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Sample records for 20-core prostate biopsy

  1. Geometric systematic prostate biopsy.

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    Chang, Doyoung; Chong, Xue; Kim, Chunwoo; Jun, Changhan; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop; Stoianovici, Dan

    2017-04-01

    The common sextant prostate biopsy schema lacks a three-dimensional (3D) geometric definition. The study objective was to determine the influence of the geometric distribution of the cores on the detection probability of prostate cancer (PCa). The detection probability of significant (>0.5 cm(3)) and insignificant (geometric distribution of the cores was optimized to maximize the probability of detecting significant cancer for various prostate sizes (20-100cm(3)), number of biopsy cores (6-40 cores) and biopsy core lengths (14-40 mm) for transrectal and transperineal biopsies. The detection of significant cancer can be improved by geometric optimization. With the current sextant biopsy, up to 20% of tumors may be missed at biopsy in a 20 cm(3) prostate due to the schema. Higher number and longer biopsy cores are required to sample with an equal detection probability in larger prostates. Higher number of cores increases both significant and insignificant tumor detection probability, but predominantly increases the detection of insignificant tumors. The study demonstrates mathematically that the geometric biopsy schema plays an important clinical role, and that increasing the number of biopsy cores is not necessarily helpful.

  2. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

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    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate biopsy uses imaging ... Biopsy? What is Ultrasound- and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate biopsies are performed ...

  3. Optimizing prostate biopsy for repeat transrectal prostate biopsies patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojun Deng; Jianwei Cao; Feng Liu; Weifeng Wang; Jidong Hao; Jiansheng Wan; Hui Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objective:Diagnosis of patients with negative prostate biopsy and persistent suspicion of prostate cancer re-mains a serious problem. In this study, we investigated the application of optimizing prostate biopsy for patients who need repeat prostate biopsy. Methods:In this prospective, non-randomized phase-I clinical trial, the prostate cancer detection rate of initial detection scheme was compared with optimizing prostate biopsy scheme. The number of punctures of initial detection scheme was the same as that of optimizing prostate biopsy scheme. The puncture direction of optimizing prostate biopsy was a 45° angle to the sagittal plane from front, middle, and back. The two cores from each lateral lobe were horizontal y inwardly inclined 45°. Results:A total of 45 patients with initial negative biopsy for cancer were received the optimizing prostate biopsy scheme. The cancer detection rate was 17.8%(8/45), and prostate intraepithelial neoplasm (PIN) was 6.7%(3/45). The pa-tients receiving repeat transrectal prostate biopsies were pathological y diagnosed as lower Gleason grade prostate cancers. Conclusion:The cancer detection rate of repeat biopsy prostate cancer is lower than that of initial biopsy. Our study showed that the optimizing prostate biopsy is important to improve the detection rate of repeat transrectal prostate biopsies patients.

  4. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

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    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Ultrasound- and MRI- ... Ultrasound-and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? What is Ultrasound- and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? Ultrasound- and MRI- ...

  5. SATURATION BIOPSY OF THE PROSTATE (REVIEW

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    A. V. Sadchenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate biopsy is the principal method of diagnois of prostate cancer, allowing to start the adequate treatment. The tactics of the patients, which have negative initial biopsy, is a subject of discussion. Saturation biopsy is a “gold standard„ of diagnostics of PCA with repeat biopsy. Saturation biopsy of the prostate is not a primary procedure, usually apply in patients with negative biopsies in anamnesis, patients with multifocal PIN and ASAP. Saturation biopsy allows to more precisely predict the volume and degree of malignancy of PCA, that can be used for planning tactics of active surveillance and focal therapy.

  6. Different Methods for Prostate Biopsy and Biopsy Protocols

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    Mahyar Ghafoori

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Prostate carcinoma is one of the most common"nmalignancies among men. Increasing mortality rates due"nto prostate carcinoma have been observed worldwide."nThis disease usually progresses imperceptibly, for this"nreason; screening programs aimed at early detection"nhave been developed. The prostate specific antigen"n(PSA test is among the best screening tools available"nin medicine today because it is recognized as the best"nmarker for its early detection."nIn case of abnormal rise in PSA, the patient usually"nrefers for prostate biopsy under the guide of trans"nrectal ultrasonography (TRUS. Different methods are"nrecognized for prostate biopsy that may be divided"ninto two main categories namely, systematic biopsy"nand targeted biopsy."nIn systematic biopsy we divide the prostate gland"nrandomly to different sections and obtain biopsy"nspecimens from each section.The protocol of systematic biopsy is different among"ndifferent institutions. The number of biopsy specimens"ncould be started from less than 6 to more than 20"nbiopsies in some institutions. Increasing the number"nof biopsy specimens increases the detection rate for"nprostate cancer increasing the complications such"nas post biopsy prostatitis and septicemia, which are"nthe most important, as well. In scheduling a biopsy"nprotocol with high number of biopsies it is preferred"nto hospitalize the patient and prescribe intravenous"nantibiotics."nTargeted biopsy of the prostate means obtaining biopsy"nspecimens from a pathologic lesion that is suspicious"nfor prostate cancer. Different modalities could be"nused for detecting prostate cancer within the prostate"ngland. Transrectal ultrasonography, ultrasonography"nwith the use of ultrasound contrast agents, MRI of the"nprostate with the use of endorectal coil, dynamic MR"nstudy with contrast agent, diffusion weighted imaging"nof the prostate and MR spectroscopy all could help"nin the detection of a suspicious tumoral mass in the

  7. A Prospective Randomized Trial of Two Different Prostate Biopsy Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-03

    Prostate Cancer; Local Anesthesia; Prostate-Specific Antigen/Blood; Biopsy/Methods; Image-guided Biopsy/Methods; Prostatic Neoplasms/Diagnosis; Prostate/Pathology; Prospective Studies; Humans; Male; Ultrasonography, Interventional/Methods

  8. Prostate biopsy tracking with deformation estimation

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    Baumann, Michael; Daanen, Vincent; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    Transrectal biopsies under 2D ultrasound (US) control are the current clinical standard for prostate cancer diagnosis. The isoechogenic nature of prostate carcinoma makes it necessary to sample the gland systematically, resulting in a low sensitivity. Also, it is difficult for the clinician to follow the sampling protocol accurately under 2D US control and the exact anatomical location of the biopsy cores is unknown after the intervention. Tracking systems for prostate biopsies make it possible to generate biopsy distribution maps for intra- and post-interventional quality control and 3D visualisation of histological results for diagnosis and treatment planning. They can also guide the clinician toward non-ultrasound targets. In this paper, a volume-swept 3D US based tracking system for fast and accurate estimation of prostate tissue motion is proposed. The entirely image-based system solves the patient motion problem with an a priori model of rectal probe kinematics. Prostate deformations are estimated with ...

  9. EFFICACY OF IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY IN PROSTATE NEEDLE BIOPSIES

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    Tameem Afroz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Prostate needle biopsies can pose a major diagnostic challenge when it comes to differentiating adenocarcinoma and its variants from its benign mimics. In needle biopsies, when the suspicious focus is small, morphological features may not suffice to differentiate it from its morphologic mimics like atrophy, basal cell hyperplasia, reactive inflammatory changes, seminal vesicles and adenosis. Immunohistochemical marker for basal cells, p63 and prostate cancer specific marker, Alpha-Methylacyl-CoA Racemase (AMACR help in overcoming such diagnostic dilemmas. MATERIALS AND METHODS We analysed 157 prostate core needle biopsies over a period of 2 years. Routine Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E sections and immunohistochemical markers for basal cells (p63 and prostate cancer specific marker (AMACR were used. Prospective study was done on prostate needle core biopsies. Biopsy was done under ultrasound guidance with an 18-gauge needle. Biopsy was done in patients with raised serum PSA levels for exclusion of prostate carcinoma. RESULTS Over a period of two years, 157 prostate core needle biopsies were studied. 83 were benign lesions comprising 69 benign prostatic hyperplasias, five basal cell hyperplasias, four granulomatous lesions and three showed atrophic changes. Two biopsies morphologically resembled seminal vesicles. Prostate cancer specific marker, AMACR was negative in all, but two lesions. In these two lesions, it showed weak nonspecific staining. Basal cell marker p63 showed a continuous staining pattern highlighting the basal cells in all the 69 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia, 5 cases of basal hyperplasia showed positivity in all the hyperplastic basal cells. In the two cases of seminal vesicles, it showed intense basal cell positivity. It showed a discontinuous pattern in two of the four granulomatous lesions and showed a weak, but a continuous staining pattern in the atrophic lesions. 74 were adenocarcinomas; the predominant

  10. Reducing infection rates after prostate biopsy.

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    Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Pilatz, Adrian; Waliszewski, Przemyslaw; Weidner, Wolfgang; Johansen, Truls E Bjerklund

    2014-02-01

    Over the years, prostate biopsy has become the gold-standard technique for diagnosing prostate carcinoma. Worldwide, several million prostate biopsies are performed every year, most commonly using the transrectal approach. Preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis with fluoroquinolones has been shown to be effective for reducing infection rates. However, in recent years, an increase in febrile infection rates after transrectal prostate biopsy (from 1% to 4%) has been reported in retrospective and prospective studies. The predominant risk factor for infection seems to be the presence of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria in faeces. Patients at risk of fluoroquinolone resistance should receive carefully selected antibiotics at sufficient concentrations to be effective. Targeted prophylaxis after rectal flora swabbing has been shown to be efficacious compared with empirical antibiotic prophylaxis. Several forms of bowel preparations are under investigation, although none have yet been shown to significantly reduce infection rates. Perineal prostate biopsy is currently being evaluated as a strategy for preventing the inoculation of rectal flora, but limited data support this approach at present.

  11. Guidelines for processing and reporting of prostatic needle biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); C. Lopes; C. Santonja; C.G. Pihl; I. Neetens; P. Martikainen (Pekka); S. di Lollo; L. Bubendorf; R.F. Hoedemaeker

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe reported detection rate of prostate cancer, lesions suspicious for cancer, and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in needle biopsies is highly variable. In part, technical factors, including the quality of the biopsies, the tissue processing, and histopatholo

  12. Study of prostate biopsy robot system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong-de; ZHANG Long; ZHAO Yan-jiang; ZHANG Yan-hua

    2009-01-01

    A system for prostate biopsy with robot assistance was proposed. The system consists of Motoman robot, needle insertion mechanism, and control software. A experiment was held with this software, and it proved that the whole system is simple, reliable and good application.

  13. Mycobacterium abscessus complex bacteremia due to prostatitis after prostate biopsy.

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    Chen, Chung-Hua; Lin, Jesun; Lin, Jen-Shiou; Chen, Yu-Min

    2016-10-01

    We present the case of a 49-year-old man, who developed Mycobacterium abscessus complex (M. abscessus complex) bacteremia and prostatitis after prostate biopsy. The patient was successfully treated with amikacin with imipenem-cilastatin with clarithromycin. Infections caused by M. abscessus complex have been increasingly described as a complication associated with many invasive procedures. Invasive procedures might have contributed to the occurrence of the M. abscessus complex. Although M. abscessus complex infection is difficult to diagnose and treat, we should pay more attention to this kind of infection, and the correct treatment strategy will be achieved by physicians.

  14. MRI-Guided Robotic Prostate Biopsy: A Clinical Accuracy Validation

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Helen; Lasso, Andras; Vikal, Siddharth; Guion, Peter; Krieger, Axel; Kaushal, Aradhana; Whitcomb, Louis L.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a major health threat for men. For over five years, the U.S. National Cancer Institute has performed prostate biopsies with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided robotic system.

  15. Prostate biopsy strategies: current state of the art.

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    Mian, Badar M

    2004-05-01

    Prostate-specific antigen testing and prostate biopsy have revolutionized our ability to detect prostate cancer at an early stage. The transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy procedure has undergone a number of modifications over the past 10 years to meet our goal of early detection of cancer at a curable stage. Biopsy schemes have evolved from lesion-directed biopsies to systematic mapping of the peripheral zone of the prostate, which harbors almost all of the significant tumor foci. An increase in the number of biopsy cores from 6 to 10 (or 12) has resulted in a significant improvement in the detection of clinically localized cancer, without any appreciable increase in the number of indolent cancers. Current biopsy schemes also have enhanced our ability to determine the true prognostic value of pathologic lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and atypical small acinar proliferation which have been associated with cancer detection in repeat biopsies. I discuss the rationale behind, and the outcomes of, various biopsy strategies. More than 15 years after PSA testing was popularized for early detection, a number of men are presenting for evaluation regarding repeat prostate biopsy for various clinical indications. The indications, biopsy scheme, and cancer detection rates for repeat prostate biopsy are discussed in detail.

  16. Strategies for prevention of ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy infections

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    Lu DD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diane D Lu, Jay D Raman Division of Urology, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA Abstract: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male patients and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in males. To confirm the diagnosis of prostate cancer, an ultrasound-guided needle biopsy is necessary to obtain prostate tissue sufficient for histologic analysis by pathologists. Ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy can be accomplished via a transperineal or transrectal approach. The latter biopsy technique involves placing an ultrasound probe into the rectum, visualizing the prostate located just anterior to it, and then obtaining 12–14 biopsies. Each biopsy core requires piercing of the rectal mucosa which can inherently contribute to infection. The increasing infectious risk of prostate needle biopsy requires refinement and re-evaluation of the process in which the technique is performed. Such processes include (but are not limited to prebiopsy risk stratification, antibiotic prophylaxis, use of rectal preparations, and equipment processing. In the subsequent review, we highlight the current available information on different strategies to reduce the risk of infection following prostate needle biopsy. Keywords: prostate cancer, prostate biopsy, urinary tract infection, sepsis, complications

  17. Ultrasound-guided transrectal extended prostate biopsy: a prospective study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammed Ahmed Al-Ghazo; Ibrahim Fathi Ghalayini; Ismail Ibrahim Matalka

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic value of the 10 systematic transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) prostate biopsy compared with the sextant biopsy technique for patients with suspected prostate cancer. Methods: One hundred and fifty-two patients with suspected prostate cancer were included in the study. Patients were entered in the study because they presented with high levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) (over 4 ng/mL) and/or had undergone an abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE). In addition to sextant prostate biopsy cores, four more biopsies were obtained from the lateral peripheral zone with additional cores from each suspicious area revealed by transrectal ultrasound. Sextant, lateral peripheral zone and suspicious area biopsy cores were submitted separately to the pathological department. Results: Cancer detection rates were 27.6% (42/152) and 19.7% (30/152) for the 10-core and sextant core biopsy protocols, respectively. Adding the lateral peripheral zone (PZ) to the sextant prostate biopsy showed a 28.6% (12/42) increase in the cancer detection rate in patients with positive prostate cancer (P < 0.01).The cancer detection rate in patients who presented with elevated PSA was 29.3% (34/116). When serum PSA was 4-10 ng/mL TRUS-guided biopsy detected cancer in 20.6%, while the detection rate was 32.4% and 47.0% when serum PSA was 10-20 ng/mL and above 20 ng/mL, respectively. Conclusion: The 10 systematic TRUS-guided prostate biopsy improves the detection rate of prostate cancer by 28.6% when compared with the sextant biopsy technique alone, without increase in the morbidity. We therefore recommend the 10-core biopsy protocol to be the preferred method for early detection of prostate cancer.

  18. Potential predictive factors of positive prostate biopsy in the Chinese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-16

    Jan 16, 2012 ... probability of a positive biopsy than any factor alone. ... predictive factors for a positive prostate biopsy in Chinese men. ... and sagittal projections. Prostate ..... Liu ZY, Sun YH, Xu CL, Gao X, Zhang LM, Ren SC (2009). Age- ...

  19. The future perspectives in transrectal prostate ultrasound guided biopsy

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    Sung Il Hwang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the most common neoplasms in men. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS-guided systematic biopsy has a crucial role in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, it shows limited value with gray-scale ultrasound alone because only a small number of malignancies are visible on TRUS. Recently, new emerging technologies in TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were introduced and showed high potential in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. High echogenicity of ultrasound contrast agent reflect the increased status of angiogenesis in tumor. Molecular imaging for targeting specific biomarker can be also used using ultrasound contrast agent for detecting angiogenesis or surface biomarker of prostate cancer. The combination of TRUS-guided prostate biopsy and ultrasound contrast agents can increase the accuracy of prostate cancer diagnosis. Elastography is an emerging ultrasound technique that can provide the information regarding tissue elasticity and stiffness. Tumors are usually stiffer than the surrounding soft tissue. In two types of elastography techniques, shearwave elastography has many potential in that it can provide quantitative information on tissue elasticity. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI from high resolution morphologic and functional magnetic resonance (MR technique enables to detect more prostate cancers. The combination of functional techniques including apparent diffusion coefficient map from diffusion weighted imaging, dynamic contrast enhanced MR and MR spectroscopy are helpful in the localization of the prostate cancer. MR-ultrasound (US fusion image can enhance the advantages of both two modalities. With MR-US fusion image, targeted biopsy of suspicious areas on MRI is possible and fusion image guided biopsy can provide improved detection rate. In conclusion, with recent advances in multiparametric-MRI, and introduction of new US techniques such as contrast-enhanced US and elastography, TRUS-guided biopsy

  20. The future perspectives in transrectal prostate ultrasound guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sung Ii; Lee, Hak Jong

    2014-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common neoplasms in men. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided systematic biopsy has a crucial role in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, it shows limited value with gray-scale ultrasound alone because only a small number of malignancies are visible on TRUS. Recently, new emerging technologies in TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were introduced and showed high potential in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. High echogenicity of ultrasound contrast agent reflect the increased status of angiogenesis in tumor. Molecular imaging for targeting specific biomarker can be also used using ultrasound contrast agent for detecting angiogenesis or surface biomarker of prostate cancer. The combination of TRUS-guided prostate biopsy and ultrasound contrast agents can increase the accuracy of prostate cancer diagnosis. Elastography is an emerging ultrasound technique that can provide the information regarding tissue elasticity and stiffness. Tumors are usually stiffer than the surrounding soft tissue. In two types of elastography techniques, shearwave elastography has many potential in that it can provide quantitative information on tissue elasticity. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from high resolution morphologic and functional magnetic resonance (MR) technique enables to detect more prostate cancers. The combination of functional techniques including apparent diffusion coefficient map from diffusion weighted imaging, dynamic contrast enhanced MR and MR spectroscopy are helpful in the localization of the prostate cancer. MR-ultrasound (US) fusion image can enhance the advantages of both two modalities. With MR-US fusion image, targeted biopsy of suspicious areas on MRI is possible and fusion image guided biopsy can provide improved detection rate. In conclusion, with recent advances in multiparametric-MRI, and introduction of new US techniques such as contrast-enhanced US and elastography, TRUS-guided biopsy may evolve toward

  1. Documenting the location of prostate biopsies with image fusion

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    Turkbey, Baris; Xu, Sheng; Kruecker, Jochen; Locklin, Julia; Pang, Yuxi; Bernardo, Marcelino; Merino, Maria J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop a system that documents the location of transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsies by fusing them to MRI scans obtained prior to biopsy, as the actual location of prostate biopsies is rarely known. PATIENTS AND METHODS Fifty patients (median age 61) with a median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 5.8 ng/ml underwent 3T endorectal coil MRI prior to biopsy. 3D TRUS images were obtained just prior to standard TRUS-guided 12-core sextant biopsies wherein an electromagnetic positioning device was attached to the needle guide and TRUS probe in order to track the position of each needle pass. The 3D-TRUS image documenting the location of each biopsy was fused electronically to the T2-weighted MRI. Each biopsy needle track was marked on the TRUS images and these were then transposed onto the MRI. Each biopsy site was classified pathologically as positive or negative for cancer and the Gleason score was determined. RESULTS The location of all (n = 605) needle biopsy tracks was successfully documented on the T2-weighted (T2W) MRI. Among 50 patients, 20 had 56 positive cores. At the sites of biopsy, T2W signal was considered ‘positive’ for cancer (i.e. low in signal intensity) in 34 of 56 sites. CONCLUSION It is feasible to document the location of TRUS-guided prostate biopsies on pre-procedure MRI by fusing the pre-procedure TRUS to an endorectal coil MRI using electromagnetic needle tracking. This procedure may be useful in documenting the location of prior biopsies, improving quality control and thereby avoiding under-sampling of the prostate as well as directing subsequent biopsies to regions of the prostate not previously sampled. PMID:20590543

  2. Motorized fusion guided prostate biopsy: phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifabadi, Reza; Xu, Sheng; Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford J.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: Fusion of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with intraoperative real-time Ultrasound (US) during prostate biopsy has significantly improved the sensitivity of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided cancer detection. Currently, sweeping of the TRUS probe to build a 3D volume as part of the fusion process and the TRUS probe manipulation for needle guidance are both done manually. A motorized, joystick controlled, probe holder was custom fabricated that can potentially reduce inter-operator variability, provide standardization of needle placement, improve repeatability and uniformity of needle placement, which may have impacts upon the learning curve after clinical deployment of this emerging approach. Method: a 2DOF motorized probe holder was designed to provide translation and rotation of a triplane TRUS end firing probe for prostate biopsy. The probe holder was joystick controlled and can assist manipulation of the probe during needle insertion as well as in acquiring a smoother US 2D to 3D sweep in which the 3D US volume for fusion is built. A commercial MRI-US fusion platform was used. Three targets were specified on MR image of a commercial prostate phantom. After performing the registration, two operators performed targeting, once manually and once with the assistance of the motorized probe holder. They repeated these tasks 5 times resulting in a total of 30 targeting events. Time of completion and mechanical error i.e. distance of the target from the needle trajectory in the software user interface were measured. Repeatability in reaching a given target in a systematic and consistent way was measured using a scatter plot showing all targets in the US coordinate system. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (PPMCC) was used to demonstrate the probe steadiness during targeting. Results: the completion time was 25+/-17 sec, 25+/-24 sec, and 27+/-15 sec for free hand and 24+/-10 sec, 22.5+/-10 sec, and 37+/-10 sec for motorized insertion, for target

  3. Comparison of sonoelastography guided biopsy with systematic biopsy: impact on prostate cancer detection

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    Pallwein, Leo; Struve, Peter; Aigner, Friedrich; Gradl, Johann; Schurich, Matthias; Frauscher, Ferdinand [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Radiology 2/Uroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Mitterberger, Michael; Horninger, Wolfgang; Bartsch, Georg [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Urology, Innsbruck (Austria); Pedross, Florian [Medical Universit Innsbruck, Department of Medical Statistics, Information and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2007-09-15

    A prospective study was performed to determine the value of sonoelastography (SE) targeted biopsy for prostate cancer (PCa) detection. A series of 230 male screening volunteers was examined. Two independent examiners evaluated each subject. One single investigator performed {<=}5 SE targeted biopsies into suspicious regions in the peripheral zone only. The stiffness of the lesion was displayed by SE and color-coded from red (soft) to blue (hard). Hard lesions were considered as malignant and targeted by biopsy. Subsequently, another examiner performed ten systematic biopsies. Cancer detection rates of the two techniques were compared. Cancer was detected in 81 of the 230 patients (35%), including 68 (30%) by SE targeted biopsy and in 58 (25%) by systematic biopsy. Cancer was detected by targeted biopsy alone in 23 patients (10%) and by systematic biopsy alone in 13 patients (6%). The detection rate for SE targeted biopsy cores (12.7% or 135 of 1,109 cores) was significantly better than for systematic biopsy cores (5.6% or 130 of 2,300 cores, P < 0.001). SE targeted biopsy in a patient with cancer was 2.9-fold more likely to detect PCa than systematic biopsy. SE targeted biopsy detected more cases of PCa than systematic biopsy, with fewer than half the number of biopsy cores in this prostate-specific antigen screening population. (orig.)

  4. Electrical property sensing biopsy needle for prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, V; Schned, A R; Hartov, A; Heaney, J A; Seigne, J; Halter, R J

    2013-11-01

    Significant electrical property differences have been demonstrated to exist between malignant and benign prostate tissues. We evaluated how well a custom designed clinically deployable electrical property sensing biopsy needle is able to discriminate between these tissue types in an ex vivo prostate model. An electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) sensing biopsy (Bx) needle was developed to record resistive (ρR) and reactive (ρX) components of electrical impedance from 100 Hz to 1 MHz. Standard twelve-core biopsy protocols were followed, in which the EIS-Bx device was used to gauge electrical properties prior to extracting tissue cores through biopsy needle firing from 36 ex vivo human prostates. Histopathological assessment of the cores was statistically compared to the impedance spectrum gauged from each core. The magnitudes of the mean resistive and reactive components were significantly higher in cancer tissues (P biopsy procedures. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Prospective Analysis on the Relation between Pain and Prostate Volume during Transrectal Prostate Biopsy

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    Yun, Tae Jin; Lee, Hak Jong; Kim, Seung Hyup; Lee, Sang Eun; Byun, Seok Soo; Hong, Sung Kyu; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Seong, Chang Kyu [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    We wanted to assess the relationship between pain and the prostate volume during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided biopsy. Between July and September 2006, 71 patients scheduled for TRUS biopsy of the prostate were considered for inclusion to this study. These patients underwent periprostatic neurovascular bundle block with lidocaine prior to biopsy. Pain was assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) during periprostatic neurovascular bundle block (VAS 1), during biopsy (VAS 2), and 20 minutes after biopsy (VAS 3). The mean pain scores were analyzed in the large prostate group (prostate volume > 40 cc) and the small prostate group (prostate volume {<=} 40 cc). P values < 0.05 were considered significant. The mean prostate volume was 42.2 cc (standard deviation: 8.6). The mean pain scores of VAS 1, 2 and 3 were 4.70 {+-} 1.61, 3.15 {+-}2.44 and 1.05 {+-} 1.51, respectively. In the large prostate group, the mean pains scores of VAS 1, 2 and 3 were 4.75 {+-} 1.76, 3.51 {+-} 2.76 and 1.29 {+-} 1.70, respectively, whereas in the small prostate group, the means pain scores were 4.66 {+-} 1.46, 2.77 {+-} 2.0, and 0.80 {+-} 1.26, respectively. Although there were no statistical differences of VAS 1, the larger prostate group revealed higher pain scores of VAS 2 and 3 compared with the small prostate group (p < 0.05). Patients with larger prostate volumes tend to feel more pain during and after TRUS guided prostate biopsy. Our findings suggest that additional analgesic strategies may be necessary when the patients with larger prostate undergo TRUS guided prostate biopsy.

  6. Thin-needle aspiration biopsy of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, L G; Woyke, S; Schreiber, K; Kohlberg, W; Freed, S Z

    1984-05-01

    The authors summarize the current status of thin-needle aspiration biopsy of the prostate and evaluate the accomplishments and limitations of this method of diagnosis. Historical developments, indications, technique, contraindications, complications, cytology of aspirates, diagnostic efficacy of aspirates, and grading of prostatic carcinomas are discussed.

  7. Comparison of sonoelastography guided biopsy with systematic biopsy: impact on prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallwein, Leo; Mitterberger, Michael; Struve, Peter; Horninger, Wolfgang; Aigner, Friedrich; Bartsch, Georg; Gradl, Johann; Schurich, Matthias; Pedross, Florian; Frauscher, Ferdinand

    2007-09-01

    A prospective study was performed to determine the value of sonoelastography (SE) targeted biopsy for prostate cancer (PCa) detection. A series of 230 male screening volunteers was examined. Two independent examiners evaluated each subject. One single investigator performed stiffness of the lesion was displayed by SE and color-coded from red (soft) to blue (hard). Hard lesions were considered as malignant and targeted by biopsy. Subsequently, another examiner performed ten systematic biopsies. Cancer detection rates of the two techniques were compared. Cancer was detected in 81 of the 230 patients (35%), including 68 (30%) by SE targeted biopsy and in 58 (25%) by systematic biopsy. Cancer was detected by targeted biopsy alone in 23 patients (10%) and by systematic biopsy alone in 13 patients (6%). The detection rate for SE targeted biopsy cores (12.7% or 135 of 1,109 cores) was significantly better than for systematic biopsy cores (5.6% or 130 of 2,300 cores, P cancer was 2.9-fold more likely to detect PCa than systematic biopsy. SE targeted biopsy detected more cases of PCa than systematic biopsy, with fewer than half the number of biopsy cores in this prostate-specific antigen screening population.

  8. Seminal epithelium in prostate biopsy can mimic malignant and premalignant prostatic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arista-Nasr, J; Trolle-Silva, A; Aguilar-Ayala, E; Martínez-Benítez, B

    2016-01-01

    In most prostate biopsies, the seminal epithelium is easily recognised because it meets characteristic histological criteria. However, some biopsies can mimic malignant or premalignant prostatic lesions. The aims of this study were to analyse the histological appearance of the biopsies that mimic adenocarcinomas or preneoplastic prostatic lesions, discuss the differential diagnosis and determine the frequency of seminal epithelia in prostate biopsies. We consecutively reviewed 500 prostate puncture biopsies obtained using the sextant method and selected those cases in which we observed seminal vesicle or ejaculatory duct epithelium. In the biopsies in which the seminal epithelium resembled malignant or premalignant lesions, immunohistochemical studies were conducted that included prostate-specific antigen and MUC6. The most important clinical data were recorded. Thirty-six (7.2%) biopsies showed seminal epithelium, and 7 of them (1.4%) resembled various prostate lesions, including high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical acinar proliferations, adenocarcinomas with papillary patterns and poorly differentiated carcinoma. The seminal epithelium resembled prostate lesions when the lipofuscin deposit, the perinuclear vacuoles or the nuclear pseudoinclusions were inconspicuous or missing. Five of the 7 biopsies showed mild to moderate cellular atypia with small and hyperchromatic nuclei, and only 2 showed cellular pleomorphism. The patients were alive and asymptomatic after an average of 6 years of progression. The seminal epithelium resembles prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical acinar proliferations and various types of prostatic adenocarcinomas in approximately 1.4% of prostate biopsies. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Compliance with biopsy recommendations of a prostate cancer risk calculator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, Heidi A.; Roobol, Monique J.; Busstra, Martijn; Kil, Paul; Oomens, Eric H.; de Jong, Igle J.; Bangma, Chris H.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Korfage, Ida

    OBJECTIVES To assess both urologist and patient compliance with a 'no biopsy' or 'biopsy' recommendation of the European Randomized study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) Risk Calculator (RC), as well as their reasons for non-compliance. To assess determinants of patient compliance. PATIENTS

  10. Biopsym : a learning environment for transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Janssoone; Vadcard, Lucile; Mozer, Pierre; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a learning environment for image-guided prostate biopsies in cancer diagnosis; it is based on an ultrasound probe simulator virtually exploring real datasets obtained from patients. The aim is to make the training of young physicians easier and faster with a tool that combines lectures, biopsy simulations and recommended exercises to master this medical gesture. It will particularly help acquiring the three-dimensional representation of the prostate needed for practicing biopsy sequences. The simulator uses a haptic feedback to compute the position of the virtual probe from three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound recorded data. This paper presents the current version of this learning environment.

  11. Ciprofloxacin-Ceftriaxone Combination Prophylaxis for Prostate Biopsy; Infective Complications

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    Alper Ozorak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To present our clinical experience about infective complications due to ultrasound guided transrectal prostate biopsy under ciprofloxacin plus third-generation cephalosporin (Ceftriaxone combination prophylaxis. Material and Method: The 1193 patients that used combination of ceftriaxone 1 g intramuscular 1 hour before biopsy and ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice a day for 5 days after biopsy were included to study. Before biopsy, urine analysis and urinary cultures were not performed routinely. Serious infective complications such as acute prostatitis and urosepsis, causing microorganisms were evaluated. Results: Serious infective complications occurred in (1.3% 16 patients. Fifteen of them had acute prostatitis and urine culture results were positive in 10/15 patients for Escherichia coli. The strains were uniformly resistant to ciprofloxacin. Only 1 patient had urosepsis and his blood and urine cultures demonstrated extended- spectrum %u03B2-lactamase-producing (ESBL Escherichia coli also resistant to ciprofloxacin. Antibiotic treatment-related side effects were not observed in any patient. Discussion: Although there is not a certain procedure, ciprofloxacin is the most common used antibiotic for transrectal prostate biopsy prophylaxis. On the other hand, the incidence of ciprofloxacin resistant Escherichia coli strain is increasing. Thus, new prophylaxis strategies have to be discussed. Ceftriaxone plus ciprofloxacin prophylaxis is safe and can be useable option for prophylaxis of prostate biopsy.

  12. Malakoplakia of the prostate diagnosed by elevated PSA level and transrectal prostate biopsy

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    Sacit Nuri Görgel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Malakoplakia is an inflammation which is thought to develop secondary to chronic Escherichia coli infections. Although often seen in the genitourinary tract, it can also be seen in colon, stomach, lung, liver, bone, uterus, and skin. In this case report, we present prostatic malakoplakia diagnosed by elevated prostate-specific antigen level and transrectal prostate biopsy.

  13. Elevated Prostate Health Index (phi and Biopsy Reclassification During Active Surveillance of Prostate Cancer

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    Darian Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Prostate Health Index (phi has been FDA approved for decision-making regarding prostate biopsy. Phi has additionally been shown to positively correlate with tumor volume, extraprostatic disease and higher Gleason grade tumors. Here we describe a case in which an elevated phi encouraged biopsy of a gentleman undergoing active surveillance leading to reclassification of his disease as high risk prostate cancer.

  14. The results of transrectal prostate biopsy in patients with low levels of prostate specific antigen

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    Ahmet Ali Sancaktutar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the resultsof prostate biopsy of patients who had the prostatespecificantigen (PSA levels below 4 ng/ml.Material and methods: The medical records of 63 patientswho underwent transrectal prostate biopsy, betweenJanuary 2005 and December 2011, due to suspicionof prostate cancer with the PSA levels under 4 ng/mlwere retrospectively reviewed.Results: Transrectal Prostate biopsy was performed to63 patients. Prostate cancer was detected in 12 (19%patients. The mean value of PSA was 2.5 ng/ml. TheGleason score of Prostate cancer patients was 6,8 (5-7and the number of positive cores were 3.Conclusions: The rate of prostate cancer was found as19% in patients with levels of PSA under 4 ng/ml and thisratio is compatible with the results of previous reports.

  15. Detection rate of clinically insignificant prostate cancer increases with repeat prostate biopsies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bumsoo Park; Seong-Soo Jeon; Sung-Ho Ju; Byong-Chang Jeong; Seong-Il Seo; Hyun-Moo Lee; Han-Yong Choi

    2013-01-01

    To analyze if clinically insignificant prostate cancer (ClPC) is more frequently detected with repeat prostate biopsies,we retrospectively analyzed the records of 2146 men diagnosed with prostate cancer after one or more prostate biopsies.The patients were divided into five groups according to the number of prostate biopsies obtained,e.g.group 1 had one biopsy,group 2 had two biopsies and group 3 had three biopsies.Of the 2146 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer,1956 (91.1%),142 (6.6%),38 (1.8%),9 (0.4%) and 1 (0.1%) men were in groups 1,2,3,4 and 5,respectively.Groups 4 and 5 were excluded because of the small sample sizes.The remaining three groups (groups 1,2 and 3) were statistically analyzed.There were no differences in age or prostate-specific antigen level among the three groups.ClPC was detected in 201 (10.3%),28 (19.7%) and 9 (23.7%) patients in groups 1,2 and 3,respectively (P<0.001).A multivariate analysis showed that the number of biopsies was an independent predictor to detect CIPC (0R=2.688 for group 2; 0R=4.723 for group 3).In conclusion,patients undergoing multiple prostate biopsies are more likely to be diagnosed with CIPC than those who only undergo one biopsy.However,the risk still exists that the patient could have clinically significant prostate cancer.Therefore,when counseling patients with regard to serial repeat biopsies,the possibility of prostate cancer overdiagnosis and overtreatment must be balanced with the continued risk of clinically significant disease.

  16. BiopSee® – transperineal stereotactic navigated prostate biopsy

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    Dimos Baltas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, prostate cancer was the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. Currently secure diagnosis confirmation is done by a transrectal biopsy and following histopathological examination. Conventional transrectal biopsy success rates are rather low with ca. 30% detection upon the first and ca 20% after re-biopsy. The paper presents a novel system for stereotactic navigated prostate biopsy. The approach results into higher accuracy, reproducibility and unrestricted and effective access to all prostate regions. Custom designed ultrasound, new template design and integrated 2-axes stepper allows superior 2D and 3D prostate imaging quality and precise needle navigation. DICOM functionality and image fusion enable to import pre-operative datasets (e.g. multiparametric MRI, targets etc. and overlay all available radiological information into the biopsy planning and guiding procedure. The biopsy needle insertion itself is performed under augmented reality ultrasound guidance. Each procedure step is automatically documented in order to provide quality assurance and permit data re-usage for the further treatment. First clinical results indicates success rates of ca. 70% by first biopsies by our approach.

  17. Ultrasound guidance system for prostate biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Johann; Kerschner, Reinhard; Kaar, Marcus; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Figl, Michael

    2017-03-01

    We designed a guidance system for prostate biopsy based on PET/MR images and 3D ultrasound (US). With our proposed method common inter-modal MR-US (or CT-US in case of PET/CTs) registration can be replaced by an intra-modal 3D/3D-US/US registration and an optical tracking system (OTS). On the pre-operative site, a PET/MR calibration allows to link both hybrid modalities with an abdominal 3D-US. On the interventional site, another abdominal 3D US is taken to merge the pre-operative images with the real-time 3D-US via 3D/3D-US/US registration. Finally, the images of a tracked trans-rectal US probe can be displayed with the pre-operative images by overlay. For PET/MR image fusion we applied a point-to-point registration between PET and OTS and MR and OTS, respectively. 3D/3D-US/US registration was evaluated for images taken in supine and lateral patient position. To enable table shifts between PET/MR and US image acquisition a table calibration procedure is presented. We found fiducial registration errors of 0.9 mm and 2.8 mm, respectively, with respect to the MR and PET calibration. A target registration error between MR and 3D US amounted to 1.4 mm. The registration error for the 3D/3D-US/US registration was found to be 3.7 mm. Furthermore, we have shown that ultrasound is applicable in an MR environment.

  18. Mitochondria, prostate cancer, and biopsy sampling error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Ryan L; Mills, John; Harbottle, Andrew; Creed, Jennifer M; Crewdson, Gregory; Reguly, Brian; Guimont, François S

    2013-04-01

    Mitochondria and their associated genome are emerging as sophisticated indicators of prostate cancer biology. Alterations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome) have been implicated in cell proliferation, metastatic behavior, androgen independence, as a signal for apoptosis, and as a predictor of biochemical recurrence. Somatic mutation patterns in complete mtgenomes are associated with prostate specific antigen levels (PSA) in prostate cancer patients and a large-scale mtgenome deletion (3.4 kb) is consistent with a prostate "cancerization" field effect. This review will focus on the biological characteristics of mitochondria and their direct clinical application to prostate cancer. Mitochondrial science is currently influencing clinical prostate cancer diagnostics and the rapid progress in this area indicates future, break-through contributions in the general field of oncology.

  19. TRANSRECTAL ULTRASOUND GUIDED PROSTATIC NERVE BLOCKADE FOR PAIN CONTROL DURING TRANSRECTAL PROSTATE BIOPSY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Liu-ping; DENG Jun-hong; ZHONG Hong; HU Jian-bo; WEI Hong-ai; WANG Liang-sheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of transrectal ultrasound guided prostatic nerve blockade on the discomfort associated with systematic biopsy of the prostate. Methods: 73 patients receiving systematic 13 cores biopsy of the prostate were randomized into two groups. Group A(37 cases) received an injection of 5 ml 1% lidocaine into the prostatic neurovascular bundles on each side at the base of the prostate under ultrasound guidance and group B(36 cases) received 5 ml saline injection (0.9% sodium chloride) at the same site. Pain during biopsy was assessed by using a 10-point linear visual analog score (VAS) immediately after the biopsy. Results: The mean pain scores during transrectal prostate biopsy were significantly lower in group A than group B(1.1±0.6 versus 5.9±3.1, t=4.81, P<0.01). During this study no patient in either group had any adverse effect from the injection. Conclusion: Transcrectal ultrasound guided prostatic nerve blockade is a safe and efficacious method for providing satisfactory anesthesia in transrectal prostate biopsy. We recommend its routine administration in all patients during this procedure.

  20. Widespread high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia on biopsy predicts the risk of prostate cancer: A 12 months analysis after three consecutive prostate biopsies

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    Cosimo De Nunzio

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the risk of prostate cancer (PCa on a third prostate biopsy in a group of patients with two consecutive diagnoses of high grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN. Materials and methods: From November 2004 to December 2007, patients referred to our clinic with a PSA ! 4 ng/ml or an abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE were scheduled for trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS guided 12-core prostate biopsy. Patients with HGPIN underwent a second prostate biopsy, and if the results of such procedure yielded a second diagnosis of HGPIN, we proposed a third 12-core needle biopsy regardless of PSA value. Crude and adjusted logistic regressions were used to assess predictors of PCa on the third biopsy. Results: A total of 650 patients underwent 12 cores transrectal ultrasound prostatic biopsy in the study period. Of 147 (22% men with a diagnosis of HGPIN, 117 underwent a second prostatic biopsy after six months and 43 a third biopsy after other six months. After the third biopsy, 19 patients (34% still showed HGPIN, 15 (35% were diagnosed with PCa and 9 (21% presented with chronic prostatitis. Widespread HGPIN on a second biopsy was significantly associated with PCa on further biopsy (!2 = 4.04, p = 0.04. Moreover, the presence of widespread HGPIN significantly predicted the risk of PCa on crude and adjusted logistic regressions. Conclusions: Widespread HGPIN on second biopsy is associated with the presence of PCa on a third biopsy. Nonetheless, the relationship between HGPIN and PCa remains complex and further studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  1. Nonspecific Presentation of a Multiloculated Prostatic Abscess After Transurethral Prostatic Biopsy for Elevated Prostate-specific Antigen Level

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    Nilay M. Gandhi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Prostate postbiopsy infectious complications typically present in the form of prostatitis and uncommonly urosepsis. Prostatic abscesses are generally found after multiple bouts of prostatitis and are associated with a clinically septic picture requiring intensive care unit admission and resuscitation. We report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with prostatic abscess in the setting of nonspecific urinary symptoms after transrectal ultrasonography–guided prostate biopsy. At 4-month follow-up, he is currently free of disease with undetectable prostate-specific antigen level and negative imaging.

  2. Preparation and management of complications in prostate biopsies

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    Chiang Jeng Tyng

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Transrectal ultrasonography-guided biopsy plays a key role in prostate sampling for cancer detection. Among interventional procedures, it is one of the most frequent procedures performed by radiologists. Despite the safety and low morbidity of such procedure, possible complications should be promptly assessed and treated. The standardization of protocols and of preprocedural preparation is aimed at minimizing complications as well as expediting their management. The authors have made a literature review describing the possible complications related to transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy, and discuss their management and guidance to reduce the incidence of such complications.

  3. Significance of microvessel density in prostate cancer core biopsy

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    Salapura-Dugonjić Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. In prostate tumors, angiogenesis, measured as microvessel density, is associated with tumor stage and Gleason score. The aim of this study was determine neovascularization of prostatic adenocarcinomas in core biopsies and corresponding prostatectomies. Methods. The study population included 61 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP for localized prostate carcinoma patients and did not receive chemohormonal, or radiation therapy before surgery. Tumor blocks were immunostained using the endothelial-specific antibody CD31 and subsequently evaluated at x 400 magnification in both biopsies and corresponding prostatectomies. Results. When comparing microvessel density in core biopsies and corresponding prostatectomies, no statistically significant difference was found (p > 0.1. A statistically significant positive correlation was found when determining correlation between microvessel density (as linear and categorical variable, i.e. with the cut-off value of 48 that was associated with the Gleason score (p 0.1. Conclusion. Microvessel density can be reliably applied to needle prostate biopsy specimens. Quantification of the microvascular density in biopsies is an accurate pre-operative predictor of tumor stage, discriminating between organconfined and organ-extending neoplasms.

  4. Transrectal Ultrasound-guided Systematic 13-Core Prostate Biopsy to Diagnose Prostate Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liuping Yang; Junhong Deng; Hong Zhong; Jianbo Hu; Hongai Wei; Liangsheng Wang

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the clinical value of transrectal ultrasound guided systematic 13-core prostate biopsy.METHODS A total of 213 patients referred for abnormal digital rectal examination and/or with a prostate specific antigen of 4 ng/ml or greater underwent transrectal ultrasound guided systematic 13-core prostate biopsy. This procedure was conducted in addition to the standard sextant biopsies in which cores were taken from the far lateral and middle regions of the gland as described by Eskew. Fathological findings of the additional regions were compared with those of the sextant regions.RESULTS Of the 213 patients 31% had cancer on biopsy (66/213). Of the 66 patients with prostate cancer 14 (21%) had carcinoma only in the additional regions, which would have remained undetected had the sextant biopsy technique been used alone (P<0.05). No severe complications occurred among the patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound guided systematic 13-core prostate biopsy.CONCLUSION Our data demonstrated that transrectal ultrasound guided systematic 13-core prostate biopsy can significantly increase the cancer detection rate. It is safe and efficacious, and should be recommended for use clinically.

  5. Higher Prostate Cancer Grade Groups Are Detected in Patients Undergoing Multiparametric MRI-targeted Biopsy Compared With Standard Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordetsky, Jennifer B; Thomas, John V; Nix, Jeffrey W; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/ultrasound (US) fusion-guided prostate biopsy can detect more clinically significant prostate cancers, which could impact patient management. As many of the studies evaluating MRI/US fusion-guided prostate biopsy were conducted in specialized quaternary care centers, the question remains whether this technology is transferable to general practice. Our study assesses the diagnostic ability of MRI/US fusion-guided prostate biopsy compared with standard biopsy in the new era of prostate cancer Grade Grouping. We reviewed our prostate biopsy database evaluating men who underwent MRI/US fusion-guided prostate biopsy with concurrent standard 12-core extended-sextant biopsy. Patient demographics and pathologic findings were reviewed. All patient biopsies were performed by 1 of 2 urologic oncologists. Tumors were given a Grade Group for each biopsy based on the core with the highest grade in each case. A total of 191 patients underwent MRI/US fusion-guided biopsy with concurrent 12-core extended sextant biopsy, with a cancer detection rate of 56%. The average number of biopsy cores obtained via the targeted approach was significantly less than those obtained by standard biopsy, 4.8 cores versus 12 cores, respectively, Pbiopsy, 41.4% and 49.2%, respectively, P=0.15. However, when comparing the 2 techniques, the degree of detection of ≥Grade Group 3 tumors significantly favored targeted biopsy over standard biopsy (P=0.009). MRI/US fusion-guided prostate biopsy is equivalent to the standard-of-care 12-core biopsy in terms of cancer detection and superior in detecting higher grade disease.

  6. Prostate cancer polar localization on core biopsy predicts pathologic stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Patrick J; Bailey, Lisa R; Purdom, Matthew S; Davenport, Daniel L; Strup, Stephen E

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the polar sub-localization of prostate cancer on needle core biopsy ('polar' defined as tumor = 1 mm from the tissue polar edge) as a predictor of extraprostatic extension. Histologic sections from 58 patients who underwent preoperative prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy at the University of Kentucky from 2006 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were retrospectively case matched based on pathologic stage (pT2 versus pT3/4) using biopsy Gleason grade and prostate-specific antigen. Histologic sections of needle core biopsies were analyzed for polar involvement. The location of polar involvement was correlated to the presence of extraprostatic extension on final prostatectomy pathology. Average percentage of total polar cores was predictive of extraprostatic extension on final prostatectomy, particularly in the prostatic apex and base (p = 0.029 and 0.006, respectively). Higher grade tumors were identified at the pole in the high stage cohort (p = 0.032). Total percent polar involvement had the greatest sensitivity and specificity for predicting extraprostatic extension when directly compared to previously described histologic parameters (percent greatest involvement of a single core, length of greatest involvement of a single core, presence of perineural invasion, presence of bilateral gland involvement, and percent total positive core involvement). The location of polar involvement on needle core biopsy was also predictive of the precise location of extraprostatic extension on final prostatectomy pathology (Chi-square p value > 70% in all prostate sextants). These data suggest the use of biopsy polar core involvement as a valuable histologic predictor of increased pathologic stage.

  7. Clinical significance of proliferative inflammatory atrophy in prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celma, A; Servián, P; Planas, J; Placer, J; Quilez, M T; Arbós, M A; de Torres, I; Morote, J

    2014-03-01

    Proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) is a frequently observed lesion in prostate biopsies and some authors have postulated its involvement in prostate carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms that would permit its neoplastic transformation and the clinical significance of its finding in a prostate biopsy is currently not well known. To analyze the characteristics of the PIA lesion, its possible role in prostate carcinogenesis and its relation with the tumor aggressiveness. A systematic review was made of the literature in PubMed with the terms «proliferative inflammatory atrophy» or «PIA» and «prostate.» The most important findings are summarized in accordance with the study objective. PIA seems to be involved in prostate carcinogenesis. This hypothesis is based on its frequent association to cancer lesions (CaP) and on some genetic alterations that are common to the high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and to the CaP, fundamentally deficit in GSTP1 expression and overexpression of AGR2. Currently, there are no epidemiological studies that evaluate the incidence of PIA or its association with HGPIN and CaP. Only one study, carried out by our group, has determined the global incidence of PIA in 30% of the prostate biopsies, a lower association to CaP than the HGPIN lesion and an association between PIA and tumors of lower and insignificant grade. PIA shares genetic alterations with HGPIN and CaP. Currently, there is no epidemiologic evidence to consider that the PIA is associated to a greater incidence of CaP and the genetic and epidemiological data available suggest its association to not very aggressive tumors. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. High-risk prostate cancer: value of multi-modality 3T MRI-guided biopsies after previous negative biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fütterer, J.J.; Verma, S.; Hambrock, T.; Yakar, D.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2012-01-01

    Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy is the gold standard for prostate cancer detection. The latter detection rates of random systematic TRUS-guided biopsy do not exceed 44\\%. As a consequence other biopsy methods have been explored. One of these methods is MR-guided biopsy (MRGB), which revealed de

  9. Three different anesthesia techniques for a comfortable prostate biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Sahin

    2015-01-01

    Discussion: Enabling pain and discomfort control in patients is very important during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. In our study, we observed that the periprostatic block enables more comfortable compared with patient groups with intrarectal lidocaine gel and pudendal block and better reduction in pain scores.

  10. Targeted MRI-guided prostate biopsy: are two biopsy cores per MRI-lesion required?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimmoeller, L.; Quentin, M.; Blondin, D.; Dietzel, F.; Schleich, C.; Thomas, C.; Antoch, G. [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Hiester, A.; Rabenalt, R.; Albers, P.; Arsov, C. [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Urology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Gabbert, H.E. [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Pathology, Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    This study evaluates the feasibility of performing less than two core biopsies per MRI-lesion when performing targeted MR-guided in-bore prostate biopsy. Retrospectively evaluated were 1545 biopsy cores of 774 intraprostatic lesions (two cores per lesion) in 290 patients (66 ± 7.8 years; median PSA 8.2 ng/ml) regarding prostate cancer (PCa) detection, Gleason score, and tumor infiltration of the first (FBC) compared to the second biopsy core (SBC). Biopsies were acquired under in-bore MR-guidance. For the biopsy cores, 491 were PCa positive, 239 of 774 (31 %) were FBC and 252 of 771 (33 %) were SBC (p = 0.4). Patient PCa detection rate based on the FBC vs. SBC were 46 % vs. 48 % (p = 0.6). For clinically significant PCa (Gleason score ≥4 + 3 = 7) the detection rate was 18 % for both, FBC and SBC (p = 0.9). Six hundred and eighty-seven SBC (89 %) showed no histologic difference. On the lesion level, 40 SBC detected PCa with negative FBC (7.5 %). Twenty SBC showed a Gleason upgrade from 3 + 3 = 6 to ≥3 + 4 = 7 (2.6 %) and 4 to ≥4 + 3 = 7 (0.5 %). The benefit of a second targeted biopsy core per suspicious MRI-lesion is likely minor, especially regarding PCa detection rate and significant Gleason upgrading. Therefore, a further reduction of biopsy cores is reasonable when performing a targeted MR-guided in-bore prostate biopsy. (orig.)

  11. Current status of transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy in the diagnosis of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raja, J. [Department of Radiology, St George' s Hospital, Tooting, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jowadraja@gmail.com; Ramachandran, N. [Department of Radiology, St George' s Hospital, Tooting, London (United Kingdom); Munneke, G. [Department of Radiology, St George' s Hospital, Tooting, London (United Kingdom); Patel, U. [Department of Radiology, St George' s Hospital, Tooting, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-15

    In contemporary practice, most prostate cancers are either invisible on ultrasound or indistinguishable from concurrent benign prostatic hyperplasia. Diagnosis therefore rests on prostate biopsy. Biopsies are not simply directed at ultrasonically visible lesions, as these would miss many cancers; rather the whole gland is sampled. The sampling itself is systematic, using patterns based on prostate zonal anatomy and the geographical distribution and frequency of cancer. This review explains the evolution of the prostate biopsy technique, from the classical sextant biopsy method to the more recent extended biopsy protocols (8, 10, 12, >12 and saturation biopsy protocols). Extended protocols are increasingly being used to improve diagnostic accuracy, especially in those patients who require repeat biopsy. This trend has been facilitated by the ongoing improvement in safety and acceptability of the procedure, particularly with the use of antibiotic prophylaxis and local anaesthesia. The technical details of these extended protocols are discussed, as are the current data regarding procedure-related morbidity and how this may be minimized.

  12. Obesity and future prostate cancer risk among men after an initial benign biopsy of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundle, Andrew; Jankowski, Michelle; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N; Tang, Deliang; Rybicki, Benjamin A

    2013-05-01

    In general population studies, obesity has been associated with risk of high-grade prostate cancer, but little is known about obesity and future prostate cancer risk among men with an initial benign biopsy of the prostate; a high-risk population. Within a cohort of 6,692 men followed up after a biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) with benign findings, a nested case-control study was conducted of 494 prostate cancer cases and controls matched on age, race, follow-up duration, biopsy versus TURP and date of procedure. Body mass index at the time of the initial procedure was abstracted from medical records, and initial biopsy specimens were reviewed for the presence of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). Obesity was associated with the presence of PIN in the initial benign specimen [OR = 2.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-4.11]. After adjustment for the matching variables, family history of prostate cancer, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at the initial procedure, the number of PSA tests and digital rectal examinations during follow-up, obesity (OR = 1.57; 95% CI, 1.07-2.30) at the time of the initial procedure was associated with prostate cancer incidence during follow-up. Risk associated with obesity was confined to cases with follow-up less than 1,538 days, the median duration of follow-up among cases (OR = 1.95; 95% CI, 1.09-3.48). Obesity is associated with the presence of PIN in benign specimens and with future prostate cancer risk after an initial benign finding. Obesity may be a factor to consider when planning clinical follow-up after a benign biopsy.

  13. Prostate-specific antigen increase during dutasteride to indicate the need for prostate biopsy: influence of prostatic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarra, Alessandro; Maggi, Martina; Fasulo, Andrea; Salciccia, Stefano; Gentile, Vincenzo; Cattarino, Susanna; Gentilucci, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the significance of an increase in total prostate-specific antigen (PSA) serum levels despite dutasteride treatment as a predictor of prostate cancer (PC) at biopsy. We focused our attention on the rate of the first PSA increase and on the influence of prostatic inflammation. From 2011 to 2016, 365 men with a previous negative prostate biopsy and persistent elevated PSA levels received dutasteride treatment. The population was followed for a range of 12-48 months. One hundred twelve cases with a confirmed PSA increase >0.5 ng/ml over the nadir value during the follow-up were included in Group A and underwent a new prostate biopsy. In Group A, the PSA increase was associated with PC at the re-biopsy in 66% of cases. The percentage of PSA reduction after 6 months of treatment was not a significant indicator of the risk for PC. The distribution of inflammatory infiltrates significantly (p<00.01) varied from positive to negative prostate biopsies. The relative risk for PC at biopsy significantly increased according to PSA level during dutasteride. Treatment with dutasteride can help to analyze PSA kinetic. A persistent prostatic inflammation is a factor able to reduce the performance of PSA kinetic during dutasteride treatment.

  14. Saturation biopsy improves preoperative Gleason scoring of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Philip; Wolf, Susanne; Adam, Alexander; Heukamp, Lukas Carl; Ellinger, Jörg; Vorreuther, Roland; Solleder, Gerold; Buettner, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the differences between conventional needle biopsy (CB) and saturation biopsy (SB) techniques with regard to the prediction of Gleason score, tumor stage, and insignificant prostate cancer. Data from a total number of 240 patients were analyzed. The main group, consisting of 185 patients, was diagnosed according to a saturation prostate needle biopsy protocol (SB), by which more than 12 cores were taken per biopsy. The control group was diagnosed using CB, by which 12 or less than 12 cores were taken per biopsy (n=55). In the main group, the Gleason score of the biopsy was confirmed in 19.5%, in the control group in 23.5% according to the prostatectomy specimen (p=0.50). Upgrading after the operation was found in 56.7% in the main group and in 60% in the control group (p=0.24). Downgrading after the operation was found in 23.9% in the main group and in 16.3% in the control group (p=0.24). If the Gleason score of the postoperative specimens differed by only one point from the biopsy, we considered this a minor deviation. In the main group, 59% of the carcinomas were preoperatively classified correctly or revealed minor deviation in Gleason scores. In contrast, only 47% of the carcinomas in the control group were assessed correctly or with minor deviation in Gleason scores. Thus, the main group demonstrated a better rate of preoperative prediction in tumor grading assessed by Gleason score (p=0.05). In addition, the Gleason scores of both protocols were assigned to three groups (Gleason 7), and the group changes from the biopsy to the prostatectomy specimen were found to be significantly more frequent in the CB group (p=0.04). There was no significant difference between the two types of biopsy techniques regarding tumor stage or the detection of insignificant carcinomas. The advantage of the extensive prostate needle biopsy technique (SB) is a better preoperative prediction of the Gleason score as well as the risk groups with Gleason scores 7. Both

  15. Individualized prostate biopsy strategy for Chinese patients with different prostate-specific antigen levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Dai; Ding-Wei Ye; Yun-Yi Kong; Yi-Jin Shen; Bo-Hua Wang

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the best individualized prostate biopsy strategies for Chinese patients with suspected prostate cancer. Methods: The present study included 221 Chinese patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies for the first time. All patients underwent the same 10-core biopsy protocol. In addition to the Hodge sextant technique, four more biopsies were obtained from the base and middle regions of bilateral peripheral zones.The differences between 10-core and sextant strategies in cancer detection among patients with different prostate specific anitgen (PSA) levels were evaluated. The relationship between PSA level, number of positive biopsy cores and organ-confined cancer rate in prostate cancer patients was also analyzed. Results: The overall prostate cancer detection rate was 40.7% in the 221 patients. The 10-core strategy increased cancer detection by 6.67% (6/90) in our patients (P 50 ng/mL (P 50 ng/mL. For patients with PSA ranging from 20.1 ng/mL to 50 ng/mL, the 10-core strategy should be applied in patients with life expectancy > 10 years and the sextant strategy should be applied in those with life expectancy < 10 years.

  16. Inflammation and focal atrophy in prostate needle biopsy cores and association to prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Ines; Bettin, Alfonso; Reyes, Niradiz

    2016-10-01

    The possible origin of proliferative inflammatory atrophy in the regenerative proliferation of prostate epithelial cells in response to injury caused by inflammation, and their relation to prostate adenocarcinoma have not been defined. Inflammation and focal atrophy are common pathological findings in prostate biopsies, currently not routinely included in surgical pathology reports. The objective of the study was to determine the correlation between inflammation and focal atrophy with prostate adenocarcinoma. Prostate needle biopsies from 203 patients with clinical parameters suspicious for malignancy were evaluated for the presence and extent of chronic inflammation, type and grade of focal atrophy, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and adenocarcinoma. Relations among them and with age were also analyzed. χ(2) tests and binary logistic regression were used to estimate associations. Chronic inflammation was observed in 77.3% of the biopsies, significantly associated to adenocarcinoma (P = .031). Moderate/severe inflammation in at least 1 biopsy core increased the risk of prostate adenocarcinoma (odds ratio, 2.94; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-6.8), whereas glandular localization of inflammation decreased the risk. Focal atrophy was present in 72.9% of the biopsies, proliferative inflammatory atrophy was the most common type, and its grade was significantly associated to inflammation (P atrophy were associated to high levels of inflammation, supporting its previously proposed inflammatory nature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Image Registration for Targeted MRI-guided Transperineal Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Andriy; Tuncali, Kemal; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Wells, William M.; Kikinis, Ron; Tempany, Clare M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate image registration methodology for automated re-identification of tumor-suspicious foci from pre-procedural MR exams during MR-guided transperineal prostate core biopsy. Materials and Methods A hierarchical approach for automated registration between planning and intra-procedural T2-weighted prostate MRI was developed and evaluated on the images acquired during 10 consecutive MR-guided biopsies. Registration accuracy was quantified at image-based landmarks and by evaluating spatial overlap for the manually segmented prostate and sub-structures. Registration reliability was evaluated by simulating initial mis-registration and analyzing the convergence behavior. Registration precision was characterized at the planned biopsy targets. Results The total computation time was compatible with a clinical setting, being at most 2 minutes. Deformable registration led to a significant improvement in spatial overlap of the prostate and peripheral zone contours compared to both rigid and affine registration. Average in-slice landmark registration error was 1.3±0.5 mm. Experiments simulating initial mis-registration resulted in an estimated average capture range of 6 mm and an average in-slice registration precision of ±0.3 mm. Conclusion Our registration approach requires minimum user interaction and is compatible with the time constraints of our interventional clinical workflow. The initial evaluation shows acceptable accuracy, reliability and consistency of the method. PMID:22645031

  18. Gleason score and laterality concordance between prostate biopsy and prostatectomy specimens

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Prostate biopsy involvement and Gleason score guide treatment decisions in prostate cancer. We evaluated concordance in Gleason score and laterality between biopsy and radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) specimens and factors that influenced this relationship. Material and Methods: We reviewed 538 prostate cancer diagnoses at a Veterans Affairs medical center (2000-2005) to identify men with prostate biopsy and RRP specimens. During this time there was a move from limited (6 co...

  19. Prostate Biopsy Sampling Causes Hematogenous Dissemination of Epithelial Cellular Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Ladjevardi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extent of epithelial cellular material (ECM occurring in venous blood samples after diagnostic core needle biopsy (CNB was studied in 23 patients with CNB diagnosed prostate cancer without provable metastases and 15 patients without cancer. The data show a significant increase of ECM in the peripheral blood sampled 20 seconds or 30 minutes after the last of 10 CNB procedures compared to the number of ECM detectable in the blood samples taken before the performance of CNB. The data indicate that diagnostic CNB of prostate cancer causes an extensive tissue trauma with a potential risk of cancer cell dissemination.

  20. Outcomes and trends of prostate biopsy for prostate cancer in Chinese men from 2003 to 2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Na

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA screening is growing in popularity in China, but its impact on biopsy characteristics and outcomes are poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to characterize prostate biopsy outcomes and trends in Chinese men over a 10-year period, since the increasing use of PSA tests. METHODS: All men (n = 1,650 who underwent prostate biopsy for PCa at Huashan Hospital, Shanghai, China from 2003-2011 were evaluated. Demographic and clinical information was collected for each patient, including age, digital rectal examination (DRE, transrectal ultrasound (prostate volume and nodule, total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA levels and free PSA ratio (fPSA/tPSA prior to biopsy. Prostate biopsy was performed using six cores before October 2007 or ten cores thereafter. Logistic regression and multivariate analysis were used to evaluate our data. RESULTS: The overall positive rate of prostate biopsy for PCa was 47% and the rate decreased significantly over the years from 74% in 2003 to 33% in 2011 (P-trend = 0.004. Age at diagnosis was slightly increased (P-trend = 0.04 while fPSA/tPSA was significantly decreased (P-trend = 1.11×10-5. A statistically significant trend was not observed for tPSA levels, prostate volume, or proportion of positive nodule. The model including multiple demographic and clinical variables (i.e., age, DRE, tPSA, fPSA/tPSA and transrectal ultrasound results (AUC = 0.93 statistically outperformed models that included only PSA (AUC = 0.85 or fPSA/tPSA (AUC = 0.66 to predict PCa risks (P<0.05. Similar results were observed in a subgroup of men whose tPSA levels were lower than 20 ng/mL (AUC = 0.87, vs. AUC of tPSA  = 0.62, P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Detection rates of PCa and high-grade PCa among men that underwent prostate biopsy at the institution has decreased significantly in the past 10 years, likely due to increasing use of PSA tests. Predictive performance of

  1. Antibiotic prophylaxis for transrectal prostate biopsy-a new strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antsupova, Valeria; Nørgaard, Nis; Bisbjerg, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fluoroquinolones are extensively used as prophylaxis for transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate (TRUBP). Emerging fluoroquinolone resistance and selection of multiresistant organisms warrant new prophylactic strategies. Pivmecillinam and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid have...... pivmecillinam and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was used (5.9%). CONCLUSIONS: The combination of pivmecillinam and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid is an attractive prophylaxis for TRUBP from a clinical, bacteriological and ecological point of view as compared with ciprofloxacin....

  2. Life-threatening meningitis resulting from transrectal prostate biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou-Jun Shen; Shan-Wen Chen; Hua Wang; Xie-Lai Zhou; Ju-Ping Zhao

    2005-01-01

    After antibiotic prophylaxis with metronidazole and levofloxacin, a transrectal sextant biopsy was performed under the guide of transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) for a 75-year-old suspicious patient with prostate adenocarcinoma.Although antibiotics were also given after this procedure, the patient still developed fever, anxious, agrypnia and headache. Blood cultures remained negative. Lumbar puncture was performed and was consistent with Escherichia coli bacterial meningitis.

