the largest global project ever for a scientific instrument based on advanced technology. Starting from accelerator performance requirements, we recall how these can be met by an appropriate combination of technologies, such as high-field superconducting magnets, superfluid helium cryogenics, power electronics, with particular emphasis on developments required to meet demanding specifications, and industrialization issues which had to be solved for achieving series production of precision components under tight quality assurance and within limited resources. This provides the opportunity for reviewing the production status of the main systems and the progress ...

  6. Probing the light radion through diphotons at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Huitu, Katri; Maitra, Ushoshi; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; Rai, Santosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A radion in a scenario with a warped extra dimension can be lighter than the Higgs boson, even if the Kaluza-Klein excitation modes of the graviton turn out to be in the multi-TeV region. The discovery of such a light radion would be gateway to new physics. We show how the two-photon mode of decay can enable us to probe a radion in the mass range 60 - 110 GeV. We take into account the diphoton background, including fragmentation effects, and include cuts designed to suppress the background to the maximum possible extent. Our conclusion is that, with an integrated luminosity of 3000 $\\rm fb^{-1}$ or less, the next run of the Large Hadron Collider should be able to detect a radion in this mass range, with a significance of 5 standard deviations or more.

  7. A polarized window for left-right symmetry at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Subhadeep

    2015-01-01

    The breaking of parity, a fundamental symmetry between left and right is best understood in the framework of left-right symmetric extension of the standard model. We show that the production of a heavy right-handed neutrino at the proposed Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) could give us the most simple and direct hint of the scale of this breaking in left-right symmetric theories. This production mode gives a lepton number violating signal with $\\Delta L=2$ which is very clean and has practically no standard model background. We highlight that the right-handed nature of $W_R$ exchange which defines the left-right symmetric theories can be confirmed by using a polarized electron beam and also enhance the production rates with relatively lower beam energy.

  8. Black holes in many dimensions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider: testing critical string theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, JoAnne L; Lillie, Ben; Rizzo, Thomas G

    2005-12-31

    We consider black hole production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in a generic scenario with many extra dimensions where the standard model fields are confined to a brane. With approximately 20 dimensions the hierarchy problem is shown to be naturally solved without the need for large compactification radii. We find that in such a scenario the properties of black holes can be used to determine the number of extra dimensions, . In particular, we demonstrate that measurements of the decay distributions of such black holes at the LHC can determine if is significantly larger than 6 or 7 with high confidence and thus can probe one of the critical properties of string theory compactifications.

  9. Landscape of supersymmetric particle mass hierarchies and their signature space at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Daniel; Liu, Zuowei; Nath, Pran

    2007-12-21

    The minimal supersymmetric standard model with soft breaking has a large landscape of supersymmetric particle mass hierarchies. This number is reduced significantly in well-motivated scenarios such as minimal supergravity and alternatives. We carry out an analysis of the landscape for the first four lightest particles and identify at least 16 mass patterns, and provide benchmarks for each. We study the signature space for the patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider by analyzing the lepton+ (jet> or =2) + missing P{T} signals with 0, 1, 2, and 3 leptons. Correlations in missing P{T} are also analyzed. It is found that even with 10 fb{-1} of data a significant discrimination among patterns emerges.

  10. A New Paradigm: Role of Electron-positron and Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Shou-hua

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, a light scalar boson (denoted as H(125) in this paper) was discovered at the LHC. We explore the possible correlation between the lightness of H(125) and the smallness of CP-violation based on the Lee model, namely the spontaneous CP-violation two-Higgs-doublet-model. It is a new way to understand why H(125) is light. Based on this we propose that it is the much heavier scalar bosons, instead of the H(125), which need to be understood. This opens a new paradigm that one tries to understand the electro-weak symmetry breaking and CP violation. For the new paradigm, similar to many other physics beyond the standard model, one need both electron-positron and higher energy hadron collider, as well as the low energy experiments, in order to pin down the whole picture.

  11. The ERL-based Design of Electron-Hadron Collider eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyn, Vadim; et al.

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments of the ERL-based design of future high luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC focused on balancing technological risks present in the design versus the design cost. As a result a lower risk design has been adopted at moderate cost increase. The modifications include a change of the main linac RF frequency, reduced number of SRF cavity types and modified electron spin transport using a spin rotator. A luminosity-staged approach is being explored with a Nominal design ($L \\sim 10^{33} {\\rm cm}^2 {\\rm s}^{-1}$) that employs reduced electron current and could possibly be based on classical electron cooling, and then with the Ultimate design ($L \\gt 10^{34} {\\rm cm}^{-2} {\\rm s}^{-1}$) that uses higher electron current and an innovative cooling technique (CeC). The paper describes the recent design modifications, and presents the full status of the eRHIC ERL-based design.

  12. Synchrotron Radiation and beam tube vacuum in a Very Large Hadron Collider; Stage 1 VLHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation induced photodesorption in particle accelerators may lead to pressure rise and to beam-gas scattering losses, finally affecting the beam lifetime. We discuss the beam tube vacuum in the low field Stage 1 Very Large Hadron Collider VLHC. Since VLHC Stage 1 has a room temperature beam tube, a non-evaporable getter (NEG St101 strip) pumping system located inside a pumping antechamber, supplemented by lumped ion pumps for pumping methane is considered. A possible beam conditioning scenario is presented for reaching design intensity. The most important results are summarized in this paper. More detailed reports of the calculations will be presented at the PAC2001 Conference, Chicago, IL to be held in June 2001, and at the Snowmass Conference, CO, to be held on July 2001

  13. The data acquisition and reduction challenge at the Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cittolin, Sergio

    2012-02-28

    The Large Hadron Collider detectors are technological marvels-which resemble, in functionality, three-dimensional digital cameras with 100 Mpixels-capable of observing proton-proton (pp) collisions at the crossing rate of 40 MHz. Data handling limitations at the recording end imply the selection of only one pp event out of each 10(5). The readout and processing of this huge amount of information, along with the selection of the best approximately 200 events every second, is carried out by a trigger and data acquisition system, supplemented by a sophisticated control and monitor system. This paper presents an overview of the challenges that the development of these systems has presented over the past 15 years. It concludes with a short historical perspective, some lessons learnt and a few thoughts on the future.

  14. Non-Standard ZZ Production with Leptonic Decays at the Large Hadron Collider

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Hao

    2012-01-01

    The prospects of anomalous ZZγ and ZZZ triple gauge boson couplings are investigated at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through an excess of events in ZZ diboson production. Two such channels are selected and the tree level results including leptonic final states are discussed: ZZ → e1 e1+ e2- e2+ and ZZ → e- e+v(v)(e, e1,2 = e, μ). The results in the full finite width method are compared with the narrow width approximation (NWA) method in detail. Besides the Z boson transverse momentum distributions, the azimuthal angle between the Z boson decay to fermions, △Φ, and their separations in the pseudo-rapidity-azimuthal angle plane, AR, as well as the sensitivity on anomalous couplings are displayed at the 14 TeV LHC.%The prospects of anomalous ZZγ and ZZZ triple gauge boson couplings are investigated at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through an excess of events in ZZ diboson production.Two such channels are selected and the tree level results including leptonic final states are discussed:Z Z → e-1e+1 e-2 e+2 and Z Z → e-e+v-(v)( e,e1,2 =e,μ).The results in the full finite width method are compared with the narrow width approximation (NWA) method in detail.Besides the Z boson transverse momentum distributions,the azimuthal angle between the Z boson decay to fermions,△ Φ,and their separations in the pseudo-rapidity-azimuthal angle plane,△R,as well as the sensitivity on anomalous couplings are displayed at the 14 TeV LHC.

  15. Viewpoint: the End of the World at the Large Hadron Collider?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New arguments based on astrophysical phenomena constrain the possibility that dangerous black holes will be produced at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. On 8 August, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN injected its first beams, beginning an experimental program that will produce proton-proton collisions at an energy of 14 TeV. Particle physicists are waiting expectantly. The reason is that the Standard Model of strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions, despite its many successes, is clearly incomplete. Theory says that the holes in the model should be filled by new physics in the energy region that will be studied by the LHC. Some candidate theories are simple quick fixes, but the most interesting ones involve new concepts of spacetime waiting to be discovered. Look up the LHC on Wikipedia, however, and you will find considerable space devoted to safety concerns. At the LHC, we will probe energies beyond those explored at any previous accelerator, and we hope to create particles that have never been observed. Couldn't we, then, create particles that would actually be dangerous, for example, ones that would eat normal matter and eventually turn the earth into a blob of unpleasantness? It is morbid fun to speculate about such things, and candidates for such dangerous particles have been suggested. These suggestions have been analyzed in an article in Reviews of Modern Physics by Jaffe, Busza, Wilczek, and Sandweiss and excluded on the basis of constraints from observation and from the known laws of physics. These conclusions have been upheld by subsequent studies conducted at CERN.

  16. Applications of SCET to the pair production of supersymmetric particles at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broggio, Alessandro

    2013-02-04

    In this thesis we investigate the phenomenology of supersymmetric particles at hadron colliders beyond next-to-leading order (NLO) in perturbation theory. We discuss the foundations of Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and, in particular, we explicitly construct the SCET Lagrangian for QCD. As an example, we discuss factorization and resummation for the Drell-Yan process in SCET. We use techniques from SCET to improve existing calculations of the production cross sections for slepton-pair production and top-squark-pair production at hadron colliders. As a first application, we implement soft-gluon resummation at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic order (NNNLL) for slepton-pair production in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM). This approach resums large logarithmic corrections arising from the dynamical enhancement of the partonic threshold region caused by steeply falling parton luminosities. We evaluate the resummed invariant-mass distribution and total cross section for slepton-pair production at the Tevatron and LHC and we match these results, in the threshold region, onto NLO fixed-order calculations. As a second application we present the most precise predictions available for top-squark-pair production total cross sections at the LHC. These results are based on approximate NNLO formulas in fixed-order perturbation theory, which completely determine the coefficients multiplying the singular plus distributions. The analysis of the threshold region is carried out in pair invariant mass (PIM) kinematics and in single-particle inclusive (1PI) kinematics. We then match our results in the threshold region onto the exact fixed-order NLO results and perform a detailed numerical analysis of the total cross section.

  17. Higgs Factory and 100 TeV Hadron Collider: Opportunity for a New World Laboratory within a Decade

    CERN Document Server

    Assadi, Saeed; McIntyre, Peter; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; Mann, Thomas; Mathewson, Christopher; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; York, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Suggestions have been made for a 80-100 km circumference Future Circular Collider (FCC) that could ultimately contain a circular e+e- ring collider operating as a Higgs Factory as well as a 100 TeV hadron collider. Those suggestions have motivated us to propose an approach in which the project is sited at the location at the SSC tunnel, which has the lowest tunnel cost ever. The low tunnel cost would make it cost-effective to locate the 100 TeV Hadron Collider in a 270 km circumference tunne, using 4.5 Tesla superconducting magnets. The SSC tunnel itself would be used to house the Higgs Factory and the injector for the Hadron Collider. The injector for the Higgs Factory would be also used as a driver for an X-ray Free Electron Laser with unique capabilities for protein crystallography. The location of the project at a location with favorable geotechnology for minimum-cost tunneling, and low-cost/low-risk technology for the SRF and superconducting magnets, open the possibility to build the proposed laboratory ...

  18. Mixing It Up With MT2: Unbiased Mass Measurements at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Curtin, David

    2011-01-01

    Recently, much progress has been made on techniques to measure the masses of new particles with partially-invisible decays at a hadron collider. We examine for the first time the realistic application of MT2-based measurement methods to a fully hadronic final state from a symmetric two-step decay chain with maximal combinatorial uncertainty. Several problems arise in such an analysis: the MT2 variables are powerful but fragile, with shallow edges that are easily washed out or faked by ubiquitous combinatorics background. Traditional methods of both cleaning up the distribution and determining edge position can fail badly. To perform successful mass measurements we introduce several new techniques: the Edge-to-Bump method of extracting an edge from a distribution by analyzing a distribution of fits rather than a single fit; a very simple yet high-yield method for determining decay-chain assignments event-by-event; and a systematic procedure to obtain MT2 edge measurements in the presence of heavy combinatorics...

  19. A Novel method for modeling the recoil in W boson events at hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, Ernest; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U.; Ahsan, Mahsana; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-07-01

    We present a new method for modeling the hadronic recoil in W {yields} {ell}{nu} events produced at hadron colliders. The recoil is chosen from a library of recoils in Z {yields} {ell}{ell} data events and overlaid on a simulated W {yields} {ell}{nu} event. Implementation of this method requires that the data recoil library describe the properties of the measured recoil as a function of the true, rather than the measured, transverse momentum of the boson. We address this issue using a multidimensional Bayesian unfolding technique. We estimate the statistical and systematic uncertainties from this method for the W boson mass and width measurements assuming 1 fb{sup -1} of data from the Fermilab Tevatron. The uncertainties are found to be small and comparable to those of a more traditional parameterized recoil model. For the high precision measurements that will be possible with data from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron and from the CERN LHC, the method presented in this paper may be advantageous, since it does not require an understanding of the measured recoil from first principles.

  20. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) Preliminary Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Apollinari, G; Béjar Alonso, I; Brüning, O; Lamont, M; Rossi, L

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting magnets, compact superconducting cav...

  1. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, R; Boccone, V; Bracco, C; Brugger, M; Cauchi, M; Cerutti, F; Deboy, D; Ferrari, A; Lari, L; Marsili, A; Mereghetti, A; Mirarchi, D; Quaranta, E; Redaelli, S; Robert-Demolaize, G; Rossi, A; Salvachua, B; Skordis, E; Tambasco, C; Valentino, G; Weiler, T; Vlachoudis, V; Wollmann, D

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010--2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5--4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An un-controlled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multi-stage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the co...

