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Sample records for 2-mercaptopropionylglycine

  1. Analyses of radioprotective action and cytotoxicity of various sulfhydryl compounds in cultured mouse L cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioprotective action and cytotoxicity of various sulfhydryl compounds; 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG), 2-mercaptopropionylglycine-amide (MPG-amide), 2-mercaptopropionylphenylalanine (MPPA), 2-mercaptopropionylphenylglycine (MPPG), 3-mercaptopropionylglycine (3-MPG), AET, cysteine and cysteamine were compared in irradiated and unirradiated mouse L cells using colony forming ability as a criterion. It was indicated that the sulfhydryl compounds divided into three classes, according to their radioprotective action and toxicity. Most effective radioprotection was obtained by cysteamine and cysteine, followed by AET and MPG-amide in that order. Toxicity of these sulfhydryl compounds were generally observed in concentrations in the range of 0.1 - 2 mM, while they are much less toxic and effectively radioprotective in higher concentration, especially in cysteamine and cysteine. On the other hand, MPG, MPPA, MPPG, and 3-MPG were all non-toxic and generally ineffective in protecting irradiated cells, except that MPG in concentrations around 0.02 mM and 15 mM and MPPA and 3-MPG around 15 mM have a slight but significant protective action. (auth.)

  2. Reaction of the hydroxyl radical with glutathione in neutrai and alkaline aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoberg, L. (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm, Sweden); Eriksen, T.E.; Revesz, L.

    1982-02-01

    The reaction of OH with glutathione (..gamma..-glu-cys-gly) in neutral and alkaline aqueous solutions has been studied by pulse radiolysis. In addition to the sulfur-centered GS-(GSSG/sup -/.) radical formed by electron transfer or hydrogen abstraction from GS/sup -/ (GSH), at least one carbon-centered radical is formed with pH-dependent yield by hydrogen abstraction from the ..gamma..-glutamyl moiety. The latter radical is transformed in a first-ordered reaction most probably to a carbon-centered radical on the cysteine group. No evidence for the formation of carbon-centered radicals was found in comparable experiments with cysteine and 2-mercaptopropionylglycine.

  3. Clinical experiences with a chemical radioprotector in tumor radiotherapy: WR-2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since cysteine was found to protect lethally irradiated rats, sulfhydryl compounds that provide protection of laboratory animals against lethal doses of ionizing radiations have also been given much attention. The SH compounds have been the most extensively investigated, and β-aminoethylisothiouronium (AET) and cysteamine have been selected as being representative of those drugs that are highly protective. However, clinical application is limited, as the toxicity of these compounds is high. In a series of experiments to reevaluate radioprotective agents with low toxicity, the authors found that 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG) and adrenochrome monoguangylhydrazone methanesulfonate (AMM) have a potent radioprotector effect in a dose far below their toxic doses in both mice and humans. Recently, the development of effective thiophosphate derivatives of cysteamine, namely WR-2721 [S-2-(3-amino-propylaminoethyl)phosphorothioate] by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Commands, led to a reevaluation of these compounds and their potential in radiotherapy. Initial investigations indicated that WR-2721 provided a considerable degree of radioprotection to normal tissues. This compound provided excellent protection for normal tissues (DMF = 2-2.5) but little protection for the transplanted tumor. Thus this drug may have a differential protection in vivo and may be useful for improving the therapeutic ratio in cancer radiotherapy. The results of animal and chemical experiments in Japan are summarized herein

  4. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry as an alternative to cloud point extraction based methods for rapid quantification of silver ions and surface coated silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak K; Linder, Sean W

    2016-01-15

    Speciation and accurate quantification of ionic silver and metallic silver nanoparticles are critical to investigate silver toxicity and to determine the shelf-life of products that contain nano silver under various storage conditions. We developed a rapid method for quantification of silver ions and silver nanoparticles using capillary electrophoresis (CE) interfaced with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The addition of 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (tiopronin) to the background electrolyte was used to facilitate the chromatographic separation of ionic silver and maintain the oxidation state of silver. The obtained limits of detection were 0.05 μg kg(-1) of silver nanoparticles and 0.03 μg kg(-1) of ionic silver. Nanoparticles of varied sizes (10-110 nm) with different surface coating, including citrate acid, lipoic acid, polyvinylpyrrolidone and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were successfully analyzed. Particularly good recoveries (>93%) were obtained for both ionic silver and silver nanoparticle in the presence of excess amount of BSA. The method was further tested with six commercially available dietary supplements which varied in concentration and matrix components. The summed values of silver ions and silver nanoparticles correlated well with the total silver concentration determined by ICPMS after acid digestion. This method can serve as an alternative to cloud point extraction technique when the extraction efficiency for protein coated nanoparticles is low.