  3. Evolution of prostate biopsy techniques. Looking back on a meaningful journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, A; Sanchez-Salas, R; Castro-Marin, M; Barret, E; Guillot-Tantay, C; Prapotnich, D; Cathelineau, X

    2016-10-01

    The technique of prostate biopsy has evolved a long way since its inception to being a safe diagnostic procedure. The principles of the biopsy technique continue to improvise with the knowledge about prostate cancer and availability of newer treatment options like active surveillance and focal therapy. Currently, we depend on accurate cancer information from the biopsy more than ever for deciding the ideal treatment option. The aim of this review is to present the major milestones in prostate biopsy technique evolutions and its impact on the prostate cancer management. We performed a detailed non-systematic literature review to present the historical facts on the transformations in prostate biopsy techniques and also the direction of present research to improve accurate cancer detection. There is a clear change in trend in biopsy technique before and after the introduction of transrectal ultrasound and prostate specific antigen. In the earlier era, the biopsies were aimed at palpable nodules and obtaining adequate prostatic tissue for diagnosis while the later era has moved towards detection of non-palpable and early prostate cancer. Recently, there is an increasing trend towards image guided targeted biopsies to extract maximum cancer information from minimum biopsy cores. Prostate biopsy techniques have seen major changes since its inception and have a major impact on prostate cancer management. There is a great potential for research which can further support the newer treatment options like focal therapy. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Prostate cancer detection with MR-ultrasound fusion biopsy: the role of systematic and targeted biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filson, Christopher P.; Natarajan, Shyam; Margolis, Daniel J.A.; Huang, Jiaoti; Lieu, Patricia; Dorey, Frederick J.; Reiter, Robert E.; Marks, Leonard S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND To evaluate performance of magnetic resonance (MR)-ultrasound guided fusion biopsy in diagnosing clinically significant prostate cancer (csCaP). METHODS 1042 men underwent multi-parametric MRI (mpMRI) and fusion biopsy consecutively in a prospective trial (2009 – 2014). An expert reader graded mpMRI regions of interest (ROI) 1–5 using published protocols. The fusion biopsy device was used to obtain targeted cores from ROIs (when present) followed by a fusion-image guided 12-core systematic biopsy in all men, even if no suspicious ROI. Primary endpoint was detection of clinically significant CaP (i.e., Gleason score ≥ 7). RESULTS Among 825 men with ≥ 1 suspicious ROI of grade 3 or higher, 289 (35%) had csCaP. Powerful predictors of csCaP were ROI grade (grade 5 vs 3, OR 6.5, pbiopsies detected more csCaP (n=289) than targeting (n=229) or systematic biopsy alone (n=199). Among patients with no suspicious ROI, 35 (16%) had csCaP on systematic biopsy. CONCLUSION In this prospective trial, MR-ultrasound fusion biopsy allowed detection of csCaP with a direct relationship with ROI grade and PSA density. The combination of targeted and systematic biopsy detected more csCaP than either modality alone; systematic biopsies revealed csCaP in 16% of men with no suspicious MRI target. Advantages of this new biopsy method are apparent, but issues of cost, training, and reliability await resolution prior to widespread adoption. PMID:26749141

  5. Antibiotic prophylaxis and complications following prostate biopsies - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemann, Nina; Helgstrand, John Thomas; Brasso, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies (TRUS-gb) are associated with both mild and serious complications. Prophylactic antibiotics reduce the risk of septicaemia and mortality; however, no international consensus exists on the timing and duration of antibiotics, including the optimal...... drug strategy. We reviewed the current evidence supporting use of prophylactic antibiotics and the risk of complications following prostate biopsies. METHODS: This review was drafted in accordance with the Prisma Guidelines. The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched. RESULTS: A total...... of 19 eligible trials were identified. One trial demonstrated a significant reduction in the risk of infection after biopsy and reported that oral ciprofloxacin as either a single-dose or a three-day regimen was superior to oral chloramphenicol and norfloxacin. Of three studies investigating the timing...

  6. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging 3T and prostate cancer: correlation with transperineal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, Roberto; Altieri, Vincenzo Maria; Marchioni, Michele; Castellan, Pietro; Pellegrini, Maurizio; Álvarez-Maestro, Mario; Sánchez-Gómez, Javier; De Francesco, Piergustavo; Ingrosso, Manuela; Tartaro, Armando; Tenaglia, Raffaele Lanfranco

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to correlate the results obtained by 3T Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI3T) with those obtained by histological examination of samples of the trans-perineal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TPUS-B). 34 patients were enrolled in the study. All patients had a clinical suspicion of cancer due to increased PSA and/or positive digital rectal examination. Patients were subjected to an MRSI 3T examination and subsequently to TPUS-B. Of the 22 (22/34) patients who presented abnormalities MRSI at 3T, 9 had a histological diagnosis of Prostate adenocarcinoma. Of the remaining 13 patients, 6 were found to be histologically positive for Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy and 7 Chronic Interstitial Inflammation or High Grade Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia. 12 (12/34) patients found to have no peripheral alterations in their prostate on 3T MRSI, none were positive for ADK or inflammation on histology. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 100%, 48%, 40% and 100% respectively. In this study, we correlated the values obtained from 3T MRSI with the results of histologically examined prostate biopsies. Our work shows that 72.8% of the voxels in which there was a change in ratio of Cit/(Cho + Cr), corresponded to areas of prostate tissue disease. Of these, 73.2% were positive for ADK and 26.8% for CII or HG PIN. In literature, it is noted that PCa can be distinguished from areas of benign tissue, in the peripheral zone, on the basis of the values of the ratio Cit/(Cho + Cr) (17), although some benign conditions, such as prostatitis or PINHG, can alter these values (18-19). In conclusion, the use of MRSI 3T before performing prostate biopsies may represent a valid aid for the urologist in the diagnosis of PCa, allowing them to avoid unnecessary prostate biopsies that may be negative. Furthermore, it would also be possible to reduce the total number of biopsies, thus decreasing patient exposure

  7. Anterior prostate biopsy at initial and repeat evaluation: is it useful to detect significant prostate cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Pepe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: Detection rate for anterior prostate cancer (PCa in men who underwent initial and repeat biopsy has been prospectively evaluated. Materials and Methods: From January 2013 to March 2014, 400 patients all of Caucasian origin (median age 63.5 years underwent initial (285 cases and repeat (115 cases prostate biopsy; all the men had negative digital rectal examination and the indications to biopsy were: PSA values > 10 ng/mL, PSA between 4.1-10 or 2.6-4 ng/mL with free/total PSA≤25% and ≤20%, respectively. A median of 22 (initial biopsy and 31 cores (repeat biopsy were transperineally performed including 4 cores of the anterior zone (AZ and 4 cores of the AZ plus 2 cores of the transition zone (TZ, respectively. Results: Median PSA was 7.9 ng/mL; overall, a PCa was found in 180 (45% patients: in 135 (47.4% and 45 (36% of the men who underwent initial and repeat biopsy, respectively. An exclusive PCa of the anterior zone was found in the 8.9 (initial biopsy vs 13.3% (repeat biopsy of the men: a single microfocus of cancer was found in the 61.2% of the cases; moreover, in 7 out 18 AZ PCa the biopsy histology was predictive of significant cancer in 2 (28.5% and 5 (71.5% men who underwent initial and repeat biopsy, respectively. Conclusions: However AZ biopsies increased detection rate for PCa (10% of the cases, the majority of AZ PCa with histological findings predictive of clinically significant cancer were found at repeat biopsy (about 70% of the cases.

  8. A review of repeat prostate biopsies and the influence of technique on cancer detection: our experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinlan, M R

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Follow-up of patients with an initial negative prostate biopsy, but surrounding whom a suspicion of prostate cancer persists, is difficult. In addition, debate exists as to the optimal technique for repeat prostate biopsy. AIMS: To assess the cancer detection rate on repeat prostate biopsy. METHODS: We reviewed patients who underwent prostate biopsy in our department in 2005 who had >or=1 previous biopsy within the preceding 5 years. Cancer detection rate on repeat biopsy and the influence of the number of biopsy cores were recorded. RESULTS: Cancer detection rate on repeat biopsy was 15.4%, with approximately 60% detected on the first repeat biopsy, but approximately 10% not confirmed until the fourth repeat biopsy. Gleason score was similar regardless of the time of diagnosis (6.1-6.5). Mean interval between first biopsy and cancer diagnosis (range 18-55 months) depended on the number of repeat procedures. There was an association between the number of biopsy cores and cancer detection. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the practice of increasing the number of cores taken on initial and first repeat biopsy to maximise prostate cancer detection and reduce the overall number of biopsies needed.

  9. Gleason score and laterality concordance between prostate biopsy and prostatectomy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth G. Nepple

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Prostate biopsy involvement and Gleason score guide treatment decisions in prostate cancer. We evaluated concordance in Gleason score and laterality between biopsy and radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP specimens and factors that influenced this relationship. Material and Methods: We reviewed 538 prostate cancer diagnoses at a Veterans Affairs medical center (2000-2005 to identify men with prostate biopsy and RRP specimens. During this time there was a move from limited (6 core to extended (12 core biopsy schemes. Discordance in Gleason score was defined as any change in Gleason score. Results: 152 men underwent RRP with biopsy showing Gleason 7 in 8%. Biopsy involvement was unilateral in 59% and bilateral in 41%. Compared to the biopsy, RRP Gleason score was concordant in 76 (50%, higher in 51 (34%, and lower in 25 (16%. Bilateral involvement was concordant in 97%, while unilateral involvement was concordant in only 20%. Both Gleason score and laterality were concordant in only 26%. Gleason concordance was higher in those with 8 or more cores compared to < 8 cores taken (54% vs. 34%, p = 0.046, but concordance was not affected by age, PSA, prostate volume, or length of time from biopsy to RRP. During later years, concordance did not improve despite taking more cores. Conclusions: Prostate biopsy underestimated prostatectomy Gleason score in 34% of men and bilateral involvement in 80% of those with unilateral disease on biopsy. Taking at least eight cores improves the accuracy of the prostate biopsy.

  10. Usefulness of GATA-3 as a marker of seminal epithelium in prostate biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rey, J A; Chantada-de la Fuente, D; Peteiro-Cancelo, M Á; Gómez-de María, C; San Miguel-Fraile, M P

    2017-04-28

    The incidental presence of seminal vesicle epithelium in prostate needle biopsies is generally recognisable through routine microscopy. However, the biopsy can sometimes be erroneously interpreted as malignant due to its architectural and cytological characteristics, and immunohistochemistry can be useful for correctly identifying the biopsy. Our objective was to analyse the potential usefulness of GATA-3 as a marker of seminal epithelium. Through immunohistochemistry with a monoclonal anti-GATA-3 antibody (clone L50-823), we studied seminal vesicle sections from 20 prostatectomy specimens, 12 prostate needle biopsies that contained seminal vesicle tissue and 68 prostate biopsies without seminal vesicle epithelium, 36 of which showed adenocarcinoma. Staining for GATA-3 was intense in the 20 seminal vesicles of the prostatectomy specimens and in the 12 prostate needle biopsies that contained seminal epithelium. In the 60 biopsies without a seminal vesicle, GATA-3 was positive in the prostate basal cells and even in the secretory cells (57 cases), although with less intensity in 55 of the cases. One of the 36 prostatic adenocarcinomas tested positive for GATA-3. The intense immunohistochemical expression of GATA-3 in the seminal vesicle epithelium can help identify the epithelium in prostate biopsies. This marker is also positive in the basal cells of healthy prostates and, with less intensity, in the secretory cells. Positivity, weak or moderate, is observed on rare occasions in prostatic adenocarcinomas. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of transperineal template biopsies of the prostate in the diagnosis of prostate cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmajed, Mohamed Ismat; Hughes, Daniel; Shergill, Iqbal Singh

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer has shown a significant increase, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis. Current practice considers histological diagnosis a necessity in the majority of the cases. The limitations of transrectal biopsies led to the development of the promising transperineal prostatic biopsies. The latter offers a safer approach by avoiding the rectum, utilizing brachytherapy template grid to detect anterior zone disease and provides accurate prostatic mapping by systematically sampling the whole gland. It also helps to direct biopsies based on images obtained from previous prostate scanning and identify those eligible for focal therapy to direct focal treatment accurately. The current literature provides enough reassurance that transperineal template biopsies are effective, efficient and superior to the traditional and inaccurate transrectal biopsies. The absence of consensus on the technical aspect of template biopsies is a drawback, yet it highlights the need to develop robust guidelines to standardize the procedure.

  12. Optimization of Prostate Biopsy: the Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Targeted Biopsy in Detection, Localization and Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjurlin, Marc A.; Meng, Xiaosong; Le Nobin, Julien; Wysock, James S.; Lepor, Herbert; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Taneja, Samir S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Optimization of prostate biopsy requires addressing the shortcomings of standard systematic transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy, including false-negative rates, incorrect risk stratification, detection of clinically insignificant disease and the need for repeat biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging is an evolving noninvasive imaging modality that increases the accurate localization of prostate cancer at the time of biopsy, and thereby enhances clinical risk assessment and improves the ability to appropriately counsel patients regarding therapy. In this review we 1) summarize the various sequences that comprise a prostate multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging examination along with its performance characteristics in cancer detection, localization and reporting standards; 2) evaluate potential applications of magnetic resonance imaging targeting in prostate biopsy among men with no previous biopsy, a negative previous biopsy and those with low stage cancer; and 3) describe the techniques of magnetic resonance imaging targeted biopsy and comparative study outcomes. Materials and Methods A bibliographic search covering the period up to October 2013 was conducted using MEDLINE®/PubMed®. Articles were reviewed and categorized based on which of the 3 objectives of this review was addressed. Data were extracted, analyzed and summarized. Results Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging consists of anatomical T2-weighted imaging coupled with at least 2 functional imaging techniques. It has demonstrated improved prostate cancer detection sensitivity up to 80% in the peripheral zone and 81% in the transition zone. A prostate cancer magnetic resonance imaging suspicion score has been developed, and is depicted using the Likert or PI-RADS (Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System) scale for better standardization of magnetic resonance imaging interpretation and reporting. Among men with no previous biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging increases the frequency of

  13. Sex Steroid Metabolism in Benign and Malignant Intact Prostate Biopsies: Individual Profiling of Prostate Intracrinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Gianfrilli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro studies reveal that androgens, oestrogens, and their metabolites play a crucial role in prostate homeostasis. Most of the studies evaluated intraprostatic hormone metabolism using cell lines or preprocessed specimens. Using an ex vivo model of intact tissue cultures with preserved architecture, we characterized the enzymatic profile of biopsies from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH or cancer (PC, focusing on 17β-hydroxy-steroid-dehydrogenases (17β-HSDs and aromatase activities. Samples from 26 men who underwent prostate needle core biopsies (BPH n = 14; PC n = 12 were incubated with radiolabeled 3H-testosterone or 3H-androstenedione. Conversion was evaluated by TLC separation and beta-scanning of extracted supernatants. We identified three major patterns of conversion. The majority of BPHs revealed no active testosterone/oestradiol conversion as opposed to prostate cancer. Conversion correlated with histology and PSA, but not circulating hormones. Highest Gleason scores had a higher androstenedion-to-testosterone conversion and expression of 17β-HSD-isoenzymes-3/5. Conclusions. We developed an easy tool to profile individual intraprostatic enzymatic activity by characterizing conversion pathways in an intact tissue environment. In fresh biopsies we found that 17β-HSD-isoenzymes and aromatase activities correlate with biological behaviour allowing for morphofunctional phenotyping of pathology specimens and clinical monitoring of novel enzyme-targeting drugs.

  14. Diagnostic Value of ERG in Prostate Needle Biopsies Containing Minute Cancer Foci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachurska Svitlana Y.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate carcinoma (PC is the second most diagnosed cancer in men population worldwide. The small amount of the tissue in prostate needle biopsy is often sufficient for the correct interpretation. Novel antibodies, as ERG, could add to the diagnostic value of IHC study in analysing difficult core biopsies.

  15. PCA3 and PCA3-Based Nomograms Improve Diagnostic Accuracy in Patients Undergoing First Prostate Biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Vlaeminck-Guillem

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available While now recognized as an aid to predict repeat prostate biopsy outcome, the urinary PCA3 (prostate cancer gene 3 test has also been recently advocated to predict initial biopsy results. The objective is to evaluate the performance of the PCA3 test in predicting results of initial prostate biopsies and to determine whether its incorporation into specific nomograms reinforces its diagnostic value. A prospective study included 601 consecutive patients addressed for initial prostate biopsy. The PCA3 test was performed before ≥12-core initial prostate biopsy, along with standard risk factor assessment. Diagnostic performance of the PCA3 test was evaluated. The three available nomograms (Hansen’s and Chun’s nomograms, as well as the updated Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator; PCPT were applied to the cohort, and their predictive accuracies were assessed in terms of biopsy outcome: the presence of any prostate cancer (PCa and high-grade prostate cancer (HGPCa. The PCA3 score provided significant predictive accuracy. While the PCPT risk calculator appeared less accurate; both Chun’s and Hansen’s nomograms provided good calibration and high net benefit on decision curve analyses. When applying nomogram-derived PCa probability thresholds ≤30%, ≤6% of HGPCa would have been missed, while avoiding up to 48% of unnecessary biopsies. The urinary PCA3 test and PCA3-incorporating nomograms can be considered as reliable tools to aid in the initial biopsy decision.

  16. Clinical value of core length in contemporary multicore prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangchul; Jeong, Seong Jin; Hwang, Sung Il; Hong, Sung Kyu; Lee, Hak Jong; Byun, Seok Soo; Choe, Gheeyoung; Lee, Sang Eun

    2015-01-01

    There is little data about the clinical value of core length for prostate biopsy (PBx). We investigated the clinical values of various clinicopathological biopsy-related parameters, including core length, in the contemporary multi-core PBx. Medical records of 5,243 consecutive patients who received PBx at our institution were reviewed. Among them, 3,479 patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤ 10 ng/ml level who received transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided multi (≥ 12)-core PBx at our institution were analyzed for prostate cancer (PCa). Gleason score upgrading (GSU) was analyzed in 339 patients who were diagnosed with low-risk PCa and received radical prostatectomy. Multivariate logistic regression analyses for PCa detection and prediction of GSU were performed. The mean age and PSA of the entire cohort were 63.5 years and 5.4 ng/ml, respectively. The overall cancer detection rate was 28.5%. There was no statistical difference in core length between patients diagnosed with PCa and those without PCa (16.1 ± 1.8 vs 16.1 ± 1.9 mm, P = 0.945). The core length was also not significantly different (16.4 ± 1.7 vs 16.4 ± 1.6mm, P = 0.889) between the GSU group and non-GSU group. Multivariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that the core length of PBx did not affect PCa detection in TRUS-guided multi-core PBx (P = 0.923) and was not prognostic for GSU in patients with low-risk PCa (P = 0.356). In patients undergoing contemporary multi-core PBx, core length may not have significant impact on PCa detection and also GSU following radical prostatectomy among low-risk PCa group.

  17. Clinical value of core length in contemporary multicore prostate biopsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangchul Lee

    Full Text Available There is little data about the clinical value of core length for prostate biopsy (PBx. We investigated the clinical values of various clinicopathological biopsy-related parameters, including core length, in the contemporary multi-core PBx.Medical records of 5,243 consecutive patients who received PBx at our institution were reviewed. Among them, 3,479 patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA ≤ 10 ng/ml level who received transrectal ultrasound (TRUS-guided multi (≥ 12-core PBx at our institution were analyzed for prostate cancer (PCa. Gleason score upgrading (GSU was analyzed in 339 patients who were diagnosed with low-risk PCa and received radical prostatectomy. Multivariate logistic regression analyses for PCa detection and prediction of GSU were performed.The mean age and PSA of the entire cohort were 63.5 years and 5.4 ng/ml, respectively. The overall cancer detection rate was 28.5%. There was no statistical difference in core length between patients diagnosed with PCa and those without PCa (16.1 ± 1.8 vs 16.1 ± 1.9 mm, P = 0.945. The core length was also not significantly different (16.4 ± 1.7 vs 16.4 ± 1.6mm, P = 0.889 between the GSU group and non-GSU group. Multivariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that the core length of PBx did not affect PCa detection in TRUS-guided multi-core PBx (P = 0.923 and was not prognostic for GSU in patients with low-risk PCa (P = 0.356.In patients undergoing contemporary multi-core PBx, core length may not have significant impact on PCa detection and also GSU following radical prostatectomy among low-risk PCa group.

  18. Serum testosterone as a biomarker for second prostatic biopsy in men with negative first biopsy for prostatic cancer and PSA>4ng/mL, or with PIN biopsy result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiamegos, Alexandros; Varkarakis, John; Kontraros, Michael; Karagiannis, Andreas; Chrisofos, Michael; Barbalias, Dimitrios; Deliveliotis, Charalampos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Data from animal, clinical and prevention studies support the role of androgens in prostate cancer growth, proliferation and progression. Results of serum based epidemiologic studies in humans, however, have been inconclusive. The present study aims to define whether serum testosterone can be used as a predictor of a positive second biopsy in males considered for re-biopsy. Material and Methods: The study included 320 men who underwent a prostatic biopsy in our department from October 2011 until June 2012. Total testosterone, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and prostate pathology were evaluated in all cases. Patients undergoing a second biopsy were identified and biopsy results were statistically analyzed. Results: Forty men (12.5%) were assessed with a second biopsy. The diagnosis of the second biopsy was High Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia in 14 patients (35%) and Prostate Cancer in 12 patients (30%). The comparison of prostatic volume, total testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and albumin showed that patients with cancer of the prostate had significantly greater levels of free testosterone (p=0.043) and bioavailable T (p=0.049). Conclusion: In our study, higher free testosterone and bioavailable testosterone levels were associated with a cancer diagnosis at re-biopsy. Our results indicate a possible role for free and bioavailable testosterone in predicting the presence of prostate cancer in patients considered for re-biopsy. PMID:27532110

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Ultrasound Fusion-Guided Prostate Biopsy: Review of Technology, Techniques, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongnyuy, Michael; George, Arvin K; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R; Pinto, Peter A

    2016-04-01

    Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided (12-14 core) systematic biopsy of the prostate is the recommended standard for patients with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). Advances in imaging have led to the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of PCa with subsequent development of software-based co-registration allowing for the integration of MRI with real-time TRUS during prostate biopsy. A number of fusion-guided methods and platforms are now commercially available with common elements in image and analysis and planning. Implementation of fusion-guided prostate biopsy has now been proven to improve the detection of clinically significant PCa in appropriately selected patients.

  20. Pain during Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsy and the Role of Periprostatic Nerve Block: What Radiologists Should Know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazir, Babar [Dept. of Oncologic Imaging, National Cancer Centre, Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-10-15

    Early prostate cancers are best detected with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided core biopsy of the prostate. Due to increased longevity and improved prostate cancer screening, more men are now subjected to TRUS-guided biopsy. To improve the detection rate of early prostate cancer, the current trend is to increase the number of cores obtained. The significant pain associated with the biopsy procedure is usually neglected in clinical practice. Although it is currently underutilized, the periprostatic nerve block is an effective technique to mitigate pain associated with prostate biopsy. This article reviews contemporary issues pertaining to pain during prostate biopsy and discusses the practical aspects of periprostatic nerve block.

  1. Initial prostate biopsy: development and internal validation of a biopsy-specific nomogram based on the prostate cancer antigen 3 assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, J.; Auprich, M.; Ahyai, S.A.; Taille, A. De La; Poppel, H. van; Marberger, M.; Stenzl, A.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Huland, H.; Fisch, M.; Abbou, C.C.; Schalken, J.A.; Fradet, Y.; Marks, L.S.; Ellis, W.; Partin, A.W.; Pummer, K.; Graefen, M.; Haese, A.; Walz, J.; Briganti, A.; Shariat, S.F.; Chun, F.K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urinary prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) assay in combination with established clinical risk factors improves the identification of men at risk of harboring prostate cancer (PCa) at initial biopsy (IBX). OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate internally the first IBX-specific PCA3-based nomo

  2. Antibiotic prophylaxis for transrectal ultrasound biopsy of the prostate in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, L G

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common solid cancer affecting men in Ireland. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsies of the prostate are routinely performed to diagnose prostate cancer. They are, in general, a safe procedure but are associated with a significant risk of infective complications ranging from fever, urinary tract infection to severe urosepsis. At present, there are no recommended national guidelines on the use of antibiotic prophylaxis to minimise the risk of infective complications post-TRUS biopsy.

  3. Photoacoustic and Ultrasonic Image-Guided Needle Biopsy of the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0024 TITLE: Photoacoustic and Ultrasonic Image-Guided Needle Biopsy of the Prostate PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard...light sources to yield multi-spectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging data in excised prostate tissue. Two types of interstitial sources – a directional...ANSI Std. Z39.18 Photoacoustic and Ultrasonic Image-Guided Needle Biopsy of the Prostate 34 Table of Contents Page 1. Introduction

  4. Design of a predictive targeting error simulator for MRI-guided prostate biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Avni, Shachar; Vikal, Siddharth; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2010-01-01

    Multi-parametric MRI is a new imaging modality superior in quality to Ultrasound (US) which is currently used in standard prostate biopsy procedures. Surface-based registration of the pre-operative and intra-operative prostate volumes is a simple alternative to side-step the challenges involved with deformable registration. However, segmentation errors inevitably introduced during prostate contouring spoil the registration and biopsy targeting accuracies. For the crucial purpose of validating...

  5. Significant impact of transperineal template biopsy of the prostate at a single tertiary institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Huang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Transperineal biopsy at our institution showed a high rate of disease-upgrading, with a large proportion involving anterior and transition zones. A significant amount of patients went on to receive curative treatment. TPB is a valuable diagnostic procedure with minimal risk of developing urosepsis. We believe TBP should be offered as an option for all repeat prostate biopsies and considered as an option for initial prostate biopsy.

  6. Can non-malignant biopsy features identify men at increased risk of biopsy-detectable prostate cancer at re-screening after 4 years?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Tineke; Roobol, Monique J.; Schroder, Fritz H.; van der Kwast, Theodorus H.; Roemeling, Stijn; van der Cruijsen-Koeter, Ingrid W.; Bangma, Chris H.; van Leenders, Geert J. L. H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To identify pathological features in non-malignant sextant prostate needle biopsies and assess their predictive value for detecting prostate cancer on biopsy 4 years later. PATIENTS AND METHODS We selected and reviewed the biopsy specimens of 121 men that were diagnosed as non-malignant d

  7. Does obesity affect the accuracy of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for predicting prostate cancer among men undergoing prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jong J; Jeong, Seong J; Lee, Byung K; Jeong, Chang W; Byun, Seok-Soo; Hong, Sung K; Lee, Sang E

    2013-08-01

    What's known on the subject? and what does the study add?: As most urologist known, obesity significantly lowers serum PSA levels. So there is some concern about delayed diagnosis of prostate cancer in obese men. In the present study, we found that the accuracy level of PSA for detecting prostate cancer was not significantly different between different obesity levels. A well-designed study adjusting for several factors, e.g. diet, exercise, medication and comorbidity, which may possibly compensate for the associated effects on PSA levels, is needed for confirmation of the present findings. To investigate prostate-specific antigen (PSA) accuracy in detecting prostate cancer according to body mass index (BMI) in Asian men with a PSA level of prostate biopsy. We reviewed the records of 3471 patients, whose initial PSA levels were prostate biopsy between January 2004 and May 2011. BMI was categorised as performed previously for the Asian population: prostate cancer in each BMI group was assessed based on the receiver operating characteristics-derived area under the curve. The mean age and median PSA level were inversely associated with BMI; the median PSA level in each BMI category was 7.84, 7.75, 7.33 and 5.79 ng/mL, respectively (P prostate cancer was detected from biopsy in 1102 (31.7%) patients. The PSA accuracy for predicting prostate cancer in all patients was estimated to be 0.607, and PSA accuracies in each BMI category were 0.638, 0.572, 0.613 and 0.544, respectively; there was no significant difference among the groups in terms of PSA accuracy. The accuracy of PSA in predicting prostate cancer did not change regardless of BMI category in Asian men. However, as patients with higher BMIs had lower PSA levels than those with lower BMIs, it can therefore be suggested that the PSA threshold should be lower in obese men to discriminate between prostate cancer and benign conditions in the real clinical situation. © 2013 BJU International.

  8. The criteria for the decision of transrectal US-guided prostate biopsy: Can we reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Joon Hyung; Cho, Jae Ho; Ahn, Jay Hong; Chang, Jay Chun [Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-15

    To establish the criteria which can safely reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies by comparing the transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) findings, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate specific antigen density (PSAD) in the decision of criteria for the prostatic biopsy using TRUS. Two hundred and twenty patients underwent TRUS- guided prostate biopsy due to elevated PSA and/or focal nodule on TRUS were included. Sixty five (27.5%) patients were confirmed as prostate cancer, and remained 155 (70.5%) patients were reported as benign diseases including benign prostate hyperplasia. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of TRUS, PSA and PSAD were evaluated and the single criterion or the combination of the criteria which can safely reduce the unnecessary biopsies without missing prostatic cancer were investigated. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of TRUS, PSA (cut-off value, 4 ng/ml) and PSAD (cut-off level, 0.2 ng/ml/cm{sup 3}) were 78.5%/95.4%/95.4%/27.8%/51.6%/64/5%, 42.7%/64.5%/73.6%, respectively. PSAD cut-off level 0.2 ng/ml/cm{sup 3} was the most excellent single criterion for the decision of prostatic biopsy and the number of unnecessary biopsies was 100 cases. But 3 cases of prostatic cancer which the PSAD level was below 0.2 ng/ml/cm{sup 3} were included and in all these 3 cases, a focal nodule was detected on TRUS. Therefore, we applied these two criteria at once and the biopsies of 30 cases (13.6%) are unnecessary. With the single criterion, we could not obtain the satisfactory results but by the combinations of criteria (TRUS and PSAD), 30 (13.6%) cases are unnecessary biopsies without missing cancer. We think that the short term follow-up may be a substitute for the immediate when nodular lesion is suspicious on TRUS and serum PSAD level is below 0.2 ng/ml/cm{sup 3}.

  9. Near-infrared pulsed light to guide prostate biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, J.; Debourdeau, M.; Laidevant, A.; Hervé, L.; Allié, C.; Vray, D.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2011-03-01

    The protocol for prostate cancer diagnosis, currently based on ultrasound guided biopsy, is limited by a lack of relevance. To improve this protocol, a new approach was proposed combining optical and ultrasound measurements to guide biopsy specifically to the tumors. Adding an optical measurement modality into an already existing ultrasound probe is challenging as the overall size of the system should not exceed a given dimension so as to fit the operative environment. Moreover, examination should not take more than 15 min to avoid any complication. A combined ultrasound and optical endorectal probe was designed to comply with the constraints of the sterilization protocols, the examination duration and required compactness. Therefore a totally innovative pulsed laser source has been designed to meet compactness requirements while providing accurate time-resolved measurements. A dedicated multi-channel photon counting system was optimized to decrease the examination duration. A fast reconstruction method based on the analysis of the intensity and time of flight of the detected photons has been associated to provide 3D localization of fluorescent dots almost immediately after acquisition. The bi-modal probe was capable of withstanding the sterilization procedures. The performance of the compact laser source has been shown at the same level as that of a standard laboratory Titane:Sapphire laser. The dedicated photon counting solution was capable of acquiring optical data in less than one minute. To evaluate the overall performance of the system in dealing with a realistic background signal, measurements and reconstructions were conducted on prostate mimicking phantom and in vivo.

  10. Upgrading and upstaging in prostate cancer: From prostate biopsy to radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, Carolina; Cerruto, Maria Angela; Cioffi, Antonio; Novella, Giovanni; Cavalleri, Stefano; Artibani, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common malignancy in men and the second cause of cancer-related mortality after lung cancer. Several studies have evaluated the correlation between bioptic and pathological Gleason score (GS), documenting a correlation ranging between 30 and 60%. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the association between bioptic and pathological GS in a series of patients undergoing prostate needle biopsy and subsequent radical prostatectomy. We also aimed to evaluate the possible prognostic factors of upgrading and upstaging. We prospectively collected and retrospectively reviewed data from 300 consecutive patients who underwent radical retropubic or robot-assisted prostatectomy at our Institution. Patients who underwent prostate needle biopsy, transrectal or transperineal, with a minimum of 5 samples, were included in this study. Upgrading and downgrading were defined as increase or decrease, respectively, from one prognostic grade group to another, similar to up- or downstaging. The mean age of the patients was 62.97 years and the mean prostate-spesific antigen (PSA) level was 7.83 ng/ml. A total of 51.3% of the population underwent a transperineal prostate biopsy. The most frequently represented bioptic GS was 3+3 (64.0%) followed by 3+4=7 (15.6%); the most frequent pathological Gleason score was 3+4 (44.3%), followed by 3+3 (31.0%). With reagard to the bioptic GS 4-5-6 group, approximately half of the specimens (46.7%) were subsequently upgraded to GS 3+4, and 5.3% to 4+3. With regards to the bioptic GS 3+4 group, 57.4% was confirmed in the surgical specimen. In the 4+3 group, 23.5% of the cases was downgraded to 3+4 and 35.3% was confirmed. With regards to stage, ~39.7% of the patients received an upstaging on the pathological specimen. We evaluated the correlations between preoperative serum PSA level, prostate volume, digital rectal examination and biopsy type and none of the variables considered exhibited a correlation with any

  11. Multiparametric MRI in biopsy guidance for prostate cancer: fusion-guided.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwax, Jason T; George, Arvin K; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common solid-organ malignancy among American men and the second most deadly. Current guidelines recommend a 12-core systematic biopsy following the finding of an elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). However, this strategy fails to detect an unacceptably high percentage of clinically significant cancers, leading researchers to develop new, innovative methods to improve the effectiveness of prostate biopsies. Multiparametric-MRI (MP-MRI) has emerged as a promising instrument in identifying suspicious regions within the prostate that require special attention on subsequent biopsy. Fusion platforms, which incorporate the MP-MRI into the biopsy itself and provide active targets within real-time imaging, have shown encouraging results in improving the detection rate of significant cancer. Broader applications of this technology, including MRI-guided focal therapy for prostate cancer, are in early phase trials.

  12. Value of Targeted Prostate Biopsy Using Magnetic Resonance–Ultrasound Fusion in Men with Prior Negative Biopsy and Elevated Prostate-specific Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonn, Geoffrey A.; Chang, Edward; Natarajan, Shyam; Margolis, Daniel J.; Macairan, Malu; Lieu, Patricia; Huang, Jiaoti; Dorey, Frederick J.; Reiter, Robert E.; Marks, Leonard S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Conventional biopsy fails to detect the presence of some prostate cancers (PCas). Men with a prior negative biopsy but persistently elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) pose a diagnostic dilemma, as some harbor elusive cancer. Objective To determine whether use of magnetic resonance–ultrasound (MR-US) fusion biopsy results in improved detection of PCa compared to repeat conventional biopsy. Design, setting, and participants In a consecutive-case series, 105 subjects with prior negative biopsy and elevated PSA values underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fusion biopsy in an outpatient setting. Intervention Suspicious areas on multiparametric MRI were delineated and graded by a radiologist; MR–US fusion biopsy was performed by a urologist using the Artemis device; targeted and systematic biopsies were obtained regardless of MRI result. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Detection rates of all PCa and clinically significant PCa (Gleason ≥3 + 4 or Gleason 6 with maximal cancer core length ≥4 mm) were determined. The yield of targeted biopsy was compared to systematic biopsy. The ability of an MRI grading system to predict clinically significant cancer was investigated. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine predictors of significant cancer on biopsy. Results and limitations Fusion biopsy revealed PCa in 36 of 105 men (34%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 25–45). Seventy-two percent of men with PCa had clinically significant disease; 21 of 23 men (91%) with PCa on targeted biopsy had significant cancer compared to 15 of 28 (54%) with systematic biopsy. Degree of suspicion on MRI was the most powerful predictor of significant cancer on multivariate analysis. Twelve of 14 (86%) subjects with a highly suspicious MRI target were diagnosed with clinically significant cancer. Conclusions MR-US fusion biopsy provides improved detection of PCa in men with prior negative biopsies

  13. Association between HIV status and Positive Prostate Biopsy in a Study of U.S. Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayland Hsiao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV infection is associated with increased incidence of malignancies, such as lymphomas and testicular cancers. We reviewed the relationship between HIV infection and prostate cancer in a contemporary series of prostate biopsy patients. The study is a retrospective analysis of consecutive prostate biopsies performed at a VA Medical Center. The indications for performing a prostate biopsy included an abnormal digital rectal examination and/or an elevated PSA. Patients were categorized according to their HIV status, biopsy results, and various demographic and clinical characteristics. Univariate and multivariate analyses compared distributions of HIV status, and various clinical and demographic characteristics. The adjusted measures of association between HIV status and positive biopsy were expressed as odds ratios (ORs and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI. The likelihood of positive biopsy was significantly higher among 18 HIV-positive patients compared to patients with negative HIV tests (adjusted OR = 3.9; 95% CI: 1.3–11.5. In analyses restricted to prostate cancer patients, HIV-positive patients were not different from the remaining group with respect to their prostate cancer stage, PSA level, PSA velocity, PSA density, or Gleason grade. There is an association between HIV infection and prostate biopsy positive for carcinoma in a population referred for urologic workup. Further confirmation of this association by prospective studies may impact the current screening practices in HIV patients.

  14. Mapping of transrectal ultrasonographic prostate biopsies: quality control and learning curve assessment by image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Mozer, Pierre; Chevreau, Gregoire; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Bart, Stephane; Renard-Penna, Raphaele; Comperat, Eva; Conort, Pierre; Bitker, Marc-Olivier; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Richard, Francois; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Mapping of transrectal ultrasonographic (TRUS) prostate biopsies is of fundamental importance for either diagnostic purposes or the management and treatment of prostate cancer, but the localization of the cores seems inaccurate. Our objective was to evaluate the capacities of an operator to plan transrectal prostate biopsies under 2-dimensional TRUS guidance using a registration algorithm to represent the localization of biopsies in a reference 3-dimensional ultrasonographic volume. Methods: Thirty-two patients underwent a series of 12 prostate biopsies under local anesthesia performed by 1 operator using a TRUS probe combined with specific third-party software to verify that the biopsies were indeed conducted within the planned targets. RESULTS: The operator reached 71% of the planned targets with substantial variability that depended on their localization (100% success rate for targets in the middle and right parasagittal parts versus 53% for targets in the left lateral base). Feedback from this ...

  15. Extracellular vesicles such as prostate cancer cell fragments as a fluid biopsy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, S I; Kim, Y; Biggs, C N; Chin, J L; Leong, H S

    2015-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived vesicles generated through a process of cell membrane shedding or storage vesicle release, as occurs during apoptosis, necrosis or exocytosis. Initially perceived as cellular by-products or 'dust' of insignificant biological importance, recent research has shed light on the role of EVs as mediators of intercellular communication, blood coagulation and disease progression. The prostate is a source of EVs and their abundance in complex biological fluids such as plasma, serum and urine make them compelling entities for a 'fluid biopsy'. As such, prostate cancer cell fragments (PCCF) are EVs generated by the tumor resident within the prostate and are also present in blood, expressing a portion of biomarkers representative of the primary tumor. High-throughput analytical techniques to determine biomarker expression on EVs is the last hurdle towards translating the full potential of prostate EVs for clinical use. We describe current state-of-the-art methods for the analysis of prostate-derived EVs in patient fluids such as plasma and the challenges that lie ahead in this emerging field of translational research.

  16. The impact of transrectal prostate biopsy on erectile function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden-Castro, E; Pelayo-Nieto, M; Espinosa-Perezgrovas, D; Rubio-Arellano, E D; Catalán-Quinto, G; Guzmán-Hernández, F; Morales-Covarrubias, J A; Cortez-Betancourt, R

    2016-09-01

    To assess erectile function at different periods of time in patients who undergo transrectal prostate biopsy (TRPB). A total of 364 patients underwent TRPB. All of the patients were assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5). All patients with a positive result for cancer or with previous erectile dysfunction in the initial assessment were excluded. Ninety-three patients were included and were assessed before the biopsy and at 4, 12 and 24 weeks after the TRPB, using the IIEF-5 and assessing erectile function across these time periods. We assessed 93 patients. During the first prebiopsy assessment, 100% of the patients scored ≥22 points. In the first postbiopsy evaluation at 4 weeks, 66.6% scored ≥ 22 points, and 33.3% had erectile dysfunction, thereby indicating a statistically significant reduction in the IIEF-5 score (P=.001). In the second postbiopsy evaluation, only 9.1% patients still had mild to moderate erectile dysfunction (P=.04). By the end, 92.48% of the patients scored ≥ 22 points, and 7.52% still had mild erectile dysfunction, without presenting a significant difference (P=.1). After a TRPB, the drop in IIEF-5 scores and the presence of erectile dysfunction are temporary and transient, with greater impairment during the first month following the procedure and improvement starting after the first month, with almost total recovery at 6 months. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Beyond Diagnosis: Evolving Prostate Biopsy in the Era of Focal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Dominguez-Escrig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of use as the “gold standard” in the detection of prostate cancer, the optimal biopsy regimen is still not universally agreed upon. While important aspects such as the need for laterally placed biopsies and the importance of apical cancer are known, repeated studies have shown significant patients with cancer on subsequent biopsy when the original biopsy was negative and an ongoing suspicion of cancer remained. Attempts to maximise the effectiveness of repeat biopsies have given rise to the alternate approaches of saturation biopsy and the transperineal approach. Recent interest in focal treatment of prostate cancer has further highlighted the need for accurate detection of prostate cancer, and in response, the introduction of transperineal template-guided biopsy. While the saturation biopsy approach and the transperineal template approach increase the detection rate of cancer in men with a previous negative biopsy and appear to have acceptable morbidity, there is a lack of clinical trials evaluating the different biopsy strategies. This paper reviews the evolution of prostatic biopsy and current controversies.

  18. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) as a method for identifying benign and malignant prostate biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhui; Guan, Guangying; Ling, Yuting; Lang, Stephen; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong; Nabi, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    Objectives. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men. Digital rectal examination (DRE) - a known clinical tool based on alteration in the mechanical properties of tissues due to cancer has traditionally been used for screening prostate cancer. Essentially, DRE estimates relative stiffness of cancerous and normal prostate tissue. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) are new optical imaging techniques capable of providing cross-sectional imaging of tissue microstructure as well as elastogram in vivo and in real time. In this preliminary study, OCE was used in the setting of the human prostate biopsies ex vivo, and the images acquired were compared with those obtained using standard histopathologic methods. Methods. 120 prostate biopsies were obtained by TRUS guided needle biopsy procedures from 9 patients with clinically suspected cancer of the prostate. The biopsies were approximately 0.8mm in diameter and 12mm in length, and prepared in Formalin solution. Quantitative assessment of biopsy samples using OCE was obtained in kilopascals (kPa) before histopathologic evaluation. The results obtained from OCE and standard histopathologic evaluation were compared provided the cross-validation. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for OCE (histopathology was a reference standard). Results. OCE could provide quantitative elasticity properties of prostate biopsies within benign prostate tissue, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical hyperplasia and malignant prostate cancer. Data analysed showed that the sensitivity and specificity of OCE for PCa detection were 1 and 0.91, respectively. PCa had significantly higher stiffness values compared to benign tissues, with a trend of increasing in stiffness with increasing of malignancy. Conclusions. Using OCE, microscopic resolution elastogram is promising in diagnosis of human prostatic diseases. Further studies using this technique to improve the

  19. Complications and risk factors in transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Márcio Nóbrega de Jesus

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Prostate biopsy is not a procedure without risk. There is concern about major complications and which antibiotics are best for routine use before these biopsies. The objective was to determine the rate of complications and the possible risk factors in prostate biopsies. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective study, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu. METHODS: Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS guided prostate biopsies were carried out in 174 patients presenting either abnormality in digital rectal examinations (DRE or levels higher than 4 ng/ml in prostate-specific antigen (PSA tests, or both. RESULTS: Hemorrhagic complications were the most common (75.3%, while infectious complications occurred in 19% of the cases. Hematuria was the most frequent type (56%. Urinary tract infection (UTI occurred in 16 patients (9.2%. Sepsis was observed in three patients (1.7%. The presence of an indwelling catheter was a risk factor for infectious complications (p < 0.05. Higher numbers of biopsies correlated with hematuria, rectal bleeding and infectious complications (p < 0.05. The other conditions investigated did not correlate with post-biopsy complications. CONCLUSIONS: Post-biopsy complications were mostly self-limiting. The rate of major complications was low, thus showing that TRUS guided prostate biopsy was safe and effective. Higher numbers of fragments taken in biopsies correlated with hematuria, rectal bleeding and infectious complications. An indwelling catheter represented a risk factor for infectious complications. The use of aspirin was not an absolute contraindication for TRUS.

  20. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging predicts the presence of prostate cancer in patients with negative prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista, F; Castillo, E; Gimbernat, H; Rodríguez-Barbero, J M; Panizo, J; Angulo, J C

    2015-03-01

    To assess the ability of multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to detect prostate cancer in patients with prior negative transrectal prostate biopsy (TPB). mpMRI (TSE-T2-w, DWI and DCE sequences) was performed on 1.5T (Magnetom Avanto; Siemens Healthcare Solutions) in 150 patients suspicious of prostate cancer and with negative TPB. European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) criteria were used (score 1: clinically significant disease is highly unlikely to be present; score 2: clinically significant cancer is unlikely to be present; score 3: clinically significant cancer is equivocal; score 4: clinically significant cancer is likely to be present; score 5: clinically significant cancer is highly likely to be present). PSA measurement (total and free), digital rectal examination (DRE), transrectal ultrasound (TRU) and a second TPB (at least 14 cylinders) were performed in all patients. Variables were submitted for independent blind analysis. The accuracy of each test was measured. Stepwise selection model for prediction of prostate cancer in second TPB was developed. Mean age was 66.2± 5 years (51-77), mean PSA 11.3± 9.6ng/mL (0.9-75) and mean prostatic volume 82.2±42 (20-250) cc. DRE was suspicious in 11 (7.3%) patients. The mean number of cylinders per patient sampled in second TRB was 17.6±2.7(14-22). Second TRB was positive in 28 patients (18.7%). mpMRI was positive (score 3-5) in 102 (68%), test sensibility was 92.9% and the NPV was 95.8%. The risk of prostate cancer diagnosis in second TPB is modified by: PSA velocity > 0.75 (OR 1.04 [0.99-1.08]; P=0.06), free/total ratio PSA <15% (OR 0.37 [0.13-1.05]; P=0.06), each cc. of prostate volume (OR 0.98 [0.97-1]; P=0.017) and mpMRI 3-5 (OR 7.87 [1.78-34.7]; P=0.006). Multivariate analysis reveals that mpMRI (OR 7.41 [1.65-33.28]; P=0.009) and prostatic volume (OR 0.31 [0.12-0.78]; P=0.01) are independent risk predictors of prostate cancer. According to ESUR guidelines and in patients

  1. Touch imprint cytology of prostate core needle biopsy specimens: A useful method for immediate reporting of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Aytac

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: TIC smears can provide an immediate and reliable cytological diagnosis of prostate carcinoma. It may clearly help the rapid detection of carcinoma, particularly in highly suspected cases that had negative routine biopsy results for malignancy with abnormal serum prostate specific antigen (PSA levels and atypical digital rectal examination.

  2. Prostate cancer antigen 3 test for prostate biopsy decision: a systematic review and meta analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Yong; Gou Xin; Huang Peng; Mou Chan

    2014-01-01

    Background The specificity for early interventions of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in prostate cancer (PCa) is not satisfactory.It is likely that prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) can be used to predict biopsy outcomes more accurately than PSA for the early detection of PCa.We systematically reviewed literatures and subsequently performed a meta-analysis.Methods A bibliographic search in the database of Embase,Medline,Web of Science,NCBI,PubMed,CNKI,and those of health technology assessment agencies published before April 2013 was conducted.The key words used were "prostatic neoplasms","prostate","‘prostate,' ‘carcinoma' or ‘cancer' or ‘tumor',or ‘PCa,'" and free terms of "upm3","pca3","dd3","aptimapca 3",and "prostate cancer antigen 3".All patients were adults.The intervention was detecting PCA3 in urine samples for PCa diagnosis.We checked the quality based on the QUADAS criteria,collected data,and developed a meta-analysis to synthesize results.Twenty-four studies of diagnostic tests with moderate to high quality were selected.Results The sensitivity was between 46.9% and 82.3%; specificity was from 55% to 92%; positive predictive value had a range of 39.0%-86.0%; and the negative predictive value was 61.0%-89.7%.The meta-analysis has heterogeneity between studies.The global sensitivity value was 0.82 (95% Cl 0.72-0.90); specificity was 0.962 (95% Cl 0.73-0.99); positive likelihood ratio was 2.39 (95% Cl 2.10-2.71); negative likelihood ratio was 0.51 (95% Cl 0.46-0.86); diagnostic odds ratio was 4.89 (95% Cl 3.94-6.06); and AUC in SROC curve was 0.744 1.Conclusion PCA3 can be used for early diagnosis of PCa and to avoid unnecessary biopsies.

  3. Endorectal coil MRI and MR-spectroscopic imaging in patients with elevated serum prostate specific antigen with negative trus transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooq Ahmad Ganie

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Prostatic biopsy directed with endorectal coil MRI and MR-spectroscopic imaging findings in patients with elevated serum PSA and prior negative biopsy, improves the early diagnosis of prostatic carcinoma and accurate localization of prostate cancer within the gland.

  4. Sepsis and 'superbugs': should we favour the transperineal over the transrectal approach for prostate biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummet, Jeremy P; Weerakoon, Mahesha; Huang, Sean; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Frydenberg, Mark; Moon, Daniel A; O'Reilly, Mary; Murphy, Declan

    2014-09-01

    To determine the rate of hospital re-admission for sepsis after transperineal (TP) biopsy using both local data and worldwide literature, as there is growing interest in TP biopsy as an alternative to transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided biopsy for patients undergoing repeat prostate biopsy. Pooled prospective databases on TP biopsy from multiple centres in Melbourne were queried for rates of re-admission for infection. A literature review of PubMed and Embase was also conducted using the search terms: 'prostate biopsy, fever, infection, sepsis, septicaemia and complications'. In all, 245 TP biopsies were performed (111 at Alfred Health, 92 at Epworth Healthcare, 38 at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and four at other institutions). The rate of hospital re-admission for infection was zero. The literature review showed that the rate of sepsis after TRUS biopsy appears to be rising with increasing rates of multi-resistant bacteria found in rectal flora, and is as high as 5%. However, the rate of sepsis from published series of TP biopsy approached zero. Both local and international data suggest a negligible rate of sepsis with TP biopsy. This compares to a concerning rise in the rate of sepsis after TRUS biopsy due to the increasing prevalence of multi-resistant bacteria in rectal flora. Although TRUS biopsy is convenient, cheap and quick to perform, we think that TP biopsy should now be offered as an option, not only to patients undergoing repeat prostate biopsy, but to all patients in whom a prostate biopsy is indicated. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  5. Obesity is associated with higher risk of prostate cancer detection in a biopsy population in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Juhyun; Cho, Sung Yong; Lee, Seung Bae; Son, Hwancheol; Jeong, Hyeon

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of obesity on prostate cancer detection, as measured by the body mass index (BMI) in a Korean biopsy population. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 1213 men who underwent transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy at our institution. Biopsy outcomes were analysed with respect to various variables, including patient age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), prostate volume, digital rectal examination (DRE) findings and obesity, defined as BMI ≥25 kg/m(2) , an Asian BMI category. Among 1213 men, 408 (33.6%) were obese and 344 (28.4%) had a positive biopsy. Obese men were younger (65.5 vs 67.1 years, P = 0.003), had a larger prostate (49.2 vs 42.9 mL, P obese men. In the multivariate analysis, obesity was significantly associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer detection in men undergoing biopsy (odds ratio [OR] = 1.446, P = 0.024). In addition, obesity was significantly associated with a higher rate of biopsy-detected high grade (Gleason score ≥4 + 3) disease, and this association remained after multivariate adjustment (OR = 1.498, P = 0.039). Obese men were younger, had a larger prostate, and had less tendency to have an abnormality on DRE than non-obese men. Obesity was associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer detection as an independent factor, including high grade prostate cancer in a Korean biopsy population. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  6. Analysis of Preoperative Detection for Apex Prostate Cancer by Transrectal Biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Tomokazu Sazuka; Takashi Imamoto; Takeshi Namekawa; Takanobu Utsumi; Mitsuru Yanagisawa; Koji Kawamura; Naoto Kamiya; Hiroyoshi Suzuki; Takeshi Ueda; Satoshi Ota; Yukio Nakatani; Tomohiko Ichikawa

    2013-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to determine concordance rates for prostatectomy specimens and transrectal needle biopsy samples in various areas of the prostate in order to assess diagnostic accuracy of the transrectal biopsy approach, especially for presurgical detection of cancer in the prostatic apex. Materials and Methods. From 2006 to 2011, 158 patients whose radical prostatectomy specimens had been evaluated were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Concordance rates for h...

  7. Prostate Biopsy Assistance System with Gland Deformation Estimation for Enhanced Precision

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Michael; Daanen, Vincent; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2009-01-01

    Computer-assisted prostate biopsies became a very active research area during the last years. Prostate tracking makes it possi- ble to overcome several drawbacks of the current standard transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsy procedure, namely the insufficient targeting accuracy which may lead to a biopsy distribution of poor quality, the very approximate knowledge about the actual location of the sampled tissues which makes it difficult to implement focal therapy strategies based on biopsy results, and finally the difficulty to precisely reach non-ultrasound (US) targets stemming from different modalities, statistical atlases or previous biopsy series. The prostate tracking systems presented so far are limited to rigid transformation tracking. However, the gland can get considerably deformed during the intervention because of US probe pres- sure and patient movements. We propose to use 3D US combined with image-based elastic registration to estimate these deformations. A fast elastic registration algorithm that...

  8. Safety of 12 core transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy in patients on aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Vasudeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To prospectively assess safety outcome of TRUS guided prostate biopsy in patients taking low dose aspirin. Materials and methods: Consecutive patients, who were planned for 12 core TRUS guided prostate biopsy and satisfied eligibility criteria, were included in the study and divided into two Groups: Group A: patients on aspirin during biopsy, Group B: patients not on aspirin during biopsy, including patients in whom aspirin was stopped prior to the biopsy. Parameters included for statistical analysis were: age, serum prostate specific antigen (PSA, prostate volume, hemoglobin (Hb %, number of hematuria episodes, number of patient reporting hematuria, hematuria requiring intervention, number of patient reporting hematospermia and number of patient reporting rectal bleeding. Results: Of 681 eligible patients, Group A and B had 191 and 490 patients respectively. The mean age, prostate volume, serum PSA and pre-biopsy hemoglobin were similar in both Groups with no significant differences noted between them. None of the post-biopsy complications, including number of hematuria episodes (p=0.83, number of patients reporting hematuria (p=0.55, number of patients reporting hematospermia (p=0.36 and number of patients reporting rectal bleeding (p=0.65, were significantly different between Groups A and B respectively. None of the hemorrhagic complication in either group required intervention and were self limiting. Conclusion: Continuing low dose aspirin during TRUS guided prostate biopsy neither alters the minor bleeding episodes nor causes major bleeding complication. So, discontinuation of low dose aspirin prior to TRUS guided prostate biopsy is not required.

  9. Our Prostate Biopsy Results in The Patients with Prostate Specific Antigen Levels Below 4 ng/ml

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Aydemir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the re¬sults of prostate biopsy of patients who had the prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels below 4 ng/ml. Material and Method: The medical records of 524 pa¬tients who underwent transrectal prostate biopsy be¬tween January 2010 and February 2013 in our clinic, due to suspi¬cion of prostate cancer were evaluated and histopathologic results of 43 patients whose PSA levels under 4 ng/ml were retrospectively revieved. Results: The mean age of patients was 64.63 ±7:42 and the mean level of PSA was 2.89 ±0.88ng /ml. A digital rectal examination (DRE had suspicious findings in 41(95.34% patients. Prostate adenocarcinoma was determined in 13 of (30.23% patients according to the biopsy result. The mean PSA value of these patients was 2.89 ±0.88 ng/ml and the mean gleason score of these patients was 6.41 ±0.87. The mean prostate volume of these patients was 41.46 ±11.95 cm3. Discussion: In our study, prostate cancer was identified in 30.3% of patients whose PSA levels were below 4 ng/ml. DRE, is still important for the evaluation of the prostate. According to our results, significant number of cancers can be detected in PSA below 4 ng/ml levels.

  10. Optical biopsy of the prostate: can we TRUST (trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled spectral tomography)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Daqing; Jiang, Zhen; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Holyoak, G. Reed; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Rock, Kendra; Ownby, Charlotte L.; Bunting, Charles F.; Slobodov, Gennady

    2011-03-01

    Needle-based core-biopsy to locate prostate cancer relies heavily upon trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging guidance. Ultrasonographic findings of classic hypoechoic peripheral zone lesions have a low specificity of ~28%, a low positive predictive value of ~29%, and an overall accuracy of ~43%, in prostate cancer diagnosis. The prevalence of isoechoic or nearly invisible prostate cancers on ultrasonography ranges from 25 to 42%. As a result, TRUS is useful and convenient to direct the needle trajectory following a systematic biopsy sampling template rather than to target only the potentially malignant lesion for focal-biopsy. To address this deficiency in the first-line of prostate cancer imaging, a trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled spectral tomography (TRUST) approach is being developed to non-invasively resolve the likely optical signatures of prostate malignancy. The approach has evolved from using one NIR wavelength to two NIR bands, and recently to three bands of NIR spectrum information. The concept has been evaluated on one normal canine prostate and three dogs with implanted prostate tumor developed as a model. The initial results implementing TRUST on the canine prostate tumor model includes: (1) quantifying substantially increased total hemoglobin concentration over the time-course of imaging in a rapidly growing prostate tumor; (2) confirming hypoxia in a prostatic cystic lesion; and (3) imaging hypoxic changes of a necrotic prostate tumor. Despite these interesting results, intensive technologic development is necessary for translating the approach to benefiting clinical practice, wherein the ultimate utility is not possibly to eliminate needle-biopsy but to perform focal-biopsy that is only necessary to confirm the cancer, as well as to monitor and predict treatment responses.

  11. Addressing the need for repeat prostate biopsy: new technology and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blute, Michael L; Abel, E Jason; Downs, Tracy M; Kelcz, Frederick; Jarrard, David F

    2015-08-01

    No guidelines currently exist that address the need for rebiopsy in patients with a negative diagnosis of prostate cancer on initial biopsy sample analysis. Accurate diagnosis of prostate cancer in these patients is often complicated by continued elevation of serum PSA levels that are suggestive of prostate cancer, resulting in a distinct management challenge. Following negative initial findings of biopsy sample analysis, total serum PSA levels and serum PSA kinetics are ineffective indicators of a need for a repeat biopsy; therefore, patients suspected of having prostate cancer might undergo several unnecessary biopsy procedures. Several alternative strategies exist for identifying men who might be at risk of prostate cancer despite negative findings of biopsy sample analysis. Use of other serum PSA-related measurements enables more sensitive and specific diagnosis and can be combined with knowledge of clinicopathological features to improve outcomes. Other options include the FDA-approved Progensa(®) test and prostate imaging using MRI. Newer tissue-based assays that measure methylation changes in normal prostate tissue are currently being developed. A cost-effective strategy is proposed in order to address this challenging clinical scenario, and potential directions of future studies in this area are also described.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided biopsies may improve diagnosis in biopsy-naive men with suspicion of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Mads Dochedahl; Balslev, Ingegerd; Boesen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate whether a short prostate biparametric magnetic resonance imaging (bp-MRI) protocol provides a valuable diagnostic addition for biopsy guidance in biopsy-naive men with a suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). METHODS: A total of 62...... underwent TRUS-bx followed by bp-MRI-guided biopsies (bp-MRI-bx) under MRI/TRUS image fusion from any bp-MRI suspicious lesions not obviously targeted by TRUS-bx. RESULTS: PCa was found in 42 (68%) and 32 (52%) patients by TRUS-bx and bp-MRI-bx, respectively. Bp-MRI-bx de-tected PCa in one patient who had...

  13. Extended biopsy based criteria incorporating cumulative cancer length for predicting clinically insignificant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Yoshinobu; Kawakami, Satoru; Numao, Noboru; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Saito, Kazutaka; Kubo, Yuichi; Koga, Fumitaka; Kumagai, Jiro; Yamamoto, Shinya; Yonese, Junji; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Fukui, Iwao; Kihara, Kazunori

    2012-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The criteria used for selecting patients with prostate cancer for active surveillance (AS) are still not satisfactory due to the difficulty in predicting the significance of the prostate cancer. Urologists could predict insignificant prostate cancer by incorporating cumulative cancer length and biopsy Gleason score, derived from extended biopsy. The present study has added new criteria for predicting insignificant prostate cancer, which would lead to a better selection of candidates for AS. • To develop extended biopsy based criteria for predicting insignificant cancer (IC) using extended biopsy findings. • From 2000 to 2009, 1575 patients with prostate cancer were primarily treated by radical prostatectomy in two referral hospitals. • Of these, the study cohort comprised 499 patients with extended biopsy confirmed, clinically organ-confined (cT1-2N0M0) prostate cancer with PSA levels of ISUP) modified biopsy Gleason score ≤ 7. • Accordingly, we analysed predictors of IC in a subset cohort of 370 patients in this category. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that 2005 ISUP modified biopsy Gleason score and CCL/core were independently significant predictors of IC. • We determined a threshold value of CCL/core of 0.20 mm for predicting IC using receiver operating characteristic analysis. • Based on these findings, we developed simple extended biopsy based criteria for predicting IC as follows: (i) PSA level of ISUP modified biopsy Gleason score ≤ 6; (iv) CCL/core of ISUP modified biopsy Gleason score and CCL/core. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2012 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  14. Prostate biopsy with image fusion: system validation and clinical results (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruecker, J.; Kadoury, S.; Xu, S.; Turkbey, B.; Choyke, P.; Pinto, P.; Wood, B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Prostate cancer (PCA) is the second most frequent cause of cancer-related death in men in the United States and Europe. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided systematic prostate biopsy is the standard of care for detection and diagnosis of PCA. However, due to inadequate visualization of PCA

  15. Is it possible to predict low-volume and insignificant prostate cancer by core needle biopsies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Toft, Birgitte Grønkaer; Røder, Martin Andreas;

    2013-01-01

    M: tumour ≤5% of total prostate volume and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤10 ng/mL. In all definitions, Gleason score (GS) was ≤6 and the tumour was organ confined. Biopsies alone performed poorly as a predictor of unifocal and unilateral cancer in the prostatectomy specimens with positive predictive...

  16. Feasibility of a 2nd generation MR-compatible manipulator for transrectal prostate biopsy guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bomers, J.G.R.; Bosboom, D.G.H.; Tigelaar, G.H.; Sabisch, J.; Futterer, J.J.; Yakar, D.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility of a 2nd generation MR-compatible, remote-controlled manipulator (RCM) as an aid to perform MR-guided transrectal prostate biopsy in males with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). METHODS: This prospective phase I study was approved by the local ethical

  17. Selective detection of histologically aggressive prostate cancer: an Early Detection Research Network Prediction model to reduce unnecessary prostate biopsies with validation in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen B; Salami, Simpa; Regan, Meredith M; Ankerst, Donna P; Wei, John T; Rubin, Mark A; Thompson, Ian M; Sanda, Martin G

    2012-05-15

    Limited survival benefit and excess treatment because of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in randomized trials suggests a need for more restricted selection of prostate biopsy candidates by discerning risk of histologically aggressive versus indolent cancer before biopsy. Subjects undergoing first prostate biopsy enrolled in a multicenter, prospective cohort of the National Cancer Institute Early Detection Research Network (N = 635) were analyzed to develop a model for predicting histologically aggressive prostate cancers. The control arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (N = 3833) was used to validate the generalization of the predictive model. The Early Detection Research Network cohort was comprised of men among whom 57% had no cancer, 14% had indolent cancer, and 29% had aggressive cancer. Age, body mass index, family history of prostate cancer, abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE), and PSA density (PSAD) were associated with aggressive cancer (all P cancer (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.81 vs 0.71, P Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial cohort accurately identified men at low (cancer for whom biopsy could be averted (AUC = 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.80). Under criteria from the Early Detection Research Network model, prostate biopsy can be restricted to men with PSAD >0.1 ng/mL/cc or abnormal DRE. When PSAD is obesity can identify biopsy candidates. A predictive model incorporating age, family history, obesity, PSAD, and DRE elucidates criteria whereby ¼ of prostate biopsies can be averted while retaining high sensitivity in detecting aggressive prostate cancer. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  18. [Transrectal biopsy scheme can predict incorrect histological grading in prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Morales, M L; Fernández-Ramos, J; Pérez-Méndez, L; Alventosa-Fernández, E; Pastor-Santoveña, M S; Aguirre-Jaime, A

    2014-01-01

    To identify factors that might explain why a prostate with a Gleason score (GS) <7 in the biopsy specimen can turn out to have a GS ≥7 in the surgical specimen. We compared the GS of biopsy specimens with the GS of surgical specimens in 185 patients who underwent surgery for prostate cancer. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values for the GS of the biopsy specimens. We used Cohen's kappa to determine the degree of concordance between a GS of <7 and ≥7 for the biopsy specimen and the surgical specimen. Age, a family history of prostate cancer, total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA), digital rectal examination, prostate structure and volume, and the number of biopsy cores (biopsy scheme) were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Histological study of biopsy specimens yielded high sensitivity (98%) but low specificity (49%) for GS ≤6 and low sensitivity (35, 26%) and high specificity (93, 99%) for GS=7 and GS ≥7, respectively. Cohen's kappa for the GS from the biopsy and surgical specimens was 0.43 (95% CI=30-56%). The biopsy scheme was the only predictor of discordance in the GS between the two techniques. Among the other variables included in the model, only tPSA showed a slightly significant association. Taking a scheme with less than 7 cores as a reference, we found no difference with 8 to 9 cores but we did find a difference with 10 to 11 cores and with 12 or more cores, with a prevalence ratio of 0.138 (95% CI=0.030-0.513) and 0.277 (95% CI=0.091-0.806), respectively. The GS of the biopsy depends on the scheme. This factor must be taken into account when choosing a treatment option in patients with low tumor grade in biopsy specimens. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Cancer detection rates of different prostate biopsy regimens in patients with renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoşcan, Mustafa Burak; Özorak, Alper; Oksay, Taylan; Perk, Hakkı; Armağan, Abdullah; Soyupek, Sedat; Serel, Tekin Ahmet; Koşar, Alim

    2014-07-01

    We aimed to evaluate the cancer detection rates of 6-, 10-, 12-core biopsy regimens and the optimal biopsy protocol for prostate cancer diagnosis in patients with renal failure. A total of 122 consecutive patients with renal failure underwent biopsy with age-specific prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels up to 20 ng/mL. The 12-core biopsy technique (sextant biopsy + lateral base, lateral mid-zone, lateral apex, bilaterally) performed to all patients. Pathology results were examined separately for each sextant, 10-core that exclude parasagittal mid-zones from 12-cores (10a), 10-core that exclude apex zones from 12-cores (10b) and 12-core biopsy regimens. Of 122 patients, 37 (30.3%) were positive for prostate cancer. The cancer detection rates for sextant, 10a, 10b and 12 cores were 17.2%, 29%, 23.7% and 30.7%, respectively. Biopsy techniques of 10a, 10b and 12 cores increased the cancer detection rates by 40%, 27.5% and 43.2% among the sextant technique, respectively. Biopsy techniques of 10a and 12 cores increased the cancer detection rates by 17.1% and 21.6% among 10b biopsy technique, respectively. There were no statistical differences between 12 core and 10a core about cancer detection rate. Adding lateral cores to sextant biopsy improves the cancer detection rates. In our study, 12-core biopsy technique increases the cancer detection rate by 5.4% among 10a core but that was not statistically different. On the other hand, 12-core biopsy technique includes all biopsy regimens. We therefore suggest 12-core biopsy or minimum 10-core strategy incorporating six peripheral biopsies with elevated age- specific PSA levels up to 20 ng/mL in patients with renal failure.

  20. Sonoelastography of the prostate: comparison with systematic biopsy findings in 492 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallwein, Leo; Mitterberger, Michael; Pinggera, Germar; Aigner, Friedrich; Pedross, Florian; Gradl, Johann; Pelzer, Alexandre; Bartsch, Georg; Frauscher, Ferdinand

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of sonoelastography (SE) for prostate cancer detection in comparison with systematic biopsy findings. Four hundred and ninety two PSA screening volunteers (mean age: 61.9+/-8.6) with an total PSA >1.25 ng/mL and a free to total PSA ration of prostate before 10 core systematic prostate biopsy. Tissue elasticity of the peripheral zone was investigated only. Tissue elasticity was displayed from red (soft) to green (intermediate) and to blue (hard). Only hard lesions (blue) were considered to be suspicious for prostate cancer. The peripheral zone of the prostate was divided in 3 regions on each side: base, mid-gland, apex. A different investigator performed systematic biopsy, and the biopsy findings were compared with the SE findings. In 125 of 492 patients (25.4%) systematic biopsy demonstrated prostate cancer. Cancer was detected in 321 of 2952 (11%) outer gland areas (74 in the base, 106 in the mid-gland, 141 in the apex). The Gleason score ranged from 3 to 10 (mean: 6.5). In SE 533 of 2952 (18.1%) suspicious areas were detected and 258 of these areas (48.4%) showed cancer. Most of the false-positive findings (275/533 areas; 51.6%) were associated with chronic inflammation and atrophy especially at the basal prostate areas. The sensitivity by entire organ was calculated with 86% and the specificity 72%. The analysis by outer gland areas showed the highest sensitivity in the apex (79%). The specificity by outer gland areas ranged between 85% and 93%. The correlation between SE findings and biopsy results was high (pstiffness of the prostate and may therefore improve prostate cancer detection.