  2. Cryogenic Studies for the Proposed CERN Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC)

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F

    2011-01-01

    The LHeC (Large Hadron electron Collider) is a proposed future colliding beam facility for lepton-nucleon scattering particle physics at CERN. A new 60 GeV electron accelerator will be added to the existing 27 km circumference 7 TeV LHC for collisions of electrons with protons and heavy ions. Two basic design options are being pursued. The first is a circular accelerator housed in the existing LHC tunnel which is referred to as the "Ring-Ring" version. Low field normal conducting magnets guide the particle beam while superconducting (SC) RF cavities cooled to 2 K are installed at two opposite locations at the LHC tunnel to accelerate the beams. For this version in addition a 10 GeV re-circulating SC injector will be installed. In total four refrigerators with cooling capacities between 1.2 kW and 3 kW @ 4.5 K are needed. The second option, referred to as the "Linac-Ring" version consists of a race-track re-circulating energy-recovery type machine with two 1 km long straight acceleration sections. The 944 hi...

  3. Left-Right Symmetry and Lepton Number Violation at the Large Hadron Electron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lindner, Manfred; Rodejohann, Werner; Yaguna, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    We show that the proposed Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) will provide a great opportunity to search for left-right symmetry and establish lepton number violation, complementing current and planned searches based on LHC data and neutrinoless double beta decay. We consider several plausible configurations for the LHeC -- including different electron energies and polarizations, as well as distinct values for the charge misidentification rate. Within left-right symmetric theories we determine the values of right-handed neutrino and gauge boson masses that could be tested at the LHeC after one, five and ten years of operation. Our results indicate that this collider might probe, via the $\\Delta L =2$ signal $e^-p\\to e^+jjj$, Majorana neutrino masses up to $1$ TeV and $W_R$ masses up to $\\sim 6.5$ TeV. Interestingly, part of this parameter space is beyond the expected reach of the LHC and of future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments.

  4. Test of relativistic gravity for propulsion at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Felber, Franklin

    2009-01-01

    A design is presented of a laboratory experiment that could test the suitability of relativistic gravity for propulsion of spacecraft to relativistic speeds. The first exact time-dependent solutions of Einstein's gravitational field equation confirm that even the weak field of a mass moving at relativistic speeds could serve as a driver to accelerate a much lighter payload from rest to a good fraction of the speed of light. The time-dependent field of ultrarelativistic particles in a collider ring is calculated. An experiment is proposed as the first test of the predictions of general relativity in the ultrarelativistic limit by measuring the repulsive gravitational field of bunches of protons in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The estimated 'antigravity beam' signal strength at a resonant detector of each proton bunch is 3 nm/s^2 for 2 ns during each revolution of the LHC. This experiment can be performed off-line, without interfering with the normal operations of the LHC.

  5. Searching for Supersymmetry with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    French, Sky Trillium

    2011-01-01

    On Monday 23rd November 2009, the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider began taking data at $\\sqrt{s}=900$ GeV. On the penultimate day of March the following year, after a brief shutdown, ATLAS resumed data taking but at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV. These $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV collisions continued until the end of October 2010. This thesis presents the very first low-$p_T$ electron candidates from the complete 9$\\mu b^{-1} \\sqrt{s}=900$ GeV dataset, and higher-$p_T$ candidates from the first 1 nb$^{-1}$ of the $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV dataset. These candidates are presented in the context of electron reconstruction and identification and illustrate how various properties of these electrons compare with expectations based on Monte Carlo simulations. An observation is made of the $Z$ candidates present in the first ~220 nb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV collision data, these being amongst the first $Z$ bosons ever produced by a proton-proton collider. A detailed study is then presented of the full ~35pb$^{-1}$ 2010 $\\sqrt{s}=7$ T...

  6. Fault Tracking of the Superconducting Magnet System at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Griesemer, Tobias

    2016-03-25

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is one of the most complex machines ever built. It is used to explore the mysteries of the universe by reproducing conditions of the big bang. High energy particles are collide in particle detectors and as a result of the collision process secondary particles are created. New particles could be discovered during this process. The operation of such a machine is not straightforward and is subject to many different types of failures. A model of LHC operation needs to be defined in order to understand the impact of the various failures on availability. As an example a typical operational cycle is described: the beams are first injected, then accelerated, and finally brought into collisions. Under nominal conditions, beams should be in collision (so-called ‘stable beams’ period) for about 10 hours and then extracted onto a beam dump block. In case of a failure, the Machine Protection Systems ensure safe extraction of the beams. From the experience in LHC Run 1 (2009 - 20...

  7. Heavy-ion physics with the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schukraft, J

    2012-02-28

    After close to 20 years of preparation, the dedicated heavy-ion experiment A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) took first data at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator with proton collisions at the end of 2009 and with lead nuclei at the end of 2010. After a short introduction into the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, this article recalls the main design choices made for the detector and summarizes the initial operation and performance of ALICE. Physics results from this first year of operation concentrate on characterizing the global properties of typical, average collisions, both in proton-proton (pp) and nucleus-nucleus reactions, in the new energy regime of the LHC. The pp results differ, to a varying degree, from most quantum chromodynamics-inspired phenomenological models and provide the input needed to fine tune their parameters. First results from Pb-Pb are broadly consistent with expectations based on lower energy data, indicating that high-density matter created at the LHC, while much hotter and larger, still behaves like a very strongly interacting, almost perfect liquid.

  8. Commissioning and First Operation of Superconducting Links at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    van Weelderen, R; Perin, A; Darve, C; Doohan, R S; Gilankar, S G

    2010-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) now under commissioning at CERN is a 26.7 km collider based on several thousand high-field superconducting magnets, the majority of which operating in superfluid helium below 2 K and some isolated magnets operating in normal helium at 4.5 K. Four superconducting links (DSLs) of about 76 m in length and one of about 517 m in length, were designed, constructed and installed over a three year period. Their purpose is to transport current over long distances whenever underground LHC space constraints prevents to put power converters, current feed boxes and magnets in each others’ proximity. The four 76 m long DSLs transport current between current feed boxes and several of the isolated magnets, whereas the 517 m long DSL transports current between two current feed boxes. The links are comprised of cryogenic, vacuum-insulated, transfer lines housing one or more superconducting cables. The operating temperatures are about 5 K for the DSL part that houses the cable and about 60 K fo...

  9. Supersymmetry phenomenology in the context of neutrino physics and the large hadron collider LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanussek, Marja

    2012-05-15

    Experimentally, it is well established that the Standard Model of particle physics requires an extension to accommodate the neutrino oscillation data, which indicates that at least two neutrinos are massive and that two of the neutrino mixing angles are large. Massive neutrinos are naturally present in a supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model which includes lepton-number violating terms (the B3 MSSM). Furthermore, supersymmetry stabilizes the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and the scale of unified theories or the Planck scale. In this thesis, we study in detail how neutrino masses are generated in the B3 MSSM. We present a mechanism how the experimental neutrino oscillation data can be realized in this framework. Then we discuss how recently published data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can be used to constrain the parameter space of this model. Furthermore, we present work on supersymmetric models where R-parity is conserved, considering scenarios with light stops in the light of collider physics and scenarios with near-massless neutralinos in connection with cosmological restrictions.

  10. Supersymmetry phenomenology in the context of neutrino physics and the large hadron collider LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimentally, it is well established that the Standard Model of particle physics requires an extension to accommodate the neutrino oscillation data, which indicates that at least two neutrinos are massive and that two of the neutrino mixing angles are large. Massive neutrinos are naturally present in a supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model which includes lepton-number violating terms (the B3 MSSM). Furthermore, supersymmetry stabilizes the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and the scale of unified theories or the Planck scale. In this thesis, we study in detail how neutrino masses are generated in the B3 MSSM. We present a mechanism how the experimental neutrino oscillation data can be realized in this framework. Then we discuss how recently published data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can be used to constrain the parameter space of this model. Furthermore, we present work on supersymmetric models where R-parity is conserved, considering scenarios with light stops in the light of collider physics and scenarios with near-massless neutralinos in connection with cosmological restrictions.

  11. Development of a beam condition monitor for use in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider using synthetic diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Hernando, L; Ilgner, C; MacPherson, A; Oh, A; Pernegger, H; Pritchard, T; Stone, R; Worm, S

    2004-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will collide two counter rotating proton beams, each with a store energy about 350MJ; enough to melt 550kg of copper. If there is failure in an element of the accelerator, the resulting beam losses could cause damage not only to the machine but also to the experiments. A Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) is foreseen to monitor last increments of particle flux near the interaction point and if necessary, to generate an abort signal to the LHC accelerator control, to dump the beams. Due to its radiation hardness and minimal services requirements, synthetic CVD diamond is being considered as BCM sensor option. (12 refs).

  12. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

    2014-08-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010-2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5-4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

  13. High energy proton-proton elastic scattering at the Large Hadron Collider and nucleon structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luddy, Richard Joseph

    To gain insight into the structure of the nucleon, we pursue the development of the phenomenological model of Islam et al. (IIFS model) for high energy elastic pp and p¯p scattering. We determine the energy dependence of the parameters of the IIFS model using the available elastic differential cross section data from SPS Collider and Tevatron and the known asymptotic behavior of sigmatot (s) and rho(s) from dispersion relation calculations and more recent analyses of Cudell et al. (COMPETE Collaboration). Next, we incorporate a high energy elastic valence quark-quark scattering amplitude into the model based on BFKL pomeron to describe small impact parameter (large | t|) pp collisions. Finally, we predict the pp elastic differential cross section at the unprecedented c.m. energy of s = 14.0 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This prediction assumes crucial significance---because of an approved experiment at LHC: TOTal and Elastic Measurement (TOTEM). The TOTEM group plans to measure pp elastic dsigma/dt at 14.0 TeV all the way from momentum transfer |t| = 0 to |t| ≃ 10 GeV 2. Their measurement will stringently test not only the diffraction and o-exchange descriptions of the original IIFS model, but also the additional valence quark-quark scattering contribution that we find to be dominant for large |t|. Successful quantitative verification of the predicted dsigma/dt will mean that our picture of the nucleon with an outer cloud of qq¯ condensed ground state, an inner core of topological baryonic charge, and a still smaller core of massless valence quarks provides a realistic description of nucleon structure.

  14. Searches for Lorentz Violation in Top-Quark Production and Decay at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittington, Denver Wade [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We present a first-of-its-kind confirmation that the most massive known elementary particle obeys the special theory of relativity. Lorentz symmetry is a fundamental aspect of special relativity which posits that the laws of physics are invariant regardless of the orientation and velocity of the reference frame in which they are measured. Because this symmetry is a fundamental tenet of physics, it is important to test its validity in all processes. We quantify violation of this symmetry using the Standard-Model Extension framework, which predicts the effects that Lorentz violation would have on elementary particles and their interactions. The top quark is the most massive known elementary particle and has remained inaccessible to tests of Lorentz invariance until now. This model predicts a dependence of the production cross section for top and antitop quark pairs on sidereal time as the orientation of the experiment in which these events are produced changes with the rotation of the Earth. Using data collected with the DØ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we search for violation of Lorentz invariance in events involving the production of a $t\\bar{t}$ pair. Within the experimental precision, we find no evidence for such a violation and set upper limits on parameters describing its possible strength within the Standard-Model Extension. We also investigate the prospects for extending this analysis using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider which, because of the higher rate of $t\\bar{t}$ events at that experiment, has the potential to improve the limits presented here.

  15. American superconductor technology to help CERN to explore the mysteries of matter company's high temperature superconductor wire to be used in CERN's Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    American Superconductor Corporation has been selected by CERN, to provide 14,000 meters of high temperature superconductor (HTS) wire for current lead devices that will be used in CERN's Large Hadron Collider (1 page).

  16. Forecasting the Socio-Economic Impact of the Large Hadron Collider: a Cost-Benefit Analysis to 2025 and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Florio, Massimo; Forte, Stefano; Sirtori, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we develop a cost-benefit analysis of a major research infrastructure, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the highest-energy accelerator in the world, currently operating at CERN. We show that the evaluation of benefits can be made quantitative by estimating their welfare effects on different types of agents. Four classes of direct benefits are identified, according to the main social groups involved: (a) scientists; (b) students and young researchers; (c) firms in the procurement...

  17. Benchmarking Electron-Cloud Build-Up and Heat-Load Simulations against Large-Hadron-Collider Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Dominguez, O; Iriso, U; Maury, H.; Rumolo, G.; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    After reviewing the basic features of electron clouds in particle accelerators, the pertinent vacuum-chamber surface properties, and the electron-cloud simulation tools in use at CERN, we report recent observations of electron-cloud phenomena at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and ongoing attempts to benchmark the measured LHC vacuum pressure increases and heat loads against electron-cloud build-up simulations aimed at determining the actual surface parameters and at monitoring the so-called ...

  18. Higgs boson pair production in new physics models at hadron, lepton, and photon colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Asakawa, Eri; Kanemura, Shinya; Okada, Yasuhiro; Tsumura, Koji

    2010-01-01

    We study Higgs boson pair production processes at future hadron and lepton colliders including the photon collision option in several new physics models; i.e., the two-Higgs-doublet model, the scalar leptoquark model, the sequential fourth generation fermion model and the vector-like quark model. Cross sections for these processes can deviate significantly from the standard model predictions due to the one-loop correction to the triple Higgs boson coupling constant. For the one-loop induced processes such as $gg \\to hh$ and $\\gamma\\gamma\\to hh$, where $h$ is the (lightest) Higgs boson and $g$ and $\\gamma$ respectively represent a gluon and a photon, the cross sections can also be affected by new physics particles via additional one-loop diagrams. In the two-Higgs-doublet model and scalar leptoquark models, cross sections of $e^+e^-\\to hhZ$ and $\\gamma\\gamma\\to hh$ can be enhanced due to the non-decoupling effect in the one-loop corrections to the triple Higgs boson coupling constant. In the sequential fourth ...