  5. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry as an alternative to cloud point extraction based methods for rapid quantification of silver ions and surface coated silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak K; Linder, Sean W

    2016-01-15

    Speciation and accurate quantification of ionic silver and metallic silver nanoparticles are critical to investigate silver toxicity and to determine the shelf-life of products that contain nano silver under various storage conditions. We developed a rapid method for quantification of silver ions and silver nanoparticles using capillary electrophoresis (CE) interfaced with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The addition of 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (tiopronin) to the background electrolyte was used to facilitate the chromatographic separation of ionic silver and maintain the oxidation state of silver. The obtained limits of detection were 0.05 μg kg(-1) of silver nanoparticles and 0.03 μg kg(-1) of ionic silver. Nanoparticles of varied sizes (10-110 nm) with different surface coating, including citrate acid, lipoic acid, polyvinylpyrrolidone and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were successfully analyzed. Particularly good recoveries (>93%) were obtained for both ionic silver and silver nanoparticle in the presence of excess amount of BSA. The method was further tested with six commercially available dietary supplements which varied in concentration and matrix components. The summed values of silver ions and silver nanoparticles correlated well with the total silver concentration determined by ICPMS after acid digestion. This method can serve as an alternative to cloud point extraction technique when the extraction efficiency for protein coated nanoparticles is low. PMID:26724893

  6. Scavenging ROS dramatically increase NMDA receptor whole-cell currents in painted turtle cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukoff, David James; Hogg, David William; Hawrysh, Peter John; Buck, Leslie Thomas

    2014-09-15

    Oxygen deprivation triggers excitotoxic cell death in mammal neurons through excessive calcium loading via over-activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. This does not occur in the western painted turtle, which overwinters for months without oxygen. Neurological damage is avoided through anoxia-mediated decreases in NMDA and AMPA receptor currents that are dependent upon a modest rise in intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) originating from mitochondria. Anoxia also blocks mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which is another potential signaling mechanism to regulate glutamate receptors. To assess the effects of decreased intracellular [ROS] on NMDA and AMPA receptor currents, we scavenged ROS with N-2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Unlike anoxia, ROS scavengers increased NMDA receptor whole-cell currents by 100%, while hydrogen peroxide decreased currents. AMPA receptor currents and [Ca(2+)]i concentrations were unaffected by ROS manipulation. Because decreases in [ROS] increased NMDA receptor currents, we next asked whether mitochondrial Ca(2+) release prevents receptor potentiation during anoxia. Normoxic activation of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium (mKATP) channels with diazoxide decreased NMDA receptor currents and was unaffected by subsequent ROS scavenging. Diazoxide application following ROS scavenging did not rescue scavenger-mediated increases in NMDA receptor currents. Fluorescent measurement of [Ca(2+)]i and ROS levels demonstrated that [Ca(2+)]i increases before ROS decreases. We conclude that decreases in ROS concentration are not linked to anoxia-mediated decreases in NMDA/AMPA receptor currents but are rather associated with an increase in NMDA receptor currents that is prevented during anoxia by mitochondrial Ca(2+) release.

  7. Downstream signaling of reactive oxygen species, protein kinase C epsilon translocation and delayed neuroprotection in sevoflurane preconditioned rats following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Ye; Qulian Guo; E Wang; Yundan Pan; Qing Li; Honghao Zhou

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brief exposure to the anesthetic sevoflurane results in delayed neuroprotection.However, few studies have addressed delayed neuroprotection after preconditioning with a single administration of sevoflurane.OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationship between a single preconditioning administration of sevoflurane and reactive oxygen species production and protein kinase C-epsilon (PKC- ε ) translocation.DESIGN, TIME, AND SETTING: The randomized, controlled, animal experiment was conducted at the Central Laboratory, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, China from November 2007 to April 2008.MATERIALS: A total of 120 healthy, male, Sprague Dawley rats were equally and randomly assigned into five groups: sham operation, ischemia/reperfusion, sevoflurane, 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (2-MPG, a selective reactive oxygen species scavenger) + sevoflurane (MPG + sevoflurane), and MPG. Sevoflurane (Baxter, USA) and MPG (Sigma, USA) were used in this study.METHODS: Intervention consisted of three procedures. (1) MPG injection: a selective reactive oxygen species scavenger, MPG (20 mg/kg), was infused into the rat caudal vein in the MPG and MPG + sevoflurane groups. (2) Sevoflurane preconditioning: 30 minutes following MPG injection,rats in the sevoflurane and MPG + sevoflurane groups breathed a mixed gas of 2.4% sevoflurane and 97.6% oxygen for 60 minutes. Rats in the sham operation, ischemia/reperfusion, and MPG groups breathed 100% pure oxygen for 60 minutes. (3) Ischemia/reperfusion: 24 hours after sevoflurane or pure oxygen preconditioning, middle cerebral artery occlusion models were established in the ischemia/reperfusion, sevoflurane, MPG + sevoflurane, and MPG groups.Following 2 hours ischemia/6 hours and 24 hours reperfusion, the carotid artery was separated, but the middle cerebral artery was not occluded, in the sham operation group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: In the ischemic hemisphere, PKC-ε translocation in the rat parietal cortex was measured by Western