  1. MR-Guided Biopsy of the Prostate: An Overview of Techniques and a Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pondman, Kirsten M.; Fütterer, Jurgen J.; ten Haken, Bernard; Schultze Kool, Leo J.; Witjes, J. Alfred; Hambrock, Thomas; Macura, Katarzyna J.; Barentsz, Jelle O.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Systematic transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy (TRUSBx) is the gold standard for detecting prostate cancer. This systematic approach is characterized by low sensitivity (39–52%) and high specificity (81–82%). Magnetic resonance (MR)–guided biopsy techniques are becoming more and more

  2. Optimizing Performance and Interpretation of Prostate Biopsy : A Critical Analysis of the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chun, Felix K. -H.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Freedland, Stephen J.; Montironi, Rodolfo; Montorsi, Francesco; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Schroder, Fritz H.; Scattoni, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Context: The number and location of biopsy cores and the interpretation of prostate biopsy in different clinical settings remain the subjects of continuing debate. Objective: Our aim was to review the current evidence regarding the performance and interpretation of initial, repeat, and saturation pr

  3. Optimizing Performance and Interpretation of Prostate Biopsy : A Critical Analysis of the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chun, Felix K. -H.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Freedland, Stephen J.; Montironi, Rodolfo; Montorsi, Francesco; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Schroder, Fritz H.; Scattoni, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Context: The number and location of biopsy cores and the interpretation of prostate biopsy in different clinical settings remain the subjects of continuing debate. Objective: Our aim was to review the current evidence regarding the performance and interpretation of initial, repeat, and saturation pr

  4. MR-Guided Biopsy of the Prostate: An Overview of Techniques and a Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pondman, Kirsten M.; Fütterer, Jurgen J.; ten Haken, Bernard; Schultze Kool, Leo J.; Witjes, J. Alfred; Hambrock, Thomas; Macura, Katarzyna J.; Barentsz, Jelle O.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Systematic transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy (TRUSBx) is the gold standard for detecting prostate cancer. This systematic approach is characterized by low sensitivity (39–52%) and high specificity (81–82%). Magnetic resonance (MR)–guided biopsy techniques are becoming more and more avail

  5. Fluoroquinolone resistant rectal colonization predicts risk of infectious complications after transrectal prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Michael A; Taylor, Stephen A; Batura, Deepak; Steensels, Deborah; Chayakulkeeree, Methee; Soenens, Charlotte; Rao, G Gopal; Dash, Atreya; Park, Samuel; Patel, Nishant; Woo, Jason; McDonald, Michelle; Nseyo, Unwanaobong; Banapour, Pooya; Unterberg, Stephen; Ahlering, Thomas E; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Sakamoto, Kyoko; Fierer, Joshua; Black, Peter C

    2014-12-01

    Infection after transrectal prostate biopsy has become an increasing concern due to fluoroquinolone resistant bacteria. We determined whether colonization identified by rectal culture can identify men at high risk for post-transrectal prostate biopsy infection. Six institutions provided retrospective data through a standardized, web based data entry form on patients undergoing transrectal prostate biopsy who had rectal culture performed. The primary outcome was any post-transrectal prostate biopsy infection and the secondary outcome was hospital admission 30 days after transrectal prostate biopsy. We used chi-square and logistic regression statistical analysis. A total of 2,673 men underwent rectal culture before transrectal prostate biopsy from January 1, 2007 to September 12, 2013. The prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance was 20.5% (549 of 2,673). Fluoroquinolone resistant positive rectal cultures were associated with post-biopsy infection (6.6% vs 1.6%, p Fluoroquinolone resistant positive rectal culture increased the risk of infection (OR 3.98, 95% CI 2.37-6.71, p fluoroquinolone prophylaxis, the infection and hospitalization proportion increased to 8.2% (28 of 343) and 6.1% (21 of 343), with OR 4.77 (95% CI 2.50-9.10, p fluoroquinolone resistant bacteria isolates were Escherichia coli (83.7%). Limitations include the retrospective study design, nonstandardized culture and interpretation of resistance methods. Colonization of fluoroquinolone resistant organisms in the rectum identifies men at high risk for infection and subsequent hospitalization from prostate biopsy, especially in those with fluoroquinolone prophylaxis only. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transperineal prostate biopsy with ECHO-MRI fusion. Biopsee system. Initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Selas, E; Cuadros, V; Montáns, J; Sánchez, E; López-Alcorocho, J M; Gómez-Sancha, F

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to present our initial experience with the stereotactic echo-MRI fusion system for diagnosing prostate cancer. Between September 2014 and January 2015, we performed 50 prostate biopsies using the stereotactic echo-MRI fusion system. The 3-Tesla multiparameter MR images were superimposed using this image fusion system on 3D echo images obtained with the Biopsee system for the exact locating of areas suspected of prostate cancer. The lesions were classified using the Prostate Imaging Report and Date System. We assessed a total of 50 patients, with a mean age of 63 years (range, 45-79), a mean prostate-specific antigen level of 8 ng/mL (range, 1.9-20) and a mean prostate volume of 52mL (range, 12-118). Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 69% of the patients and intraepithelial neoplasia in 6%. The results of the biopsy were negative for 24% of the patients. The results of the biopsy and MRI were in agreement for 62% of the patients; however, 46% also had a tumour outside of the suspicious lesion. We diagnosed 46% anterior tumours and 33% apical tumours. One patient had a haematuria, another had a haematoma and a third had acute urine retention. Multiparametric prostatic MRI helps identify prostate lesions suggestive of cancer. The Biopsee echo-MRI fusion system provides for guided biopsy and increases the diagnostic performance, reducing the false negatives of classical biopsies and increasing the diagnosis of anterior tumours. Transperineal access minimises the risk of prostatic infection and sepsis. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Adaptation of a 3D prostate cancer atlas for transrectal ultrasound guided target-specific biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanan, R; Suri, J S [Eigen Inc, Grass Valley, CA (United States); Werahera, P N; Barqawi, A; Crawford, E D [University of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States); Shinohara, K [University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Simoneau, A R [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)], E-mail: jas.suri@eigen.com

    2008-10-21

    Due to lack of imaging modalities to identify prostate cancer in vivo, current TRUS guided prostate biopsies are taken randomly. Consequently, many important cancers are missed during initial biopsies. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential clinical utility of a high-speed registration algorithm for a 3D prostate cancer atlas. This 3D prostate cancer atlas provides voxel-level likelihood of cancer and optimized biopsy locations on a template space (Zhan et al 2007). The atlas was constructed from 158 expert annotated, 3D reconstructed radical prostatectomy specimens outlined for cancers (Shen et al 2004). For successful clinical implementation, the prostate atlas needs to be registered to each patient's TRUS image with high registration accuracy in a time-efficient manner. This is implemented in a two-step procedure, the segmentation of the prostate gland from a patient's TRUS image followed by the registration of the prostate atlas. We have developed a fast registration algorithm suitable for clinical applications of this prostate cancer atlas. The registration algorithm was implemented on a graphical processing unit (GPU) to meet the critical processing speed requirements for atlas guided biopsy. A color overlay of the atlas superposed on the TRUS image was presented to help pick statistically likely regions known to harbor cancer. We validated our fast registration algorithm using computer simulations of two optimized 7- and 12-core biopsy protocols to maximize the overall detection rate. Using a GPU, patient's TRUS image segmentation and atlas registration took less than 12 s. The prostate cancer atlas guided 7- and 12-core biopsy protocols had cancer detection rates of 84.81% and 89.87% respectively when validated on the same set of data. Whereas the sextant biopsy approach without the utility of 3D cancer atlas detected only 70.5% of the cancers using the same histology data. We estimate 10-20% increase in prostate cancer

  8. The PICTURE study: diagnostic accuracy of multiparametric MRI in men requiring a repeat prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Lucy A M; Kanthabalan, Abi; Arya, Manit; Briggs, Tim; Barratt, Dean; Charman, Susan C; Freeman, Alex; Gelister, James; Hawkes, David; Hu, Yipeng; Jameson, Charles; McCartan, Neil; Moore, Caroline M; Punwani, Shonit; Ramachandran, Navin; van der Meulen, Jan; Emberton, Mark; Ahmed, Hashim U

    2017-04-25

    Transrectal prostate biopsy has limited diagnostic accuracy. Prostate Imaging Compared to Transperineal Ultrasound-guided biopsy for significant prostate cancer Risk Evaluation (PICTURE) was a paired-cohort confirmatory study designed to assess diagnostic accuracy of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) in men requiring a repeat biopsy. All underwent 3 T mpMRI and transperineal template prostate mapping biopsies (TTPM biopsies). Multiparametric MRI was reported using Likert scores and radiologists were blinded to initial biopsies. Men were blinded to mpMRI results. Clinically significant prostate cancer was defined as Gleason ⩾4+3 and/or cancer core length ⩾6 mm. Two hundred and forty-nine had both tests with mean (s.d.) age was 62 (7) years, median (IQR) PSA 6.8 ng ml (4.98-9.50), median (IQR) number of previous biopsies 1 (1-2) and mean (s.d.) gland size 37 ml (15.5). On TTPM biopsies, 103 (41%) had clinically significant prostate cancer. Two hundred and fourteen (86%) had a positive prostate mpMRI using Likert score ⩾3; sensitivity was 97.1% (95% confidence interval (CI): 92-99), specificity 21.9% (15.5-29.5), negative predictive value (NPV) 91.4% (76.9-98.1) and positive predictive value (PPV) 46.7% (35.2-47.8). One hundred and twenty-nine (51.8%) had a positive mpMRI using Likert score ⩾4; sensitivity was 80.6% (71.6-87.7), specificity 68.5% (60.3-75.9), NPV 83.3% (75.4-89.5) and PPV 64.3% (55.4-72.6). In men advised to have a repeat prostate biopsy, prostate mpMRI could be used to safely avoid a repeat biopsy with high sensitivity for clinically significant cancers. However, such a strategy can miss some significant cancers and overdiagnose insignificant cancers depending on the mpMRI score threshold used to define which men should be biopsied.

  9. [Use of Eductyl(®) suppository for rectal preparation before prostate biopsy: an observational survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, P; Bruce, W; Janelle, D; Perier, R; Poussot, D; Richeboeuf, B; Vigouroux, V; Savarieau, B; Cargill, G; Davody, A-P

    2012-03-01

    Local preparation of rectum governs the possibly survenue of complications during transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies of prostate. To determine the efficacy and acceptability of rectal preparation (Eductyl(®) suppository) in patients undergoing a transrectal prostate biopsy. From May to August 2005, eight urologists (Bel-Air Urological Center, Bordeaux) included 137 patients (mean age 66.4 years) with an indication of prostate biopsies. All patients were administrated prophylactic antibiotic therapy. They used Eductyl(®) effervescent suppositories for local preparation, the day before and/or the morning of the exam. Rectal vacuity was satisfactory or very satisfactory for 99% of patients. Introduction of probe and tracking of prostate were easy or very easy in 99% of cases. Eight days after the exam, only 35% of patients had suffered anal or rectal pain during a mean of 2 days. Most of patients recovered bowel function without requiring treatment and without any difficulty or pain. The bowel function recovery occurred the day of prostate biopsy and the day after for 28.4% and 62.2% of patients, respectively. Urologists considered that the use of Eductyl(®) suppositories before prostate biopsies ensured a satisfactory rectal preparation and optimal conditions for the exam. Moreover, this preparation was well accepted by patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. THE PROGNOSTIC AND DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF REPEATED TRANSRECTAL PROSTATE SATURATION BIOPSY

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    M. A. Kurdzhiev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the rate of prostate cancer (PC development after repeated transrectal saturation prostate biopsy (RTRSPB, to study the characteristics of diagnosed tumors, and to estimate their clinical significance from the data of radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP.Materials and methods. The results of RTRSPB were analyzed in 226 patients with a later evaluation of a tumor from the results of RRP. All the patients underwent at least 2 prostate biopsies (mean 2.4. The average number of biopsy cores was 26.7 (range 24—30. The average value of total prostate-specific antigen before saturation biopsy was 7.5 (range 7.5 to 28.6 ng/ml. The mean age of patients was 62 years (range 53 to 70.  Results. PC was diagnosed in 14.6% of cases (33/226. An isolated lesion of the prostatic transition zone was in 12.1% of cases. If this zone had been excluded from the biopsy scheme, the detection rate of PC during saturation biopsy should be reduced by 13.8%. Better PC detectability during repeated saturation biopsy generally occurred due to the localized forms of the disease (93.3%. The agreement of Gleason tumor grading in the biopsy and prostatectomy specimens was noted in 66.7% of cases.Conclusion. Saturation biopsy allows prediction of a pathological stage of PC, Gleason grade of a tumor and its site localization with a greater probability. Most tumors detectable by saturation biopsy were clinically significant, which makes it possible to recommend RTRSPB to some cohort of high PC-risk patients 

  11. Analysis of Preoperative Detection for Apex Prostate Cancer by Transrectal Biopsy

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    Tomokazu Sazuka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to determine concordance rates for prostatectomy specimens and transrectal needle biopsy samples in various areas of the prostate in order to assess diagnostic accuracy of the transrectal biopsy approach, especially for presurgical detection of cancer in the prostatic apex. Materials and Methods. From 2006 to 2011, 158 patients whose radical prostatectomy specimens had been evaluated were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Concordance rates for histopathology results of prostatectomy specimens and needle biopsy samples were evaluated in 8 prostatic sections (apex, middle, base, and transitional zones bilaterally from 73 patients diagnosed at this institution, besides factors for detecting apex cancer in total 118 true positive and false negative apex cancers. Results. Prostate cancer was found most frequently (85% in the apex of all patients. Of 584 histopathology sections, 153 (49% from all areas were false negatives, as were 45% of apex biopsy samples. No readily available preoperative factors for detecting apex cancer were identified. Conclusions. In Japanese patients, the most frequent location of prostate cancer is in the apex. There is a high false negative rate for transrectal biopsy samples. To improve the detection rate, transperitoneal biopsy or more accurate imaging technology is needed.

  12. Short-term prophylaxis with ciprofloxacin in extended 16-core prostate biopsy

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    Renato Caretta Chambó

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the safety, efficacy and possible complications of 16-core transrectal prostate biopsies using two doses of ciprofloxacin for prophylaxis of infectious complications. Materials and Methods Sixteen-core prostate biopsies were performed on a number of patients with different signs of potential prostate cancer. Complications were assessed both during the procedure and one week later. After the procedure, urine samples were collected for culture. The rate of post-biopsy complications, hospital visits and hospitalizations were also analyzed. Ciprofloxacin (500 mg was administered two hours before, and eight hours after the procedure. Results The overall rate of post-biopsy complications was 87.32%, being 5.4% of those considered major complications due to hemorrhage, or to urinary retention. Eight patients required hospital treatment post-biopsy. Fever occurred in just one patient (0.29%. There was no incidence of orchitis, epididymitis, prostatitis, septicemia, hospitalization, or death. The urine culture showed positive results in five patients (2.15%. Conclusion One-day prophylaxis with ciprofloxacin proved to be safe and effective in the prevention of infectious complications following 16-core prostate biopsies.

  13. Impact of obesity on the predictive accuracy of prostate-specific antigen density and prostate-specific antigen in native Korean men undergoing prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Heon; Doo, Seung Whan; Yang, Won Jae; Lee, Kwang Woo; Lee, Chang Ho; Song, Yun Seob; Jeon, Yoon Su; Kim, Min Eui; Kwon, Soon-Sun

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of obesity on the biopsy detection of prostate cancer. We retrospectively reviewed data of 1182 consecutive Korean patients (≥50 years) with serum prostate-specific antigen levels of 3-10 ng/mL who underwent initial extended 12-cores biopsy from September 2009 to March 2013. Patients who took medications that were likely to influence the prostate-specific antigen level were excluded. Receiver operating characteristic curves were plotted for prostate-specific antigen and prostate-specific antigen density predicting cancer status among non-obese and obese men. A total of 1062 patients (mean age 67.1 years) were enrolled in the analysis. A total of 230 men (21.7%) had a positive biopsy. In the overall study sample, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of serum prostate-specific antigen for predicting prostate cancer on biopsy were 0.584 and 0.633 for non-obese and obese men, respectively (P = 0.234). However, the area under the curve for prostate-specific antigen density in predicting cancer status showed a significant difference (non-obese 0.696, obese 0.784; P = 0.017). There seems to be a significant difference in the ability of prostate-specific antigen density to predict biopsy results between non-obese and obese men. Obesity positively influenced the overall ability of prostate-specific antigen density to predict prostate cancer. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  14. Clinicopathologic characteristics of anterior prostate cancer (APC), including correlation with previous biopsy pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magers, Martin J; Zhan, Tianyu; Udager, Aaron M; Wei, John T; Tomlins, Scott A; Wu, Angela J; Kunju, Lakshmi P; Lew, Madelyn; Feng, Felix Y; Hamstra, Daniel A; Siddiqui, Javed; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Montgomery, Jeffrey S; Weizer, Alon Z; Morgan, Todd M; Hollenbeck, Brent K; Miller, David C; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Jiang, Hui; Mehra, Rohit

    2015-11-01

    Anterior-predominant prostate cancer (APC) is an incompletely understood entity which can be difficult to sample via transrectal biopsy. Seemingly favorable biopsy results may belie the potential aggressiveness of these tumors. Here, we attempt to characterize APC by retrospectively examining the clinicopathologic features of APC at radical prostatectomy and comparing our findings with prior biopsy information. We found that 17.4 % of patients in our study had APC. APC demonstrated a significantly lower (P value biopsy than non-transperineal saturation (i.e., transrectal ultrasound guided) biopsy strategies. Four patients (7 %) without transperineal saturation biopsy exhibited a significantly worse GS at RP than biopsy, compared to five patients (36 %) with transperineal saturation biopsy. Our findings corroborate the difficulty in detecting APC and suggest that APC is not a uniform disease with a wholly indolent phenotype. Dedicated long-term outcome data are needed in these patients. Additionally, alternative pathologic staging parameters may be necessary.

  15. The diagnostic ability of an additional midline peripheral zone biopsy in transrectal ultrasonography-guided 12-core prostate biopsy to detect midline prostate cancer

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    Inpyeong Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic effect of adding a midline peripheral zone (PZ biopsy to the 12-core biopsy protocol used to diagnose prostate cancer (PC, and to assess the clinical and pathologic characteristics of midline-positive PC in order to identify a potential subgroup of patients who would require midline PZ biopsy. Methods: This study included 741 consecutive patients who underwent a transrectal ultrasonography-guided, 12-core prostate biopsy with an additional midline core biopsy between October 2012 and December 2013. We grouped patients by the presence or absence of PC and subdivided patients with PC based on the involvement of the midline core. The clinical characteristics of these groups were compared, including serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA concentrations, PSA density, and pathological features in the biopsy specimens. Results: PC was detected in 289 patients (39.0%. Among the PC patients, 66 patients (22.8% had midline PC. No patients were diagnosed with PC based only on a midline core. The Gleason scores, number of positive cores, tumor core length, serum PSA concentrations, and PSA density were significantly higher in patients with midline-positive PC (P<0.001. Furthermore, significant cancer was more frequent in the midline-positive group (98.5% vs. 78.0%. Conclusion: Patients showing a positive result for PC in a midline PZ biopsy were more likely to have multiple tumors or large-volume PC with a high tumor burden. However, our data indicated that an additional midline core biopsy is unlikely to be helpful in detecting occult midline PC.

  16. The diagnostic ability of an additional midline peripheral zone biopsy in transrectal ultrasonography-guided 12-core prostate biopsy to detect midline prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, In Pyeong; Kim, Sang Youn; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Myoung Seok; Kim, Seung Hyup [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic effect of adding a midline peripheral zone (PZ) biopsy to the 12-core biopsy protocol used to diagnose prostate cancer (PC), and to assess the clinical and pathologic characteristics of midline-positive PC in order to identify a potential subgroup of patients who would require midline PZ biopsy. This study included 741 consecutive patients who underwent a transrectal ultrasonography-guided, 12-core prostate biopsy with an additional midline core biopsy between October 2012 and December 2013. We grouped patients by the presence or absence of PC and subdivided patients with PC based on the involvement of the midline core. The clinical characteristics of these groups were compared, including serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentrations, PSA density, and pathological features in the biopsy specimens. PC was detected in 289 patients (39.0%). Among the PC patients, 66 patients (22.8%) had midline PC. No patients were diagnosed with PC based only on a midline core. The Gleason scores, number of positive cores, tumor core length, serum PSA concentrations, and PSA density were significantly higher in patients with midline-positive PC (P<0.001). Furthermore, significant cancer was more frequent in the midline-positive group (98.5% vs. 78.0%). Patients showing a positive result for PC in a midline PZ biopsy were more likely to have multiple tumors or large-volume PC with a high tumor burden. However, our data indicated that an additional midline core biopsy is unlikely to be helpful in detecting occult midline PC.

  17. Inflammatory changes in biopsy specimens from patients with suspected prostate cancer

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    Zbigniew Wolski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Prostate cancer (PCa is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in elderly men, and accounts for 30% of all newly diagnosed cases of cancer. The development of the ‘clinically insignificant’ prostate cancer into its invasive form is still unclear, and it is believed that chronic inflammation may play its role, as proposed by De Marzo in 1999. However, there is no clear opinion on the subject of existence of dependencies between changes of the inflammatory type and PCa.Material and methods. The study involved 1,010 men, suspected of prostate cancer development by positive digital rectal examination (DRE and/or elevated PSA value. The 10 cores, TRUS guided biopsy was performed. In those with ASAP, HG–PIN or inflammation the second biopsy was proposed.Results. In the first biopsy PCa was diagnosed in 336 patients (33.27%. ASAP was found in 58 (5.74%, HG–PIN in 82 (8.11%, and the coexistence of both was found in 19 (1.88%. Chronic prostatitis was diagnosed in 101 (10% men. Of those who underwent second biopsy, PCa was diagnosed in six of 19 patients (31.57% who were diagnosed with HG–PIN in the first biopsy, in four of 40 (10% with BPH in the first biopsy, in four of 18 (22.22% with ASAP or LG–PIN together with ASAP, and in two out of five (40% with the coexistence of ASAP and HG–PIN. Malignancy was not confirmed in any of the patients in whom the diagnosis of BPH, HG–PIN, or ASAP was accompanied by chronic prostatitis.Conclusions. Chronic prostatitis does not significantly increase the value of PSA in patients with benign changes (BPH. The presence of prostatitis in the first biopsy did not predict cancer in subsequent biopsy, because the second biopsy did not reveal prostate cancer in any of the patients in whom prostatitis was diagnosed in the first biopsy.

  18. Should Hypoechoic Lesions on Transrectal Ultrasound Be Sampled During Magnetic Resonance Imaging-targeted Prostate Biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Nabeel A; Siddiqui, M Minhaj; George, Arvin K; Kongnyuy, Michael; Ho, Richard; Fascelli, Michele; Merino, Maria J; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    To determine whether supplemental biopsy of hypoechoic ultrasound lesions (HUL) incidentally found during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) fusion-targeted prostate biopsy results in improved prostate cancer (PCa) detection. Patients underwent MRI-TRUS-targeted biopsy as part of an ongoing prospective trial from August 2007 to February 2015. For men with HUL, the biopsy pathology of HUL and MRI lesions was classified according to the updated 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading system. The detection of PCa by MRI-targeted biopsy with and without HUL biopsy was compared. Of 1260 men in the trial, 106 underwent biopsy of 119 HULs. PCa was diagnosed in 52 out of 106 men (49%) by biopsy of either MRI lesions or HUL. Biopsy of HUL in addition to MRI lesions resulted in 4 additional diagnoses of high-grade (ISUP grades 3-5) PCa versus biopsy of MRI lesions alone (20 vs 16 men, P = .046). Three of these cases were upgraded from lower grade (ISUP grades 1-2) PCa on MRI-guided biopsy alone, and only 1 case (1% of cohort) was diagnosed that would have been missed by MRI-guided biopsy alone. Supplemental biopsy of HUL did not change the PCa risk category in 96% (102 out of 106) of men with HUL. Supplemental biopsy of HUL yields a small increase in the detection of higher grade PCa as compared with biopsy of MRI lesions alone. As upgrading is rare, routinely screening for HUL during MRI-targeted biopsy remains controversial. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Targeted prostate biopsy: value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in detection of localized cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Jesse D; Huang, Jiaoti; Marks, Leonard S

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men, with 1.1 million new cases worldwide reported by the World Health Organization in one recent year. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy has been used for the diagnosis of prostate cancer for over 2 decades, but the technique is usually blind to cancer location. Moreover, the false negative rate of TRUS biopsy has been reported to be as high as 47%. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) includes T1- and T2-weighted imaging as well as dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). mp-MRI is a major advance in the imaging of prostate cancer, enabling targeted biopsy of suspicious lesions. Evolving targeted biopsy techniques—including direct in-bore biopsy, cognitive fusion and software-based MRI-ultrasound (MRI-US) fusion—have led to a several-fold improvement in cancer detection compared to the earlier method. Importantly, the detection of clinically significant cancers has been greatly facilitated by targeting, compared to systematic biopsy alone. Targeted biopsy via MRI-US fusion may dramatically alter the way prostate cancer is diagnosed and managed. PMID:24589455

  20. Dissemination of tuberculosis after biopsy of primary tubercular prostate: a case report

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    Onkar Jha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Only 15-20% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB has been attributed to TB of the urogenital system and often Results from haematogenous spread from an active site of infection. Isolated involvement of prostate by TB is relatively less common. The incidence of primary prostatic TB is unknown and in its truest sense is a very rare entity. Here, we report the case of a patient with primary prostatic TB who was misdiagnosed as nonspecific granulomatous inflammation on transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate, who later presented to our centre after 4 months with disseminated TB. The rarity of the case prompted us to report this case.

  1. Biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Biopsies - Overview A biopsy is the removal of tissue ... What are the limitations of biopsies? What are biopsies? A biopsy is the removal of tissue in ...

  2. Diagnosis of prostate cancer with needle biopsy: Should all cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-11

    Jun 11, 2011 ... The sensitivity of PSA was 99.2%. ... Needle biopsy allows appropriate surgical treatment for patients whose .... 715 consecutive breast biopsies with at least two year follow‑up of benign lesions. ... The effects of castration.

  3. Identification of Threshold Prostate Specific Antigen Levels to Optimize the Detection of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer by Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Ultrasound Fusion Guided Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Nabeel A.; George, Arvin K.; Siddiqui, M. Minhaj; Rothwax, Jason T.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Stamatakis, Lambros; Su, Daniel; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Raskolnikov, Dima; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Simon, Richard; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L.; Merino, Maria J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prostate specific antigen sensitivity increases with lower threshold values but with a corresponding decrease in specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy detects prostate cancer more efficiently and of higher grade than standard 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsy but the optimal population for its use is not well defined. We evaluated the performance of magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy vs 12-core biopsy across a prostate specific antigen continuum. Materials and Methods We reviewed the records of all patients enrolled in a prospective trial who underwent 12-core transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsies from August 2007 through February 2014. Patients were stratified by each of 4 prostate specific antigen cutoffs. The greatest Gleason score using either biopsy method was compared in and across groups as well as across the population prostate specific antigen range. Clinically significant prostate cancer was defined as Gleason 7 (4 + 3) or greater. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results A total of 1,003 targeted and 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsies were performed, of which 564 diagnosed prostate cancer for a 56.2% detection rate. Targeted biopsy led to significantly more upgrading to clinically significant disease compared to 12-core biopsy. This trend increased more with increasing prostate specific antigen, specifically in patients with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 and greater than 10 ng/ml. Prostate specific antigen 5.2 ng/ml or greater captured 90% of upgrading by targeted biopsy, corresponding to 64% of patients who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent fusion biopsy. Conversely a greater proportion of clinically insignificant disease was detected by 12-core vs targeted biopsy overall. These differences persisted when controlling for potential confounders on multivariate analysis. Conclusions Prostate

  4. Effect on hemostasis of an absorbable hemostatic gelatin sponge after transrectal prostate needle biopsy

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    Kohei Kobatake

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To examine the usefulness of an absorbable hemostatic gelatin sponge for hemostasis after transrectal prostate needle biopsy. Subjects and Methods The subjects comprised 278 participants who underwent transrectal prostate needle biopsy. They were randomly allocated to the gelatin sponge insertion group (group A: 148 participants and to the non-insertion group (group B: 130 participants. In group A, the gelatin sponge was inserted into the rectum immediately after biopsy. A biopsy-induced hemorrhage was defined as a case in which a subject complained of bleeding from the rectum, and excretion of blood clots was confirmed. A blood test was performed before and after biopsy, and a questionnaire survey was given after the biopsy. Results Significantly fewer participants in group A required hemostasis after biopsy compared to group B (3 (2.0% vs. 11 (8.5%, P=0.029. The results of the blood tests and the responses from the questionnaire did not differ significantly between the two groups. In multivariate analysis, only “insertion of a gelatin sponge into the rectum” emerged as a significant predictor of hemostasis. Conclusion Insertion of a gelatin sponge into the rectum after transrectal prostate needle biopsy significantly increases hemostasis without increasing patient symptoms, such as pain and a sense of discomfort.

  5. Evaluation of MRI-TRUS fusion versus cognitive registration accuracy for MRI-targeted, TRUS-guided prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cool, Derek W; Zhang, Xuli; Romagnoli, Cesare; Izawa, Jonathan I; Romano, Walter M; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsy accuracies of operators with different levels of prostate MRI experience using cognitive registration versus MRI-TRUS fusion to assess the preferred method of TRUS prostate biopsy for MRI-identified lesions. SUBJECTS AND METHODS; One hundred patients from a prospective prostate MRI-TRUS fusion biopsy study were reviewed to identify all patients with clinically significant prostate adenocarcinoma (PCA) detected on MRI-targeted biopsy. Twenty-five PCA tumors were incorporated into a validated TRUS prostate biopsy simulator. Three prostate biopsy experts, each with different levels of experience in prostate MRI and MRI-TRUS fusion biopsy, performed a total of 225 simulated targeted biopsies on the MRI lesions as well as regional biopsy targets. Simulated biopsies performed using cognitive registration with 2D TRUS and 3D TRUS were compared with biopsies performed under MRI-TRUS fusion. Two-dimensional and 3D TRUS sampled only 48% and 45% of clinically significant PCA MRI lesions, respectively, compared with 100% with MRI-TRUS fusion. Lesion sampling accuracy did not statistically significantly vary according to operator experience or tumor volume. MRI-TRUS fusion-naïve operators showed consistent errors in targeting of the apex, midgland, and anterior targets, suggesting that there is biased error in cognitive registration. The MRI-TRUS fusion expert correctly targeted the prostate apex; however, his midgland and anterior mistargeting was similar to that of the less-experienced operators. MRI-targeted TRUS-guided prostate biopsy using cognitive registration appears to be inferior to MRI-TRUS fusion, with fewer than 50% of clinically significant PCA lesions successfully sampled. No statistically significant difference in biopsy accuracy was seen according to operator experience with prostate MRI or MRI-TRUS fusion.

  6. Feasibility of a 2{sup nd} generation MR-compatible manipulator for transrectal prostate biopsy guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bomers, J.G.R.; Yakar, D. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, route 766, P.O Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bosboom, D.G.H. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, route 766, P.O Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Soteria Medical, Arnhem (Netherlands); Tigelaar, G.H.; Sabisch, J. [Soteria Medical, Arnhem (Netherlands); Fuetterer, J.J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, route 766, P.O Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); University of Twente, MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    To assess the feasibility of a 2{sup nd} generation MR-compatible, remote-controlled manipulator (RCM) as an aid to perform MR-guided transrectal prostate biopsy in males with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). This prospective phase I study was approved by the local ethical committee and written informed consent was obtained from each patient. Twenty patients with ≥1 cancer suspicious region (CSR) with a PI-RADS score of ≥3 detected on the diagnostic multi-parametric MRI and no prior prostate treatment underwent MR-guided biopsy with the aid of the RCM. Complications were classified according to the modified Clavien system for reporting surgical complications. For evaluation of the workflow, procedure- and manipulation times were recorded. All CSR's (n=20) were reachable with the MR-compatible RCM and the cancer detection rate was 70 %. The median procedure time was 36:44 minutes (range, 23 - 61 minutes) and the median manipulation time for needle guide movement was 5:48 minutes (range, 1:15 - 18:35 minutes). Two Clavien grade 1 complications were reported. It is feasible and safe to perform transrectal MR-guided prostate biopsy using a MR-compatible RCM as an aid. It is a fast and efficient way to biopsy suspicious prostate lesions with a minimum number of biopsies per patient. (orig.)

  7. A biomedical engineering approach to mitigate the errors of prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hashim Uddin; Emberton, Mark; Kepner, Gordon; Kepner, Jeremy

    2012-02-07

    The current protocol for detecting and ruling out prostate cancer involves serum PSA testing followed by sampling of the prostate using a transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided biopsy. Many specialists have discussed how PSA screening has contributed to underdetection of clinically significant prostate cancer, overdiagnosis of clinically insignificant disease and poor risk stratification; however, little consideration has been given to the role of TRUS-guided biopsy in these errors. The performance of TRUS-guided biopsy is constrained by the biomechanical attributes of the sampling strategy, resulting in suboptimal detection efficiency of each core. By using a biomedical engineering approach, a uniform grid sampling strategy could be used to improve the detection efficiency of prostate biopsy. Moreover, the calibration of the sampling can be adjusted by altering the distance between needle deployments. Our model shows that for any given number of needle trajectories, a uniform grid approach will be superior to a divergent, nonuniform strategy for the detection of clinically important disease. This is an important message that should result in a move away from divergent sampling to a uniform grid approach for prostate biopsy.

  8. Pathological extension of prostate cancer as defined by gleason score on biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos F. Dall'oglio

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Based on the importance of the Gleason score on the behavior of prostate adenocarcinoma, this study attempts to predict the extension of prostate adenocarcinoma pre-operatively, as defined by the Gleason score on biopsy, in individuals who will undergo radical prostatectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We selected 899 individuals who underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy from 1988 to 2004. Clinical and pathological data obtained in the preoperative period were retrospectively analyzed through digital rectal examinations of the prostate, initial serum PSA levels and pathological data provided by biopsy. The Gleason score on biopsy was assessed and divided into 3 groups: 2 to 6, 7, and 8 to 10, and correlated with the possibility of the disease being confined to the prostate. RESULTS: From the 899 selected patients, 654 (74% showed Gleason scores of 2 to 6, 165 (18% had a score of 7 and 80 (9% had scores of 8 to 10 on biopsy. The likelihood of confined diseases, extraprostatic extensions, invasion of seminal vesicles and lymph nodal involvement were respectively: 74%, 18%, 8% and 0.8% for a Gleason score of 2 to 6, 47%, 30%, 19% and 4% for a Gleason score of 7, and 49%, 29%, 18% and 4% for a Gleason score of 8 to 10. CONCLUSION: In patients who will undergo radical prostatectomy due to prostate adenocarcinoma, a Gleason score of 7 on biopsy shows the same behavior as a Gleason score of 8 to 10 in relation to extension of disease.

  9. Low grade urothelial carcinoma mimicking basal cell hyperplasia and transitional metaplasia in needle prostate biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Arista-Nasr

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose The vast majority of urothelial carcinomas infiltrating the bladder are consistent with high-grade tumors that can be easily recognized as malignant in needle prostatic biopsies. In contrast, the histological changes of low-grade urothelial carcinomas in this kind of biopsy have not been studied. Materials and Methods We describe the clinicopathologic features of two patients with low-grade bladder carcinomas infiltrating the prostate. They reported dysuria and hematuria. Both had a slight elevation of the prostate specific antigen and induration of the prostatic lobes. Needle biopsies were performed. At endoscopy bladder tumors were found in both cases. Results Both biopsies showed nests of basophilic cells and cells with perinuclear clearing and slight atypia infiltrating acini and small prostatic ducts. The stroma exhibited extensive desmoplasia and chronic inflammation. The original diagnosis was basal cell hyperplasia and transitional metaplasia. The bladder tumors also showed low-grade urothelial carcinoma. In one case, the neoplasm infiltrated the lamina propria, and in another, the muscle layer. In both, a transurethral resection was performed for obstructive urinary symptoms. The neoplasms were positive for high molecular weight keratin (34BetaE12 and thrombomodulin. No metastases were found in either of the patients, and one of them has survived for five years. Conclusions The diagnosis of low-grade urothelial carcinoma in prostate needle biopsies is difficult and may simulate benign prostate lesions including basal cell hyperplasia and urothelial metaplasia. It is crucial to recognize low-grade urothelial carcinoma in needle biopsies because only an early diagnosis and aggressive treatment can improve the prognosis for these patients.

  10. Decreased infiltration of macrophage scavenger receptor-positive cells in initial negative biopsy specimens is correlated with positive repeat biopsies of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonomura, Norio; Takayama, Hitoshi; Kawashima, Atsunari; Mukai, Masatoshi; Nagahara, Akira; Nakai, Yasutomo; Nakayama, Masashi; Tsujimura, Akira; Nishimura, Kazuo; Aozasa, Katsuyuki; Okuyama, Akihiko

    2010-06-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptor (MSR)-positive inflammatory cells and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been reported to regulate the growth of various cancers. In this study, the infiltration of MSR-positive cells and TAMs was analyzed to predict the outcome of repeat biopsy in men diagnosed as having no malignancy at the first prostate biopsy. Repeat biopsy of the prostate was carried out in 92 patients who were diagnosed as having no malignancy at the first biopsy. Of these, 30 patients (32.6%) were positive for prostate cancer at the repeat biopsy. Tumor-associated macrophages and MSR-positive cells were immunohistochemically stained with mAbs CD68 and CD204, respectively. Six ocular measuring fields were chosen randomly under a microscope at x400 power in the initial negative biopsy specimens, and the mean TAM and MSR counts for each case were determined. No difference in TAM count was found between the cases with or without prostate cancer. By contrast, the MSR count in patients with cancer was significantly lower than that in patients without cancer at the repeat biopsy (P biopsies, or TAM count. Decreased infiltration of MSR-positive cells in negative first biopsy specimens was correlated with positive findings in the repeat biopsy. The MSR count might be a good indicator for avoiding unnecessary repeat biopsies.

  11. The incidence of fluoroquinolone resistant infections after prostate biopsy--are fluoroquinolones still effective prophylaxis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, Joseph; Teper, Ervin; Ferrandino, Michael; Macchia, Richard J; Blank, William; Grunberger, Ivan; Colon, Ivan

    2008-03-01

    Fluoroquinolones have been shown to decrease infective complications after prostate biopsy. However, fluoroquinolone resistance is emerging. We quantified contemporary rates of infective complications and the incidence of fluoroquinolone resistant infections after prostate biopsy under fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. We retrospectively evaluated the records of 1,273 patients who underwent prostate biopsy at New York Harbor Veterans Affairs Hospital from January 2004 to December 2006. Patients received levofloxacin or gatifloxacin. Using the Veterans Affairs computerized patient record system we reviewed all patient visits within 1 month after prostate biopsy. Visits were queried for infective symptoms. Positive cultures were evaluated for resistance patterns. The annual and overall incidence of infective complications and fluoroquinolone resistant infections was calculated. Of 1,273 patients 31 (2.4%) presented with infective symptoms after biopsy. The overall incidence of fluoroquinolone resistant infections was 1.2% (15 cases). When stratified by year, there were statistically significant increases in the incidence of infective complications and fluoroquinolone resistance from 2004 to 2006. Of the positive cultures those from 89% of patients yielded Escherichia coli and 90% were fluoroquinolone resistant. Fluoroquinolone resistant E. coli were also resistant to gentamicin in 22% of cases, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole in 44%, piperacillin in 72% and ampicillin in 94%. However, 100% sensitivity was demonstrated for amikacin, ceftazidime and ceftriaxone. Fluoroquinolones are still effective as antibiotic prophylaxis for prostate biopsies but there is an increase in infective complications and fluoroquinolone resistance. When patients present with post-prostate biopsy infective symptoms, almost 50% are associated with fluoroquinolone resistant pathogens. Empirical treatment with ceftriaxone, ceftazidime or amikacin should be initiated until culture specific therapy can

  12. Feasibility of a 2(nd) generation MR-compatible manipulator for transrectal prostate biopsy guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomers, J G R; Bosboom, D G H; Tigelaar, G H; Sabisch, J; Fütterer, J J; Yakar, D

    2017-04-01

    To assess the feasibility of a 2(nd) generation MR-compatible, remote-controlled manipulator (RCM) as an aid to perform MR-guided transrectal prostate biopsy in males with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). This prospective phase I study was approved by the local ethical committee and written informed consent was obtained from each patient. Twenty patients with ≥1 cancer suspicious region (CSR) with a PI-RADS score of ≥3 detected on the diagnostic multi-parametric MRI and no prior prostate treatment underwent MR-guided biopsy with the aid of the RCM. Complications were classified according to the modified Clavien system for reporting surgical complications. For evaluation of the workflow, procedure- and manipulation times were recorded. All CSR's (n=20) were reachable with the MR-compatible RCM and the cancer detection rate was 70 %. The median procedure time was 36:44 minutes (range, 23 - 61 minutes) and the median manipulation time for needle guide movement was 5:48 minutes (range, 1:15 - 18:35 minutes). Two Clavien grade 1 complications were reported. It is feasible and safe to perform transrectal MR-guided prostate biopsy using a MR-compatible RCM as an aid. It is a fast and efficient way to biopsy suspicious prostate lesions with a minimum number of biopsies per patient. • It is feasible to perform transrectal prostate biopsy using a MR-compatible RCM. • Using a RCM for MR-guided biopsy is safe, fast, and efficient. • All cancer suspicious regions were reachable with the RCM.

  13. Low incidence of prostate cancer identified in the transition and anterior zones with transperineal biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danforth TL

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Teresa L Danforth,1 K Kent Chevli,1,2 Louis Baumann,1,2 Michael Duff1,21The State University of New York (SUNY, Buffalo, NY, 2Cancer Care of Western New York, Cheektowaga, NY, USAPurpose: Determine the incidence of anterior (AZ and transition (TZ zone prostate cancers using a transperineal mapping approach.Methods: A retrospective review of 137 patients with history of previous negative biopsy undergoing transperineal saturation biopsy for an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA, high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical small acinar proliferation history, or abnormal digital rectal exam. The number of biopsy cores was determined by prostate volume and obtained using a predefined template. The electronic medical records were reviewed for patients' clinical and pathological characteristics.Results: Forty-one of 137 patients (31.4% had positive biopsy for prostate adenocarcinoma; 11 were from 24-core, 19 from 36-core, and 11 from 48-core sampling. Glands > 45 mL had a mean of 1.7 previous biopsies and a PSA of 9.1 ng/mL. Glands < 30 mL were 1.3 and 6.3 ng/mL and glands 30–45 mL were 1.4 and 6.5 ng/mL. Glands < 45 mL had a higher number of positive biopsies per total cores. Seven patients chose active surveillance while 34 chose treatment. Of the 36- and 48-cores biopsies, 2.2% and 1.5%, respectively, were positive in the TZ. One patient was AZ-positive, 1 was TZ-positive, and 18 were peripheral zone (PZ-positive alone. Twelve patients had cancer detected in PZ and TZ. Two patients developed urinary retention and one had a urine infection.Conclusion: Transperineal saturation biopsy is a safe and efficacious method of prostate cancer detection in patients with previous negative biopsy and high suspicion for cancer. Few cancers were found to originate in the TZ or AZ alone. We recommend that initial biopsy templates should sample PZ with less focus on the TZ.Keywords: carcinoma, prostate, biopsy, transperineal

  14. MRI-guided biopsy of the prostate: correlation between the cancer detection rate and the number of previous negative TRUS biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmuş, Tahir; Reichelt, Uta; Huppertz, Alexander; Hamm, Bernd; Beyersdorff, Dirk; Franiel, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate prostate cancer detection rate of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided biopsy and to elucidate possible relations to the number of prior negative transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided biopsies. Eighty-seven consecutive patients (mean age, 65.0 years; mean prostate-specific antigen, 13.3 ng/mL) with at least one prior negative TRUS-guided biopsy and persistent suspicion of prostate cancer were included in this study. All patients underwent MRI-guided biopsy after a diagnostic multiparametric MRI examination at 1.5 Tesla. Specimens were immediately fixated and subsequently evaluated by an experienced uropathologist. Prostate cancer detection rates were calculated. Prostate cancer-positive and -negative cores were compared. Correlation between number of prior biopsies and presence of prostate cancer was evaluated. Cancer detection rates for patients with one (n=24), two (n=25), three (n=18), and four or more (n=20) negative TRUS-guided biopsies were 29.2%, 40.0%, 66.7%, and 35.0%, respectively (P = 0.087). The median number of removed cores per patient was 3 (range, 1-8) without a significant difference between patients with and without cancer (P = 0.48). 
Thirty of 36 cancer patients were at intermediate or high risk according to the D´Amico clinical risk score. Eleven of 15 high risk cancers were localized in the transition zone (P = 0.002). This study demonstrates high cancer detection rates of MRI-guided biopsy independent of the number of previous TRUS-guided biopsies and the number of taken prostate cores. MRI-guided biopsy therefore represents a less invasive and effective diagnostic tool for patients with prostate cancer suspicion and previous negative TRUS-guided biopsies.

  15. Possibility of transrectal photoacoustic imaging-guided biopsy for detection of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Miya; Shinchi, Masayuki; Horiguchi, Akio; Shinmoto, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Irisawa, Kaku; Wada, Takatsugu; Asano, Tomohiko

    2017-03-01

    A transrectral ultrasonography (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy is mandatory for histological diagnosis in patients with an elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), but its diagnostic accuracy is not satisfactory; therefore, a considerable number of patients are forced to have an unnecessary repeated biopsy. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has the ability to visualize the distribution of hemoglobin clearly. Thus, there is the potential to acquire different maps of small vessel networks between cancerous and normal tissue. We developed an original TRUS-type PA probe consisting of a microconvex array transducer with an optical illumination system providing coregistered PA and ultrasound images. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the clinical possibility of a transrectral PA image. The prostate biopsy cores obtained by transrectal systemic biopsies under TRUS guidance were stained with HE staining and anti-CD34 antibodies as a marker of the endothelium of the blood vessel in order to find a pattern in the map of a small vessel network, which allows for imaging-based identification of prostate cancer. We analyzed the association of PA signal patterns, the cancer location by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study, and the pathological diagnosis with CD34 stains as a prospective intervention study. In order to demonstrate the TRUS-merged-with-PA imaging guided targeted biopsy combined with a standard biopsy for capturing the clinically significant tumors, we developed a puncture needle guide attachment for the original TRUS-type PA probe.

  16. Positive predictive value of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in initial core needle biopsies of prostate adenocarcinoma--a study with complete sampling of hemi-prostates with corresponding negative biopsy findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delatour, Nicolas L D Roustan; Mai, Kien T

    2008-09-01

    High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is a putative premalignant lesion of prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa). The significance of isolated HGPIN in initial biopsy cores as a marker of PCa in repeat biopsies has been extensively investigated, but little is known of the true occurrence of PCa in this setting, because repeat biopsies can miss the focus of cancer. In this study, a hemi-prostate model was used to define the true positive predictive value of HGPIN in core biopsies in predicting PCa. From 132 consecutive resected prostate specimens, 70 hemi-prostates with all corresponding biopsy cores negative for PCa were thoroughly examined. Of the 70 hemi-prostates, 38 had PCa (including 8 with clinically significant PCa), and 11 had HGPIN. In the group of 38 hemi-prostate with PCa, 7 were associated with HGPIN-positive biopsies. No statistically significant difference was found between the hemi-prostates with or without PCa, regarding the presence, microscopic pattern, or multiple core involvement of HGPIN in the biopsies. The positive predictive value of HGPIN in predicting for clinically significant PCa was 27%, the negative predictive value was 87%, the sensitivity was 38%, and the specificity was 91% (P = 0.04, statistically significant). In addition, the positive predictive value of multiple cores with HGPIN in predicting for clinically significant PCa was 75% (negative predictive value 92%). The results of the present study have failed to support HGPIN as a statistically significant predictor for the occurrence of PCa. More importantly, however, HGPIN and multiple core involvement did seem to be a useful marker for clinically significant PCa.

  17. Development of a Novel Robot for Transperineal Needle Based Interventions: Focal Therapy, Brachytherapy and Prostate Biopsies

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Jean-Alexandre; Baumann, Michael; Descotes, Jean-Luc; Bolla, Michel; Giraud, Jean-Yves; Rambeaud, Jean-Jacques; Troccaz, Jocelyne; 10.1016/j.juro.2012.06.003

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We report what is to our knowledge the initial experience with a new 3-dimensional ultrasound robotic system for prostate brachytherapy assistance, focal therapy and prostate biopsies. Its ability to track prostate motion intraoperatively allows it to manage motions and guide needles to predefined targets. Materials and Methods: A robotic system was created for transrectal ultrasound guided needle implantation combined with intraoperative prostate tracking. Experiments were done on 90 targets embedded in a total of 9 mobile, deformable, synthetic prostate phantoms. Experiments involved trying to insert glass beads as close as possible to targets in multimodal anthropomorphic imaging phantoms. Results were measured by segmenting the inserted beads in computerized tomography volumes of the phantoms. Results: The robot reached the chosen targets in phantoms with a median accuracy of 2.73 mm and a median prostate motion of 5.46 mm. Accuracy was better at the apex than at the base (2.28 vs 3.83 mm, p <...

  18. TRUS-guided transperineal prostate 12+X core biopsy with template for the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Gang; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Xu

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the clinical value and safety of trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided transperineal prostate 12+X core biopsy in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Patients who received a TRUS-guided transperineal prostate biopsy for suspected prostate cancer at the General Hospital of The People's Liberation Army between September 2009 and May 2014 were retrospectively analyzed, this consisted of 1,300 patients. These patients were randomly divided into the 12+X core group or the standard 12-core group. The mean age of all the patients was 70.5 years old. Levels of prostate-specific antigen, digital rectal examination, transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were checked and used as reference prior and subsequent to the biopsy procedure. The 12+X core group consisted of 937 patients and the 12-core group consisted of 363 patients. The mean number of core samples taken from both groups was 14.5 (ranging from 12 to 24) and the mean operative time of the whole group was 20.4 min (ranging from 15 to 40 min). The puncture positive detection rate of abnormal rectal examination, trans-rectal ultrasound, and MRI was 24.0, 30.1, and 59.2%, respectively, whereas the puncture positive rate was 47.2% in 12+X core group and 34.5% in 12-core group. Improved prostate needle biopsy with 12+X cores was found to have significantly higher detection rate than that with 12 cores as well as fewer post-operative complications, therefore making the method ideal for diagnosing prostate cancer.

  19. New Image-Based Techniques for Prostate Biopsy and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Stranded Seeds Following Prostate Brachytherapy Julio R. Lobo, Mehdi Moradi, Nick Chng, Ehsan Dehghan, William J. Morris, Gabor Fichtinger, and...statistical texture matching method. IEEE Trans. Med. Imaging 25(3), 256– 272 (2006) 4. Hodge , A.C., Fenster, A., Downey, D.B., Ladak, H.M.: Prostate boundary

  20. MR-guided biopsy of the prostate: Comparison of diagnostic specimen quality with 18G and 16G biopsy needles

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    Durmus, Tahir, E-mail: tahir.durmus@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Goldmann, Ulrike, E-mail: ulrike.goldmann@charite.de [Department of Pathology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Baur, Alexander D.J., E-mail: alexander.baur@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Huppertz, Alexander, E-mail: Alexander.huppertz@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Imaging Science Institute, Charité, Berlin (Germany); Schwenke, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.schwenke@scossis.de [SCO:SSiS Statistical Consulting, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd, E-mail: Bernd.hamm@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Franiel, Tobias, E-mail: tobias.franiel@med.uni-jena.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiology – Universitätsklinikum Jena (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate specimen quality and diagnostic differences between magnetic resonance (MR) compatible 16G and 18G biopsy needles in MR-guided biopsy (MRGB) of the prostate. Materials and methods: Semiautomatic MR compatible biopsy needles with a diameter of 16G (Group A) or 18G (Group B) were used to perform MRGB in 88 patients with suspected prostate cancer. After embedding and staining, length and width of all specimens (140 cores in Group A, 143 in Group B) were measured. Fragmentation, squeezing artifacts, and overall evaluability were evaluated using a quality score from 0 (no tissue) to 3 (optimal tissue quality). Groups were statistically compared; p-values <0.05 were regarded as significant. Results: Demographic data were not significantly different between Group A and B with a mean age of 63 ± 7.3 and 67 ± 5.7 years; and a mean prostate-specific antigen of 12.6 ± 10.3 ng/ml and 13.8 ± 11.6 ng/ml, respectively (p = 0.70). Area of longitudinally sectioned histological specimens was significantly larger in Group A than in Group B with 9.38 mm{sup 2} (8.74; 10.02) and 7.95 mm{sup 2} (7.32; 8.59), respectively (p = 0.002). However, there were significantly more cores without prostate tissue with 18 cores (12.9%) versus 3 cores (2.1%) in Groups A and B, respectively (p = 0.004). Fragmentation, squeezing artifacts, and overall evaluability were not statistically different between the two groups. The rate of prostate cancer in the cores was also not significantly different between Groups A and B (22.1% and 24.5%; p = 0.77). Conclusion: 16G biopsy needles do not provide a relevant diagnostic advantage over 18G needles in MRGB. Therefore, use of 18G needles is not discouraged and may even be preferred as it is not expected to result in a relevant degradation of specimen quality or compromise in prostate cancer detection rate.

  1. Endoclipping treatment of life-threatening rectal bleeding after prostate biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Panagiotis Katsinelos,; Jannis Kountouras,; Georgios Dimitriadis,; Grigoris Chatzimavroudis,; Christos Zavos,; Ioannis Pilpilidis,; George Paroutoglou,; George Germanidis,; Kostas Mimidis

    2009-01-01

    Rectal bleeding is frequently seen in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided multiple biopsy of the prostate, but is usually mild and stops spontaneously. We report what is believed to be the first case of life-threatening rectal bleeding following this procedure, which was successfully treated by endoscopic intervention through placement of three clips on the sites of bleeding. This case emphasizes endoscopic intervention associated with endoclipping as a safe and effective method to achieve hemostasis in massive rectal bleeding after prostate biopsy. Additionally, current data on the complications of the TRUS-guided multiple biopsy of the prostate and the options for treating fulminant rectal bleeding, a consequence of this procedure, are described.

  2. Mortality and complications after prostate biopsy in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening (PLCO) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, Paul F; Parnes, Howard L; Andriole, Gerald

    2014-02-01

    To examine mortality and morbidity after prostate biopsy in the intervention arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening (PLCO) trial. Abstractors from the PLCO trial recorded the types and dates of diagnostic follow-up procedures after positive screens and documented the types and dates of resultant complications. Cancers and deaths among the participants were tracked. The mortality rate in the 120-day period after prostate biopsy was compared with a control rate of deaths in the 120-day period after a negative screen in men without biopsy. Multivariate analysis was performed to control for potential confounders, including age, comorbidities and smoking. Rates of any complication, infectious and non-infectious complications were computed among men with a negative biopsy. Multivariate analysis was used to examine the risk factors for complications. Of the 37,345 men enrolled in the PLCO trial (intervention arm), 4861 had at least one biopsy after a positive screen and 28,661 had a negative screen and no biopsy. The 120-day mortality rate after biopsy was 0.95 (per 1000), compared with the control group rate of 1.8; the multivariate relative risk was 0.49 (95% CI: 0.2-1.1). Among 3706 negative biopsies, the rates (per 1000) of any complication, infectious and non-infections complications were 20.2, 7.8 and 13.0, respectively. A history of prostate enlargement or inflammation was significantly associated with higher rates of both infectious (odds ratio [OR] = 3.7) and non-infectious (OR = 2.2) complications. Black race was associated with a higher infectious complications rate (OR = 7.1) and repeat biopsy was associated with lower rates of non-infectious complications (OR = 0.3). Mortality rates were not found to be higher after prostate biopsy in the PLCO trial and complications were relatively infrequent, with several risk factors identified. Published 2013. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in

  3. Temporal-based needle segmentation algorithm for transrectal ultrasound prostate biopsy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cool, Derek W; Gardi, Lori; Romagnoli, Cesare; Saikaly, Manale; Izawa, Jonathan I; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-04-01

    Automatic identification of the biopsy-core tissue location during a prostate biopsy procedure would provide verification that targets were adequately sampled and would allow for appropriate intraprocedure biopsy target modification. Localization of the biopsy core requires accurate segmentation of the biopsy needle and needle tip from transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsy images. A temporal-based TRUS needle segmentation algorithm was developed specifically for the prostate biopsy procedure to automatically identify the TRUS image containing the biopsy needle from a collection of 2D TRUS images and to segment the biopsy-core location from the 2D TRUS image. The temporal-based segmentation algorithm performs a temporal analysis on a series of biopsy TRUS images collected throughout needle insertion and withdrawal. Following the identification of points of needle insertion and retraction, the needle axis is segmented using a Hough transform-based algorithm, which is followed by a temporospectral TRUS analysis to identify the biopsy-needle tip. Validation of the temporal-based algorithm is performed on 108 TRUS biopsy sequences collected from the procedures of ten patients. The success of the temporal search to identify the proper images was manually assessed, while the accuracies of the needle-axis and needle-tip segmentations were quantitatively compared to implementations of two other needle segmentation algorithms within the literature. The needle segmentation algorithm demonstrated a >99% accuracy in identifying the TRUS image at the moment of needle insertion from the collection of real-time TRUS images throughout the insertion and withdrawal of the biopsy needle. The segmented biopsy-needle axes were accurate to within 2.3 +/- 2.0 degrees and 0.48 +/- 0.42 mm of the gold standard. Identification of the needle tip to within half of the biopsy-core length (<10 mm) was 95% successful with a mean error of 2.4 +/- 4.0 mm. Needle-tip detection using the temporal

  4. Complications and prostate cancer diagnosis rate of TRUS prostate biopsies using 16 and 18G needles by Clavien scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Serkan; Akif Diri, Mehmet; Bagcioglu, Murat; Karakan, Tolga; Aydın, Arif

    2017-05-16

    We aimed to compare the 18 and 16-Gauge (G) needles used in transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided needle biopsy for cancer detection rates and complications using the Clavien Scoring System. The 80 patients who were included in the study were randomized and divided into two groups. Group 1 (n = 36) had a TRUS-guided prostate biopsy with an 18G needle and Group 2 had a 16G needle (n = 44). The hematuria, bleeding assessment, and infection events were evaluated on a daily basis. These complications were graded according to the Clavien Scoring. In Group 1, only five (13%) patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer, and three patients were reported to have atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP). In Group 2, 16 (36%) patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer and one patient was reported to have ASAP. The difference in the prostate cancer detection rate between the groups was statistically significant. According to the Clavien grading system, the complications were at the Grade 1 level in 25 people in Group 1 in 29 people in Group 2. Grade 2 level complications were not observed in either group. While one person was Grade 3 in Group 1, two people in Group 2 had this rate. There were no significant differences between the groups. We found that cancer detection rate increased by increasing the thickness of the needle used in TRUS-guided prostate biopsy without any increase in the complications.

  5. Well-differentiated prostate cancer in core biopsy specimens may be associated with extraprostatic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cury

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Accurate determination of the Gleason score in prostate core biopsy specimens is crucial in selecting the type of prostate cancer treatment, especially for patients with well-differentiated tumors (Gleason score 2 to 4. For such patients, an inaccurate biopsy score may result in a therapeutic intervention that is too conservative. We evaluate the role of Gleason score 2-4 in prostate core-needle biopsies for predicting the final pathological staging following radical prostatectomy. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective study at Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo. METHODS: We analyzed the medical records of 120 consecutive patients who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy to treat clinical localized prostate cancer at our institution between December 2001 and July 2006. Thirty-two of these patients presented well-differentiated tumors (Gleason score 2 to 4 in biopsy specimens and were included in the study. The Gleason scores of the core-needle biopsies were compared with the pathological staging of the surgical specimens. RESULTS: Sixteen of the 32 patients (50% presented moderately differentiated tumors (Gleason score 5 to 7 in surgical specimens. Eighteen patients (56% had tumors with involvement of the prostate capsule and ten (31% had involvement of adjacent organs. Evaluating the 16 patients that maintained Gleason scores of 2 to 4 in the pathological staging of the surgical specimens, 11 (68.7% had focal invasion of the prostate capsule and five (31.25% had organ-confined disease. CONCLUSION: Well-differentiated tumors (Gleason score 2 to 4 seen in biopsies are not predictive of organ-confined disease.

  6. Development of a Hybrid Optical Biopsy Probe to Improve Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    taken on 3 identified regions for cancer, normal and BPH . The measured tissues will be then sliced out and sent to pathology for analysis. Blue and...cancer volumes (assessed by % involvement of the biopsy cores). Fresh prostatectomy sample will be brought to the pathology room immersed in saline...prostate surface as per the regular pathology protocol (blue dye for left side, orange dye for right side, green dye for anterior margin). (2) Prostate

  7. New indicator for prostate gland biopsy when malignancy is in question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmi A Haroun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to find out a new indicator with a higher specificity level than prostate prostate-specific antigen (PSA in order to achieve a better selection of patients who will undergo prostate biopsy. Trans-rectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy was performed in 135 patients who had elevated PSA level and/or palpable nodule on digital rectal examination. The PSA level was ≤10 ng/mL in 81 patients and >10 ng/mL in 54 patients. We designed a new formula consisting of prostate volume, patient′s age, and free prostate specific antigen. Its resultant was defined as prostate biopsy index and was compared with the most currently used parameters. Histology results yielded prostate gland malignancy in 40 (30% patients. Our new index differed significantly between the malignant and the non-malignant patient categories (P = 0.01. The ROC curve analysis at different specificity and sensitivity levels (85%, 90% and 95% and regarding the area under the curve (AUC, our new index was significantly better than the other studied parameters (P = 0.001. Additionally, the AUC in patients with a PSA level ≤10 ng/mL and bet-ween 10.1 and 20 ng/mL was 0.75 and 0.78, with a sensitivity of 91% and 83% and a specificity of 24% and 73%, respectively, at a cut-off point of 1.7. The overall sensitivity and specificity at the same point were 80% and 41%, respectively. In conclusion, the performance of our new index was superior to all other evaluated parameters. At 83% sensitivity with a cut-off point of 1.7, 63.5% of the performed biopsies could have been avoided in patients with a PSA level between 10.1 and 20 ng/mL.

  8. Probability modeling of the number of positive cores in a prostate cancer biopsy session, with applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serfling, Robert; Ogola, Gerald

    2016-02-10

    Among men, prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common newly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of death from cancer. A major issue of very large scale is avoiding both over-treatment and under-treatment of CaP cases. The central challenge is deciding clinical significance or insignificance when the CaP biopsy results are positive but only marginally so. A related concern is deciding how to increase the number of biopsy cores for larger prostates. As a foundation for improved choice of number of cores and improved interpretation of biopsy results, we develop a probability model for the number of positive cores found in a biopsy, given the total number of cores, the volumes of the tumor nodules, and - very importantly - the prostate volume. Also, three applications are carried out: guidelines for the number of cores as a function of prostate volume, decision rules for insignificant versus significant CaP using number of positive cores, and, using prior distributions on total tumor size, Bayesian posterior probabilities for insignificant CaP and posterior median CaP. The model-based results have generality of application, take prostate volume into account, and provide attractive tradeoffs of specificity versus sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Sonoelastography of the prostate: Comparison with systematic biopsy findings in 492 patients

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    Pallwein, Leo [Department of Radiology 2/Uroradiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: leo.pallwein@i-med.ac.at; Mitterberger, Michael; Pinggera, Germar [Department of Urology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Aigner, Friedrich [Department of Radiology 2/Uroradiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pedross, Florian [Department of Medical Statistics, Information and Health Economics, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Gradl, Johann [Department of Radiology 2/Uroradiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pelzer, Alexandre; Bartsch, Georg [Department of Urology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Frauscher, Ferdinand [Department of Radiology 2/Uroradiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2008-02-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the value of sonoelastography (SE) for prostate cancer detection in comparison with systematic biopsy findings. Material and methods: Four hundred and ninety two PSA screening volunteers (mean age: 61.9 {+-} 8.6) with an total PSA >1.25 ng/mL and a free to total PSA ration of <18% underwent SE of the prostate before 10 core systematic prostate biopsy. Tissue elasticity of the peripheral zone was investigated only. Tissue elasticity was displayed from red (soft) to green (intermediate) and to blue (hard). Only hard lesions (blue) were considered to be suspicious for prostate cancer. The peripheral zone of the prostate was divided in 3 regions on each side: base, mid-gland, apex. A different investigator performed systematic biopsy, and the biopsy findings were compared with the SE findings. Results: In 125 of 492 patients (25.4%) systematic biopsy demonstrated prostate cancer. Cancer was detected in 321 of 2952 (11%) outer gland areas (74 in the base, 106 in the mid-gland, 141 in the apex). The Gleason score ranged from 3 to 10 (mean: 6.5). In SE 533 of 2952 (18.1%) suspicious areas were detected and 258 of these areas (48.4%) showed cancer. Most of the false-positive findings (275/533 areas; 51.6%) were associated with chronic inflammation and atrophy especially at the basal prostate areas. The sensitivity by entire organ was calculated with 86% and the specificity 72%. The analysis by outer gland areas showed the highest sensitivity in the apex (79%). The specificity by outer gland areas ranged between 85% and 93%. The correlation between SE findings and biopsy results was high (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Sonoelastography findings showed a good correlation with the systematic biopsy results. The best sensitivity and specificity was found in the apex region. Sonoelastography seems to offer a new approach for differentiation of tissue stiffness of the prostate and may therefore improve prostate cancer detection.

  10. BiopSym: a simulator for enhanced learning of ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy

    CERN Document Server

    Sclaverano, Stefano; Vadcard, Lucile; Mozer, Pierre; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simulator of ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies for cancer diagnosis. When performing biopsy series, the clinician has to move the ultrasound probe and to mentally integrate the real-time bi-dimensional images into a three-dimensional (3D) representation of the anatomical environment. Such a 3D representation is necessary to sample regularly the prostate in order to maximize the probability of detecting a cancer if any. To make the training of young physicians easier and faster we developed a simulator that combines images computed from three-dimensional ultrasound recorded data to haptic feedback. The paper presents the first version of this simulator.