  19. Higgs boson pair production in new physics models at hadron, lepton, and photon colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Eri; Harada, Daisuke; Kanemura, Shinya; Okada, Yasuhiro; Tsumura, Koji

    2010-12-01

    We study Higgs boson pair production processes at future hadron and lepton colliders including the photon collision option in several new physics models; i.e., the two-Higgs-doublet model, the scalar leptoquark model, the sequential fourth generation fermion model and the vectorlike quark model. Cross sections for these processes can deviate significantly from the standard model predictions due to the one-loop correction to the triple Higgs boson coupling constant. For the one-loop induced processes such as gg→hh and γγ→hh, where h is the (lightest) Higgs boson and g and γ respectively represent a gluon and a photon, the cross sections can also be affected by new physics particles via additional one-loop diagrams. In the two-Higgs-doublet model and scalar leptoquark models, cross sections of e+e-→hhZ and γγ→hh can be enhanced due to the nondecoupling effect in the one-loop corrections to the triple Higgs boson coupling constant. In the sequential fourth generation fermion model, the cross section for gg→hh becomes very large because of the loop effect of the fermions. In the vectorlike quark model, effects are small because the theory has decoupling property. Measurements of the Higgs boson pair production processes can be useful to explore new physics through the determination of the Higgs potential.

  20. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falgari, P. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Spinoza Inst.; Papanastasiou, A.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Signer, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-03-15

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of {Gamma}{sub X}/m{sub X}, with {Gamma}{sub X} and m{sub X} the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the q anti q partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naive counting {proportional_to}{Gamma}{sub t}/m{sub t}{proportional_to}1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  1. QCD Corrections to Pair Production of Type III Seesaw Leptons at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    If kinematically accessible, hadron collider experiments provide an ideal laboratory for the direct production of heavy lepton partners in Seesaw models. In the context of the Type III Seesaw Mechanism, the $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s)$ rate and shape corrections are presented for the pair production of hypothetical, heavy $SU(2)_L$ triplet leptons in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13,$ 14, and 100 TeV. The next-to-leading order (NLO) $K$-factors span, approximately, $K^{NLO}=1.1 - 1.4$ for both charged current and neutral current processes over a triplet mass range $m_T = 100~\\text{GeV}-2\\text{TeV}$. Total production cross sections exhibit a $^{+5\\%}_{-6\\%}$ scale dependence at 14 TeV and $\\pm1\\%$ at 100 TeV. The NLO differential $K$-factors for heavy lepton kinematics are largely flat, suggesting that na\\"ive scaling by the total $K^{NLO}$ is reasonably justified. The resummed transverse momentum distribution of the dilepton system is presented at leading logarithmic (LL) accuracy. The effects of resummation are la...

  2. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Falgari, P; Signer, A

    2013-01-01

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of $\\Gamma_X/m_X$, with $\\Gamma_X$ and $m_X$ the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the $q \\bar{q}$ partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the na\\" ive counting $\\sim \\Gamma_t/m_t \\sim 1%$. However, they can be si...

  3. Novel Concepts for Optimization of the CERN Large Hadron Collider Injection Lines.

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchsberger, Kajetan; Wenninger, J

    2011-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presently the particle accelerator with the highest center of mass energy in the world and is for that reason the most promising instrument for particle physics discoveries in the near future. The transfer lines TI2 and TI8 which transfer the beam from the last pre-accelerator, the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to the LHC are with a total length of about 6 km the longest ones in the world, which makes it necessary to do optics matching with high precision. Tests between 2004 and 2008 revealed several, previousely unpredicted, effects in these lines: An assymetry in betatron phase between the two transverse planes, a dispersion mismatch at the injection point from the transfer lines to the LHC and unexpectedly strong transverse coupling at the same location. In this thesis, we introduce the methods and tools that we developed to investigate these discrepancies. We describe the analysis of the available data, measurements of the transfer line optics and the calculation of op...

  4. Studies of purification of the Resistive Plate Chamber gas mixture for the Large Hadron Collider experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Capeans, M; Guida, R; Hahn, F; Haider, S

    2009-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) installed as part of the large muon detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments use a gas mixture of 94.7% C2H2F4, 5% iC(4)H(10) and 0.3% SF6. Based on economical grounds, the design philosophy of the gas systems for the ATLAS and CMS RPC's foresees to recirculate the gas mixture in 90-95% closed loop circulation. At the LHC, RPC chambers are operated in a high radiation environment, conditions for which large amount of impurities in the return gas have been observed in earlier studies. They are potentially dangerous for the stable operation of the detectors, the materials in the detector and the gas system. While several purification stages have been foreseen in the present gas systems, chemical reactions between the absorber and the impurities are yet not well understood. Furthermore, the effects on the gas mixture of the foreseen factor 10 increase of luminosity for the LHC upgraded phase should be studied. We present the results of systematic studies of the...

  5. A Possible 1.8 K Refrigeration Cycle for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Millet, F; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    1998-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CERN, will make use of superconducting magnets operating below 2.0 K. This requires, for each of the eight future cryogenic installations, an isothermal cooling capacity of up to 2.4 kW obtained by vaporisation of helium II at 1.6 kPa and 1.8 K. The process design for this cooling duty has to satisfy several demands. It has to be adapted to four already existing as well as to four new refrigerators. It must cover a dynamic range of one to three, and it must to allow continuous pump-down from 4.5 K to 1.8 K. A possible solution, as presented in this paper, includes a combination of cold centrifugal and warm volumetric compressors. It is characterised by a low thermal load on the refrigerator, and a large range of adaptability to different operation modes. The expected power factor for 1.8 K cooling is given, and the proposed control strategy is explained.

  6. Beam-induced radiation in the compact muon solenoid tracker at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A P Singh; P C Bhat; N V Mokhov; S Beri

    2010-05-01

    The intense radiation environment at the Large Hadron Collider, CERN at a design energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 14$ TeV and a luminosity of 1034 cm−2S−1 poses unprecedented challenges for safe operation and performance quality of the silicon tracker detectors in the CMS and ATLAS experiments. The silicon trackers are crucial for the physics at the LHC experiments, and the inner layers, being situated only a few centimeters from the interaction point, are most vulnerable to beam-induced radiation. We have recently carried out extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies using MARS program to estimate particle fluxes and radiation dose in the CMS silicon pixel and strip trackers from proton–proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 14$ TeV and from machine-induced background such as beam–gas interactions and beam halo. We will present results on radiation dose, particle fluxes and spectra from these studies and discuss implications for radiation damage and performance of the CMS silicon tracker detectors.

  7. CP violation in supersymmetry, Higgs sector and the large hadron collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rohini M Godbole

    2006-11-01

    In this talk I discuss some aspects of CP violation (CPV) in supersymmetry (SUSY) as well as in the Higgs sector. Further, I discuss ways in which these may be probed at hadronic colliders. In particular I will point out the ways in which studies in the $\\tilde{}^{±}$, $\\tilde{}_{2}^{0}$ sector at the Tevatron may be used to provide information on this and how the search can be extended to the LHC. I will then follow this by a discussion of the CP mixing induced in the Higgs sector due to the above-mentioned CPV in the soft SUSY breaking parameters and its effects on the Higgs phenomenology at the LHC. I would then point out some interesting aspects of the phenomenology of a moderately light charged Higgs boson, consistent with the LEP constraints, in this scenario. Decay of such a charged Higgs boson would also allow a probe of a light (≲ 50 GeV), CP-violating (CPV) Higgs boson. Such a light neutral Higgs boson might have escaped detection at LEP and could also be missed at the LHC in the usual search channels.

  8. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Backhaus, Malte; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    During Run-1 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the ATLAS Pixel Detector has shown excellent performance. The ATLAS collaboration took advantage of the first long shutdown of the LHC during 2013 and 2014 and extracted the ATLAS Pixel Detector from the experiment, brought it to surface and maintained the services. This includes the installation of new service quarter panels, the repair of cables, and the installation of the new Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). Additionally a completely new innermost pixel detector layer, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), was constructed and installed in May 2014 between a new smaller beam pipe and the existing Pixel Detector. With a radius of 3.3 cm the IBL is located extremely close to the interaction point. Therefore a new readout chip and two new sensor technologies (planar and 3D) are used in IBL. In order to achieve best possible physics performance the material budget was improved with respect to the existing Pixel Detector. This is realized using lightweight staves for mechanic...

  9. Next-to-Leading Order Predictions for W + 3-Jet Distributions at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C.F.; /MIT, LNS; Bern, Z.; /UCLA; Dixon, L.J.; /SLAC; Febres Cordero, F.; /UCLA; Forde, D.; Gleisberg, T.; /SLAC; Ita, H.; /UCLA; Kosower, D.A.; /Saclay, SPhT; Maitre, D.; /Durham U.

    2009-12-09

    We present next-to-leading order QCD predictions for a variety of distributions in W + 3-jet production at both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider. We include all subprocesses and incorporate the decay of the W boson into leptons. Our results are in excellent agreement with existing Tevatron data and provide the first quantitatively precise next-to-leading order predictions for the LHC. We include all terms in an expansion in the number of colors, confirming that the specific leading-color approximation used in our previous study is accurate to within three percent. The dependence of the cross section on renormalization and factorization scales is reduced significantly with respect to a leading-order calculation. We study different dynamical scale choices, and find that the total transverse energy is significantly better than choices used in previous phenomenological studies. We compute the one-loop matrix elements using on-shell methods, as numerically implemented in the BlackHat code. The remaining parts of the calculation, including generation of the real-emission contributions and integration over phase space, are handled by the SHERPA package.

  10. Correlation between magnetic field quality and mechanical components of the Large Hadron Collider main dipoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellesia, B

    2006-12-15

    The 1234 superconducting dipoles of the Large Hadron Collider, working at a cryogenic temperature of 1.9 K, must guarantee a high quality magnetic field to steer the particles inside the beam pipe. Magnetic field measurements are a powerful way to detect assembly faults that could limit magnet performances. The aim of the thesis is the analysis of these measurements performed at room temperature during the production of the dipoles. In a large scale production the ideal situation is that all the magnets produced were identical. However all the components constituting a magnet are produced with certain tolerance and the assembly procedures are optimized during the production; due to these the reality drifts away from the ideal situation. We recollected geometrical data of the main components (superconducting cables, coil copper wedges and austenitic steel coil collars) and coupling them with adequate electro-magnetic models we reconstructed a multipolar field representation of the LHC dipoles defining their critical components and assembling procedures. This thesis is composed of 3 main parts: 1) influence of the geometry and of the assembling procedures of the dipoles on the quality of the magnetic field, 2) the use of measurement performed on the dipoles in the assembling step in order to solve production issues and to understand the behaviour of coils during the assembling step, and 3) a theoretical study of the uncertain harmonic components of the magnetic field in order to assess the dipole production.

  11. Reliability of the Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Guaglio, G; Santoni, C

    2005-01-01

    The energy stored in the Large Hadron Collider is unprecedented. The impact of the beam particles can cause severe damage on the superconductive magnets, resulting in significant downtime for repairing. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) detects the secondary particles shower of the lost beam particles and initiates the extraction of the beam before any serious damage to the equipment can occur. This thesis defines the BLMS specifications in term of reliability. The main goal is the design of a system minimizing both the probability to not detect a dangerous loss and the number of false alarms generated. The reliability theory and techniques utilized are described. The prediction of the hazard rates, the testing procedures, the Failure Modes Effects and Criticalities Analysis and the Fault Tree Analysis have been used to provide an estimation of the probability to damage a magnet, of the number of false alarms and of the number of generated warnings. The weakest components in the BLMS have been pointed out....

  12. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run 2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, M.

    2016-09-01

    During Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the ATLAS Pixel Detector has shown excellent performance. The ATLAS collaboration took advantage of the first long shutdown of the LHC during 2013 and 2014 and extracted the ATLAS Pixel Detector from the experiment, brought it to surface and maintained the services. This included the installation of new service quarter panels, the repair of cables, and the installation of the new Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). Additionally, a completely new innermost pixel detector layer, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), was constructed and installed in May 2014 between a new smaller beam pipe and the existing Pixel Detector. With a radius of 3.3 cm the IBL is located extremely close to the interaction point. Therefore, a new readout chip and two new sensor technologies (planar and 3D) are used in the IBL. In order to achieve best possible physics performance the material budget was improved with respect to the existing Pixel Detector. This is realized using lightweight staves for mechanical support and a CO2 based cooling system. This paper describes the improvements achieved during the maintenance of the existing Pixel Detector as well as the performance of the IBL during the construction and commissioning phase. Additionally, first results obtained during the LHC Run 2 demonstrating the distinguished tracking performance of the new Four Layer ATLAS Pixel Detector are presented.

  13. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment for Run-2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . Taking advantage of Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) during 2014/2015, the Pixel Detector was brought to surface to equip it with new service panels and to repair modules. The Insertable B-Layer (IBL), a fourth layer of pixel sensors, was installed in-between the existing Pixel Detector and a new beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and increased pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) were used and a new readout chip has been designed with CMOS 130 nm technology with larger area, smaller pixel size and faster readout capability. Dedicated design features in combination with a new composite material were considered and used in order to reduce the material budget of the support structure while keeping the optimal thermo-mechanical performance. An overview of the lessons learned during the IBL project is presented, focusing on the challenges and highlighting the issues met during the production, integration, installation and commissioning phases of the detector. Early performance tests using cosmic and beam data are also presented

  14. Search for Microscopic Black Hole Signatures at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, Ka Vang [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2011-05-01

    A search for microscopic black hole production and decay in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV has been conducted using Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. A total integrated luminosity of 35 pb-1 data sample, taken by CMS Collaboration in year 2010, has been analyzed. A novel background estimation for multi-jet events beyond TeV scale has been developed. A good agreement with standard model backgrounds, dominated by multi-jet production, is observed for various final-state multiplicities. Using semi-classical approximation, upper limits on minimum black hole mass at 95% confidence level are set in the range of 3.5 - 4.5 TeV for values of the Planck scale up to 3 TeV. Model-independent limits are provided to further constrain microscopic black hole models with additional regions of parameter space, as well as new physics models with multiple energetic final states. These are the first limits on microscopic black hole production at a particle accelerator.

  15. EuCARD-AccNet-EuroLumi Workshop: The High-Energy Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F; HE-LHC10; HE-LHC 10

    2011-01-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the EuCARD-AccNet-EuroLumi Workshop on a High-Energy Large Hadron Collider `HE-LHC10' which was held on Malta from 14 to 16 October 2010. This is the first workshop where the possibility of building a 33 TeV centre-of-mass energy proton--proton accelerator in the LHC tunnel is discussed. The key element of such a machine will be the 20 T magnets needed to bend the particle beams: therefore much space was given to discussions about magnet technologies for high fields. The workshop also discussed possible parameter sets, issues related to beam dynamics and synchrotron radiation handling, and the need for new injectors, possibly with 1 TeV energy. The workshop searched for synergies with other projects and studies around the world facing similar challenges or pushing related technologies, revisited past experience, and explored a possible re-use of existing superconducting magnets. Last not least, it reinforced the inter-laboratory collaborations within EuCARD, especially ...