  11. Cutting to the Core of the Issue: Emerging Strategies To Reduce Prostate Biopsy-Related Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberland, Robin R

    2016-10-01

    Over 1 million men undergo biopsy in the United States each year to evaluate for prostate cancer (S. Loeb, H. B. Carter, S. I. Berndt, W. Ricker, and E. M. Schaeffer, J Urol 186:1830-1834, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.juro.2011.06.057). In recent years, there has been a rise in infectious complications related to these procedures. This review aims to provide an overview of the guidelines that direct transrectal prostate biopsy, to describe associated infection, and to evaluate the published data driving the current trend toward prebiopsy screening for resistant organisms. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. The accuracy of different biopsy strategies for the detection of clinically important prostate cancer: a computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecornet, Emilie; Ahmed, Hashim Uddin; Hu, Yipeng; Moore, Caroline M; Nevoux, Pierre; Barratt, Dean; Hawkes, David; Villers, Arnaud; Emberton, Mark

    2012-09-01

    The true accuracy of different biopsy strategies for detecting clinically significant prostate cancer is unknown, given the positive evaluation bias required for verification by radical prostatectomy. To evaluate how well different biopsy strategies perform at detecting clinically significant prostate cancer we used computer simulation in cystoprostatectomy cases with cancer. A computer simulation study was performed on prostates acquired at radical cystoprostatectomy. A total of 346 prostates were processed and examined for prostate cancer using 3 mm whole mount slices. The 96 prostates that contained cancer were digitally reconstructed. Biopsy simulations incorporating various degrees of random localization error were performed using the reconstructed 3-dimensional prostate computer model. Each biopsy strategy was simulated 500 times. Two definitions of clinically significant prostate cancer were used to define the reference standard, including definition 1--Gleason score 7 or greater, and/or lesion volume 0.5 ml or greater and definition 2--Gleason score 7 or greater, and/or lesion volume 0.2 ml or greater. A total of 215 prostate cancer foci were present. The ROC AUC to detect and rule out definition 1 prostate cancer was 0.69, 0.75, 0.82 and 0.91 for 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsy with a random localization error of 15 and 10 mm, 14-core transrectal ultrasound biopsy and template prostate mapping using a 5 mm sampling frame, respectively. To our knowledge our biopsy simulation study is the first to evaluate the performance of different sampling strategies to detect clinically important prostate cancer in a population that better reflects the demographics of a screened cohort. Compared to other strategies standard transrectal ultrasound biopsy performs poorly for detecting clinically important cancer. Marginal improvement can be achieved using additional cores placed anterior but the performance attained by template prostate mapping is optimal. Copyright

  13. Obesity is a significant risk factor for prostate cancer at the time of biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Stephen J; Wen, Joanne; Wuerstle, Melanie; Shah, Amy; Lai, Dominic; Moalej, Bita; Atala, Christina; Aronson, William J

    2008-11-01

    Studies suggest obesity is associated with decreased prostate cancer risk. We hypothesized obesity is biologically associated with increased risk, although this is obscured owing to hemodilution of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and larger prostate size. We retrospectively studied 441 consecutive men undergoing prostate biopsy between 1999 and 2003 at two equal access centers within the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. We estimated the association between obesity (body mass index >or= 30 kg/m(2)) and positive biopsy and Gleason >or=4+3 using logistic regression analysis adjusting for multiple clinical characteristics. A total of 123 men (28%) were obese and 149 men (34%) had cancer. Median PSA and age were 5.7 ng/mL and 63.9 years, respectively. Obese men had significantly lower PSA concentrations (P = .02) and larger prostate volumes (P = .04). Obesity was not significantly related to age (P = .19) or race (P = .37). On univariate analysis, obesity was not associated with prostate cancer risk (odds ratio [OR] 1.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73-1.75, P = .58). However, after adjusting for multiple clinical characteristics, obesity was associated with significantly increased prostate cancer risk (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.17-3.32, P = .01). After multivariable adjustment, there was no significant association between obesity and high-grade disease (P = .18). Without adjustment for clinical characteristics, obesity was not significantly associated with prostate cancer risk in this equal-access, clinic-based population. However, after adjusting for the lower PSA levels and the larger prostate size, obesity was associated with a 98% increased prostate cancer risk. These findings support the fact that current prostate cancer screening practices may be biased against obese men.

  14. Systematic ultrasound-guided saturation and template biopsy of the prostate: Indications and advantages of extended sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isbarn, H.; Briganti, B.; Visschere, P.J. De; Futterer, J.J.; Ghadjar, P.; Giannarini, G.; Ost, P.; Ploussard, G.; Sooriakumaran, P.; Surcel, C.; Oort, I.M. van; Yossepowitch, O.; Bergh, R. van den

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Prostate biopsy (PB) is the gold standard for the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). However, the optimal number of biopsy cores remains debatable. We sought to compare contemporary standard (10-12 cores) vs. saturation (=18 cores) schemes on initial as well as repeat PB. METHODS: A non

  15. Systematic ultrasound-guided saturation and template biopsy of the prostate: Indications and advantages of extended sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isbarn, H.; Briganti, B.; Visschere, P.J. De; Futterer, J.J.; Ghadjar, P.; Giannarini, G.; Ost, P.; Ploussard, G.; Sooriakumaran, P.; Surcel, C.; Oort, I.M. van; Yossepowitch, O.; Bergh, R. van den

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Prostate biopsy (PB) is the gold standard for the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). However, the optimal number of biopsy cores remains debatable. We sought to compare contemporary standard (10-12 cores) vs. saturation (=18 cores) schemes on initial as well as repeat PB. METHODS: A

  16. How does prostate biopsy guidance error impact pathologic cancer risk assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Peter R.; Gaed, Mena; Gómez, José A.; Moussa, Madeleine; Gibson, Eli; Cool, Derek W.; Chin, Joseph L.; Pautler, Stephen; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided "fusion" prostate biopsy aims to reduce the 21-47% false negative rate of clinical 2D TRUS-guided sextant biopsy, but still has a substantial false negative rate. This could be improved via biopsy needle target optimization, accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system errors, image registration errors, and irregular tumor shapes. As an initial step toward the broader goal of optimized prostate biopsy targeting, in this study we elucidated the impact of biopsy needle delivery error on the probability of obtaining a tumor sample, and on the core involvement. These are both important parameters to patient risk stratification and the decision for active surveillance vs. definitive therapy. We addressed these questions for cancer of all grades, and separately for high grade (>= Gleason 4+3) cancer. We used expert-contoured gold-standard prostatectomy histology to simulate targeted biopsies using an isotropic Gaussian needle delivery error from 1 to 6 mm, and investigated the amount of cancer obtained in each biopsy core as determined by histology. Needle delivery error resulted in variability in core involvement that could influence treatment decisions; the presence or absence of cancer in 1/3 or more of each needle core can be attributed to a needle delivery error of 4 mm. However, our data showed that by making multiple biopsy attempts at selected tumor foci, we may increase the probability of correctly characterizing the extent and grade of the cancer.

  17. Impact of prostate cancer testing: an evaluation of the emotional consequences of a negative biopsy result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macefield, R C; Metcalfe, C; Lane, J A; Donovan, J L; Avery, K N L; Blazeby, J M; Down, L; Neal, D E; Hamdy, F C; Vedhara, K

    2010-04-27

    When testing for prostate cancer, as many as 75% of men with a raised prostate-specific antigen (PSA) have a benign biopsy result. Little is known about the psychological effect of this result for these men. In all, 330 men participating in the prostate testing for cancer and treatment (ProtecT) study were studied; aged 50-69 years with a PSA level of > or = 3 ng ml(-1) and a negative biopsy result. Distress and negative mood were measured at four time-points: two during diagnostic testing and two after a negative biopsy result. The majority of men were not greatly affected by testing or a negative biopsy result. The impact on psychological health was highest at the time of the biopsy, with around 20% reporting high distress (33 out of 171) and tense/anxious moods (35 out of 180). Longitudinal analysis on 195 men showed a significant increase in distress at the time of the biopsy compared with levels at the PSA test (difference in Impact of Events Scale (IES) score: 9.47; 95% confidence interval (CI) (6.97, 12.12); Presult (difference in score: 7.32; 95% CI (5.51, 9.52); Presult. Men should be informed of the risk of distress relating to diagnostic uncertainty before they consent to PSA testing.

  18. Effectiveness of stress management in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Li-Pin; Tung, Heng-Hsin; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Lai, Yu-Wei; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Saint Shiou-Sheng; Chiu, Allen W

    2016-01-01

    To assess the utilization of stress management in relieving anxiety and pain among patients who undergo transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy of the prostate. Eighty-two patients admitted to a community hospital for a TRUS biopsy of the prostate participated in this case-controlled study. They were divided into an experimental group that was provided with stress management and a control group that received only routine nursing care. Stress management included music therapy and one-on-one simulation education. Before and after the TRUS biopsy, the patients' state-anxiety inventory score, pain visual analogue scale (VAS), respiratory rate, heart rate, and blood pressure were obtained. There were no differences in baseline and disease characteristics between the two groups. The VAS in both groups increased after the TRUS biopsy, but the difference in pre- and postbiopsy VAS scores was significantly lower in the experimental group (P=0.03). Patients in both groups experienced mild anxiety before and after the biopsy, but those in the experimental group displayed a significantly greater decrease in postbiopsy state-anxiety inventory score compared to the control group (P=0.02). Stress management can alleviate anxiety and pain in patients who received a TRUS biopsy of the prostate under local anesthesia.

  19. The results of transperineal versus transrectal prostate biopsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Fei Shen; Yu-Chun Zhu; Wu-Ran Wei; Yong-Zhong Li; Jie Yang; Yu-Tao Li; Ding-Ming Li; Jia Wang; Hao Zeng

    2012-01-01

    This systematic review was performed to compare the efficacy and complications of transperineal (TP) vs.transrectal (TR) prostate biopsy.A systematic research of PUBMED,EMBASE and the Cochrane Library was performed to identify all clinical controlled trials on prostate cancer (PCa) detection rate and complications achieved by TP and TR biopsies.Prostate biopsies included sextant,extensive and saturation biopsy procedures.All patients were assigned to a TR group and a TP group.Subgroup analysis was performed according to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and digital rectal examination (DRE) findings.The Cochrane Collaboration's RevMan 5.1 software was used for the meta-analysis.A total of seven trials,including three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four case- control studies (CCS),met our inclusion criteria.There was no significant difference in the cancer detection rate between the sextant TR and TP groups (risk difference (RD),-0.02; 95% confidence interval (Cl),-0.08-0.03; P=0.34).Meta-analysis for RCTs combined with CCS showed that there was no difference in the cancer detection rate between the extensive TR and TP group (RD,-0.01; 95% CI,-0.05-0.04; P=0.81).There was no significant difference in PCa detection rate between the saturation TR and TP approaches (31.4% vs.25.7%,respectively; P=0.3).There were also no significant differences in cancer detection between the TR and TP groups in each subgroup.Although the data on complications were not pooled for the meta-analysis,no significant difference was found when comparing TR and TP studies.TR and TP biopsies were equivalent in terms of efficiency and related complications.TP prostate biopsy should be an available and alternative procedure for use by urologists.

  20. Development and validation of a virtual reality transrectal ultrasound guided prostatic biopsy simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalasani, Venu; Cool, Derek W.; Sherebrin, Shi; Fenster, Aaron; Chin, Joseph; Izawa, Jonathan I

    2011-01-01

    Objective We present the design, reliability, face, content and construct validity testing of a virtual reality simulator for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), which allows doctors-in-training to perform multiple different biopsy schemes. Methods This biopsy system design uses a regular “end-firing” TRUS probe. Movements of the probe are tracked with a micro-magnetic sensor to dynamically slice through a phantom patient’s 3D prostate volume to provide real-time continuous TRUS views. 3D TRUS scans during prostate biopsy clinics were recorded. Intrinsic reliability was assessed by comparing the left side of the prostate to the right side of the prostate for each biopsy. A content and face validity questionnaire was administered to 26 doctors to assess the simulator. Construct validity was assessed by comparing notes from experts and novices with regards to the time taken and the accuracy of each biopsy. Results Imaging data from 50 patients were integrated into the simulator. The completed VR TRUS simulator uses real patient images, and is able to provide simulation for 50 cases, with a haptic interface that uses a standard TRUS probe and biopsy needle. Intrinsic reliability was successfully demonstrated by comparing results from the left and right sides of the prostate. Face and content validity respondents noted the realism of the simulator, and its appropriateness as a teaching model. The simulator was able to distinguish between experts and novices during construct validity testing. Conclusions A virtual reality TRUS simulator has successfully been created. It has promising face, content and construct validity results. PMID:21470507

  1. Development and validation of risk score for predicting positive repeat prostate biopsy in patients with a previous negative biopsy in a UK population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews Fiona

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little evidence is available to determine which patients should undergo repeat biopsy after initial benign extended core biopsy (ECB. Attempts have been made to reduce the frequency of negative repeat biopsies using PSA kinetics, density, free-to-total ratios and Kattan's nomogram, to identify men more likely to harbour cancer but no single tool accurately predicts biopsy outcome. The objective of this study was to develop a predictive nomogram to identify men more likely to have a cancer diagnosed on repeat prostate biopsy. Methods Patients with previous benign ECB undergoing repeat biopsy were identified from a database. Association between age, volume, stage, previous histology, PSA kinetics and positive repeat biopsy was analysed. Variables were entered stepwise into logistic regression models. A risk score giving the probability of positive repeat biopsy was estimated. The performance of this score was assessed using receiver characteristic (ROC analysis. Results 110 repeat biopsies were performed in this period. Cancer was detected in 31% of repeat biopsies at Hospital (1 and 30% at Hospital (2. The most accurate predictive model combined age, PSA, PSA velocity, free-to-total PSA ratio, prostate volume and digital rectal examination (DRE findings. The risk model performed well in an independent sample, area under the curve (AUCROC was 0.818 (95% CI 0.707 to 0.929 for the risk model and 0.696 (95% CI 0.472 to 0.921 for the validation model. It was calculated that using a threshold risk score of > 0.2 to identify high risk individuals would reduce repeat biopsies by 39% while identifying 90% of the men with prostate cancer. Conclusion An accurate multi-variable predictive tool to determine the risk of positive repeat prostate biopsy is presented. This can be used by urologists in an outpatient setting to aid decision-making for men with prior benign histology for whom a repeat biopsy is being considered.

  2. [Comparison in the follow-up of two patients with persistent elevated PSA and negative prostate biopsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarra, Alessandro; Panebianco, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    To compare two clinical cases on the follow-up of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia at risck of progression, negative prostate biopsy and persistent elevated PSA levels. After a first negative prostate biopsy for elevated PSA levels, Case A received dutasteride therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia, whereas Case B continued his therapy without dutasteride. In both cases, other diagnostic procedures or other biopsies were decided on the basis of PSA level modifications. Case A showed a stabilization of PSA levels with a new nadir; the patient did not undergo new biopsies or other diagnostic procedures till the presence (24 months of follow-up) of a PSA elevation despite dutasteride therapy. A new biopsy, then, showed a prostate adenocarcinoma. Case B showed persistent and progressive PSA elevation; the patient underwent other diagnostic procedures and 2 new negative biopsies. Only after 26 months of follow-up a further biopsy showed a prostate adenocarcinoma. 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors can reduce the number of unnecessary prostate biopsies.

  3. Efficacy and cost analysis of transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy under monitored anesthesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung Gu Kang; Bum Sik Tae; Sam Hong Mine; Young Hwu Ko; Seok Ho Kang; Jeong Gu Lee; Je Jong Kim; Jun Cheon

    2011-01-01

    @@ Sedation may result in reduction in pain during transrectal ultrasound(TRUS)-guided prostate biopsies.We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a combination of propofol and remifentanil infusion during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy and the related increases in health care costs.From January to September 2010,100 men undergoing a transrectal prostate biopsy were randomized into two groups.In Group 1,[50]patients received a combined infusion of propofol and remifentanil; in Group 2,[50]patients received lidocaine jelly.After TRUS-guided biopsies were performed,pain and patient satisfaction were evaluated by a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS),and a cost-related patient satisfaction questionnaire was completed by all patients.Patients were also asked whether they would be willing to undergo repeat biopsy by the same method.Patients in Group 1 showed a significantly lower VAS score than those in Group 2 (mean VAS score: 0.9士1.1 versus 6.312.5; P<0.001).In addition,the patient satisfaction scale was significantly higher in Group 1(P=0.002).Although the overall cost was significantly higher in Group 1(P=0.006),patient satisfaction scales considering cost were also higher in this group (P=0.009).A combination of propofol and remifentanil is a safe and effective way to decrease patient pain and increase patient satisfaction during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy.Although the costs were higher in the group that received sedation,as expected,the patients exhibited heightened satisfaction and willingness to repeat biopsies by the same method.

  4. The effect of video-based education on patient anxiety in men undergoing transrectal prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Huseyin; Cakmak, Ozgur; Unal, Elif; Akarken, Ilker; Un, Sitki; Ekin, Rahmi Gokhan; Konyalioglu, Ersin; Isoglu, Cemal Selcuk; Zorlu, Ferruh

    2014-11-01

    We assess the effect of video-based education on patient anxiety during transrectal prostate biopsy. A total of 246 patients who underwent transrectal prostate biopsy were prospectively enrolled in the study. Group 1 included 123 patients who received both written and video-based education, while Group 2 included 123 patients who received only written instructions regarding prostate biopsies. State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was used to assess state and trait anxiety (STAI-S/T) After completing the STAI-S and STAI-T questionnaires, all patients in Group 1 received written information and video-based education and they again completed STAI-S before the biopsy. On the contrary, after completing the STAI-S and STAI-T questionnaires, the patients in Group 2 received only written information and then they completed the STAI-S before the biopsy. Moreover, a visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess pain scores during digital rectal examination, probe insertion, periprostatic local anesthesic infiltration, and biopsy. No difference was noted between 2 groups regarding VAS scores. Comparing the 2 groups on baseline anxiety, we found that trait anxiety scores (STAI-T) were similar (p = 0.238). Pre-information STAI-S scores were similar in both groups (p = 0.889) and they both indicated high anxiety levels (score ≥42). While post-information STAI-S scores remained high in Group 2, post-information STAI-S scores significantly decreased in Group 1 (p = 0.01). Undergoing a prostate biopsy is stressful and may cause anxiety for patients. Video-based education about the procedure can diminish patient anxiety.

  5. Assessment and clinical factors associated with pain in patients undergoing transrectal prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gómez, E; Ramírez, M; Gómez-Ferrer, A; Rubio-Briones, J; Iborra, I; J Carrasco-Valiente; Campos, J P; Ruiz-García, J; Requena-Tapia, M J; Solsona, E

    2015-09-01

    To quantify the degree of pain experienced by patients who undergo ultrasound-guided transrectal prostate biopsy in standard clinical practice and assess the clinical factors associated with increased pain. Analysis of a multicenter series of patients with prostate biopsy according to standard clinical practice. The biopsy was performed transrectally with a protocol of local anesthesia on the posterolateral nerve bundle. The pain was assessed at 20minutes into the procedure using the visual analog scale (0-10). The degree of pain was analyzed, and the association was studied using a univariate/multivariate analysis of selected clinical variables and the degree of pain. A total of 1188 patients with a median age of 64 years were analyzed. Thirty percent of the biopsies were diagnosed with a tumor. The median pain score was 2, with 65% of the patients reporting a pain score ≤2. The multivariate analysis showed that the prostate volume (RR, 1.34; 95% CI 1.01-1.77; P=.04), having a previous biopsy (RR, 2.25; 95% CI 1.44-3.52; P<.01), age (RR, .63; 95% CI .47-.85; P<.01) and feel palpation (RR, 1.95; 95% CI 1.28-2.96; P<.01) were factors independently associated with greater pain during the procedure. Transrectal biopsy with local anesthesia is a relatively painless technique. Factors such as age, a previous biopsy, pain on being touched and prostate volume were associated with the presence of greater pain during the procedure. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Effectiveness of stress management in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu LP

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Li-Pin Chiu,1,2 Heng-Hsin Tung,3 Kuan-Chia Lin,3 Yu-Wei Lai,1,4 Yi-Chun Chiu,1,4 Saint Shiou-Sheng Chen,1,4 Allen W Chiu1,4 1Division of Urology, Taipei City Hospital, 2University of Taipei, General Education Center, 3School of Nursing, Department of Care Management, National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Science, 4Department of Urology, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China Background: To assess the utilization of stress management in relieving anxiety and pain among patients who undergo transrectal ultrasound (TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate.  Methods: Eighty-two patients admitted to a community hospital for a TRUS biopsy of the prostate participated in this case-controlled study. They were divided into an experimental group that was provided with stress management and a control group that received only routine nursing care. Stress management included music therapy and one-on-one simulation education. Before and after the TRUS biopsy, the patients’ state-anxiety inventory score, pain visual analogue scale (VAS, respiratory rate, heart rate, and blood pressure were obtained.  Results: There were no differences in baseline and disease characteristics between the two groups. The VAS in both groups increased after the TRUS biopsy, but the difference in pre- and postbiopsy VAS scores was significantly lower in the experimental group (P=0.03. Patients in both groups experienced mild anxiety before and after the biopsy, but those in the experimental group displayed a significantly greater decrease in postbiopsy state-anxiety inventory score compared to the control group (P=0.02.Conclusion: Stress management can alleviate anxiety and pain in patients who received a TRUS biopsy of the prostate under local anesthesia. Keywords: anxiety, pain, stress management, transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate

  7. Repeat prostate biopsy accuracy: simulator-based comparison of two- and three-dimensional transrectal US modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cool, Derek W; Connolly, Michael J; Sherebrin, Shi; Eagleson, Roy; Izawa, Jonathan I; Amann, Justin; Romagnoli, Cesare; Romano, Walter M; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-02-01

    To compare the accuracy of biopsy with two-dimensional (2D) transrectal ultrasonography (US) with that of biopsy with conventional three-dimensional (3D) transrectal US and biopsy with guided 3D transrectal US in the guidance of repeat prostate biopsy procedures in a prostate biopsy simulator. The institutional review board approved this retrospective study. Five residents and five experts performed repeat biopsies with a biopsy simulator that contained the transrectal US prostate images of 10 patients who had undergone biopsy. Simulated repeat biopsies were performed with 2D transrectal US, conventional 3D transrectal US, and guided 3D transrectal US (an extension of 3D transrectal US that enables active display of biopsy targets). The modalities were compared on the basis of time per biopsy and how accurately simulated repeat biopsies could be guided to specific targets. The probability for successful biopsy of a repeat target was calculated for each modality. Guided 3D transrectal US was significantly (P < .01) more accurate for simulated biopsy of repeat targets than was 2D or 3D transrectal US, with a biopsy accuracy of 0.86 mm +/- 0.47 (standard deviation), 3.68 mm +/- 2.60, and 3.60 mm +/- 2.57, respectively. Experts had a 70% probability of sampling a prior biopsy target volume of 0.5 cm(3) with 2D transrectal US; however, the probability approached 100% with guided 3D transrectal US. Biopsy accuracy was not significantly different between experts and residents for any modality; however, experts were significantly (P < .05) faster than residents with each modality. Repeat biopsy of the prostate with 2D transrectal US has limited accuracy. Compared with 2D transrectal US, the biopsy accuracy of both experts and residents improved with guided 3D transrectal US but did not improve with conventional 3D transrectal US.

  8. Two-micrometer thulium laser resection of the prostate-tangerine technique in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients with previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jian; Wei, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Fei; Liu, Hai-Tao; Zhao, Fu-Jun; Han, Bang-Min; Sun, Xiao-Wen; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2017-01-01

    The 2-μm thulium laser resection of the prostate-tangerine technique (TmLRP-TT) has been introduced as a minimally invasive treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This study was undertaken to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of TmLRP-TT for the treatment of BPH patients with previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy. A prospective analysis of 51 patients with previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy who underwent surgical treatment using TmLRP-TT was performed from December 2011 to December 2013. Preoperative status, surgical details, and perioperative complications were recorded. The follow-up outcome was evaluated with subjective and objective tests at 1 and 6 months. TmLRP-TT was successfully completed in all patients. Mean prostate volume, operative duration, and catheterization time were 93.3 ± 37.9 ml, 69.5 ± 39.5 min, and 6.5 ± 1.3 days, respectively. The mean International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life score, maximum urinary flow rate, and post-void residual urine volume changed notably at 6-month follow-up (22.5 ± 6.9 vs 6.1 ± 3.2, 4.8 ± 1.3 vs 1.1 ± 0.9, 7.3 ± 4.5 vs 18.9 ± 7.1 ml s-1 , and 148.7 ± 168.7 vs 28.4 ± 17.9 ml). Two (3.9%) patients required blood transfusion perioperatively, while 3 (5.9%) patients experienced transient hematuria postoperatively, and 2 (3.9%) patients received 3 days recatheterization due to clot retention. TmLRP-TT is a safe and effective minimally invasive technique for patients with previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy during the 6-month follow-up. This promising technology may be a feasible surgical method for previously negative transrectal prostate biopsy in the future.

  9. Feasibility of a pneumatically actuated MR-compatible robot for transrectal prostate biopsy guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakar, D.; Schouten, M.G.; Bosboom, D.G.H.; Barentsz, J.O.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Futterer, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility of using a remote-controlled, pneumatically actuated magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible robotic device to aid transrectal biopsy of the prostate performed with real-time 3-T MR imaging guidance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective study was approved by the ethi

  10. Is periprostatic nerve block a gold standard in case of transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: PNB provides better pain control in TRUS-guided prostate biopsy but still there is need of additional analgesic in the form of tramadol or INB. Tramadol has advantage of oral intake and analgesic effect at time of probe insertion and at nerve block. Both tramadol and INB may be used in combination along with PNB.

  11. Rare complication after a transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy: a giant retroperitoneal hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiancone, Francesco; Mirone, Vincenzo; Fedelini, Maurizio; Meccariello, Clemente; Pucci, Luigi; Carrino, Maurizio; Fedelini, Paolo

    2016-05-24

    Common complications related to transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostatic needle biopsy are hematuria, hematospermia, and hematochezia. To the best of our knowledge, we report the second case of a very large hematoma extending from the pelvis into the retroperitoneal space in literature.A 66-year-old man with a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 5.4 ng/ml was admitted to our department for a TRUS-guided prostatic needle biopsy. Laboratory values on the day before biopsy, including coagulation studies, were all normal. The patients did not take any anticoagulant drugs. No immediate complications were encountered. Nevertheless, 7 hours after the biopsy, the patient reached our emergency department with severe diffuse abdominal pain, hypotension, tachycardia, and confusional state. He underwent an ultrasonography and then a computed tomography (CT) scan that showed "a blood collection in the pelvis that extending to the lower pole of left kidney associated with a focus of active contrast extravasation, indicating active ongoing prostate bleeding." Consequently, he underwent a diagnostic angiography that showed no more contrast extravasation, without the need of embolization. Management of hematoma has been conservative and hematoma was completely reabsorbed 4 months later.

  12. Prospective randomized trial to evaluate effectiveness of periprostatic nerve block in prostatic biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Lavania

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of local anesthetic infiltration, in decreasing the discomfort experienced by patients undergoing trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS guided biopsy of prostate. Materials and methods: Between January 2002 and February 2003, we investigated consecutively, asymptomatic men, suspected of having prostatic cancer. About 39 patients were randomized to receive 10 ml of 2% Lidocaine periprostatic block + intrarectal Lidocaine gel (group 1 = 20, or intarectal Lidocaine gel only (group 2 = 19 during prostatic biopsy. Immediately following the TRUS-guided biopsy, patients were asked to grade the pain they experienced using the 11-point visual analogue score (VAS. Results: The mean pain score in the patients of group 1 were significantly lower than the patients of group 2 ( P < 0.001, suggesting that periprostatic block produced a significant reduction in the perceived pain. Conclusions: Local anesthetic infiltration by TRUS-guided injection of Lidocaine is effective for decreasing pain associated with prostatic biopsy.

  13. [Does neuroendocrine differentiation have prognostic value in prostate core needle biopsies?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskulski, Jarosław; Gołabek, Tomasz; Kopczyński, Janusz; Orłowsk, Pawel; Bukowczan, Jakub; Dudek, Przemek; Chłosta, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The biological behaviour of prostate cancer (PCa) varies significantly and cannot be, therefore, predicted. Better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning PCa oncogenesis and progression with its yet-to-be discovered poor prognostic factors is essential in order to optimise and tailor treatment to an individual patient. The aim of this paper was to investigate the association between the rate of focal PCa neuroendocrine activity, tumour cell proliferation index score, and the rate of PCa positive core needle biopsy results. 92 men, with histologically confirmed PCa, which was clinically confined to the prostate and was graded with Gleason score > or =7, had their core needle biopsies under transrectal ultrasonography guidance performed. The PCa neuroendocrine activity was immunohistochemically confirmed using antibodies against Chromogranin-A and neuron specific enolase. The neuroendocrine activity was detected in 14 (13%) out of 92 PCa patients participating in the study. The proliferative index was not increased in non-cancerous prostate cells. There was no relationship between PCa neuroendocrine activity, the number and percentage of PCa positive biopsies, prostate volume, serum PSA concentration, and Gleason score found. No association between selected PCa prognostic factors and neuroendocrine activity could be found in patients with organ confined prostate cancer.

  14. Is there a role for body mass index in the assessment of prostate cancer risk on biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuanyuan; Ketchum, Norma S; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Thompson, Ian M

    2014-10-01

    We examine the role of body mass index in the assessment of prostate cancer risk. A total of 3,258 participants who underwent biopsy (including 1,902 men with a diagnosis of prostate cancer) were identified from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial. The associations of body mass index with prostate cancer and high grade prostate cancer were examined using logistic regression, adjusting for age, race, body mass index adjusted prostate specific antigen, digital rectal examination, family history of prostate cancer, biopsy history, prostate specific antigen velocity, and time between study entry and the last biopsy. The prediction models were compared with our previously developed body mass index adjusted Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial prostate cancer risk calculator. Of the study subjects 49.1% were overweight and 29.3% were obese. After adjustment, among men without a known family history of prostate cancer, increased body mass index was not associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer (per one-unit increase in logBMI OR 0.83, p=0.54) but was significantly associated with a higher risk of high grade prostate cancer (ie Gleason score 7 or greater prostate cancer) (OR 2.31, p=0.03). For men with a known family history of prostate cancer the risks of prostate cancer and high grade prostate cancer increased rapidly as body mass index increased (prostate cancer OR 3.73, p=0.02; high grade prostate cancer OR 7.95, p=0.002). The previously developed risk calculator generally underestimated the risks of prostate cancer and high grade prostate cancer. Body mass index provided independently predictive information regarding the risks of prostate cancer and high grade prostate cancer after adjusting for other risk factors. Body mass index, especially in men with a known family history of prostate cancer, should be considered for inclusion in any clinical assessment of prostate cancer risk and recommendations regarding prostate biopsy. Copyright © 2014

  15. MRI-ultrasound fusion biopsy for prediction of final prostate pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Jesse D.; Stephenson, Samuel; Brugger, Michelle; Lu, David Y.; Lieu, Patricia; Sonn, Geoffrey A.; Natarajan, Shyam; Dorey, Frederick J.; Huang, Jiaoti; Margolis, Daniel J.A.; Reiter, Robert E.; Marks, Leonard S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To explore the impact of MRI-ultrasound (MRI-US) fusion prostate biopsy on prediction of final surgical pathology. MATERIALS AND METHODS 54 consecutive men undergoing radical prostatectomy at UCLA after Artemis fusion biopsy (Eigen, Grass Valley, CA) were included in this prospective IRB-approved pilot study. Using MRI-US fusion, tissue was obtained from a 12-point systematic grid (mapping biopsy, MBx) and from regions of interest detected by multi-parametric MRI (targeted biopsy, TBx). A single radiologist read all MRIs, and a single pathologist independently re-reviewed all biopsy and whole-mount pathology, blinded to prior interpretation and matched specimen. Gleason score (GS) concordance between biopsy and prostatectomy was the primary endpoint. RESULTS Mean age was 62 years, with median PSA 6.2 ng/ml. Final GS at prostatectomy was 6 (13%), 7 (70%), and 8–9 (17%). A tertiary pattern was detected in 17 (31%) men. 32/45 (71%) high-suspicion (image grade 4–5) MRI targets contained prostate cancer (CaP). The per-core cancer detection rate was 20% by MBx and 42% by TBx. The highest Gleason pattern at prostatectomy was detected by MBx in 54%, TBx in 54%, and the combination in 81% of cases. 17% were upgraded from fusion biopsy to final pathology; one case (2%) was downgraded. The combination of TBx and MBx was needed to obtain the best predictive accuracy. CONCLUSIONS In this pilot study, MR-US fusion biopsy allowed for prediction of final prostate pathology with greater accuracy than that reported previously using conventional methods (81% versus 40–65%). If confirmed, these results would have important clinical implications. PMID:24793118

  16. The uncertain relationship between obesity and prostate cancer: an Italian biopsy cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nunzio, C; Freedland, S J; Miano, L; Finazzi Agrò, E; Bañez, L; Tubaro, A

    2011-12-01

    The study aims to investigate the relationship between obesity and prostate cancer diagnosis at biopsy. From 2005 onwards, a consecutive series of patients undergoing 12-core prostate biopsy for PSA value ≥ 4 ng/ml and/or positive digital rectal examination (DRE) were enrolled. Before the biopsy, patients underwent a physical examination, including height and weight measurement. Obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m(2). Blood samples were drawn from all patients and analyzed for total PSA and testosterone. 885 patients were enrolled with a median age and PSA of 67 years (range 37-95) and 6.4 ng/ml (range 1-30) respectively. Median BMI was 27.1 kg/m(2) (range 18-46.6) with 185 patients classified as obese. 363 patients had cancer at biopsy; 76 were obese. PSA was independently associated with a higher risk of cancer (OR 1.09 per 1 unit PSA, p = 0.01). On multivariate analysis, the BMI was not significantly associated with an increased prostate cancer risk (p = 0.19). Out of 363 patients with prostate cancer, 154 had a Gleason score 6 (23 were obese) and 209 a Gleason score ≥7 (53 were obese). Among men with cancer, a higher BMI on univariate (p = 0.001) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.005) was associated with high-grade disease (Gleason ≥ 7). In our single center study and less aggressively screened cohort, obesity is associated with an increased risk of a high-grade Gleason score when prostate cancer is diagnosed at biopsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Outbreak of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Ochrobactrum anthropi Infections after Prostate Biopsies, France, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviari, Skerdi; Cassier, Pierre; Dananché, Cédric; Hulin, Monique; Dauwalder, Olivier; Rouvière, Olivier; Bertrand, Xavier; Perraud, Michel; Bénet, Thomas; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    We report an outbreak of healthcare-associated prostatitis involving rare environmental pathogens in immunocompetent patients undergoing transrectal prostate biopsies at Hôpital Édouard Herriot (Lyon, France) during August 13-October 10, 2014. Despite a fluoroquinolone-based prophylaxis, 5 patients were infected with Achromobacter xylosoxidans and 3 with Ochrobactrum anthropi, which has not been reported as pathogenic in nonimmunocompromised persons. All patients recovered fully. Analysis of the outbreak included case investigation, case-control study, biopsy procedure review, microbiologic testing of environmental and clinical samples, and retrospective review of hospital records for 4 years before the outbreak. The cases resulted from asepsis errors during preparation of materials for the biopsies. A low-level outbreak involving environmental bacteria was likely present for years, masked by antimicrobial drug prophylaxis and a low number of cases. Healthcare personnel should promptly report unusual pathogens in immunocompetent patients to infection control units, and guidelines should explicitly mention asepsis during materials preparation.

  18. Multi-parametric MRI-pathologic correlation of prostate cancer using tracked biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sheng; Turkbey, Baris; Kruecker, Jochen; Yan, Pingkun; Locklin, Julia; Pinto, Peter; Choyke, Peter; Wood, Bradford

    2010-02-01

    MRI is currently the most promising imaging modality for prostate cancer diagnosis due to its high resolution and multiparametric nature. However, currently there is no standard for integration of diagnostic information from different MRI sequences. We propose a method to increase the diagnostic accuracy of MRI by correlating biopsy specimens with four MRI sequences including T2 weighted MRI, Diffusion Weight Imaging, Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI and MRI spectroscopy. This method uses device tracking and image fusion to determine the specimen's position on MRI images. The proposed method is unbiased and cost effective. It does not substantially interfere with the standard biopsy workflow, allowing it to be easily accepted by physicians. A study of 41 patients was carried out to validate the approach. The performance of all four MRI sequences in various combinations is reported. Guidelines are given for multi-parametric imaging and tracked biopsy of prostate cancer.

  19. Ultrasound-guided seminal vesicle biopsies in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wymenga, LFA; Duisterwinkel, FJ; Groenier, K; Mensink, HJA

    2000-01-01

    Invasion of prostatic adenocarcinoma into the seminal vesicles (SV) is generally accepted as an index of poor prognosis. The pre-operative identification of SV invasion is an important element in staging since it may alter subsequent treatment decisions. We studied the possibility of diagnosing SV i

  20. Targeted histology sampling from atypical small acinar proliferation area detected by repeat transrectal prostate biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Karman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Оbjective: to define the approach to the management of patients with the detected ASAP area.Materials and methods. In the time period from 2012 through 2015, 494 patients with previously negative biopsy and remaining suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa were examined. The patients underwent repeat 24-core multifocal prostate biopsy with taking additional tissue samples from suspicious areas detected by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal ultrasound. An isolated ASAP area was found in 127 (25. 7 % of the 494 examined men. All of them were offered to perform repeat target transrectal biopsy of this area. Targeted transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the ASAP area was performed in 56 (44.1 % of the 127 patients, 53 of them being included in the final analysis.Results. PCa was diagnosed in 14 (26.4 % of the 53 patients, their mean age being 64.4 ± 6.9 years. The average level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA in PCa patients was 6.8 ± 3.0 ng/ml, in those with benign lesions – 9.3 ± 6.5 ng/ml; the percentage ratio of free/total PSA with PCa was 16.2 ± 7,8 %, with benign lesions – 23.3 ± 7.7 %; PSA density in PCa patients was 0.14 ± 0.07 ng/ml/cm3, in those with benign lesions – 0.15 ± 0.12 ng/ml/cm3. Therefore, with ASAP area being detected in repeat prostate biopsy samples, it is advisable that targeted extended biopsy of this area be performed. 

  1. Determination of Optimum Formalin Fixation Duration for Prostate Needle Biopsies for Immunohistochemistry and Quantum Dot FISH Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayana, Ubaradka G; Birch, Chandler; Nagle, Raymond B; Tomlins, Scott A; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Zhang, Wenjun; Hubbard, Antony; Brunhoeber, Patrick; Wang, Yixin; Tang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Prostate biopsy is the key clinical specimen for disease diagnosis. However, various conditions used during biopsy processing for histologic analysis may affect the performance of diagnostic tests, such as hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC), or in situ hybridization (ISH). One such condition that may affect diagnostic test performance is fixation duration in 10% neutral buffered formalin (NBF). For example, prostate needle biopsies are often <1 mm in diameter and thus overfixed. It is important to understand the impact of tissue fixation duration on diagnostic test performance to enable optimized assay procedures. This study was designed to study the effect of 10% NBF fixation duration of prostate needle biopsy on multiplexed quantum dot (QD) ISH assay of ERG and PTEN, 2 genes commonly altered in prostate cancer. The samples were also evaluated for H&E staining and ERG and PTEN IHC. H&E staining and ERG and PTEN IHC were acceptable for all the durations of fixation tested. For QD ISH, we observed good signals with biopsy samples fixed from 4 to 120 hours. Biopsy specimens fixed between 8 and 72 hours gave the best signal as scored by the study pathologist. In a separate cohort of 18 routinely processed prostate biopsy cores, all cores were stained successfully with the QD ISH assay, and results were 100% concordant to ERG and PTEN IHC. We conclude that 8 to 72 hours duration of fixation for prostate needle biopsies in 10% NBF results in optimal QD ISH assay performance.

  2. Intravenous piperacillin/tazobactam plus fluoroquinolone prophylaxis prior to prostate ultrasound biopsy reduces serious infectious complications and is cost effective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remynse LC

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Louis C Remynse III, Patrick J Sweeney, Kevin A Brewton, Jay M LonswayUrology Associates of Battle Creek, PC, Battle Creek, MI, USAAbstract: Infectious complications related to prostate ultrasound and biopsy have increased in the past decade with the emergence of increasing fluoroquinolone bacterial resistance. We investigated the addition of intravenous (iv piperacillin/tazobactam immediately prior to prostate ultrasound and biopsy with standard fluoroquinolone prophylaxis to determine if it would decrease the incidence of serious infectious complications after prostate ultrasound and biopsy. Group 1 patients were a historic control of 197 patients who underwent prostate ultrasound and biopsy with standard fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. Group 2 patients, 104 patients, received standard fluoroquinolone prophylaxis and the addition of a single dose of iv piperacillin/tazobactam 30 minutes prior to prostate ultrasound and biopsy. There were ten serious bacterial infectious complications in group 1 patients. No patients in group 2 developed serious bacterial infections after prostate ultrasound and biopsy. There was approximately a 5% incidence of serious bacterial infection in group 1 patients. Subgroup analysis revealed an almost 2.5 times increased risk of infection in diabetes patients undergoing prostate ultrasound and biopsy. There was a 10% risk of serious bacterial infection in diabetics compared with a 3.8% risk group 1 nondiabetes patients. The addition of a single dose of iv piperacillin/tazobactam along with standard fluoroquinolone prophylaxis substantially reduces the risk of serious bacterial infection after prostate ultrasound and biopsy (P < 0.02.Keywords: piperacillin/tazobactam, fluoroquinolone, prostate biopsy, infectious complications

  3. Prostate cancer: 1.5 T endo-coil dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and MR spectroscopy-correlation with prostate biopsy and prostatectomy histopathological data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, E.; Balslev, I.; Løgager, Vibeke Berg

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 43 patients, scheduled for radical...... prostatectomy, underwent prostate MR examination. Prostate cancer was identified by transrectal ultrasonographically (TRUS) guided sextant biopsy. MR examination was performed at 1.5T with an endorectal MR coil. Cancer localisation was performed on sextant-basis - for comparison between TRUS biopsy, MR...

  4. Empiric antibiotics therapy for mildly elevated prostate specific antigen: Helpful to avoid unnecessary biopsies?

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    Andrea Fandella

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The management of mildly elevated (4.0-10.0 ng/ml prostate specific antigen (PSA is uncertain. Immediate prostate biopsy, antibiotic treatment, or monitoring PSA level for 1-3 months is still in controversy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analysed the effect of empiric antibiotics on an increased PSA in a mono-institutional study. We analysed the data of 100 patients with a PSA of 4-10 ng/ml and normal digital rectal examination undergoing their first prostate biopsy. Patients were divided in two different cohorts. One cohort was submitted to antibiotic therapy (Levoxacin 500 mg daily for 20 days and both cohort had a re-dosing of PSA before the prostate biopsy. Results: Average age of the whole group of patients was 66.48 ± 8.32 years and their average initial PSA level was 6.67 ± 1.57 ng/mL. In the treated group (N = 49 29 patients had a decreasing PSA value from mean baseline PSA value of 6.6 ± 1.54 ng/ml to the re-dosed mean PSA level of 5.4 ± 1,61 ng/ml (p = 0.7; 20 patients didn’t experience a decrease PSA value, with a mean PSA level of 6.9 ± 1.68 ng/ml. In the control group (N = 51, 30 patients had a decrease of PSA level from mean baseline PSA level of 6.5 ± 1,59 ng/ml to a re-dosed PSA level of 5.5 ± 1.57 ng/ml; 21 patients didn’t experience a decrease of PSA value, with a mean PSA level of 6.7 ± 1.71 ng/ml. Multivariate analysis of age, PSA changes, antibiotics therapy and biopsy results (presence or absence of cancer revealed no significant difference between the two cohorts. Sepsis after biopsy occurred in 3 patient in the antibiotics group (6% and in one of the control group (2%. Conclusions: The study, even with some limitations, does not seem to show an advantage due to the administration of antibacterial therapy to reduce PSA values before prostate biopsy and subsequently to reduce unnecessary prostate biopsies.

  5. Diclofenac Suppository as a Preemptive Analgesia in Ultrasound-guided Biopsy of Prostate: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroon, Naveed; Ather, M Hammad; Khan, Salma; Kumar, Pirkash; Salam, Basit

    2015-10-01

    To compare preprocedure Diclofenac suppository and Xylocaine gel with Xylocaine gel only in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy of prostate for pain. It is a randomized controlled trial conducted on patients undergoing TRUS-guided biopsy for clinical or biochemical suspicion of prostate cancer following a written informed consent and Ethics Review Committee approval. Patients were randomized into 2 groups. Group A included those patients who received Diclofenac suppository 2 hours before in combination with 10 mL of 2% Xylocaine gel 5 minutes before biopsy. Group B received Xylocaine gel only. A visual analog scale was used to measure the pain scores at the time of TRUS probe insertion, just after taking biopsy cores and 2 hours after biopsy. A total of 100 patients were recruited in the study with 50 patients each in group A and B. Mean age of group A was 69.1 ± 10 years and 67.3 ± 8.1 years for group B. The mean pain score for group A and B at the time of probe insertion was 0.08 ± 0.27 and 0.34 ± 0.63 (P = .032), immediately after taking biopsy cores was 1.46 ± 1.15 and 4.68 ± 0.77 (P = .000), and 2 hours after biopsy was 0.14 ± 0.45 vs 2.40 ± 0.81 (P = .000), respectively. The mean pain score at the time of TRUS probe insertion, immediately after taking biopsy cores, and 2 hours after biopsy is statistically significantly higher in group B. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. TU-CD-BRB-12: Radiogenomics of MRI-Guided Prostate Cancer Biopsy Habitats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyanova, R; Lynne, C; Abraham, S; Patel, M; Jorda, M; Kryvenko, O; Ishkanian, A; Abramowitz, M; Pollack, A [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Tachar, M; Erho, N; Buerki, C; Lam, L; Davicioni, E [GenomeDx Biosciences Inc., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diagnostic prostate biopsies are subject to sampling bias. We hypothesize that quantitative imaging with multiparametric (MP)-MRI can more accurately direct targeted biopsies to index lesions associated with highest risk clinical and genomic features. Methods: Regionally distinct prostate habitats were delineated on MP-MRI (T2-weighted, perfusion and diffusion imaging). Directed biopsies were performed on 17 habitats from 6 patients using MRI-ultrasound fusion. Biopsy location was characterized with 52 radiographic features. Transcriptome-wide analysis of 1.4 million RNA probes was performed on RNA from each habitat. Genomics features with insignificant expression values (<0.25) and interquartile range <0.5 were filtered, leaving total of 212 genes. Correlation between imaging features, genes and a 22 feature genomic classifier (GC), developed as a prognostic assay for metastasis after radical prostatectomy was investigated. Results: High quality genomic data was derived from 17 (100%) biopsies. Using the 212 ‘unbiased’ genes, the samples clustered by patient origin in unsupervised analysis. When only prostate cancer related genomic features were used, hierarchical clustering revealed samples clustered by needle-biopsy Gleason score (GS). Similarly, principal component analysis of the imaging features, found the primary source of variance segregated the samples into high (≥7) and low (6) GS. Pearson’s correlation analysis of genes with significant expression showed two main patterns of gene expression clustering prostate peripheral and transitional zone MRI features. Two-way hierarchical clustering of GC with radiomics features resulted in the expected groupings of high and low expressed genes in this metastasis signature. Conclusions: MP-MRI-targeted diagnostic biopsies can potentially improve risk stratification by directing pathological and genomic analysis to clinically significant index lesions. As determinant lesions are more reliably

  7. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography using cadence-contrast pulse sequencing technology for targeted biopsy of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigner, Friedrich; Pallwein, Leo; Mitterberger, Michael; Pinggera, Germar M; Mikuz, Gregor; Horninger, Wolfgang; Frauscher, Ferdinand

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (US) using cadence-contrast pulse sequencing (CPS) technology, compared with systematic biopsy for detecting prostate cancer, as grey-scale US has low sensitivity and specificity for detecting prostate cancer. In all, 44 men with suspicious prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and CPS findings were assessed; all had CPS-targeted and systematic biopsy. Transrectal CPS images were taken with a low mechanical index (0.14). A microbubble contrast agent (SonoVue, Bracco International BV, Amsterdam, the Netherlands) was administered as a bolus, with a maximum dose of 4.8 mL. CPS was used to assess prostatic vascularity. Areas with a rapid and increased contrast enhancement within the peripheral zone were defined as suspicious for prostate cancer. Up to five CPS targeted biopsies were taken and subsequently a 10-core systematic biopsy was taken. Cancer detection rates for the two techniques were compared. Overall, cancer was detected in 35 of 44 patients (80%), with a mean PSA level of 3.8 ng/mL. Lesions suspicious on CPS showed cancer in 35 of 44 patients (80%) and systematic biopsy detected cancer in 15 of 44 patients (34%). CPS-targeted cores were positive in 105 of 220 cores (47.7%) and in 41 of 440 systematic biopsy cores (9.3%) (P biopsy was 6.7 and for CPS-targeted biopsy 6.8 (P > 0.05). The sensitivity of CPS for detecting cancer was 100% (confidence interval, 95%). However, limitations in the series included that only CPS-positive cases were investigated, and CPS-targeted biopsy should be evaluated in a more extended biopsy scheme. Contrast-enhanced US using CPS enables excellent visualization of the microvasculature associated with prostate cancer, and can improve the detection of prostate cancer compared with systematic biopsy.

  8. Prostate biopsy: is age important for determining the pathological features in prostate cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto A. Antunes

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The influence of age on the aggressiveness of prostate cancer (PCa is controversial. This study aims to assess the influence of age in determining the pathological features of biopsies from patients diagnosed with PCa. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We selected 1422 patients with clinical suspicion of PCa; among them, 547 (38.5% had received a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. Patients were categorized into the following age groups: up to 50 years old, 51 to 60 years, 61 to 70 years, 71 to 80 years, and over 80 years. The evaluated variables were histological grade, presence of perineural invasion and estimate of tumor volume through measurement of the maximum percentage of tissue with cancer in one fragment and total percentage of tissue with cancer in the sample. RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 66.4 years, with age range from 32 to 94 years. The estimate of tumor volume by maximum percentage of tissue with cancer in one fragment (p = 0.064, total percentage of tissue with cancer in the sample (p = 0.443, and Gleason score (p = 0.485 were not statistically different in relation to the age groups under study. The presence of perineural invasion occurred more frequently among the 50 years and 81 years age groups when compared with patients aged from 51 to 60 and from 61 to 80 years (p = 0.005. CONCLUSIONS: Age did not represent a determining factor for pathological findings concerning Gleason score and estimate of tumor volume by the variables in use.

  9. Outcomes of Prostate Biopsy in Men with Hypogonadism Prior or During Testosterone Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Shoskes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The relationship between Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT and prostate cancer remains controversial. Most TRT studies show no change in prostate specific antigen (PSA but some men do have PSA rise or develop an abnormal digital rectal exam (aDRE. Our objective was to examine the biopsy results of men with symptomatic hypogonadism before or during therapy. Materials and Methods: Data was extracted from our medical record on men with hypogonadism who had a prostate biopsy within the past 4 years done by 3 Urologists with guideline driven practice patterns. Results: 96 men were identified. Mean age at biopsy was 63 (range 40–85 and median PSA was 3.78ng/dL (0.5–662. Of the 61 men not on TRT, median PSA was 4.34 (0.5 to 662 and mean total testosterone 254 (191–341. There were 29 (47.5% prostate cancers found (6 Gleason score 6, 13 Gleason score 7, 10 Gleason score 8 or 9. Of the 35 men on TRT, median PSA was 3.27 (0.5 to 13.7. The %PSA increase ranged from 2 to 251% (mean 93.5%. Mean total testosterone was 383 (146–792. Of the 14 men treated < 2 years, none had cancer. Of the 21 men treated 2 or more years 5 had cancer (2 Gleason score 6, 3 Gleason score 7. Conclusions: Men with hypogonadism and a clinical indication for biopsy often have prostate cancer, many high grade. No men with an initial PSA rise on TRT had cancer. Men on long term TRT should be monitored with PSA and DRE per guidelines.

  10. A tissue biopsy-based epigenetic multiplex PCR assay for prostate cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Neste Leander

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PSA-directed prostate cancer screening leads to a high rate of false positive identifications and an unnecessary biopsy burden. Epigenetic biomarkers have proven useful, exhibiting frequent and abundant inactivation of tumor suppressor genes through such mechanisms. An epigenetic, multiplex PCR test for prostate cancer diagnosis could provide physicians with better tools to help their patients. Biomarkers like GSTP1, APC and RASSF1 have demonstrated involvement with prostate cancer, with the latter two genes playing prominent roles in the field effect. The epigenetic states of these genes can be used to assess the likelihood of cancer presence or absence. Results An initial test cohort of 30 prostate cancer-positive samples and 12 cancer-negative samples was used as basis for the development and optimization of an epigenetic multiplex assay based on the GSTP1, APC and RASSF1 genes, using methylation specific PCR (MSP. The effect of prostate needle core biopsy sample volume and age of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE samples was evaluated on an independent follow-up cohort of 51 cancer-positive patients. Multiplexing affects copy number calculations in a consistent way per assay. Methylation ratios are therefore altered compared to the respective singleplex assays, but the correlation with patient outcome remains equivalent. In addition, tissue-biopsy samples as small as 20 μm can be used to detect methylation in a reliable manner. The age of FFPE-samples does have a negative impact on DNA quality and quantity. Conclusions The developed multiplex assay appears functionally similar to individual singleplex assays, with the benefit of lower tissue requirements, lower cost and decreased signal variation. This assay can be applied to small biopsy specimens, down to 20 microns, widening clinical applicability. Increasing the sample volume can compensate the loss of DNA quality and quantity in older samples.

  11. Outcomes of Prostate Biopsy in Men with Hypogonadism Prior or During Testosterone Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoskes, Daniel A; Barazani, Yagil; Fareed, Khaled; Sabanegh, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT) and prostate cancer remains controversial. Most TRT studies show no change in prostate specific antigen (PSA) but some men do have PSA rise or develop an abnormal digital rectal exam (aDRE). Our objective was to examine the biopsy results of men with symptomatic hypogonadism before or during therapy. Data was extracted from our medical record on men with hypogonadism who had a prostate biopsy within the past 4 years done by 3 Urologists with guideline driven practice patterns. 96 men were identified. Mean age at biopsy was 63 (range 40-85) and median PSA was 3.78ng/dL (0.5-662). Of the 61 men not on TRT, median PSA was 4.34 (0.5 to 662) and mean total testosterone 254 (191-341). There were 29 (47.5%) prostate cancers found (6 Gleason score 6, 13 Gleason score 7, 10 Gleason score 8 or 9). Of the 35 men on TRT, median PSA was 3.27 (0.5 to 13.7). The %PSA increase ranged from 2 to 251% (mean 93.5%). Mean total testosterone was 383 (146-792). Of the 14 men treated < 2 years, none had cancer. Of the 21 men treated 2 or more years 5 had cancer (2 Gleason score 6, 3 Gleason score 7). Men with hypogonadism and a clinical indication for biopsy often have prostate cancer, many high grade. No men with an initial PSA rise on TRT had cancer. Men on long term TRT should be monitored with PSA and DRE per guidelines.

  12. Color Doppler quantitative measures to predict outcome of biopsies in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strigari, Lidia; Marsella, Annelisa; Canitano, Stefano; Gomellini, Sara; Arcangeli, Stefano; Genovese, Elisabetta; Saracino, Biancamaria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Sentinelli, Steno; Crecco, Marcello; Benassi, Marcello; Arcangeli, Giorgio [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome 00144 (Italy); Radiology Department, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome 00144 (Italy); Radiotherapy Department, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome 00144 (Italy); Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Center, Rome 00144 (Italy); Radiotherapy Department, Regina Elena National Cancer Center, Rome 00144 (Italy); Pathology Department, Regina Elena National Cancer Center, Rome 00144 (Italy); Radiology Department, Regina Elena National Cancer Center, Rome 00144 (Italy); Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome 00144 (Italy); Radiotherapy Department, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome 00144 (Italy)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: The aim was to correlate the color Doppler flow activity pre- and postradiotherapy, using transrectal color Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS) and the 2 year positive biopsy rate after radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Analysis was carried out in 69 out of 160 patients who had undergone treatment with 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to prostate and seminal vesicles. Patients were randomized to receive 80 Gy in 40 fractions in 8 weeks (arm A) and 62 Gy in 20 fractions in 5 weeks, 4 fractions per week (arm B). Color Doppler flow activity (CDFA) was evaluated calculating the vascularization index (VI), defined as the ratio between the colored and total pixels in the whole and peripheral prostate, delineated by a radiation oncologist on CDUS images, using EcoVasc a home-made software. The difference between the 2 year post- and pre-3D-CRT maximum VI (VI{sub max}), named {Delta}VI{sub max}, was calculated in the whole and peripheral prostate for each patient. Then, {Delta}VI{sub max} and the detected 2 year biopsy outcome were analyzed using the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) technique. Results: The VI{sub max} increased or decreased in patients with positive or negative biopsies, respectively, compared to the value before RT in both arms. The area under the ROC curve for {Delta}VI{sub max} in the whole and peripheral prostate is equal to 0.790 and 0.884, respectively. Conclusion: The {Delta}VI{sub max} index, comparing CDFA at 2 years compared to that before RT, allows the 2 year postradiotherapy positive biopsy rate to be predicted.

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of Robot-Guided, Software Based Transperineal MRI/TRUS Fusion Biopsy of the Prostate in a High Risk Population of Previously Biopsy Negative Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte Kroenig

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In this study, we compared prostate cancer detection rates between MRI-TRUS fusion targeted and systematic biopsies using a robot-guided, software based transperineal approach. Methods and Patients. 52 patients received a MRIT/TRUS fusion followed by a systematic volume adapted biopsy using the same robot-guided transperineal approach. The primary outcome was the detection rate of clinically significant disease (Gleason grade ≥ 4. Secondary outcomes were detection rate of all cancers, sampling efficiency and utility, and serious adverse event rate. Patients received no antibiotic prophylaxis. Results. From 52 patients, 519 targeted biopsies from 135 lesions and 1561 random biopsies were generated (total n=2080. Overall detection rate of clinically significant PCa was 44.2% (23/52 and 50.0% (26/52 for target and random biopsy, respectively. Sampling efficiency as the median number of cores needed to detect clinically significant prostate cancer was 9 for target (IQR: 6–14.0 and 32 (IQR: 24–32 for random biopsy. The utility as the number of additionally detected clinically significant PCa cases by either strategy was 0% (0/52 for target and 3.9% (2/52 for random biopsy. Conclusions. MRI/TRUS fusion based target biopsy did not show an advantage in the overall detection rate of clinically significant prostate cancer.

  14. The impact of obesity on the predictive accuracy of PSA in men undergoing prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañez, Lionel L; Albisinni, Simone; Freedland, Stephen J; Tubaro, Andrea; De Nunzio, Cosimo

    2014-04-01

    Obese men have been reported to have lower serum PSA values relative to normal-weight men in population-based studies, screening cohorts, and in men with prostate cancer (CaP) treated with surgery. There are concerns that PSA may be less accurate in detecting prostate cancer in men with increased body mass index (BMI). We determine whether the diagnostic potential of PSA is negatively influenced by obesity by comparing its operating characteristics across BMI categories among men undergoing prostate biopsy. Demographic, clinical, and histopathological data on 917 men who underwent trans-rectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy from 2002 to 2010 at a University hospital in Italy were used in the study. Men were categorized for BMI as follows: obese). Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curves were used to assess PSA accuracy for predicting prostate cancer overall and then stratified according to digital rectal examination (DRE) findings using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The obesity rate of the study cohort was 21 %. There was no statistically significant difference in the overall AUCs of PSA for predicting CaP among normal-weight (AUC = 0.56), overweight (AUC = 0.60), and obese men (AUC = 0.60; p = 0.68) in either DRE-positive or negative men. In a cohort of Italian men undergoing prostate biopsy, the performance accuracy of PSA as a predictor of CaP is not significantly altered by BMI. Obesity does not negatively impact the overall ability of PSA to discriminate between CaP and benign conditions.

  15. Prostate cancer detection upon transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy in relation to digital rectal examination and prostate-specific antigen level: what to expect in the Chinese population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy YC Teoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the prostate cancer detection rates upon transrectal ultrasound (TRUS-guided biopsy in relation to digital rectal examination (DRE and prostate-specific antigen (PSA, and risk factors of prostate cancer detection in the Chinese population. Data from all consecutive Chinese men who underwent first TRUS-guided prostate biopsy from year 2000 to 2013 was retrieved from our database. The prostate cancer detection rates with reference to DRE finding and PSA level of 50 ng ml−1 were investigated. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate for potential risk factors of prostate cancer detection. A total of 2606 Chinese men were included. In patients with normal DRE, the cancer detection rates were 8.6%, 13.4%, 21.8%, 41.7% and 85.2% in patients with PSA 50 ng ml−1 respectively. In patients with abnormal DRE, the cancer detection rates were 12.4%, 30.2%, 52.7%, 80.6% and 96.4% in patients with PSA 50 ng ml−1 respectively. Older age, smaller prostate volume, larger number of biopsy cores, presence of abnormal DRE finding and higher PSA level were associated with increased risk of prostate cancer detection upon multivariate logistic regression analyses (P < 0.001. Chinese men appeared to have lower prostate cancer detection rates when compared to the Western population. Taking the different risk factors into account, an individualized approach to the decision of TRUS-guided biopsy can be adopted.

  16. A Prospective Comparison of Selective Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Fusion-Targeted and Systematic Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Biopsies for Detecting Prostate Cancer in Men Undergoing Repeated Biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Nørgaard, Nis; Løgager, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    + 3) cancers (14/64 vs. 41/74) and more patients with intermediate/high-grade cancers (GS ≥3 + 4) (50/64 vs. 33/74) using fewer biopsy cores compared with TRUS-bx (p targeted-only" approach in men with PI-RADS ≥3 lesions reduced the number of men requiring repeated biopsies......INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to compare the prostate cancer (PCa) detection rate of systematic transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies (TRUS-bx) and multiparametric-MRI targeted biopsies (mp-MRI-bx) in a repeat biopsy setting and evaluate the clinical significance following an "MRI-targeted...... by 50%, decreased low-grade cancer diagnoses by 66%, and increased intermediate/high-grade cancer diagnoses by 52%. CONCLUSIONS: MRI-targeted biopsies have a high detection rate for significant PCa in patients with prior negative transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies and preferentially detect...

  17. Obesity does not correlate with adverse pathologic findings on transperineal template-guided mapping biopsy of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Nathan; Merrick, Gregory S; Stewart, Renee; Andreini, Hugo; Taubenslag, Walter; Curtis, Rodney; Butler, Wayne M; Wallner, Kent E

    2011-01-01

    Obesity has correlated with adverse pathologic features on prostate biopsy and may predispose to a higher rate of prostate cancer-related death after radical prostatectomy. In this study, we examine the potential relationship between body mass index (BMI) and histopathologic findings on transperineal template-guided mapping biopsy of the prostate (TTMB). From January 2005 to January 2008, 244 consecutive patients underwent TTMB using an anatomic-based technique. The criteria for TTMB included previously negative transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsy with persistently elevated PSA and/or diagnosis of ASAP, or HG-PIN. The study population was divided into 4 different BMI cohorts (BMI prostate volume, were not significantly different between the various BMI cohorts. On average, the study population had undergone 1.7 TRUS biopsies before TTMB. Of the 244 study patients, 112 (45.9%), were diagnosed with prostate adenocarcinoma on TTMB. There was no difference in the rate of cancer detection between the different BMI cohorts. Among patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, BMI did not correlate with Gleason score or percent of positive biopsy cores. When the geography of biopsy-positive cores was analyzed, there were no statistically significant differences in cancer location among the different BMI groups. In this study, obesity did not predispose toward higher Gleason score, larger cancer volume, or geographic cancer distribution on repeat biopsy with TTMB. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Stratification of the aggressiveness of prostate cancer using pre-biopsy multiparametric MRI (mpMRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Durgesh Kumar; Kumar, Rajeev; Bora, Girdhar S; Thulkar, Sanjay; Sharma, Sanjay; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R

    2016-03-01

    Risk stratification, based on the Gleason score (GS) of a prostate biopsy, is an important decision-making tool in prostate cancer management. As low-grade disease may not need active intervention, the ability to identify aggressive cancers on imaging could limit the need for prostate biopsies. We assessed the ability of multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) in pre-biopsy risk stratification of men with prostate cancer. One hundred and twenty men suspected to have prostate cancer underwent mpMRI (diffusion MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging) prior to biopsy. Twenty-six had cancer and were stratified into three groups based on GS: low grade (GS ≤ 6), intermediate grade (GS = 7) and high grade (GS ≥ 8). A total of 910 regions of interest (ROIs) from the peripheral zone (PZ, range 25-45) were analyzed from these 26 patients. The metabolite ratio [citrate/(choline + creatine)] and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of voxels were calculated for the PZ regions corresponding to the biopsy cores and compared with histology. The median metabolite ratios for low-grade, intermediate-grade and high-grade cancer were 0.29 (range: 0.16, 0.61), 0.17 (range: 0.13, 0.32) and 0.13 (range: 0.05, 0.23), respectively (p = 0.004). The corresponding mean ADCs (×10(-3) mm(2) /s) for low-grade, intermediate-grade and high-grade cancer were 0.99 ± 0.08, 0.86 ± 0.11 and 0.69 ± 0.12, respectively (p < 0.0001). The combined ADC and metabolite ratio model showed strong discriminatory ability to differentiate subjects with GS ≤ 6 from subjects with GS ≥ 7 with an area under the curve of 94%. These data indicate that pre-biopsy mpMRI may stratify PCa aggressiveness noninvasively. As the recent literature data suggest that men with GS ≤ 6 cancer may not need radical therapy, our data may help limit the need for biopsy and allow informed decision making for clinical intervention. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. In-bore setup and Software for 3T MRI-guided Transperineal Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Junichi; Tuncali, Kemal; Iordachita, Iulian; Song, Sang-Eun; Fedorov, Andriy; Oguro, Sota; Lasso, Andras; Fennessy, Fiona M; Tempany, Clare M; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2012-01-01

    MRI-guided prostate biopsy in conventional closed-bore scanners requires transferring the patient outside the bore during needle insertion due to the constrained in-bore space, causing a safety hazard and limiting image feedback. To address this issue, we present our custom-made in-bore setup and software to support MRI-guided transperineal prostate biopsy in a wide-bore 3 Tesla (T) MRI scanner. The setup consists of a specially designed tabletop and a needle-guiding template with Z-frame that give a physician access to the perineum of the patient at the imaging position and allow performance of MRI-guided transperineal biopsy without moving the patient out of the scanner. The software and Z-frame allow registration of the template, target planning, and biopsy guidance. Initially, we performed phantom experiments to assess the accuracy of template registration and needle placement in a controlled environment. Subsequently, we embarked on our clinical trial (N = 10). The phantom experiments showed that the translational errors of the template registration along the right-left (RP) and anterior-posterior (AP) axes were 1.1 ± 0.8 mm and 1.4 ± 1.1 mm respectively, while the rotational errors around the RL, AP, and superior-inferior axes were 0.8 ± 1.0 degrees, 1.7 ± 1.6 degrees, and 0.0 ± 0.0 degrees respectively. The 2D root-mean-square (RMS) needle placement error was 3.0 mm. The clinical biopsy procedures were safely carried out in all ten clinical cases with a needle placement error of 5.4 mm (2D RMS). In conclusion, transperineal prostate biopsy in a wide-bore 3T scanner is feasible using our custom-made tabletop set up and software, which supports manual needle placement without moving the patient out of the magnet. PMID:22951350

  20. Prostate cancer: 1.5 T endo-coil dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and MR spectroscopy-correlation with prostate biopsy and prostatectomy histopathological data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, E.; Balslev, I.; Løgager, Vibeke Berg

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 43 patients, scheduled for radical...... prostatectomy, underwent prostate MR examination. Prostate cancer was identified by transrectal ultrasonographically (TRUS) guided sextant biopsy. MR examination was performed at 1.5T with an endorectal MR coil. Cancer localisation was performed on sextant-basis - for comparison between TRUS biopsy, MR......% and 69% for DCEMRI, and 46% and 78% for CSI. CONCLUSION: T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI in combination can identify prostate cancer. Further development of MR technologies for these MR methods is necessary to improve the detection of the prostate cancer...

  1. Combined ciprofloxacin and amikacin prophylaxis in the prevention of septicemia after transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehinde, Elijah O; Al-Maghrebi, May; Sheikh, Mehraj; Anim, Jehoram T

    2013-03-01

    A steady increase in the incidence of septicemia after prostate biopsy in our unit between 2001 and 2005 prompted us to review our prophylactic antibiotic regimen. We compared the incidence of septicemia in patients undergoing prostate biopsy between 2001 and 2005 when only oral ciprofloxacin was used prophylactically (group 1) to the incidence among patients undergoing biopsy between 2006 and 2010 when a single dose of intravenous amikacin was added to ciprofloxacin (group 2). In group 1 the 300 patients were given 500 mg oral ciprofloxacin twice daily 1 day before and for 2 days after the biopsy while in group 2 the 897 patients, in addition to the ciprofloxacin previously mentioned, received 500 mg intravenous amikacin 30 minutes before the biopsy. Patients admitted to the hospital with septicemia after prostate biopsy had urine and blood culture and sensitivity tests. The number of patients in whom septicemia developed in each group after prostate biopsy and the microorganisms isolated from the urine and blood of such patients were compared using the chi-square test. Septicemia was seen in 24 of 300 (8%) and 15 of 897 (1.7%) patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively (p responsible for 33 of 39 (84.6%) septicemic cases. The addition of amikacin to ciprofloxacin prophylaxis significantly reduces the incidence of septicemia after prostate biopsy. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Stiffness mapping prostate biopsy samples using a tactile sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiyu; Omata, Sadao; Peehl, Donna M; Constantinou, Chris E

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the stiffness of cancerous cells reflects their pathological stage and progression rates, with increased cancerous cell stiffness associated with increased aggressiveness. Therefore, the elasticity of the cancerous cells has the potential to be used as an indicator of the cancer's aggressiveness. However, the sensitivity and resolution of current palpation and imaging techniques are not sufficient to detect small cancerous tissues. In previous studies, we developed a tactile-based device to map with high resolution the stiffness of a tissue section. The purpose of this study is to evaluate this device using different tissues (BPH, Cancer and PZ) collected from human prostates. The preliminary results show that the tactile device is sensitive enough to tell the differences of the stiffness of different tissues. The results also disclosed the factors (humidity, temperature and tissue degradation) which could dramatically affect the results of stiffness mapping. The tactile technology described in this paper has the potential to help disclose the underlying mechanical mechanisms that lead to increased stiffness in prostate tumors.

  3. Repeated biopsies in patients with prostate cancer on active surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Marcussen, Niels; Berg, Kasper D;

    2015-01-01

    were included. The International Society of Urological Pathology 2005 Gleason scoring system was used for the histopathological assessment of all biopsies. Three different definitions of histopathological progression were applied. Unweighted and linear weighted Kappa (κ) statistics were used to compare...... the interobserver agreement. RESULTS: The overall Gleason score agreement was 68.8% with a weighted κ of 0.670. The interobserver agreement was 79.6% for meeting the AS selection criteria. According to the three progression definitions applied, overall agreement was between 80.7% and 89.0% with weighted κ values...

  4. Target detection: Magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion–guided prostate biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonn, Geoffrey A.; Margolis, Daniel J.; Marks, Leonard S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled image-guided detection of prostate cancer. Fusion of MRI with real-time ultrasound (US) allows the information from MRI to be used to direct biopsy needles under US guidance in an office-based procedure. Fusion can be performed either cognitively or electronically, using a fusion device. Fusion devices allow superimposition (coregistration) of stored MRI images on real-time US images; areas of suspicion found on MRI can then serve as targets during US-guided biopsy. Currently available fusion devices use a variety of technologies to perform coregistration: robotic tracking via a mechanical arm with built-in encoders (Artemis/Eigen, BioJet/Geoscan); electromagnetic tracking (UroNav/Philips-Invivo, Hi-RVS/Hitachi); or tracking with a 3D US probe (Urostation/Koelis). Targeted fusion biopsy has been shown to identify more clinically significant cancers and fewer insignificant cancers than conventional biopsy. Fusion biopsy appears to be a major advancement over conventional biopsy because it allows (1) direct targeting of suspicious areas not seen on US and (2) follow-up biopsy of specific cancerous sites in men undergoing active surveillance. PMID:24239473

  5. Evaluation of a robotic technique for transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schouten, Martijn G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); University Medical Centre Nijmegen, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bomers, Joyce G.R.; Yakar, Derya; Huisman, Henkjan; Bosboom, Dennis; Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rothgang, Eva [Pattern Recognition Lab, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Siemens Corporate Research (Germany); Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Siemens Corporate Research, Baltimore, MD (United States); Misra, Sarthak [University of Twente, MIRA-Institute of Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    To evaluate the accuracy and speed of a novel robotic technique as an aid to perform magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided prostate biopsies on patients with cancer suspicious regions. A pneumatic controlled MR-compatible manipulator with 5 degrees of freedom was developed in-house to guide biopsies under real-time imaging. From 13 consecutive biopsy procedures, the targeting error, biopsy error and target displacement were calculated to evaluate the accuracy. The time was recorded to evaluate manipulation and procedure time. The robotic and manual techniques demonstrated comparable results regarding mean targeting error (5.7 vs 5.8 mm, respectively) and mean target displacement (6.6 vs 6.0 mm, respectively). The mean biopsy error was larger (6.5 vs 4.4 mm) when using the robotic technique, although not significant. Mean procedure and manipulation time were 76 min and 6 min, respectively using the robotic technique and 61 and 8 min with the manual technique. Although comparable results regarding accuracy and speed were found, the extended technical effort of the robotic technique make the manual technique - currently - more suitable to perform MRI-guided biopsies. Furthermore, this study provided a better insight in displacement of the target during in vivo biopsy procedures. (orig.)

  6. A panel of kallikrein markers can reduce unnecessary biopsy for prostate cancer: data from the European Randomized Study of Prostate Cancer Screening in Göteborg, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scardino Peter T

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA is widely used to detect prostate cancer. The low positive predictive value of elevated PSA results in large numbers of unnecessary prostate biopsies. We set out to determine whether a multivariable model including four kallikrein forms (total, free, and intact PSA, and human kallikrein 2 (hK2 could predict prostate biopsy outcome in previously unscreened men with elevated total PSA. Methods The study cohort comprised 740 men in Göteborg, Sweden, undergoing biopsy during the first round of the European Randomized study of Screening for Prostate Cancer. We calculated the area-under-the-curve (AUC for predicting prostate cancer at biopsy. AUCs for a model including age and PSA (the 'laboratory' model and age, PSA and digital rectal exam (the 'clinical' model were compared with those for models that also included additional kallikreins. Results Addition of free and intact PSA and hK2 improved AUC from 0.68 to 0.83 and from 0.72 to 0.84, for the laboratory and clinical models respectively. Using a 20% risk of prostate cancer as the threshold for biopsy would have reduced the number of biopsies by 424 (57% and missed only 31 out of 152 low-grade and 3 out of 40 high-grade cancers. Conclusion Multiple kallikrein forms measured in blood can predict the result of biopsy in previously unscreened men with elevated PSA. A multivariable model can determine which men should be advised to undergo biopsy and which might be advised to continue screening, but defer biopsy until there was stronger evidence of malignancy.

  7. Spondylodiscitis as Complication of Transrectal Ultrasonography-guided Prostate Biopsy: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberato Aldo Ferrara

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old man presented with high fever, and severe back and abdominal pain following transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. Diagnosis of spondylodiscitis and psoas abscesses was made based on MRI images of the lumbar tract of the spine. Six-month broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and immobilization with a girdle overcame the disease without any relapse at the 1-year follow-up. Spondylodiscitis after TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is a rare event, which is not yet included as a major complication of the procedure. It is probably due to the presence of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria in faeces. It is, therefore, important to highlight this possibility and to stress the use of targeted antibiotic prophylaxis after rectal flora swabbing with selected antibiotics at sufficient concentrations to be effectiv

  8. [Periprostatic anaesthesic infiltration for prostatic biopsy: a prospective, randomized, double blind and placebo-controlled study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Gonzalo; González, E U Roxana

    2005-06-01

    A prospective, randomized, double blind and placebo-controlled study to evaluate the effectiveness of periprostatic infiltration with lidocaine to reduce pain of prostatic biopsy. In a thirteen months period of time, 115 patients were randomized to receive 10 ml of lidocaine 1% (n=60) or saline (n=55). Evaluating the pain with visual analogue scale (0-10), the first group referred average pain of 3.83 and the second group of 6.87, being this difference clearly significant (panesthesic puncture. The periprostatic infiltration is easy to perform without complications and it is effective in reducing the pain of this procedure. It should be used as a routine procedure in prostatic biopsy.

  9. Increased fatty acid synthase expression in prostate biopsy cores predicts higher Gleason score in radical prostatectomy specimen

    OpenAIRE

    HAMADA, SHINSUKE; Horiguchi, Akio; Kuroda, Kenji; Ito, Keiichi; ASANO, TOMOHIKO; Miyai, Kosuke; Iwaya, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Background Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is highly expressed in various types of cancer, and elevated expression of FAS has been suggested to be a predictor of tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis. We examined whether FAS expression in prostate biopsy cores could predict the pathological characteristics of radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens. Methods Paraffin-embedded prostate biopsy cores, obtained from 102 patients who subsequently underwent RP, were immunostained with polyclonal anti-FAS a...

  10. Incidence of sepsis following transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy at a tertiary-care medical center in Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Shahait

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Urosepsis is a rare but life-threatening complication following transrectal ultrasound (TRUS guided needle prostate biopsy. Despite the technological and pharmacological improvements, the problem of bacterial urosepsis after prostate biopsy remains. A strategy for preventing urosepsis following TRUS prostate biopsy in areas with high prevalence of resistant strains or patients presenting risk factors is lacking. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of urosepsis, as well its predictors, following TRUS guided needle biopsy of the prostate in a tertiary care medical center in Lebanon. Materials and Methods We carried out a retrospective study on all patients who underwent TRUS prostate biopsy at the American University of Beirut Medical Center between January 1, 2011 and June 31, 2013. Patients’ hospital charts were reviewed. Data collected included demographic information, pre-procedure disease specific information, as well as post-procedure information. Predictors of urosepsis following TRUS were assessed. Results In total, 265 patients were included in this study, where the prevalence of urosepsis following TRUS prostate biopsy was found to be 9.4%. The significant independent predictors of urosepsis were found to be: age with an OR=0.93 (95% CI: 0.88–1.00, p-value=0.03, and hypertension comorbidity with an OR=3.25 (95% CI: 1.19–8.85, p-value=0.02. Conclusion We found a high prevalence of urosepsis among patients who have undergone TRUS prostate biopsy, and identified two significant risk factors. The results of this study highlight the importance of implementing strategies for prevention of urosepsis following TRUS prostate biopsy.

  11. Comparison of 3 different methods of anesthesia before transrectal prostate biopsy: a prospective randomized trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oebek, C.; Oezkan, B.; Tunc, B.; Can, G.; Yalcin, V.; Solok, V. [University of Istanbul (Turkey). Cerrahpasa School of Medicine. Depts. of Urology and Public Health (GC)

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: Periprostatic nerve block (PNB) is the most common anesthesia technique used before prostate biopsy. However, needle punctures for anesthetic infiltration may be painful and cause higher infectious complications. We assessed whether addition of rectal lidocaine gel would improve its efficacy. We also investigated the efficacy and safety of tramadol, a codeine derivative, as a noninvasive method. Materials and Methods: A total of 300 patients who underwent prostate biopsies were randomized into 4 groups of controls, PNB, perianal/intrarectal lidocaine gel plus PNB and tramadol. Pain was assessed with a numeric analog scale. Results: Each group consisted of 75 patients, and there was a statistically significant difference among pain scores (p = 0.001). Mean pain scores were 4.63 for controls, 2.57 for PNB, 2.03 for infiltration plus gel group and 3.11 for tramadol. Pain and discomfort were least in PNB plus gel arm. The difference of pain score between PNB alone and tramadol group did not reach statistical significance. Infectious complications were higher in the combination group, whereas there were no complications with tramadol. Conclusions: Any form of analgesia/anesthesia was superior to none. The combination of PNB plus gel provided significantly better analgesia compared to PNB alone or tramadol. If this can be duplicated in other trials, the combination may be accepted as the new gold standard of anesthesia for prostate biopsy. The efficacy of tramadol was similar to that of PNB, and was free of complications. Therefore, tramadol may have a role before prostate biopsy, which needs to be explored. (author)

  12. A fully actuated robotic assistant for MRI-guided prostate biopsy and brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2013-03-01

    Intra-operative medical imaging enables incorporation of human experience and intelligence in a controlled, closed-loop fashion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal modality for surgical guidance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with its ability to perform high resolution, real-time, high soft tissue contrast imaging without ionizing radiation. However, for most current image-guided approaches only static pre-operative images are accessible for guidance, which are unable to provide updated information during a surgical procedure. The high magnetic field, electrical interference, and limited access of closed-bore MRI render great challenges to developing robotic systems that can perform inside a diagnostic high-field MRI while obtaining interactively updated MR images. To overcome these limitations, we are developing a piezoelectrically actuated robotic assistant for actuated percutaneous prostate interventions under real-time MRI guidance. Utilizing a modular design, the system enables coherent and straight forward workflow for various percutaneous interventions, including prostate biopsy sampling and brachytherapy seed placement, using various needle driver configurations. The unified workflow compromises: 1) system hardware and software initialization, 2) fiducial frame registration, 3) target selection and motion planning, 4) moving to the target and performing the intervention (e.g. taking a biopsy sample) under live imaging, and 5) visualization and verification. Phantom experiments of prostate biopsy and brachytherapy were executed under MRI-guidance to evaluate the feasibility of the workflow. The robot successfully performed fully actuated biopsy sampling and delivery of simulated brachytherapy seeds under live MR imaging, as well as precise delivery of a prostate brachytherapy seed distribution with an RMS accuracy of 0.98mm.

  13. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy: Three different types of local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Giuseppina; Subba, Enrica; Pappalardo, Rosa; Macchione, Luciano; Ricotta, Gioacchino; Muscarà, Graziella; Lembo, Francesco; Magno, Carlo

    2016-12-30

    Transrectal Ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy is regarded as the gold standard for prostate cancer diagnosis. The majority of patients perceive TRUS-guided prostate biopsy as a physically and psychologically traumatic experience. We aimed to compare in this paper the efficacy of three different anesthesia techniques to control the pain during the procedure. 150 patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy were randomly divided into three groups. Group A included 50 patients who received one hour before the procedure a mixture of 2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine, Group B: 50 patients who received intrarectal local anesthetic administration (lidocaine 5 ml 10%) and lidocaine local spray 15 % and Group C included 50 patients who received periprostatic block anesthesia (lidocaine 10 ml 10%). Visual analogue scale (VAS) of patients in different groups was evaluated at the end of the biopsy and 30 minutes after the procedure. The VAS of patients in Group A was 1.32 ± 0.65 (VAS I) and 2.47 ± 0.80 (VAS II). In group B the VAS of patients was 1.09 ± 0.47 (VAS I) and 1.65 ± 0.61 (VAS II). In group C the VAS of patients was 2.63 ± 0.78 (VAS I) and 1.70 ± 0.85 (VAS II). There was no statistically significant difference in term of VAS I between group A and B. A statistically significant difference was determined in terms of VAS II between group A and B. There was no statistically significant difference in term of VAS between group B and C. The most effective of the three methods for pain control we used was intrarectal local anesthetic administration and lidocaine local spray 15% that enables an ideal patient comfort.

  14. The effectivity of periprostatic nerve blockade for the pain control during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Otunctemur

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS guided prostete biopsy is accepted as a standard procedure in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Many different protocoles are applied to reduce the pain during the process. In this study we aimed to the comparison of two procedure with intrarectal lidocaine gel and periprostatice nerve blockade respective- ly in addition to perianal intrarectal lidocaine gel on the pain control in prostate biop- sy by TRUS. Methods: 473 patients who underwent prostate biopsy guided TRUS between 2008-2012 were included in the study. 10-point linear visual analog pain scale(VAS was used to evaluate the pain during biopsy. The patients were divided into two groups according to anesthesia procedure. In Group 1, there were 159 patients who had perianal-intrarectal lidocaine gel, in Group 2 there were 314 patients who had periprostatic nerve blockade in addition to intrarectal lidocain gel. The pain about probe manipulation was aseesed by VAS-1 and during the biopsy needle entries was evalu- ated by VAS-2. Results were compared with Mann-Whitney U and Pearson chi-square test. Results: Mean VAS-2 scores in Group 1 and Group 2 were 4.54 ± 1.02 and 2.06 ± 0.79 respectively. The pain score was determined significantly lower in the Group 2 (p = 0.001. In both groups there was no significant difference in VAS-1 scores, patient’s age, prostate volume, complication rate and PSA level. Conclusion: The combination of periprostatic nerve blockade and intrarectal lidocain gel provides a more meaningful pain relief compared to group of patients undergoing intrarectal lidocaine gel.

  15. Differentiation of prostatitis and prostate cancer by using diffusion-weighted MR imaging and MR-guided biopsy at 3 T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagel, Klaas N.A.; Schouten, Martijn G.; Hambrock, Thomas; Litjens, Geert J.S.; Hoeks, Caroline; ten Haken, Bernard; Barentsz, Jelle O.; Fütterer, Johannes Jacobus; Fütterer, Jurgen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine if prostatitis and prostate cancer (PCa) can be distinguished by using apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) on magnetic resonance (MR) images, with specimens obtained at MR-guided biopsy as the standard of reference. Materials and Methods The need for institutional review

  16. Differentiation of prostatitis and prostate cancer by using diffusion-weighted MR imaging and MR-guided biopsy at 3 T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagel, Klaas N.A.; Schouten, Martijn G.; Hambrock, Thomas; Litjens, Geert J.S.; Hoeks, Caroline; Haken, ten Bennie; Barentsz, Jelle O.; Fütterer, Jurgen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine if prostatitis and prostate cancer (PCa) can be distinguished by using apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) on magnetic resonance (MR) images, with specimens obtained at MR-guided biopsy as the standard of reference. Materials and Methods The need for institutional review boa

  17. Differentiation of Prostatitis and Prostate Cancer by Using Diffusion-weighted MR Imaging and MR-guided Biopsy at 3 T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagel, K.N.A.; Schouten, M.G.; Hambrock, T.; Litjens, G.J.S.; Hoeks, C.M.A.; Haken, B.T.; Barentsz, J.O.; Futterer, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if prostatitis and prostate cancer (PCa) can be distinguished by using apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) on magnetic resonance (MR) images, with specimens obtained at MR-guided biopsy as the standard of reference. Materials and Methods: The need for institutional review bo

  18. Differentiation of prostatitis and prostate cancer by using diffusion-weighted MR imaging and MR-guided biopsy at 3 T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagel, Klaas N.A.; Schouten, Martijn G.; Hambrock, Thomas; Litjens, Geert J.S.; Hoeks, Caroline; ten Haken, Bernard; Barentsz, Jelle O.; Fütterer, Johannes Jacobus; Fütterer, Jurgen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine if prostatitis and prostate cancer (PCa) can be distinguished by using apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) on magnetic resonance (MR) images, with specimens obtained at MR-guided biopsy as the standard of reference. Materials and Methods The need for institutional review boar

  19. Is There a Concordance Between the Gleason Scores of Needle Biopsy and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Prostatic Carsinoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Özgör

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the concordance between the Gleason Scores (GS of prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens. Methods: Prostate biopsy was performed in 1135 patients with the suspicion of prostate cancer in our clinic between 2008 and 2012. A total of 366 patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Radical prostatectomy was performed in 73 of these patients and GS of pathology specimens were included in this study for comparison. The patients were divided into three groups (low intermediate- and high-risk patients according to the D’amico risk classification for prostate cancer. Results: The median age of the patients was 64.2±6.1 years (54- 73. The mean prostate specific antigen level was 20.34 ng/mL and the mean biopsy core number was 12±0.58. A statistically significant concordance was detected between the GS of biopsy specimens and radical prostatectomy materials in 65.7% of patients (p<0.01. There were 40 patients in the low-risk group, however, 8 (20% of them were identified to be intermediate-risk patients and one (2.5% was found to be a high-risk patient after radical prostatectomy. Conclusion: Concordance between the GS of prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy materials are important for selection of the appropriate treatment

  20. Evaluation of T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in localizing prostate cancer before repeat biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheikh, Alexandre Ben; Girouin, Nicolas [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France)]|[Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France)]|[Universite de Lyon 1, faculte de medecine Lyon Nord, Lyon (France); Colombel, Marc; Marechal, Jean-Marie [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urology, Lyon (France); Gelet, Albert [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urology, Lyon (France)]|[Inserm, U556, Lyon (France); Bissery, Alvine; Rabilloud, Muriel [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Biostatistics, Lyon (France)]|[Universite de Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5558, Laboratoire Biostatistiques-Sante, Pierre-Benite (France); Lyonnet, Denis [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France)]|[Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France)]|[Universite de Lyon 1, faculte de medecine Lyon Nord, Lyon (France)]|[Inserm, U556, Lyon (France); Rouviere, Olivier [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France)]|[Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France)]|[Universite de Lyon 1, faculte de medecine Lyon Nord, Lyon (France)]|[Inserm, U556, Lyon (France)]|[Hopital Edouard Herriot, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Pavillon P Radio, Lyon Cedex 03 (France)

    2009-03-15

    We assessed the accuracy of T2-weighted (T2w) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in localizing prostate cancer before transrectal ultrasound-guided repeat biopsy. Ninety-three patients with abnormal PSA level and negative prostate biopsy underwent T2w and DCE prostate MRI using pelvic coil before repeat biopsy. T2w and DCE images were interpreted using visual criteria only. MR results were correlated with repeat biopsy findings in ten prostate sectors. Repeat biopsy found prostate cancer in 23 patients (24.7%) and 44 sectors (6.6%). At per patient analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 47.8%, 44.3%, 20.4% and 79.5% for T2w imaging and 82.6%, 20%, 24.4% and 93.3% for DCE imaging. When all suspicious areas (on T2w or DCE imaging) were taken into account, a sensitivity of 82.6% and a negative predictive value of 100% could be achieved. At per sector analysis, DCE imaging was significantly less specific (83.5% vs. 89.7%, p < 0.002) than T2w imaging; it was more sensitive (52.4% vs. 32.1%), but the difference was hardly significant (p = 0.09). T2w and DCE MRI using pelvic coil and visual diagnostic criteria can guide prostate repeat biopsy, with a good sensitivity and NPV. (orig.)

  1. Raising cut-off value of prostate specific antigen (PSA for biopsy in symptomatic men in India to reduce unnecessary biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Agnihotri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The characteristics of prostate specific antigen (PSA for trans-rectal ultrasonography guided prostate biopsy in men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS are not well defined. This study was carried out to analyse the threshold of PSA for biopsy in symptomatic men in India. Methods: From January 2000 to June 2011, consecutive patients who had digital rectal examination (DRE and PSA testing done for LUTS were included in this study. PSA was done with ELISA technique. Patients with acute or chronic prostatitis, prostatic abscess, history of surgery on prostate within the previous three months and patients on 5α-reductase inhibitors or on urethral catheter were excluded. Results: Of the 4702 patients evaluated, 70.9 per cent had PSA of less than 4 ng/ml and 29.1 per cent had PSA of more than 4 ng/ml. Of these, 875 men with a mean age of 65.72±7.4 (range 50-75 yr had trans rectal ultrasonography (TRUS guided biopsy. Twenty five men had biopsy at PSA level of 20 ng/ml. Positive predictive value of PSA in ranges of 4.1-10, 10.1-20, >20 ng/ml was 15.2, 24 and 62.6 per cent, respectively with negative DRE. PSA cut-off to do biopsy was derived by ROC curve as 5.82 ng/ml for all the men. When the subjects were further stratified on the basis of DRE findings, a cut-off of 5.4 ng/ml was derived in men with normal DRE. Interpretation & conclusions: A cut-off for biopsy in symptomatic men with negative DRE could safely be raised to 5.4 ng/ml, which could avoid subjecting 10 per cent of men to undergo unnecessary biopsy.

  2. Is effective a prior multiparametric magnetic resonance scan in patients candidates to prostate biopsy? CAT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Rodríguez, J R; Molinero Pérez, M; Herrera Imbroda, B; Domínguez Pinos, M D

    2016-01-01

    We carried out a critically appraised topic (CAT)-type study to determine whether the relevant scientific evidence supports the recommendation of doing a multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging study of the prostate in all patients who are candidates for prostate biopsy with the aim of improving the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer and stratifying patients to receive active surveillance or treatment. After a formal literature search and an analysis of the two most relevant articles it found, we reached the conclusion that, despite promising results that point to the potential usefulness of this approach, there is still not enough clear scientific evidence to endorse it categorically. Before this approach can be endorsed, we need evidence from well-designed prospective randomized trials using widely agreed upon criteria and including large numbers of patients at multiple centers.

  3. Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: aspirin increases the incidence of minor bleeding complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliwell, O.T. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: hallo99@doctors.org.uk; Yadegafar, G. [Public Health Sciences and Medical Statistics Division, School of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton University, Southampton (United Kingdom); Lane, C.; Dewbury, K.C. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Aim: To assess whether patients taking aspirin were more likely to experience bleeding complications after transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy. Materials and methods: Three hundred and eighty-seven patients taking aspirin who underwent prostate biopsy over a 3.5 year period and 731 patients not taking aspirin over a 2 year period returned a questionnaire assessing the incidence and severity of bleeding complications. Results: Patients taking aspirin had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of haematuria and rectal bleeding, but not of haemospermia. They also had a longer mean duration of bleeding, but no increase in bleeding severity. Severe bleeding was very uncommon in both groups and no patients required intervention for bleeding complications. Conclusion: Aspirin exacerbates minor bleeding complications in patients undergoing TRUS guided biopsy of the prostate, but in this large group of aspirin-taking patients no dangerous bleeding complications were encountered. It may be that the risks associated with aspirin cessation outweigh the risks of haemorrhagic complications.

  4. Diagnostic usefulness of the cytological study of the transport buffer in transrectal prostate core biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, J I; Cáceres, F; Pérez, A; Caamaño, V; Larrinaga, G; Lecumberri, D; Arruza, A

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of the cytological study of the transport buffer in the diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma in transrectal core biopsies. A total of 256 consecutively biopsied patients have been included in the analysis, 100 of them diagnosed of prostate adenocarcinoma. The procedure included the cytological analysis of the transport buffer and conventional histology. Cytological evaluation was performed in a blind way by the same pathologist. Overall sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values to detect malignancy in the cytological slides were 54%, 98%, 94% and 76%, respectively. When restricted the analysis to cases with Gleason score higher than 8, sensitivity and negative predictive value increased to 85% and 97%, respectively. Similarly, when the analysis focused exclusively to cases with more than 5mm of cancer in the biopsy, sensitivity and positive predictive value increased to 66% and 96%, respectively. This study shows that whilst specificity was maintained in 98%, sensitivity, and positive and negative predictive values significantly improved in high grade and high volume adenocarcinomas. Our findings confirm that the cytological study of the transport buffer may complement the histology in the diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of cancer heterogeneity in ultrasound guided biopsies of prostate in men suspected with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yuting; Li, Chunhui; Feng, Kairui; Palmer, Scott; Appleton, Paul L; Lang, Stephen; McGloin, David; Huang, Zhihong; Nabi, Ghulam

    2017-06-01

    Prostate cancer is a multifocal disease with characteristic heterogeneity and foci that can range from low grade indolent to aggressive disease. The latter is characterised by the well-established histopathological Gleason grading system used in the current clinical care. Nevertheless, a large discrepancy exists on initial biopsy and after the final radical prostatectomy. Moreover, there is no reliable imaging modality to study these foci, in particular at the level of the cells and surrounding matrix. Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is significant in cancer progression with collagen as the dominant structural component providing mechanical strength and flexibility of tissue. In this study, the collagen assembly in prostate tissue was investigated with second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy: malignant foci demonstrated a reticular pattern, with a typical collagen pattern for each Gleason score. The orientation of collagen for each biopsy was computed by applying a ratio of the anisotropic and isotropic collagen fibres. This value was found to be distinct for each Gleason score. The findings suggest that this approach can not only be used to detect prostate cancer, but also can act as a potential biomarker for cancer aggressiveness. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Optoacoustic imaging of the prostate: development toward image-guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Ermilov, Sergey A; Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Conjusteau, André; Fronheiser, Matthew; Bell, Brent A; Motamedi, Massoud; Oraevsky, Alexander A

    2010-01-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) tomography has demonstrated utility in identifying blood-rich malignancies in breast tissue. We describe the development and characterization of a laser OA imaging system for the prostate (LOIS-P). The system consists of a fiber-coupled Q-switched laser operating at 757 nm, a commercial 128-channel ultrasonic probe, a digital signal processor, and software that uses the filtered radial back-projection algorithm for image reconstruction. The system is used to reconstruct OA images of a blood-rich lesion induced in vivo in a canine prostate. OA images obtained in vivo are compared to images acquired using ultrasound, the current gold standard for guiding biopsy of the prostate. Although key structural features such as the urethra could be identified with both imaging techniques, a bloody lesion representing a highly vascularized tumor could only be clearly identified in OA images. The advantages and limitations of both forward and backward illumination modes are also evaluated by collecting OA images of phantoms simulating blood vessels within tissue. System resolution is estimated to be 0.2 mm in the radial direction of the acoustic array. The minimum detectable pressure signal is 1.83 Pa. Our results encourage further development toward a dual-modality OA/ultrasonic system for prostate imaging and image-guided biopsy.

  7. Design of a predictive targeting error simulator for MRI-guided prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Shachar; Vikal, Siddharth; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2010-02-23

    Multi-parametric MRI is a new imaging modality superior in quality to Ultrasound (US) which is currently used in standard prostate biopsy procedures. Surface-based registration of the pre-operative and intra-operative prostate volumes is a simple alternative to side-step the challenges involved with deformable registration. However, segmentation errors inevitably introduced during prostate contouring spoil the registration and biopsy targeting accuracies. For the crucial purpose of validating this procedure, we introduce a fully interactive and customizable simulator which determines the resulting targeting errors of simulated registrations between prostate volumes given user-provided parameters for organ deformation, segmentation, and targeting. We present the workflow executed by the simulator in detail and discuss the parameters involved. We also present a segmentation error introduction algorithm, based on polar curves and natural cubic spline interpolation, which introduces statistically realistic contouring errors. One simulation, including all I/O and preparation for rendering, takes approximately 1 minute and 40 seconds to complete on a system with 3 GB of RAM and four Intel Core 2 Quad CPUs each with a speed of 2.40 GHz. Preliminary results of our simulation suggest the maximum tolerable segmentation error given the presence of a 5.0 mm wide small tumor is between 4-5 mm. We intend to validate these results via clinical trials as part of our ongoing work.

  8. Prostate biopsies guided by three-dimensional real-time (4-D) transrectal ultrasonography on a phantom: comparative study versus two-dimensional transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Jean-Alexandre; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Troccaz, Jocelyne; Rambeaud, Jean-Jacques; Descotes, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the accuracy in localisation and distribution of real-time three-dimensional (4-D) ultrasound-guided biopsies on a prostate phantom. METHODS: A prostate phantom was created. A three-dimensional real-time ultrasound system with a 5.9MHz probe was used, making it possible to see several reconstructed orthogonal viewing planes in real time. Fourteen operators performed biopsies first under 2-D then 4-D transurethral ultrasound (TRUS) guidance (336 biopsies). The biopsy path was modelled using segmentation in a 3-D ultrasonographic volume. Special software was used to visualise the biopsy paths in a reference prostate and assess the sampled area. A comparative study was performed to examine the accuracy of the entry points and target of the needle. Distribution was assessed by measuring the volume sampled and a redundancy ratio of the sampled prostate. RESULTS: A significant increase in accuracy in hitting the target zone was identified using 4-D ultrasonography as compared to 2-D....

  9. Detection of bone marrow metastases in prostate cancer: Role of trephine biopsy and Immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Bone marrow (BM metastases are an integral part of tumor dissemination in many malignancies. Prostate carcinoma, which has high tendency to metastasize to bone, shown to have affinity for endosteal niche as well as tendency to compete with hematopoietic cells to home in BM. This marrow dissemination can be confidently proved by histopathological examination of BM. Aims: In this study, we are trying to detect the presence of metastases and micrometastases in BM of prostate carcinoma patients with the help of immunohistochemical markers prostate-specific antigen (PSA and prostate-specific acid phosphatase and correlate the findings with American Joint Committee on Cancer Tumor, Node and Metastasis 7 th (2010 classification, serum PSA, and biopsy Gleason′s score. Materials and Methods: We performed BM examination and hematological workup of 11 known prostate carcinoma patients including metastatic cases also, during our study period of 1 year. The BM biopsy sections and clot sections were used to carry out immunohistochemistry. The data were analyzed by using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 15.0 statistical analysis software. Results: We found that two patients were positive for metastases in BM out of the 11. Both of these patients already had metastases to other site with very high serum PSA levels. Anemia was common hematological alteration in both of them and one of them showed increased osteoblasts in the aspirate film. Conclusion: Taking into account our small sample size and short study duration, we conclude that further large sized future studies with long-term follow-up in to this BM dissemination by prostate cancer cells could open new horizons to understand the biology of metastasis of this common malignancy and also provide more effective therapeutic options as well as prognostic implications in these patients.

  10. A comparison of 3 on-line nomograms with the detection of primary circulating prostate cells to predict prostate cancer at initial biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, N P; Fuentealba, C; Reyes, E; Jacob, O

    2017-05-01

    The use of nomograms which include the PSA may improve the predictive power of obtaining a prostate biopsy (PB) positive for cancer. We compare the use of three on-line nomagrams with the detection of primary malignant circulating prostate cells (CPCs) to predict the results of an initial PB in men with suspicion of prostate cancer. Consecutive men with suspicion of prostate cancer underwent a 12 core TRUS prostate biopsy; age, total serum PSA, percent free PSA, family history, ethnic origin and prostate ultrasound results were used for risk assessment using the online nomograms. Mononuclear cells were obtained by differential gel centrifugation from 8ml of blood and CPCs were identified using double immunomarcation with anti-PSA and anti-P504S. A CPC was defined as a cell expressing PSA and P504S and defined as negative/positive. Biopsies were classified as cancer/no-cancer. Areas under the curve (AUC) for each parameter were calculated and compared and diagnostic yields were calculated. 1,223 men aged>55 years participated, 467 (38.2%) had a biopsy positive for cancer of whom 114/467 (24.4%) complied with the criteria for active observation. Area under the curve analysis showed CPC detection to be superior (p<0.001), avoiding 57% of potential biopsies while missing 4% of clinically significant prostate cancers. The CPC detection was superior to the nomograms in predicting the presence of prostate cancer at initial biopsy; its high negative predictive value potentially reduces the number of biopsies while missing few significant cancers, being superior to the nomograms in this aspect. Being a positive/negative test the detection of CPCs avoids defining a cutoff value which may differ between populations. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Usefulness of transrectal ultrasound-guided 12 core biopsy method in patients with clinically suspected prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Se Hwan; Lim, Joo Won; Park, Seong Jin; Ko, Young Tae; Kim, Yoon Wha [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-15

    To evaluate the improvement of prostate cancer detection provided by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided 12 core biopsy method compared with sextant biopsy method. Between June 1997 and February 1999, 29 patients with pathologically proven prostate cancer in 124 patients who underwent TRUS-guided 12 core biopsy method were evaluated. They had abnormal findings in prostate specific antigen (PSA), digital rectal examination (DRE) or TRUS findings. The prostate was diffusely enlarged in all patients on DRE findings and in 15 cases (15/29, 52%), hard nodule was palpated. The average of PSA and prostate specific antigen density (PSAD) is 229.33 ng/ml (1-2280) and 9.14 ng/ml/cm{sup 3} (0.048-142.5), respectively, 12 transrectal biopsy, including 2 transition zones, was performed in both lobe, 6 biopsies were located in both base, middle and apex. Then 2 biopsies were inserted between 3 biopsies in both peripheral zone and 2 biopsies were performed in both transition zone. Each specimen was pathologically examined. The results of pathology were compared with method 1 and 2, respectively. We defined the method 1 and 2 as different sextant biopsy method. The method 1 is that cores are taken from both base, middle and apex and method 2 is that cores are taken from both base, apex and transition zone. TRUS findings were analyzed by two radiologists. Of the 29 patients with prostate cancer, 3 (10%) had carcinomas only in the additional regions as compared with method. When compared with method 2,2 (7.0%) had carcinomas only in the additional regions. 2 patients were same in both cases. TRUS findings were abnormal in 21 cases in all patients whose 12 biopsy method was not helpful. 12 biopsy method was helpful in 2/8 (25%) whose TRUS findings were non-specific and 1/21 (4.8%) whose TRUS findings were abnormal. Small low echoic lesion was seen in one patients whose 12 biopsy method was helpful, but cancer was found in other area. TRUS-guided 12 core biopsy method may be superior

  12. Body mass index and prostate cancer severity: do obese men harbor more aggressive disease on prostate biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamie, Karim; Oberfoell, Stephanie; Kwan, Lorna; Labo, Jessica; Wei, John T; Litwin, Mark S

    2013-05-01

    To examine the association of obesity with the prebiopsy prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, clinical stage, and D'Amico tumor risk in 2 independent cohorts of men with prostate cancer. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of men with biopsy-proven prostate cancer from California's Improving Access, Counseling and Treatment for Californians with Prostate Cancer program and from a random sample of men treated at the University of Michigan. We performed multivariate analyses to examine the relationship of body mass index (BMI) with the prebiopsy PSA level, Gleason score, clinical stage, and D'Amico tumor risk, while controlling for demographics. The mean age was 61.5 years, and the median prebiopsy PSA level was 6.7 ng/mL. Greater than 70% of men were at least overweight. On univariate analysis, the BMI was not associated with prebiopsy PSA levels, Gleason score, or D'Amico tumor risk. On multivariate analysis, we found no association between BMI and log-transformed PSA, Gleason score, clinical T stage, or D'Amico risk. Advancing age was associated with a greater risk of a higher prebiopsy PSA level, Gleason score, and D'Amico tumor risk. Obese men with prostate cancer were no more likely to have a higher prebiopsy PSA level, Gleason score, clinical T stage, or D'Amico risk than those of normal weight. Although we do not know whether the BMI affected the prebiopsy PSA values in those without a diagnosis of prostate cancer, our findings suggest that the BMI does not affect the interpretation of the prebiopsy PSA levels in those with cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Pilot study on predictive value of plasmatic levels of 9 angiogenetic biomarkers in selection of patients candidate to prostate biopsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serretta, Vincenzo; Scurria, Salvatore; Dispensa, Nino; Chiapparrone, Gaetano; Provenzano, Sandro; Caruso, Stefano; Bronte, Giuseppe; Cicero, Giuseppe; Russo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    To reduce the number of negative prostate biopsies in patients with elevated PSA serum levels represents a major challenge in urological oncology. Angiogenetic factors might be involved in initial stages of prostate cancer and might represent useful tools in patients' selection for prostate biopsy. The plasmatic levels of Angiopoietin-2, Follistatin, G-CSF, HGF, IL-8, Leptin, PDGF-BB, PECAM-1 and VEGF were measured by BioPlex immunoassay in patients undergoing prostate biopsy for palpable prostate nodule and/or elevated PSA levels (≥4 ng/mL). They were related with biopsy results. ROC curve analysis was exploited to test the diagnostic accuracy of each biomarker by AUC calculation. A potential cut-off level was computed. Fifty patients were entered. Median PSA was 6.8 ng/mL. A prostate nodule was palpable in 18 (36%) patients. The median number of biopsy cores was 12. Prostate cancer was detected in 25 (50%) and ASAP and PIN in 2 more patients (4%) respectively. Among the 9 considered biomarkers, only leptin showed an interesting diagnostic performance with an AUC of 0.781, at a cut-off value of 2.11 ng/mL, demonstrating a sensitivity of 78%, a specificity of 77% and a positive predictive value of 85%. Main limitations of our study are the exploratory design and the criteria adopted for patients' selection determining a detection rate for prostate cancer above the usual range. Leptin only, in our preliminary study, shows promising diagnostic accuracy for the selection of patients candidate to prostate biopsy. Further studies are required to confirm its diagnostic value and its relation with BMI.

  14. Targeted Prostate Biopsy: Lessons Learned Midst the Evolution of a Disruptive Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri, Nima; Natarajan, Shyam; Margolis, Daniel J; Marks, Leonard S

    2015-09-01

    Lessons learned during a 6-year experience with more than 1200 patients undergoing targeted prostate biopsy via MRI/ultrasound fusion are reported: (1) the procedure is safe and efficient, requiring some 15-20 minutes in an office setting; (2) MRI is best performed by a radiologist with specialized training, using a transabdominal multiparametric approach and preferably a 3T magnet; (3) grade of MRI suspicion is the most powerful predictor of biopsy results, eg, Grade 5 usually represents cancer; (4) some potentially important cancers (15%-30%) are MRI-invisible; (5) Targeted biopsies provide >80% concordance with whole-organ pathology. Early enthusiasm notwithstanding, cost-effectiveness is yet to be resolved, and the technologies remain in evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. TARGETED PROSTATE BIOPSY: LESSONS LEARNED MIDST THE EVOLUTION OF A DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri, Nima; Natarajan, Shyam; Margolis, Daniel J.; Marks, Leonard S.

    2015-01-01

    Lessons learned during a 6-year experience with more than 1200 patients undergoing targeted prostate biopsy via MRI/US fusion are reported: (1) The procedure is safe and efficient, requiring some 15–20 minutes in an office setting; (2) MRI is best performed by a radiologist with specialized training, employing a trans-abdominal multi-parametric approach and preferably a 3T magnet; (3) Grade of MRI suspicion is the most powerful predictor of biopsy results, e.g., Grade 5 usually represents cancer; (4) Some potentially-important cancers (15%–30%) are MRI-invisible; (5) Targeted biopsies provide >80% concordance with whole-organ pathology. Early enthusiasm notwithstanding, cost-effectiveness is yet to be resolved, and the technologies remain in evolution. PMID:26166671

  16. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and image-guided biopsy to detect seminal vesicle invasion by prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskolnikov, Dima; George, Arvin K; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Turkbey, Baris; Shakir, Nabeel A; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Rothwax, Jason T; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Siddiqui, M Minhaj; Su, Daniel; Stamatakis, Lambros; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the correlation between multiparametric prostate MRI (MP-MRI) suspicion for seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) by prostate cancer (PCa) and pathology on MRI/ultrasound (US) fusion-guided biopsy. From March 2007 to June 2013, 822 patients underwent MP-MRI at 3 Tesla and MRI/US fusion-guided biopsy. Of these, 25 patients underwent targeted biopsy of the seminal vesicles (SVs). In six patients, bilateral SVI was suspected, resulting in 31 samples. MP-MRI findings that triggered these SV biopsies were scored as low, moderate, or high suspicion for SVI based on the degree of involvement on MRI. Correlative prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy (RP) pathology were reviewed by a single genitourinary pathologist. At the time of MP-MRI, the median age was 64 years with a median prostate-specific antigen of 10.74 ng/mL. Of the 31 SV lesions identified, MP-MRI suspicion scores of low, moderate, and high were assigned to 3, 19, and 9 lesions, respectively. MRI/US fusion-guided biopsy detected SVI in 20/31 (65%) of cases. For the four patients who underwent RP after a preoperative assessment of SVI, biopsy pathology and RP pathology were concordant in all cases. As this technology becomes more available, MP-MRI and MRI/US fusion-guided biopsy may play a role in the preoperative staging for PCa. Future work will determine if improved preoperative staging leads to better surgical outcomes.

  17. Predicting Prostate Biopsy Results Using a Panel of Plasma and Urine Biomarkers Combined in a Scoring System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albitar, Maher; Ma, Wanlong; Lund, Lars;

    2016-01-01

    , and PTEN in plasma and urine. Patient age, serum prostate-specific antigen (sPSA) level, and biomarkers data were used to develop two independent algorithms, one for predicting the presence of PCa and the other for predicting high-grade PCa (Gleason score [GS] ≥7). RESULTS: Using training and validation...... a scoring system to predict prostate biopsy results and the presence of high grade PCa. METHODS: Urine and plasma specimens were collected from 319 patients recommended for prostate biopsies. We measured the gene expression levels of UAP1, PDLIM5, IMPDH2, HSPD1, PCA3, PSA, TMPRSS2, ERG, GAPDH, B2M, AR...

  18. Incidental seminal vesicle amyioidosis observed in diagnostic prostate biopsies-are routine investigations for systemic amyloidosis warranted?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zichu Yang; Alexander Laird; Ashley Monaghan; Morag Seywright; Imran Ahmad; Hing Y Leung

    2013-01-01

    Seminal vesicle (SV) amyloidosis is a well-documented histological entity,but it is observed infrequently.Its incidence is on the rise,which is probably related to the increasing use of prostate biopsies to investigate patients with elevated serum prostate-specific antigen levels.Here,we report seven cases of incidental SV amyloidosis over a 3-year period and consider their relationship to the previously suggested aetiological factors.Based on our series,we conclude that incidental localized SV amyloidosis observed in diagnostic prostate biopsies does not warrant formal investigations for systemic amyloidosis.

  19. NOTE: Adaptation of a 3D prostate cancer atlas for transrectal ultrasound guided target-specific biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, R.; Werahera, P. N.; Barqawi, A.; Crawford, E. D.; Shinohara, K.; Simoneau, A. R.; Suri, J. S.

    2008-10-01

    Due to lack of imaging modalities to identify prostate cancer in vivo, current TRUS guided prostate biopsies are taken randomly. Consequently, many important cancers are missed during initial biopsies. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential clinical utility of a high-speed registration algorithm for a 3D prostate cancer atlas. This 3D prostate cancer atlas provides voxel-level likelihood of cancer and optimized biopsy locations on a template space (Zhan et al 2007). The atlas was constructed from 158 expert annotated, 3D reconstructed radical prostatectomy specimens outlined for cancers (Shen et al 2004). For successful clinical implementation, the prostate atlas needs to be registered to each patient's TRUS image with high registration accuracy in a time-efficient manner. This is implemented in a two-step procedure, the segmentation of the prostate gland from a patient's TRUS image followed by the registration of the prostate atlas. We have developed a fast registration algorithm suitable for clinical applications of this prostate cancer atlas. The registration algorithm was implemented on a graphical processing unit (GPU) to meet the critical processing speed requirements for atlas guided biopsy. A color overlay of the atlas superposed on the TRUS image was presented to help pick statistically likely regions known to harbor cancer. We validated our fast registration algorithm using computer simulations of two optimized 7- and 12-core biopsy protocols to maximize the overall detection rate. Using a GPU, patient's TRUS image segmentation and atlas registration took less than 12 s. The prostate cancer atlas guided 7- and 12-core biopsy protocols had cancer detection rates of 84.81% and 89.87% respectively when validated on the same set of data. Whereas the sextant biopsy approach without the utility of 3D cancer atlas detected only 70.5% of the cancers using the same histology data. We estimate 10-20% increase in prostate cancer detection rates

  20. The impact of core length on prostate cancer diagnosis during a standard 14-core prostate biopsy scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Atti, Lucio; Ippolito, Carmelo

    2016-11-18

    Even if many studies in the literature purposed to evaluate the improvement of the prostate biopsy (PBx), few studies assessed the diagnostic value of core length in PBx. In this study, we evaluated the length of needle cores sampled during transrectal PBx (TRUSBx) and its impact on cancer diagnosis in a standard 14-core scheme. Medical records of 573 patients who underwent an initial TRUSBx with 14-cores scheme for suspicious prostate cancer (PCa) at our Department were reviewed. The PBx procedure and pathological evaluation were standardized. Cores lengths were compared in patients with versus without cancer, and were divided into group A and B, respectively. Statistical analysis was done to define an acceptable cut-off for biopsy length. The mean age of the entire cohort was 62.1 ± 7.2 years, while median total prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate volume were 4.2 ng/ml and 44.7 ml, respectively. PCa was showed in 33.3% of patients. Mean core length in group A versus B was 11.9 ± 3.9 versus 11.1 ± 3.2 mm (p = 0.016). Thus, core lengths were significantly longer in patients with cancer. There were no statistically significant differences when we considered the whole length of cores sampled from the right lobe (p = 0.58) and left lobe (p = 0.34). The cancer detection rates in cores may be increased by core length in PCa patients during a TRUSBx. Our results suggest a core length of greater than 11.8 mm as a cut-off for quality warranty.

  1. In vivo testing of laser optoacoustic system for image-guided biopsy of prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oraevsky, Alexander; Ermilov, Sergey; Mehta, Ketan; Miller, Tom; Bell, Brent; Orihuela, Eduardo; Motamedi, Massoud

    2006-02-01

    We have developed and used a laser optoacoustic imaging system with transrectal probe (LOIS-P) for detection of mechanical lesions in canine prostates in vivo. LOIS images have been acquired with a 128-channel transrectal probe and a 32-channel data acquisition system. Optoacoustic images showed a strong contrast enhancement for a blood containing lesion, when compared with ultrasound images. Our studies demonstrated that sufficient optoacoustic contrast exists between blood containing lesion and prostate tissue, although the lesion has been undetectable with ultrasound. The imaging results have been compared with visual examination of surgically excised prostates. Although axial resolution of the wide-band transducers employed in the transrectal probe provides good axial resolution of 0.5 mm, the convex arc geometry of the this array of transducers provides lateral resolution degrading with depth in tissue. A two step algorithm has been developed to improve the lateral resolution of deeply located objects. This algorithm employs optoacoustic image reconstruction based on radial back-projection to determine location and shape of the target object, then a procedure, we call Maximum Angular Amplitude Probability (MAAP), to determine true brightness of the object and simultaneously remove arc-shaped artifacts associated with radial back-projection. A laser optoacoustic imaging system (LOIS-P) with transrectal probe operating in backward detection mode empowered with the new image reconstruction algorithm seems promising as a modality for detection of prostate cancer and guiding prostate biopsy.

  2. Lymphatic drainage from the treated versus untreated prostate: feasibility of sentinel node biopsy in recurrent cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeeren, Lenka; Valdes Olmos, Renato A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meinhardt, Willem; Poel, Henk G. van der [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Urology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-11-15

    The goal of this study was to establish the feasibility of sentinel node biopsy in patients with recurrent prostate cancer after initial local treatment and to compare lymphatic drainage patterns of the treated versus untreated prostate. In ten patients with a proven local recurrence after initial local treatment (four external beam radiation, four brachytherapy and two high-intensity focused ultrasound), the radiotracer ({sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid, GE Healthcare) was injected into the prostate. Planar images after 15 min and 2 h were followed by SPECT/CT (Symbia T, Siemens) to visualize lymphatic drainage. Laparoscopic sentinel lymphadenectomy was assisted by a gamma probe (Europrobe, EuroMedical Instruments) and a portable gamma camera (Sentinella, S102, Oncovision). Sentinel node identification and lymphatic drainage patterns were compared to a consecutive series of 70 untreated prostate carcinoma patients from our institute. Lymphatic drainage was visualized in all treated patients, with a median of 3.5 sentinel nodes per patient. Most sentinel nodes were localized in the pelvic area, although the percentage of patients with a sentinel node outside the pelvic para-iliac region (para-aortic, presacral, inguinal or near the ventral abdominal wall) was high compared to the untreated patients (80 versus 34%, p = 0.01). In patients with recurrent prostate cancer, 95% of the sentinel nodes could be harvested and half of the patients had at least one positive sentinel node on pathological examination. Lymphatic mapping of the treated prostate appears feasible, although sentinel nodes are more frequently found in an aberrant location. Larger trials are needed to assess the sensitivity and therapeutic value of lymphatic mapping in recurrent prostate cancer. (orig.)

  3. Quantification of tumor extension in prostate biopsies: importance in the identification of confined tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite Kátia R.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the importance of quantifying the adenocarcinoma in prostate biopsies when determining the tumor's final stage in patients who undergo radical prostatectomy. To identify the best methodology for obtaining such data. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Prostate biopsies from 132 patients were examined, with determination of Gleason histological grade and tumor volume in number of involved fragments, tumor extent of the fragment mostly affected by the tumor and the total percentage of tumor in the specimen. Theses parameters were statistically correlated with the neoplasia's final stage following the evaluation of radical prostatectomy specimens. RESULTS: An average of 12 and a median of 14 biopsy fragments were evaluated per patient. In the univariate analysis the Gleason histological grade, the largest tumor extent in one fragment and the total percentage of tumor in the specimen were correlated with tumor stage of the surgical specimen. In the multivariate analysis, the Gleason histological grade and the total percentage of tumor were strongly correlated with the neoplasia's final stage. The risk of the tumor not being confined was 3 for Gleason 7 tumors and 10.6 for Gleason 8 tumors or above. In cases where the tumor involved more than 60% of the specimen, the risk of non-confined disease was 4.4 times. Among 19 patients with unfavorable histological parameters, Gleason > 7 and extension greater than 60% the tumor final stage was pT3 in 95%. CONCLUSION: When associated to the Gleason histological grade, tumor quantification in prostate biopsies is an important factor for determining organ-confined disease, and among the methods, total percentage of tumor is the most informative one. Such data should be included in the pathological report and must be incorporated in future nomograms.

  4. Safety of transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy in patients affected by Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Dell'Atti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Crohn’s disease (CD is a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is usually considered a contraindication to transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUSBx. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety of TRUSBx in a small cohort of patients with CD. Methods: We queried our institutional database clinical data of patients with a diagnosis of CD undergoing TRUSBx, and a retrospective prospective study of 5 patients was planned. All patients enrolled were in the remission phase of CD and asymptomatic. They received the same antibiotic prophylaxis and a povidone-iodine aqueous solution enema before the procedure. A standardized reproducible technique was used with using a ultrasound machine equipped with a 5-9 MHz multifrequency convex probe “end-fire”. The patients were treated under local anaesthesia, and a 14-core biopsy scheme was performed in each patient as first intention. After the procedure each patient was given a verbal numeric pain scale to evaluate tolerability of TRUSBx. Results: TRUSBx was successfully completed in all patients. The number of biopsy cores was 14 (12-16. Of the 5 biopsy procedures performed 40% revealed prostatic carcinoma (PCa with a Gleason score 6 (3+3. No patients required catheterization or admission to the hospital for adverse events after the procedure. The most frequent adverse event was hematospermia (60%, while hematuria was present in 20% of patients and a minimal rectal bleeding in 20% of the patients. No patients reported severe or unbearable pain (score ≥ 8. Conclusions: This study suggests that CD may not be an absolute contraindication to TRUSBx for prostate cancer detection, but still requires a careful patients selection.

  5. MR imaging-guided prostate biopsy: technical features and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Flavio; Manenti, Guglielmo; Aversa, Tommaso; Catalano, Carlo; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    Repeatedly negative prostate biopsies in individuals with elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels can be frustrating for both the patient and the urologist. This study was performed to investigate if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided transrectal biopsy (MRGB) increases diagnostic performance in individuals with suspected prostate cancer (PCa). Twenty-three consecutive men with a total PSA >4 ng/mL, PSA density >0.15, PSA velocity >0.75 ng/mL/year and suspicious MRI findings were included (average age 64 years; age range 53-75 years; total PSA levels ranging from 4.7 to 54 ng/mL; median 9 ng/mL). MRGB was performed with a closed unit at 1.5 Tesla, an MRI compatible biopsy device, a needle guide, and a titanium double-shoot biopsy gun. At prebiopsy MRI, in the 23 patients, a total of 26 suspicious areas to which the MRGB should be directed were found, 23 of them in the peripheral zone and three in the transitional zone. The needle guide was depicted and could be positioned with MRI guidance in all 23 patients. The duration of the procedure ranged from 35 to 55 min (mean 40 min). MRGB was well tolerated by all patients, and no major complications were observed. The detection rate for the diagnosis of PCa was 80, and 90 % of detected PCa were of intermediate aggressiveness. MRGB has the potential to improve cancer detection rates in men with suspected PCa to deliver the relevant treatment as soon as possible.

  6. Probability of Extraprostatic Disease According to the Percentage of Positive Biopsy Cores in Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago N. Valette

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjectivePrediction of extraprostatic disease in clinically localized prostate cancer is relevant for treatment planning of the disease. The purpose of this study was to explore the usefulness of the percentage of positive biopsy cores to predict the chance of extraprostatic cancer.Materials and MethodsWe evaluated 1787 patients with localized prostate cancer submitted to radical prostatectomy. The percentage of positive cores in prostate biopsy was correlated with the pathologic outcome of the surgical specimen. In the final analysis, a correlation was made between categorical ranges of positive cores (10% intervals and the risk of extraprostatic extension and/or bladder neck invasion, seminal vesicles involvement or metastasis to iliac lymph nodes. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis.ResultsFor each 10% of positive cores we observed a progressive higher prevalence of extraprostatic disease. The risk of cancer beyond the prostate capsule for ConclusionThe percentage of positive cores in prostate biopsy can predict the risk of cancer outside the prostate. Our study shows that the percentage of positive prostate biopsy fragments helps predict the chance of extraprostatic cancer and may have a relevant role in the patient's management.

  7. Baseline subject characteristics predictive of compliance with study-mandated prostate biopsy in men at risk of prostate cancer: results from REDUCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, S; Sun, S; Howard, L E; Moreira, D M; Castro-Santamaria, R; Andriole, G L; Vidal, A C; Freedland, S J

    2016-06-01

    Study compliance is crucial when the study outcome is determined by an invasive procedure, such as prostate biopsy. To investigate predictors of compliance in study-mandated prostate biopsies, we analyzed demographic, clinical and reported lifestyle data from the REDUCE trial. We retrospectively identified 8025 men from REDUCE with at least 2 years of follow-up, and used multivariable logistic regression to test the association between baseline demographic and clinical characteristics and undergoing the study-mandated prostate biopsy at 2 years. We then examined whether missing any of these data was associated with undergoing a biopsy. In REDUCE, 22% of men did not undergo a 2-year biopsy. On multivariable analysis, the non-North American region was predictive of 42-44% increased likelihood of undergoing a 2-year biopsy (P⩽0.001). Being enrolled at a center that enrolled >10 subjects (2nd and 3rd tertile) was associated with a 42-48% increased likelihood of undergoing a 2-year biopsy (P<0.001). In addition, black race predicted 44% lower rate of on-study 2-year biopsy (odds ratio (OR)=0.56; P=0.001). Finally, missing one or more baseline variables was associated with a 32% decreased likelihood of undergoing a 2-year biopsy (OR=0.68; P<0.001). In REDUCE, men outside North America, those at higher volume centers and those with complete baseline data were more likely to undergo study-mandated 2-year biopsies. Given prostate biopsy is becoming increasingly utilized as an endpoint in trials that are often multi-national, regional differences in compliance should be considered when designing future trials. Likewise, efforts are needed to ensure compliance in low-volume centers or among subjects missing baseline data.

  8. Does Obesity Modify the Ability of Prebiopsy Prostate Specific Antigen to Detect Prostate Cancer on Repeat Biopsy? Results from the REDUCE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Adriana C; Howard, Lauren E; Moreira, Daniel M; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Andriole, Gerald L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    Higher body mass index is linked to lower prostate specific antigen. This has given rise to concerns that prostate specific antigen may be less reliable for predicting prostate cancer among obese men. We tested the accuracy of prebiopsy prostate specific antigen for predicting prostate cancer across body mass index categories. We used the REDUCE study, which tested dutasteride for prostate cancer risk reduction in men with a prostate specific antigen of 2.5 to 10.0 ng/ml and a negative pre-study biopsy. All men were required to have a biopsy at 2 and 4 years independent of prostate specific antigen. We assessed the performance of prebiopsy prostate specific antigen to predict overall and high grade prostate cancer (Gleason sum 7 or greater) in each body mass index group using AUC. Of 6,103 men who had a 2-year biopsy 1,646 (27%) were normal weight, 3,209 (53%) were overweight and 1,248 (20%) were obese. Mean adjusted prostate specific antigen for normal weight, overweight and obese subjects on placebo was 7.73, 7.17 and 6.79 ng/ml (p-trend=0.192), and on dutasteride 3.16, 2.93 and 2.62 ng/ml (p=0.008). AUC analysis using raw prostate specific antigen data for predicting prostate cancer ranged from 0.60 to 0.64 in the placebo arm and 0.58 to 0.66 in the dutasteride arm with no difference across body mass index categories (p-interactions ≥0.212). Similar results were found for high grade prostate cancer with AUC ranging from 0.69 to 0.70 in the placebo arm and 0.65 to 0.75 in the dutasteride arm but no differences across body mass index categories (p-interactions ≥0.157). Among men with a previous negative biopsy the accuracy of prebiopsy prostate specific antigen to predict overall and high grade prostate cancer was independent of body mass index. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of individual containers for prostate biopsy samples: Do we gain diagnostic performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panach-Navarrete, J; García-Morata, F; Valls-González, L; Martínez-Jabaloyas, J M

    2016-05-01

    Prostate cores from transrectal biopsies are usually sent in separate vials for pathological processing. Although this is a common practice, there are controversial studies on its usefulness. We wanted to compare the rate of prostate cancer diagnosis between processing samples in 2 containers and processing them in individual containers to see if there are differences. Our secondary objective was to check the rate of diagnosis of various tumour subtypes in each of the 2 groups. A retrospective observational study was conducted of 2,601 cases of prostate biopsies. Ten cores were extracted in each biopsy. We divided the sample into 2 groups: biopsies sent in 2 containers to the department of pathology (left and right lobes) or sent in 10 (one for each cylinder), according to the different criteria used in our centre in the past. We then classified the cases according to the absence of neoplasia, insignificant tumour (involvement of just 1 cylinder, <5%, Gleason score<7), Gleason 6 or Gleason≥7. A bivariate statistical analysis was performed using the chi-squared test. A total of 1,777 participants were included in the 2-container group, and 824 were included in the 10-container group. We diagnosed a rate of 32.4% of cancers in the 2-container group and 40% in the 10-container group, a difference that was statistically significant (P<.001). The insignificant carcinomas were diagnosed more often in the 2-container group than in the 10-container group (6.4% vs. 4.3%, respectively; P=.03). Samples with a Gleason score of 6 were diagnosed more often in the 10-container group than in the 2-container group (11.9% vs. 8.1%, respectively; P=.002). The same occurred with the Gleason score≥7 (23.8% in the 10-container group vs. 17.9% in the 2-container group; P<.001). We diagnosed more prostate cancers when sending biopsied cores in individual containers. Once the procedure was conducted, we also observed in our series a reduction in the diagnoses of insignificant carcinoma

  10. Comparison of Two Local Anesthesia Injection Methods During a Transrectal Ultrasonography-guided Prostate Biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Song Ee; Oh, Young Taik [Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jang Hwan; Rha, Koon Ho; Hong, Sung Joon; Yang, Seung Choul [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    To compare the effectiveness of 2 injection methods of lidocaine during a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy for pain control and complication rates. We retrospectively evaluated patients who underwent a TRUS-guided prostate biopsy from March 2005 to March 2006. One hundred patients were categorized into two groups based on injection method. For group 1, 10 mL of 1% lidocaine was injected bilaterally at the junction of the seminal vesicle and prostate and for group 2, into Denonvilliers' fascia. Pain scores using a visual analog scale (VAS) as well as immediate and delayed complication rates were evaluated. The mean VAS score showed no significant differences between the groups (group 1, 3.4{+-}1.78: group 2, 2.8{+-}1.3: p = 0.062). The difference in delayed complication rates and incidence of hematuria, hemospermia, and blood via the rectum was not significant between groups. However, two patients in group 1 complained of symptoms immediately after local anesthesia: one of tinnitus and the other of mild dizziness. There were no significant differences between pain control and complication rates between the 2 lidocaine injection methods. However, injection into Denonvilliers' fascia is thought to have less potential risk

  11. Safety of ultrasound-guided transrectal extended prostate biopsy in patients receiving low-dose aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Kariotis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine whether the peri-procedural administration of low-dose aspirin increases the risk of bleeding complications for patients undergoing extended prostate biopsies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From February 2007 to September 2008, 530 men undergoing extended needle biopsies were divided in two groups; those receiving aspirin and those not receiving aspirin. The morbidity of the procedure, with emphasis on hemorrhagic complications, was assessed prospectively using two standardized questionnaires. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the mean number of biopsy cores (12.9 ± 1.6 vs. 13.1 ± 1.2 cores, p = 0.09. No major biopsy-related complications were noted. Statistical analysis did not demonstrate significant differences in the rate of hematuria (64.5% vs. 60.6%, p = 0.46, rectal bleeding (33.6% vs. 25.9%, p = 0.09 or hemospermia (90.1% vs. 86.9%, p = 0.45. The mean duration of hematuria and rectal bleeding was significantly greater in the aspirin group compared to the control group (4.45 ± 2.7 vs. 2.4 ± 2.6, p = < 0.001 and 3.3 ± 1.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.7, p < 0.001. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only younger patients (mean age 60.1 ± 5.8 years with a lower body mass index (< 25 kg/m2 receiving aspirin were at a higher risk (odds ratio = 3.46, p = 0.047 for developing hematuria and rectal bleeding after the procedure. CONCLUSIONS: The continuing use of low-dose aspirin in patients undergoing extended prostatic biopsy is a relatively safe option since it does not increase the morbidity of the procedure.