  16. Phenomenology of supersymmetric Z' decays at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corcella, Gennaro [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    I study the phenomenology of heavy neutral bosons Z', predicted in GUT-inspired U(1)' models, at the Large Hadron Collider. In particular, I investigate possible signatures due to Z' decays into supersymmetric particles, such as chargino, neutralino, and sneutrino pairs, leading to final states with charged leptons and missing energy. The analysis is carried out at √(s) = 14 TeV, for a few representative points of the parameter space of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, suitably modified to accommodate the extra Z' boson and consistent with the discovery of a Higgs-like boson with mass around 125 GeV. Results are presented for several observables and compared with those obtained for direct Z' decays into lepton pairs, as well as direct production of supersymmetric particles. For the sake of comparison, Z' phenomenology in an effective supersymmetric extension of the Sequential Standard Model is also discussed. (orig.)

  17. Busca por dimensões extras no detector CMS do large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R

    We present the results of a search for experimental evidence of extra space dimensions in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, furnished by the Large Hadron Collider accelerator. We analyzed the data taken by the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment during 2011, which total an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb−1. The Randall-Sundrum warped extra dimensions model was used as a standard benchmark for the experimental signatures which could be observed in the data, in the presence of extra dimensions. The studied reaction is pp → G∗→ ZZ→ qqνν, where G∗ is the first Randall-Sundrum graviton resonance. The observations agree witht he Standard Model predictions. In the absence of experimental signals of extra dimensions, we put limits on the parameters of the Randall-Sundrum model. Upper limits, with 95% confidence, for the cross-section of processes which would raise the event yield in the channel considered are in the [0.047 – 0.021] pb range, for resonance masses in the [1000...

  18. QCD corrections to forward-backward charge asymmetries in l- l+ j production at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Pittau, R; Ametller, L; Ametller, Ll.

    2005-01-01

    The large cross sections for gauge boson production at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) might give a chance to determine the electroweak parameters with high precision. We calculated two different forward-backward charge asymmetries (A^CS_FB and A^j_FB) of lepton pairs in events with a large transverse momentum jet p p (pbar) -> Z, gamma* + j -> e- e+ j at next-to-leading order (NLO), O(alpha_s) corrections, making use of the Monte Carlo programs MCFM and ALPGEN. These observables could provide a new determination of the weak mixing angle sin^2 theta^lept_eff (M_Z^2) with a statistical precision for each lepton flavour of 10^{-3} (7 x 10^{-3}) at LHC (Tevatron). If b jets are identified, a new asymmetry with respect to the b quark (A^b_FB) can also be measured with a statistical precision of 2 x 10^{-3} (4 x 10^{-2}) at LHC (Tevatron). Finally, we comment on the dependence of our results on various sources of uncertainties and compare, in the case of A^b_FB, the exact result with...

  19. Operational Experience and Consolidations for the Current Lead Control Valves of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Perin, A; Pirotte, O; Krieger, B; Widmer, A

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider superconducting magnets are powered by more than 1400 gas cooled current leads ranging from 120 A to 13000 A. The gas flow required by the leads is controlled by solenoid proportional valves with dimensions from DN 1.8 mm to DN 10 mm. During the first months of operation, signs of premature wear were found in the active parts of the valves. This created major problems for the functioning of the current leads threatening the availability of the LHC. Following the detection of the problems, a series of measures were implemented to keep the LHC running, to launch a development program to solve the premature wear problem and to prepare for a global consolidation of the gas flow control system. This article describes first the difficulties encountered and the measures taken to ensure a continuous operation of the LHC during the first year of operation. The development of new friction free valves is then presented along with the consolidation program and the test equipment developed to val...

  20. A central rapidity straw tracker and measurements on cryogenic components for the large hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis is divided into two parts in which two different aspects of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project are discussed. The first part describes the design of a transition radiation tracker (TRT) for the inner detector in ATLAS. In particular, the barrel part was studied in detail. The barrel TRT consists of 52544 1.5 m long proportional tubes (straws), parallel to the beam axis and each with a diameter of 4 mm. The detector is divided into three module layers with 32 modules in each layer. The preparatory study comprises: module size optimization, mechanical and thermal calculations, tracking performance and material budget studies. The second part deals with the cryogenic system for the LHC superconducting magnets. They will work at a temperature below 2 K and it is essential to understand the thermal behaviour of the individual cryogenic components in order to assess the insulating properties of the magnet cryostat. The work involves the design of two dedicated heat-inlet measuring benches for cryogenic components, and the results from heat-inlet measurements on two different types of cryogenic components are reported. 54 refs., 79 figs., 14 tabs

  1. Measurement of nonlinear observables in the Large Hadron Collider using kicked beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, E. H.; Tomás, R.; Schmidt, F.; Persson, T. H. B.

    2014-08-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a circular accelerator such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may significantly impact its performance. As the LHC progresses to more challenging regimes of operation it is to be expected that the nonlinear single particle dynamics in the transverse planes will play an increasing role in limiting the reach of the accelerator. As such it is vital that the nonlinear sources are well understood. The nonlinear fields of a circular accelerator may be probed through measurement of the amplitude detuning: the variation of tune with single particle emittance. This quantity may be assessed experimentally by exciting the beam to large amplitudes with kicks, and obtaining the tunes and actions from turn-by-turn data at Beam Position Monitors. The large amplitude excitations inherent to such a measurement also facilitate measurement of the dynamic aperture from an analysis of beam losses following the kicks. In 2012 these measurements were performed on the LHC Beam 2 at injection energy (450 GeV) with the nominal magnetic configuration. Nonlinear coupling was also observed. A second set of measurements were performed following the application of corrections for b4 and b5 errors. Analysis of the experimental results, and a comparison to simulation are presented herein.

  2. The Local Helium Compound Transfer Lines for the Large Hadron Collider Cryogenic System

    CERN Document Server

    Parente, C; Munday, A; Wiggins, P

    2006-01-01

    The cryogenic system for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at CERN will include twelve new local helium transfer lines distributed among five LHC points in underground caverns. These lines, being manufactured and installed by industry, will connect the cold boxes of the 4.5-K refrigerators and the 1.8-K refrigeration units to the cryogenic interconnection boxes. The lines have a maximum of 30-m length and may possess either small or large re-distribution units to allow connection to the interface ports. Due to space restrictions the lines may have complex routings and require several elbowed sections. The lines consist of a vacuum jacket, a thermal shield and either three or four helium process pipes. Specific internal and external supporting and compensation systems were designed for each line to allow for thermal contraction of the process pipes (or vacuum jacket, in case of a break in the insulation vacuum) and to minimise the forces applied to the interface equipment. Whenever possible, f...

  3. Performance Analysis of the Ironless Inductive Position Sensor in the Large Hadron Collider Collimators Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danisi, Alessandro; Masi, Alessandro; Losito, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The Ironless Inductive Position Sensor (I2PS) has been introduced as a valid alternative to Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) when external magnetic fields are present. Potential applications of this linear position sensor can be found in critical systems such as nuclear plants, tokamaks, satellites and particle accelerators. This paper analyzes the performance of the I2PS in the harsh environment of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where position uncertainties of less than 20 µm are demanded in the presence of nuclear radiation and external magnetic fields. The I2PS has been targeted for installation for LHC Run 2, in order to solve the magnetic interference problem which standard LVDTs are experiencing. The paper describes in detail the chain of systems which belong to the new I2PS measurement task, their impact on the sensor performance and their possible further optimization. The I2PS performance is analyzed evaluating the position uncertainty (on 30 s), the magnetic immunity and the long-term stability (on 7 days). These three indicators are assessed from data acquired during the LHC operation in 2015 and compared with those of LVDTs. PMID:26569259

  4. GPU Enhancement of the Trigger to Extend Physics Reach at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lujan, P; Hunt, A; Jindal, P; LeGresley, P

    2013-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the trigger systems for the detectors must be able to process a very large amount of data in a very limited amount of time, so that the nominal collision rate of 40 MHz can be reduced to a data rate that can be stored and processed in a reasonable amount of time. This need for high performance places very stringent requirements on the complexity of the algorithms that can be used for identifying events of interest in the trigger system, which potentially limits the ability to trigger on signatures of various new physics models. In this paper, we present an alternative tracking algorithm, based on the Hough transform, which avoids many of the problems associated with the standard combinatorial track finding currently used. The Hough transform is also well-adapted for Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)-based computing, and such GPU-based systems could be easily integrated into the existing High-Level Trigger (HLT). This algorithm offers the ability to trigger on topological signa...

  5. The Thermosiphon Cooling System of the ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Battistin, M; Bitadze, A; Bonneau, P; Botelho-Direito, J; Boyd, G; Corbaz, F; Crespo-Lopez, O; Da Riva, E; Degeorge, C; Deterre, C; DiGirolamo, B; Doubek, M; Favre, G; Godlewski, J; Hallewell, G; Katunin, S; Lefils, D; Lombard, D; McMahon, S; Nagai, K; Robinson, D; Rossi, C; Rozanov, A; Vacek, V; Zwalinski, L

    2015-01-01

    The silicon tracker of the ATLAS experiment at CERN Large Hadron Collider will operate around –15°C to minimize the effects of radiation damage. The present cooling system is based on a conventional evaporative circuit, removing around 60 kW of heat dissipated by the silicon sensors and their local electronics. The compressors in the present circuit have proved less reliable than originally hoped, and will be replaced with a thermosiphon. The working principle of the thermosiphon uses gravity to circulate the coolant without any mechanical components (compressors or pumps) in the primary coolant circuit. The fluorocarbon coolant will be condensed at a temperature and pressure lower than those in the on-detector evaporators, but at a higher altitude, taking advantage of the 92 m height difference between the underground experiment and the services located on the surface. An extensive campaign of tests, detailed in this paper, was performed using two small-scale thermosiphon systems. These tests confirmed th...

  6. The CERN Large Hadron Collider as a tool to study high-energy density matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N A; Kain, V; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Gryaznov, V; Piriz, A R; Temporal, M; Hoffmann, D H H; Fortov, V E

    2005-04-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate two extremely powerful 7 TeV proton beams. Each beam will consist of 2808 bunches with an intensity per bunch of 1.15x10(11) protons so that the total number of protons in one beam will be about 3x10(14) and the total energy will be 362 MJ. Each bunch will have a duration of 0.5 ns and two successive bunches will be separated by 25 ns, while the power distribution in the radial direction will be Gaussian with a standard deviation, sigma=0.2 mm. The total duration of the beam will be about 89 mus. Using a 2D hydrodynamic code, we have carried out numerical simulations of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper target that is irradiated with one of the LHC beams. These calculations show that only the first few hundred proton bunches will deposit a high specific energy of 400 kJ/g that will induce exotic states of high energy density in matter.

  7. Chromaticity decay due to superconducting dipoles on the injection plateau of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Aquilina, N; Sammut, N; Strzeclzyk, M; Todesco, E

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that in a superconducting accelerator a significant chromaticity drift can be induced by the decay of the sextupolar component of the main dipoles. In this paper we give a brief overview of what was expected for the Large Hadron Collider on the grounds of magnetic measurements of individual dipoles carried out during the production. According to this analysis, the decay time constants were of the order of 200 s: since the injection in the LHC starts at least 30 minutes after the magnets are at constant current, the dynamic correction of this effect was not considered to be necessary. The first beam measurements of chromaticity showed significant decay even after few hours. For this reason, a dynamic correction of decay on the injection plateau was implemented based on beam measurements. This means that during the injection plateau the sextupole correctors are powered with a varying current to cancel out the decay of the dipoles. This strategy has been implemented successfully. A similar pheno...

  8. Performance Analysis of the Ironless Inductive Position Sensor in the Large Hadron Collider Collimators Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Danisi, Alessandro; Losito, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The Ironless Inductive Position Sensor (I2PS) has been introduced as a valid alternative to Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) when external magnetic fields are present. Potential applications of this linear position sensor can be found in critical systems such as nuclear plants, tokamaks, satellites and particle accelerators. This paper analyzes the performance of the I2PS in the harsh environment of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where position uncertainties of less than 20 μm are demanded in the presence of nuclear radiation and external magnetic fields. The I2PS has been targeted for installation for LHC Run 2, in order to solve the magnetic interference problem which standard LVDTs are experiencing. The paper describes in detail the chain of systems which belong to the new I2PS measurement task, their impact on the sensor performance and their possible further optimization. The I2PS performance is analyzed evaluating the position uncertainty (on 30 s), the magnetic im...

  9. Performance Analysis of the Ironless Inductive Position Sensor in the Large Hadron Collider Collimators Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danisi, Alessandro; Masi, Alessandro; Losito, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The Ironless Inductive Position Sensor (I2PS) has been introduced as a valid alternative to Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) when external magnetic fields are present. Potential applications of this linear position sensor can be found in critical systems such as nuclear plants, tokamaks, satellites and particle accelerators. This paper analyzes the performance of the I2PS in the harsh environment of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where position uncertainties of less than 20 µm are demanded in the presence of nuclear radiation and external magnetic fields. The I2PS has been targeted for installation for LHC Run 2, in order to solve the magnetic interference problem which standard LVDTs are experiencing. The paper describes in detail the chain of systems which belong to the new I2PS measurement task, their impact on the sensor performance and their possible further optimization. The I2PS performance is analyzed evaluating the position uncertainty (on 30 s), the magnetic immunity and the long-term stability (on 7 days). These three indicators are assessed from data acquired during the LHC operation in 2015 and compared with those of LVDTs.