  12. Development of a nuclear morphometric signature for prostate cancer risk in negative biopsies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Gann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our objective was to develop and validate a multi-feature nuclear score based on image analysis of direct DNA staining, and to test its association with field effects and subsequent detection of prostate cancer (PCa in benign biopsies. METHODS: Tissue sections from 39 prostatectomies were Feulgen-stained and digitally scanned (400×, providing maps of DNA content per pixel. PCa and benign epithelial nuclei were randomly selected for measurement of 52 basic morphometric features. Logistic regression models discriminating benign from PCa nuclei, and benign from malignant nuclear populations, were built and cross-validated by AUC analysis. Nuclear populations were randomly collected 5 mm from cancer foci, and from cancer-free prostates, HGPIN, and PCa Gleason grade 3-5. Nuclei also were collected from negative biopsy subjects who had a subsequent diagnosis of PCa and age-matched cancer-free controls (20 pairs. RESULTS: A multi-feature nuclear score discriminated cancer from benign cell populations with AUCs of 0.91 and 0.79, respectively, in training and validation sets of patients. In prostatectomy samples, both nuclear- and population-level models revealed cancer-like features in benign nuclei adjacent to PCa, compared to nuclei that were more distant or from PCa-free glands. In negative biopsies, a validated model with 5 variance features yielded significantly higher scores in cases than controls (P = 0.026. CONCLUSIONS: A multifeature nuclear morphometric score, obtained by automated digital analysis, was validated for discrimination of benign from cancer nuclei. This score demonstrated field effects in benign epithelial nuclei at varying distance from PCa lesions, and was associated with subsequent PCa detection in negative biopsies. IMPACT: This nuclear score shows promise as a risk predictor among men with negative biopsies and as an intermediate biomarker in Phase II chemoprevention trials. The results also suggest that

  13. Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of the Prostate: Is the Information Accessible, Usable, Reliable and Readable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Ciaran E.; Nason, Gregory J.; Kelly, Michael E.; McMahon, Colm; Cantwell, Colin P.; Quinlan, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the accessibility, usability, reliability and readability of Internet information regarding transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided biopsy of the prostate. Materials and Methods The terms “prostate biopsy”, “TRUS biopsy” and “transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the prostate” were separately entered into the each of the top 5 most accessed Internet search engines. Websites were evaluated for accessibility, usability and reliability using the LIDA tool – a validated tool for the assessment of health related websites. Website readability was assessed using the Flesch Reading Ease Score and the Flesch Kincaid Grade Level. Results Following the application of exclusion criteria, 82 unique websites were analyzed. There was a significant difference in scores depending on authorship categories (p ≤ 0.001), with health related charity websites scoring highest (mean 122.29 ± 13.98) and non-academic affiliated institution websites scoring lowest (mean 87 ± 19.76). The presence of advertisements on a website was associated with a lower mean overall LIDA tool score (p = 0.024). Only a single website adhered to the National Institutes for Health recommendations on readability. Conclusions This study demonstrates variability in the quality of information available to Internet users regarding TRUS biopsies. Collaboration of website design and clinical acumen are necessary to develop appropriate websites for patient benefit. PMID:26195961

  14. Outbreak of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Ochrobactrum anthropi Infections after Prostate Biopsies, France, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassier, Pierre; Dananché, Cédric; Hulin, Monique; Dauwalder, Olivier; Rouvière, Olivier; Bertrand, Xavier; Perraud, Michel; Bénet, Thomas; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of healthcare-associated prostatitis involving rare environmental pathogens in immunocompetent patients undergoing transrectal prostate biopsies at Hôpital Édouard Herriot (Lyon, France) during August 13–October 10, 2014. Despite a fluoroquinolone-based prophylaxis, 5 patients were infected with Achromobacter xylosoxidans and 3 with Ochrobactrum anthropi, which has not been reported as pathogenic in nonimmunocompromised persons. All patients recovered fully. Analysis of the outbreak included case investigation, case–control study, biopsy procedure review, microbiologic testing of environmental and clinical samples, and retrospective review of hospital records for 4 years before the outbreak. The cases resulted from asepsis errors during preparation of materials for the biopsies. A low-level outbreak involving environmental bacteria was likely present for years, masked by antimicrobial drug prophylaxis and a low number of cases. Healthcare personnel should promptly report unusual pathogens in immunocompetent patients to infection control units, and guidelines should explicitly mention asepsis during materials preparation. PMID:27434277

  15. [MRI/TRUS fusion-guided prostate biopsy : Value in the context of focal therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, T; von Hardenberg, J; Blana, A; Cash, H; Baumunk, D; Salomon, G; Hadaschik, B; Henkel, T; Herrmann, J; Kahmann, F; Köhrmann, K-U; Köllermann, J; Kruck, S; Liehr, U-B; Machtens, S; Peters, I; Radtke, J P; Roosen, A; Schlemmer, H-P; Sentker, L; Wendler, J J; Witzsch, U; Stolzenburg, J-U; Schostak, M; Ganzer, R

    2017-02-01

    Several systems for MRI/TRUS fusion-guided biopsy of the prostate are commercially available. Many studies have shown superiority of fusion systems for tumor detection and diagnostic quality compared to random biopsy. The benefit of fusion systems in focal therapy of prostate cancer (PC) is less clear. Critical considerations of fusion systems for planning and monitoring of focal therapy of PC were investigated. A systematic literature review of available fusion systems for the period 2013-5/2016 was performed. A checklist of technical details, suitability for special anatomic situations and suitability for focal therapy was established by the German working group for focal therapy (Arbeitskreis fokale und Mikrotherapie). Eight fusion systems were considered (Artemis™, BioJet, BiopSee®, iSR´obot™ Mona Lisa, Hitachi HI-RVS, UroNav and Urostation®). Differences were found for biopsy mode (transrectal, perineal, both), fusion mode (elastic or rigid), navigation (image-based, electromagnetic sensor-based or mechanical sensor-based) and space requirements. Several consensus groups recommend fusion systems for focal therapy. Useful features are "needle tracking" and compatibility between fusion system and treatment device (available for Artemis™, BiopSee® and Urostation® with Focal One®; BiopSee®, Hitachi HI-RVS with NanoKnife®; BioJet, BiopSee® with cryoablation, brachytherapy). There are a few studies for treatment planning. However, studies on treatment monitoring after focal therapy are missing.

  16. [Use of intrarectal lidocaine gel in ultrasound-guided transrectal biopsies of the prostate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Mediero, J M; Martínez-Piñeiro Lorenzo, L; Núñez Mora, C; de Fata Chillón, F Ramón; Cruz Jimeno, J L; Alonso y Gregorio, S; de la Peña Barthel, J J

    2003-01-01

    To know in a quantitative manner the degree of discomfort and pain of the biopsies of the prostate and to evaluate the effectiveness of the transrectal lidocaine. We performed 140 transrectal biopsies of the prostate, Patients were included on a random basis into two arms: one of them received intrarectal lidocaine, 20 mg (group 1, n = 71) and the other group received placebo (group 2, n = 28) both of them ten minutes prior the proceeding. The global pain mean was 3.7 (0 no pain, 10 highest pain) and the global discomfort mean was 3.5. The group 1 patients showed a trend to feel less pain and discomfort although it did not reach the necessary statistic significance (p = 0.7 y p = 0.5 respectively). We do not achieve the good results obtained by other groups in order to decrease the degree of pain and discomfort with the use of intrarectal lidocaine. We did not find relationship between the PSA level, previous biopsies, intrarectal lidocaina and degree of information received and the degree of pain and discomfort.

  17. The Rectal Administration of Lignocaine Gel and Periprostatic Lignocaine Infiltration During Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsy Provides Effective Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, EJ; Ali, S; Koneru, S

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Transrectal ultrasound guided prostate needle biopsy (TRUS) is the standard procedure to diagnose or exclude prostate cancer. This procedure can be associated with significant discomfort, both on insertion of the ultrasound probe as well as on taking the biopsy. We evaluated a new technique for pain relief during TRUS biopsy. PATIENTS AND METHODS In Group 1 (n = 60), the biopsies were taken without any analgesia. In Group 2 (n = 60), 11 ml of Instillagel (2% lignocaine) was administered rectally prior to probe insertion and 5 ml of 1% lignocaine periprostatic injection was administered before taking the biopsy. The discomfort encountered during the procedure was graded by the patient on a scale ranging from no discomfort to mild, moderate and severe pain. RESULTS In Group 2, there was a marked reduction in the pain experienced during the procedure. The Chi-squared test for trend showed a significant association between the rectal administration of local anaesthetic gel and reduction in pain on probe insertion (P = 0.0001). There was also a significant association between the use of periprostatic lignocaine injection and reduction in pain on taking the biopsy (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS The use of lignocaine gel prior to probe insertion and periprostatic infiltration of lignocaine before taking the needle biopsy significantly reduces the pain experienced by the patient during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. PMID:16551424

  18. DNA Ploidy Measured on Archived Pretreatment Biopsy Material May Correlate With Prostate-Specific Antigen Recurrence After Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, Mira, E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Oncology, Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy Program, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); MacAulay, Calum [Department of Integrative Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Hayes, Malcolm [Department of Pathology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Korbelik, Jagoda [Department of Integrative Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Morris, W. James [Radiation Oncology, Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy Program, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Palcic, Branko [Department of Integrative Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To explore whether DNA ploidy of prostate cancer cells determined from archived transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy specimens correlates with disease-free survival. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven failures and 47 controls were selected from 1006 consecutive low- and intermediate-risk patients treated with prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy (July 1998-October 2003). Median follow-up was 7.5 years. Ten-year actuarial disease-free survival was 94.1%. Controls were matched using age, initial prostate-specific antigen level, clinical stage, Gleason score, use of hormone therapy, and follow-up (all P nonsignificant). Seventy-eight specimens were successfully processed; 27 control and 20 failure specimens contained more than 100 tumor cells were used for the final analysis. The Feulgen-Thionin stained cytology samples from archived paraffin blocks were used to determine the DNA ploidy of each tumor by measuring integrated optical densities. Results: The samples were divided into diploid and aneuploid tumors. Aneuploid tumors were found in 16 of 20 of the failures (80%) and 8 of 27 controls (30%). Diploid DNA patients had a significantly lower rate of disease recurrence (P=.0086) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.256). On multivariable analysis, patients with aneuploid tumors had a higher prostate-specific antigen failure rate (HR 5.13). Additionally, those with “excellent” dosimetry (V100 >90%; D90 >144 Gy) had a significantly lower recurrence rate (HR 0.25). All patients with aneuploid tumors and dosimetry classified as “nonexcellent” (V100 <90%; D90 <144 Gy) (5 of 5) had disease recurrence, compared with 40% of patients with aneuploid tumors and “excellent” dosimetry (8 of 15). In contrast, dosimetry did not affect the outcome for diploid patients. Conclusions: Using core biopsy material from archived paraffin blocks, DNA ploidy correctly classified the majority of failures and nonfailures in this study. The results suggest that DNA ploidy can be used as a

  19. Prostate cancer: 1.5 T endo-coil dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and MR spectroscopy-correlation with prostate biopsy and prostatectomy histopathological data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta, E-mail: elcha@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Balslev, Ingegerd [Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Logager, Vibeke [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Hansen, Alastair [Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Jakobsen, Henrik; Kromann-Andersen, Bjarne; Norgaard, Nis [Department of Urology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, (Denmark); Horn, Thomas [Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Thomsen, Henrik S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data. Materials and methods: 43 patients, scheduled for radical prostatectomy, underwent prostate MR examination. Prostate cancer was identified by transrectal ultrasonographically (TRUS) guided sextant biopsy. MR examination was performed at 1.5T with an endorectal MR coil. Cancer localisation was performed on sextant-basis - for comparison between TRUS biopsy, MR techniques and histopathological findings on prostatectomy specimens. Results: Prostate cancer was identified in all 43 patients by combination of the three MR techniques. The detection of prostate cancer on sextant-basis showed sensitivity and specificity: 50% and 91% for TRUS, 72% and 55% for T2WI, 49% and 69% for DCEMRI, and 46% and 78% for CSI. Conclusion: T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI in combination can identify prostate cancer. Further development of MR technologies for these MR methods is necessary to improve the detection of the prostate cancer.

  20. Obesity affects the biopsy-mediated detection of prostate cancer, particularly high-grade prostate cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of 29,464 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Meng-Bo; Liu, Sheng-Hua; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Bai, Pei-De; Ding, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, obesity (measured according to the body mass index) has correlated inconsistently with the risk of biopsy-measured prostate cancer, and specifically high-grade prostate cancer. This meta-analysis aimed to clarify these correlations. A comprehensive literature search of the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was conducted for relevant studies published through January 2014. The pooled estimates of odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) were computed, and the meta-analysis was performed with the STATA software according to a random effects approach. A total of 11 studies that included 29,464 individuals were identified. A 5-kg/m2 increase in body mass index was associated with a 15% (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.98-1.34) higher risk of prostate cancer detection and a 37% (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.19-1.57) higher risk of high-grade prostate cancer detection at biopsy. There were no differences among the results of studies conducted in the USA, Europe or Asia. We also found that studies that had adjusted for prostate-specific antigen levels, digital rectal examination results, and prostate volumes obtained positive significant outcomes (OR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.12-1.44), whereas studies that did not adjust for the above-mentioned confounding variables obtained negative results (OR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.68-1.25). Moreover, the positive correlation between body mass index and the detection of both prostate cancer and high-grade diseases tended to be stronger as the number of biopsy cores increased. The present meta-analysis demonstrated that a high body mass index correlated positively with prostate cancer detection, especially high-grade prostate cancer detection. The adoption of a modified and possibly more aggressive biopsy strategy was suggested for obese populations.

  1. Obesity affects the biopsy-mediated detection of prostate cancer, particularly high-grade prostate cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of 29,464 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Bo Hu

    Full Text Available In previous studies, obesity (measured according to the body mass index has correlated inconsistently with the risk of biopsy-measured prostate cancer, and specifically high-grade prostate cancer. This meta-analysis aimed to clarify these correlations.A comprehensive literature search of the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was conducted for relevant studies published through January 2014. The pooled estimates of odds ratios (OR and confidence intervals (CI were computed, and the meta-analysis was performed with the STATA software according to a random effects approach.A total of 11 studies that included 29,464 individuals were identified. A 5-kg/m2 increase in body mass index was associated with a 15% (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.98-1.34 higher risk of prostate cancer detection and a 37% (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.19-1.57 higher risk of high-grade prostate cancer detection at biopsy. There were no differences among the results of studies conducted in the USA, Europe or Asia. We also found that studies that had adjusted for prostate-specific antigen levels, digital rectal examination results, and prostate volumes obtained positive significant outcomes (OR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.12-1.44, whereas studies that did not adjust for the above-mentioned confounding variables obtained negative results (OR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.68-1.25. Moreover, the positive correlation between body mass index and the detection of both prostate cancer and high-grade diseases tended to be stronger as the number of biopsy cores increased.The present meta-analysis demonstrated that a high body mass index correlated positively with prostate cancer detection, especially high-grade prostate cancer detection. The adoption of a modified and possibly more aggressive biopsy strategy was suggested for obese populations.

  2. Role of (18)F-Choline PET/CT in guiding biopsy in patients with risen PSA levels and previous negative biopsy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Londoño, G A; García Vicente, A M; Amo-Salas, M; Fúnez Mayorga, F; López Guerrero, M A; Talavera Rubio, M P; Gutierrez Martin, P; González García, B; de la Torre Pérez, J A; Soriano Castrejón, Á M

    To study (18)F-Choline PET/CT in the diagnosis and biopsy guide of prostate cancer (pCa) in patients with persistently high prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and previous negative prostate biopsy. To compare the clinical risk factors and metabolic variables as predictors of malignancy. Patients with persistently elevated PSA in serum (total PSA >4ng/mL) and at least a previous negative or inconclusive biopsy were consecutively referred for a whole body (18)F-Choline PET/CT. Patient age, PSA level, PSA doubling time (PSAdt) and PSA velocity (PSAvel) were obtained. PET images were visually (positive or negative) and semiquantitatively (SUVmax) reviewed. (18)F-Choline uptake prostate patterns were defined as focal, multifocal, homogeneous or heterogeneous. Histology on biopsy using transrectal ultrasound-guided approach was the gold standard. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp) and accuracy (Ac) of PET/CT for diagnosis of pCa were evaluated using per-patient and per-prostate lobe analysis. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to assess the value of SUVmax to diagnose pCa. Correlation between PET/CT and biopsy results per-prostate lobe was assessed using the Chi-square test. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were applied to compare clinical risk factors and metabolic variables as predictors of malignancy. Thirty-six out of 43 patients with histologic confirmation were included. In 11 (30.5%) patients, pCa was diagnosed (Gleason score from 4 to 9). The mean values of patient age, PSA level, PSAdt and PSAvel were: 65.5 years, 15.6ng/ml, 28.1 months and 8.5ng/mL per year, respectively. Thirty-three patients had a positive PET/CT; 18 had a focal pattern, 7 multifocal, 4 homogeneous and 4 heterogeneous. Se, Sp and Ac of PET/CT were of 100%, 12% and 38% in the patient based analysis, and 87%, 29% and 14% in the prostate lobe based analysis, respectively. The ROC curve analysis of SUVmax showed an AUC of 0.568 (p=0.52). On a lobe

  3. The effect of noise-cancelling headphones or music on pain perception and anxiety in men undergoing transrectal prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivian, Matvey; Qi, Peter; Kimura, Masaki; Chen, Valerie H; Chen, Stephanie H; Gan, Tong J; Polascik, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    To assess the effect of noise-cancelling headphones with or without music on patient pain and anxiety associated with routine, office-based transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy in a prospective randomized study. Patients scheduled for prostate biopsy as a result of elevated prostate-specific antigen and/or abnormal digital rectal examination were prospectively enrolled and randomized into a control, noise-cancelling headphones, or music-headphones group. Patients completed pain and anxiety questionnaires and had their physiological parameters assessed before and after the procedure and compared across groups. Eighty-eight patients were enrolled. Pain scores increased from baseline across all study groups, with the lowest mean score in the music group. No appreciable change was noted in anxiety scores after the procedure between groups (P>.05). Although postbiopsy systolic blood pressure values remained comparable with baseline levels in all groups, postbiopsy diastolic blood pressure increased in the control and headphones groups (P=.062 and .088, respectively) but remained stable in the music group (P=.552) after biopsy, indicating lesser physiological response to anxiety and pain in this group. Music-induced attention shift during prostate biopsy may have a beneficial impact on procedural anxiety and pain perception, but no apparent effect was noted for use of headphones alone. Further studies are necessary to explore strategies to reduce perceived anxiety and pain in men undergoing prostate biopsy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in Gleason score grading on serial follow-up biopsies in prostate cancer patients undergoing active surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guijarro, A; Hernández, V; López, B; Capitán, C; Pérez-Fernández, E; de la Peña, E; de la Morena, J M; Llorente, C

    2015-04-01

    Active surveillance for prostate cancer has grown systematically in the recent years with more robust mid-term outcomes. However, changes in Gleason score during serial biopsies are not detailed in many of these reports. To evaluate changes in Gleason score on follow-up biopsies in low-risk prostate cancer in patients undergoing AS program in our center. Series of patients diagnosed of prostate cancer between 2004 and 2013 have been analyzed. The inclusion criteria were: PSA ≤ 10 ng/ml + Gleason ≤ 6 + T1c/T2a + ≤ 2 positive cores, and no more than 50% of affected core. The pathology of each of the biopsies was analyzed. We studied a series of 175 patients undergoing AS. Mean follow-up was 3.96 years (SD 2.4). Follow-up biopsies with Gleason scores ≥ 7 were: 5.72% in the first biopsy, 7.39% and 7.41% in subsequent biopsies. By contrast, in 42.03% of cases did not show evident tumor involvement in the first biopsy, 40.74% and 51.85% in the second and third biopsies respectively. Median stay in the AS program was: 90.99 months (95% CI: 53.53-128.46) in patients with first positive biopsy vs. 96.66 months (95% CI: 63.19-130.13) in those without evidence of tumor. In our series the pathological data of the first 3 biopsies remain stable in terms of the positive biopsy rate, Gleason score, or indication of active treatment proportions. Those patients who do not show evidence of malignancy in the first follow-up biopsy are less likely to need active treatment than the other patients in the series. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Documenting the location of systematic transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies: correlation with multi-parametric MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sheng; Kruecker, Jochen; Locklin, Julia; Pang, Yuxi; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Baccala, Angelo; Rastinehad, Ardeshir; Benjamin, Compton; Merino, Maria J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract During transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsies, the actual location of the biopsy site is rarely documented. Here, we demonstrate the capability of TRUS-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image fusion to document the biopsy site and correlate biopsy results with multi-parametric MRI findings. Fifty consecutive patients (median age 61 years) with a median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 5.8 ng/ml underwent 12-core TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate. Pre-procedural T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were fused to TRUS. A disposable needle guide with miniature tracking sensors was attached to the TRUS probe to enable fusion with MRI. Real-time TRUS images during biopsy and the corresponding tracking information were recorded. Each biopsy site was superimposed onto the MRI. Each biopsy site was classified as positive or negative for cancer based on the results of each MRI sequence. Sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating curve (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) values were calculated for multi-parametric MRI. Gleason scores for each multi-parametric MRI pattern were also evaluated. Six hundred and 5 systemic biopsy cores were analyzed in 50 patients, of whom 20 patients had 56 positive cores. MRI identified 34 of 56 positive cores. Overall, sensitivity, specificity, and ROC area values for multi-parametric MRI were 0.607, 0.727, 0.667, respectively. TRUS-MRI fusion after biopsy can be used to document the location of each biopsy site, which can then be correlated with MRI findings. Based on correlation with tracked biopsies, T2-weighted MRI and apparent diffusion coefficient maps derived from diffusion-weighted MRI are the most sensitive sequences, whereas the addition of delayed contrast enhancement MRI and three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated higher specificity consistent with results obtained using radical prostatectomy specimens. PMID:21450548

  6. Histopathological findings in extended prostate biopsy with PSA ≤ 4 ng/mL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia R. Leite

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cancer detection has been reported in up to 27% of patients when lowering the PSA cutoff to 2.5 ng/mL. Although this practice could increase the number of biopsies performed, it also could lead to more frequent detection of significant prostate cancers at an organ-confined stage and/or a less aggressive state. This study describes the incidence of malignancy and tumor characteristics in extended prostate biopsies with PSA ≤ 4 ng/mL. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prostate biopsies from 1081 patients where examined, 275 (25.4% patients had PSA level ≤ 4 ng/mL. RESULTS: Cancer was diagnosed in 32.0% and 35.7% of patients with PSA ≤ 4 ng/mL and > 4 ng/mL, respectively (p = 0.906. The median Gleason score was 7 independent of PSA > or ≤ 4 ng/mL (p = 0.078. The median number of cores positive for tumor was 4 and 3, respectively, for PSA > 4 ng/mL and PSA ≤ 4 ng/mL (p = 0.627. There was a difference in the total percent of tumors involving all cores, 11% and 7% for PSA > or ≤ 4 ng/mL (p = 0.042. Fifty-six patients underwent radical prostatectomy, 12 had PSA ≤ 4 ng/mL. In both groups, a diagnosis of cancer was accurate with no differences in Gleason score, tumor volume or staging for both groups. CONCLUSION: When PSA is below 4 ng/mL, cancer is detected in a proportion equal to the proportion diagnosed with a PSA > 4 ng/mL, and tumor characteristics are similar between the two groups. Only clinically significant tumors were diagnosed following radical prostatectomy.

  7. Telomerase activity in needle biopsies from prostate cancer and benign prostates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wymenga, LFA; Wisman, GBA; Ruiters, MHJ; Mensink, HJA; Veenstra, R.

    2000-01-01

    Background Telomerase activation is thought to be essential for the immortality of cancer cells. It may be a prognostic factor in small volume well differentiated prostate cancers and hence a guide for the aggressiveness of the approach. The length of the chromosome tips (telomeres) are maintained b

  8. Telomerase activity in needle biopsies from prostate cancer and benign prostates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wymenga, LFA; Wisman, GBA; Ruiters, MHJ; Mensink, HJA; Veenstra, R.

    2000-01-01

    Background Telomerase activation is thought to be essential for the immortality of cancer cells. It may be a prognostic factor in small volume well differentiated prostate cancers and hence a guide for the aggressiveness of the approach. The length of the chromosome tips (telomeres) are maintained b

  9. Serial prostate biopsy and risk of lower urinary tract symptoms: results from a large, single-institution active surveillance cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Allison S; Hilton, Joan F; Cowan, Janet E; Washington, Samuel L; Carroll, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    To describe the effect of serial prostate biopsy on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in men who undergo active surveillance (AS) at a large academic institution. This is a retrospective study of men enrolled in AS for ≥6 months who underwent ≥1 biopsy and completed ≥1 International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. In additional to total IPSS, we report the mean difference between the first and last questionnaires for patients who completed ≥2 questionnaires. Multivariate models, adjusting for disease features, age, race, prostate volume and baseline, or incident benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), were used to assess relationships between IPSS and total biopsy exposure. Four hundred eighty-two men were eligible, and 291 completed ≥2 IPSS questionnaires. Overall, mean (standard deviation) age was 61.7 (7.8) years, and median prostate volume (interquartile range) was 42 (34-61) mL. At baseline, 11% provided history of BPH. Among men who completed multiple questionnaires, 25% experienced clinically significant worsening (IPSS increase ≥4 points). In regression model, total IPSS was not significantly associated with greater biopsy exposure (P = .25). IPSS change from initial and the latest questionnaire was not significantly associated with initial or interval biopsy exposure in an adjusted longitudinal model (P = .64 and .50, respectively), but a trend was observed with greater age decade (+4.07 points, 95% CI -0.30 to 8.4; P = .07). Repeated prostate biopsy does not appear to independently pose additional risk of LUTS in an AS population. In unadjusted analyses, greater biopsy exposure is a surrogate for increasing follow-up time, age, and BPH risk, and thus, risk of LUTS onset and progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 3D-2D ultrasound feature-based registration for navigated prostate biopsy: A feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Selmi, Sonia,; Promayon, Emmanuel; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this paper is to describe a 3D-2D ultrasound feature-based registration method for navigated prostate biopsy and its first results obtained on patient data. A system combining a low-cost tracking system and a 3D-2D registration algorithm was designed. The proposed 3D-2D registration method combines geometric and image-based distances. After extracting features from ultrasound images, 3D and 2D features within a defined distance are matched using an intensity...

  11. 3D-2D ultrasound feature-based registration for navigated prostate biopsy: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Sonia Y; Promayon, Emmanuel; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a 3D-2D ultrasound feature-based registration method for navigated prostate biopsy and its first results obtained on patient data. A system combining a low-cost tracking system and a 3D-2D registration algorithm was designed. The proposed 3D-2D registration method combines geometric and image-based distances. After extracting features from ultrasound images, 3D and 2D features within a defined distance are matched using an intensity-based function. The results are encouraging and show acceptable errors with simulated transforms applied on ultrasound volumes from real patients.

  12. Clinical application of a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Shyam; Marks, Leonard S; Margolis, Daniel J A; Huang, Jiaoti; Macairan, Maria Luz; Lieu, Patricia; Fenster, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Prostate biopsy (Bx) has for 3 decades been performed in a systematic, but blind fashion using 2D ultrasound (US). Herein is described the initial clinical evaluation of a 3D Bx tracking and targeting device (Artemis; Eigen, Grass Valley, CA). Our main objective was to test accuracy of the new 3D method in men undergoing first and follow-up Bx to rule out prostate cancer (CaP). Patients in the study were men ages 35-87 years (66.1 ± 9.9), scheduled for Bx to rule out CaP, who entered into an IRB-approved protocol. A total of 218 subjects underwent conventional trans-rectal US (TRUS); the tracking system was then attached to the US probe; the prostate was scanned and a 3D reconstruction was created. All Bx sites were visualized in 3D and tracked electronically. In 11 men, a pilot study was conducted to test ability of the device to return a Bx to an original site. In 47 men, multi-parametric 3 Tesla MRI, incorporating T2-weighted images, dynamic contrast enhancement, and diffusion-weighted imaging, was performed in advance of the TRUS, allowing the stored MRI images to be fused with real-time US during biopsy. Lesions on MRI were delineated by a radiologist, assigned a grade of CaP suspicion, and fused into TRUS for biopsy targeting. 3D Bx tracking was completed successfully in 180/218 patients, with a success rate approaching 95% among the last 50 men. Average time for Bx with the Artemis device was 15 minutes with an additional 5 minutes for MRI fusion and Bx targeting. In the tracking study, an ability to return to prior Bx sites (n=32) within 1.2 ± 1.1 mm SD was demonstrated and was independent of prostate volume or location of Bx site. In the MRI fusion study, when suspicious lesions were targeted, a 33% Bx-positivity rate was found compared with a 7% positivity rate for systematic, nontargeted Bx (19/57 cores vs. 9/124 cores, P=0.03). Use of 3D tracking and image fusion has the potential to transform MRI into a clinical tool to aid biopsy and improve current

  13. Intraprostatic locations of tumor foci of higher grade missed by diagnostic prostate biopsy among potential candidates for active surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangmo; Lee, Jung Keun; Choe, Gheeyoung; Hong, Sung Kyu

    2016-01-01

    To establish optimal biopsy scheme for selection of candidates for active surveillance (AS) among prostate cancer (PCa) patients, information on topographical distribution of tumor foci of higher grade missed by contemporary biopsy amongst potential candidates of AS would certainly be useful. Thus we analyzed topographic distribution of tumor foci by examining prostatectomy specimens in 444 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for low risk PCa. Anterior and posterior prostate areas were demarcated by a horizontal line drawn at midpoint of prostatic urethra. Among 444 subjects, patients with upgrading showed relatively higher prevalence of index tumor foci in anterior prostate than those without upgrading, though not reaching statistical significance (p = 0.252). Meanwhile, among 135 (30.4%) patients with very low risk PCa, patients with upgrading showed significantly higher prevalence of index tumor foci in anterior prostate than those without upgrading (52.2% vs 33.8%; p = 0.031). In conclusions, tumor foci of higher grade missed by diagnostic biopsy were mostly located in anterior prostate among very low risk PCa patients. Such finding would be concrete evidence to support the notion that more efforts are needed to increase accuracy in detecting tumor foci in anterior prostate among potential candidates for AS. PMID:27827421

  14. Analgesic Efficacy of Intrarectal Instillation of Lidocaine Gel prior to Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy: A Prospective Randomized Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Tae Jin; Kim, Seung Hyup; Cho, Jeong Yeon [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hak Jong; Lee, Sang Eun; Byun, Seok Soo [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Chang Kyu [Seoul National University Borame Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    To assess the analgesic efficacy of intrarectal lidocaine gel instillation prior to periprostatic nerve block during transrectal, ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies. Between March 2004 and October 2004, 203 consecutive patients for prostate biopsies were randomized into two groups. In 90 patients of group A, 10ml of 2% lidocaine gel was instilled intrarectally 10 minutes prior to periprostatic neurovascular bundle block, while 113 patients of group B received only periprostatic neurovascular bundle block without lidocaine gel instillation. Pain was assessed with the visual analogue pain scale, during periprostatic neurovascular bundle block (VAS 1), during the biopsy procedures (VAS 2) and 20 minutes after the procedure (VAS 3). The difference in VAS scores between patients in the two groups was evaluated with the unpaired t-test, with p < 0.05 considered significant. Patients in group A experienced statistically less pain during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy (VAS 2, 2.994 versus 3.903, p < 0.01). However, no significant difference in VAS values could be demonstrated during periprostatic neurovascular bundle block (VAS 1, 4.761 versus 5.133, p > 0.05) or at after 20 minutes after the procedure (VAS 3, 0.9778 versus 1.257, p > 0.05). Intrarectal instillation of lidocaine gel leads to significant additional analgesic efficacy during the biopsy procedure. It is a simple, safe and rapid technique that should be considered in all patients undergoing TRUS guided prostate biopsy

  15. Lidocaine suppository for transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: a prospective, double-blind, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goluza, Eleonora; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Kastelan, Zeljko; Peric, Mladen; Murselovic, Tamara; Sosic, Hrvoje

    2011-01-01

    To investigate analgesia using lidocaine suppositories for prostate biopsy. From 2007 to 2009, 160 patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy at the Department of Urology, KBC Zagreb. 80 patients received a 60-mg lidocaine suppository intrarectally at different time points from 15 to 120 min before biopsy and 80 patients received a glycerin suppository as placebo. The pain level was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups, i.e. they were similar regarding patients' age, prostate-specific antigen levels, prostate volume and the incidence of diagnosis of malignancy on biopsy. The mean pain score in the lidocaine group (3 ± 1) was significantly lower than the mean pain score in the glycerin group (4.1 ± 1.3) (p suppository till the biopsy and the optimal time for performing biopsy starting approximately 1 h after placing the suppository. Lidocaine suppositories are an easy-to-use, self-applicable (by the patient) and cheap method of local analgesia, with acceptable results. Possible complications related to this procedure are insignificant. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Percentage of Positive Biopsy Cores: A Better Risk Stratification Model for Prostate Cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Jiayi; Vicini, Frank A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Williams, Scott G. [Peter Maccallum Cancer Centre and University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Ye Hong; McGrath, Samuel; Ghilezan, Mihai; Krauss, Daniel; Martinez, Alvaro A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Kestin, Larry L., E-mail: lkestin@comcast.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of the percentage of positive biopsy cores (PPC) and perineural invasion in predicting the clinical outcomes after radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer and to explore the possibilities to improve on existing risk-stratification models. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2004, 1,056 patients with clinical Stage T1c-T3N0M0 prostate cancer, who had four or more biopsy cores sampled and complete biopsy core data available, were treated with external beam RT, with or without a high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost at William Beaumont Hospital. The median follow-up was 7.6 years. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed with PPC, Gleason score, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen, T stage, PNI, radiation dose, androgen deprivation, age, prostate-specific antigen frequency, and follow-up duration. A new risk stratification (PPC classification) was empirically devised to incorporate PPC and replace the T stage. Results: On multivariate Cox regression analysis, the PPC was an independent predictor of distant metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival (all p < .05). A PPC >50% was associated with significantly greater distant metastasis (hazard ratio, 4.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.86-8.61), and its independent predictive value remained significant with or without androgen deprivation therapy (all p < .05). In contrast, PNI and T stage were only predictive for locoregional recurrence. Combining the PPC ({<=}50% vs. >50%) with National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk stratification demonstrated added prognostic value of distant metastasis for the intermediate-risk (hazard ratio, 5.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.78-16.6) and high-risk (hazard ratio, 4.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.70-11.3) groups, regardless of the use of androgen deprivation and high-dose RT (all p < .05). The proposed PPC classification appears to provide improved stratification of the clinical outcomes relative to the National

  17. CARCINOMA PROSTATE HISTOPATHOLOGY IN NEEDLE BIOPSIES INCLUDING REVISED GLEASON’S GRADING AND ROLE OF IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL MARKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Priyadarsini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Adenocarcinoma of prostate is the most common form of cancer in men accounting for 29% of cancers in developed nations and the incidence of prostatic cancer is 6.4% in males of Trivandrum District. MATERIALS AND METHODS All prostatic biopsies taken per rectally and stained by haematoxylin and eosin. In suspected cases of malignancy immunohistochemical markers, the AMACR P504S and high molecular weight cytokeratin 34E12 were done. RESULTS The total number of cases studied were 142. The final diagnosis with histomorphological features show that maximum cases were prostatic carcinoma constituting 45.5% of the samples received. CONCLUSION All prostatic carcinomas were graded by revised Gleason’s grade (ISUP 2005 and the use of immunohistochemical markers in arriving at a definite diagnosis in carcinoma prostate was confirmed.

  18. Usefulness of cognitive targeting in multiparametric MRI-guided biopsy to diagnose the dominant lesion in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Bennett, J; Conejero Olesti, A; Hurtado Salom, C; Rebenaque, E; Parada, D; Serrano Alcalá, E; Abreu De Con, J A

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of cognitive targeting in multiparametric MRI-guided biopsy to obtain samples of the dominant nodule in prostate cancer. We performed cognitive-targeted biopsy after multiparametric MRI in 53 patients with progressive elevation of PSA. All patients provided written informed consent. Biopsies were done via a transperineal route under ultrasound guidance. The first three samples were obtained by cognitive targeting, with the target lesion determined by multiparametric MRI according to the PI-RADS (prostate imaging, reporting, and data system) criteria. Then 9 cylinders were obtained from the remaining segments of the prostate (systematic biopsies). The pathologist evaluated the 12 cylinders without knowing which ones were obtained by cognitive targeting. In patients with multifocal lesions, we defined the dominant lesion as the one with the highest Gleason score and tumor volume; in patients with unifocal lesions, we defined the dominant lesion as the lesion identified. We diagnosed 29 prostate tumors. In 89.7% (26/29), the dominant nodule was diagnosed by the cognitive-targeted biopsy. If only cognitive-targeted biopsy had been done, the dominant nodule would not have been diagnosed in two (3.8%, 2/53) patients and only one (1.8%, 1/53) patient, in whom no sample was obtained from the lesion with the highest Gleason score, would have been understaged. The rate of positivity of cognitive-targeted biopsy was 50.9% (27/53) in the entire group of patients and 46.3% (19/41) in the group of patients with previous negative biopsies. No significant immediate or late complications were observed. Cognitive targeting is safe and efficacious for detecting the dominant lesion in prostate cancer. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Randomized controlled trial of antibiotic prophylaxis regimens for transrectai ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAN Eddie Shu-yin; LO Ka-lun; NG Chi-fai; HOU See-ming; YIP Sidney Kam-hung

    2012-01-01

    Background A prior study showed significant antibioti resistance to quinotone in our poputation.In this study we aimed to evaluate and compare the efficacy of a single versus a combined prophylactic antibiotic regimen before transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy(TRUGPB).Methods A prospective randomized study was conducted at a university hospital.Patients undergoing TRUGPB were randomized into an amoicillin-clavulanate alone(1mg;one dose before and two doses after biopsy)or an amoxicllin-clavulanate+ciprofloxacin group(250mg;one dose before and two doses after biopsy).Patients were surveyed for infection symptoms by phine on days 3 and 30 after TRUGPB.We defined an infective complication as the iccurrence of symptoms including fever,chills or rigor within 30 days after prostate biopsy,requiring medical treatment or hospitalization,aided by a tertiory-wide etectronic medical record system.Results Between November 2007 and July 2009,367 patients were randomized to either amoxicillin-clavulanate alone or amoxicillin-caavulanate+ciprofloxacin group.The infection rates after TRUGPB were 3.9%in the former group(7 out of 179 patoents)versus 0.53%(1 out of 188 patients)in the latter.Sixty-three percent(5/8)of patients with infective complications needed hospitalization.There was no intensive care unit admission or mortality during the study period.Conclusions Combining prophylactic antibiotics with amoxicllin-clavulanate+soprofloxacin significantly reduced the in cidence of infective complications after TRUGPB.We recommended a combination regimen,especially in centre with high incidence of post-TRUGPB infection.

  20. Predicting Prostate Biopsy Results Using a Panel of Plasma and Urine Biomarkers Combined in a Scoring System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albitar, Maher; Ma, Wanlong; Lund, Lars;

    2016-01-01

    a scoring system to predict prostate biopsy results and the presence of high grade PCa. METHODS: Urine and plasma specimens were collected from 319 patients recommended for prostate biopsies. We measured the gene expression levels of UAP1, PDLIM5, IMPDH2, HSPD1, PCA3, PSA, TMPRSS2, ERG, GAPDH, B2M, AR......, and PTEN in plasma and urine. Patient age, serum prostate-specific antigen (sPSA) level, and biomarkers data were used to develop two independent algorithms, one for predicting the presence of PCa and the other for predicting high-grade PCa (Gleason score [GS] ≥7). RESULTS: Using training and validation...... data sets, a model for predicting the outcome of PCa biopsy was developed with an area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of 0.87. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were 87% and 63%, respectively. We then developed a second algorithm to identify patients...

  1. The Accuracy of Prostate Cancer Localization Diagnosed on Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy Compared to 3-Dimensional Transperineal Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Krughoff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prostate cancer is often understaged following 12-core transrectal ultrasound- (TRUS- guided biopsies. Our goal is to understand where cancers are typically missed by this method. Methods. Transperineal 3-dimensional mapping biopsy (3DMB provides a more accurate depiction of disease status than transrectal ultrasound- (TRUS- guided biopsy. We compared 3DMB findings in men with prior TRUS-guided biopsies to determine grade and location of missed cancer. Results were evaluated for 161 men with low-risk organ confined prostate cancer. Results. The number of cancer-positive biopsy zones per patient with TRUS was 1.38 ± 1.21 compared to 3.33 ± 4.06 with 3DMB, with most newly discovered cancers originating from the middle lobe and apex. Approximately half of all newly discovered cancerous zones resulted from anterior 3DMB sampling. Gleason upgrade was recognized in 56 patients using 3DMB. When both biopsy methods found positive cores in a given zone, Gleason upgrades occurred most frequently in the middle left and right zones. TRUS cancer-positive zones not confirmed by 3DMB were most often the basal zones. Conclusion. Most cancer upgrades and cancers missed from TRUS biopsy originated in the middle left zone of the prostate, specifically in anterior regions. Anterior sampling may lead to more accurate diagnosis and appropriate followup.

  2. Pre-biopsy 3-Tesla MRI and targeted biopsy of the index prostate cancer: correlation with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Uday; Dasgupta, Prokar; Challacombe, Ben; Cahill, Declan; Brown, Christian; Patel, Roshnee; Kirby, Roger

    2017-01-01

    To study whether pre-biopsy 3-Tesla prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with targeted biopsy allows accurate anatomical and oncological characterization of the index prostate tumour, and whether this translates into improved positive surgical margin (PSM) rates after radical prostatectomy. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all men (n = 201) who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) between July 2012 and July 2014. Patients were divided into a study group (n = 63) who had undergone pre-biopsy 3-Tesla MRI, followed by visual targeted and systematic prostate biopsy, and a control group (n = 138) who had undergone systematic biopsy alone. The two groups were well matched regarding patient and cancer characteristics. The primary study objective was to assess the accuracy of pre-biopsy MRI for localizing the index tumour. Secondary study objectives were to assess the accuracy of MRI in assessing the maximum tumour diameter (MTD) of the index tumour focus and accuracy of the targeted biopsy in determining the Gleason score and primary Gleason grade of the index tumour focus and whether PSMs were improved after RARP. The reference standard was whole-gland pathology of the resected prostate gland. Continuous variables and proportions were compared using the t-test and Mann-Whitney test or contingency tables, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plots were used to compare measurement of MTD. The MRI accurately located the index tumour focus in 73% of patients. Accuracies, stratified according to use of the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) categories 5, 4 and 3, were 94, 75 and 60% respectively. Accuracies stratified according to MTD of ≤0.7, ≤1 and >1 cm were 50, 57 and 79%, respectively. There was a positive linear correlation between MRI and histological MTD (r = 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.16-0.63; P = 0.002), but MRI generally underestimated the MTD: the mean MRI-measured MTD was 1

  3. Antibiotic prophylaxis in prostate biopsy: a comparative randomized clinical assay between ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and chloramphenicol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Tobias-Machado

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare, prospectively, 4 different schemes of antibiotic prophylaxis previously to transrectal prostate biopsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 257 patients were randomized in 4 groups: Group I: single dose of ciprofloxacin 2 hours before the procedure; Group II: ciprofloxacin 3 days; Group III: chloramphenicol 3 days; and Group IV: norfloxacin 3 days. The complication rate was assessed in a blind way on the third and on the thirtieth days through a questionnaire. Groups were compared by the qui-square method and, in small samples, by the Fisher method, with statistical significance of 95%. RESULTS: Complications index throughout the sample differed between the 4 groups of patients under study, being 3.1% for group I, 2.1% for group II, 18.3% for group III and 10.5% for group IV. Schemes employing ciprofloxacin were statistically superior to those that used norfloxacin or chloramphenicol (p 0.05. CONCLUSION: Schemes using ciprofloxacin presented better results in prophylaxis previously to prostate biopsy. We recommend using a single dose of ciprofloxacin due to its posologic ease and low cost, associated with a therapeutic response equivalent to 3-day regimens.

  4. 3D versus 2D Systematic Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsy: Higher Cancer Detection Rate in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Peltier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare prostate cancer detection rates of extended 2D versus 3D biopsies and to further assess the clinical impact of this method in day-to-day practice. Methods. We analyzed the data of a cohort of 220 consecutive patients with no prior history of prostate cancer who underwent an initial prostate biopsy in daily practice due to an abnormal PSA and/or DRE using, respectively, the classical 2D and the new 3D systems. All the biopsies were done by a single experienced operator using the same standardized protocol. Results. There was no significant difference in terms of age, total PSA, or prostate volume between the two groups. However, cancer detection rate was significantly higher using the 3D versus the 2D system, 50% versus 34% (P<0.05. There was no statistically significant difference while comparing the 2 groups in term of nonsignificant cancer detection. Conclusion. There is reasonable evidence demonstrating the superiority of the 3D-guided biopsies in detecting prostate cancers that would have been missed using the 2D extended protocol.

  5. CLINICAL STAGING OF CANCER OF THE PROSTATE DURING ITS PRIMARY BIOPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Petrov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical staging of cancer is the important element of a diagnostic process that determines the nature and scope of therapeutic measures required for a patient. Objective: to assess the role of clinical, clinical laboratory, and morphological findings in the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PC and to analyze the pattern of its clinical stages in patients having different levels of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA and the results of digital rectal examination (DRE and ultrasound study (USS of the gland. Subjects and methods. The examination and follow-up records were analyzed in 2579 males aged 38-88 years who had indications for primary puncture biopsy of the prostate. Results. PC was detected in 997 (38.66% patients. Clinically localized adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in 50.85% of cases, locally advanced one being in 49.15%, including that with its invasion into the seminal vesicles in 8.73%. The findings of DRE and transrectal USS and serum PSA values allow one to substantially define the likely extent of cancer.

  6. Agreement of Gleason score on prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimen: is there improvement with increased number of biopsy cylinders and the 2005 revised Gleason scoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praet, Charles; Libbrecht, Louis; D'Hondt, Frederiek; Decaestecker, Karel; Fonteyne, Valérie; Verschuere, Stephanie; Rottey, Sylvie; Praet, Marleen; De Visschere, Pieter; Lumen, Nicolaas

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the agreement of GS on biopsy compared with RP specimens and to assess whether an increased number of biopsy cylinders and the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) GS modification improved this agreement. Pathological data of biopsy and RP specimens were analyzed in 328 consecutive patients, before (group 1; n = 135) and after (group 2; n = 193) implementation of the 2005 ISUP modification. Additionally, patients had more biopsy cylinders taken in group 2 (mean 10 vs. 6.9). The agreement of GS between biopsy and RP specimens was evaluated using the kappa coefficient. GS was pooled into 3 grades: low- (GS ≤ 6), intermediate- (GS = 7), and high-grade (GS ≥ 8) prostate cancer. Kappa coefficient for GS in group 1 and 2 was 0.261 and 0.341, respectively. For tumor grade, this was 0.308 and 0.359 for group 1 and 2, respectively. For RP specimens, there was more agreement between biopsy and RP GS in group 2 compared with group 1 (53.9% vs. 37.8%). Upgrading was almost exclusively (89.5%) seen in patients with biopsy GS ≤ 6 and was lower in group 2 (25.4% vs. 48.1%) because of classification of more intermediate- and high-grade tumors using the 2005 ISUP modification. Taking > 6 biopsy cylinders was associated with better GS and tumor grade agreement. Extended biopsy template and the 2005 ISUP modification resulted in an improved agreement between biopsy GS and RP GS and a shift toward more aggressive tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Preoperative determination of prostate cancer tumor volume: analysis through biopsy fragments

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    Alberto A. Antunes

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Preoperative determination of prostate cancer (PCa tumor volume (TV is still a big challenge. We have assessed variables obtained in prostatic biopsy aiming at determining which is the best method to predict the TV in radical prostatectomy (RP specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Biopsy findings of 162 men with PCa submitted to radical prostatectomy were revised. Preoperative characteristics, such as PSA, the percentage of positive fragments (PPF, the total percentage of cancer in the biopsy (TPC, the maximum percentage of cancer in a fragment (MPC, the presence of perineural invasion (PNI and the Gleason score were correlated with postoperative surgical findings through an univariate analysis of a linear regression model. RESULTS: The TV correlated significantly to the PPF, TPC, MPC, PSA and to the presence of PNI (p < 0.001. However, the Pearson correlation analysis test showed an R2 of only 24%, 12%, 17% and 9% for the PPF, TPC, MPC, and PSA respectively. The combination of the PPF with the PSA and the PNI analysis showed to be a better model to predict the TV (R2 of 32.3%. The TV could be determined through the formula: Volume = 1.108 + 0.203 x PSA + 0.066 x PPF + 2.193 x PNI. CONCLUSIONS: The PPF seems to be better than the TPC and the MPC to predict the TV in the surgical specimen. Due to the weak correlation between those variables and the TV, the PSA and the presence of PNI should be used together.

  8. Prediction of pathological and oncological outcomes based on extended prostate biopsy results in patients with prostate cancer receiving radical prostatectomy: a single institution study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishizaki Fumio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prediction of pathological outcomes prior to surgery remains a challenging problem for the appropriate surgical indication of prostate cancer. This study was performed to identify preoperative values predictive of pathological and oncological outcomes based on standardized extended prostate biopsies with core histological results diagrammed/mapped in patients receiving radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer clinically diagnosed as localized or locally advanced disease. Methods In 124 patients with clinically localized or locally advanced prostate cancer (cT1c–cT3a without prior treatment, pathological outcomes on the surgical specimen including seminal vesicle involvement (SVI, positive surgical margin (PSM, and perineural invasion (PNI were studied in comparison with clinical parameters based on the results of 14-core prostate biopsies comprising sextant, laterally-directed sextant, and bilateral transition zone (TZ sampling. Results Concerning the association of pathological outcomes with oncological outcomes, patients with PSM and PNI on surgical specimens had poorer biochemical-progression-free survival than those without PSM (logrank p = 0.002 and PNI (p = 0.003; it was also poorer concerning SVI, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.120. Concerning the impact of clinical parameters on these pathological outcomes, positive TZ and multiple positive biopsy cores in the prostatic middle were independent values predictive of SVI with multivariate analyses (p = 0.020 and p = 0.025, respectively; both positive TZ and multiple positive prostatic middle biopsies were associated with larger tumor volume (p  Conclusions %positive cores and Gleason score in extended biopsies were independent values predictive of PSM and PNI in prostate cancer clinically diagnosed as localized or locally advanced disease, respectively, which were associated with poorer oncological outcomes. When

  9. Prospective study of antibiotic prophylaxis for prostate biopsy involving >1100 men.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manecksha, Rustom P

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to compare infection rates for two 3-day antibiotic prophylaxis regimens for transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUSgbp) and demonstrate local microbiological trends. In 2008, 558 men and, in 2009, 625 men had TRUSgpb. Regimen 1 (2008) comprised 400 mg Ofloxacin immediately before biopsy and 200 mg 12-hourly for 3 days. Regimen 2 (2009) comprised Ofloxacin 200 mg 12-hourly for 3 days commencing 24 hours before biopsy. 20\\/558 (3.6%) men had febrile episodes with regimen 1 and 10\\/625 (1.6%) men with regimen 2 (P = 0.03). E. coli was the most frequently isolated organism. Overall, 7\\/13 (54%) of positive urine cultures were quinolone resistant and (5\\/13) 40% were multidrug resistant. Overall, 5\\/9 (56%) patients with septicaemia were quinolone resistant. All patients were sensitive to Meropenem. There was 1 (0.2%) death with regimen 1. Commencing Ofloxacin 24 hours before TRUSgpb reduced the incidence of febrile episodes significantly. We observed the emergence of quinolone and multidrug-resistant E. coli. Meropenem should be considered for unresolving sepsis.

  10. Quinolone Prophylaxis in Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy: An Eight-Year Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Juin Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy of prophylaxis with pipemidic acid and levofloxacin in transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy (TRUSP-Bx. From January 2002 to December 2004, patients receiving oral pipemidic acid 500 mg twice daily for three days with or without a preoperative intravenous cefazolin 1 gm injection comprised group A. Between January 2005 and December 2009, patients receiving oral levofloxacin 500 mg one hour before biopsy comprised group B. We calculated the annual febrile urinary tract infection (fUTI rates. Patients’ characteristics, including age, prophylactic antibiotics, biopsy core numbers, pathologic results, PSA, and the spectrums and susceptibility of pathogens, were also evaluated. A total of 1313 (35.5% patients belonged to group A, while 2381 (64.5% patients belonged to group B. Seventy-three patients experienced postoperative infectious complications. There was a significant difference in the fUTI rate between groups A and B (3.7% versus 1.0%, P<0.001. The yearly fUTI rates varied from 0.6 to 3.9% between 2002 and 2009. Of the 73 patients with fUTI, those receiving levofloxacin prophylaxis were more likely to harbor fluoroquinolone-resistant pathogens (P<0.001. E. coli was the most common pathogen in both groups. Levofloxacin remains effective and appears superior to pipemidic acid based prophylaxis.

  11. Optimized high-throughput microRNA expression profiling provides novel biomarker assessment of clinical prostate and breast cancer biopsies

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    Fedele Vita

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies indicate that microRNAs (miRNAs are mechanistically involved in the development of various human malignancies, suggesting that they represent a promising new class of cancer biomarkers. However, previously reported methods for measuring miRNA expression consume large amounts of tissue, prohibiting high-throughput miRNA profiling from typically small clinical samples such as excision or core needle biopsies of breast or prostate cancer. Here we describe a novel combination of linear amplification and labeling of miRNA for highly sensitive expression microarray profiling requiring only picogram quantities of purified microRNA. Results Comparison of microarray and qRT-PCR measured miRNA levels from two different prostate cancer cell lines showed concordance between the two platforms (Pearson correlation R2 = 0.81; and extension of the amplification, labeling and microarray platform was successfully demonstrated using clinical core and excision biopsy samples from breast and prostate cancer patients. Unsupervised clustering analysis of the prostate biopsy microarrays separated advanced and metastatic prostate cancers from pooled normal prostatic samples and from a non-malignant precursor lesion. Unsupervised clustering of the breast cancer microarrays significantly distinguished ErbB2-positive/ER-negative, ErbB2-positive/ER-positive, and ErbB2-negative/ER-positive breast cancer phenotypes (Fisher exact test, p = 0.03; as well, supervised analysis of these microarray profiles identified distinct miRNA subsets distinguishing ErbB2-positive from ErbB2-negative and ER-positive from ER-negative breast cancers, independent of other clinically important parameters (patient age; tumor size, node status and proliferation index. Conclusion In sum, these findings demonstrate that optimized high-throughput microRNA expression profiling offers novel biomarker identification from typically small clinical samples such as breast

  12. Repeat Targeted Prostate Biopsy under Guidance of Multiparametric MRI-Correlated Real-Time Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound for Patients with Previous Negative Biopsy and Elevated Prostate-Specific Antigen: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dong Ryul; Jung, Dae Chul; Oh, Young Taik; Noh, Songmi; Han, Kyunghwa; Kim, Kiwook; Rha, Koon-Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To prospectively determine whether multi-parametric MRI (mpMRI) - contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) correlated, imaging-guided target biopsy (TB) method could improve the detection of prostate cancer in re-biopsy setting of patients with prior negative biopsy. Methods From 2012 to 2014, a total of 42 Korean men with a negative result from previous systematic biopsy (SB) and elevated prostate-specific antigen underwent 3T mpMRI and real-time CEUS guided TB. Target lesions were determined by fusion of mpMRI and CEUS. Subsequently, 12-core SB was performed by a different radiologist. We compared core-based cancer detection rates (CaDR) using the generalized linear mixed model (GLIMMIX) for each biopsy method. Results Core-based CaDR was higher in TB (17.92%, 38 of 212 cores) than in SB (6.15%, 31 of 504 cores) (p biopsy of patients with prior negative biopsy can improve CaDR based on the number of cores taken. PMID:26083348

  13. Additional benefit of using a risk-based selection for prostate biopsy: an analysis of biopsy complications in the Rotterdam section of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Peter K; Alberts, Arnout R; Venderbos, Lionne D F; Bangma, Chris H; Roobol, Monique J

    2017-09-01

    To investigate biopsy complications and hospital admissions that could be reduced by the use of European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) risk calculators. All biopsies performed in the Rotterdam section of the ERSPC between 1993 and 2015 were included. Biopsy complications and hospital admission data were prospectively recorded in questionnaires that were completed 2 weeks after biopsy. The ERSPC risk calculators 3 (RC3) and 4 (RC4) were applied to men attending the first and subsequent rounds of screening, respectively. Applying the predefined RC3/4 probability thresholds for prostate cancer (PCa) risk of ≥12.5% and high-grade PCa risk ≥3%, we assessed the number of complications, admissions and costs that could be reduced by avoiding biopsies in men below these thresholds. A total of 10 747 biopsies with complete questionnaires were included. For these biopsies a complication rate of 67.9% (7294/10 747), a post-biopsy fever rate of 3.9% (424/10747) and a hospital admission rate of 0.9% (92/10747) were recorded. The fever rate was found to be static over the years, but the hospital admission rate tripled from 0.6% (1993-1996) to 2.1% (2009-2015). Among 7704 biopsies which fit the criteria for RC3 or RC4, 35.8% of biopsies (2757/7704), 37.4% of complications (1972/5268), 39.4% of fever events (128/325) and 42.3% of admissions (30/71) could have been avoided by using one of the risk calculators. More complications could have been avoided if RC4 had been used and for more recent biopsies (2009-2015). Our findings show that 35.9% of the total cost of biopsies and complication treatment could have been avoided. A significant proportion of biopsy complications, hospital admissions and costs could be reduced if biopsy decisions were based on ERSPC risk calculators instead of PSA only. This effect was most prominent in more recent biopsies and in men with repeated biopsies or screening. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU

  14. MR-guided transgluteal biopsies with an open low-field system in patients with clinically suspected prostate cancer: technique and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zangos, Stephan [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Eichler, Katrin; Engelmann, Kerstin; Ahmed, Mukhtiar; Dettmer, Sebastian; Herzog, Christopher; Pegios, Wasilios; Wetter, A.; Lehnert, Thomas; Mack, Martin G.; Vogl, Thomas J. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and safety of MR-guided biopsies with a transgluteal approach in patients with uncertain or suspicious prostate lesions. Twenty-five patients with uncertain or suspicious focal prostate lesions detected by high-field MR imaging of the prostate gland using endorectal coil imaging were biopsied with a transgluteal approach in a low-field MRI system (0.2 T, Concerto, Siemens). The procedures were guided using T1-weighted FLASH sequences. The prostate gland was biopsied repeatedly with a coaxial technique through a 15-gauge pencil tip with a 16-gauge biopsy handy (median 3.8 samples per patient). Complications and biopsy findings were documented retrospectively. Using T1-weighted sequences biopsy procedures were performed successfully with MR guidance in all cases without any side effects or complications. The median intervention time was 11.3 min. Pathological findings revealed ten cases of hyperplasia or atrophy, three cases of prostatitis, ten cases of carcinoma and two cases of normal tissue. The clinical follow-up showed that in two patients prostate cancer was missed at MR-guided biopsy. Transgluteal MR-guided biopsy of the prostate gland is a safe and promising approach for histological clarification of uncertain or suspicious lesions. (orig.)

  15. Three-dimensional nonrigid landmark-based magnetic resonance to transrectal ultrasound registration for image-guided prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue; Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Registration of three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic resonance (MR) to 3-D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) prostate images is an important step in the planning and guidance of 3-D TRUS guided prostate biopsy. In order to accurately and efficiently perform the registration, a nonrigid landmark-based registration method is required to account for the different deformations of the prostate when using these two modalities. We describe a nonrigid landmark-based method for registration of 3-D TRUS to MR prostate images. The landmark-based registration method first makes use of an initial rigid registration of 3-D MR to 3-D TRUS images using six manually placed approximately corresponding landmarks in each image. Following manual initialization, the two prostate surfaces are segmented from 3-D MR and TRUS images and then nonrigidly registered using the following steps: (1) rotationally reslicing corresponding segmented prostate surfaces from both 3-D MR and TRUS images around a specified axis, (2) an approach to find point correspondences on the surfaces of the segmented surfaces, and (3) deformation of the surface of the prostate in the MR image to match the surface of the prostate in the 3-D TRUS image and the interior using a thin-plate spline algorithm. The registration accuracy was evaluated using 17 patient prostate MR and 3-D TRUS images by measuring the target registration error (TRE). Experimental results showed that the proposed method yielded an overall mean TRE of [Formula: see text] for the rigid registration and [Formula: see text] for the nonrigid registration, which is favorably comparable to a clinical requirement for an error of less than 2.5 mm. A landmark-based nonrigid 3-D MR-TRUS registration approach is proposed, which takes into account the correspondences on the prostate surface, inside the prostate, as well as the centroid of the prostate. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method yields clinically sufficient accuracy.

  16. Can a Gleason 6 or Less Microfocus of Prostate Cancer in One Biopsy and Prostate-Specific Antigen Level Archetype of Low-Risk Prostate Disease?

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    Taverna, Gianluigi; Benecchi, Luigi; Grizzi, Fabio; Seveso, Mauro; Giusti, Guido; Piccinelli, Alessandro; Benetti, Alessio; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Minuti, Francesco; Graziotti, Pierpaolo

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) remains a cause of death worldwide. Here we investigate whether a single microfocus of PC at the biopsy (graded as Gleason 6 or less, ≤5% occupancy) and the PSA archetype of low-risk prostate disease. 4500 consecutive patients were enrolled. Among them, 134 patients with a single micro-focus of PC were followed up, and the parameters influencing the biochemical relapse (BR) were analysed. Out of 134 patients, 94 had clinically significant disease, specifically in 74.26% of the patients with PSA <10 ng/mL. Positive surgical margins and the extracapsular invasion were found in 29.1% and 51.4% patients, respectively. BR was observed in 29.6% of the patients. Cox regression evidenced a correlation between the BR and Gleason grade at the retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP), capsular invasion, and the presence of positive surgical margins. Multivariate regression analysis showed a statistically significant correlation between the presence of surgical margins at the RRP and BR. Considering a single micro-focus of PC at the biopsy and PSA serum level <10 ng/mL, clinically significant disease was found in 74.26% patients and only positive surgical margins are useful for predicting the BR.

  17. The accuracy and safety aspects of a novel robotic needle guide manipulator to perform transrectal prostate biopsies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, M.G.; Ansems, J.; Renema, W.K.J.; Bosboom, D.G.H.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Futterer, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To introduce a new in-house developed pneumatically controlled magnetic field compatible manipulator as an aid to perform magnetic resonance (MR)-guided biopsies of the prostate. METHODS: A pneumatic controlled manipulator with five degrees of freedom constructed of plastic to achieve magne

  18. Systematic Analysis of Transrectal Prostate Biopsies Using an Ink Method and Specific Histopathologic Protocol: A Prospective Study

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    David Parada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transrectal prostate biopsy is the standard protocol for the screening for prostate cancer. It helps to locate prostatic adenocarcinoma and plan treatment. However, the increasing number of prostate biopsies leads to considerably greater costs for the pathology laboratories. In this study, we compare the traditional method with an ink method in combination with a systematic histopathologic protocol. Methods. Two hundred consecutive transrectal prostate biopsy specimens were received from the radiology department. They were separated into two groups: one hundred were processed as six different specimens in the usual manner. The other one hundred were submitted in six containers, the apex, base, and middle section of which were stained different colours. The samples subject to the ink method were embedded in paraffin and placed in two cassettes which were sectioned using a specific protocol. Results. The comparative study of the nonink and ink methods for histopathologic diagnosis showed no statistical differences as far as diagnostic categories were concerned (value<.005. The number of PIN diagnoses increased when the ink method was used, but no statistical differences were found. The ink method led to a cost reduction of 48.86%. Conclusions. Our ink method combined with a specific histopathologic protocol provided the same diagnostic quality, tumor location information as the traditional method, and lower pathology expenses.

  19. Poor glycemic control of diabetes mellitus is associated with higher risk of prostate cancer detection in a biopsy population.

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    Juhyun Park

    Full Text Available To evaluate the impact of glycemic control of diabetes mellitus (DM on prostate cancer detection in a biopsy population.We retrospectively reviewed the records of 1,368 men who underwent prostate biopsy at our institution. We divided our biopsy population into three groups according to their history of DM, and their Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c level: a no-DM (DM- group; a good glycemic control (DM+GC group (HbA1c <6.5%; and a poor glycemic control (DM+PC group (HbA1c ≥6.5%. For sub-analyses, the DM+PC group was divided into a moderately poor glycemic control (DM+mPC group (6.5≤ HbA1c <7.5% and a severely poor glycemic control (DM+sPC group (HbA1c ≥7.5%.Among 1,368 men, 338 (24.7% had a history of DM, and 393 (28.7% had a positive biopsy. There was a significant difference in prostatic specific antigen density (PSAD (P = 0.037 and the frequency of abnormal DRE findings (P = 0.031 among three groups. The occurrence rate of overall prostate cancer (P<0.001 and high-grade prostate cancer (P = 0.016 also presented with a significantly difference. In the multivariate analysis, the DM+PC group was significantly associated with a higher rate of overall prostate cancer detection in biopsy subjects compared to the DM- group (OR = 2.313, P = 0.001 but the DM+PC group was not associated with a higher rate of high-grade (Gleason score ≥7 diseases detected during the biopsy (OR = 1.297, P = 0.376. However, in subgroup analysis, DM+sPC group was significantly related to a higher risk of high-grade diseases compared to the DM- group (OR = 2.446, P = 0.048.Poor glycemic control of DM was associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer detection, including high-grade disease, in the biopsy population.

  20. Is an Extended Prostate Biopsy Scheme Associated with an Improvement in the Accuracy Between the Biopsy Gleason Score and Radical Prostatectomy Pathology? A Multivariate Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugor, Vahudin; Poth, Sandor; Kühn, Reinhard; Bernat, Marija Maja; Porres, Daniel; Labanaris, Apostolos P

    2016-08-01

    To examine whether an extended prostate biopsy (PB) scheme is associated with an improvement in the accuracy between the PB Gleason score (GS) and radical prostatectomy (RP) pathology and to identify probable preoperative variables that stratified patients likely to harbor significant upgrading (SU). A retrospective review of 538 patients' records diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa) who underwent RP and exhibited a SU, at two tertiary medical centers, was conducted. The patients were divided into 3 groups: 194 who underwent a 6-core PB (36%), 156 who underwent a 12-core PB (28.9%) and 188 (34.9%) who underwent an 18-core PB. A multivariate analysis was conducted, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, clinical stage, prostate size and duration from PB to RP. The 6-core group exhibited a 42.7% SU, the 12-core group exhibited a 38.8% SU and the 18-core group exhibited a 14.1% SU. There was a highly significant lower rate of SU in the 18-core than that in the 6-core (pmultivariate analysis, only a prostate size of >35 g significantly elevated the probability of SU in the 6-core (p35 g in patients who undergo a 6- or 12-core PB is the only preoperative variable that stratifies patients likely to harbor SU. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. Imaging and pathology findings after an initial negative MRI-US fusion-guided and 12-core extended sextant prostate biopsy session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Cheng William; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Hoang, Anthony N.; Türkbey, Barış; Stamatakis, Lambros; Xu, Sheng; Amalou, Hayet; Minhaj Siddiqui, M.; Nix, Jeffrey W.; Vourganti, Srinivas; Merino, Maria J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Wood, Bradford J.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE A magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasonography (MRI-US) fusion-guided prostate biopsy increases detection rates compared to an extended sextant biopsy. The imaging characteristics and pathology outcomes of subsequent biopsies in patients with initially negative MRI-US fusion biopsies are described in this study. MATERIALS AND METHODS We reviewed 855 biopsy sessions of 751 patients (June 2007 to March 2013). The fusion biopsy consisted of two cores per lesion identified on multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) and a 12-core extended sextant transrectal US (TRUS) biopsy. Inclusion criteria were at least two fusion biopsy sessions, with a negative first biopsy and mpMRI before each. RESULTS The detection rate on the initial fusion biopsy was 55.3%; 336 patients had negative findings. Forty-one patients had follow-up fusion biopsies, but only 34 of these were preceded by a repeat mpMRI. The median interval between biopsies was 15 months. Fourteen patients (41%) were positive for cancer on the repeat MRI-US fusion biopsy. Age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), prostate volume, PSA density, digital rectal exam findings, lesion diameter, and changes on imaging were comparable between patients with negative and positive rebiopsies. Of the patients with positive rebiopsies, 79% had a positive TRUS biopsy before referral (P = 0.004). Ten patients had Gleason 3+3 disease, three had 3+4 disease, and one had 4+4 disease. CONCLUSION In patients with a negative MRI-US fusion prostate biopsy and indications for repeat biopsy, the detection rate of the follow-up sessions was lower than the initial detection rate. Of the prostate cancers subsequently found, 93% were low grade (≤3+4). In this low risk group of patients, increasing the follow-up time interval should be considered in the appropriate clinical setting. PMID:24509182

  2. Accuracy of prostate biopsies for predicting Gleason score in radical prostatectomy specimens: nationwide trends 2000-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danneman, Daniela; Drevin, Linda; Delahunt, Brett; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Robinson, David; Bratt, Ola; Loeb, Stacy; Stattin, Pär; Egevad, Lars

    2017-01-01

    To investigate how well the Gleason score in diagnostic needle biopsies predicted the Gleason score in a subsequent radical prostatectomy (RP) specimen before and after the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) revision of Gleason grading, and if the recently proposed ISUP grades 1-5 (corresponding to Gleason scores 6, 3 + 4, 4 + 3, 8 and 9-10) better predict the RP grade. All prostate cancers diagnosed in Sweden are reported to the National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR). We analysed the Gleason scores and ISUP grades from the diagnostic biopsies and the RP specimens in 15 598 men in the NPCR who: were diagnosed between 2000 and 2012 with clinical stage T1-2 M0/X prostate cancer on needle biopsy; were aged ≤70 years; had serum PSA concentration of ISUP grades would have led to a decreasing agreement between biopsy and RP grades over time, from 68% in 2000 to 57% in 2012, with an OR of 0.95 in multivariable analysis (P ISUP grading revision. Had ISUP grades been used instead of Gleason score, the agreement between biopsy and RP grade would have decreased, probably because of its separation of Gleason score 7 into ISUP grades 2 and 3 (Gleason score 3 + 4 vs 4 + 3). © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Association between Seminal Vesicle Invasion and Prostate Cancer Detection Location after Transrectal Systemic Biopsy among Men Who Underwent Radical Prostatectomy.