  10. Correlation between magnetic field quality and mechanical components of the Large Hadron Collider main dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1234 superconducting dipoles of the Large Hadron Collider, working at a cryogenic temperature of 1.9 K, must guarantee a high quality magnetic field to steer the particles inside the beam pipe. Magnetic field measurements are a powerful way to detect assembly faults that could limit magnet performances. The aim of the thesis is the analysis of these measurements performed at room temperature during the production of the dipoles. In a large scale production the ideal situation is that all the magnets produced were identical. However all the components constituting a magnet are produced with certain tolerance and the assembly procedures are optimized during the production; due to these the reality drifts away from the ideal situation. We recollected geometrical data of the main components (superconducting cables, coil copper wedges and austenitic steel coil collars) and coupling them with adequate electro-magnetic models we reconstructed a multipolar field representation of the LHC dipoles defining their critical components and assembling procedures. This thesis is composed of 3 main parts: 1) influence of the geometry and of the assembling procedures of the dipoles on the quality of the magnetic field, 2) the use of measurement performed on the dipoles in the assembling step in order to solve production issues and to understand the behaviour of coils during the assembling step, and 3) a theoretical study of the uncertain harmonic components of the magnetic field in order to assess the dipole production

  11. The CERN Large Hadron Collider as a tool to study high-energy density matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Gryaznov, V; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Kain, V; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Temporal, M

    2005-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate two extremely powerful 7 TeV proton beams. Each beam will consist of 2808 bunches with an intensity per bunch of 1.15*10/sup 11/ protons so that the total number of protons in one beam will be about 3*10/sup 14/ and the total energy will be 362 MJ. Each bunch will have a duration of 0.5 ns and two successive bunches will be separated by 25 ns, while the power distribution in the radial direction will be Gaussian with a standard deviation, sigma =0.2 mm. The total duration of the beam will be about 89 mu s. Using a 2D hydrodynamic code, we have carried out numerical simulations of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper target that is irradiated with one of the LHC beams. These calculations show that only the first few hundred proton bunches will deposit a high specific energy of 400 kJ/g that will induce exotic states of high energy density in matter.

  12. High precision tools for slepton pair production processes at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thier, Stephan Christoph

    2015-01-20

    In this thesis, we develop high precision tools for the simulation of slepton pair production processes at hadron colliders and apply them to phenomenological studies at the LHC. Our approach is based on the POWHEG method for the matching of next-to-leading order results in perturbation theory to parton showers. We calculate matrix elements for slepton pair production and for the production of a slepton pair in association with a jet perturbatively at next-to-leading order in supersymmetric quantum chromodynamics. Both processes are subsequently implemented in the POWHEG BOX, a publicly available software tool that contains general parts of the POWHEG matching scheme. We investigate phenomenological consequences of our calculations in several setups that respect experimental exclusion limits for supersymmetric particles and provide precise predictions for slepton signatures at the LHC. The inclusion of QCD emissions in the partonic matrix elements allows for an accurate description of hard jets. Interfacing our codes to the multi-purpose Monte-Carlo event generator PYTHIA, we simulate parton showers and slepton decays in fully exclusive events. Advanced kinematical variables and specific search strategies are examined as means for slepton discovery in experimentally challenging setups.

  13. The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider the new machine for illuminating the mysteries of Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Brüning, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a broad introduction to the physics and technology of the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). This new configuration of the LHC is one of the major accelerator projects for the next 15 years and will give new life to the LHC after its first 15-year operation. Not only will it allow more precise measurements of the Higgs boson and of any new particles that might be discovered in the next LHC run, but also extend the mass limit reach for detecting new particles. The HL-LHC is based on the innovative accelerator magnet technologies capable of generating 11–13 Tesla fields, with effectiveness enhanced by use of the new Achromatic Telescopic Squeezing scheme, and other state-of-the-art accelerator technologies, such as superconducting compact RF crab cavities, advanced collimation concepts, and novel power technology based on high temperature superconducting links. The book consists of a series of chapters touching on all issues of technology and design, and each chapter can be re...

  14. Superconducting Magnet with the Reduced Barrel Yoke for the Hadron Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Berriaud, C; Curé, B; Dudarev, A; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mentink, M; Rolando, G; Da Silva, H F Pais; Wagner, U; Kate, H H J ten

    2015-01-01

    The conceptual design study of a hadron Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) with a center-of-mass energy of the order of 100 TeV in a new tunnel of 80-100 km circumference assumes the determination of the basic requirements for its detectors. A superconducting solenoid magnet of 12 m diameter inner bore with the central magnetic flux density of 6 T is proposed for a FCC-hh experimental setup. The coil of 24.518 m long has seven 3.5 m long modules included into one cryostat. The steel yoke with a mass of 21 kt consists of two barrel layers of 0.5 m radial thickness, and 0.7 m thick nose disk, four 0.6 m thick end-cap disks, and three 0.8 m thick muon toroid disks each side. The outer diameter of the yoke is 17.7 m; the length without the forward muon toroids is 33 m. The air gaps between the end-cap disks provide the installation of the muon chambers up to the pseudorapidity of \\pm 3.5. The conventional forward muon spectrometer provides the measuring of the muon momenta in the pseudorapidity region from \\pm 2.7...

  15. Superconducting Magnet with the Minimum Steel Yoke for the Hadron Future Circular Collider Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A.; Curé, B.; Dudarev, A.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Mentink, M.; Da Silva, H. Pais; Rolando, G.; ten Kate, H. H. J.; Berriaud, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    The conceptual design study of a hadron Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) with a center-of-mass energy of the order of 100 TeV in a new tunnel of 80-100 km circumference assumes the determination of the basic requirements for its detectors. A superconducting solenoid magnet of 12 m diameter inner bore with the central magnetic flux density of 6 T in combination with two superconducting dipole and two conventional toroid magnets is proposed for a FCC-hh experimental setup. The coil of 23.468 m long has seven 3.35 m long modules included into one cryostat. The steel yoke with a mass of 22.6 kt consists of two barrel layers of 0.5 m radial thickness, and the 0.7 m thick nose disk and four 0.6 m thick end-cap disks each side. The maximum outer diameter of the yoke is 17.7 m; the length is 62.6 m. The air gaps between the end-cap disks provide the installation of the muon chambers up to the pseudorapidity about \\pm 2.7. The superconducting dipole magnets allow measuring the charged particle momenta in the pseudora...

  16. Transport models for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subrata Pal

    2015-05-01

    We review the transport models that are widely used to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We show that transport model analysis of two important and complementary observables, the anisotropic flow of bulk hadrons and suppression of hadron yields at high transverse momentum, provide exciting new information on the properties of the plasma formed.

  17. Magnetic-field-induced squeezing effect at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Long-Gang; Endrődi, Gergely; Petersen, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    In off-central heavy-ion collisions, quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is exposed to the strongest magnetic fields ever created in the universe. Because of the paramagnetic nature of the QGP at high temperatures, the spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field configuration exerts an anisotropic force density that competes with the pressure gradients resulting from purely geometric effects. In this paper, we simulate (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamics with external magnetic fields to estimate the effect of this force density on the anisotropic expansion of the QGP in collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While negligible for quickly decaying magnetic fields, we find that long-lived fields generate a substantial force density that suppresses the momentum anisotropy of the plasma by up to 20 % at the LHC energy and also leaves its imprint on the elliptic flow v2 of charged pions.

  18. Chiral electric field in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yang; Yang, Chun-Bin; Cai, Xu; Feng, Sheng-Qin

    2016-08-01

    It has been proposed that electric fields may lead to chiral separation in quark-gluon plasma (QGP). This is called the chiral electric separation effect. The strong electromagnetic field and the QCD vacuum can both be completely produced in off-central nuclear-nuclear collision. We use the Woods-Saxon nucleon distribution to calculate the electric field distributions of off-central collisions. The chiral electric field spatial distribution at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energy regions are systematically studied in this paper. The dependence of the electric field produced by the thermal quark in the central position with different impact parameters on the proper time with different collision energies in the RHIC and LHC energy regions are studied in this paper. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375069, 11435054, 11075061, 11221504) and Key Laboratory Foundation of Quark and Lepton Physics (Hua-Zhong Normal University)(QLPL2014P01)

  19. Beam losses from ultra-peripheral nuclear collisions between Pb ions in the Large Hadron Collider and their alleviation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, R.; /CERN; Bocian, D.; /Fermilab /CERN; Gilardoni, S.; Jowett, J.M.; /CERN

    2009-08-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between colliding heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will give rise to localized beam losses that may quench superconducting magnets, apart from contributing significantly to the luminosity decay. To quantify their impact on the operation of the collider, we have used a three-step simulation approach, which consists of optical tracking, a Monte-Carlo shower simulation and a thermal network model of the heat flow inside a magnet. We present simulation results for the case of {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} ion operation in the LHC, with focus on the alice interaction region, and show that the expected heat load during nominal {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} operation is 40% above the quench level. This limits the maximum achievable luminosity. Furthermore, we discuss methods of monitoring the losses and possible ways to alleviate their effect.

  20. Prompt D*+ production in proton-proton and lead-lead collisions, measured with the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, R. S.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the results are presented of the first measurements of the D*+ meson nuclear modification factor RAA in heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) detector at CERN. These open charmed mesons are a useful tool to investigat

  1. QCD corrections to pair production of Type III Seesaw leptons at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Richard

    2015-12-01

    If kinematically accessible, hadron collider experiments provide an ideal laboratory for the direct production of heavy lepton partners in Seesaw models. In the context of the Type III Seesaw Mechanism, the O({α}_s) rate and shape corrections are presented for the pair production of hypothetical, heavy SU(2) L triplet leptons in pp collisions at √{s} = 13, 14 and 100TeV. The next-to-leading order (NLO) K-factors span, approximately, K NLO = 1 .1 - 1 .4 for both charged current and neutral current processes over a triplet mass range m T = 100 GeV - 2 TeV. Total production cross sections exhibit a - 6 % + 5 % scale dependence at 14 TeV and ±1% at 100 TeV. The NLO differential K-factors for heavy lepton kinematics are largely flat, suggesting that na¨ıve scaling by the total K NLO is reasonably justified. The resummed transverse momentum distribution of the dilepton system is presented at leading logarithmic (LL) accuracy. The effects of resummation are large in TeV-scale dilepton systems. Discovery potential to heavy lepton pairs at 14 and 100 TeV is briefly explored: at the High-Luminosity LHC, we estimate a 4 .8 - 6 .3 σ discovery potential maximally for m T = 1 .5 - 1 .6 TeV after 3000 fb-1. With 300 (3000) fb-1, there is 2σ sensitivity up to m T = 1 .3 - 1 .4 TeV (1 .7 - 1 .8 TeV) in the individual channels. At 100 TeV and with 10 fb-1, a 5 σ discovery can be achieved for m T = 1 .4 - 1 .6 TeV. Due to the factorization properties of Drell-Yan-type systems, the fixed order and resummed calculations reduce to convolutions over tree-level quantities.

  2. Measured and simulated heavy-ion beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, P. D.; Bruce, R.; Jowett, J. M.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.; Valentino, G.; Wollmann, D.

    2016-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN pushes forward to new regimes in terms of beam energy and intensity. In view of the combination of very energetic and intense beams together with sensitive machine components, in particular the superconducting magnets, the LHC is equipped with a collimation system to provide protection and intercept uncontrolled beam losses. Beam losses could cause a superconducting magnet to quench, or in the worst case, damage the hardware. The collimation system, which is optimized to provide a good protection with proton beams, has shown a cleaning efficiency with heavy-ion beams which is worse by up to two orders of magnitude. The reason for this reduced cleaning efficiency is the fragmentation of heavy-ion beams into isotopes with a different mass to charge ratios because of the interaction with the collimator material. In order to ensure sufficient collimation performance in future ion runs, a detailed theoretical understanding of ion collimation is needed. The simulation of heavy-ion collimation must include processes in which 82+208Pb ions fragment into dozens of new isotopes. The ions and their fragments must be tracked inside the magnetic lattice of the LHC to determine their loss positions. This paper gives an overview of physical processes important for the description of heavy-ion loss patterns. Loss maps simulated by means of the two tools ICOSIM [1,2] and the newly developed STIER (SixTrack with Ion-Equivalent Rigidities) are compared with experimental data measured during LHC operation. The comparison shows that the tool STIER is in better agreement.

  3. Reliability of the beam loss monitors system for the large hadron collider at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy stored in the Large Hadron Collider is unprecedented. The impact of the beam particles can cause severe damage on the superconductive magnets, resulting in significant downtime for repairing. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) detects the secondary particles shower of the lost beam particles and initiates the extraction of the beam before any serious damage to the equipment can occur. This thesis defines the BLMS specifications in term of reliability. The main goal is the design of a system minimizing both the probability to not detect a dangerous loss and the number of false alarms generated. The reliability theory and techniques utilized are described. The prediction of the hazard rates, the testing procedures, the Failure Modes Effects and Criticalities Analysis and the Fault Tree Analysis have been used to provide an estimation of the probability to damage a magnet, of the number of false alarms and of the number of generated warnings. The weakest components in the BLMS have been pointed out. The reliability figures of the BLMS have been calculated using a commercial software package (Isograph.). The effect of the variation of the parameters on the obtained results has been evaluated with a sensitivity analysis. The reliability model has been extended by the results of radiation tests. Design improvements, like redundant optical transmission, have been implemented in an iterative process. The proposed system is compliant with the reliability requirements. The model uncertainties are given by the limited knowledge of the thresholds levels of the superconductive magnets and of the locations of the losses along the ring. The implemented model allows modifications of the system, following the measuring of the hazard rates during the LHC life. It can also provide reference numbers to other accelerators which will implement similar technologies. (author)

  4. The large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the search for the divine particle; El gran acelerador de hadrones (LHC) y la busqueda de la particula divina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, G.