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    Young Ik Lee

    Full Text Available Our hypothesis is that the location of the seminal vesicles near the base of the prostate, the more positive cores are detected in the base, the greater the risk of seminal vesicle invasion. Therefore we investigate the clinical outcomes of base dominant prostate cancer (BDPC in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS -guided biopsies compared with anteromiddle dominant prostate cancer (AMPC.From November 2003 to June 2014, a total of 990 intermediate and high risk prostate cancer (PCa patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP were enrolled and stratified into two groups according to proportion of positive cores-BDPC group had ≥ 33.3% ratio of positive cores from the prostate base among all positive cores and AMPC group < 33.3% in systemic biopsy. Between two groups, we compared the rate of pathologic outcomes and biochemical recurrence (BCR. We performed multivariate logistic regression model to confirm the significance of BDPC to seminal vesicle invasion (SVI and Cox proportional hazard analysis to BCR.Among these 990 PCa patients, the 487 patients in BDPC group had more advanced clinical stage (p<0.001, a higher biopsy GS (p = 0.002, and a higher rate of extracapsular extension (ECE, SVI and BCR (all p<0.001 than AMPC group. The patients in BDPC group had poor BCR free survival rate via Kaplan-meier analysis (p<0.001. The ratio of the base positive cores was a significant predictor to SVI in multivariate analysis (p < 0.001 and significant predictor of BCR in multivariate Cox proportional analysis (hazard ratio: 1.466, p = 0.004.BDPC in TRUS-guided prostate biopsies was significantly associated with SVI and BCR after adjusting for other clinical factors. Therefore, BDPC should be considered to be a more aggressive tumor despite an otherwise similar cancer profile.

  4. Infection after transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy: increased relative risks after recent international travel or antibiotic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Uday; Dasgupta, Prokar; Amoroso, Peter; Challacombe, Ben; Pilcher, James; Kirby, Roger

    2012-06-01

    Study Type - Prognosis (case series) Level of Evidence 4 What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Septicaemia is the most frequent cause of hospitalization after transtrectal prostate biopsy; fatalities have been reported and the incidence is on the rise. This study shows that men with a history of recent international travel or antibiotic use have up to four times increased risk of septicaemia and hospitalization. When they do occur, infections are usually due to multi-resistant E coli and additional care, e.g. delay before biopsy, different antibiotic prophylaxis or transperineal biopsy, should be considered in these cases. OBJECTIVE • To study the infection rate after prostate biopsy in those who have travelled overseas or used antibiotics in the 4 weeks before biopsy. PATIENTS AND METHODS • A total of 316 men with a mean (range) age of 61 (45-85) years were studied. All had undergone transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy after standard antibiotic prophylaxis. • Before their biopsy the patients were risk stratified and a history of recent international travel or antibiotic use was recorded. • Those who suffered sufficiently severe infection/sepsis so as to require hospitalization were identified at the end of the study period. • The characteristics of these patients and the types of infections were explored and the relative risk (RR) of infection after recent travel or antibiotic use was calculated. RESULTS • Of the 316 men, 16 were hospitalized with infection. • The group with (n= 16) and without (n= 300) infection were equivalent in age, prostate-specific antigen level, disease status and number of biopsy cores taken. • Either recent travel or antibiotic use were independent risk factors for infection [travel: 8/16 vs 76/300; P= 0.04; RR 2.7 and antibiotic use: 4/16 vs 20/300; P= 0.025; RR 4]. There was no significant pattern in the countries visited or the type of antibiotic used. • Culture results were

  5. The economic effect of using magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance ultrasound fusion biopsy for prostate cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Ryan C; Costa, Daniel N; Lotan, Yair

    2016-07-01

    Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a maturing imaging modality that has been used to improve detection and staging of prostate cancer. The goal of this review is to evaluate the economic effect of the use of MRI and MRI fusion in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. A literature review was used to identify articles regarding efficacy and cost of MRI and MRI-guided biopsies. There are currently a limited number of studies evaluating cost of incorporating MRI into clinical practice. These studies are primarily models projecting cost estimates based on meta-analyses of the literature. There is considerable variance in the effectiveness of MRI-guided biopsies, both cognitive and fusion, based on user experience, type of MRI (3T vs. 1.5T), use of endorectal coil and type of scoring system for abnormalities such that there is still potential for improvement in accuracy. There is also variability in assumed costs of incorporating MRI into clinical practice. The addition of MRI to the diagnostic algorithm for prostate cancer has caused a shift in how we understand the disease and in what tumors are found on initial and repeat biopsies. Further risk stratification may allow more men to pursue noncurative therapy, which in and of itself is cost-effective in properly selected men. As prostate cancer care comes under increasing scrutiny on a national level, there is pressure on providers to be more accurate in their diagnoses. This in turn can lead to additional testing including Multiparametric MRI, which adds upfront cost. Whether the additional cost of prostate MRI is warranted in detection of prostate cancer is an area of intense research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fluid biopsy in patients with metastatic prostate, pancreatic and breast cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrinucci, Dena; Bethel, Kelly; Kolatkar, Anand; Luttgen, Madelyn S.; Malchiodi, Michael; Baehring, Franziska; Voigt, Katharina; Lazar, Daniel; Nieva, Jorge; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Ko, Andrew H.; Korn, W. Michael; Schram, Ethan; Coward, Michael; Yang, Xing; Metzner, Thomas; Lamy, Rachelle; Honnatti, Meghana; Yoshioka, Craig; Kunken, Joshua; Petrova, Yelena; Sok, Devin; Nelson, David; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Hematologic spread of carcinoma results in incurable metastasis; yet, the basic characteristics and travel mechanisms of cancer cells in the bloodstream are unknown. We have established a fluid phase biopsy approach that identifies circulating tumor cells (CTCs) without using surface protein-based enrichment and presents them in sufficiently high definition (HD) to satisfy diagnostic pathology image quality requirements. This 'HD-CTC' assay finds >5 HD-CTCs mL-1 of blood in 80% of patients with metastatic prostate cancer (n = 20), in 70% of patients with metastatic breast cancer (n = 30), in 50% of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer (n = 18), and in 0% of normal controls (n = 15). Additionally, it finds HD-CTC clusters ranging from 2 HD-CTCs to greater than 30 HD-CTCs in the majority of these cancer patients. This initial validation of an enrichment-free assay demonstrates our ability to identify significant numbers of HD-CTCs in a majority of patients with prostate, breast and pancreatic cancers.

  7. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma Diagnosed on Prostate Biopsy: A Case Report

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    Nazan Özsan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL is a very rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, usually affecting elderly patients and characterized by selective infiltration of neoplastic cells within blood vessels’ lumina. IVLBCL diagnosed with prostatic involvement is extremely rare. We report a patient of 65 years old, having mostly neurological complaints but diagnosed with IVLBCL upon histopathological examination of transurethral prostate resection material, which revealed large neoplastic cell infiltration totally limited within the lumens of small vessels. By immunohistochemistry, neoplastic cell infiltration was positive with MUM1, bcl-6, and bcl-2 and negative with ALK1, CD10, and CD30, with a high Ki-67 proliferation index. CD34 and CD31 staining showed expression in endothelial cells, highlighting the intravascular nature of neoplastic infiltrate. The patient unfortunately refused to receive treatment and died of the disease 8 months after the diagnosis. IVLBCL, though very rare, should be considered in differential diagnosis of all organ biopsies with intravascular infiltration. Further improvements in the understanding of the pathogenesis and biology of this rare type of lymphoma are mandatory.

  8. Septic Shock following Prostate Biopsy: Aggressive Limb Salvage for Extremities after Pressor-Induced Ischemic Gangrene

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    Jocelyn Lu, BS

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Vasopressors used to treat patients with septic shock can cause ischemic necrosis of appendages such as the ears and nose, as well as the extremities. Cases of quadruple-extremity necrosis have high morbidity and mortality, and a profound negative impact on quality of life. This case report details the successful limb salvage and return to function using free tissue transfer as a means to salvage bilateral lower extremities in a patient who suffered vasopressor-induced ischemia of upper and lower extremities after prostate biopsy–induced septic shock. Septic shock following transrectal ultrasound–guided prostate biopsy is a rare, yet life-threatening complication. Successful treatment included thorough planning and staging of therapies such as awaiting tissue demarcation and serial surgical debridement to adequately prepare the tissue bed for free tissue transfer. Adjunctive treatments such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative-pressure wound therapy, and meticulous wound care played a crucial role in wound healing. This vigilant planning and coordinated care resulted in the successful lower extremity salvage, consisting of bilateral transmetatarsal amputations and free tissue transfer to both limbs. We present our long-term follow-up of a functional ambulatory patient after catastrophic, life-threatening infection and appropriate multidisciplinary care.

  9. Differentiation of prostatitis and prostate cancer by using diffusion-weighted MR imaging and MR-guided biopsy at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Klaas N A; Schouten, Martijn G; Hambrock, Thomas; Litjens, Geert J S; Hoeks, Caroline M A; ten Haken, Bennie; Barentsz, Jelle O; Fütterer, Jurgen J

    2013-04-01

    To determine if prostatitis and prostate cancer (PCa) can be distinguished by using apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) on magnetic resonance (MR) images, with specimens obtained at MR-guided biopsy as the standard of reference. The need for institutional review board approval and informed consent was waived. MR-guided biopsies were performed in 130 consecutive patients with cancer-suspicious regions (CSRs) on multiparametric MR images obtained at 3 T. In this retrospective study, 88 patients met the inclusion criteria. During the biopsy procedure, an axial diffusion-weighted sequence was performed and ADC maps were generated (repetition time msec/echo time msec, 2000/67; section thickness, 4 mm; in-plane resolution, 1.8 × 1.8 mm; and b values of 0, 100, 500, and 800 sec/mm(2)). Subsequently, a confirmation image with the needle left in situ was acquired and projected on the ADC map. The corresponding ADCs at the biopsy location were compared with the histopathologic outcomes of the biopsy specimens. Linear mixed-model regression analyses were used to test for ADC differences between the histopathologic groups. The study included 116 biopsy specimens. Median ADCs of normal prostate tissue, prostatitis, low-grade PCa (Gleason grade components 2 or 3), and high-grade PCa (Gleason grade components 4 or 5) were 1.22 × 10(-3) mm(2)/sec (standard deviation, ± 0.21), 1.08 × 10(-3) mm(2)/sec (± 0.18), 0.88 × 10(-3) mm(2)/sec (± 0.15), and 0.88 × 10(-3) mm(2)/sec (± 0.13), respectively. Although the median ADCs of biopsy specimens with prostatitis were significantly higher compared with low- and high-grade PCa (P types. Diffusion-weighted imaging is a noninvasive technique that shows differences between prostatitis and PCa in both the peripheral zone and central gland, although its usability in clinical practice is limited as a result of significant overlap in ADCs. RSNA, 2013

  10. 重复穿刺活检中高级别上皮内瘤对前列腺癌的预测价值%Prediction value of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia for prostate cancer on repeat biopsies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huilian Hou; Xuebin Zhang; Xu Li; Xingfa Chen; Chunbao Wang; Guanjun Zhang; Honghan Wang; Huilin Gong; Yuan Deng; Min Wang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The significance of isolated high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in initial biopsy as an predictor for prostate cancer has been extensively research, and the true relationship remnant is no clear till now. The aim of this study is to evaluate prediction value of cancer on repeat biopsy in patients with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia,using multivariate analysis. Methods: Thirty-eight men with a diagnosis of isolated high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in initial needle biopsy were studies, in the Fist Affiliated Hospital of Medical School of Xi'an Jiaotong University, from January 2003 to March 2009. These samples were using immunostaining of p63 and 34βE12 and P504s, with a median follow-up of 525 (range, 7 to 1650) days, and to researched the incidence of subsequent prostate cancer, and to predicted the risk of prostate cancer in clinicopathological parameters of isolated high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia on repeat biopsies by logistic regression analysis. Results: There were 10 of 38 (26.3%) men with prostate cancer on repeat biopsies after diagnosis isolated high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in initial biopsy, of the rates of prostate cancer were 80% for micropapillary and 75% for cribriform high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (P < 0.05), respectively. The positive cores of isolated high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia was the important for the risk of prostate cancer using Multifactor logistic regression analysis. The time range in 30 to 690 days was stronger risk for prostate cancer detection after diagnosis isolated HGPIN in initial biopsy. p63 and 34βE12 were disrupted positive expression, and P504S was weak positive expression in the 61% isolated high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Conclusion: Isolated high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia on repeat biopsy conferred a 26.3% risk of prostate cancer, and this risk level is lower than the

  11. Incidental diagnosis of a retroperitoneal schwannoma in a patient with chronic leukemia undergoing prostatic biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autieri, Domenico; Pastore, Antonio Luigi; Silvestri, Luigi; Leto, Antonino; Ripoli, Andrea; Palleschi, Giovanni; Porta, Natale; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Carbone, Antonio

    2012-12-30

    We present a case of retroperitoneal schwannoma incidentally diagnosed in a patient undergoing surgical drainage of a pelvic abscess as a complication of a prostatic biopsy. A 50-year-old male, suffering from lymphatic leukemia, came to our observation due to lichen ruber planus and ejaculatory pain. The patient underwent a trans-perineal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the right seminal vesicle and of a hypoechoic area documented by ultrasonography. 48 hours after the procedure, the patient had developed: cold sores, shortness of breath with dyspnea, and high fever (40°C). The patient was hospitalized, underwent an emergency CT which documented a right presacral and pararectal liquid mass (abscess). The patient underwent emergency laparotomy and drainage of the abscess. The lesion histological examination revealed a retroperitoneal schwannoma with inflammatory phenomena and hyperplasic lymphadenitis. The retroperitoneal schwannoma is a silent disease whose only clinical manifestation coincides with the compression of adjacent anatomical structures. In many cases, the symptoms, even if present, as in this case (ejaculatory pain with compression of the seminal vesicle), are non-specific, thus delaying diagnosis and the therapeutic approach.

  12. Comparison between needle biopsy and radical prostatectomy samples in assessing Gleason score and modified Gleason score in prostatic adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu DOĞAN GÜN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Histologic grading is an important predictor of prostatic disease stage and prognosis. We aimed to assess the degree of concordance between pathologic characteristics of the specimens obtained from biopsy and radical prostatectomy materials.Gleason scores and modified Gleason scores calculated for 25 cases of prostatic adenocarcinoma from both needle biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens were analyzed.Mean Gleason scores for biopsy and radical specimens were 6.4 (SD:±0.7 and 6.64 (SD:±1.3; and corresponding modified Gleason scores were 7.32 (SD:±1.43 and 7.32 (SD:±0.98, respectively. The Gleason scores of biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens were identical in 48% (12/25 of the cases, while 32% (8/25 of the biopsy specimens were over-and 20% (5/25 of them were undergraded. While assessing modified Gleason scores, the exact degree of concordance of biopsy specimens with radical prostatectomy materials was 56% (14/25 and of the 11 (44% cases not correlated exactly, 6 (24% were over- and 5 (20% were undergraded. When the exact, over- and underestimated scores of Gleason and modified Gleason grading systems were compared statistically, no difference between two groups was seen (p>0.05. Overgrading errors were found to be more than undergrading errors for both of the scoring systems. Using either the modified Gleason or traditional Gleason scoring

  13. Predictive value of negative 3T multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate on 12-core biopsy results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysock, James S; Mendhiratta, Neil; Zattoni, Fabio; Meng, Xiaosong; Bjurlin, Marc; Huang, William C; Lepor, Herbert; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Taneja, Samir S

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the cancer detection rates for men undergoing 12-core systematic prostate biopsy with negative prebiopsy multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) results. Clinical data from consecutive men undergoing prostate biopsy who had undergone prebiopsy 3T mpMRI from December 2011 to August 2014 were reviewed from an institutional review board-approved prospective database. Men with negative prebiospy mpMRI results (negMRI) before biopsy were identified for the present analysis. Clinical features, cancer detection rates and negative predictive values were summarized. Seventy five men with negMRI underwent systematic 12-core biopsy during the study period. In the entire cohort, men with no previous biopsy, men with previously negative biopsy and men enrolled in active surveillance protocols, the overall cancer detection rates were 18.7, 13.8, 8.0 and 38.1%, respectively, and the detection rates for Gleason score (GS) ≥7 cancer were 1.3, 0, 4.0 and 0%, respectively. The NPVs for all cancers were 81.3, 86.2, 92.0, and 61.9, and for GS ≥7 cancer they were 98.7, 100, 96.0 and 100%, respectively. A negative prebiopsy mpMRI confers an overall NPV of 82% on 12-core biopsy for all cancer and 98% for GS ≥7 cancer. Based on biopsy indication, these findings assist in prebiopsy risk stratification for detection of high-risk disease and may provide guidance in the decision to pursue biopsy. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Comparative Effectiveness of Single versus Combination Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Infections after Transrectal Prostate Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Kaylee; Parlee, Anne; Orlando, Ralph; Lerner, Lori; Strymish, Judith; Gupta, Kalpana

    2015-12-01

    An increase in fluoroquinolone resistance and transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate (TRUS) biopsy infections has prompted the need for alternative effective antibiotic prophylaxis. We aimed to compare ciprofloxacin and other single-agent therapies to combination therapy for efficacy and adverse effects. Men who underwent a TRUS biopsy within the VA Boston health care system with documented receipt of prophylactic antibiotics periprocedure were eligible for inclusion. Postprocedure infections within 30 days were ascertained by chart review from electronic records, including any inpatient, outpatient, or urgent-care visits. Among 455 evaluable men over a 3-year period, there were 25 infections (5.49%), with sepsis occurring in 2.4%, urinary tract infections (UTI) in 1.54%, and bacteremia in 0.44% of patients. Escherichia coli was the most common urine (89%) and blood (92%) pathogen, with fluoroquinolone resistance rates of 88% and 91%, respectively. Ciprofloxacin alone was associated with significantly more infections than ciprofloxacin plus an additional agent (P = 0.014). Intramuscular gentamicin alone was also significantly associated with a higher infection rate obtained with all other regimens (P = 0.004). Any single-agent regimen, including ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, or gentamicin, was associated with significantly higher infection rates than any combination regimen (odds ratio [OR], 4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.47, 10.85; P = 0.004). Diabetes, immunosuppressive condition or medication, hospitalization within the previous year, and UTI within the previous 6 months were not associated with infection risk. Clostridium difficile infections were similar. These findings suggest that ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, and gentamicin alone are inferior to a combination regimen. Institutions with high failure rates of prophylaxis for TRUS biopsies should consider combination regimens derived from their local data.

  15. [Pain during transrectal ultrasound guided needle biopsy of the prostate: comparison of the use or not of lidocaine gel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Pérez, Gilmer A; Meza Montoya, Luis; Morante Deza, Carlos; Pow-Sang Godoy, Mariela; Destefano Urrutia, Víctor

    2009-02-01

    The prostate biopsy guided by ultrasound is the method of choice for early diagnosis of prostate cancer, is a safe whose main trouble is that it feels discomfort during the procedure. From July 2004 until March 2005 we prospectively studied 114 patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound guided needle biopsy of the prostate, they were divided in two groups: in one group we used lidocaina gel 2% inside the rectum before the procedure and in the other group we did not use it. We compared the pain that patients felt during the procedure with a pain scale. We did not find differences between both groups, but the patients in whom we used a new needle felt less pain than the patients in whom we used a re-esterilized one. The use of lidocaine gel intrarectal 2% before a prostate biopsy guided by ultrasound did not diminish the sensation of pain from the procedure in our patients, which was increased by the use of sterilized needles.

  16. Extending the validity of the Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer (MAX-PC) at the time of prostate biopsy in a racially-mixed population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, William; Hemmerich, Joshua; Meltzer, David

    2007-05-01

    The Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer (MAX-PC) has been validated for assessing men with prostate cancer for cancer-specific anxiety. It was originally validated in a predominantly white population. The MAX-PC Prostate Cancer Anxiety Subscale (MAX-PC-PCAS) may be relevant for measuring cancer-specific anxiety in undiagnosed men at risk for prostate cancer. We assess the validity of the MAX-PC-PCAS at the time of prostate biopsy (n = 178). Questions assessed socio-demographic information, health status, patient-estimated risk of cancer, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale--Anxiety Subscale (HADS-A), and the MAX-PC-PCAS. The patients' most recent PSA was recorded. Cronbach's alpha, inter-item correlations, and Pearson correlations with both the HADS-A and clinical variables were compared with the original validation sample. Our sample was younger (63.1 vs 71.1 years), had a larger fraction of African-Americans (43 vs 10%), and had higher PSAs. Cronbach's alpha was equivalent (0.91 vs 0.90), median inter-item correlation was equivalent (0.63 vs 0.61), and Pearson correlation with HADS-A was higher (0.71 vs 0.57). Anxiety levels were not correlated with PSA levels, and there were minor differences in the validation findings by race. The validity of the MAX-PC-PCAS extends to men without cancer undergoing biopsy and to African-Americans.

  17. Patient information leaflets for Transrectal Ultrasound guided prostate biopsy: Results of North Thames deanery survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phipps Claire

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We evaluated the quality of patient information leaflets for Trans-Rectal Ultrasound guided prostate biopsies (TRUS-Bx in North Thames region. TRUS-Bx information leaflets were requested from 24 hospitals in the region. All hospitals were contacted by telephone, and non-responders were followed-up by postal survey. Leaflets received were evaluated for a clear description of the procedure, directions to TRUS-Bx location, a clear description of the procedure, contact for queries/concerns, information about preparation prior to procedure, information about regular medication, information on how to obtain results, instructions for follow-up arrangements, analgesia used and risk of morbidity/mortality. Additionally, the leaflets were evaluated for diagrams to clarify the procedure and the anatomy, and sources of additional information, such as reference to published articles or prostate cancer patient support groups/internet websites. Findings In summary, a total of 17 leaflets (77% were received. Of these, the majority (94% had a clear description of the procedure, contact for queries/concerns (82%, information about preparation prior to TRUS-Bx (71%. Directions to TRUS-Bx location (29%, and analgesia used (35%, was very poorly described, and information on obtaining results and follow-up arrangements were described in only 12 (71% leaflets. Complications such as risks of infection, haematuria, haematospermia and rectal bleeding, were generally explained (71%-76% of leaflets, urinary retention was mentioned in only 5 (29% leaflets and mortality in only 1 case. Descriptive diagrams of the procedure and prostate anatomy were very rarely used, and sources of additional information were limited to 1 published article and reference to 1 prostate cancer support group. Conclusions This study demonstrates that there is large variation in the information supplied in TRUS-Bx patient information leaflets in the North Thames region, with

  18. Transperineal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy is safe even when patients are on combination antiplatelet and/or anticoagulation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kimitoshi; Washino, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yuhki; Konishi, Tsuzumi; Ohshima, Masashi; Arai, Yoshiaki; Miyagawa, Tomoaki

    2017-07-05

    To assess whether hemorrhagic complications associated with transperineal prostate biopsy increased in patients on antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant therapy. In total, 598 consecutive patients underwent transperineal prostate biopsy. The medication group comprised patients who took anti-thromboembolic agents, and the control group comprised those who did not take these agents. No anti-thromboembolic agent was stopped before, during, or after prostate biopsy in the medication group. Complications developing in both groups were compared and classified using the modified Clavien classification system. Subgroup analyses to compare complications in patients taking single antiplatelet, single anticoagulant, and dual antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant agents, and multivariate analyses to predict bleeding risk were also performed. Of the 598 eligible patients, 149 comprised the medication group and 449 comprised the control group. Hematuria (Grade I) developed in 88 (59.1%) and 236 (52.5%) patients in the medication and control group, respectively (p = 0.18). Clot retention (Grade I) was more frequently observed in the medication group than the controls (2.0% versus 0.2%, respectively, p antiplatelet agent. Other complications were generally similar among the groups. In the multivariate analysis, taking more than two anti-thromboembolic agents was the only significant risk factor for bleeding events. No severe complication developed after the transperineal biopsies in either group, although minor bleeding was somewhat more frequent in the medication group. It may not be necessary to discontinue anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet agents when transperineal prostate biopsy is contemplated.

  19. Risk of prostate cancer diagnosis and mortality in men with a benign initial transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemann, Nina; Røder, M Andreas; Helgstrand, J Thomas

    2017-01-01

    , and Dec 31, 2011, in Denmark were eligible for inclusion. Follow-up data were obtained on April 28, 2015. The primary endpoint was the cumulative incidence of prostate cancer-specific mortality, analysed in a competing risk setting, with death from other causes as the competing event. FINDINGS: Between...... information. The 20-year risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality in men with benign initial results is low. Our findings question whether men with low PSA concentration and a benign initial biopsy set should undergo further diagnostic assessment in view of the high risk of mortality from other causes...

  20. Efficacy and safety of fosfomycin-trometamol in the prophylaxis for transrectal prostate biopsy. Prospective randomized comparison with ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista, F; Redondo, C; Meilán, E; García-Tello, A; Ramón de Fata, F; Angulo, J C

    2014-01-01

    Prostate biopsy is the standardized diagnostic method for prostate cancer. However, although there is not a standardized protocol, there are recommendations in order to reduce the incidence of complications. The objective of the present work is to assess the efficacy and safety of antibiotic prophylaxis in the prostate biopsy by comparing two antibiotic regimes: two doses of fosfomycin-trometamol 3g (FMT) every 48 hours with 10 doses of oral ciprofloxacin 500 mg every 12 hours during 5 days. Randomized prospective study was performed with 671 patients who had undergone to walking transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Patients of group A (n=312) were treated with ciprofloxacin, and patients of group B (n=359) with FMT. Efficacy and tolerability of two prophylactic regimes were compared. Urine culture was carried out at 2 weeks after biopsy. Initially, patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria were not treated with antibiotics; urine culture was repeated after 1 month, persistent bacteriuria was treated according to antibiogram. No differences between groups were found in age (P=.78), cancer presence (P=.9) or number of biopsy cylinders (P=.93). The mean number of cores obtained was 11.3 ± 3.25 (range 6-20). Digestive intolerance was observed for 9 patients (2.9%) of group A and 10 patients (2.8%) in group B. One patient (.3%) of group A showed severe allergic reaction. In total, 167 patients (24.6%) had complications: 16 (2.4%) fever, 47 (6.9%) hemospermia, 81 (11.9%) hematuria, 7 (1%) rectal bleeding and 16 (2.4%) urinary retention. No statistically differences between groups were observed (27.6% vs. 22.6%; P=.17). However, hemospermia was more frequent in group A (9.9% vs. 4.5%; P=.006). Bacteriuria after biopsy was detected in 44 patients (6.6%), being more frequent in group B patients (4.2% vs. 8.6%; P=.02) although a higher number of second treatment cycles were not needed (53.9% vs. 29%; P=.17). The likelihood of resistance to ciprofloxacin in patients

  1. Sedation as an alternative method to lessen patient discomfort due to transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgut, A.T. [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ministry of Health, TR-06590 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: ahmettuncayturgut@yahoo.com; Ergun, E. [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ministry of Health, TR-06590 Ankara (Turkey); Kosar, U. [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ministry of Health, TR-06590 Ankara (Turkey); Kosar, P. [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ministry of Health, TR-06590 Ankara (Turkey); Ozcan, A. [Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ministry of Health, TR-06590 Ankara (Turkey)

    2006-01-15

    Background: Despite being highly efficient for the relief of patient discomfort due to transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy, periprostatic anesthesia is occasionally reported to be of limited use. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of conscious sedation, an accepted method for lessening patient discomfort due to interventional radiological procedures and compare it with periprostatic anesthesia. Methods: 93 candidates for biopsy were randomised to three groups: group 1 (n = 31) received intravenous midazolam, group 2 (n = 31) received periprostatic lidocaine injection, whereas group 3 (n = 31) received no anesthetic before the procedure. After the biopsy patients were asked to express discomfort by visual anologue scale (VAS). Results: The mean scores for groups 1 and 2 were significantly lower than that of group 3 (1.4 {+-} 1.1 and 2.0 {+-} 1.5 versus 4.7 {+-} 1.6, respectively; p < 0.05 for both). For patients with VAS scores exceeding 4 (moderate to severe discomfort), a significant difference was calculated between groups 1 and 2 (3% versus 29%, p < 0.05) and between each and group 3 (3% and 29% versus 80%, respectively; p < 0.05 for each). Conclusions: Sedation is an alternative for increasing patient comfort during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy, especially in clinical situations like patient anxiety, young age, repeat biopsies or inflammatory anal diseases.

  2. Simple Use of the Suppository Type Povidone-Iodine Can Prevent Infectious Complications in Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Soo Park

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the effect of simple use of suppository povidone-iodine on infectious complications after transrectal ultrasonography-guided biopsy of the prostate. Methods. All 481 patients are included and received antibiotic prophylaxis. Among them, 360 patients received povidone-iodine suppository (Gynobetadine; 200 mg immediately prior to biopsy and 121 patients did not. Infectious complications were classified. To evaluate bactericidal effects, we counted bacterial colonies in the rectum, harvested from a rectal swab before insertion of the suppository and after biopsy. Aliquots of the suspended bacterial strains were added to Mueller-Hinton agar medium for incubation. Colony counts were determined. Results. Infectious complications developed in 1 case (0.3% in the rectal preparation group (Group 1 and in 8 cases (6.6% in the nonrectal preparation group (Group 2. One in Group 1 had a fever without sepsis. Two patients had sepsis and six had fever without sepsis in Group 2. Rectal preparation was a statistically significant risk factor influencing the development of infectious complications. In vitro experiments, the mean number of colony-forming units decreased 99.9% after the rectal povidone-iodine preparation. Conclusions. All through the biopsy, povidone-iodine melted into the rectum and decreased the bacterial colony count. Simple use of povidone-iodine suppository before prostate biopsy minimizes the risk of infectious complications.

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as detailed as with the transrectal probe. An MRI of the pelvis may be obtained as an ... Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related ...

  5. Pain related and overall morbidity with TRUS guided prostate biopsy a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvpreet S. Ubee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess analgesia requirement after trans-rectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy(TRUSBx for appropriate counselling. Materials and Methods Prospectively, successive patients undergoing TRUSBx between July 2009 and November 2011 were given questionnaires prior to procedure. Standard 12-core TRUSBx under peri-prostatic block (10 mL of 1% lidocaine and antibiotic prophylaxis (oral ciprofloxacin, intravenous gentamicin and metronidazole suppository were performed. Pain perception was assessed using a Visual Analogue Score (VAS. Results Mean (range age of the 405 patients was 67.3 years (48-88. Mean VAS during the procedure was 2.93 and 2.20 on reaching home. Mean maximum VAS for the cohort on day 1 and day 2 were 1.27 and 0.7 respectively. 140 (35% were independent with some or minimal discomfort. 14 patients required assistance for some of their basic daily needs. 9 patients (2.2% were hospitalised due to sepsis. 131 patients (32.4% required additional oral analgesia following TRUSBx on days 0, 1 and 2. These patients were generally younger with a mean age for this group of 63.6 years (46-88. The difference in the mean age between those self-medicating and not was not statistically significant (p > 0.005. This group had mean VAS during the procedure of 4 and when patients reached home was 3.5. Mean maximum VAS on day 1 and 2 was 2.1 and 1.3 respectively. 11 patients required assistance from another adult. Conclusion A third of patients required self-medicated analgesia post-procedure. Age alone cannot be used as a criterion to identify patients who will subsequently require analgesia post-procedure, but a higher VAS during the procedure may be indicative. These patients must be counselled appropriately.

  6. P504S/alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase: a useful marker for diagnosis of small foci of prostatic carcinoma on needle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhong; Wu, Chin-Lee; Woda, Bruce A; Dresser, Karen; Xu, Jiangchun; Fanger, Gary R; Yang, Ximing J

    2002-09-01

    Establishing a definitive diagnosis of malignancy in prostate needle biopsies with very small foci of adenocarcinoma is a major diagnostic challenge for surgical pathologists. A positive diagnostic marker specific for prostatic adenocarcinoma may enhance our ability to detect limited prostate cancer and reduce errors in diagnosis. P504S, also known as alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase, recently identified by cDNA subtraction and microarray technology, might serve as such a specific marker because it has been demonstrated to be highly expressed in prostatic adenocarcinoma, but not in benign prostatic glands. However, whether small foci of carcinoma can be reliably detected by this marker is a crucial question for its clinical application. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of P504S immunohistochemistry in detecting small amounts of prostate cancer in prostate needle biopsies. A total of 142 prostate needle biopsies, including 73 cases with a small focus of prostatic adenocarcinoma (prostates, were examined by using immunohistochemistry for P504S and high molecular weight cytokeratin (34betaE12). P504S immunoreactivity was found in 69 of 73 cases (94.5%) of carcinoma but not in any benign prostates (0 of 69) or benign glands adjacent to malignant glands. The 34betaE12 immunostaining confirmed the absence of basal cells in the focus of carcinoma in all 73 cases. The high specificity and sensitivity of P504S in the detection of minimal prostatic adenocarcinoma indicated its potential diagnostic value in clinical practice. Using a combination of P504S and 34betaE12 can help the diagnosis of limited prostatic adenocarcinoma on needle biopsy.

  7. Length of prostate biopsies is not necessarily compromised by pooling multiple cores in one paraffin block: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Teemu T; Isola, Jorma; Kaipia, Antti; Riikonen, Jarno; Koivusalo, Laura; Huovinen, Sanna; Laurila, Marita; Porre, Sinikka; Tirkkonen, Mika; Kujala, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Individually submitted prostatic needle biopsies are recommended by most guidelines because of their potential advantage in terms of core quality. However, unspecified bilateral biopsies are commonly submitted in many centers. The length of the core is the key quality indicator of prostate biopsies. Because there are few recent publications comparing the quality of 12 site-designated biopsies versus pooled biopsies, we compared the lengths of the biopsies obtained by both methods. The material was obtained from 471 consecutive subjects who underwent prostatic needle biopsy in the Tampere University Hospital district between January and June 2013. Biopsies from 344 subjects fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The total number of cores obtained was 4047. The core lengths were measured on microscope slides. Extraprostatic tissue was subtracted from the core length. The aggregate lengths observed were 129.5 ± 21.8 mm (mean ± SD) for site-designated cores and 136.9 ± 26.4 mm for pooled cores (p = 0.09). The length of the core was 10.8 ± 1.8 mm for site-designated cores and 11.4 ± 2.2 mm for pooled cores (p = 0.87). The median length for pooled cores was 11 mm (range 5 mm - 18 mm). For individual site-designated cores, the median length was 11 mm (range 7 mm -15 mm). The core length was not correlated with the number of cores embedded into one paraffin block (r = 0.015). There was no significant difference in cancer detection rate (p = 0.62). Our results suggest that unspecified bilateral biopsies do not automatically lead to reduced core length. We conclude that carefully embedded multiple (three to nine) cores per block may yield cores of equal quality in a more cost-efficient way and that current guidelines favoring individually submitted cores may be too strict.

  8. Clinical Characteristics and Outcome of Gleason Score 10 Prostate Cancer on Core Biopsy Treated by External Radiotherapy and Hormone Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-peng Mai; Wei-gang Yan; Han-zhong Li; Zhi-gang Ji; Fu-quan Zhang; Ke Hu; Yu Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with Gleason score 10 prostate cancer treated by external radiotherapy and hormone therapy. Methods From January 2003 to March 2014, 1832 patients with prostate cancer were treated, among which 9 patients (represented 0.49%) were identified as Gleason score 10 disease on prostate core biopsy without distant metastases when first diagnosed. All 9 patients were treated by whole pelvic external radiotherapy (The whole pelvic dose was 50.0 Gy and the boost dose ranged from 76.2 to 78.0 Gy) and long-term hormone therapy. We assessed the clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes and treatment toxicities. Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results The median follow-up was 4.8 years. Six patients’ pre-treatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were lower than 20.0μg/L and three patients’ pre-treatment PSA levels were higher than 70.0μg/L. The median percentage of positive biopsy cores was 91%. Three, four and two cases were classified as T2c, T3a and T3b stage, respectively. Three cases were assessed as N1 stage. The 5-year biochemical failure-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, cancer specific survival and overall survival rates were 28.6%, 57.1%, 66.7%and 57.1%, respectively. Five patients experienced grade 1-2 acute gastrointestinal toxicities and six patients complained of grade 1-2 acute genitourinary toxicities. No bone fracture or cardiovascular disease was detected. Conclusions Gleason score 10 prostate cancer on core biopsy is usually combined with other high risk factors. The pre-treatment PSA levels lie in two extremes. Timely and active treatments are urgent needed because unfavourable oncological outcomes are often presented.

  9. The diagnostic accuracy and cost-effectiveness of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and enhanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in aiding the localisation of prostate abnormalities for biopsy: a systematic review and economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mowatt, G.; Scotland, G.; Boachie, C.; Cruickshank, M.; Ford, J.A.; Fraser, C.; Kurban, L.; Lam, T.B.; Padhani, A.R.; Royle, J.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Tassie, E.

    2013-01-01

    In the UK, prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men. A diagnosis can be confirmed only following a prostate biopsy. Many men find themselves with an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and a negative biopsy. The best way to manage these men remains uncertain.To assess the

  10. The diagnostic accuracy and cost-effectiveness of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and enhanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in aiding the localisation of prostate abnormalities for biopsy: a systematic review and economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mowatt, G.; Scotland, G.; Boachie, C.; Cruickshank, M.; Ford, J.A.; Fraser, C.; Kurban, L.; Lam, T.B.; Padhani, A.R.; Royle, J.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Tassie, E.

    2013-01-01

    In the UK, prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men. A diagnosis can be confirmed only following a prostate biopsy. Many men find themselves with an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and a negative biopsy. The best way to manage these men remains uncertain.To assess the dia

  11. The diagnostic accuracy and cost-effectiveness of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and enhanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in aiding the localisation of prostate abnormalities for biopsy: a systematic review and economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mowatt, G.; Scotland, G.; Boachie, C.; Cruickshank, M.; Ford, J.A.; Fraser, C.; Kurban, L.; Lam, T.B.; Padhani, A.R.; Royle, J.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Tassie, E.

    2013-01-01

    In the UK, prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men. A diagnosis can be confirmed only following a prostate biopsy. Many men find themselves with an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and a negative biopsy. The best way to manage these men remains uncertain.To assess the dia

  12. Routine Ertapenem Prophylaxis for Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy does Not Select for Carbapenem Resistant Organisms: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Maxim G; Page, Matthew J; McLachlan, Alice G; Studd, Rodney C; Blackmore, Timothy K

    2017-03-10

    Sepsis after transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy is an increasing problem in this era of rising antibiotic resistance. Although ertapenem prophylaxis has proved effective at our institution to reduce this, it has raised local and regional antimicrobial stewardship concerns. We investigated the possible selective effect of single dose ertapenem prophylaxis on fecal colonization with carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Patients underwent a rectal swab prior to receiving prebiopsy ertapenem prophylaxis. A second swab was obtained at followup 4 to 6 weeks later. Swabs were screened for carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae using an enhanced CDC (Centers for Disease Control) method. Prebiopsy swabs were also screened for extended spectrum β-lactamase producing and ciprofloxacin resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Patients were monitored for post-biopsy sepsis. A total of 326 patients were enrolled in the study. At baseline 6.4% and 9.0% of patients had colonization with extended spectrum β-lactamase producing and ciprofloxacin resistant Enterobacteriaceae, respectively. Carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae were not detected at baseline or followup in any patients. Colonization with nonfermentative organisms with intrinsic ertapenem resistance was detected in 29.4% of patients at baseline and followup (p = 1.0). Three cases (0.9%, 95% CI 0.2-2.8) of probable post-biopsy sepsis were identified during the study period. None was bacteremic or required intensive care unit admission. Single dose ertapenem prophylaxis did not appear to have a significant selective effect on fecal colonization with carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae or other ertapenem resistant gram-negative organisms in this outpatient group. It is highly effective prophylaxis for transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. In the right setting ertapenem may represent a useful prophylactic option to prevent post-transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy sepsis. Copyright © 2017

  13. Can Single Positive Core Prostate Cancer at biopsy be Considered a Low-Risk Disease after Radical Prostatectomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Kupka da Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Single positive core in a prostate biopsy is usually associated with indolent prostate cancer (PCa and is one of the active surveillance (AS inclusion criteria. We investigated whether single positive core PCa at biopsy could define an archetype of low-risk disease. Materials and Methods A total of 1320 consecutive patients were enrolled. Among them, 249 patients with single positive core PCa were followed up, and the clinical and pathological parameters influencing prognosis were analyzed. Results Out of the 249 patients, 172 (69.0% had pathological findings ≥ pT2c and 87 (34.9% had an undergraded Gleason Score (GS based on the biopsy. Positive surgical margins (PSMs, extraprostatic extension (EPE and seminal vesicle invasion (SVI were found in 20.8%, 10.0% and 6.0% of patients, respectively. In a comparative analysis, we found that the PSA level, prostate weight and number of cores at biopsy are essential to correctly predict an indolent PCa. A total of 125 patients (67.3% with nonpalpable tumors became high-risk tumors (pT2c-T3. Analyzing only nonpalpable tumors with a GS of 6 at biopsy (156 patients, we noted that 106 (67.9% of cT1 progressed from cT1c to pT2c-pT3. Conclusions Single core PCa have clinically significant disease in the Radical Prostatectomy specimens, with considerable rates of overgrading for the GS, pT2c-pT3, PSMs, EPE and SVI. The treatment plan must be evaluated individually for patients with single core PCa and must take into account other prognostic factors when determining whether a patient should be managed with AS.

  14. Prostate-specific antigen reduction after empiric antibiotic treatment does not rule out biopsy in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms: prospective, controlled, single-center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Anıl Atalay

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: This study has shown that, use empirical antibiotic treatment decreased the PSA levels but did not have any effect on prostate cancer detection. In addition, prostate cancer detection rates were found to be higher in patients with reduced PSA levels after treatment. Therefore, it may not be safe to rule out biopsies in patients who achieve a satisfactory PSA response to antibiotics.

  15. Post-prostate biopsy infection with Escherichia coli ST131 leading to epididymo-orchitis and meningitis caused by Gram-negative bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assimacopoulos, Aris; Johnston, Brian; Clabots, Connie; Johnson, James R

    2012-12-01

    A 57-year-old man who had recently undergone a transrectal prostate biopsy for a rising prostate-specific antigen level developed postbiopsy necrotizing epididymo-orchitis (requiring orchiectomy) and then Gram-negative meningitis, despite fluoroquinolone administration for periprocedural prophylaxis and subsequent therapy. The causative organism proved to be a fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strain from sequence type ST131.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided prostate biopsy. Institutional analysis and systematic review

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    Polanec, S.H.; Helbich, T.H.; Kubin, K.; Pinker-Domenig, K.; Brader, P. [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy; Margreiter, M.; Klingler, H.C. [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Urology; Susani, M. [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Pathology

    2014-05-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the detection rate of prostate cancer (PCa) after magnetic resonance-guided biopsy (MRGB); to monitor the patient cohort with negative MRGB results and to compare our own results with other reports in the current literature. Materials and Methods: A group of 41 patients was included in this IRB-approved study and subjected to combined MRI and MRGB. MRGB was performed in a closed 1.5 T MR unit and the needle was inserted rectally. The follow-up period ranged between 12 and 62 months (mean 3.1 years). To compare the results with the literature, a systematic literature search was performed. Eighteen publications were evaluated. Results: The cancer-suspicious regions were punctured successfully in all cases. PCa was detected in eleven patients (26.9 %) who were all clinically significant. MRGB showed a benign histology in the remaining 30 patients. In the follow-up (mean 3.1 years) of patients with benign histology, no new PCa was diagnosed. The missed cancer rate during follow-up was 0.0 % in our study. Conclusion: MRGB is effective for the detection of clinically significant cancer, and this is in accordance with the recent literature. In the follow-up of patients with benign histology, no new PCa was discovered. Although the probability of developing PCa after negative MRGB is very low, active surveillance is reasonable. (orig.)

  17. Local anesthesia for pain control during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pu Yan,* Xiao-yan Wang,* Wei Huang, Yong Zhang Beijing Tian Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Neurology Research Division, China National Clinical Research Center for Neurological Disease, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work. Background: A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intrarectal local anesthestic (IRLA, periprostatic nerve block (PPNB, and the combined modalities in alleviating the pain during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS-guided prostate biopsy.Materials and methods: A literature review was performed to identify all published randomized controlled trials (RCTs about IRLA vs no anesthesia or placebo gel; PPNB vs no injection, periprostatic placebo injection, or IRLA; combined PPNB and IRLA vs PPNB alone; and combined PPNB and intraprostatic nerve block (IPNB vs PPNB alone before TRUS-guided biopsy. Sources included MEDILINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library from 1980 to 2016. The main outcomes were biopsy pain score, probe manipulation pain score, and anesthetic infiltration pain score assessed by the visual pain scale.Results: A total of 26 articles involving 36 RCTs were used in this analysis: Although IRLA can lead to pain reduction, the result was not statistically significant when compared with no anesthesia or placebo gel (weighted mean difference [WMD]: -0.22, 95% CI: -0.45 to 0, P=0.06. PPNB can lead to significantly lower biopsy pain scores when compared with no analgesia (WMD: -1.32, 95% CI: -1.68 to -0.95, P<0.00001, placebo injection (WMD: -2.62, 95% CI: -3.16 to -2.07, P<0.00001, or IRLA (WMD: -1.31, 95% CI: -1.40 to -1.22, P<0.00001. PPNB + IRLA can lead to significantly lower biopsy pain scores when compared with PPNB alone (WMD: -0.45, 95% CI: -0.62 to -0.28, P<0.00001. PPNB + IPNB can lead to significantly lower biopsy pain scores when compared with PPNB alone (WMD: -0.73, 95% CI: -0.92 to -0.55, P<0.00001. There were no severe

  18. Workflow assessment of 3T MRI-guided transperineal targeted prostate biopsy using a robotic needle guidance

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    Song, Sang-Eun; Tuncali, Kemal; Tokuda, Junichi; Fedorov, Andriy; Penzkofer, Tobias; Fennessy, Fiona; Tempany, Clare; Yoshimitsu, Kitaro; Magill, John; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided transperineal targeted prostate biopsy has become a valuable instrument for detection of prostate cancer in patients with continuing suspicion for aggressive cancer after transrectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) guided biopsy. The MRI-guided procedures are performed using mechanical targeting devices or templates, which suffer from limitations of spatial sampling resolution and/or manual in-bore adjustments. To overcome these limitations, we developed and clinically deployed an MRI-compatible piezoceramic-motor actuated needle guidance device, Smart Template, which allows automated needle guidance with high targeting resolution for use in a wide closed-bore 3-Tesla MRI scanner. One of the main limitations of the MRI-guided procedure is the lengthy procedure time compared to conventional TRUS-guided procedures. In order to optimize the procedure, we assessed workflow of 30 MRI-guided biopsy procedures using the Smart Template with focus on procedure time. An average of 3.4 (range: 2~6) targets were preprocedurally selected per procedure and 2.2 ± 0.8 biopsies were performed for each target with an average insertion attempt of 1.9 ± 0.7 per biopsy. The average technical preparation time was 14 ± 7 min and the in-MRI patient preparation time was 42 ± 7 min. After 21 ± 7 min of initial imaging, 64 ± 12 min of biopsy was performed yielding an average of 10 ± 2 min per tissue sample. The total procedure time occupying the MRI suite was 138 ± 16 min. No noticeable tendency in the length of any time segment was observed over the 30 clinical cases.

  19. Higher body mass index increases the risk for biopsy-mediated detection of prostate cancer in Chinese men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Bo Hu

    Full Text Available To investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI and prostate cancer (PCa risk at biopsy in Chinese men.We retrospectively reviewed the records of 1,807 consecutive men who underwent initial multicore (≥10 prostate biopsy under transrectal ultrasound guidance between Dec 2004 and Feb 2014. BMI was categorised based on the Asian classification of obesity as follows: <18.5 (underweight, 18.5-22.9 (normal weight, 23-24.9 (overweight, 25-29.9 (moderately obese, and ≥30 kg/m2 (severely obese. The odds ratios (OR of each BMI category for risk of PCa and high-grade prostate cancer (HGPCa, Gleason score ≥4+3 detection were estimated in crude, age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted models. Prevalence ratios and accuracies of PSA predicted PCa were also estimated across BMI groups.In total, PCa was detected by biopsy in 750 (45.4% men, and HGPCa was detected in 419 (25.4% men. Compared with men of normal weight, underweight men and obese men were older and had higher prostate specific antigen levels. The risk of overall PCa detection via biopsy presented an obvious U-shaped relationship with BMI in crude analysis. Overall, 50.0%, 37.4%, 45.6% 54.4% and 74.1% of the men in the underweight, normal weight, overweight, moderately obese and severely obese groups, respectively, were diagnosed with PCa via biopsy. In multivariate analysis, obesity was significantly correlated with a higher risk of PCa detection (OR = 1.17, 95%CI 1.10-1.25, P<0.001. However, higher BMI was not correlated with HGPCa detection (OR = 1.03, 95%CI 0.97-1.09, P = 0.29. There were no significant differences in the accuracy of using PSA to predict PCa or HGPCa detection across different BMI categories.Obesity was associated with higher risk of PCa detection in the present Chinese biopsy population. No significant association was detected between obesity and HGPCa.

  20. Multi-drug resistant E.coli urosepsis in physicians following transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies--three cases including one death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, William H; Bell, David G; Lawen, Joseph G; Rendon, Ricardo A

    2010-04-01

    Three male physicians underwent transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies for elevated prostate-specific antigen levels or irregular digital rectal exam findings. All three of these patients developed urosepsis secondary to multi-drug resistant organisms despite antibiotic prophylaxis. There are increasing reports of infectious complications following prostate biopsy caused by multi-drug resistant organisms. These cases highlight the potentially lethal risks to healthcare workers who are more likely to harbor multi-drug resistant organisms than the general population. Further research into preoperative assessment and appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis in all potentially high risk patients is warranted.

  1. Clinical outcome following a low-suspicion multiparametric prostate MRI or benign MRI-guided biopsy to detect prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Nørgaard, Nis; Løgager, Vibeke;

    2017-01-01

    predictive values of MRI in ruling out any prostate cancer and significant prostate cancer defined as: a) any core with Gleason score (GS) > 6 or b) > 2 positive cores/cancerous core ≥ 50%. RESULTS: Prostate cancer was detected in 38/194 (20%) patients during the median study period of 47 months...... (interquartile range 43-52). The overall negative predictive value of MRI in ruling out any and significant prostate cancer was 80% (156/194) and 95% (184/194), respectively. No patient with a low-suspicion MRI had intermediate/high grade cancer (Gleason score > 6). The majority of patients with no cancer during...

  2. Interobserver agreement of gleason score and modified gleason score in needle biopsy and in surgical specimen of prostate cancer

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    Sergio G. Veloso

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Gleason score, which has a high interobserver variability, is used to classify prostate cancer. The most recent consensus valued the tertiary Gleason pattern and recommended its use in the final score of needle biopsies (modified Gleason score. This pattern is considered to be of high prognostic value in surgical specimens. This study emphasized the evaluation of the modified score agreement in needle biopsies and in surgical specimen, as well as the interobserver variability of this score MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three pathologists evaluated the slides of needle biopsies and surgical specimens of 110 patients, reporting primary, secondary and tertiary Gleason patterns and after that, traditional and modified Gleason scores were calculated. Kappa test (K assessed the interobserver agreement and the agreement between the traditional and modified scores of the biopsy and of the surgical specimen RESULTS: Interobserver agreement in the biopsy was K = 0.36 and K = 0.35, and in the surgical specimen it was K = 0.46 and K = 0.36, for the traditional and modified scores, respectively. The tertiary Gleason grade was found in 8%, 0% and 2% of the biopsies and in 8%, 0% and 13% of the surgical specimens, according to observers 1, 2 and 3, respectively. When evaluating the agreement of the traditional and modified Gleason scores in needle biopsy with both scores of the surgical specimen, a similar agreement was found through Kappa CONCLUSION: Contrary to what was expected, the modified Gleason score was not superior in the agreement between the biopsy score and the specimen, or in interobserver reproducibility, in this study.

  3. Biopsy of the prostate guided by transrectal ultrasound: relation between warfarin use and incidence of bleeding complications

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    Ihezue, C.U. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital (United Kingdom); Smart, J. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital (United Kingdom); Dewbury, K.C. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: keith.dewbury@suht.swest.nhs.uk; Mehta, R. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital (United Kingdom); Burgess, L. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    AIM: To determine the relation between warfarin use and the frequency of bleeding complications after biopsy of the prostate guided by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). METHODS: Overall, 1022 consecutive patients with suspected prostatic disease were followed after biopsy. Warfarin and aspirin use was determined on the day of the procedure. A TRUS-guided biopsy was performed and patients were offered a questionnaire to complete 10 days after the procedure, to determine any immediate or delayed bleeding complications. Follow-up telephone calls were made to those who had not replied within the stipulated period. RESULTS: Of the 1000 patients who replied, 49 were receiving warfarin, 220 were receiving aspirin and 731 were not receiving any anticoagulant drugs. Of the 49 subjects reporting current use of warfarin, 18 (36.7%) experienced haematuria, compared with 440 (60.2%) of the patients receiving no anti-coagulant drugs who reported haematuria. This was statistically significant (p=0.001). Of the group receiving warfarin, 4 (8.2%) experienced haematospermia whereas 153 (21%) of the group receiving no anticoagulant medication reported haematospermia. This difference also was statistically significant (p=0.030). Rectal bleeding was experienced by 7 (14.3%) of the group receiving warfarin compared with 95 (13%) in the group without anticoagulant medication, but this was not statistically significant (p=0.80). We also demonstrated that there was no statistically significant association between the severity of the bleeding complications and medication with warfarin. CONCLUSION: None of the group receiving warfarin experienced clinically important bleeding complications. Our results suggest that the frequency and severity of bleeding complications were no worse in the warfarin group than in the control group and that discontinuing anticoagulation medication before prostate biopsy may be unnecessary.

  4. The prostate cancer detection rates of CEUS-targeted versus MRI-targeted versus systematic TRUS-guided biopsies in biopsy-naïve men: a prospective, comparative clinical trial using the same patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postema, A W; Scheltema, M J V; Mannaerts, C K; Van Sloun, R J G; Idzenga, T; Mischi, M; Engelbrecht, M R E; De la Rosette, J J M C H; Wijkstra, H

    2017-04-05

    The current standard for Prostate Cancer (PCa) detection in biopsy-naïve men consists of 10-12 systematic biopsies under ultrasound guidance. This approach leads to underdiagnosis and undergrading of significant PCa while insignificant PCa may be overdiagnosed. The recent developments in MRI and Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) imaging have sparked an increasing interest in PCa imaging with the ultimate goal of replacing these "blind" systematic biopsies with reliable imaging-based targeted biopsies. In this trial, we evaluate and compare the PCa detection rates of multiparametric (mp)MRI-targeted biopsies, CEUS-targeted biopsies and systematic biopsies under ultrasound guidance in the same patients. After informed consent, 299 biopsy-naïve men will undergo mpMRI scanning and CEUS imaging 1 week prior to the prostate biopsy procedure. During the biopsy procedure, a systematic transrectal 12-core biopsy will be performed by one operator blinded for the imaging results and targeted biopsy procedure. Subsequently a maximum of 4 CEUS-targeted biopsies and/or 4 mpMRI-targeted biopsies of predefined locations determined by an expert CEUS reader using quantification techniques and an expert radiologist, respectively, will be taken by a second operator using an MRI-US fusion device. The primary outcome is the detection rate of PCa (all grades) and clinically significant PCa (defined as Gleason score ≥7) compared between the three biopsy protocols. This trial compares the detection rate of (clinically significant) PCa, between both traditional systematic biopsies and targeted biopsies based on predefined regions of interest identified by two promising imaging technologies. It follows published recommendations on study design for the evaluation of imaging guided prostate biopsy techniques, minimizing bias and allowing data pooling. It is the first trial to combine mpMRI imaging and advanced CEUS imaging with quantification. The Dutch Central Committee on Research

  5. Importance of prostate-specific antigen (PSA as a predictive factor for concordance between the Gleason scores of prostate biopsies and RADICAL prostatectomy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Gianni de Lima

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the concordance between the Gleason scores of prostate biopsies and radical prostatectomy specimens, thereby highlighting the importance of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA level as a predictive factor of concordance. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 253 radical prostatectomy cases performed between 2006 and 2011. The patients were divided into 4 groups for the data analysis and dichotomized according to the preoperative PSA, <10 ng/mL and ≥10 ng/mL. A p-score <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: The average patient age was 63.3±7.8 years. The median PSA level was 9.3±4.9 ng/mL. The overall concordance between the Gleason scores was 52%. Patients presented preoperative PSA levels <10 ng/mL in 153 of 235 cases (65% and ≥10 ng/mL in 82 of 235 cases (35%. The Gleason scores were identical in 86 of 153 cases (56% in the <10 ng/mL group and 36 of 82 (44% cases in the ≥10 ng/mL group (p = 0.017. The biopsy underestimated the Gleason score in 45 (30% patients in the <10 ng/mL group and 38 (46% patients in the ≥10 ng/mL (p = 0.243. Specifically, the patients with Gleason 3 + 3 scores according to the biopsies demonstrated global concordance in 56 of 110 cases (51%. In this group, the patients with preoperative PSA levels <10 ng/dL had higher concordance than those with preoperative PSA levels ≥10 ng/dL (61% x 23%, p = 0.023, which resulted in 77% upgrading after surgery in those patients with PSA levels ≥10 ng/dl. CONCLUSION: The Gleason scores of needle prostate biopsies and those of the surgical specimens were concordant in approximately half of the global sample. The preoperative PSA level was a strong predictor of discrepancy and might improve the identification of those patients who tended to be upgraded after surgery, particularly in patients with Gleason scores of 3 + 3 in the prostate biopsy and preoperative PSA levels ≥10 ng/mL.

  6. Contemporary update on pathology-related issues on routine workup of prostate biopsy: sectioning, tumor extent measurement, specimen orientation, and immunohistochemistry.

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    Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Scarpelli, Marina; Galosi, Andrea B; Cheng, Liang

    2014-04-01

    While the prime goal of the needle biopsy is to diagnose prostatic adenocarcinoma (PCa), once PCa is detected further descriptive information regarding the type of cancer, amount of tumor, and grade in prostate needle cores forms the cornerstone for contemporary management of the patient and to assess the potential for local cure and the risk for distant metastasis. This review gives an update on selected pathology-related issues on routine workup of prostate biopsy with special references to adequate histologic sectioning necessary to maximize cancer yield, tumor extent measurements and methodologies, specimen orientation, and the role of immunohistochemistry in the evaluation of the prostate. Multiple factors influence the diagnostic yield of prostate biopsies. Many of these factors are fixed and uncontrollable. Other factors are controlled by the urologist, including number of cores obtained, method and location of biopsy, and amount of tissue obtained. The yield of cancer is also controlled by the pathologist and histotechnologist. It is necessary to report the number of cores submitted and the number of positive cores, thereby giving the fraction of positive cores. The percentage involvement by carcinoma with or without the linear extent of carcinoma of the single core with the greatest amount of tumor should also be provided. Using the marking technique, we can add a new pathological parameter: pathological orientation. Cancer or atypical lesions can be accurately located within the biopsy specimen and integrated to biopsy approach. Probably the most common use of immunohistochemistry in the evaluation of the prostate is for the identification of basal cells, which are absent with rare exception in adenocarcinoma of the prostate and in general positive in mimickers of prostate cancer. If a case is still considered atypical by a uropathology expert after negative basal cell staining, positive staining for alpha-methylacyl-CoA-racemase can help establish in 50

  7. Listening to music during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy decreases anxiety, pain and dissatisfaction in patients: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yun Hee; Oh, Tae Hoon; Lee, Jae Whan; Park, Seung Chol; Seo, Ill Young; Jeong, Hee Jong; Kwon, Whi-An

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether listening to music during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided 12-core needle prostate biopsy decreases anxiety, pain and dissatisfaction among patients and results in a more comfortable and better tolerated procedure. 76 male patients who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy between March 2013 and June 2014 were randomized into the following groups: no music (group I, n = 38) or classical music (group II, n = 38) during the procedure. Before TRUS-guided prostate biopsy, lidocaine gel was instilled into the rectum. Patient anxiety levels were quantified using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. A visual analog scale (0-10) was used for self-assessment of satisfaction, discomfort and willingness among patients to have a repeat TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. Demographic characteristics, mean age, procedure duration and procedure indications did not differ statistically between the two groups. The mean anxiety level and mean pain score of group II were significantly lower than those of group I (p = 0.001 and p = 0.003, respectively). Group II also had a significantly higher mean satisfaction score than group I (p = 0.007). Before the procedure, heart rate and systolic blood pressure were similar in groups I and II; however, after the procedure, levels were lower in group II than in group I (heart rate, p = 0.014; systolic blood pressure, p = 0.011). Listening to music during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy significantly reduced patients' feelings of pain, discomfort and dissatisfaction. Music can serve as a simple, inexpensive and effective adjunct to sedation during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. We recommend playing music during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy Gleason score correlation in heterogenous tumors: proposal for a composite Gleason score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Stella, Javier A; Shah, Alpa B; Montoya-Cerrillo, Diego; Williamson, Sean R; Gupta, Nilesh S

    2015-09-01

    When prostate biopsy cores are separately identified in multiple containers, current recommendations are to grade each specimen individually. For treatment algorithms, the highest Gleason score (HGS) is typically used as the overall score, even if a lower score predominates. This practice has the potential to misrepresent the overall cancer in the entire gland for some patients and place them in a higher-grade group. We compare a novel composite Gleason score (CGS), integrating grade patterns from contiguous positive biopsy sites, with HGS to determine correlation with the radical prostatectomy (RP) Gleason score (GS). One hundred needle biopsy cases from 2008 to 2012 with >2 GSs in a biopsy set (eg, 3+3=6, 3+4=7, and 4+3=7) or more than a 1-step difference in GS (eg, 3+4=7 and 4+4=8 without 4+3=7) were analyzed. Grades were assigned using both methods (HGS and CGS) and compared with RPGS. Grade groups I to V were used to define downgrade and upgrade. Comparing HGS with RPGS, 31% remained the same and 69% had a change in GS (87% downgraded and 13% upgraded). Comparing CGS with RPGS, 59% remained the same and 41% had a change in GS (10% downgraded and 90% upgraded). Of the 2 methods, the CGS showed better overall correlation with RP (P2 grades are present in a biopsy set. CGS has a significantly lower rate of downgrade and predicts the RPGS more accurately than HGS.

  9. Comparison of Transperineal Mapping Biopsy Results with Whole-Mount Radical Prostatectomy Pathology in Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer

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    Darren J. Katz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of transperineal mapping biopsy (TMB by comparing it to the pathology specimen of patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP for localized prostate cancer. Methods. From March 2007 to September 2009, 78 men at a single center underwent TMB; 17 of 78 subsequently underwent RP. TMB cores were grouped into four quadrants and matched to data from RP whole-mount slides. Gleason score, tumor location and volume, cross-sectional area, and maximal diameter were measured; sensitivity and specificity were assessed. Results. For the 17 patients who underwent RP, TMB revealed 12 (71% had biopsy Gleason grades ≥ 3 + 4 and 13 (76% had bilateral disease. RP specimens showed 14 (82% had Gleason scores ≥ 3 + 4 and 13 (76% had bilateral disease. Sensitivity and specificity of TMB for prostate cancer detection were 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 72%–94% and 83% (95% CI 62%–95%, respectively. Four quadrants negative for cancer on TMB were positive on prostatectomy, and six positive on TMB were negative on prostatectomy. Conclusion. TMB is a highly invasive procedure that can accurately detect and localize prostate cancer. These findings help establish baseline performance characteristics for TMB and its utility for organ-sparing strategies.

  10. Is Body Mass Index the Best Adiposity Measure for Prostate Cancer Risk? Results From a Veterans Affairs Biopsy Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrios-Rivera, Lourdes; Howard, Lauren; Frank, Jennifer; De Hoedt, Amanda; Beverly, Devon; Grant, Delores J; Hoyo, Cathrine; Freedland, Stephen J

    2017-07-01

    To test multiple adiposity measures and prostate cancer (PC) risk in men undergoing prostate biopsy. We hypothesized that body mass index (BMI), body fat, and waist circumference would be highly correlated, and all would be associated with aggressive PC, but not overall risk. A case (483)-control (496) study among men undergoing prostate biopsy from 2007 to 2016 was conducted at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Anthropometric and self-reported measurements were taken. Percent body fat was measured. Associations between adiposity measures and PC risk and high-grade PC (Gleason ≥7) were examined using logistic regression. BMI, percent body fat, and waist circumference were highly correlated (ρ ≥ .79) (P BMI (P = .011) was associated with overall PC risk, but percent body fat (P = .16) and waist circumference (P = .19) were not. However, all adiposity measurements were associated with high-grade disease (P BMI, body fat, and waist circumference were all highly correlated and associated with aggressive PC. This study supports the idea that higher adiposity is selectively associated with high-grade PC and reinforces the continued use of self-reported BMI as a measure of obesity in epidemiologic studies of PC. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Contemporary outcomes in the detection of prostate cancer using transrectal ultrasound-guided 12-core biopsy in Singaporean men with elevated prostate specific antigen and/or abnormal digital rectal examination

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    Alvin Lee

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, using contemporary 12-core biopsy methods, the local prostate cancer detection rate based on serum PSA and DRE findings has increased over the past decade presumably due to multiple genetic and environmental factors. Post-biopsy sepsis remains an important complication worldwide.

  12. Intrarectal ice application prior to transrectal prostate biopsy: a prospective randomised trial accessing pain and collateral effects

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    Baris Çaliskan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To analyze the efficacy of intrarectal ice application as an anesthetic method prior to transrectal ultrasound (TRUS guided prostate biopsy. Materials and Methods A total of 120 consecutive men were included into the study prospectively. Patients were equally randomized as group 1 and 2 with 60 patients each. Ice was applied as an anesthetic method 5 minutes before procedure to the patients in group 1. Patients in group 2 were applied 10 ml of 2% lidocaine gel 10 minutes before procedure. Twelve core biopsy procedure was performed for all patients. The pain level was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS. Results Median pain score was 3.5 (1-8 in group 1 and 5 (1-8 in group 2. There is significantly difference between groups regarding the mean sense of pain level during the procedure. (p=0.007 There was also no difference in complications between two groups about presence and duration of macroscopic hematuria and rectal bleeding. Conclusions Intrarectal ice application prior to TRUS prostate biopsy has an effect on reducing pain. Development of new techniques about cold effect or ice can make this method more useful and decrease complication rates.

  13. Multiparametric MRI in men with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer undergoing repeat biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Nørgaard, Nis; Løgager, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    for detection of csPCa in men undergoing repeat biopsies. Material and Methods MpMRI was performed prior to re-biopsy in 289 prospectively enrolled patients. All underwent repeat TRUSbx followed by targeted biopsies (MRITB) of any mpMRI-identified lesion. MpMRI suspicion grade, PSA level, and density (PSAd...

  14. [Comparison of the use of local anaesthetic versus lidocaine injection under ultrasound guide for the pain control in patients undergoing prostate biopsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Márquez, C; Cadena González, Y; Guerra Garzón, A; Pérez Hidalgo, J M

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the lidocaine gel's application effect versus the periprostatic placement of lidocaine to manage the pain in patients who go through a prostate biopsy. We took the patients who entered the FCI-IC to effectuate a prostate biopsy with an echographic guideline. The patients were split in two groups of 22 people with each one bearing similar characteristics. One of these groups experimented the previous prostate biopsy with 10cc of intrarectal lidocaine gel and the other group experimented 10 cc of lidocaine to 1% in the vesic-prostatic through echographic guidelines. To evaluate the pain, we used the visual analogue scale to gauge the pain during and after the procedure in both groups. The daily procedure to do biopsies by octants and their subsequent preparation remained the same and never changed. The average scale of pain during the procedure was 2.0 for the group with injected anaesthesia and 4.77 for the group who used gel. After the procedure the average of pain was 0.77 and 3.14 respectively. Some complications as bacteremy were present in 3 patients (6.8%) of the total, who were in the gel group and none were found in the group of injected anestesia. No significant relation was found with respect to other variables. the application of periprostatic lidocaine is efficient to control the pain in patients who go through a prostate biopsy. Besides, it is a safe procedure which can be easily reproduce in our environment.

  15. Clinical performance of transperineal template guided mapping biopsy for therapeutic decision making in low risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahallal, Y; Sanchez-Salas, R; Sivaraman, A; Barret, E; Secin, F P; Validire, P; Rozet, F; Galiano, M; Cathelineau, X

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the role of Transperineal Template guided Mapping Biopsy (TTMB) in determining the management strategy in patients with low risk prostate cancer (PCa). We retroscpectively evaluated 169 patients who underwent TTMB at our institution from February 2008 to June 2011. Ninety eight of them harbored indolent PCa defined as: Prostate Specific Antigen<10ng/ml, Gleason score 6 or less, clinical stage T2a or less, unilateral disease and a maximum of one third positive cores at first biopsy and<50% of the core involved. TTMB results were analyzed for Gleason score upgrading and upstaging as compared to initial TransRectal UltraSound (TRUS) biopsies and its influence on the change in the treatment decisions. TTMB detected cancer in 64 (65%) patients. The upgrade, upstage and both were noted in 33% (n=21), 12% (n=8) and 7% (n=5) respectively of the detected cancers. The disease characteristics was similar to initial TRUS in 30 (48%) patients and TTMB was negative in 34 (35%) patients. Prostate volume was significantly smaller in patients with upgrade and/or upstage noted at TTMB (45.4 vs 37.9; P=.03). TTMB results influenced 73.5% of upgraded and/or upstaged patients to receive radical treatment while 81% of the patients with unmodified stage and/or grade continued active surveillance or focal therapy. In patients with low risk PCa diagnosed by TRUS, subsequent TTMB demonstrated cancer upgrade and/or upstage in about one-third of the patients and resulted in eventual change in treatment decision. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  16. Dissemination of tuberculosis after biopsy of primary tubercular prostate: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Onkar Jha; Vidya Nair; Deepak Talwar

    2015-01-01

    Only 15-20% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) has been attributed to TB of the urogenital system and often Results from haematogenous spread from an active site of infection. Isolated involvement of prostate by TB is relatively less common. The incidence of primary prostatic TB is unknown and in its truest sense is a very rare entity. Here, we report the case of a patient with primary prostatic TB who was misdiagnosed as nonspecific granulomatous inflammation on transrectal ultrasound-guid...

  17. Percent free prostate-specific antigen is effective to predict prostate biopsy outcome in Chinese men with prostate-specific antigen between 10.1 and 20.0 ng ml(-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Zhou, Li-Qun; Cai, Xiao-Bing; Xie, Li-Ping; Huang, Yi-Ran; He, Da-Lin; Gao, Xu; Xu, Chuan-Liang; Ding, Qiang; Wei, Qiang; Yin, Chang-Jun; Ren, Shan-Cheng; Wang, Fu-Bo; Tian, Ye; Sun, Zhong-Quan; Fu, Qiang; Ma, Lu-Lin; Zheng, Jun-Hua; Ye, Zhang-Qun; Ye, Ding-Wei; Xu, Dan-Feng; Hou, Jian-Quan; Xu, Ke-Xin; Yuan, Jian-Lin; Gao, Xin; Liu, Chun-Xiao; Pan, Tie-Jun; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Percent free prostatic-specific antigen (%fPSA) has been introduced as a tool to avoid unnecessary biopsies in patients with a serum PSA level of 4.0-10.0 ng ml-1 , however, it remains controversial whether %fPSA is effective in PSA range of 10.1-20.0 ng ml-1 in both Chinese and Western population. In this study, the diagnostic performance of %fPSA and serum PSA in predicting prostate cancer (PCa) and high-grade PCa (HGPCa) was analyzed in a multi-center biopsy cohort of 5915 consecutive Chinese patients who underwent prostate biopsy in 22 hospitals across China from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. The indication for biopsy was PSA>4.0 ng ml-1 or/and suspicious digital rectal examination. Total and free serum PSA determinations were performed by three types of electrochemiluminescence immunoassays with recalibration to the World Health Organization standards. The diagnostics accuracy of PSA, %fPSA and %fPSA in combination with PSA (%fPSA + PSA) was determined by the area under the receivers operating characteristic curve (AUC). %fPSA was more effective than PSA in men aged ≥60 years old. The AUC was 0.584 and 0.635 in men aged ≥60 years old with a PSA of 4.0-10.0 ng ml-1 and 10.1-20.0 ng ml-1 , respectively. The AUC of %fPSA was superior to that of PSA in predicting HGPCa in patients ≥60 years old in these two PSA range. Our results indicated that %fPSA is both statistically effective and clinical applicable to predict prostate biopsy outcome in Chinese patients aged ≥60 years old with a PSA of 4.0-10.0 ng ml-1 and 10.1-20.0 ng ml-1 .

  18. Usual and unusual histologic patterns of high Gleason score 8 to 10 adenocarcinoma of the prostate in needle biopsy tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottipati, Srinivas; Warncke, Jason; Vollmer, Robin; Humphrey, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    High Gleason score 8 to 10 adenocarcinoma is the most aggressive and potentially lethal form of prostate cancer. The 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP)-modified Gleason grading scheme defines several gland arrangements of high Gleason grade patterns 4 and 5. The aim of this investigation was to quantitate the frequency of the ISUP-defined high Gleason grade patterns in needle biopsy tissue, to determine the common admixtures and to characterize patterns not presented in the 2005 ISUP report. For patients who underwent radical prostatectomy, we analyzed for association of specific high-grade patterns in needle biopsy with extraprostatic extension in radical prostatectomy tissues. A total of 268 prostate needle biopsy cases with Gleason score of 8 to 10 were examined. A mean of 3.6 patterns (range, 1 to 8) were identified per case and only 12% of cases had a pure single pattern. Ill-defined glands with poorly formed lumina (at 57%) and fused microacinar glands (at 53%) comprised the predominant and most frequently admixed patterns. Single cells and single signet ring cells were present in 53% and 31% of cases, respectively. Additional patterns in order of frequency included cords (35%), cribriform glands (25%), sheets of cells (19%), chains (4%), glomeruloid (3%), comedonecrosis (2%), and hypernephromatoid (1 case=0.3%). Gleason score 8 to 10 carcinomas are typically extensive in needle core tissue, with a mean of 4.4 positive cores (range, 1 to 15 cores) per case. Only 14 cases (5%) had high-grade minimal carcinoma measuring ISUP report include single file growth, solid cylinders, and nested patterns. The single file pattern was present in 40% of cases, and the small solid nested pattern was detected in 24% of cases. One case displayed solid cylinders. Only the single file pattern was associated with extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy (P=0.005). These results show that the 2005 ISUP-defined patterns of high Gleason score 8 to 10

  19. Fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli in intestinal flora of patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy--should we reassess our practices for antibiotic prophylaxis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensels, D; Slabbaert, K; De Wever, L; Vermeersch, P; Van Poppel, H; Verhaegen, J

    2012-06-01

    Although the estimate of the incidence of sepsis following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUSPB) is low, fluoroquinolone-resistant infections after prostate biopsy are being increasingly noted. This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of faecal carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strains before TRUSPB and at evaluating potential predisposing risk factors. The incidence of sepsis after prostate biopsy was determined, and our routine practice for antibiotic prophylaxis for TRUSPB was evaluated. A prospective study was conducted in 342 consecutive patients undergoing prostate biopsy between December 2009 and July 2010. Before TRUSPB, a rectal swab was cultured. The correlation between the presence of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains and plausible risk factors was investigated by the use of a questionnaire. Of the 236 patients included, 22.0% (52/236) harboured ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli strains. The use of fluoroquinolones in the 6 months before biopsy was associated with an increased risk of faecal carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains (p fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains was an important risk factor for infectious complications after TRUSPB (p fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains (22.0%) before TRUSPB. The use of fluoroquinolones in the previous 6 months before biopsy is a risk factor for faecal carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains and for infectious complications after TRUSPB. Hence, the universal administration of fluoroquinolones should be reconsidered. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  20. A randomised controlled trial comparing use of lignocaine periprostatic nerve block alone and combined with diclofenac suppository for patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Wei Ling; Hawks, Cynthia; Tan, Andrew H H; Hayne, Dickon

    2014-11-01

    To examine whether or not the combination of diclofenac suppository with peri-prostatic nerve block (PPNB) was effective in reducing the degree of pain experienced during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy in a randomised single-blind placebo-controlled trial. In all, 96 patients having a planned TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were randomised into one of the following arms on a 1:1 basis: 10 mL 1% lignocaine PPNB and placebo suppository (control) or 10 mL 1% lignocaine PPNB and 100 mg diclofenac suppository (treatment). Pain scores were recorded using the Numerical Rating Scale for pain (0-10) at the following time-points: (i) introduction of probe, (ii) during biopsy, (iii) 1 h after biopsy, (iv) later that evening (≈6 h after biopsy) and (v) 1 day after biopsy. Patients were asked about their preferred method for pain control if a repeat TRUS-guided prostate biopsy was required: local anaesthetic (LA) again or intravenous sedation. There were no significant differences in age (P = 0.653) or PSA level (P = 0.584) between either study arm. The differences in pain scores between the control and treatment groups were not significant at Time 1 (probe insertion; P = 0.299), Time 2 (biopsy; P = 0.983), Time 4 (evening after; P = 0.231) and Time 5 (1 day after biopsy; P = 0.384). At Time 3 (1 h after biopsy), the control pain scale scores were statistically significantly higher than the treatment pain scale scores (P = 0.044). There was no difference between treatment (87%) and control (80%) groups as to whether they would prefer to repeat the biopsy under LA (P = 0.373). The use of a diclofenac suppository with PPNB did not show any clinically meaningful effect in decreasing pain or improving tolerability of TRUS-guided prostate biopsy and is not recommended. PPNB TRUS-guided biopsy is extremely well tolerated, with >80% of patients electing for subsequent LA biopsy if required. © 2014 The Authors. BJU International © 2014 BJU

  1. Prostatic biopsy in the prostate specific antigen gray zone; La biopsia prostatica multipla nalla zona grigia dei valori dell'antigene prostatico specifico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drudi, F. M.; Ricci, P.; Iannicelli, E.; Di Nardo, R.; Novelli, L.; Laghi, A.; Passariello, R. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia II Cattedra; Perugia, G. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Urologia U. Bracci

    2000-02-01

    The main purpose of this study was to identify cases of undetected prostatic cancer in patients with normal findings at digital examination and transrectal US, and prostate specific antigen (PSA) values ranging 4-10 ng/mL. 290 patients were submitted to transrectal US and random bilateral prostatic biopsy; 3 samples were collected from each side of the gland using 16-Gauge thru-cut needles. Of the 290 patients who gave full informed consent, 34 people were selected whose age range was between 56 to 76 years (mean: 64). Inclusion criteria were PSA 4-10 ng/mL, PSAD cut-off 0.15, free/total PSA ratio 15-25%, and normal findings at digital examination and transrectal US. PSA velocity was calculated collecting 3 blood samples every 30 days for 2 months. 5 of the 34 selected patients (15%) had prostatic cancer, and 2 (6%) Pin (1 Pin 1 and 1 Pin 2). As for the other 27 patients, biopsy demonstrated 4 (12%) cases of prostatitis and 23 (62%) cases of BPH. PSA values increased in all patients with positive histology, versus only 6 (22%) of those with negative histology. Our findings confirm that prostatic biopsy can detect tumors also in areas which appear normal at transrectal US and digital examination, and that PSA rate increases in patients with positive histology. Finally, the actual clinical role of prostatic biopsy relative to all other diagnostic imaging techniques remains to be defined. [Italian] Si intende qui dimostrare la percentuale di neoplasie prostatiche sfuggite all'esplorazione rettale e all'ecografia transrettale nei pazienti convalori di antigene prostatico specifico tra 4 e 10 ng/ml. 290 pazienti sono stati sottoposti a ecografia transrettale e biopsia multipla (6 prelievi, ago da 16 Gauge) dopo consenso informato. Di questi sono stati selezionati 34: eta' tra 56 e 76 anni, eta' media 64 anni. Parametri di selezione: antigene prostatico specifico con valori tra 4 e 10ng/ml; densita' dell'antigene prostatico specifico con

  2. Transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided pelvic plexus block to reduce pain during prostate biopsy: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Tarun; Mukherjee, Subhabrata; Sinha, Rajan K; Kamal, Mir R; Ghosh, Nabankur; Saha, Barun; Mitra, Nilanjan; Sharma, Pramod K; Mandal, Soumendra N; Karmakar, Dilip

    2015-06-01

    To assess the role of pelvic plexus block (PPB) in reducing pain during transrectal ultrasonography(TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy, compared with the conventional periprostatic nerve block (PNB). A prospective, double-blind observational study was conducted with patients being randomised into three groups. Group-1 (47 patients) received intrarectal local anaesthesia (IRLA) with 10 mL 2% lignocaine jelly along with pelvic plexus block (PPB) with 2.5 mL 2% lignocaine injection bilaterally. Group-2 (46 patients) received IRLA with periprostatic nerve block (PNB). Group-3 (46 patients) received only IRLA without any type of nerve block. The patients were requested to rate the level of pain from 0 to 10 on a visual analogue scale (VAS) at two time points: VAS-1: during biopsy procedure and VAS-2: 30 min after the procedure. The mean age of the patients, mean volume of the prostates and mean serum PSA values were comparable among the three groups. The mean pain score during biopsy was significantly less in the PPB group [mean (range) sore of 2.91 (2-4)] compared with the PNB group [mean (range) score of 4 (3-5)], and both these groups were superior to the no nerve block group [mean score of 5.4 (3-7)]. There was no significant difference between the mean pain scores, 30 min after the procedure among the three groups with the mean (range) scores being 2.75 (2-4), 2.83 (2-4) and 2.85 (2-4), respectively. PPB is superior to conventional periprostatic nerve block (PNB) for pain control during TRUS-guided biopsy and both are in turn superior to no nerve block. © 2014 The Authors. BJU International © 2014 BJU International.

  3. A boosted Bayesian multiresolution classifier for prostate cancer detection from digitized needle biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Scott; Feldman, Michael; Tomaszewski, John; Madabhushi, Anant

    2012-05-01

    Diagnosis of prostate cancer (CaP) currently involves examining tissue samples for CaP presence and extent via a microscope, a time-consuming and subjective process. With the advent of digital pathology, computer-aided algorithms can now be applied to disease detection on digitized glass slides. The size of these digitized histology images (hundreds of millions of pixels) presents a formidable challenge for any computerized image analysis program. In this paper, we present a boosted Bayesian multiresolution (BBMR) system to identify regions of CaP on digital biopsy slides. Such a system would serve as an important preceding step to a Gleason grading algorithm, where the objective would be to score the invasiveness and severity of the disease. In the first step, our algorithm decomposes the whole-slide image into an image pyramid comprising multiple resolution levels. Regions identified as cancer via a Bayesian classifier at lower resolution levels are subsequently examined in greater detail at higher resolution levels, thereby allowing for rapid and efficient analysis of large images. At each resolution level, ten image features are chosen from a pool of over 900 first-order statistical, second-order co-occurrence, and Gabor filter features using an AdaBoost ensemble method. The BBMR scheme, operating on 100 images obtained from 58 patients, yielded: 1) areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.84, 0.83, and 0.76, respectively, at the lowest, intermediate, and highest resolution levels and 2) an eightfold savings in terms of computational time compared to running the algorithm directly at full (highest) resolution. The BBMR model outperformed (in terms of AUC): 1) individual features (no ensemble) and 2) a random forest classifier ensemble obtained by bagging multiple decision tree classifiers. The apparent drop-off in AUC at higher image resolutions is due to lack of fine detail in the expert annotation of CaP and is not an artifact of the

  4. Application of transrectal ultrasound-guided repeat needle biopsy in the diagnosis of prostate cancer in Chinese population: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transrectal ultrasound-guided repeat needle biopsy (TUGRNB is widely used for diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa. However, significance of TUGRNB in Chinese population was rarely reported. A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the significance of TUGRNB applied in prediction of PCa in Chinese population. Materials and Methods: A total of 960 from January 2009 to December 2012 were included. Repeat needle biopsy rate and PCa positive detection rate were evaluated. Relationship between prostate specific antigen (PSA levels and PCa positive rates was analyzed. Results: PCa positive detection rate after initial needle biopsy was 28.4%, which was lower than the rate of repeat needle biopsy (40%. The rate for immediate transurethral resection (TUR, surgery after initial needle biopsy, was 27.1%, however with a low PCa positive detection rate (0.66%. The repeat needle biopsy rate was lower compared with the initial biopsy rate (P 20 ng/ml, PCa positive rate was significantly higher than those with PSA < 20 ng/ml (P < 0.05. Conclusion: PCa positive detection rate following repeat needle biopsy in Chinese population was higher, although the repeated needle biopsy rate was still in a low level. TUGRNB should attract more attention in the diagnosis of PCa.

  5. Assessment of Prospectively Assigned Likert Scores for Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Transrectal Ultrasound Fusion Biopsies in Patients with Suspected Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Daniel N; Lotan, Yair; Rofsky, Neil M; Roehrborn, Claus; Liu, Alexander; Hornberger, Brad; Xi, Yin; Francis, Franto; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We assess the performance of prospectively assigned magnetic resonance imaging based Likert scale scores for the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer, and analyze the pre-biopsy imaging variables associated with increased cancer detection using targeted magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion biopsy. In this retrospective review of prospectively generated data including men with abnormal multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (at least 1 Likert score 3 or greater lesion) who underwent subsequent targeted magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion biopsy, we determined the association between different imaging variables (Likert score, lesion size, lesion location, prostate volume, radiologist experience) and targeted biopsy positivity rate. We also compared the detection of clinically significant cancer according to Likert scale scores. Tumors with high volume (50% or more of any core) Gleason score 3+4 or any tumor with greater Gleason score were considered clinically significant. Each lesion served as the elementary unit for analysis. We used logistic regression for univariate and multivariate (stepwise selection) analysis to assess for an association between targeted biopsy positivity rate and each tested variable. The relationship between Likert scale and Gleason score was evaluated using the Spearman correlation coefficient. A total of 161 men with 244 lesions met the study eligibility criteria. Targeted biopsies diagnosed cancer in 41% (66 of 161) of the men and 41% (99 of 244) of the lesions. The Likert score was the strongest predictor of targeted biopsy positivity (OR 3.7, p Likert score, lesion size and prostate volume were significant predictors of targeted biopsy positivity. Higher Likert scores were also associated with increased detection of clinically significant tumors (p Likert scale score used to convey the degree of suspicion on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging is the strongest

  6. Where Do TRUS- and MRI Guided Biopsies Miss Significant Prostate Cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Nørgaard, Nis; Løgager, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the location of missed sPCa lesions by transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUSbx) and multiparametric MRI-guided biopsies (mpMRIbx) in men undergoing repeat biopsies. METHODS: 289 men with prior negative TRUSbx underwent mpMRI. The location of any suspicious lesion was registered...... and scored using PIRADS v1 classification according to the likelihood of being sPCa. All patients underwent repeat (re-)TRUSbx and targeted mpMRIbx (image fusion) of any suspicious lesion. Biopsy results were compared and the location of missed sPCa lesions were registered. Cancer significance was defined as...... techniques in men undergoing repeat biopsies....

  7. Combined application of information theory on laboratory results with classification and regression tree analysis: analysis of unnecessary biopsy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Pyo, Tina; Oh, Heung-Bum; Park, Hyun Jun; Lee, Kwan-Jeh

    2013-01-16

    The probability of a prostate cancer-positive biopsy result varies with PSA concentration. Thus, we applied information theory on classification and regression tree (CART) analysis for decision making predicting the probability of a biopsy result at various PSA concentrations. From 2007 to 2009, prostate biopsies were performed in 664 referred patients in a tertiary hospital. We created 2 CART models based on the information theory: one for moderate uncertainty (PSA concentration: 2.5-10 ng/ml) and the other for high uncertainty (PSA concentration: 10-25 ng/ml). The CART model for moderate uncertainty (n=321) had 3 splits based on PSA density (PSAD), hypoechoic nodules, and age and the other CART for high uncertainty (n=160) had 2 splits based on prostate volume and percent-free PSA. In this validation set, the patients (14.3% and 14.0% for moderate and high uncertainty groups, respectively) could avoid unnecessary biopsies without false-negative results. Using these CART models based on uncertainty information of PSA, the overall reduction in unnecessary prostate biopsies was 14.0-14.3% and CART models were simplified. Using uncertainty of laboratory results from information theoretic approach can provide additional information for decision analysis such as CART. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of pathological data between prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimen in patients with low to very low risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendínez-Cano, G; Alonso-Flores, J; Beltrán-Aguilar, V; Cayuela, A; Salazar-Otero, S; Bachiller-Burgos, J

    2015-10-01

    To analyze the correlation between pathological data found in radical prostatectomy and previously performed biopsy in patients at low risk prostate cancer. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the characteristics of radical prostatectomies performed in our center from January 2012 to November 2014. The inclusion criteria were patients with low-risk disease (cT1c-T2a, PSA≤10ng/mL and Gleason score≤6). We excluded patients who had fewer than 8 cores in the biopsy, an unspecified number of affected cores, rectal examinations not reported in the medical history or biopsies performed in another center. Of the 184 patients who underwent prostatectomy during this period, 87 met the inclusion criteria, and 26 of these had<3 affected cores and PSA density≤.15 (very low risk). In the entire sample, the percentage of undergrading (Gleason score≥7) and extracapsular invasion (pT3) was 18.4% (95% CI 10.3-27.6) and 10.35% (95% CI 4.6-17.2), respectively. The percentage of positive margins was 21.8% (95% CI 12.6-29.9). In the very low-risk group, we found no cases of extracapsular invasion and only 1 case of undergrading (Gleason 7 [3+4]), representing 3.8% of the total (95% CI 0-12.5). Predictors of no correlation (stage≥pT3a or undergrading) were the initial risk group, volume, PSA density and affected cores. Prostate volume, PSA density, the number of affected cores and the patient's initial risk group influence the poor pathological prognosis in the radical prostatectomy specimen (extracapsular invasion and Gleason score≥7). Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. A novel technique using three-dimensionally documented biopsy mapping allows precise re-visiting of prostate cancer foci with serial surveillance of cell cycle progression gene panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukimura, Osamu; Gross, Mitchell E; de Castro Abreu, Andre Luis; Azhar, Raed A; Matsugasumi, Toru; Ushijima, So; Kanazawa, Motohiro; Aron, Manju; Gill, Inderbir S

    2015-06-01

    Conventional systematic biopsy has the shortcoming of sampling error and reveals "no evidence of cancer" with a rate of >50% on active surveillance (AS). The objective of this study is to report our initial experience of applying a 3D-documented biopsy-mapping technology to precisely re-visit geographically documented low-risk prostate cancer and to perform serial analysis of cell-cycle-progression (CCP) gene-panel. Over a period of 40 months (1/2010-4/2013), the 3D-biopsy-mapping technique, in which the spatial location of biopsy-trajectory was digitally recorded (Koelis), was carried out. A pair of diagnostic (1st-look) and surveillance (2nd-look) biopsy were performed per subject (n = 25), with median interval of 12 months. The documented biopsy-trajectory was used as a target to guide the re-visiting biopsy from the documented cancer focus, as well as the targeted field-biopsy from the un-sampled prostatic field adjacent to negative diagnostic biopsies. The accuracy of re-visiting biopsy and biopsy-derived CCP signatures were evaluated in the pair of the serial biopsy-cores. The 1st-look-biopsy revealed a total of 43 cancer lesions (1.7 per patient). The accuracy of re-visiting cancer was 86% (37/43) per lesion, 76% (65/86) per core, and 80% (20/25) per patient. This technology also provided an opportunity for 3D-targeted field-biopsy in order to potentially minimize sampling errors. The CCP gene-panel of the 1st-look (-0.59) versus 2nd-look (-0.37) samples had no significant difference (P = 0.4); which suggested consistency in the molecular signature of the known cancer foci during the short-time interval of median 12 months. Any change in CCP of the same cancer foci would be likely due to change in sampling location from the less to more significant portion in the cancer foci rather than true molecular progression. The study limitations include a small number of the patients. The 3D-documented biopsy-mapping technology achieved an encouraging re

  10. Droplet Digital PCR Based Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7 Detection from Prostate Cancer Patient Blood Biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafeng Ma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor splice variant V7 (AR-V7 was recently identified as a valuable predictive biomarker in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Here, we report a new, sensitive and accurate screen for AR-V7 mRNA expression directly from circulating tumor cells (CTCs: We combined EpCAM-based immunomagnetic CTC isolation using the IsoFlux microfluidic platform with droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR to analyze total AR and AR-V7 expression from prostate cancer patients CTCs. We demonstrate that AR-V7 is reliably detectable in enriched CTC samples with as little as five CTCs, even considering tumor heterogeneity, and confirm detection of AR-V7 in CTC samples from advanced prostate cancer (PCa patients with AR-V7 detection limited to castrate resistant disease status in our sample set. Sensitive molecular analyses of circulating tumor cells (CTCs or circulating tumor nucleic acids present exciting strategies to detect biomarkers, such as AR-V7 from non-invasive blood samples, so-called blood biopsies.

  11. 3D non-rigid registration using surface and local salient features for transrectal ultrasound image-guided prostate biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Akbari, Hamed; Halig, Luma; Fei, Baowei

    2011-03-01

    We present a 3D non-rigid registration algorithm for the potential use in combining PET/CT and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images for targeted prostate biopsy. Our registration is a hybrid approach that simultaneously optimizes the similarities from point-based registration and volume matching methods. The 3D registration is obtained by minimizing the distances of corresponding points at the surface and within the prostate and by maximizing the overlap ratio of the bladder neck on both images. The hybrid approach not only capture deformation at the prostate surface and internal landmarks but also the deformation at the bladder neck regions. The registration uses a soft assignment and deterministic annealing process. The correspondences are iteratively established in a fuzzy-to-deterministic approach. B-splines are used to generate a smooth non-rigid spatial transformation. In this study, we tested our registration with pre- and postbiopsy TRUS images of the same patients. Registration accuracy is evaluated using manual defined anatomic landmarks, i.e. calcification. The root-mean-squared (RMS) of the difference image between the reference and floating images was decreased by 62.6+/-9.1% after registration. The mean target registration error (TRE) was 0.88+/-0.16 mm, i.e. less than 3 voxels with a voxel size of 0.38×0.38×0.38 mm3 for all five patients. The experimental results demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of the 3D non-rigid registration algorithm.

  12. The role of imaging based prostate biopsy morphology in a data fusion paradigm for transducing prognostic predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Faisal M.; Kulikowski, Casimir A.

    2016-03-01

    A major focus area for precision medicine is in managing the treatment of newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients. For patients with a positive biopsy, clinicians aim to develop an individualized treatment plan based on a mechanistic understanding of the disease factors unique to each patient. Recently, there has been a movement towards a multi-modal view of the cancer through the fusion of quantitative information from multiple sources, imaging and otherwise. Simultaneously, there have been significant advances in machine learning methods for medical prognostics which integrate a multitude of predictive factors to develop an individualized risk assessment and prognosis for patients. An emerging area of research is in semi-supervised approaches which transduce the appropriate survival time for censored patients. In this work, we apply a novel semi-supervised approach for support vector regression to predict the prognosis for newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients. We integrate clinical characteristics of a patient's disease with imaging derived metrics for biomarker expression as well as glandular and nuclear morphology. In particular, our goal was to explore the performance of nuclear and glandular architecture within the transduction algorithm and assess their predictive power when compared with the Gleason score manually assigned by a pathologist. Our analysis in a multi-institutional cohort of 1027 patients indicates that not only do glandular and morphometric characteristics improve the predictive power of the semi-supervised transduction algorithm; they perform better when the pathological Gleason is absent. This work represents one of the first assessments of quantitative prostate biopsy architecture versus the Gleason grade in the context of a data fusion paradigm which leverages a semi-supervised approach for risk prognosis.

  13. Tolerance of local anesthetic for transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy: our experience and a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, M.R.E.; Bryant, N.J.; Brown, J.A.; Tiwari, P.; Cooperberg, P.L.; Wong, A.D. [St Paul' s Hospital, Ultrasound Dept., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: twong@providcencehealth.bc.ca

    2006-06-15

    To determine whether local anesthetic injection or gel reduced pain during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies and whether there was significant difference between quadrant and apex-only anesthesia. Between September 2001 and May 2002, 240 male patients with elevated prostate-specific antigen and (or) abnormal digital rectal examination were randomized into 1 of 4 groups: 1) transrectal lidocaine gel, 2) quadrant lidocaine injections, 3) apex-only lidocaine injections, or 4) no local anesthetic. Patients scored their pain on a numerical rating scale where 0 indicated no pain and 10 indicated worst pain. We analyzed mean and standard deviations of scores, using a 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc multiple comparisons with Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) studentized range test to determine whether there were significant differences across the groups. There was no significant difference between local anesthetic gel (mean 3.1, SD 1.9) and no anesthetic (mean 3.5, SD 1.9) or between quadrant (mean 1.7, SD 1.7) and apex-only (mean 2.0, SD 1.8) local anesthetic injections. There was significant difference between quadrant injections (mean 1.7, SD 1.7) and no local anesthetic (mean 3.5, SD 1.9) and between apex-only injections (mean 2.0, SD 1.8) and no local anesthetic (mean 3.5, SD 1.9). There was significant pain reduction with local anesthetic injections but not with gel, and since there was no significant difference in efficacy between quadrant and apex-only injections, we recommend apex-only local anesthetic injections for transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies because it simplifies the injection procedure. (author)

  14. Real-time registration of 3D to 2D ultrasound images for image-guided prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Derek J; Gardi, Lori; De Silva, Tharindu; Zhao, Shuang-Ren; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-09-01

    During image-guided prostate biopsy, needles are targeted at tissues that are suspicious of cancer to obtain specimen for histological examination. Unfortunately, patient motion causes targeting errors when using an MR-transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) fusion approach to augment the conventional biopsy procedure. This study aims to develop an automatic motion correction algorithm approaching the frame rate of an ultrasound system to be used in fusion-based prostate biopsy systems. Two modes of operation have been investigated for the clinical implementation of the algorithm: motion compensation using a single user initiated correction performed prior to biopsy, and real-time continuous motion compensation performed automatically as a background process. Retrospective 2D and 3D TRUS patient images acquired prior to biopsy gun firing were registered using an intensity-based algorithm utilizing normalized cross-correlation and Powell's method for optimization. 2D and 3D images were downsampled and cropped to estimate the optimal amount of image information that would perform registrations quickly and accurately. The optimal search order during optimization was also analyzed to avoid local optima in the search space. Error in the algorithm was computed using target registration errors (TREs) from manually identified homologous fiducials in a clinical patient dataset. The algorithm was evaluated for real-time performance using the two different modes of clinical implementations by way of user initiated and continuous motion compensation methods on a tissue mimicking prostate phantom. After implementation in a TRUS-guided system with an image downsampling factor of 4, the proposed approach resulted in a mean ± std TRE and computation time of 1.6 ± 0.6 mm and 57 ± 20 ms respectively. The user initiated mode performed registrations with in-plane, out-of-plane, and roll motions computation times of 108 ± 38 ms, 60 ± 23 ms, and 89 ± 27 ms, respectively, and corresponding

  15. The value of touch imprint cytology of prostate core needle biopsy specimens – Kuwait experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hussein

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The routine use of TIC complements CNB reports and helps to provide an immediate and reliable cytological diagnosis of prostate lesions. TIC and serial sectioning of CNB specimens significantly improve the diagnostic accuracy.

  16. The influence of family ties on men's prostate cancer screening, biopsy, and treatment decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Eric K; Scott, John G; Ferrante, Jeanne M

    2013-11-01

    Extensive research has focused on understanding family dynamics of men with prostate cancer. However, little qualitative work has examined the role of family ties on men's prostate cancer decisions across the spectrum of screening, diagnosis, and treatment. Using data from a larger study, we qualitatively explored the influence of family ties on men's prostate cancer decisions. Semistructured interviews were conducted with men ages ≥50 (N = 64), and data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach and a series of immersion/crystallization cycles. Three major themes of spousal/family member influence were identified: (a) spousal/family member alliance marked by open communication and shared decision making, (b) men who actively opposed spouse/family member pressure and made final decisions themselves, and (c) men who yielded to spouse/family member pressure. Our findings provide insights into men's relational dynamics that are important to consider for the shared decision-making process across the prostate cancer spectrum.

  17. A novel equation and nomogram including body weight for estimating prostate volumes in men with biopsy-proven benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasukazu Nakanishi; Iwao Fukui; Kazunori Kihara; Hitoshi Masuda; Satoru Kawakami; Mizuaki Sakura; Yasuhisa Fujii; Kazutaka Saito; Fumitaka Koga; Masaya Ito; Junji Yonese

    2012-01-01

    Anthropometric measurements,e.g.,body weight (BW),body mass index (BMI),as well as serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and percent-free PSA (%fPSA) have been shown to have positive correlations with total prostate volume (TPV).We developed an equation and nomegram for estimating TPV,incorporating these predictors in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).A total of 1852 men,including 1113 at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) Hospital as a training set and 739 at Cancer Institute Hospital (CIH) as a validation set,with PSA levels of up to 20 ng ml-1,who underwent extended prostate biopsy and were proved to have BPH,were enrolled in this study.We developed an equation for continuously coded TPV and a logistic regression-based nomngram for estimating a TPV greater than 40 ml.Predictive accuracy and performance characteristics were assessed using an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) and calibration plots.The final linear regression model indicated age,PSA,%fPSA and BW as independent predictors of continuously coded TPV.For predictions in the training set,the multiple correlation coefficient was increased from 0.38 for PSA alone to 0.60 in the final model.We developed a novel nomogram incorporating age,PSA,%fPSA and BW for estimating TPV greater than 40 ml.External validation confirmed its predictive accuracy,with AUC value of 0.764.Calibration plots showed good agreement between predicted probability and observed proportion.In conclusion,TPV can be easily estimated using these four independent predictors.

  18. The optimal timing of post-prostate biopsy magnetic resonance imaging to guide nerve-sparing surgery

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    Young Hwii Ko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of our study was to evaluate the impact of the interval between prostate biopsy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI on the accuracy of simple tumor localization, which is essential information that enables nerve-sparing surgery. We also sought to determine the optimal timing of a post-biopsy MRI. A total of 184 patients who had undergone MRI before radical prostatectomy at an institution without a predetermined schedule for MRI after a prostate biopsy were enrolled. The mean interval from the biopsy to the MRI was 30.8 ± 18.6 days. The accuracy of the MRI for simplifi ed tumor location (right, left, bilateral and none was 44.6%. In the group with discordant pathologic and MRI fi ndings, the most common reason recorded was 'MRI predicted a unilateral lesion, but pathology revealed bilateral lesions' (58.3%, followed by 'MRI predicted no lesion, but pathology revealed the presence of a lesion' (32.0%. Multivariable analysis showed that the discordant group had a shorter interval (25.0 ± 14.3 vs 38.1 ± 20.6 days, P < 0.01 preceding the MRI and a higher rate of hemorrhage as observed by MRI (80.4% vs 54.8%, P < 0.01 in comparison with the accordant group. In receiver operating characteristics analysis, the area under the curve of the MRI interval in accurate prediction of the tumor location was 0.707 (P < 0.001. At the MRI interval's cutoff of 28.5 days, the sensitivity was 73.2% and the specificity was 63.7%. When the MRI was performed within 28 days, the accumulated accuracy was only 26.1% (23/88; however, when it was performed after 28 days, the reversely accumulated accuracy was 61.5% (59/96. These data support a waiting period of at least 4 weeks after a biopsy before performing an MRI for the purposes of surgical refinement.

  19. Rotational-slice-Based prostate segmentation using level set with shape constraint for 3D end-firing TRUS guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Ukwatta, Eranga; Tessier, David; Fenster, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Prostate segmentation in 3D ultrasound images is an important step in the planning and treatment of 3D end-firing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy. A semi-automatic prostate segmentation method is presented in this paper, which integrates a modified distance regularization level set formulation with shape constraint to a rotational-slice-based 3D prostate segmentation method. Its performance, using different metrics, has been evaluated on a set of twenty 3D patient prostate images by comparison with expert delineations. The volume overlap ratio of 93.39 +/- 1.26% and the mean absolute surface distance of 1.16 +/- 0.34 mm were found in the quantitative validation result.

  20. 影响二次经直肠前列腺穿刺活检阳性率的因素分析%To investigate the factors on affectting the positive prostate cancer in the secondary transrectal prostate biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾健文; 蒋重和; 莫鉴锋; 周理林; 潘楚灶; 贺沂; 邵琳

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To Explore postive factors on suspicous prostate cancer in the secondary transrectal prostate biopsy.Methods From January 2008-February 2014,55 cases in our hospital had been recevied transrectal secondary prostate biopsy,retrospectively.According to the results of biopsy,the patients were divided into control groups and prostate cancer group.Differences between prostate-specific antigen(PSA) parameters and pathological findings were compared during the first puncture and to analyze the influenced factors in the second biopsy.Results There was significant difference in Family history of prostate cancer,prostate-specific antigen velocity (PSAV),prostate specific antigen density (PSAD),HGPIN,ASAP,chronic prostatitis between two groups (P < 0.05).Family history,PSAV,PSAD,HGPIN,ASAP were risk factorsn in secondary needle prostate biopsy.Results There was significant difference in Family history of prostate cancer,prostate-specific antigen velocity (PSAV),prostate specific antigen density(PSAD),HGPIN,ASAP,chronic prostatitis between two groups(P < 0.05).Family history,PSAV,PSAD,HGPIN,ASAP were risk factorsn in secondary needle prostate biopsy.Conclusions To avoid misdiagnosis and unnecessary repeat biopies,combined with the patient's family history,the first biopsy pathology results (HGPIN,ASAP) and PSAV,PSAD parameters can improve the positive rate of secondary prostate biopsy.%目的 探讨在二次经直肠前列腺穿刺活检中影响阳性率的因素.方法 回顾性分析2008年1月~2014年2月本院55例首次经直肠前列腺穿刺活检阴性并行二次经直肠前列腺穿刺活检的患者临床资料,依第二次穿刺活检结果分为前列腺癌组与非前列腺癌组.比较两组前列腺特异性抗原(PSA)相关参数及首次穿刺时病理结果的差异,并分析影响第二次穿刺活检阳性率的相关因素.结果 前列腺癌组家族史、前列腺特异性抗原速率(PSAV)、前列腺特异性抗原密度(PSAD)水平

  1. Can perineural invasion detected in prostate needle biopsy specimens predict surgical margin positivity in D’Amico low risk patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Haki Yuksel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study, our aim was to estimate the value of perineural invasion (PNI in prostate needle biopsy (PNB specimens in the prediction of surgical margin positivity (SMP and its prognostic significance (upgrade Gleason Score in patients who had undergone radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP with low risk prostate cancer according to D’Amico risk assessment. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data of 65 patients who were diagnosed as clinical stage T1c prostate cancer (PC and underwent RRP between January 2010 and June 2013. Pathological specimens of PNB and RRP were separately examined for the parameters of PNI, vascular invasion (VI, Gleason Score (GS and SMP. Results: The patients’ mean age was 63.65 ± 4.93 (range 47- 75 years. PNI in PNB specimens were identified in 12 of 65 patients and 11 of 12 patients showed SMP on RRP specimens. While 53 of 65 patients had not PNI on PNB, only 11 of them demonstrated SMP on RRP specimens. SMP was 30.64-fold more frequently encountered in PNB specimens obtained from PNI-positive patients relative to PNI-negative patients. In our study, PNI detected in PNB specimens was statistically significantly associated with SMP on RRP specimens (P = 0.0001. Conclusion: It is well known that higher PSA values and GS were independent predictors of SMP in clinically localized prostate cancer (CLPC. We think that PNI in PNB specimens may be a useful prognostic factor for predicting SMP in cases with CLPC.

  2. PSA levels of 4.0 - 10 ng/ml and negative digital rectal examination: antibiotic therapy versus immediate prostate biopsy

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    Avraham Shtricker

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The management of mildly elevated (4.0-10.0 ng/ml prostate specific antigen (PSA is uncertain. Immediate prostate biopsy, antibiotic treatment, or short term monitoring PSA level for 1-3 months is still in controversy. Material and Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients in a large community practice (2003 - 2007 who had PSA levels between 4.0-10 ng/mL without any further evidence of infection. Data was gathered regarding patient's age, whether standard antibiotic therapy (10-14 days of ofloxacin or ciprofloxacin had been administered before the second PSA measurement, results of a second PSA test performed at 1- to 2-month intervals, whether a prostate biopsy was performed and its result. Results: One-hundred and thirty-five men met the study inclusion criteria with 65 (48.1% having received antibiotics (group 1; the PSA levels decreased in 39 (60% of which, sixteen underwent a biopsy which demonstrated prostate cancer in 4 (25%. Twenty-six (40% patients of group 1 exhibited no decrease in PSA levels; seventeen of them underwent a biopsy that demonstrated cancer in 2 (12%. The other 70 (51.9% patients were not treated with antibiotics (group 2; the PSA levels decreased in 42 (60% of which, thirteen underwent a biopsy which demonstrated prostate cancer in 4 (31%. In the other 28 (40% patients of group 2 there was no demonstrated decrease in PSA, nineteen of these subjects underwent a biopsy that demonstrated cancer in 8 (42%. Conclusions: There appears to be no advantage for administration of antibacterial therapy with initial PSA levels between 4-10 ng/mL without overt evidence of inflammation.

  3. Pathologic correlation of transperineal in-bore 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging-guided prostate biopsy samples with radical prostatectomy specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Erik; Fedorov, Andriy; Tuncali, Kemal; Olubiyi, Olutayo; Allard, Christopher B; Kibel, Adam S; Tempany, Clare M

    2017-08-01

    To determine the accuracy of in-bore transperineal 3-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided prostate biopsies for predicting final Gleason grades in patients who subsequently underwent radical prostatectomy (RP). A retrospective review of men who underwent transperineal MR imaging-guided prostate biopsy (tpMRGB) with subsequent radical prostatectomy within 1 year was conducted from 2010 to 2015. All patients underwent a baseline 3-T multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) with endorectal coil and were selected for biopsy based on MR findings of a suspicious prostate lesion and high degree of clinical suspicion for cancer. Spearman correlation was performed to assess concordance between tpMRGB and final RP pathology among patients with and without previous transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsies. A total of 24 men met all eligibility requirements, with a median age of 65 years (interquartile range [IQR] 11.7). The median time from biopsy to RP was 85 days (IQR 50.5). Final pathology revealed Gleason 3 + 4 = 7 in 12 patients, 4 + 3 = 7 in 10 patients, and 4 + 4 = 8 in 2 patients. A strong correlation (ρ: +0.75, p < 0.001) between tpMRGB and RP results was observed, with Gleason scores concordant in 17 cases (71%). 16 of the 24 patients underwent prior TRUS biopsies. Subsequent tpMRGB revealed Gleason upgrading in 88% of cases, which was concordant with RP Gleason scores in 69% of cases (ρ: +0.75, p < 0.001). Final Gleason scores diagnosed by tpMRGB at 3-T correlate strongly with final RP surgical pathology. This may facilitate prostate cancer diagnosis, particularly in patients with negative or low-grade TRUS biopsy results in whom clinically significant cancer is suspected or detected on mpMRI.

  4. Thirty-two-channel coil 3T magnetic resonance-guided biopsies of prostate tumor suspicious regions identified on multimodality 3T magnetic resonance imaging: technique and feasibility.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hambrock, T.; Futterer, J.J.; Huisman, H.J.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Basten, JP van; Oort, I van; Witjes, J.A.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the technique and feasibility of translating tumor suspicious region maps in the prostate, obtained by multimodality, anatomic, and functional 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to 32-channel coil, T2-weighted (T2-w), 3T MR images, for directing MR-guided biopsies. Furtherm

  5. Likert score 3 prostate lesions: Association between whole-lesion ADC metrics and pathologic findings at MRI/ultrasound fusion targeted biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Meng, Xiaosong; Ream, Justin M; Babb, James S; Deng, Fang-Ming; Rusinek, Henry; Huang, William C; Lepor, Herbert; Taneja, Samir S

    2016-02-01

    To assess associations between whole-lesion apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) metrics and pathologic findings of Likert score 3 prostate lesions at MRI/ultrasound fusion targeted biopsy. This retrospective Institutional Review Board-approved study received a waiver of consent. We identified patients receiving a highest lesion score of 3 on 3 Tesla multiparametric MRI reviewed by a single experienced radiologist using a 5-point Likert scale and who underwent fusion biopsy. A total of 188 score 3 lesions in 158 patients were included. Three-dimensional volumes-of-interest encompassing each lesion were traced on ADC maps. Logistic regression was used to predict biopsy results based on whole-lesion ADC metrics and patient biopsy history. Biopsy yield was compared between metrics. By lesion, targeted biopsy identified tumor in 22.3% and Gleason score (GS) > 6 tumor in 8.5%, although results varied by biopsy history: biopsy-naïve (n = 80), 20.0%/8.8%; prior negative biopsy (n = 53), 9.4%/1.9%; prior positive biopsy (n = 55): 40.0%/14.5%. Biopsy history, whole-lesion mean ADC, whole-lesion ADC10-25 , and whole-lesion ADC25-50 were each significantly associated with tumor or GS > 6 tumor at fusion biopsy (P ≤ 0.047). In men without prior negative prostate biopsy, whole-lesion ADC25-50  ≤ 1.04*10(-3) mm2 /s achieved 90.0% sensitivity and 50.0% specificity for GS > 6 tumor, which was significantly higher (P  6 cancer while avoiding negative biopsies. However, deferral of fusion biopsy may be considered for score 3 lesions in patients with prior negative biopsy (without applying whole-lesion ADC metrics) given exceedingly low (∼ 2%) frequency of GS > 6 tumor in this group. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Case of septic shock caused by extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli after transrectal prostate biopsy, successfully treated by endotoxin adsorption therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Yusuke; Fukui, Naotaka; Kageyama, Yukio; Higashi, Yotsuo

    2013-09-01

    A 62-year-old man, with a family history of prostate cancer, referred to our hospital because of elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (6.02 ng/ml). After prophylactic administration of antibiotics (cefotiam), transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed. He was admitted to the hospital due to high fever the next evening. His blood pressure was below the shock level, and his renal function deteriorated progressively. Suspecting septic shock, the patient was treated with Meropenem, γ-globulin, and dopamine, which were not effective. Then, endotoxin adsorption therapy was employed and the condition of the patient recovered soon after the initiation of the therapy. Extended spectrum β -lactamase-producing Escherichia coli was found in his urine. Pathological diagnosis of the biopsy specimen was atypical glands.

  7. Prolonged antibiotic therapy increases risk of infection after transrectal prostate biopsy: A case report after pancreasectomy and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guevar Maselli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Infection due to prostate biopsy afflicted more than 5% of patients and is the most common reason for hospitalization. A large series from US SEER-Medicare reported that men undergoing biopsy were 2.26 times more likely to be hospitalized for infectious complications within 30 days compared with randomly selected controls. The factors predicting a higher susceptibility to infection remain largely unknown but some authors have higlighted in the etiopathogenesis the importance of the augmented prevalence of ciprofloxacin resistant variant of bacteria in the rectum flora. We present one case of sepsis after transrectal prostate biopsy in a patient with history of pancreatic surgery. Based on our experience patients candidated to prostate biopsy with transrectal technique with history of recent major surgery represent an high risk category for infective complication. Also major pancreatic surgery should be consider an high risk category for infection. A transperineal approach and preventive measures (such as rectal swab should be adopted to reduce biopsy driven infection.

  8. Impact of preoperative screening for rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric bacteria on the incidence of sepsis following transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, John J; Hicks, Jennifer L; Wallace, Stephanie E; Seftel, Allen D

    2017-01-01

    With the universal adoption of antibiotic prophylaxis prior to prostate biopsy, the current risk of post-biopsy infection (including sepsis) is study of preoperative rectal cultures to screen for rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria using ciprofloxacin-supplemented MacConkey agar culture media. To evaluate the feasibility and practicality of this test, one provider used the results of rectal swab cultures collected during the preoperative outpatient evaluation to adjust each patient’s preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis when fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric bacteria were detected, whereas two other providers continued usual preoperative care and empiric antimicrobial prophylaxis. Rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria was detected in 19/152 (12.5%) of patients. In our intention-to-treat analysis (N=268), the rate of post-biopsy sepsis was 3.6% lower in the group that was screened for rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria prior to transrectal prostate biopsy. The observed risk reduction in the rectal screening group trended toward, but did not achieve, statistical significance. We suggest that preoperative screening for rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric bacteria may be a useful step toward mitigating post-prostate biopsy sepsis. PMID:28280717

  9. Low Serum Testosterone But Not Obesity Predicts High Gleason Score at Biopsy Diagnosed as Prostate Cancer in Patients with Serum PSA Lower than 20 ng/ml.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Masaki; Takeuchi, Ario; Sugimoto, Masaaki; Dejima, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Kiyoshima, Keijiro; Inokuchi, Junichi; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Yokomizo, Akira

    2015-11-01

    The impact of testosterone or obesity on the pathological grade of prostate cancer remains controversial. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the relationship of serum testosterone and body mass index (BMI) to Gleason score at biopsy. This study included 128 Japanese patients diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2000 through 2012 whose serum testosterone level and BMI were measured before treatment. Associations between clinical parameters, including pre-treatment serum testosterone level and BMI, and Gleason score at biopsy were examined. The median serum testosterone and BMI were 434 ng/dl (interquartile range=362-542 ng/dl) and 23.5 kg/m(2) (interquartile range=21.7-25.4 kg/m(2)), respectively. Gleason score at biopsy was 7 for 58 patients (45.3%), 52 patients (40.6%) and 18 patients (14.1%), respectively. On univariate analysis, positive finding at digital rectal examination (DRE), high prostate-specific antigen level at diagnosis and low serum testosterone level, but not BMI, were correlated with high Gleason score at biopsy. Multivariate analysis identified positive finding at DRE and low serum testosterone level as significant predictors of a high Gleason score at prostate biopsy. By combining these parameters, the predictive ability of a high Gleason score was improved. This study showed that positive finding at DRE and a low pre-treatment serum testosterone level, but not obesity, may be factors predictive of aggressive prostate cancer, indicating the diagnostic value of serum testosterone, as well as DRE findings, in risk assessment. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Prostate Cancer Screening: the role of biopsy, PSA, PSA dynamics and isoforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.F.J. Raaijmakers (René)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn the beginning of the past century, A. Astraldi urologist from Buenos Aires, Argentina, recognized the importance of early detection of prostate cancer and was unsatisfied with the available diagnostic tools he had to his disposal. The only diagnostic means for the urologist at that ti

  11. Transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy in Taiwan: A nationwide database study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Chun Wei

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: The most frequent complication was postbiopsy voiding difficulty, followed by infection that required treatment and significant bleeding. The sepsis-related mortality rate was 0.13%. Significant risk factors for postbiopsy complications included age, diagnosis of prostate cancer, hospitalization, and the CCI value.

  12. Prostate Cancer Screening: the role of biopsy, PSA, PSA dynamics and isoforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.F.J. Raaijmakers (René)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn the beginning of the past century, A. Astraldi urologist from Buenos Aires, Argentina, recognized the importance of early detection of prostate cancer and was unsatisfied with the available diagnostic tools he had to his disposal. The only diagnostic means for the urologist at that ti

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Peter R., E-mail: pmarti46@uwo.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Cool, Derek W. [Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada and Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Romagnoli, Cesare [Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Fenster, Aaron [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Ward, Aaron D. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided “fusion” prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. Methods: T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Results: Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm{sup 3} or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each

  14. Routine dual-color immunostaining with a 3-antibody cocktail improves the detection of small cancers in prostate needle biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Teemu T; Kujala, Paula M; Laurila, Marita; Tirkkonen, Mika; Ilvesaro, Joanna; Tuominen, Vilppu J; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Isola, Jorma

    2011-11-01

    We performed dual-color immunostaining with a 3-antibody cocktail (α-methylacyl coenzyme-A racemase, CK34betaE12, and p63) on prostate biopsies from 200 patients. Current practice (hematoxylin and eosin staining followed by dual-color immunostaining on selected cases) was compared with a protocol in which routine dual-color immunostaining was provided in all cases. In the original pathology reports, adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in 87/200 (43%) patients. Small foci interpreted as putative cancers were detected with dual-color immunostaining in 14/113 patients who were originally diagnosed with a nonmalignant lesion. All of the suggested cancerous foci were independently reevaluated by 5 pathologists. A diagnosis of adenocarcinoma was assessed by consensus in 8 cases, and atypical small acinar proliferation was diagnosed in 1 case. Consensus was not reached in 5 cases. Six of the foci reclassified as cancer were of Gleason score 3 + 3 = 6, while 2 were graded as Gleason score 4 + 4 = 8. The feasibility of routine dual-color immunostaining was also tested by analyzing the time spent on microscopic assessment. Because small, atypical lesions expressing α-methylacyl coenzyme-A racemase (blue chromogen) were easy to detect using dual-color immunostaining, the microscopic analysis of dual-color immunostaining and hematoxylin-eosin staining was faster than that of hematoxylin-eosin staining alone that was later followed by dual-color immunostaining in selected cases (median 251 seconds versus 299 seconds, P < .0001). We concluded that routine dual-color immunostaining of all prostate biopsies would produce better diagnostic sensitivity with a smaller microscopy workload for the pathologist. However, minute foci interpreted as cancer with dual-color immunostaining need to be confirmed with hematoxylin-eosin staining, and minimal criteria for a definitive diagnosis of cancer are still lacking. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prostate needle biopsies: interobserver variation and clinical consequences of histopathological re-evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Toft, Birgitte Grønkaer; Røder, Martin Andreas;

    2011-01-01

    pathology reports and with histopathology of the radical prostatectomy specimen. The consequences of re-evaluation for clinical workup and treatment of patients according to local algorithms were determined. For Gleason score (GS), complete agreement between primary report and re-evaluation was found in 76......-evaluations in 19.7% and 13.1% of patients, respectively. Gleason scoring based on the radical prostatectomy specimen was higher than in both primary reports and re-evaluation of biopsies. Although a relatively high degree of concordance was found between biopsy assessments, the significant trend towards higher...... Gleason scoring at re-evaluation, leading to frequent changes in clinical assessments and surgical strategy, justifies re-evaluation of PCa biopsies in patients with primary GS ≤ 6....

  16. Prostate needle biopsies: interobserver variation and clinical consequences of histopathological re-evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Toft, Birgitte Grønkaer; Brasso, Klaus;

    2011-01-01

    pathology reports and with histopathology of the radical prostatectomy specimen. The consequences of re-evaluation for clinical workup and treatment of patients according to local algorithms were determined. For Gleason score (GS), complete agreement between primary report and re-evaluation was found in 76......-evaluations in 19.7% and 13.1% of patients, respectively. Gleason scoring based on the radical prostatectomy specimen was higher than in both primary reports and re-evaluation of biopsies. Although a relatively high degree of concordance was found between biopsy assessments, the significant trend towards higher...... Gleason scoring at re-evaluation, leading to frequent changes in clinical assessments and surgical strategy, justifies re-evaluation of PCa biopsies in patients with primary GS = 6....

  17. Development and preliminary evaluation of a motorized needle guide template for MRI-guided targeted prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang-Eun; Tokuda, Junichi; Tuncali, Kemal; Tempany, Clare M; Zhang, Elizabeth; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2013-11-01

    To overcome the problems of limited needle insertion accuracy and human error in the use of a conventional needle guide template in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided prostate intervention, we developed a motorized MRI-compatible needle guide template that resembles a transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate template. The motorized template allows automated, gapless needle guidance in a 3T MRI scanner with minimal changes in the current clinical procedure. To evaluate the impact of the motorized template on MRI, signal-to-noise ratio and distortion were measured under various system configurations. A maximum of 44% signal-to-noise ratio decrease was found when the ultrasonic motors were running, and a maximum of 0.4% image distortion was observed due to the presence of the motorized template. To measure needle insertion accuracy, we performed four sets of five random target needle insertions mimicking four biopsy procedures, which resulted in an average in-plane targeting error of 0.94 mm with a standard deviation of 0.34 mm. The evaluation studies indicated that the presence and operation of the motorized template in the MRI bore create insignificant image degradation, and provide submillimeter targeting accuracy. The automated needle guide that is directly controlled by navigation software eliminates human error so that the safety of the procedure can be improved.

  18. Laparoscopic Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy for Prostate Cancer: The Relevance of Locations Outside the Extended Dissection Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Meinhardt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the relevance of sentinel lymph nodes (SNs outside the extended pelvic lymph node dissection area (e-PLND. Patients and Methods. Evaluation of our laparoscopic SN procedures for prostate cancer patients of intermediate prognosis. Retrospective data collection on the exact location of the excised SNs and the pathology results were analyzed. Results and Limitations. Of the 121 patients, 49 had positive lymph nodes. 37 patients (31% had SNs outside the e-PLND template. Five of these nodes were tumor bearing but only twice exclusively so. Of the 14 patients considered for salvage treatment, 6 were node positive. 7 of these 14 patients (50% had SNs outside the extended dissection area, yet none of these nodes were tumor positive. Limitations are those of a retrospective study. Conclusions. Laparoscopic SN biopsy may show SNs outside the e-PLND template in 31% of the patients. However, nodes that are exclusively positive in one of these areas are rare. For the dichotomy positive or negative nodes, the locations outside the e-PLND area are not often relevant. Nevertheless, when all positive nodes are to be treated by resection or radiotherapy, these locations are relevant. When considering salvage treatment for prostate cancer, the method is feasible.

  19. Importance of Local Control in Early-Stage Prostate Cancer: Outcomes of Patients With Positive Post-Radiation Therapy Biopsy Results Treated in RTOG 9408

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: dkrauss@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Hu, Chen [NRG Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gore, Elizabeth M. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Chafe, Susan Maria Jacinta [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Leibenhaut, Mark H. [Sutter General Hospital, Sacramento, California (United States); Narayan, Samir [Michigan Cancer Research Consortium CCOP (United States); Torres-Roca, Javier [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Zeitzer, Kenneth L. [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Bronx, New York, New York (United States); Donavanik, Viroon [Christiana Care Health Services Inc CCOP, Newark, Delaware (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); McGowan, David G. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Jones, Christopher U. [Sutter General Hospital, Sacramento, California (United States); Shipley, William U. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the association between positive post-radiation therapy (RT) biopsy results and subsequent clinical outcomes in males with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group study 94-08 analyzed 1979 males with prostate cancer, stage T1b-T2b and prostate-specific antigen concentrations of ≤20 ng/dL, to investigate whether 4 months of total androgen suppression (TAS) added to RT improved survival compared to RT alone. Patients randomized to receive TAS received flutamide with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist. According to protocol, patients without evidence of clinical recurrence or initiation of additional endocrine therapy underwent repeat prostate biopsy 2 years after RT completion. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of positive post-RT biopsy results on clinical outcomes. Results: A total of 831 patients underwent post-RT biopsy, 398 were treated with RT alone and 433 with RT plus TAS. Patients with positive post-RT biopsy results had higher rates of biochemical failure (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-2.1) and distant metastasis (HR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.3-4.4) and inferior disease-specific survival (HR = 3.8; 95% CI = 1.9-7.5). Positive biopsy results remained predictive of such outcomes after correction for potential confounders such as Gleason score, tumor stage, and TAS administration. Prior TAS therapy did not prevent elevated risk of adverse outcome in the setting of post-RT positive biopsy results. Patients with Gleason score ≥7 with a positive biopsy result additionally had inferior overall survival compared to those with a negative biopsy result (HR = 1.56; 95% CI = 1.04-2.35). Conclusions: Positive post-RT biopsy is associated with increased rates of distant metastases and inferior disease-specific survival in patients treated with definitive RT and was associated with inferior overall

  20. Accuracy of 3 Tesla pelvic phased-array multiparametric MRI in diagnosing prostate cancer at repeat biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Pepe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Multiparametric pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI accuracy in prostate cancer (PCa diagnosis was evaluated. Materials and Methods. From June 2011 to December 2013, 168 patients (median 65 years with negative digital rectal examination underwent repeat transperineal saturation biopsy (SPBx; median 28 cores for persistently high or increasing PSA values, PSA >10 ng/ml or PSA values between 4.1-10 o r 2.6-4 ng/ml with free/total PSA < 25% and < 20%, respectively. All patients underwent mpMRI using a 3.0 Tesla scanner equipped with surface 16 channels phased-array coil and lesions suspicious for PCa were submitted to additional targeted biopsies. Results. A T1c PCa was found in 66 (39% cases; SPBx and mpMRI-suspicious targeted biopsy diagnosed 60 (91% and 52 (78.8% cancers missing 6 (all of the anterior zone and 14 cancers (12 and 2 of the lateral margins and anterior zone, respectively; in detail, mpMRI missed 12 (18.1% PCa charaterized by microfocal (1 positive core with greatest percentage of cancer and Gleason score equal to 5% and 6, respectively disease at risk for insignificant cancer. The diameter of the suspicious mpMRI lesion was directly correlated to the diagnosis of PCa with poor Gleason score (p < 0.05; detection rate of cancer for each suspicious mpMRI core was 35.3%. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of mpMRI in diagnosing PCa was 75.7%, 82.5%, 71.8%, 78.9%, 87.9%, respectively. Conclusion. Multiparametric pMRI improved SPBx accuracy in diagnosing significant anterior PCa; the diameter of mpMRI suspicious lesion resulted significantly predictive of aggressive cancers.

  1. Improving the Rotterdam European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer Risk Calculator for Initial Prostate Biopsy by Incorporating the 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology Gleason Grading and Cribriform growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roobol, Monique J; Verbeek, Jan F M; van der Kwast, Theo; Kümmerlin, Intan P; Kweldam, Charlotte F; van Leenders, Geert J L H

    2017-07-01

    The survival rate for men with International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grade 2 prostate cancer (PCa) without invasive cribriform (CR) and intraductal carcinoma (IDC) is similar to that for ISUP grade 1. If updated into the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC Rotterdam) risk calculator number 3 (RC3), this may further improve upfront selection of men who need a biopsy. To improve the number of possible biopsies avoided, while limiting undiagnosed clinically important PCa by applying the updated RC3 for risk-based patient selection. The RC3 is based on the first screening round of the ERSPC Rotterdam, which involved 3616 men. In 2015, histopathologic slides for PCa cases (n=885) were re-evaluated. Low-risk (LR) PCa was defined as ISUP grade 1 or 2 without CR/IDC. High-risk (HR) PCa was defined as ISUP grade 2 with CR/IDC and PCa with ISUP grade≥3. We updated the RC3 using multinomial logistic regression analysis, including data on age, PSA, digital rectal examination, and prostate volume, for predicting LR and HR PCa. Predictive accuracy was quantified using receiver operating characteristic analysis and decision curve analysis. Men without PCa could effectively be distinguished from men with LR PCa and HR PCa (area under the curve 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.68-0.72 and 0.92, 95% CI 0.90-0.94). At a 1% risk threshold, the updated calculator would lead to a 34% reduction in unnecessary biopsies, while only 2% of HR PCa cases would be undiagnosed. A relatively simple risk stratification tool augmented with a highly sensitive contemporary pathologic biopsy classification would result in a considerable decrease in unnecessary prostate biopsies and overdiagnosis of potentially indolent disease. We improved a well-known prostate risk calculator with a new pathology classification system that better reflects disease burden. This new risk calculator allows individualized prediction of the chance of having (potentially

  2. Role of information in preparing men for transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy: a qualitative study embedded in the ProtecT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Julia; Rosario, Derek J; Howson, Joanne; Avery, Kerry N L; Salter, C Elizabeth; Goodwin, M Louise; Blazeby, Jane M; Lane, J Athene; Metcalfe, Chris; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L

    2015-02-28

    The histological diagnosis of prostate cancer requires a prostate needle biopsy. Little is known about the relationship between information provided to prepare men for transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy (TRUS-Bx) and how men experience biopsy. The objectives were a) to understand men's experiences of biopsy as compared to their expectations; and b) to propose current evidence-based information for men undergoing TRUS-Bx. Between February 2006 and May 2008, 1,147 men undergoing a standardised 10-core transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy protocol under antibiotic cover following a PSA 3.0-19.9 ng/ml in the Prostate Testing for Cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) trial, completed questionnaires about biopsy symptoms. In this embedded qualitative study, in-depth interviews were undertaken with 85 men (mean age 63.6 yrs, mean PSA 4.5 ng/ml) to explore men's experiences of prostate biopsy and how the experience might be improved. Interview data were analysed thematically using qualitative research methods. Findings from the qualitative study were used to guide selection of key findings from the questionnaire study in developing a patient information leaflet preparing men for biopsy. Although most men tolerated TRUS-Bx, a quarter reported problematic side-effects and anxiety. Side effects were perceived as problematic and anxiety arose most commonly when experiences deviated from information provided. Men who were unprepared for elements of TRUS-Bx procedure or its sequelae responded by contacting health professionals for reassurance and voiced frustration that pre-biopsy information had understated the possible severity or duration of pain/discomfort and bleeding. Findings from questionnaire and interview data were combined to propose a comprehensive, evidence-based patient information leaflet for TRUS-Bx. Men reported anxiety associated with TRUS-Bx or its side-effects most commonly if they felt inadequately prepared for the procedure. Data from this qualitative study and

  3. Escherichia coli isolates from patients with bacteremic urinary tract infection are genetically distinct from those derived from sepsis following prostate transrectal biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Michael; Yair, Yael; Samosav, Alex; Gottesman, Tamar; Yossepowitch, Orit; Harari-Schwartz, Orna; Tsivian, Alexander; Schreiber, Rachel; Gophna, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) prostate biopsy is a very common procedure that is generally considered relatively safe. However, severe sepsis can occur after TRUS prostate biopsies, with Escherichia coli being the predominant causative agent. A common perception is that the bacteria that cause post-TRUS prostate biopsy infections originate in the urinary tract, but this view has not been adequately tested. Yet other authors believe on the basis of indirect evidence that the pathogens are introduced into the bloodstream by the biopsy needle after passage through the rectal mucosa. We compared E. coli isolates from male patients with bacteremic urinary tract infection (B-UTI) to isolates of patients with post