    2008-07-01

    The large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a particle circular accelerator of 27 km of circumference. It will be used to study the smallest known particles. Two beams of subatomic particles called hadrons either protons or lead ion- will travel in opposite directions inside the circular accelerator gaining energy with every lap. Physicists will use the LHC to recreate the conditions just after the Big Bang, by colliding the two beams had-on at very high energy. There are many theories as to what will result from these collisions, but what's for sure is that a brave new world of physics will emerge from the new accelerator, as knowledge in particle physics goes on to describe the working of the Universe. for decades, the Standard Model of particle physics has served physicists well as a means of understanding the fundamental laws of Nature, but it does not tell the whole story. Only experimental data using the higher energies reached by the LHC can push knowledge forward, challenging those who seek confirmation of established knowledge, and those who dare to dream beyond the paradigm. The Higgs boson, that complete the standard model, is waited to be found. (Author)

  5. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN: Report on the Physics and Design Concepts for Machine and Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Brüning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Cetinkaya, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; De Roeck, A; d'Enterria, D; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinol, L; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Ten Kate, H; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F

    2012-01-01

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new collider for particle and nuclear physics, the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), in which a newly built electron beam of 60 GeV, up to possibly 140 GeV, energy collides with the intense hadron beams of the LHC. Compared to HERA, the kinematic range covered is extended by a factor of twenty in the negative four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$, while with the design luminosity of $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ the LHeC is projected to exceed the integrated HERA luminosity by two orders of magnitude. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering measurements. These are designed to investigate a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The physics programme also includes electron-deuteron and electron-ion scattering in a $(Q^2, 1/x)$ ran...

  6. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  7. Top-quark pair production at hadron colliders. Differential cross section and phenomenological applications with DiffTop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzzi, Marco; Lipka, Katerina [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Moch, Sven-Olaf [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    The results of phenomenological studies of top-quark pair production in proton-proton collisions are presented. Differential cross sections are calculated in perturbative QCD at approximate next-to-next-to-leading order O(α{sup 4}{sub s}) by using methods of threshold resummation beyond the leading logarithmic accuracy. Predictions for the single-particle inclusive kinematics are presented for transverse momentum and rapidity distributions of final-state top quarks. Uncertainties related to the description of proton structure, top-quark mass and strong coupling constant are investigated in detail. The results are compared to the recent measurements by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the LHC at the center of mass energy of 7 TeV. The calculation presented here is implemented in the computer code DIFFTOP and can be applied to the general case of heavy-quark pair production at hadron-hadron colliders.

  8. Probing small parton densities in ultraperipheral A A and pA collisions at the CERN large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikman, Mark; Vogt, Ramona; White, Sebastian

    2006-03-01

    We calculate photoproduction rates for several hard processes in ultraperipheral proton-lead and lead-lead collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with square root of sNN = 8.8 and 5.5 TeV, respectively, which could be triggered in the large LHC detectors. We use ATLAS as an example. The lead ion is treated as a source of (coherently produced) photons with energies and intensities greater than those of equivalent ep collisions at the DESY collider HERA. We find very large rates for both inclusive and diffractive production that will extend the HERA x range by nearly an order of magnitude for similar virtualities. We demonstrate that it is possible to reach the kinematic regime where nonlinear effects are larger than at HERA.

  9. Four-Jet Production at the Large Hadron Collider at Next-to-Leading Order in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, Z.; /UCLA; Diana, G.; /IPhT, Saclay; Dixon, L.J.; /SLAC; Febres Cordero, F.; /Simon Bolivar U.; Hoeche, S.; /Bohr Inst.; Kosower, D.A.; /IPhT, Saclay; Ita, H.; /UCLA /Bohr Inst.; Maitre, D.; /Durham U. /CERN; Ozeren, K.; /UCLA

    2012-02-15

    We present the cross sections for production of up to four jets at the Large Hadron Collider, at next-to-leading order in the QCD coupling. We use the BlackHat library in conjunction with SHERPA and a recently developed algorithm for assembling primitive amplitudes into color-dressed amplitudes. We adopt the cuts used by ATLAS in their study of multi-jet events in pp collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV. We include estimates of nonperturbative corrections and compare to ATLAS data. We store intermediate results in a framework that allows the inexpensive computation of additional results for different choices of scale or parton distributions.

  10. Searches for and identification of effects of extra spatial dimensions in dilepton and diphoton production at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankov, A. A., E-mail: pankov@ictp.it; Serenkova, I. A., E-mail: inna.serenkova@cern.ch; Tsytrinov, A. V., E-mail: tsytrin@gstu.by; Bednyakov, V. A., E-mail: Vadim.Bednyakov@cern.ch [Pavel Sukhoi Gomel State Technical University, ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy) Affiliated Centre (Belarus)

    2015-06-15

    Prospects of discovering and identifying effects of extra spatial dimensions in dilepton and diphoton production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are studied. Such effects may be revealed by the characteristic behavior of the invariant-mass distributions of dileptons and diphotons, and their identification can be performed on the basis of an analysis of their angular distributions. The discovery and identification reaches are estimated for the scale parameter M{sub S} of the Kaluza-Klein gravitational towers, which can be determined in experiments devoted to measuring the dilepton and diphoton channels at the LHC.

  11. Four-Jet Production at the Large Hadron Collider at Next-to-Leading Order in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bern, Z; Dixon, L J; Cordero, F Febres; Hoeche, S; Kosower, D A; Ita, H; Maitre, D; Ozeren, K

    2012-01-01

    We present the cross sections for production of up to four jets at the Large Hadron Collider, at next-to-leading order in the QCD coupling. We use the BlackHat library in conjunction with SHERPA and a recently developed algorithm for assembling primitive amplitudes into color-dressed amplitudes. We adopt the cuts used by ATLAS in their study of multi-jet events in pp collisions at \\sqrt{s} = 7 TeV. We include estimates of nonperturbative corrections and compare to ATLAS data. We store intermediate results in a framework that allows the inexpensive computation of additional results for different choices of scale or parton distributions.

  12. Electromagnetic Design and Optimization of Directivity of Stripline Beam Position Monitors for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Draskovic, Drasko; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Lefèvre, Thibaut; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary electromagnetic design of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the High Luminosity program of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN. The design is fitted into a new octagonal shielded Beam Screen for the low-beta triplets and is optimized for high directivity. It also includes internal Tungsten absorbers, required to reduce the energy deposition in the superconducting magnets. The achieved broadband directivity in wakefield solver simulations presents significant improvement over the directivity of the current stripline BPMs installed in the LHC.

  13. Multiplicity distributions in the forward rapidity region in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Premomoy; Muhuri, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    Measured multiplicity distributions of primary charged particles produced in the forward rapidity region of the $proton-proton$ ($pp$) collisions at the centre-of-mass energy, $\\sqrt {s}$ = 7 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have been analyzed in terms of the Negative Binomial Distribution (NBD) function. Like the multiplicity distributions in the mid-rapidity region for the $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt {s}$ = 7 TeV, the distributions for the minimum bias events in the forward region also ...

  14. Probing electroweak gauge boson scattering with the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anger, Philipp

    2014-09-01

    Electroweak gauge bosons as central components of the Standard Model of particle physics are well understood theoretically and have been studied with high precision at past and present collider experiments. The electroweak theory predicts the existence of a scattering process of these particles consisting of contributions from triple and quartic bosonic couplings as well as Higgs boson mediated interactions. These contributions are not separable in a gauge invariant way and are only unitarized in the case of a Higgs boson as it is described by the Standard Model. The process is tied to the electroweak symmetry breaking which introduces the longitudinal modes for the massive electroweak gauge bosons. A study of this interaction is also a direct verification of the local gauge symmetry as one of the fundamental axioms of the Standard Model. With the start of the Large Hadron Collider and after collecting proton-proton collision data with an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb{sup -1} at a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector, first-ever evidence for this process could be achieved in the context of this work. A study of leptonically decaying W{sup ±}W{sup ±}jj, same-electric-charge diboson production in association with two jets resulted in an observation of the electroweak W{sup ±}W{sup ±}jj production with same electric charge of the W bosons, inseparably comprising W{sup ±}W{sup ±}→W{sup ±}W{sup ±} electroweak gauge boson scattering contributions, with a significance of 3.6 standard deviations. The measured production cross section is in agreement with the Standard Model prediction. In the course of a study for leptonically decaying WZ productions, methods for background estimation, the extraction of systematic uncertainties and cross section measurements were developed. They were extended and applied to the WZjj final state whereof the purely electroweakly mediated contribution is intrinsically tied to the scattering of all Standard

  15. Heavy Flavor at the Large Hadron Collider in a Strong Coupling Approach

    CERN Document Server

    He, Min; Rapp, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Employing nonperturbative transport coefficients for heavy-flavor (HF) diffusion through quark-gluon plasma (QGP), hadronization and hadronic matter, we compute $D$- and $B$-meson observables in Pb+Pb ($\\sqrt{s}$=2.76\\,TeV) collisions at the LHC. Elastic heavy-quark scattering in the QGP is evaluated within a thermodynamic $T$-matrix approach, generating resonances close to the critical temperature which are utilized for recombination into $D$ and $B$ mesons, followed by hadronic diffusion using effective hadronic scattering amplitudes. The transport coefficients are implemented via Fokker-Planck Langevin dynamics within hydrodynamic simulations of the bulk medium in nuclear collisions. The hydro expansion is quantitatively constrained by transverse-momentum spectra and elliptic flow of light hadrons. Our approach thus incorporates the paradigm of a strongly coupled medium in both bulk and HF dynamics throughout the thermal evolution of the system.

  16. A Silicon Strip Detector for the Phase II High Luminosity Upgrade of the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    García-Argos, Carlos; McMahon, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that detects proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 14 TeV. The Semiconductor Tracker is part of the Inner Detector, implemented using silicon microstrip detectors with binary read-out, providing momentum measurement of charged particles with excellent resolution. The operation of the LHC and the ATLAS experiment started in 2010, with ten years of operation expected until major upgrades are needed in the accelerator and the experiments. The ATLAS tracker will need to be completely replaced due to the radiation damage and occupancy of some detector elements and the data links at high luminosities. These upgrades after the first ten years of operation are named the Phase-II Upgrade and involve a re-design of the LHC, resulting in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). This thesis presents the work carried out in the testing of the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade electronic systems in the future strips tracker a...

  17. Coherent photoproduction of vector mesons in ultraperipheral heavy ion collisions: Update for run 2 at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzey, V.; Kryshen, E.; Zhalov, M.

    2016-05-01

    We make predictions for the cross sections of coherent photoproduction of ρ ,ϕ ,J /ψ ,ψ (2 S ) , and Υ (1 S ) mesons in Pb-Pb ultraperipheral collisions (UPCs) at √{sN N}=5.02 TeV in the kinematics of run 2 at the Large Hadron Collider extending the approaches successfully describing the available Pb-Pb UPC data at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV . Our results illustrate the important roles of hadronic fluctuations of the photon and inelastic nuclear shadowing in photoproduction of light vector mesons on nuclei and the large leading twist nuclear gluon shadowing in photoproduction of quarkonia on nuclei. We show that the ratio of ψ (2 S ) and J /ψ photoproduction cross sections in Pb-Pb UPCs is largely determined by the ratio of these cross sections on the proton. We also argue that UPCs with electromagnetic excitations of the colliding ions followed by the forward neutron emission allows one to significantly increase the range of photon energies accessed in vector meson photoproduction on nuclei.

  18. Probing triple-Higgs productions via $4b2\\gamma$ at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Zhao, Xiaoran; Zhong, Yi-Ming; Zhao, Zhijie

    2016-01-01

    The quartic self-coupling of the Standard Model Higgs boson can only be measured by observing the triple-Higgs production process, but it is challenging for the LHC Run 2 or ILC at a few TeV because of its extremely small production rate. In this paper, we present a detailed MC simulation study of the triple-Higgs production through gluon fusion at a 100 TeV hadron collider and explore the feasibility of observing this production mode. We focus on the decay channel $HHH\\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b}\\gamma\\gamma$, investigating detector effects and optimizing the kinematic cuts to discriminate the signal from the backgrounds. Our study shows that in order to observe the Standard Model triple-Higgs signal, the integrated luminosity of a 100 TeV hadron collider should be greater than $1.8\\times 10^4$ ab$^{-1}$. We also explore the dependence of the cross section upon the trilinear ($\\lambda_3$) and quartic ($\\lambda_4$) self-couplings of the Higgs. We find that, through a search in the triple Higgs production, the...

  19. Experimental search for W/Z pairs and Higgs bosons at very high energy hadron-hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study, from an experimental point of view, the main ways to detect standard high mass Higgs bosons (from 300 GeV up to about 1 TeV) when they decay into W- and Z-pairs at the SSC. We also consider the corresponding W- and Z0-pair continuum which may itself provide interesting physics, and we pay some attention to the case of an intermediate mass charged Higgs decaying into tauν/sub tau/ (m/sub H+-/ = 300 GeV). We first explain why and how high energy pp colliders may search for Higgs' and we compare their possible performances to those of the e+e- and ep colliders at all possible mass scale (from few tens of GeV's up to 1 TeV). We then estimate the rates of the signals and the main backgrounds. We define the main characteristics of these events as reproduced by M.C. generators (especially implemented with these processes) and simulated through an idealized 4π fine-grained calorimeter. A trigger strategy for W- and Z-pairs is derived from this study. 26 refs., 28 figs

  20. Resonant production of leptogluons at the FCC based lepton-hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Acar, Y C; Oner, B B; Sultansoy, S

    2015-01-01

    Resonant production of leptogluons at the FCC based ep and \\mup colliders have been analyzed. It is shown that e-FCC and \\mu-FCC will cover much wider region of e_{8} and \\mu_{8} masses than the LHC. While leptogluons with appropriate masses (if exist) will be discovered earlier by the FCC pp collider, lepton-proton colliders will give opportunity to handle very important additional information. For example, compositeness scale can be probed up to multi-hundred TeV region.

  1. Evidence of subnucleonic degrees of freedom in J /ψ photoproduction in ultraperipheral collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-II, E.; González, I.; Deppman, A.; Bertulani, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present calculations for the incoherent photoproduction of J /ψ vector mesons in ultraperipheral heavy ion collisions (UPCs) in terms of hadronic interactions. This study was carried out using the recently developed Monte Carlo model CRISP extended to include UPCs at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. A careful study of rescattering and destruction of the J /ψ particles is presented for Pb + Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV. We have also compared our method to Au + Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  2. Discovery and measurement of excited b hadrons at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pursley, Jennifer Marie [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-08-01

    This thesis presents evidence for the B**0 and Σ$(*)±\\atop{b}$ hadrons in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. In the search for B**0 → B± π, two B± decays modes are reconstructed: B± → J/ΨK±, where J/Ψ → μ+μ-, and B± → $\\bar{D}$0π±, where $\\bar{D}$0 → K± π±. Both modes are reconstructed using 370 ± 20 pb-1 of data. Combining the B± meson with a charged pion to reconstruct B**0 led to the observation and measurement of the masses of the two narrow B**0 states, B$1\\atop{0}$ and B$*0\\atop{2}$, of m(B$1\\atop{0}$) = 5734 ± 3(stat.) ± 2(syst.) MeV/c2; m(B$*0\\atop{2}$) = 5738 ± 5(stat.) ± 1(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. In the search for Σ$(*)±\\atop{b}$ → Λ$0\\atop{b}$π±, the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ is reconstructed in the decay mode Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → Λ$+\\atop{c}$π-, where Λ$+\\atop{c}$→ pK- π+, using 1070 ± 60 pb-1 of data. Upon combining the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ candidate with a charged pion, all four of the Σ$(*)±\\atop{b}$ states are observed and their masses measured to be: m(Σ$+\\atop{b}$) = 5807.8$+2.0\\atop{-2.2}$(stat.) ± 1.7(syst.) MeV/c2; m(Σ$+\\atop{b}$) = 5815.2 ± 1.0(stat.) ± 1.7(syst.) MeV/c2; m(Σ$*+\\atop{b}$) = 5829.0$+1.6\\atop{-1.8}$(stat.)$+1.7\\atop{-1.8}$(syst.) MeV/c 2; M(Σ$*-±\\atop{b}$) - 5836.4 ± 2.0(stat.)$+1.8\\atop{-1.7}$(syst.) MeV/c2. This is the first observation of Σ$(*)±\\atop{b}$ baryons.

  3. Podcast The Large Hadron Collider and the Search for the Higgs-Boson

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    When it was first developed, the standard model predicted a collection of particles, and thanks to more and more powerful colliders, physicsists have been able to find them all except one: the Higgs-Boson.

  4. Large Area Silicon Tracking Detectors with Fast Signal Readout for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Köstner, S

    2005-01-01

    The Standard Model of elementary particles, which is summarized briefly in the second chapter, incorporates a number of successful theories to explain the nature and consistency of matter. However not all building blocks of this model could yet be tested by experiment. To confirm existing theories and to improve nowadays understanding of matter a new machine is currently being built at CERN, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), described in the third chapter. LHC is a proton-proton collider which will reach unprecedented luminosities and center of mass energies. Five experiments are attached to it to give answers to questions like the existence of the Higgs meson, which allows to explain the mass content of matter, and the origin of CP-violation, which plays an important role in the baryogenesis of the universe. Supersymmetric theories, proposing a bosonic superpartner for each fermion and vice versa, will be tested. By colliding heavy ions, high energy and particle densities can be achieved and probed. This stat...

  5. Charm production in Pb+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider energy

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Taesoo; Cabrera, Daniel; Cassing, Wolfgang; Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2015-01-01

    We study charm production in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=$2.76 TeV in the Parton-Hadron-String-Dynamics transport approach and the charm dynamics in the partonic and hadronic medium. The charm quarks are produced through initial binary nucleon-nucleon collisions by using the PYTHIA event generator taking into account the (anti-)shadowing incorporated in the EPS09 package. The produced charm quarks interact with off-shell massive partons in the quark-gluon plasma and are hadronized into $D$ mesons through coalescence or fragmentation close to the critical energy density, and then interact with hadrons in the final hadronic stage with scattering cross sections calculated in an effective Lagrangian approach with heavy-quark spin symmetry. The PHSD results show a reasonable $R_{\\rm AA}$ and elliptic flow of $D$ mesons in comparison to the experimental data for Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV from the ALICE Collaboration. We also study the effect of temperature-dependent off-shell charm q...

  6. Les Houches guidebook to Monte Carlo generators for hadron collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool

  7. Les Houches guidebook to Monte Carlo generators for hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, Matt A.; Frixione, Stefano; Laenen, Eric; Tollefson, Kirsten

    2004-03-01

    Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool.

  8. Les Houches Guidebook to Monte Carlo generators for hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, M.A

    2004-08-24

    Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool.

  9. Happy 20th Birthday, World Wide Web!

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    On 13 March CERN celebrated the 20th anniversary of the World Wide Web. Check out the video interview with Web creator Tim Berners-Lee and find out more about the both the history and future of the Web. To celebrate CERN also launched a brand new website, CERNland, for kids.

  10. The 20th HTF Gained Hard Wins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ The 20th China Harbin International Economic and Trade Farir,opened on June 15 with 3,001 booths,one quarter more than last year,also drew a perfect ending on June 19,making forein deals of US$7.59,3 percent up than last year.

  11. Magnet trouble likely to complicate start of large hadron collider Repairs may preclude a test run before the particle smasher starts tackling the Higgs boson

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Researchers building the world's next top particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that straddles the Franco-Swiss border, may not get a chance to work out the bugs before they fire up the machine in earnest." (1/2 page)

  12. Benchmarking Electron-Cloud Build-Up and Heat-Load Simulations against Large-Hadron-Collider Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, O; Maury, H; Rumolo, G; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    After reviewing the basic features of electron clouds in particle accelerators, the pertinent vacuum-chamber surface properties, and the electron-cloud simulation tools in use at CERN, we report recent observations of electron-cloud phenomena at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and ongoing attempts to benchmark the measured LHC vacuum pressure increases and heat loads against electron-cloud build-up simulations aimed at determining the actual surface parameters and at monitoring the so-called scrubbing process. Finally, some other electron-cloud studies related to the LHC are mentioned, and future study plans are described. Presented at MulCoPim2011, Valencia, Spain, 21-23 September 2011.

  13. Constraining the Higgs couplings to up and down quarks using production kinematics at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bonner, Gage

    2016-01-01

    We study the prospects for constraining the Higgs boson's couplings to up and down quarks using kinematic distributions in Higgs production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We find that the Higgs $p_T$ distribution can be used to constrain these couplings with precision competitive to other proposed techniques. With 3000 fb$^{-1}$ of data at 13 TeV in the four-lepton decay channel, we find $-0.73 \\lesssim \\bar{\\kappa}_u \\lesssim 0.33$ and $-0.88 \\lesssim \\bar{\\kappa}_d \\lesssim 0.32$, where $\\bar{\\kappa}_q = (m_q/m_b) \\kappa_q$ is a scaling factor that modifies the $q$ quark Yukawa coupling relative to the Standard Model bottom quark Yukawa coupling. The sensitivity may be improved by including additional Higgs decay channels.

  14. Optimising charged Higgs boson searches at the Large Hadron Collider across bb¯W± final states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Moretti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the light of the most recent data from Higgs boson searches and analyses, we re-assess the scope of the Large Hadron Collider in accessing heavy charged Higgs boson signals in bb¯W± final states, wherein the contributing channels can be H+→tb¯, hW±, HW± and AW±. We consider a 2-Higgs Doublet Model Type-II and we assume as production mode bg→tH−+c.c., the dominant one over the range MH±≥480 GeV, as dictated by b→sγ constraints. Prospects of detection are found to be significant for various Run 2 energy and luminosity options.

  15. Study of cosmic ray events with high muon multiplicity using the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073687; Adamova, Dagmar; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Millan Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Zhang, Chunhui; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdemir, Irem; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hilden, Timo Eero; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobayashi, Taiyo; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kumar, Shyam; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Legrand, Iosif; Lehas, Fatiha; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Masui, Hiroshi; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Pant, Divyash; Papcun, Peter; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Symons, Timothy; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vajzer, Michal; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Vargas Trevino, Aurora Diozcora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yasar, Cigdem; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-01-01

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. In this paper, we present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. This analysis exploits the large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber. A special emphasis is given to the study of high multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons and corresponding to a muon areal density $\\rho_{\\mu} > 5.9~$m$^{-2}$. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP. While these experiments were able to reproduce the measured muon multiplicity distribution with Monte Carlo simulations at low and intermediate multiplic...

  16. Cryogenic testing of by-pass diode stacks for the superconducting magnets of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Della Corte, A; Hagedorn, Dietrich; Turtu, S; Basile, G L; Catitti, A; Chiarelli, S; Di Ferdinando, E; Taddia, G; Talli, M; Verdini, L; Viola, R

    2002-01-01

    A dedicated facility prepared by ENEA (Italian Agency for Energy and Environment) for the cryogenic testing of by-pass diodes for the protection of the CERN Large Hadron Collider main magnets will be described. This experimental activity is in the frame of a contract awarded to OCEM, an Italian firm active in the field of electronic devices and power supplies, in collaboration with ENEA, for the manufacture and testing of all the diode stacks. In particular, CERN requests the measurement of the reverse and forward voltage diode characteristics at 300 K and 77 K, and endurance test cycles at liquid helium temperature. The experimental set-up at ENEA and data acquisition system developed for the scope will be described and the test results reported. (3 refs).

  17. Study of some optical glues for the Compact Muon Solenoid at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Montecchi, Marco

    2001-01-01

    Two Avalanche Photodiodes will measure the light produced in each of the 61,200 PbWO4 crystals composing the barrel part of the electromagnetic calorimeter of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN. To improve the collection of the photons, these detectors will be glued to the crystal. To be used in CMS, the optical glue must fulfil several requirements. The paper describes those requirements and reports the results of the investigation of several commercial optical glues. In particular, refractive index, absorption length, radiation hardness and forecast ageing after 15 years are reported. The most promising glue for CMS was more deeply investigated, in particular its chemical composition, chemical compatibility with the other parts of the calorimeter and curing time in realistic conditions.

  18. A Particle Consistent with the Higgs Boson Observed with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; 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Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colas, Jacques; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dinut, Florin; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Dressnandt, Nandor; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Duguid, Liam; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fowler, Andrew; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gildemeister, Otto; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Goshaw, Alfred; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernandez, Carlos Medina; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Keller, John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kreiss, Sven; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lepold, Florian; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Donald, Jeffrey; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molfetas, Angelos; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; 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Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Plotnikova, Elena; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radloff, Peter; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; 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Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; 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Zimin, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, theoretical physicists proposed that a field permeates the universe and gives energy to the vacuum. This field was required to explain why some, but not all, fundamental particles have mass. Numerous precision measurements during recent decades have provided indirect support for the existence of this field, but one crucial prediction of this theory has remained unconfirmed despite 30 years of experimental searches: the existence of a massive particle, the standard model Higgs boson. The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has now observed the production of a new particle with a mass of 126 giga–electron volts and decay signatures consistent with those expected for the Higgs particle. This result is strong support for the standard model of particle physics, including the presence of this vacuum field. The existence and properties of the newly discovered particle may also have consequences beyond the standard model itself.

  19. Trends in Cable Magnetization and Persistent Currents during the Production of the Main Dipoles of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bellesia, B; Granata, V; Le Naour, S; Oberli, L; Sanfilippo, S; Santoni, C; Scandale, Walter; Schwerg, N; Todesco, Ezio; Völlinger, C

    2005-01-01

    The production of more than 60% of superconducting cables for the main dipoles of the Large Hadron Collider has been completed. The results of the measurements of cable magnetization and the dependence on the manufacturers are presented. The strand magnetization produces field errors that have been measured in a large number of dipoles (approximately 100 to date) tested in cold conditions. We examine here the correlation between the available magnetic measurements and the large database of cable magnetization. The analysis is based on models documented elsewhere in the literature. Finally, a forecast of the persistent current effects to be expected in the LHC main dipoles is presented, and the more critical parameters for beam dynamics are singled out.

  20. Optimising charged Higgs boson searches at the Large Hadron Collider across b b bar W± final states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Stefano; Santos, Rui; Sharma, Pankaj

    2016-09-01

    In the light of the most recent data from Higgs boson searches and analyses, we re-assess the scope of the Large Hadron Collider in accessing heavy charged Higgs boson signals in b b bar W± final states, wherein the contributing channels can be H+ → t b bar , hW±, HW± and AW±. We consider a 2-Higgs Doublet Model Type-II and we assume as production mode bg → tH- +c.c., the dominant one over the range MH± ≥ 480 GeV, as dictated by b → sγ constraints. Prospects of detection are found to be significant for various Run 2 energy and luminosity options.

  1. Optimising Charged Higgs Boson Searches at the Large Hadron Collider Across $b\\bar b W^\\pm$ Final States

    CERN Document Server

    Moretti, Stefano; Sharma, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    In the light of the most recent data from Higgs boson searches and analyses, we re-assess the scope of the Large Hadron Collider in accessing heavy charged Higgs boson signals in $b\\bar b W^\\pm$ final states, wherein the contributing channels can be $H^+\\to t\\bar b$, $hW^\\pm, HW^\\pm$ and $AW^\\pm$. We consider a 2-Higgs Doublet Model Type-II and we assume as production mode $bg\\to tH^-$ + c.c., the dominant one over the range $M_{H^\\pm}\\ge 480$ GeV, as dictated by $b\\to s\\gamma$ constraints. Prospects of detection are found to be significant for various Run 2 energy and luminosity options.

  2. ECFA study week on instrumentation technology for high-luminosity hadron colliders. Proceedings. Vol. 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of the present ECFA Study Week on 'Instrumentation Technology for High Luminosity Hadron Colliders' was to review the progress made after the La Thuile Workshop (1987) and to critically evaluate which of the detection methods and data handling structures could be suitable for luminosities in the 1034 cm-2 s-1 range. The Study Week was sponsored by the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, the Comision Interministerial Ciencia y Tecnologia of Spain, CERN, and the Commission of the European Communities. It attracted 220 participants, including 35 from industry and good representation from groups planning experiments at the SSC. The various conveners gathered many excellent and original contributions, which led to intense discussions. Subjects covered include the use of scintillating fibres; silicon, gaseous, and crystal detectors, particle identification; readout and data acquisition systems. A separate session dealt with the contributions of industry to this kind of research. (orig.)

  3. Calculation of abort thresholds for the Beam Loss Monitoring System of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Nemcic, Martin; Dehning, Bernd

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is one of the most critical machine protection systems for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Switzerland. Its main purpose is to protect the superconducting magnets from quenches and other equipment from damage by requesting a beam abort when the measured losses exceed any of the predefined threshold levels. The system consist of circa 4000 ionization chambers which are installed around the 27 kilometres ring (LHC). This study aims to choose a technical platform and produce a system that addresses all of the limitations with the current system that is used for the calculation of the LHC BLM abort threshold values. To achieve this, a comparison and benchmarking of the Java and .NET technical platforms is performed in order to establish the most suitable solution. To establish which technical platform is a successful replacement of the current abort threshold calculator, comparable prototype systems in Java and .NET we...

  4. Multiplicity distributions in the forward rapidity region in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Premomoy

    2014-01-01

    Measured multiplicity distributions of primary charged particles produced in the forward rapidity region of the $proton-proton$ ($pp$) collisions at the centre-of-mass energy, $\\sqrt {s}$ = 7 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have been analyzed in terms of the Negative Binomial Distribution (NBD) function. Like the multiplicity distributions in the mid-rapidity region for the $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt {s}$ = 7 TeV, the distributions for the minimum bias events in the forward region also are better described with the superposition of two-NBDs, as proposed by a two-component model of particle production from two processes, the "$soft$" and the "$hard$". However, the multiplicity distribution for the "hard-QCD" events in a large pseudorapidity window does not oblige the two-component model.

  5. Polarized window for left-right symmetry and a right-handed neutrino at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Subhadeep; Rai, Santosh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The breaking of parity, a fundamental symmetry between left and right, is best understood in the framework of left-right symmetric extension of the standard model. We show that the production of a heavy right-handed neutrino at the proposed Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) could give us the most simple and direct hint of the scale of this breaking in left-right symmetric theories. This production mode gives a lepton number violating signal with Δ L =2 which is very clean and has practically no standard model background. We highlight that the right-handed nature of WR exchange which defines the left-right symmetric theories can be confirmed by using a polarized electron beam and also enhance the production rates with relatively lower beam energy.

  6. Model-Independent Description and Large Hadron Collider Implications of Suppressed Two-Photon Decay of a Light Higgs Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Phalen, D; Wells, J D; Phalen, Daniel; Thomas, Brooks; Wells, James D.

    2006-01-01

    For a Standard Model Higgs boson with mass between 115 GeV and 150 GeV, the two-photon decay mode is important for discovery at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We describe the interactions of a light Higgs boson in a more model-independent fashion, and consider the parameter space where there is no two-photon decay mode. We argue from generalities that analysis of the $t\\bar t h$ discovery mode outside its normally thought of range of applicability is especially needed under these circumstances. We demonstrate the general conclusion with a specific example of parameters of a type I two-Higgs doublet theory, motivated by ideas in strongly coupled model building. We then specify a complete set of branching fractions and discuss the implications for the LHC.

  7. NLO forward-backward charge asymmetries in p p (p bar p) -> l- l+ jet production at large hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    del Águila, F; Pittau, R; Ametller, Ll.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the next-to-leading order corrections, O(alpha_s), to forward-backward charge asymmetries for lepton-pair production in association with a large transverse momentum jet at large hadron colliders. We find that the leading order results are essentially confirmed. Although experimentally challenging and in practice with large backgrounds, these observables could provide a new determination of the weak mixing angle sin2 theta^lept_eff (M_Z^2) with a statistical precision for each lepton flavour of ~10^(-3) (7 x 10^{-3}) at LHC (Tevatron), and if b jets are identified, of the b quark Z asymmetry A^b_{FB} with a statistical precision of ~ 2x10^{-3} (4x10{-2}) at LHC (Tevatron).

  8. CERN-RD39 collaboration activities aimed at cryogenic silicon detector application in high-luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Eremin, Vladimir; Verbitskaya, Elena; Dehning, Bernd; Sapinski, Mariusz; Bartosik, Marcin R.; Alexopoulos, Andreas; Kurfürst, Christoph; Härkönen, Jaakko

    2016-07-01

    Beam Loss Monitors (BLM) made of silicon are new devices for monitoring of radiation environment in the vicinity of superconductive magnets of the Large Hadron Collider. The challenge of BLMs is extreme radiation hardness, up to 1016 protons/cm2 while placed in superfluid helium (temperature of 1.9 K). CERN BE-BI-BL group, together with CERN-RD39 collaboration, has developed prototypes of BLMs and investigated their device physics. An overview of this development-results of the in situ radiation tests of planar silicon detectors at 1.9 K, performed in 2012 and 2014-is presented. Our main finding is that silicon detectors survive under irradiation to 1×1016 p/cm2 at 1.9 K. In order to improve charge collection, current injection into the detector sensitive region (Current Injection Detector (CID)) was tested. The results indicate that the detector signal increases while operated in CID mode.

  9. Improving the Compact Muon Solenoid Electromagnetic Calorimeter control and safety systems for the Large Hadron Collider Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Da Silva Di Calafiori, Diogo Raphael; Djambazov, L; Holme, O; Lustermann, W; Adzic, P; Cirkovic, P; Jovanovic, D; Zelepoukine, S

    2015-01-01

    The first long shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider (LS1, 2013-2015) provided an opportunity for significant upgrades of the detector control and safety systems of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter. A thorough evaluation was undertaken, building upon experience acquired during several years of detector operations. Substantial improvements were made to the monitoring systems in order to extend readout ranges and provide improved monitoring precision and data reliability. Additional remotely controlled hardware devices and automatic software routines were implemented to optimize the detector recovery time in the case of failures. The safety system was prepared in order to guarantee full support for both commercial off-the-shelf and custom hardware components throughout the next accelerator running period. The software applications were modified to operate on redundant host servers, to fulfil new requirements of the experiment. User interface extensions were also added to provide a more complete overview of t...

  10. Data Quality Monitoring for the ATLAS trigger System during the first data taking period of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Damazio, D O; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The first long period of data taking of the Large Hadron Collider was finished after 2 years of data in February 2013. The increase of the instantaneous luminosity by more than six orders of magnitude documents impressively the extraordinary success of this running period enabling the ATLAS experiment to collect data of very high quality. However, to ensure a constant and reliable monitoring and data quality assessment of the trigger's point of view, a highly flexible and powerful software framework is essential, covering many different aspects. Aside from drastically changing beam conditions as e.g. increasing pile up, the monitoring frame work has to follow up immediately and flexible all developments of the TDAQ system. The TDAQ monitoring system of ATLAS covers very different aspects as rate measurements, trigger configuration and software tests, data quality assessment and handling of events where the trigger decision has failed. Especially the data quality assessment must be made coherent at the online ...

  11. Data Quality Monitoring for the ATLAS trigger System during the first data taking period of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira Damazio, Denis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The first long period of data taking of the Large Hadron Collider was finished after 3 years of work in February 2013. The increase of the instantaneous luminosity by more than six orders of magnitude documents impressively the extraordinary success of this running period enabling the ATLAS experiment to collect very high quality data. However, to ensure a constant and reliable monitoring and data quality assessment from the trigger's point of view, a highly flexible and powerful software framework is essential, covering many different aspects. Aside from drastically changing beam conditions as e.g. increasing pile up, the monitoring frame work has to follow up immediately and in a flexible manner all developments of the TDAQ system. The TDAQ monitoring system of ATLAS covers very different aspects as rate measurements, trigger configuration and software tests, data quality assessment and handling of events where the trigger decision has failed. Especially the data quality assessment must be made coherent at ...

  12. A Particle Consistent with the Higgs Boson Observed with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATLAS Collabortion; Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.

    2012-12-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, theoretical physicists proposed that a field permeates the universe and gives energy to the vacuum. This field was required to explain why some, but not all, fundamental particles have mass. Numerous precision measurements during recent decades have provided indirect support for the existence of this field, but one crucial prediction of this theory has remained unconfirmed despite 30 years of experimental searches: the existence of a massive particle, the standard model Higgs boson. The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has now observed the production of a new particle with a mass of 126 giga-electron volts and decay signatures consistent with those expected for the Higgs particle. This result is strong support for the standard model of particle physics, including the presence of this vacuum field. The existence and properties of the newly discovered particle may also have consequences beyond the standard model itself.

  13. Simulation study of electron cloud induced instabilities and emittance growth for the CERN Large Hadron Collider proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, Elena; Schulte, Daniel; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    The electron cloud may cause transverse single-bunch instabilities of proton beams such as those in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). We simulate these instabilities and the consequent emittance growth with the code HEADTAIL, which models the turn-by-turn interaction between the cloud and the beam. Recently some new features were added to the code, in particular, electric conducting boundary conditions at the chamber wall, transverse feedback, and variable beta functions. The sensitivity to several numerical parameters has been studied by varying the number of interaction points between the bunch and the cloud, the phase advance between them, and the number of macroparticles used to represent the protons and the electrons. We present simulation results for both LHC at injection and SPS with LHC-type beam, for different electron-cloud density levels, chromaticities, and bunch intensities. Two regimes with qualitatively different emittance growth are observed: above th...

  14. Monolithic junction field-effect transistor charge preamplifier for calorimetry at high luminosity hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outstanding noise and radiation hardness characteristics of epitaxial-channel junction field-effect transistors (JFET) suggest that a monolithic preamplifier based upon them may be able to meet the strict specifications for calorimetry at high luminosity colliders. Results obtained so far with a buried layer planar technology, among them an entire monolithic charge-sensitive preamplifier, are described

  15. Large hadron collider will get us closer to the Big Bang

    CERN Multimedia

    Khadilkar, Dhananjay

    2006-01-01

    The LHC consists of a 27 km tunnel located 100 meters under the ground near Geneva in Switzerland, lined with hundreds of superconducting magnets which will accelerate protons and subsequently collide them at mind-boggling energies of 14 terra electorn Volts. The result will be conditions prevalent just microseconds after the Big Band 15 billion years ago (1/2 page)

  16. 62-TeV center of mass hadron collider with superbunch beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2001-11-05

    The scheme of a 62-TeV center of mass p-p collider with superbunch beams at Fermilab is proposed as a practical and realistically achievable future project. It will be built in two stages, using the same tunnel, first with a 2 Tesla low field magnet collider ring and later with a 10 Tesla high field magnet collider ring. Both low and high field magnets have twin bore aperture and will be installed in the tunnel with the circumference of 87.25 km. In each bore a proton beam is accelerated, using induction cavities to increase luminosity. In the first stage they install a 7 TeV accelerator ring with operating field of 2 Tesla, based on the superferric transmission-line design. This ring will be operated at a 14-TeV center of mass collider. This will have the same energy as the LHC, but it will have 15 times higher luminosity, namely 1.5 x 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/sec. The estimated synchrotron radiation is negligible with this machine. The existing Fermilab accelerator system, including the 150 GeV main injector, will be used as the injector system. Its rough cost estimation and schedule for this first stage are presented. In the second stage proton beams are accelerated, also using induction cavities up to 31 TeV with the 10 Tesla dipole magnets. The counter circulating beams will collide with the 62-TeV center of mass energy. With the superbunch beams they can expect the luminosity can be increased about 15 times more than the conventional method with RF cavities. It will be 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/sec. In the second stage, the synchrotron radiation power will be about 12 W/m, and they need an elaborated beam screen.

  17. Mass measurement of right-handed scalar quarks and time measurement of hadronic showers for the compact linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Weuste, Lars

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a concept for a 48.3km long e+ e- accelerator with a center-of-mass energy of 3TeV. Its purpose is the precise measurement of particles discovered by the LHC as well as the discovery of yet unknown particles. The International Large Detector (ILD) is one of its detector concepts which was specifically designed for the usage of the Particle Flow Algorithm. This thesis is divided into two parts, both within the context of CLIC. In the first part of this thesis the unprecedented measurement on time structure of hadronic showers in calorimeters with tungsten absorber material, which is used in the ILD concept for CLIC, will be presented. It shows the development and the construction of a small testbeam experiment called Tungsten Timing Testbeam (T3B) which consists of only 15 scintillator tiles of 30mm x 30mm x 5mm, read out with Silicon Photomultipliers which in turn were connected to USB oscilloscopes. T3B was placed downstream of the CALICE tungsten analog hadron calorimet...

  18. First evidence for WW and WZ diboson production with semi-leptonic decays at a Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Presented is a measurement of the simultaneous production of a W± boson in association with a second weak boson (W± or Z0) in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. Events are consider with one electron or one muon, missing transverse energy, and at least two hadronic jets. The data were collected by the D0 detector in Run IIa of the Tevatron accelerator and correspond to 1.07 fb-1 of integrated luminosity for each of the two channels (WW/WZ → evq$\\bar{q}$ and WW/WZ → μvq$\\bar{q}$). The cross section for WW + WZ production is measured to be 20.2 ± 2.5(stat) ± 3.6(sys) ± 1.2(lum) pb with a Gaussian significance of 4.4 standard deviations above the background-only scenario. This measurement is consistent with the Standard Model prediction and represents the first direct evidence for WW and WZ production with semi-leptonic decays at a hadron collider.

  19. Light-by-light scattering in ultraperipheral Pb-Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłusek-Gawenda, Mariola; Lebiedowicz, Piotr; Szczurek, Antoni

    2016-04-01

    We calculate cross sections for diphoton production in (semi)exclusive PbPb collisions, relevant for the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The calculation is based on the equivalent photon approximation in the impact parameter space. The cross sections for the elementary γ γ →γ γ subprocess are calculated including two different mechanisms. We take into account box diagrams with leptons and quarks in the loops. In addition, we consider a vector-meson dominance (VDM-Regge) contribution with virtual intermediate hadronic (vector-like) excitations of the photons. We get measurable cross sections in PbPb collisions. This opens a possibility to study the γ γ →γ γ (quasi)elastic scattering at the LHC. We present many interesting differential distributions which could be measured by the ALICE, CMS, or ATLAS Collaborations at the LHC. We study whether a separation or identification of different components (boxes, VDM-Regge) is possible. We find that the cross section for elastic γ γ scattering could be measured in the heavy-ion collisions for subprocess energies smaller than Wγ γ≈15 -20 GeV.

  20. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Piriz, A R

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding...