WorldWideScience

Sample records for 2-deoxy-2-f-18fluoro-d-glucose-positron emission tomography

  1. A case of dedifferentiated liposarcoma showing a biphasic pattern on 2-deoxy-2-F18- fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/ computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Hoshi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Integrated 2-deoxy-2-F18-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT has been used in the field of soft tissue sarcoma. We report an 81-year-old man with dedifferentiated liposarcoma in the left thigh, which was composed of well-differentiated liposarcoma and pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma. As well as other radiological modalities, FDG-PET was able to demonstrate a biphasic signal pattern composed of well-differentiated liposarcoma and dedifferentiated area, being consistent with the histological grade of malignancy.

  2. Pharmacologic Activation of Tumor Hypoxia : A Means to Increase Tumor 2-Deoxy-2-[F-18]Fluoro-D-Glucose Uptake?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, Gilles; Dierckx, Rudi; Vangestel, Christel; Laukens, Debby; Van Damme, Nancy; Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia and tumor metabolism are linked through the activation of metabolic genes following hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) activation. This raises the question of whether this relationship can be exploited to improve 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography ([F-18]FDG-

  3. Positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehllehner, Gerd; Karp, Joel S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2006-07-07

    The developments in positron emission tomography (PET) are reviewed with an emphasis on instrumentation for clinical PET imaging. After a brief summary of positron imaging before the advent of computed tomography, various improvements are highlighted including the move from PET scanners with septa to fully 3D scanners, changes in the preferred scintillators, efforts to improve the energy discrimination, and improvements in attenuation correction. Time-of-flight PET imaging is given special attention due to the recent revival of this technique, which promises significant improvement. Besides technical instrumentation efforts, other factors which influenced the acceptance of clinical PET are also discussed. (review)

  4. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  5. Positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Paans, A M J

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for measuring biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a coincidence technique. This includes also the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labelled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs on metabolism. Also deviations of normal metabolism can be measured and insight into biological processes responsible for diseases can be obtained. At present the combined PET/CT scanner is the most frequently used scanner for whole-body scanning in the field of oncology.

  6. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  7. [Tau Positron Emission Tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Makoto

    2017-07-01

    Accumulation of fibrillar tau protein aggregates is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative dementias, including a subgroup of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Visualization of tau lesions in the brains of living subjects enables a pathology-based diagnosis of dementing illnesses in the prodromal stage, and offers objective measures of disease progression and outcomes of disease-modifying therapies. With this rationale, diverse classes of low-molecular-weight chemicals capable of binding to a β-pleated sheet structure have been developed to be used for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) of tau pathologies. Clinical PET studies of AD patients with such tau probes have provided the following insights: (1) Tau fibrils accumulate in the hippocampal formation in an age-dependent manner that is independent of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) pathology; (2) The deposition of Aβ may trigger a spatial expansion of tau pathology, in transition from normal aging to advanced AD; and (3) Tau accumulation is intimately associated with local neuronal loss, leading to cortical atrophy and focal symptoms. In contrast, studies of FTLD have shown a limited performance of first-generation PET probes in capturing non-AD-type tau lesions. New compounds have accordingly been developed and clinically tested, proving to yield a high contrast for tau deposits with high specificity. These second-generation probes are being evaluated primarily by pharmaceutical companies, in line with their growing demands for neuroimaging-based biomarkers serving for clinical trials of anti-Aβ and anti-tau therapies. Meanwhile, a consortium flexibly linking academia and industry to facilitate the utilization of research tools, including tau PET probes, has been established in Japan, for the ultimate purpose of elucidating the molecular etiology of tauopathies and creating diagnostic and therapeutic agents based on such an understanding.

  8. NMF on positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bödvarsson, Bjarni; Hansen, Lars Kai; Svarer, Claus;

    2007-01-01

    In positron emission tomography, kinetic modelling of brain tracer uptake, metabolism or binding requires knowledge of the cerebral input function. Traditionally, this is achieved with arterial blood sampling in the arm or as shown in (Liptrot, M, et al., 2004) by non-invasive K-means clustering....... We propose another method to estimate time-activity curves (TAC) extracted directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Since the scaling of the basis curves is lost in the NMF the estimated TAC is scaled by a vector alpha which...

  9. Positron emission tomography basic sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, D W; Valk, P E; Maisey, M N

    2003-01-01

    Essential for students, science and medical graduates who want to understand the basic science of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), this book describes the physics, chemistry, technology and overview of the clinical uses behind the science of PET and the imaging techniques it uses. In recent years, PET has moved from high-end research imaging tool used by the highly specialized to an essential component of clinical evaluation in the clinic, especially in cancer management. Previously being the realm of scientists, this book explains PET instrumentation, radiochemistry, PET data acquisition and image formation, integration of structural and functional images, radiation dosimetry and protection, and applications in dedicated areas such as drug development, oncology, and gene expression imaging. The technologist, the science, engineering or chemistry graduate seeking further detailed information about PET, or the medical advanced trainee wishing to gain insight into the basic science of PET will find this book...

  10. Radiopharmaceutical chemistry for positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, PH

    2002-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical chemistry includes the selection, preparation, and preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled compounds. This paper describes selection criteria for candidates for positron emission tomography (PET) investigations. Practical aspects of nucleophilic and electrophilic F-18-fluorination

  11. Is positron emission tomography useful in stroke?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeReuck, J; Leys, D; DeKeyser, J

    1997-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in the study of stroke and related cerebrovascular diseases. It has shown the various stages leading to cerebral infarction and defined the significance of the ischaemic penumbra. PET scan can predict the clinical outcome of patients with acute

  12. Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

  13. 4D image reconstruction for emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Andrew J.; Verhaeghe, Jeroen

    2014-11-01

    An overview of the theory of 4D image reconstruction for emission tomography is given along with a review of the current state of the art, covering both positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). By viewing 4D image reconstruction as a matter of either linear or non-linear parameter estimation for a set of spatiotemporal functions chosen to approximately represent the radiotracer distribution, the areas of so-called ‘fully 4D’ image reconstruction and ‘direct kinetic parameter estimation’ are unified within a common framework. Many choices of linear and non-linear parameterization of these functions are considered (including the important case where the parameters have direct biological meaning), along with a review of the algorithms which are able to estimate these often non-linear parameters from emission tomography data. The other crucial components to image reconstruction (the objective function, the system model and the raw data format) are also covered, but in less detail due to the relatively straightforward extension from their corresponding components in conventional 3D image reconstruction. The key unifying concept is that maximum likelihood or maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of either linear or non-linear model parameters can be achieved in image space after carrying out a conventional expectation maximization (EM) update of the dynamic image series, using a Kullback-Leibler distance metric (comparing the modeled image values with the EM image values), to optimize the desired parameters. For MAP, an image-space penalty for regularization purposes is required. The benefits of 4D and direct reconstruction reported in the literature are reviewed, and furthermore demonstrated with simple simulation examples. It is clear that the future of reconstructing dynamic or functional emission tomography images, which often exhibit high levels of spatially correlated noise, should ideally exploit these 4D

  14. A wavelet phase filter for emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, E.T.; Lin, B. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mathematics

    1995-07-01

    The presence of a high level of noise is a characteristic in some tomographic imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET). Wavelet methods can smooth out noise while preserving significant features of images. Mallat et al. proposed a wavelet based denoising scheme exploiting wavelet modulus maxima, but the scheme is sensitive to noise. In this study, the authors explore the properties of wavelet phase, with a focus on reconstruction of emission tomography images. Specifically, they show that the wavelet phase of regular Poisson noise under a Haar-type wavelet transform converges in distribution to a random variable uniformly distributed on [0, 2{pi}). They then propose three wavelet-phase-based denoising schemes which exploit this property: edge tracking, local phase variance thresholding, and scale phase variation thresholding. Some numerical results are also presented. The numerical experiments indicate that wavelet phase techniques show promise for wavelet based denoising methods.

  15. Development of novel emission tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Geng

    In recent years, small animals, such as mice and rats, have been widely used as subjects of study in biomedical research while molecular biology and imaging techniques open new opportunities to investigate disease model. With the help of medical imaging techniques, researchers can investigate underlying mechanisms inside the small animal, which are useful for both early diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Based on tracer principle single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has increased popularity in small animal imaging due to its higher spatial resolution and variety of single-photon emitting radionuclides. Since the image quality strongly depends on the detector properties, both scintillation and semiconductor detectors are under active investigation for high resolution X-ray and gamma ray photon detection. The desired detector properties include high intrinsic spatial resolution, high energy resolution, and high detection efficiency. In this thesis study, we have made extensive efforts to develop novel emission tomography system, and evaluate the use of both semiconductor and ultra-high resolution scintillation detectors for small animal imaging. This thesis work includes the following three areas. Firstly, we have developed a novel energy-resolved photon counting (ERPC) detector. With the benefits of high energy resolution, high spatial resolution, flexible detection area, and a wide dynamic range of 27--200keV, ERPC detector is well-suited for small animal SPECT applications. For prototype ERPC detector excellent imaging (˜350microm) and spectroscopic performance (4keV Co-57 122keV) has been demonstrated in preliminary study. Secondly, to further improve spatial resolution to hundred-micron level, an ultra-high resolution Intensified EMCCD (I-EMCCD) detector has been designed and evaluated. This detector consists of the newly developed electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) sensor, columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator, and an electrostatic de-magnifier (DM) tube

  16. Therapy response evaluation with positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, George M

    2010-12-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose is widely used for evaluation of therapy response in patients with solid tumors but has not been as readily adopted in clinical trials because of the variability of acquisition and processing protocols and the absence of universal response criteria. Criteria proposed for clinical trials are difficult to apply in clinical practice, and gestalt impression is probably accurate in individual patients, especially with respect to the presence of progressive disease and complete response. Semiquantitative methods of determining tissue glucose metabolism, such as standard uptake value, can be a useful descriptor for levels of tissue glucose metabolism and changes in response to therapy if technical quality control measures are carefully maintained. The terms partial response, complete response, and progressive disease are best used in clinical trials in which the terms have specific meanings and precise definitions. In clinical practice, it may be better to use descriptive terminology agreed upon by imaging physicians and clinicians in their own practice.

  17. Positron Emission Tomography: Its 65 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Guerra, A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.

    2016-04-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a well-established imaging technique for in vivo molecular imaging. In this review after a brief history of PET there are presented its physical principles and the technology that has been developed for bringing PET from a bench experiment to a clinical indispensable instrument. The limitations and performance of the PET tomographs are discussed, both as for the hardware and software aspects. The status of art of clinical, pre-clinical and hybrid scanners (, PET/CT and PET/MR) is reported. Finally the actual trend and the recent and future technological developments are fully illustrated.

  18. 89Zr radiochemistry for positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Gregory W; Engle, Jonathan W; Barnhart, Todd E; Nickles, R Jerry

    2011-09-01

    The positron emitting isotope (89)Zr is an ideal radionuclide for use in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). This article reviews the cyclotron physics of (89)Zr production, and the chemical separation methods for isolating it from yttrium target material. (89)Zr coordination with the bifunctional chelate desferrioxamine B is discussed, along with the common procedures for attaching the chelate to mAbs. The review is intended to detail the procedure for creating (89)Zr labeled mAbs, going from cyclotron to PET.

  19. Estimation of linear functionals in emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuruc, A.

    1995-08-01

    In emission tomography, the spatial distribution of a radioactive tracer is estimated from a finite sample of externally-detected photons. We present an algorithm-independent theory of statistical accuracy attainable in emission tomography that makes minimal assumptions about the underlying image. Let f denote the tracer density as a function of position (i.e., f is the image being estimated). We consider the problem of estimating the linear functional {Phi}(f) {triple_bond} {integral}{phi}(x)f(x) dx, where {phi} is a smooth function, from n independent observations identically distributed according to the Radon transform of f. Assuming only that f is bounded above and below away from 0, we construct statistically efficient estimators for {Phi}(f). By definition, the variance of the efficient estimator is a best-possible lower bound (depending on and f) on the variance of unbiased estimators of {Phi}(f). Our results show that, in general, the efficient estimator will have a smaller variance than the standard estimator based on the filtered-backprojection reconstruction algorithm. The improvement in performance is obtained by exploiting the range properties of the Radon transform.

  20. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease.

  1. Motion correction in thoracic positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gigengack, Fabian; Dawood, Mohammad; Schäfers, Klaus P

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion leads to image degradation in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which impairs quantification. In this book, the authors present approaches to motion estimation and motion correction in thoracic PET. The approaches for motion estimation are based on dual gating and mass-preserving image registration (VAMPIRE) and mass-preserving optical flow (MPOF). With mass-preservation, image intensity modulations caused by highly non-rigid cardiac motion are accounted for. Within the image registration framework different data terms, different variants of regularization and parametric and non-parametric motion models are examined. Within the optical flow framework, different data terms and further non-quadratic penalization are also discussed. The approaches for motion correction particularly focus on pipelines in dual gated PET. A quantitative evaluation of the proposed approaches is performed on software phantom data with accompanied ground-truth motion information. Further, clinical appl...

  2. Bayesian image reconstruction: Application to emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, J.; Llacer, J.

    1989-02-01

    In this paper we propose a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) method of image reconstruction in the Bayesian framework for the Poisson noise case. We use entropy to define the prior probability and likelihood to define the conditional probability. The method uses sharpness parameters which can be theoretically computed or adjusted, allowing us to obtain MAP reconstructions without the problem of the grey'' reconstructions associated with the pre Bayesian reconstructions. We have developed several ways to solve the reconstruction problem and propose a new iterative algorithm which is stable, maintains positivity and converges to feasible images faster than the Maximum Likelihood Estimate method. We have successfully applied the new method to the case of Emission Tomography, both with simulated and real data. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Positron emission tomography and radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, PhD, Gary D.; Fox, MD, Peter; Phillips, MD, William T.

    2001-10-01

    Medical physics research is providing new avenues for addressing the fundamental problem of radiation therapy-how to provide a tumor-killing dose while reducing the dose to a non-lethal level for critical organs in adjacent portions of the patient anatomy. This talk reviews the revolutionary impact of Positron Emission Tomography on the practice of radiation oncology. The concepts of PET imaging and the development of "tumor" imaging methods using 18F-DG flouro-deoxyglucose are presented to provide the foundation for contemporary research and application to therapy. PET imaging influences radiation therapy decisions in multiple ways. Imaging of occult but viable tumor metastases eliminates misguided therapy attempts. The ability to distinguish viable tumor from scar tissue and necroses allows reduction of treatment portals and more selective treatments. Much research remains before the clinical benefits of these advances are fully realized.

  4. Positron Emission Tomography of the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease.

  5. Reconstruction Algorithms for Positron Emission Tomography and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography and their Numerical Implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Fokas, A S; Marinakis, V

    2004-01-01

    The modern imaging techniques of Positron Emission Tomography and of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography are not only two of the most important tools for studying the functional characteristics of the brain, but they now also play a vital role in several areas of clinical medicine, including neurology, oncology and cardiology. The basic mathematical problems associated with these techniques are the construction of the inverse of the Radon transform and of the inverse of the so called attenuated Radon transform respectively. We first show that, by employing mathematical techniques developed in the theory of nonlinear integrable equations, it is possible to obtain analytic formulas for these two inverse transforms. We then present algorithms for the numerical implementation of these analytic formulas, based on approximating the given data in terms of cubic splines. Several numerical tests are presented which suggest that our algorithms are capable of producing accurate reconstruction for realistic phanto...

  6. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, M. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Perez-Mendez, V. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  7. Amyloid positron emission tomography and cognitive reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matteo Bauckneht; Agnese Picco; Flavio Nobili; Silvia Morbelli

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease(AD) is characterized by a nonlinear progressive course and several aspects influence the relationship between cerebral amount of AD pathology and the clinical expression of the disease. Brain cognitive reserve(CR) refers to the hypothesized capacity of an adult brain to cope with brain damage in order to minimize symptomatology. CR phenomenon contributed to explain the disjunction between the degree of neurodegeneration and the clinical phenotype of AD. The possibility to track brain amyloidosis(Aβ) in vivo has huge relevance for AD diagnosis and new therapeutic approaches. The clinical repercussions of positron emission tomography(PET)-assessed Aβ load are certainly mediated by CR thus potentially hampering the prognostic meaning of amyloid PET in selected groups of patients. Similarly, amyloid PET and cerebrospinal fluid amyloidosis biomarkers have recently provided new evidence for CR. The present review discusses the concept of CR in the framework of available neuroimaging studies and specifically deals with the reciprocal influences between amyloid PET and CR in AD patients and with the potential consequent interventional strategies for AD.

  8. Microfluidics for Positron Emission Tomography Probe Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Wang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Owing to increased needs for positron emission tomography (PET, high demands for a wide variety of radiolabeled compounds will have to be met by exploiting novel radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of PET probes. The application of microfluidic reactors to perform radiosyntheses is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional labeling systems. Microfluidics-based radiochemistry can lead to the use of smaller quantities of precursors, accelerated reaction rates, and easier purification processes with greater yield and higher specific activity of desired probes. Several proof-of-principle examples along with the basics of device architecture and operation and the potential limitations of each design are discussed. Along with the concept of radioisotope distribution from centralized cyclotron facilities to individual imaging centers and laboratories (“decentralized model”, an easy-to-use, stand-alone, flexible, fully automated, radiochemical microfluidic platform can provide simpler and more cost-effective procedures for molecular imaging using PET.

  9. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of the skull in malignant otitis externa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Dhritiman; Bhattacharya, Anish; Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2012-01-01

    Malignant otitis externa is a severe, rare infective condition of the external auditory canal and skull base. The diagnosis is generally made from a range of clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings. Technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy is known to detect osteomyelitis earlier than computed tomography. The authors present a patient with bilateral malignant otitis externa where the extent of skull base involvement was determined on 3-phase bone scintigraphy with single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography.

  10. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle W

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...

  11. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle W

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...

  12. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography for optimized colon cancer staging and follow up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Bodil Elisabeth; Loft, Annika; Kjær, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Optimal management of colon cancer (CC) requires detailed assessment of extent of disease. This study prospectively investigates the diagnostic accuracy of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for staging and detection of recurrence...

  13. An online emission spectral tomography system with digital signal processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiong; Xiong, Wenlin; Zhang, Zhimin; Chang, Fangfei

    2009-03-30

    Emission spectral tomography (EST) has been adopted to test the three-dimensional distribution parameters of fluid fields, such as burning gas, flame and plasma etc. In most cases, emission spectral data received by the video cameras are enormous so that the emission spectral tomography calculation is often time-consuming. Hence, accelerating calculation becomes the chief factor that one must consider for the practical application of EST. To solve the problem, a hardware implementation method was proposed in this paper, which adopted a digital signal processor (DSP) DM642 in an emission spectral tomography test system. The EST algorithm was fulfilled in the DSP, then calculation results were transmitted to the main computer via the user datagram protocol. Compared with purely VC++ software implementations, this new approach can decrease the calculation time significantly.

  14. Positron emission tomography and migraine. Tomographie par emission de positons et migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabriat, H. (CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot)

    1992-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a brain imaging technique that allows in vivo studies of numerous physiological parameters. There have been few PET studies in migraine patients. Cerebral blood flow changes with no variations in brain oxygen consumption have been reported in patients with prolonged neurologic manifestations during migraine attacks. Parenteral administration of reserpine during migraine headache has been followed by a fall in the overall cerebral uptake of glucose. The small sample sizes and a number of methodologic problems complicate the interpretation of these results. Recent technical advances and the development of new PET tracers can be expected to provide further insight into the pathophysiology of migraine. Today cerebral cortex 5 HT{sub 2} serotonin receptors can be studied in migraine patients with PET.

  15. Single-photon emission computed tomography and positron-emission tomography assays for tissue oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J D; Schneider, R F; Urbain, J L; Hanks, G E

    2001-01-01

    Radiotherapy prescription can now be customized to target the major mechanism(s) of resistance of individual tumors. In that regard, functional imaging techniques should be exploited to identify the dominant mechanism(s). Tumor biology research has identified several mechanisms of tumor resistance that may be unique to radiation treatments. These fall into 3 broad areas associated with (1) tumor hypoxic fraction, (2) tumor growth rate, (3) and the intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumor clonogens. Imaging research has markers in various stages of development for quantifying relevant information about each of these mechanisms, and those that measure tumor oxygenation and predict for radioresistance are the most advanced. Positron-emission tomography (PET) measurement of oxygen 15 has yielded important information, particularly about brain tissue perfusion, metabolism, and function. Indirect markers of tumor hypoxia have exploited the covalent binding of bioreductive intermediates of azomycin-containing compounds whose uptakes are inversely proportional to intracellular oxygen concentrations. Pilot clinical studies with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and PET detection of radiolabeled markers to tumor hypoxia have been reported. Recently, other studies have attempted to exploit the reduction properties of both technetium and copper chelates for the selective deposition of radioactive metals in hypoxic tissues. A growing number of potentially useful isotopes are now available for labeling several novel chemicals that could have the appropriate specificity and sensitivity. Preclinical studies with "microSPECT" and "microPET" will be important to define the optimal radiodiagnostic(s) for measuring tissue oxygenation and for determining the time after their administration for optimal hypoxic signal acquisition. Radiolabeled markers of growth kinetics and intrinsic radiosensitivity of cells in solid tumors are also being developed. We conclude that

  16. Monte Carlo Simulation Of Emission Tomography And Other Medical Imaging Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Robert L

    2010-01-05

    An introduction to Monte Carlo simulation of emission tomography. This paper reviews the history and principles of Monte Carlo simulation, then applies these principles to emission tomography using the public domain simulation package SimSET (a Simulation System for Emission Tomography) as an example. Finally, the paper discusses how the methods are modified for X-ray computed tomography and radiotherapy simulations.

  17. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for malignant otitis externa: lesion not shown on planar image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hung; Hsieh, Hung-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Malignant otitis externa is a severe and rare infection of the external acoustic meatus. Triphasic bone and (67)Ga scintigraphies are used to initial detect and follow-up the response of therapy. With single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography images, the diagnostic sensitivity is higher. We presented a case with malignant otitis externa with initial negative planar scintigraphic finding. The lesion was detected by photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography images. We concluded that the photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography should be performed routinely for patients with suspected malignant otitis externa, even without evidence of lesion on planar images.

  18. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle Westergren;

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...... study investigates the positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of PET-CT in stage I disease and the clinical impact of the scan results in all disease stages....

  19. Pigmented villonodular synovitis mimics metastases on fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elumogo, Comfort O; Kochenderfer, James N; Civelek, A Cahid; Bluemke, David A

    2016-04-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a benign joint disease best characterized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The role of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) position emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in the diagnosis or characterization remains unclear. PVNS displays as a focal FDG avid lesion, which can masquerade as a metastatic lesion, on PET-CET. We present a case of PVNS found on surveillance imaging of a lymphoma patient.

  20. Combined single photon emission computerized tomography and conventional computerized tomography: Clinical value for the shoulder surgeons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Hirschmann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the cases described, we strive to introduce single photon emission computerized tomography in combination with conventional computer tomography (SPECT/CT to shoulder surgeons, illustrate the possible clinical value it may offer as new diagnostic radiologic modality, and discuss its limitations. SPECT/CT may facilitate the establishment of diagnosis, process of decision making, and further treatment for complex shoulder pathologies. Some of these advantages were highlighted in cases that are frequently seen in most shoulder clinics.

  1. 64Cu loaded liposomes as positron emission tomography imaging agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anncatrine Luisa; Binderup, Tina; Rasmussen, Palle

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a highly efficient method for utilizing liposomes as imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET) giving high resolution images and allowing direct quantification of tissue distribution and blood clearance. Our approach is based on remote loading of a copper-radionuclid...

  2. Monolithic scintillator detectors for high-resolution positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a technique for imaging the 3-dimensional distribution of radio-labelled molecules in vivo. This technique plays an increasingly important role in preclinical research involving mice and rats. The small dimensions of these animals impose stringent requirements o

  3. Analytic evaluation of statistical projection operators for emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuruc, A.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to outline an approach to the numerical construction of statistically efficient estimators for linear functionals in emission tomography (ET) that is more efficient than the approach used in [Kur97]. For the sake of brevity, we will assume familiarity with the notation and material in [Kur97].

  4. Sentence comprehension and word repetition : A positron emission tomography investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stowe, L.A.; Paans, A.M.J.; Wijers, A.A.; Zwarts, F.; Mulder, G.; Vaalburg, W.

    1999-01-01

    Using positron emission tomography, visual presentation of sentences was shown to cause increased regional cerebral blood flow relative to word Lists in the left lateral anterior superior and middle temporal gyri, attributable to cognitive processes that occur during sentence comprehension in

  5. Quantification in dynamic and small-animal positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Disselhorst, Johannes Antonius

    2011-01-01

    This thesis covers two aspects of positron emission tomography (PET) quantification. The first section addresses the characterization and optimization of a small-animal PET/CT scanner. The sensitivity and resolution as well as various parameters affecting image quality (reconstruction settings, type

  6. Positron Emission Tomography : background, possibilities and perspectives in neuroscience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, AMJ

    1997-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for determining biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way. This includes the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labeled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs and/or therapy on metabolism. Also deviations of no

  7. Fluorinated amino acids for tumour imaging with positron emission tomography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, P.; Boerman, O.C.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2002-01-01

    The currently preferred radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography (PET) in oncology is 2-[(18)F]fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG). Increased accumulation of this deoxyglucose analogue in tumour cells is based on elevated glucose metabolism by tumour cells and subsequent trapping in the cells. In

  8. Recent Developments in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors.

  9. Positron emission tomography in drug development and drug evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, AMJ; Vaalburg, W

    2000-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an imaging modality which can determine biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitting radionuclides as C-11, N-13, O-15 and F-18 and by measuring the annihilation radiation usin

  10. Hybrid Gama Emission Tomography (HGET): FY16 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Erin A.; Smith, Leon E.; Wittman, Richard S.; Campbell, Luke W.; Deshmukh, Nikhil S.; Zalavadia, Mital A.; Batie, Margo A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.

    2017-02-01

    Current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) methodologies for the verification of fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies are volume-averaging methods that lack sensitivity to individual pins. Further, as fresh fuel assemblies become more and more complex (e.g., heavy gadolinium loading, high degrees of axial and radial variation in fissile concentration), the accuracy of current IAEA instruments degrades and measurement time increases. Particularly in light of the fact that no special tooling is required to remove individual pins from modern fuel assemblies, the IAEA needs new capabilities for the verification of unirradiated (i.e., fresh LEU and MOX) assemblies to ensure that fissile material has not been diverted. Passive gamma emission tomography has demonstrated potential to provide pin-level verification of spent fuel, but gamma-ray emission rates from unirradiated fuel emissions are significantly lower, precluding purely passive tomography methods. The work presented here introduces the concept of Hybrid Gamma Emission Tomography (HGET) for verification of unirradiated fuels, in which a neutron source is used to actively interrogate the fuel assembly and the resulting gamma-ray emissions are imaged using tomographic methods to provide pin-level verification of fissile material concentration.

  11. Multifocal sparganosis mimicking lymphoma involvement: Multimodal imaging findings of ultrasonography, CT, MRI, and position emission tomography-computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, So Young; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Chan Sub; Kim, Tae Jung [Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Seong Yoon [Dev. of Hematology-Omcology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Hyun Jung [Dev. of Hematology-Omcology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Sparganosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by the migrating plerocercoid larva of Spirometra species tapeworms. The most frequent clinical manifestation is a subcutaneous nodule resembling a neoplasm. In this study, we presented multimodal findings of ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography-computed tomography and follow-up imagings on multifocal sparganosis, mimicking lymphoma involvement in a patient with lymphoma.

  12. Positron Emission Tomography: Principles, Technology, and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Sibylle I.

    2005-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging technique for quantitative measurement of physiologic parameters in vivo (an overview of principles and applications can be found in [P.E. Valk, et al., eds. Positron Emission Tomography. Basic Science and Clinical Practice. 2003, Springer: Heidelberg]), based on the detection of small amounts of posi-tron-emitter-labelled biologic molecules. Various radiotracers are available for neuro-logical, cardiological, and oncological applications in the clinic and in research proto-cols. This overview describes the basic principles, technology, and recent develop-ments in PET, followed by a section on the development of a tomograph with ava-lanche photodiodes dedicated for small animal imaging as an example of efforts in the domain of high resolution tomographs.

  13. Monte Carlo Simulation Of Emission Tomography And Other Medical Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    An introduction to Monte Carlo simulation of emission tomography. This paper reviews the history and principles of Monte Carlo simulation, then applies these principles to emission tomography using the public domain simulation package SimSET (a Simulation System for Emission Tomography) as an example. Finally, the paper discusses how the methods are modified for X-ray computed tomography and radiotherapy simulations. PMID:20733931

  14. Current and future technological trends in positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, J S; Freifelder, R

    1992-04-01

    Current trends in positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation are examined, with an emphasis on providing information suitable to the prospective PET user. Basic principles underlying PET are explained and information on performance measurements, techniques, and quantitation are given in order to allow the user to compare and contrast different types of PET scanners. These scanner designs are described. Specific examples are given and the combination of PET with other modalities is discussed.

  15. ENVISION, developing Positron Emission Tomography for particle therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Particle therapy is an advanced technique of cancer radiation therapy, using protons or other ions to target the cancerous mass. ENVISION aims at developing medical imaging tools to improve the dose delivery to the patient, to ensure a safer and more effective treatment. The animation illustrates the use of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for monitoring the dose during treatment. Produced by: CERN KT/Life Sciences and ENVISION Project Management: Manuela Cirilli 3D animation: Jeroen Huijben, Nymus3d

  16. Emission and transmission noise propagation in positron emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullberg, G.T.; Huesman, R.H.

    1979-06-01

    Errors in positron emission computed tomograms are the result of noise propagated from three sources: (1) the statistical fluctuation in the positron coincidence events; (2) the statistical fluctuation in the incident transmission beam; and (3) the statistical fluctuation in the transmitted beam. The data for the transmission study in (2) and (3) are used to compensate for internal absorption of the distributed positron source. For the reconstruction of a circular phantom using the convolution algorithm, the percent root-mean-square uncertainty (%RMS) is related to the total measured positron events C and the incident photon flux per cm I/sub 0/. Our derivation of the %RMS uncertainty based on the propagation of errors yields a simple expression: %RMS = ..sqrt..K/sub 1//C + K/sub 2//I/sub 0/. The constants K/sub 1/ = 4.52 x 10/sup 8/ and K/sub 2/ = 1.48 x 10/sup 8/ were determined for a 20 cm diameter disc based on computer simulation. The projection data were analytically calculated with an attenuation coefficient ..mu.. = 0.0958 cm/sup -1/ for 140 angles between 0 and ..pi... Poisson noise was added to the positron coincidence events, the incident transmission events I/sub 0/, and the transmitted events. These results indicate that for a total number of incident transmission photons per cm of 2.0 x 10/sup 5/, the contrast resolution for a fixed spatial resolution is limited to 27% even with an infinite number of emission events. For a total of 10/sup 6/ emission events the contrast resolution is 34%.

  17. Use of high-resolution computed tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the management of stage IA adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Yoshihiro; Tsutani, Yasuhiro; Okada, Morihito

    2012-01-01

    Preoperative determination of malignant behavior is critical in choosing suitable therapeutic strategies such as sublobar resection for patients with small lung cancers. The aim of present review was to evaluate high-resolution computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography as tools for management of clinical stage IA adenocarcinoma.

  18. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter

    2010-01-01

    , and molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI...

  19. Positron emission tomography of incidentally detected small pulmonary nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Dirksen, A;

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging of small pulmonary nodules incidentally detected by spiral computed tomography (CT) in a high-risk population. Ten patients (five females, five males, aged 54-72 years) were recruited...... (approx. 3.3% of the entire study population). The prevalence of malignancy in this group was 50%. The accuracy of PET was high, in spite of the fact that seven patients had nodules smaller than 15 mm and two patients had bronchoalveolar cell carcinoma. This small prospective study indicates...... that subsequent assessment with FDG PET of small pulmonary nodules incidentally detected by CT has the potential to minimize the numbers of invasive procedures performed in individuals with a benign pulmonary lesion. FDG PET also increases the possibility of an early diagnosis as compared to the strategy...

  20. Sooting flame thermometry using emission/absorption tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Robert J.; Bonczyk, Paul A.

    1990-11-01

    A sooting flame temperature measurement technique has been demonstrated based on emission-absorption tomography. The approach applies the algorithms of Fourier transform tomography to deconvolve local soot absorption coefficient and Planck function (temperature) from sets of parallel line-of-sight measurements. The technique has the advantage that it is experimentally simple and does not require involved data reduction. For small particles, there is also no sensitivity of the inferred temperature to possibly uncertain medium parameters. Its main limitation seems to be that it will not work for vanishingly small absorption, but this could be overcome in practice by seeding and then performing all work at the wavelength of a seed resonance. While in principle limited to optically thin flames, accurate corrections for moderate optical thickness can often be made. A self-consistent comparison of measured global radiation from a sooting ethylene flame with a radiative transfer calculation based on measured temperature and soot absorption parameters has been performed.

  1. Sooting flame thermometry using emission/absorption tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, R.J.; Bonczyk, P.A. (United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, Connecticut 06108 (US))

    1990-11-01

    A sooting flame temperature measurement technique has been demonstrated based on emission--absorption tomography. The approach applies the algorithms of Fourier transform tomography to deconvolve local soot absorption coefficient and Planck function (temperature) from sets of parallel line-of-sight measurements. The technique has the advantage that it is experimentally simple and does not require involved data reduction. For small particles, there is also no sensitivity of the inferred temperature to possibly uncertain medium parameters. Its main limitation seems to be that it will not work well for vanishingly small absorption, but this could be overcome in practice by seeding and then performing all work at the wavelength of a seed resonance. While in principle limited to optically thin flames, accurate corrections for moderate optical thickness can often be made. A self-consistent comparison of measured global radiation from a sooting ethylene flame with a radiative transfer calculation based on measured temperature and soot absorption parameters has been performed.

  2. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavayssiere, Robert [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France)], E-mail: cab.lav@wanadoo.fr; Cabee, Anne-Elizabeth [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); Centre RMX, 80, avenue Felix Faure, 75105 Paris (France); Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel [Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); American Hospital of Paris, Nuclear Medicine, 63, boulevard Victor Hugo - BP 109, 92202 Neuilly sur Seine Cedex (France)

    2009-01-15

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005].

  3. Routine Bone Marrow Biopsy Has Little or No Therapeutic Consequence for Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Staged Treatment-Naive Patients With Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; d´Amore, Francesco; Juul Mylam, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Routine Bone Marrow Biopsy Has Little or No Therapeutic Consequence for Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Staged Treatment-Naive Patients With Hodgkin Lymphoma......Routine Bone Marrow Biopsy Has Little or No Therapeutic Consequence for Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Staged Treatment-Naive Patients With Hodgkin Lymphoma...

  4. [Positron emission tomography: diagnostic imaging on a molecular level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemann, K; Wyss, M; Wergin, M; Bley, C Rohrer; Ametamay, S; Bruehlmeier, M; Kaser-Hotz, B

    2004-08-01

    In human medicine positron emission tomography (PET) is a modern diagnostic imaging method. In the present paper we outline the physical principles of PET and give an overview over the main clinic fields where PET is being used, such as neurology, cardiology and oncology. Moreover, we present a current project in veterinary medicine (in collaboration with the Paul Scherrer Institute and the University Hospital Zurich), where a hypoxia tracer is applied to dogs and cats suffering from spontaneous tumors. Finally new developments in the field of PET were discussed.

  5. Kinetic modeling in pre-clinical positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntner, Claudia [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Seibersdorf (Austria). Biomedical Systems, Health and Environment Dept.

    2014-07-01

    Pre-clinical positron emission tomography (PET) has evolved in the last few years from pure visualization of radiotracer uptake and distribution towards quantification of the physiological parameters. For reliable and reproducible quantification the kinetic modeling methods used to obtain relevant parameters of radiotracer tissue interaction are important. Here we present different kinetic modeling techniques with a focus on compartmental models including plasma input models and reference tissue input models. The experimental challenges of deriving the plasma input function in rodents and the effect of anesthesia are discussed. Finally, in vivo application of kinetic modeling in various areas of pre-clinical research is presented and compared to human data.

  6. Direct conversion semiconductor detectors in positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Joshua W.; Gu, Yi; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-05-01

    Semiconductor detectors are playing an increasing role in ongoing research to improve image resolution, contrast, and quantitative accuracy in preclinical applications of positron emission tomography (PET). These detectors serve as a medium for direct detection of annihilation photons. Early clinical translation of this technology has shown improvements in image quality and tumor delineation for head and neck cancers, relative to conventional scintillator-based systems. After a brief outline of the basics of PET imaging and the physical detection mechanisms for semiconductor detectors, an overview of ongoing detector development work is presented. The capabilities of semiconductor-based PET systems and the current state of these devices are discussed.

  7. The statistical efficiency of filtered backprojection in emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuruc, A.

    1995-09-25

    While there has been much interest in developing tomographic reconstruction algorithms that are more statistically efficient than filtered backprojection (FB), the degree of improvement possible has not been well understood. We present an algorithm-independent theory of statistical accuracy attainable in emission tomography that provides a geometrical interpretation of the statistical efficiency of FB. Our analysis shows that, in general, one can build unbiased estimators with smaller variance than FB. The improvement in performance is obtained by exploiting the range properties of the Radon transform.

  8. RPC: from High Energy Physics to Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, G; Vecchi, C De; Giroletti, E; Musitelli, G; Nardo, R; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Sani, G; Torre, P; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica - Universita di Pavia and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Pavia - via A. Bassi, 6 Pavia - (Italy)

    2006-05-15

    A low cost gas-based charged particle detector, the Resistive Plate Counter (RPC) intensively used in fixed target and collider high energy experiments, is proposed as basic detector for Positron Emission Tomography. The performance of RPCs in terms of intrinsic space and time resolution and electronic pulse height response, makes it possible to transform standard RPCs into photon detectors and therefore to compensate for the photon sensitivity of scintillating crystals, when the efficiency of the complex crystal + photomultiplier is turned into standard quantum efficiency (q.e). Prototype multigap glass RPCs were developed which optimize {gamma} detection efficiency and thus might substitute the traditional scintillators setups.

  9. Oncological applications of positron emission tomography with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigo, P. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Paulus, P. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Kaschten, B.J. [Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Liege and Division of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Hustinx, R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Bury, T. [Division of Pneumology, University Hospital, Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Jerusalem, G. [Division of Onco-Hematology, University Hospital, Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Benoit, T. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Foidart-Willems, J. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium)

    1996-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is now primarily used in oncological indication owing to the successful application of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in an increasing number of clinical indications at different stages of diagnosis, and for staging and follow-up. This review first considers the biological characteristics of FDG and then discusses methodological considerations regarding its use. Clinical indications are considered, and the results achieved in respect of various organs and tumour types are reviewed in depth. The review concludes with a brief consideration of the ways in which clinical PET might be improved. (orig.). With 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Acute Calculous Cholecystitis Missed on Computed Tomography and Ultrasound but Diagnosed with Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Mari Aparici

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 69-year-old patient who underwent ascending aortic aneurysm repair with aortic valve replacement. On postsurgical day 12, he developed leukocytosis and low-grade fevers. The chest computed tomography (CT showed a periaortic hematoma which represents a postsurgical change from aortic aneurysm repair, and a small pericardial effusion. The abdominal ultrasound showed cholelithiasis without any sign of cholecystitis. Finally, a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-positron emission tomography (PET/CT examination was ordered to find the cause of fever of unknown origin, and it showed increased FDG uptake in the gallbladder wall, with no uptake in the lumen. FDG-PET/CT can diagnose acute cholecystitis in patients with nonspecific clinical symptoms and laboratory results.

  11. The role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in planning radiotherapy in endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcock, Bryony; Narayan, Kailash; Drummond, Elizabeth; Bernshaw, David; Wells, Elizabeth; Hicks, Rodney J

    2015-05-01

    The optimal method of assessing disease distribution in endometrial cancer is widely debated. Knowledge of disease distribution assists in planning adjuvant radiotherapy; in this study we used positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to assess disease distribution before radiotherapy. Seventy-three consecutive patients referred to the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre for adjuvant radiotherapy for endometrial cancer, with either high-risk disease after a hysterectomy or recurrent disease, had a PET/CT before treatment. The findings on PET/CT and clinical course were recorded. PET/CT found additional disease in 35% of postoperative patients, changing planned treatment in 31%. In the group with known recurrence, additional disease was found in 72%, changing management in 36%. PET/CT is a valuable tool for planning radiotherapy in endometrial cancer.

  12. Fasciola Hepatica Mimicking Malignancy on 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sürücü, Erdem; Demir, Yusuf; Dülger, Ahmet C.; Batur, Abdüssamed; Ölmez, Şehmus; Kitapçı, Mehmet T.

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old female with complaints of gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, fatigue, vomiting, nausea, and weight loss was diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumor after removal of a 2 mm lesion from the stomach with endoscopic biopsy. Her magnetic resonance imaging that was performed due to on-going symptoms showed multiple linear hypointense lesions in the liver. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan was performed for differential diagnosis, which showed high fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in these lesions. Clinical and laboratory findings revealed the final diagnosis as Fasciola hepatica. The imaging features of this case is presented to aid in differentiating this infectious disease from malignancy and avoid misdiagnosis on FDG-PET/CT. PMID:27751978

  13. Fasciola Hepatica Mimicking Malignancy on 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Sürücü

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old female with complaints of gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, fatigue, vomiting, nausea, and weight loss was diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumor after removal of a 2 mm lesion from the stomach with endoscopic biopsy. Her magnetic resonance imaging that was performed due to on-going symptoms showed multiple linear hypointense lesions in the liver. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT scan was performed for differential diagnosis, which showed high fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG uptake in these lesions. Clinical and laboratory findings revealed the final diagnosis as Fasciola hepatica. The imaging features of this case is presented to aid in differentiating this infectious disease from malignancy and avoid misdiagnosis on FDG-PET/CT.

  14. F-18 Fluorodeoxy Glucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Findings in a Rare Case of Penile Leiomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuruva Manohar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile cancer is a rare entity accounting for only 0.4% all male malignancies. Penile leiomyosarcomas are even rarer with only around 35 cases reported in literature. We report a rare case of penile leiomyosarcoma illustrating F-18 Fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT features and histopathology correlation.

  15. Anti-3-[18F]FACBC Positron Emission Tomography-Computerized Tomography and 111In-Capromab Pendetide Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography-Computerized Tomography for Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Amzat, Rianot; Bowman, F. DuBois; Halkar, Raghuveer K.; Master, Viraj A.; Nye, Jonathon A.; Odewole, Oluwaseun A.; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; Savir-Baruch, Bital; Alaei-Taleghani, Pooneh; Goodman, Mark M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We prospectively evaluated the amino acid analogue positron emission tomography radiotracer anti-3-[18F]FACBC compared to ProstaScint® (111In-capromab pendetide) single photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography to detect recurrent prostate carcinoma. Materials and Methods A total of 93 patients met study inclusion criteria who underwent anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography plus 111In-capromab pendetide single photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography for suspected recurrent prostate carcinoma within 90 days. Reference standards were applied by a multidisciplinary board. We calculated diagnostic performance for detecting disease. Results In the 91 of 93 patients with sufficient data for a consensus on the presence or absence of prostate/bed disease anti-3-[18F]FACBC had 90.2% sensitivity, 40.0% specificity, 73.6% accuracy, 75.3% positive predictive value and 66.7% negative predictive value compared to 111In-capromab pendetide with 67.2%, 56.7%, 63.7%, 75.9% and 45.9%, respectively. In the 70 of 93 patients with a consensus on the presence or absence of extraprostatic disease anti-3-[18F]FACBC had 55.0% sensitivity, 96.7% specificity, 72.9% accuracy, 95.7% positive predictive value and 61.7% negative predictive value compared to 111In-capromabpendetide with10.0%, 86.7%, 42.9%, 50.0% and 41.9%, respectively. Of 77 index lesions used to prove positivity histological proof was obtained in 74 (96.1%). Anti-3-[18F]FACBC identified 14 more positive prostate bed recurrences (55 vs 41) and 18 more patients with extraprostatic involvement (22 vs 4). Anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography correctly up-staged 18 of 70 cases (25.7%) in which there was a consensus on the presence or absence of extraprostatic involvement. Conclusions Better diagnostic performance was noted for anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography than for 111In

  16. Instrumentation for time of-flight position emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullah, Muhammad Nasir; Pratiwi, Eva; Yeom, Jung Yeol [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Ji Min; Choi, Ho Jung [Kumoh National Institute of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a molecular imaging modality that provides information at the molecular level. This system is composed of radiation detectors to detect incoming coincident annihilation gamma photons emitted from the radiopharmaceutical injected into a patient's body and uses these data to reconstruct images. A major trend in PET instrumentation is the development of time-of-flight positron emission tomography (ToF-PET). In ToF-PET, the time information (the instant the radiation is detected) is incorporated for image reconstruction. Therefore, precise and accurate timing recording is crucial in ToF-PET. ToF-PET leads to better localization of the annihilation event and thus results in overall improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image. Several factors affect the timing performance of ToF-PET. In this article, the background, early research and recent advances in ToF-PET instrumentation are presented. Emphasis is placed on the various types of scintillators, photodetectors and electronic circuitry for use in ToF-PET, and their impact on timing resolution is discussed.

  17. Benign breast lesions detected by positron emission tomography-computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benveniste, Ana P., E-mail: apbenveniste@mdanderson.org [Department of Diagnostic Radiology,The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yang, Wei, E-mail: wyang@mdanderson.org [Department of Diagnostic Radiology,The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Benveniste, Marcelo F., E-mail: mfbenveniste@mdanderson.org [Department of Diagnostic Radiology,The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mawlawi, Osama R., E-mail: omawlawi@mdanderson.org [Department of imaging physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Marom, Edith M., E-mail: emarom@mdanderson.org [Department of Diagnostic Radiology,The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission computed tomography (FDG PET-CT) is widely used in the initial staging and response evaluation of patients with malignancy. This review describes a spectrum of benign breast findings incidentally detected by FDG PET-CT at staging that may be misinterpreted as malignancy. We describe the pattern of distribution and intensity of FDG uptake in a spectrum of benign breast diseases with their corresponding typical morphological imaging characteristics to help the nuclear medicine physician and/or general radiologist identify benign lesions, avoiding unnecessary breast imaging work-up and biopsies.

  18. CO2BOLD assessment of moyamoya syndrome: Validation with single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellaton, Alain; Bijlenga, Philippe; Bouchez, Laurie; Cuvinciuc, Victor; Barnaure, Isabelle; Garibotto, Valentina; Lövblad, Karl-Olof; Haller, Sven

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the assessment of cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) using CO2BOLD magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) vs positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as reference standard. METHODS Ten consecutive patients (8 women, mean age of 41 ± 26 years) with moyamoya syndrome underwent 14 pre-surgical evaluations for external-internal carotid artery bypass surgery. CVR was assessed using CO2BOLD and PET (4)/SPECT (11) with a maximum interval of 36 d, and evaluated by two experienced neuroradiologists. RESULTS The inter-rater agreement was 0.81 for SPECT (excellent), 0.43 for PET (fair) and 0.7 for CO2BOLD (good). In 9/14 cases, there was a correspondence between CO2BOLD and PET/SPECT. In 4/14 cases, CVR was over-estimated in CO2BOLD, while in 1/14 case, CVR was underestimated in CO2BOLD. The sensitivity of CO2BOLD was 86% and a specificity of 43%. CONCLUSION CO2BOLD can be used for pre-surgical assessment of CVR in patients with moyamoya syndrome and combines the advantages of absent irradiation, high availability of MRI and assessment of brain parenchyma, cerebral vessels and surrogate CVR in one stop. PMID:27928470

  19. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Orazio; Filippi, Luca; Manni, Carlo; Santoni, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Anatomic imaging procedures (computed tomography [CT] and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) have become essential tools for brain tumor assessment. Functional images (positron emission tomography [PET] and single-photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]) can provide additional information useful during the diagnostic workup to determine the degree of malignancy and as a substitute or guide for biopsy. After surgery and/or radiotherapy, nuclear medicine examinations are essential to assess persistence of tumor, to differentiate recurrence from radiation necrosis and gliosis, and to monitor the disease. The combination of functional images with anatomic ones is of the utmost importance for a full evaluation of these patients, which can be obtained by means of imaging fusion. Despite the fast-growing diffusion of PET, in most cases of brain tumors, SPECT studies are adequate and provide results that parallel those obtained with PET. The main limitation of SPECT imaging with brain tumor-seeking radiopharmaceuticals is the lack of precise anatomic details; this drawback is overcome by the fusion with morphological studies that provide an anatomic map to scintigraphic data. In the past, software-based fusion of independently performed SPECT and CT or MRI demonstrated usefulness for brain tumor assessment, but this process is often time consuming and not practical for everyday nuclear medicine studies. The recent development of dual-modality integrated imaging systems, which allow the acquisition of SPECT and CT images in the same scanning session, and their co-registration by means of the hardware, has facilitated this process. In SPECT studies of brain tumors with various radiopharmaceuticals, fused images are helpful in providing the precise localization of neoplastic lesions, and in excluding the disease in sites of physiologic tracer uptake. This information is useful for optimizing diagnosis, therapy monitoring, and radiotherapy treatment planning, with a

  20. Plasma Emission Profile Recreation using Soft X-Ray Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, J. W.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    With sufficient views from multiple diode arrays, soft X-ray tomography is an invaluable plasma diagnostic because it is a non-perturbing method to reconstruct the emission within the interior of the plasma. In preparation for the installation of new SXR arrays in HBT-EP, we compute high-resolution tomographic reconstructions of discharges having kink-like structures that rotate nearly rigidly. By assuming a uniform angular mapping from the kink mode rotation, Δϕ ~ ωΔ t, a temporal sequence from a single 16-diode fan array represents as many as 16 x 100 independent views. We follow the procedure described by Wang and Granetz and use Bessel basis functions to take the inverse Radon transform. This transform is fit to our data using a least-squares method to estimate the internal SXR emissivity as a sum of polar functions. By varying different parameters of the transformation, we optimize the quality of our recreation of the emission profile and quantify how the reconstruction changes with the azimuthal order of the transform. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  1. Positron Emission Tomography with Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandsson, K.

    1996-10-01

    The development of two different low-cost scanners for positron emission tomography (PET) based on 3D acquisition are presented. The first scanner consists of two rotating scintillation cameras, and produces quantitative images, which have shown to be clinically useful. The second one is a system with two opposed sets of detectors, based on the limited angle tomography principle, dedicated for mammographic studies. The development of low-cost PET scanners can increase the clinical impact of PET, which is an expensive modality, only available at a few centres world-wide and mainly used as a research tool. A 3D reconstruction method was developed that utilizes all the available data. The size of the data-sets is considerably reduced, using the single-slice rebinning approximation. The 3D reconstruction is divided into 1D axial deconvolution and 2D transaxial reconstruction, which makes it relatively fast. This method was developed for the rotating scanner, but was also implemented for multi-ring scanners with and without inter plane septa. An iterative 3D reconstruction method was developed for the limited angle scanner, based on the new concept of `mobile pixels`, which reduces the finite pixel errors and leads to an improved signal to noise ratio. 100 refs.

  2. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, R.F. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Epilepsy is a common neurologic disorder which has just begun to be studied with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). Epilepsy usually is studied with electroencephalographic (EEG) techniques that demonstrate the physiologic changes that occur during seizures, and with neuroimaging techniques that show the brain structures where seizures originate. Neither method alone has been adequate to describe the pathophysiology of the patient with epilepsy. EEG techniques lack anatomic sensitivity, and there are no structural abnormalities shown by neuroimaging which are specific for epilepsy. Functional imaging (FI) has developed as a physiologic tool with anatomic sensitivity, and SPECT has been promoted as a FI technique because of its potentially wide availability. However, SPECT is early in its development and its clinical utility for epilepsy still has to be demonstrated. To understand this role of SPECT, consideration must be given to the pathophysiology of epilepsy, brain physiology, types of seizure, epileptic syndromes, and the SPECT technique itself. 44 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available.

  4. Positron emission tomography in CNS drug discovery and drug monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Markus; Vernaleken, Ingo; Rösch, Frank

    2014-11-26

    Molecular imaging methods such as positron emission tomography (PET) are increasingly involved in the development of new drugs. Using radioactive tracers as imaging probes, PET allows the determination of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a drug candidate, via recording target engagement, the pattern of distribution, and metabolism. Because of the noninvasive nature and quantitative end point obtainable by molecular imaging, it seems inherently suited for the examination of a pharmaceutical's behavior in the brain. Molecular imaging, most especially PET, can therefore be a valuable tool in CNS drug research. In this Perspective, we present the basic principles of PET, the importance of appropriate tracer selection, the impact of improved radiopharmaceutical chemistry in radiotracer development, and the different roles that PET can fulfill in CNS drug research.

  5. Temporoparietal cortex in aphasia. Evidence from positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metter, E.J.; Hanson, W.R.; Jackson, C.A.; Kempler, D.; van Lancker, D.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E. (National Institute of Aging, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Forty-four aphasic patients were examined with (F18)-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in a resting state to determine whether consistent glucose metabolic abnormalities were present. Ninety-seven percent of subjects showed metabolic abnormalities in the angular gyrus, 89% in the supramarginal gyrus, and 87% in the lateral and transverse superior temporal gyrus. Pearson product moment correlations were calculated between regional metabolic measures and performance on the Western Aphasia Battery. No significant correlations were found between the Western Aphasia Battery scores and right hemisphere metabolic measures. Most left hemisphere regions correlated with more than one score from the Western Aphasia Battery. Temporal but not frontal regions had significant correlations to the comprehension score. The left temporoparietal region was consistently affected in these subjects, suggesting that common features in the aphasias were caused by left temporoparietal dysfunction, while behavioral differences resulted from (1) the extent of temporoparietal changes, and (2) dysfunction elsewhere in the brain, particularly the left frontal and subcortical areas.

  6. Positron Emission Tomography: state of the art and future developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzichemi, M.

    2016-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays a fundamental role in medical imaging, with a wide range of applications covering, among the others, oncology, neurology and cardiology. PET has undergone a steady technological evolution since its introduction in mid 20th century, from the development of 3D PET in the late 1980s, to the invention of PET/CT in the 1990s and more recently with the introduction of PET/MR scanners. The current research topics aiming to develop the next generation of PET scanners are summarized in this paper, focusing on the efforts to increase the sensitivity of the detectors, as long as improving their timing, spatial and energy resolutions, with the final goal of reducing the amount of radioactive dose received by the patients and the duration of the exams while improving at the same time the detectability of lesions.

  7. Determination of the attenuation map in emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Zaidi, H

    2002-01-01

    Reliable attenuation correction methods for quantitative emission computed tomography (ECT) require accurate delineation of the body contour and often necessitate knowledge of internal anatomical structure. Two broad classes of methods have been used to calculate the attenuation map referred to as "transmissionless" and transmission-based attenuation correction techniques. While calculated attenuation correction belonging to the first class of methods is appropriate for brain studies, more adequate methods must be performed in clinical applications where the attenuation coefficient distribution is not known a priori, and for areas of inhomogeneous attenuation such as the chest. Measured attenuation correction overcomes this problem and utilizes different approaches to determine this map including transmission scanning, segmented magnetic resonance images or appropriately scaled X-ray CT scans acquired either independently on separate or simultaneously on multimodality imaging systems. Combination of data acqu...

  8. A Case of Corticobasal Degeneration Studied with Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nagasawa

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured cerebral blood flow, oxygen metabolism, glucose utilization, and dopamine metabolism in the brain of a patient with corticobasal degeneration using positron emission tomography (PET. The clinical picture is distinctive, comprising features referable to both cortical and basal ganglionic dysfunction. Brain imagings of glucose and dopamine metabolism can demonstrate greater abnormalities in the cerebral cortex and in the striatum contralateral to the more affected side than those of blood flow and oxygen metabolism. This unique combination study measuring both cerebral glucose utilization and dopamine metabolism in the nigrostriatal system can provide efficient information about the dysfunctions which are correlated with individual clinical symptoms, and this study is essential to diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration.

  9. Low Utility of Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Detecting Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients Before Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Faisal; Kabbani, Monther; Abaalkhail, Faisal; Chorley, Alicia; Elbeshbeshy, Hany; Al-Hamoudi, Waleed; Alabbad, Saleh; Boehnert, Markus U; Alsofayan, Mohammad; Al-Kattan, Wael; Ahmed, Baderaldeen; Broering, Dieter; Al Sebayel, Mohamed; Elsiesy, Hussien

    2017-02-01

    Our program routinely used fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography as part of the liver transplant evaluation of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of this imaging modality in the pretransplant work-up. This was a retrospective chart review of our liver transplant database from January 2011 to December 2014 for all patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent a liver transplant. Collected data included age, sex, cause of liver disease, imaging modality, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography results, explant tissue analysis, type of transplant, and transplant outcome. During the study period, 275 liver transplants were performed. Fifty-three patients had hepatocellular carcinoma; 41 underwent fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Twenty-nine patients underwent living-donor liver transplant, and 12 patients underwent deceased-donor liver transplant. One of the 41 patients with negative FDG-imaging results had no evidence of hepatocellular carcinoma in the explant and was excluded from the study. The patients' average age was 58 years (range, 22-72 y), and 28 patients were men. The cause of liver disease was hepatitis C virus in 24 patients, cryptogenic cirrhosis in 12 patients, and hepatitis B virus in 5 patients. One patient had no hepatocellular carcinoma on explants and was excluded from the study. Twenty-five patients had hepatocellular carcinoma that met the Milan criteria, 7 were within the UCSF (University of California, San Francisco) criteria, and 8 exceeded the UCSF criteria. Of the 40 patients, 11 had positive fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography results (27.5%) with evidence of hepatocellular carcinoma in the explant; the remaining 29 patients (72.5%) had negative results. The fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography results were positive in 16% (4 of

  10. Fundamental studies of myocardial defect size quantification using positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneyama, Tatsuya [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-04-01

    In Flurine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) acquisition, a transmission scan is usually performed before the PET tracer injection (cold transmission method), followed by a subsequent emission scan. However, this procedure is time consuming. An alternative approach, in which the transmission scan is performed after the emission scan (hot transmission method), would significantly reduce the time required for data acquisition. Recently, three-dimensional PET acquisition (3D PET) has become available. The counting sensitivity is much higher in 3D PET than in conventional two-dimensional PET (2D PET), resulting in a shorter acquisition time and reduced radiation exposure for the patient. On the other hand, {sup 18}F-FDG imaging using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), a more widely available method than PET, has emerged as an alternative to PET. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of measurement of myocardial defect sizes by these new techniques, using a chest phantom. Acquisitions were performed using an elliptical cylinder chest phantom. Plastic inserts, ranging in size from 2-60% of the myocardium (n=12), were used as simulated models of transmural myocardial infarction. Fluorine-18 was given into each part of the phantom. PET imaging with cold and hot transmission methods, 3D PET, and SPECT imaging were performed with different acquisition times and different radioisotope concentrations. All PET and SPECT data were analyzed using a semiquantitative polar map approach. Defect sizes were quantified using various cutoff thresholds, and were expressed as a percentage of the left ventricular myocardium. The PET and SPECT measurements were compared with the true defect sizes. Among the various cutoff levels tested, the mean absolute difference between the measured and true defect sizes was minimal at 50% of peak activity for both PET and SPECT. The PET measurements with the hot transmission

  11. Use of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Radiation Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezban Berberoğlu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy (RT plays an important role in the treatment of lung cancer. Accurate diagnosis and staging are crucial in the delivery of RT with curative intent. Target miss can be prevented by accurate determination of tumor contours during RT planning. Currently, tumor contours are determined manually by computed tomography (CT during RT planning. This method leads to differences in delineation of tumor volume between users. Given the change in RT tools and methods due to rapidly developing technology, it is now more significant to accurately delineate the tumor tissue. F18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (F18 FDG PET/CT has been established as an accurate method in correctly staging and detecting tumor dissemination in lung cancer. Since it provides both anatomic and biologic information, F18 FDG PET decreases interuser variability in tumor delineation. For instance, tumor volumes may be decreased as atelectasis and malignant tissue can be more accurately differentiated, as well as better evaluation of benign and malignant lymph nodes given the difference in FDG uptake. Using F18 FDG PET/CT, the radiation dose can be escalated without serious adverse effects in lung cancer. In this study, we evaluated the contribution of F18 FDG PET/CT for RT planning in lung cancer.

  12. Virtual positron emission tomography/computed tomography-bronchoscopy: possibilities, advantages and limitations of clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seemann, Marcus D. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); Schaefer, Juergen F. [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Englmeier, Karl-Hans [Institute of Medical Informatics, GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the possibilities, advantages and limitations of virtual bronchoscopy using data sets from positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT). Twelve consecutive patients with lung cancer underwent PET/CT. PET was performed with F-18-labelled 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG). The tracheobronchial system was segmented with a volume-growing algorithm, using the CT data sets, and visualized with a shaded-surface rendering method. The primary tumours and the lymph node metastases were segmented for virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the CT data set and for virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy using the PET/CT data set. Virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the low-dose or diagnostic CT facilitates the detection of anatomical/morphological structure changes of the tracheobronchial system. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy was superior to virtual CT-bronchoscopy in the detection of lymph node metastases (P=0.001), because it uses the CT information and the molecular/metabolic information from PET. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy with a transparent colour-coded shaded-surface rendering model is expected to improve the diagnostic accuracy of identification and characterization of malignancies, assessment of tumour staging, differentiation of viable tumour tissue from atelectases and scars, verification of infections, evaluation of therapeutic response and detection of an early stage of recurrence that is not detectable or is misjudged in comparison with virtual CT-bronchoscopy. (orig.)

  13. Small-Animal Imaging Using Clinical Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Super-Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank P. DiFilippo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering the high cost of dedicated small-animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT, an acceptable alternative in many situations might be clinical PET/CT. However, spatial resolution and image quality are of concern. The utility of clinical PET/CT for small-animal research and image quality improvements from super-resolution (spatial subsampling were investigated. National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA NU 4 phantom and mouse data were acquired with a clinical PET/CT scanner, as both conventional static and stepped scans. Static scans were reconstructed with and without point spread function (PSF modeling. Stepped images were postprocessed with iterative deconvolution to produce super-resolution images. Image quality was markedly improved using the super-resolution technique, avoiding certain artifacts produced by PSF modeling. The 2 mm rod of the NU 4 phantom was visualized with high contrast, and the major structures of the mouse were well resolved. Although not a perfect substitute for a state-of-the-art small-animal PET/CT scanner, a clinical PET/CT scanner with super-resolution produces acceptable small-animal image quality for many preclinical research studies.

  14. Positron emission tomography / computerized tomography evaluation of primary Hodgkin's disease of liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, V S; Purandare, N C; Gujral, S; Shah, S; Nair, R; Rangarajan, V

    2009-01-01

    Occurrence of primary Hodgkin's lymphoma (PHL) of the liver is extremely rare. We report on a case of a 60-year-old male who presented with liver mass and B-symptomatology. Hepatoma or hepatic metastasis from a gastrointestinal primary was initially suspected. Tumor markers like AFP, CEA, Total PSA, and CA-19.9 were within normal limits. Positron Emission Tomography / Computerized Tomography (PET/CT) revealed a large hepatic lesion and a nodal mass in the porta hepatis. A liver biopsy was consistent with Hodgkin's lymphoma. There was complete regression of the hepatic lesion and evidence of shrinkage of the nodal mass following four cycles of chemotherapy. 18F Fluro -de-oxy Glucose (FDG) PET / CT in this case helped in establishing a primary hepatic lymphoma by demonstrating the absence of pathologically hypermetabolic foci in any other nodes or organs. PET / CT scan is a useful adjunct to conventional imaging and histopathology, not only to establish the initial diagnosis, but also to monitor treatment response in PHL.

  15. Positron emission tomography/computer tomography in guidance of extrahepatic hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common primary cancers in the world. Surgery is the gold standard for treatment of patients with HCC. Recurrence and metastasis are the major obstacles to further improve the prognosis of HCC. Most recurrences are intrahepatic. However, 30% of the recurrences are extrahepatic. The role of resection in intrahepatic recurrences is widely accepted. The role of resection in extrahepatic HCC recurrence and metastasis is not well established. 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computer tomography (PET/CT) is useful in detecting distant metastasis from a variety of malignancies and shows superior accuracy to conventional imaging modalities in identification of intrahepatic and extrahepatic metastasis. We present one patient with one new isolated omental lymph node metastasis, who had a history of huge HCC resected six years ago. The metastatic focus was identified with 18 F-FDG PET/CT and resected. The follow-up revealed good prognosis with a long-term survival potential after resection of the omental lymphatic metastasis.

  16. Comparison of diffuse optical tomography of human breast with whole-body and breast-only positron emission tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Konecky, Soren D.; Choe, Regine; Corlu, Alper; Lee, Kijoon; Wiener, Rony; Srinivas, Shyam M.; Saffer, Janet R.; FREIFELDER, RICHARD; Karp, Joel S.; Hajjioui, Nassim; Azar, Fred; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2008-01-01

    We acquire and compare three-dimensional tomographic breast images of three females with suspicious masses using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Co-registration of DOT and PET images was facilitated by a mutual information maximization algorithm. We also compared DOT and whole-body PET images of 14 patients with breast abnormalities. Positive correlations were found between total hemoglobin concentration and tissue scattering measured by DOT, and fluor...

  17. The diagnostic yield of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in recurrent testicular seminoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Bantis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT scan imaging is undoubtedly a significant evolution in oncological urology, although at present of limited use in every day urology practice. The aim of this study is to highlight the indication and diagnostic accuracy of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in the staging of a patient with metachronous bilateral testicular seminoma, elevated tumor markers, and equivocal conventional imaging findings.

  18. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography comparison of gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Fu, Qiang; Dong, You-Wen; Liu, Jian-Jing; Song,Xiu-yu; Dai, Dong; Zuo, Cong; Xu, Wen-Gui

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) features in gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma. METHODS Patients with newly diagnosed gastric lymphoma or gastric carcinoma who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT prior to treatment were included in this study. We reviewed and analyzed the PET/CT features of gastric wall lesions, including FDG avidity, pattern (focal/diffuse), and intensity [maximal standard uptake value: (SUVmax)]. The correlati...

  19. Markerless motion tracking of awake animals in positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyme, Andre; Se, Stephen; Meikle, Steven; Angelis, Georgios; Ryder, Will; Popovic, Kata; Yatigammana, Dylan; Fulton, Roger

    2014-11-01

    Noninvasive functional imaging of awake, unrestrained small animals using motion-compensation removes the need for anesthetics and enables an animal's behavioral response to stimuli or administered drugs to be studied concurrently with imaging. While the feasibility of motion-compensated radiotracer imaging of awake rodents using marker-based optical motion tracking has been shown, markerless motion tracking would avoid the risk of marker detachment, streamline the experimental workflow, and potentially provide more accurate pose estimates over a greater range of motion. We have developed a stereoscopic tracking system which relies on native features on the head to estimate motion. Features are detected and matched across multiple camera views to accumulate a database of head landmarks and pose is estimated based on 3D-2D registration of the landmarks to features in each image. Pose estimates of a taxidermal rat head phantom undergoing realistic rat head motion via robot control had a root mean square error of 0.15 and 1.8 mm using markerless and marker-based motion tracking, respectively. Markerless motion tracking also led to an appreciable reduction in motion artifacts in motion-compensated positron emission tomography imaging of a live, unanesthetized rat. The results suggest that further improvements in live subjects are likely if nonrigid features are discriminated robustly and excluded from the pose estimation process.

  20. Positron emission tomography scans on kanji and kana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Yasuhisa [Mitsui Memorial Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    We reanalyzed our positron emission tomography (PET) study on reading of Japanese kanji (morphogram) words, kana (phonogram) words and kana nonwords, using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM). The basal occipital and occipito-temporal areas were activated in common, among which activity was most pronounced in the fusiform/inferior temporal gyri with kanji and in the inferior occipital gyrus with kana. The results were consistent with the clinical observations that damage to the posterior inferior temporal cortex including the fusiform/inferior temporal gyri causes alexia with agraphia for kanji, whereas damage to the posterior occipital area including the inferior occipital gyrus causes pure alexia for kana. Bases on the present results and the lesion studies, a dual-route hypothesis that modifies Iwata's model of reading about the Japanese language was proposed. That is, the middle occipital gyrus, deep perisylvian temporoparietal cortex and posterior temporal gyrus constitute a dorsal route for reading and process phonology for words, whereas the inferior occipital, fusiform and posterior inferior temporal gyri constitute a ventral route for reading and process orthography and lexico-semantics for words. The ventral route may gain dominance in reading, according as a word is repeatedly presented. (author)

  1. FPGA-Based Pulse Parameter Discovery for Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselman, Michael; Hauck, Scott; Lewellen, Thomas K; Miyaoka, Robert S

    2009-10-24

    Modern Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are capable of performing complex digital signal processing algorithms with clock rates well above 100MHz. This, combined with FPGA's low expense and ease of use make them an ideal technology for a data acquisition system for a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. The University of Washington is producing a series of high-resolution, small-animal PET scanners that utilize FPGAs as the core of the front-end electronics. For these next generation scanners, functions that are typically performed in dedicated circuits, or offline, are being migrated to the FPGA. This will not only simplify the electronics, but the features of modern FPGAs can be utilizes to add significant signal processing power to produce higher resolution images. In this paper we report how we utilize the reconfigurable property of an FPGA to self-calibrate itself to determine pulse parameters necessary for some of the pulse processing steps. Specifically, we show how the FPGA can generate a reference pulse based on actual pulse data instead of a model. We also report how other properties of the photodetector pulse (baseline, pulse length, average pulse energy and event triggers) can be determined automatically by the FPGA.

  2. Application of silicon photomultipliers to positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncali, Emilie; Cherry, Simon R

    2011-04-01

    Historically, positron emission tomography (PET) systems have been based on scintillation crystals coupled to photomultipliers tubes (PMTs). However, the limited quantum efficiency, bulkiness, and relatively high cost per unit surface area of PMTs, along with the growth of new applications for PET, offers opportunities for other photodetectors. Among these, small-animal scanners, hybrid PET/MRI systems, and incorporation of time-of-flight information are of particular interest and require low-cost, compact, fast, and magnetic field compatible photodetectors. With high quantum efficiency and compact structure, avalanche photodiodes (APDs) overcome several of the drawbacks of PMTs, but this is offset by degraded signal-to-noise and timing properties. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) offer an alternative solution, combining many of the advantages of PMTs and APDs. They have high gain, excellent timing properties and are insensitive to magnetic fields. At the present time, SiPM technology is rapidly developing and therefore an investigation into optimal design and operating conditions is underway together with detailed characterization of SiPM-based PET detectors. Published data are extremely promising and show good energy and timing resolution, as well as the ability to decode small scintillator arrays. SiPMs clearly have the potential to be the photodetector of choice for some, or even perhaps most, PET systems.

  3. Characterization of time resolved photodetector systems for Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Powolny, François

    The main topic of this work is the study of detector systems composed of a scintillator, a photodetector and readout electronics, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In particular, the timing properties of such detector systems are studied. The first idea is to take advantage of the good timing properties of the NINO chip, which is a fast preamplifier-discriminator developed for the ALICE Time of flight detector at CERN. This chip uses a time over threshold technique that is to be applied for the first time in medical imaging applications. A unique feature of this technique is that it delivers both timing and energy information with a single digital pulse, the time stamp with the rising edge and the energy from the pulse width. This entails substantial simplification of the entire readout architecture of a tomograph. The scintillator chosen in the detector system is LSO. Crystals of 2x2x10mm3 were used. For the photodetector, APDs were first used, and were then replaced by SiPMs to make use of their highe...

  4. Epithelioid sarcoma with muscle metastasis detected by positron emission tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oya Masafumi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelioid sarcoma is an uncommon high-grade sarcoma, mostly involving the extremities. Case presentation A 33-year-old man was referred to our institute with a diagnosis of Volkmann's contracture with the symptom of flexion contracture of the fingers associated with swelling in his left forearm. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed abnormal signal intensity, comprising iso-signal intensity on T1- and high-signal intensity on T2-weighted images surrounding the flexor tendons in the forearm. Diagnosis of epithelioid sarcoma was made by open biopsy, and amputation at the upper arm was then undertaken. [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET detected multiple lesions with an increased uptake in the right neck, the bilateral upper arms and the right thigh, as well as in the left axillary lymph nodes, with maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax ranging from 2.0 to 5.5 g/ml. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed that there was a lesion within the right thigh muscle which was suggestive of metastasis, even though the lesion was occult clinically. Conclusion Increased uptake on FDG-PET might be representative of epithelioid sarcoma, and for this reason FDG-PET may be useful for detecting metastasis. Muscle metastasis is not well documented in epithelioid sarcoma. Accordingly, the frequency of muscle metastasis, including occult metastasis, needs to be further analyzed.

  5. Positron Emission Tomography Detector Development for Plant Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisenberger, A G; McKisson, J; Stolin, A; Zorn, C; Howell, C R; Crowell, A S; Reid, C D; Majewski, S

    2010-01-01

    There are opportunities for the development of new tools to advance plant biology research through the use of radionuclides. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Duke University, West Virginia University and the University of Maryland are collaborating on the development of radionuclide imaging technologies to facilitate plant biology research. Biological research into optimizing plant productivity under various environmental constraints, biofuel and carbon sequestration research are areas that could potentially benefit from new imaging technologies. Using 11CO2 tracers, the investigators at Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory / Duke University Phytotron are currently researching the dynamical responses of plants to environmental changes forecasted from increasing greenhouse trace gases involved in global change. The biological research primary focus is to investigate the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nutrients limitation on carbon and nitrogen dynamics in plants. We report here on preliminary results of 11CO2 plant imaging experiments involving barley plants using Jefferson Lab dual planar positron emission tomography detectors to image 11CO2 in live barley plants. New detector designs will be developed based on the preliminary studies reported here and further planned.

  6. Positron Emission Tomography Application to Drug Development and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Piero A.

    The research for the identification and development of new drugs represents a very complex process implying long times and massive investments. This process was not able to parallel the rate of discoveries made in the field of genomic and molecular biology and a gap created between demand of new drugs and the ability of pharmaceutical companies to select good candidates. Positron Emission Tomography, among the different Molecular Imaging modalities, could represent a new tool for the early assessment and screening of new drug candidates and, due to its physical performances and the characteristics of positron-labeled tracers, gain the role of "Biomarker" accepted by the Companies and the Regulatory Bodies of Drug Agencies. To fulfil this task PET has to exploit all of its special features such as data absolute quantification and modelling, high spatial resolution and dynamic imaging. Relevant efforts need to be directed to the careful design and validation of experimental protocols with the main goal of achieving consistency in multi- centric trials.

  7. Brain single photon emission computed tomography in neonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denays, R.; Van Pachterbeke, T.; Tondeur, M.; Spehl, M.; Toppet, V.; Ham, H.; Piepsz, A.; Rubinstein, M.; Nol, P.H.; Haumont, D. (Free Universities of Brussels (Belgium))

    1989-08-01

    This study was designed to rate the clinical value of ({sup 123}I)iodoamphetamine (IMP) or ({sup 99m}Tc) hexamethyl propylene amine oxyme (HM-PAO) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in neonates, especially in those likely to develop cerebral palsy. The results showed that SPECT abnormalities were congruent in most cases with structural lesions demonstrated by ultrasonography. However, mild bilateral ventricular dilatation and bilateral subependymal porencephalic cysts diagnosed by ultrasound were not associated with an abnormal SPECT finding. In contrast, some cortical periventricular and sylvian lesions and all the parasagittal lesions well visualized in SPECT studies were not diagnosed by ultrasound scans. In neonates with subependymal and/or intraventricular hemorrhage the existence of a parenchymal abnormality was only diagnosed by SPECT. These results indicate that ({sup 123}I)IMP or ({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO brain SPECT shows a potential clinical value as the neurodevelopmental outcome is clearly related to the site, the extent, and the number of cerebral lesions. Long-term clinical follow-up is, however, mandatory in order to define which SPECT abnormality is associated with neurologic deficit.

  8. European health telematics networks for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontaxakis, George [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain)]. E-mail: g.kontaxakis@upm.es; Pozo, Miguel Angel [Centro PET Complutense, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto Pluridisciplinar, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ohl, Roland [MedCom Gesellschaft fuer medizinische Bildverarbeitung mbH, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Visvikis, Dimitris [U650 INSERM, Lab. du Traitement de L' Information Medicale, University of Brest Occidentale, CHU Morvan, Brest 29609 (France); Sachpazidis, Ilias [Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Ortega, Fernando [Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia 46009 (Spain); Guerra, Pedro [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Cheze-Le Rest, Catherine [Dept. Medicine Nucleaire, CHU Morvan, Brest 29609 (France); Selby, Peter [MedCom Gesellschaft fuer medizinische Bildverarbeitung mbH, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Pan, Leyun [German Cancer Research Centre, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Diaz, Javier [Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia 46009 (Spain); Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia [German Cancer Research Centre, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Santos, Andres [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Strauss, Ludwig [German Cancer Research Centre, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Sakas, Georgios [MedCom Gesellschaft fuer medizinische Bildverarbeitung mbH, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany)

    2006-12-20

    A pilot network of positron emission tomography centers across Europe has been setup employing telemedicine services. The primary aim is to bring all PET centers in Europe (and beyond) closer, by integrating advanced medical imaging technology and health telematics networks applications into a single, easy to operate health telematics platform, which allows secure transmission of medical data via a variety of telecommunications channels and fosters the cooperation between professionals in the field. The platform runs on PCs with Windows 2000/XP and incorporates advanced techniques for image visualization, analysis and fusion. The communication between two connected workstations is based on a TCP/IP connection secured by secure socket layers and virtual private network or jabber protocols. A teleconsultation can be online (with both physicians physically present) or offline (via transmission of messages which contain image data and other information). An interface sharing protocol enables online teleconsultations even over low bandwidth connections. This initiative promotes the cooperation and improved communication between nuclear medicine professionals, offering options for second opinion and training. It permits physicians to remotely consult patient data, even if they are away from the physical examination site.

  9. The next generation of positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Samuel L; Roney, Celeste A; Daumar, Pierre; Lewis, Jason S

    2011-07-01

    Although (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) is still the most widely used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer, there are a few well-known limitations to its use. The last decade has seen the development of new PET probes for in vivo visualization of specific molecular targets, along with important technical advances in the production of positron-emitting radionuclides and their related labeling methods. As such, a broad range of new PET tracers are in preclinical development or have recently entered clinical trials. The topics covered in this review include labeling methods, biological targets, and the most recent preclinical or clinical data of some of the next generation of PET radiopharmaceuticals. This review, which is by no means exhaustive, has been separated into sections related to the PET radionuclide used for radiolabeling: fluorine-18, for the labeling of agents such as FACBC, FDHT, choline, and Galacto-RGD; carbon-11, for the labeling of choline; gallium-68, for the labeling of peptides such as DOTATOC and bombesin analogs; and the long-lived radionuclides iodine-124 and zirconium-89 for the labeling of monoclonal antibodies cG250, and J591 and trastuzumab, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cyclotrons and positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for clinical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, G B; MacIntyre, W J; Go, R T

    1992-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) requires positron-emitting radionuclides that emit 511-keV photons detectable by PET imagers. Positron-emitting radionuclides are commonly produced in charged particle accelerators, eg, linear accelerators or cyclotrons. The most widely available radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging are carbon-11-, nitrogen-13-, and oxygen-15-labeled compounds, many of which, either in their normal state or incorporated in other compounds, serve as physiological tracers. Other useful PET radiopharmaceuticals include fluorine-18-, bromine-75-, gallium-68 (68Ga)-, rubidium-82 (82Rb)-, and copper-62 (62Cu)-labeled compounds. Many positron emitters have short half-lives and thus require on-site cyclotrons for application, and others (68Ga, 82Rb, and 62Cu) are available from radionuclides generators using relatively long-lived parent radionuclides. This review is divided into two sections: cyclotrons and PET radiopharmaceuticals for clinical imaging. In the cyclotron section, the principle of operation of the cyclotron, types of cyclotrons, medical cyclotrons, and production of radionuclides are discussed. In the section on PET radiopharmaceuticals, the synthesis and clinical use of PET radiopharmaceuticals are described.

  11. [Methods and clinical applications of positron emission tomography in endocrinology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Landsheere, C; Lamotte, D

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows to detect in coincidence photons issued from annihilation between positrons and electrons nearby situated. Tomographic detection (plane by plane) and tomographic reconstruction will lead to the quantitation of radioactive distribution per voxel, in the organ of interest. Recent tomographs can acquire simultaneously several transaxial slices, with a high sensitivity and a spatial resolution of 3-5 mm. Commonly used positron emitters have a short half-life: 2, 10, 20 and 110 min for 150, 13N, 11C and 18F, respectively. The use of these isotopes requires on line production of radionuclides and synthesis of selected molecules. In endocrinology, PET allows among others to study noninvasively the receptor density of hormone-dependent neoplasms such as breast, uterus, prostate tumors and prolactinomas. These last tumors represent a particular entity because of several combined characteristics: high turnover rate of amino acids, high density of dopaminergic receptors and response to bromocriptine (analogue of dopamine inhibiting the secretion of prolactin) in relation to the level of receptors. Because PET permits to evaluate the density of dopaminergic receptors and the metabolism of amino acids, theoretical response of the prolactinoma to bromocriptine can be predicted, the achieved therapeutic efficacy can be estimated and the long-term follow up of tumor growth can be assessed. This example illustrates the clinical value of PET in endocrinology.

  12. Motion management in positron emission tomography/computed tomography for radiation treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinardi, Valentino; Picchio, Maria; Di Muzio, Nadia; Gilardi, Maria Carla

    2012-09-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scanners combine, in a unique gantry, 2 of the most important diagnostic imaging systems, a CT and a PET tomograph, enabling anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) studies to be performed in a single study session. Furthermore, as the 2 scanners use the same spatial coordinate system, the reconstructed CT and PET images are spatially co-registered, allowing an accurate localization of the functional signal over the corresponding anatomical structure. This peculiarity of the hybrid PET/CT system results in improved tumor characterization for oncological applications, and more recently, it was found to be also useful for target volume definition (TVD) and treatment planning in radiotherapy (RT) applications. In fact, the use of combined PET/CT information has been shown to improve the RT treatment plan when compared with that obtained by a CT alone. A limiting factor to the accuracy of TVD by PET/CT is organ and tumor motion, which is mainly due to patient respiration. In fact, respiratory motion has a degrading effect on PET/CT image quality, and this is also critical for TVD, as it can lead to possible tumor missing or undertreatment. Thus, the management of respiratory motion is becoming an increasingly essential component in RT treatment planning; indeed, it has been recognized that the use of personalized motion information can improve TVD and, consequently, permit increased tumor dosage while sparing surrounding healthy tissues and organs at risk. This review describes the methods used for motion management in PET/CT for radiation treatment planning. The article covers the following: (1) problems caused by organ and lesion motion owing to respiration, and the artifacts generated on CT, PET, and PET/CT images; (2) data acquisition and processing techniques used to manage respiratory motion in PET/CT studies; and (3) the use of personalized motion information for TVD and radiation treatment planning.

  13. Relationship of computed tomography perfusion and positron emission tomography to tumour progression in malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeung, Timothy P C [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5C1 (Canada); Yartsev, Slav [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Lee, Ting-Yim [Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, Victoria Hospital, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5W9 (Australia); Lawson Health Research Institute, St. Joseph' s Health Care London, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4V2 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 3K7 (Canada); He, Wenqing [Department of Statistical and Actuarial Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Fisher, Barbara; VanderSpek, Lauren L [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Macdonald, David [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5A5 (Canada); Bauman, Glenn, E-mail: glenn.bauman@lhsc.on.ca [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This study aimed to explore the potential for computed tomography (CT) perfusion and 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in predicting sites of future progressive tumour on a voxel-by-voxel basis after radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods: Ten patients underwent pre-radiotherapy magnetic resonance (MR), FDG-PET and CT perfusion near the end of radiotherapy and repeated post-radiotherapy follow-up MR scans. The relationships between these images and tumour progression were assessed using logistic regression. Cross-validation with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the value of these images in predicting sites of tumour progression. Results: Pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour; near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion; CT perfusion blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and permeability-surface area (PS) product; FDG-PET standard uptake value (SUV); and SUV:BF showed significant associations with tumour progression on follow-up MR imaging (P < 0.0001). The mean sensitivity (±standard deviation), specificity and area under the ROC curve (AUC) of PS were 0.64 ± 0.15, 0.74 ± 0.07 and 0.72 ± 0.12 respectively. This mean AUC was higher than that of the pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour and near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion (both AUCs = 0.6 ± 0.1, P ≤ 0.03). The multivariate model using BF, BV, PS and SUV had a mean AUC of 0.8 ± 0.1, but this was not significantly higher than the PS only model. Conclusion: PS is the single best predictor of tumour progression when compared to other parameters, but voxel-based prediction based on logistic regression had modest sensitivity and specificity.

  14. Prognostic value of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in resectable colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jang Eun Lee; Sang Woo Kim; Jin Su Kim; Kyu Yong Choi; Won Kyung Kang; Seong Taek Oh; Ie Ryung Yoo

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To assess the prognostic value of preoperative 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) in patients with resectable colorectal cancer.METHODS:One hundred sixty-three patients with resectable colorectal cancer who underwent FDG-PET/CT before surgery were included.Patient data including pathologic stage at presentation,histology,treatment,disease-free survival and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor on FDGPET/CT were retrospectively analyzed.Median follow up duration was 756 (range,419-1355).The primary end point was disease-free survival.RESULTS:Twenty-five of 163 patients (15.3%) had recurrences.The median SUVmax values of the recurrence and no-recurrence groups were 8.9 (range,5-24) and 8.2 (range,0-23,P =0.998).Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed no significant association between SUVmax and recurrence (area under the curve =0.5,P =0.998,95%CI:0.389-0.611).Because a statistically significant value was not found,SUVmax was dichotomized at its median of 8.6.The disease-free survival curve was analyzed using the median SUVmax (8.6) as the cut off.Univariate and multivariate analysis did not provide evidence that disease-free survival rates for the subgroups defined by the median SUVmax were significantly different (P =0.52,P =0.25).CONCLUSION:Our study suggests that the high FDG uptake of primary mass in resectable colorectal cancer doesn't have a significant relationship with tumor recurrence and disease-free survival.

  15. Gallium-67 Scintigraphy in the Era of Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography; Tertiary centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badriya Al-Suqri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Although 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT has largely replaced the use of gallium-67 (67Ga scintigraphy in the evaluation and follow-up of lymphoma patients, 67Ga scans are still of value, particularly in countries where no PET/CT service is available. The current study presents the experience of a tertiary care centre using 67Ga scintigraphy for the evaluation of lymphomas and infections. Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of all 67Ga scans performed between 2007 and 2011 at the Royal Hospital in Muscat, Oman. Images and reports of 67Ga scans were compared to clinical and radiological follow-up data including CT and PET/CT scans and biopsies when available. Results: A total of 74 patients were referred for 67Ga scintigraphy during this period with 12 patients excluded due to lack of follow-up data, resulting in 62 patients. Among these patients, 90 67Ga scans were performed, including 59 for lymphoma, 29 for infection and two for sarcoidosis assessment. Of the infection assessment scans, 22 were performed to assess pyrexia of unknown origin and seven for follow-up after known infections. Sensitivity and specificity were found to be 80% and 88%, respectively, for the lymphoma assessment scans. For the infection assessment scans, sensitivity and specificity were reported to be 80% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: Results from this study were consistent with other reported rates of 67Ga scan sensitivity and specificity in the evaluation of lymphomas and infections. This indicates that 67Ga scintigraphy is a useful tool for these types of evaluations when PET/CT services are not available.

  16. Diagnostic value for extrahepatic metastases of hepatocellular carcinoma in positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Eun Lee; Jae Young Jang; Soung Won Jeong; Sae Hwan Lee; Sang Gyune Kim; Sang-Woo Cha; Young Seok Kim

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluated the value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scan in diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and extrahepatic metastases.METHODS:A total of 138 patients with HCC who had both conventional imaging modalities and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan done between November 2006 and March 2011 were enrolled.Diagnostic value of each imaging modality for detection of extrahepatic metastases was evaluated.Clinical factors and tumor characteristics including PET imaging were analyzed as indicative factors for metastases by univariate and multivariate methods.RESULTS:The accuracy of chest CT was significantly superior compared with the accuracy of PET imaging for detecting lung metastases.The detection rate of metastatic pulmonary nodule ≥ 1 cm was 12/13(92.3%),when < 1 cm was 2/10 (20%) in PET imaging.The accuracy of PET imaging was significantly superior compared with the accuracy of bone scan for detecting bone metastases.In multivariate analysis,increased tumor size (≥ 5 cm) (P =0.042) and increased average standardized uptake value (SUV)uptake (P =0.028) were predictive factors for extrahepatic metastases.Isometabolic HCC in PET imaging was inversely correlated in multivariate analysis (P =0.035).According to the receiver operating characteristic curve,the optimal cutoff of average SUV to predict extrahepatic metastases was 3.4.CONCLUSION:18F-FDG PET/CT scan is invaluable for detection of lung metastases larger than 1 cm and bone metastases.Primary HCC having larger than 5 cm and increased average SUV uptake more than 3.4should be considered for extrahepatic metastases.

  17. Does positron emission tomography/computed tomography change management in colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Rachel; Connor, Saxon; Balasingam, Adrian; Eglinton, Tim

    2016-10-27

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is used pre-operatively in patients with metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer to identify those who have potentially curative disease. However, a recent randomized trial questioned the added benefit of PET/CT over conventional imaging in patients with liver metastases. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of patients with colorectal cancer in whom PET/CT altered surgical management, in a single tertiary centre. This was a retrospective study of all patients with colorectal cancer who had a PET/CT for colorectal cancer, funded by the Canterbury District Health Board between 2010 and 2014. Some 111 PET/CT scans were performed on 105 patients. A total of 38% of PET/CT were for patients with known or suspected liver metastases, 23% for suspected local recurrence and 18% for known or suspected lung metastases. Five scans were for post-operative patients with a rising carcinoembryonic antigen and no attributable source on conventional imaging. PET/CT identified additional extrahepatic sites of disease in 19 of 111 (17%) scans in patients deemed to have potentially operable disease. Overall, PET/CT altered surgical management following six of 42 (14%) scans for patients with liver metastases, four of 20 (20%) scans for patients with lung metastases and six of 26 (23%) scans for patients with local recurrence. PET/CT remains a useful adjunct to conventional imaging in the pre-operative workup of patients with colorectal cancer. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. Pitfalls in Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging: Causes and Their Classifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-ran Li; Jia-he Tian; Hui Wang; Zi-qian Chen; Chun-lei Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe the pitfalls in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging and classify them according to the principles of their generation. Methods We summarized retrospectively the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDP) PET/CT imaging pitfalls through reviewing the PET/CT images of 872 patients. The pitfalls were divided into artifacts and infrequent physiological uptake, and the artifacts were further classified according to their causes. Meanwhile, we calculated the incidences of various pitfalls. Whether the PET/CT pitfalls influenced the diagnostic decision was analyzed. The appearances of pitfalls in PET were also described. Results Pitfalls could be found in PET/CT images of 684 (78.4%) patients. Artifacts were found in 664 (76.15%) patients, and could be classified into self-factor artifacts and equipment- or technology- related artifacts. Among self-factor artifacts, respiratory motion (57.5%), postprandial or hyperglycemia artifacts (2.41%), and metal or high density matter artifacts (1.38%) were frequent. As for equipment- or technology-related factors, injection point outleakage or radiotracer contamination (13.88%) and truncation artifacts (1.83%) were most common ones. Infrequent physiological FDG uptakes, including fatty uptake, endometrial uptake, and bilateral breast feeding period uptake, were found in 20 (2.29%) patients. Among all pitfalls, the artifacts in 92 (13.4%) patients and infrequent physiological uptakes in 6 (0.88%) patients affected the diagnostic results. Artifact images in PET could be described as hot or cold area and the images of infrequent physiological uptake were always shown as hot area. Conclusions The incidence of pitfall in PET/CT imaging was high and the causes of pitfalls are various. Among all causes that artifacts generated, respiratory motion is the most common. Some pitfalls may disturb clinical physicians' decision, so it is important to recognize artifacts and physiological uptake, and

  19. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings in a patient with cerebellar mutism after operation in posterior fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedik, Gonca Kara; Sari, Oktay; Köktekir, Ender; Akdemir, Gökhan

    2017-04-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a transient period of speechlessness that evolves after posterior fossa surgery in children. Although direct cerebellar and brain stem injury and supratentorial dysfunction have been implicated in the mediation of mutism, the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the evolution of this kind of mutism remain unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed dentatothalamocortical tract injuries and single photon emission computed tomography showed cerebellar and cerebral hypoperfusion in patients with cerebellar mutism. However, findings with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) in this group of patients have not been documented previously. In this clinical case, we report a patient who experienced cerebellar mutism after undergoing a posterior fossa surgery. Right cerebellar and left frontal lobe hypometabolism was shown using FDG PET/CT. The FDG metabolism of both the cerebellum and the frontal lobe returned to normal levels after the resolution of the mutism symptoms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  20. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings in a patient with cerebellar mutism after operation in posterior fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Kara Gedik

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar mutism is a transient period of speechlessness that evolves after posterior fossa surgery in children. Although direct cerebellar and brain stem injury and supratentorial dysfunction have been implicated in the mediation of mutism, the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the evolution of this kind of mutism remain unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed dentatothalamocortical tract injuries and single photon emission computed tomography showed cerebellar and cerebral hypoperfusion in patients with cerebellar mutism. However, findings with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT in this group of patients have not been documented previously. In this clinical case, we report a patient who experienced cerebellar mutism after undergoing a posterior fossa surgery. Right cerebellar and left frontal lobe hypometabolism was shown using FDG PET/CT. The FDG metabolism of both the cerebellum and the frontal lobe returned to normal levels after the resolution of the mutism symptoms.

  1. Positron emission tomography for serial imaging of the contused adult rat spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandoe, R.D.S.; Yu, J.; Seidel, J.; Rahiem, S.T.; Hurtado, A.; Tsui, B.M.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Pomper, M.G.; Oudega, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) could be used in combination with computed tomography (CT) imaging techniques for longitudinal monitoring of the injured spinal cord. In adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6), the ninth thoracic (T9) spinal cord segment was e

  2. Predictive value of early F-18-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in chemosensitive relapsed lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, B; van Imhoff, G; Pruim, J; Sluiter, W; Vaalburg, W; Vellenga, E

    2003-01-01

    F-18-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) might be a better tool than computerized tomography (CT) in predicting long-term treatment outcome in patients with relapsed chemosensitive lymphoma who are candidates for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). We studied patien

  3. 77 FR 71802 - Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for... ``Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' The guidance is intended to assist manufacturers of PET drugs in submitting investigational new drug applications (INDs)....

  4. Readout of scintillator light with avalanche photodiodes for positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, R; Tavernier, Stefaan; Bruyndonckx, P; Clément, D; Loude, J F; Morel, Christian

    1999-01-01

    The noise properties and other relevant characteristics of avalanche photodiodes have been investigated with the perspective of replacing photomultiplier tubes in positron emission tomography. It is clearly demonstrated that they are a valid alternative to photomultiplier tubes in this application.

  5. Central benzodiazepine receptor imaging and quantitation with single photon emission computerised tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okocha, C I; Kapczinski, F; Lassen, N

    1995-01-01

    This review discusses the current use of single photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT) for central benzodiazepine receptor imaging and quantitation. The general principles underlying SPECT imaging and receptor quantitation methods such as the kinetic, pseudo-equilibrium and steady...

  6. Endocrine radionuclide scintigraphy with fusion single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ka-Kit Wong; Arpit Gandhi; Benjamin L Viglianti; Lorraine M Fig; Domenico Rubello; Milton D Gross

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review the benefits of single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT)/computed tomography(CT) hybrid imaging for diagnosis of various endocrine disorders.METHODS: We performed MEDLINE and Pub Med searches using the terms: "SPECT/CT"; "functional anatomic mapping"; "transmission emission tomography"; "parathyroid adenoma"; "thyroid cancer"; "neuroendocrine tumor"; "adrenal"; "pheochromocytoma"; "paraganglioma"; in order to identify relevant articles published in English during the years 2003 to 2015. Reference lists from the articles were reviewed to identify additional pertinent articles. Retrieved manuscripts(case reports, reviews, meta-analyses and abstracts) concerning the application of SPECT/CT to endocrine imaging were analyzed to provide a descriptive synthesis of the utility of this technology.RESULTS: The emergence of hybrid SPECT/CT camera technology now allows simultaneous acquisition of combined multi-modality imaging, with seamless fusion of three-dimensional volume datasets. The usefulness of combining functional information to depict the biodistribution of radiotracers that map cellular processes of the endocrine system and tumors of endocrine origin, with anatomy derived from CT, has improved the diagnostic capability of scintigraphy for a range of disorders of endocrine gland function. The literature describes benefits of SPECT/CT for 99mTc-sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy and 99mTc-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy, 123I- or 131I-radioiodine for staging of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, 111In- and 99mTclabeled somatostatin receptor analogues for detection of neuroendocrine tumors, 131I-norcholesterol(NP-59) scans for assessment of adrenal cortical hyperfunction, and 123I- or 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging for evaluation of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma.CONCLUSION: SPECT/CT exploits the synergism between the functional information from radiopharmaceutical imaging and anatomy from CT, translating to

  7. Physiologic positron emission tomography/CT imaging of an integrated orbital implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, Gerardo F; Finger, Paul T

    2012-01-01

    A 46-year-old woman with a T4N0M0 choroidal melanoma was staged for metastatic disease with whole-body positron emission tomography/CT imaging. She underwent enucleation of the right eye and placement of a 20-mm MEDPOR spherical implant. Four months after surgery, follow-up positron emission tomography/CT imaging revealed physiologic metabolic activity in the MEDPOR implant with no evidence of orbital melanoma or chronic inflammation.

  8. Positron emission tomography for measurement of copper fluxes in live organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Fangyu

    2014-01-01

    Copper is an essential nutrient for the physiology of live organisms, but excessive copper can be harmful. Copper radioisotopes are used for measurement of copper fluxes in live organisms using a radioactivity assay of body fluids or whole-body positron emission tomography (PET). Hybrid positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET/CT) is a versatile tool for real-time measurement of copper fluxes combining the high sensitivity and quantification capability of PET and the superior spa...

  9. Simulation of emission tomography using grid middleware for distributed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, M G; Longton, R F; Gregor, J; Smith, G T; Hutson, R K

    2004-09-01

    SimSET is Monte Carlo simulation software for emission tomography. This paper describes a simple but effective scheme for parallel execution of SimSET using NetSolve, a client-server system for distributed computation. NetSolve (version 1.4.1) is "grid middleware" which enables a user (the client) to run specific computations remotely and simultaneously on a grid of networked computers (the servers). Since the servers do not have to be identical machines, computation may take place in a heterogeneous environment. To take advantage of diversity in machines and their workloads, a client-side scheduler was implemented for the Monte Carlo simulation. The scheduler partitions the total decay events by taking into account the inherent compute-speeds and recent average workloads, i.e., the scheduler assigns more decay events to processors expected to give faster service and fewer decay events to those expected to give slower service. When compute-speeds and sustained workloads are taken into account, the speed-up is essentially linear in the number of equivalent "maximum-service" processors. One modification in the SimSET code (version 2.6.2.3) was made to ensure that the total number of decay events specified by the user is maintained in the distributed simulation. No other modifications in the standard SimSET code were made. Each processor runs complete SimSET code for its assignment of decay events, independently of others running simultaneously. Empirical results are reported for simulation of a clinical-quality lung perfusion study.

  10. Proceedings of clinical SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    It has been five years since the last in-depth American College of Nuclear Physicians/Society of Nuclear Medicine Symposium on the subject of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was held. Because this subject was nominated as the single most desired topic we have selected SPECT imaging as the basis for this year's program. The objectives of this symposium are to survey the progress of SPECT clinical applications that have taken place over the last five years and to provide practical and timely guidelines to users of SPECT so that this exciting imaging modality can be fully integrated into the evaluation of pathologic processes. The first half was devoted to a consideration of technical factors important in SPECT acquisition and the second half was devoted to those organ systems about which sufficient clinical SPECT imaging data are available. With respect to the technical aspect of the program we have selected the key areas which demand awareness and attention in order to make SPECT operational in clinical practice. These include selection of equipment, details of uniformity correction, utilization of phantoms for equipment acceptance and quality assurance, the major aspect of algorithms, an understanding of filtered back projection and appropriate choice of filters and an awareness of the most commonly generated artifacts and how to recognize them. With respect to the acquisition and interpretation of organ images, the faculty will present information on the major aspects of hepatic, brain, cardiac, skeletal, and immunologic imaging techniques. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

  11. Noninvasive imaging of islet grafts using positron-emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuxin; Dang, Hoa; Middleton, Blake; Zhang, Zesong; Washburn, Lorraine; Stout, David B.; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Atkinson, Mark A.; Phelps, Michael; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Tian, Jide; Kaufman, Daniel L.

    2006-07-01

    Islet transplantation offers a potential therapy to restore glucose homeostasis in type 1 diabetes patients. However, islet transplantation is not routinely successful because most islet recipients gradually lose graft function. Furthermore, serological markers of islet function are insensitive to islet loss until the latter stages of islet graft rejection. A noninvasive method of monitoring islet grafts would aid in the assessment of islet graft survival and the evaluation of interventions designed to prolong graft survival. Here, we show that recombinant adenovirus can engineer isolated islets to express a positron-emission tomography (PET) reporter gene and that these islets can be repeatedly imaged by using microPET after transplantation into mice. The magnitude of signal from engineered islets implanted into the axillary cavity was directly related to the implanted islet mass. PET signals attenuated over the following weeks because of the transient nature of adenovirus-mediated gene expression. Because the liver is the preferred site for islet implantation in humans, we also tested whether islets could be imaged after transfusion into the mouse liver. Control studies revealed that both intrahepatic islet transplantation and hyperglycemia altered the biodistribution kinetics of the PET probe systemically. Although transplanted islets were dispersed throughout the liver, clear signals from the liver region of mice receiving PET reporter-expressing islets were detectable for several weeks. Viral transduction, PET reporter expression, and repeated microPET imaging had no apparent deleterious effects on islet function after implantation. These studies lay a foundation for noninvasive quantitative assessments of islet graft survival using PET. diabetes | transplantation

  12. PDE regularization for Bayesian reconstruction of emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhentian; Zhang, Li; Xing, Yuxiang; Zhao, Ziran

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate a type of Bayesian reconstruction which utilizes partial differential equations (PDE) image models as regularization. PDE image models are widely used in image restoration and segmentation. In a PDE model, the image can be viewed as the solution of an evolutionary differential equation. The variation of the image can be regard as a descent of an energy function, which entitles us to use PDE models in Bayesian reconstruction. In this paper, two PDE models called anisotropic diffusion are studied. Both of them have the characteristics of edge-preserving and denoising like the popular median root prior (MRP). We use PDE regularization with an Ordered Subsets accelerated Bayesian one step late (OSL) reconstruction algorithm for emission tomography. The OS accelerated OSL algorithm is more practical than a non-accelerated one. The proposed algorithm is called OSEM-PDE. We validated the OSEM-PDE using a Zubal phantom in numerical experiments with attenuation correction and quantum noise considered, and the results are compared with OSEM and an OS version of MRP (OSEM-MRP) reconstruction. OSEM-PDE shows better results both in bias and variance. The reconstruction images are smoother and have sharper edges, thus are more applicable for post processing such as segmentation. We validate this using a k-means segmentation algorithm. The classic OSEM is not convergent especially in noisy condition. However, in our experiment, OSEM-PDE can benefit from OS acceleration and keep stable and convergent while OSEM-MRP failed to converge.

  13. Alcohol ADME in primates studied with positron emission tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zizhong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The sensitivity to the intoxicating effects of alcohol as well as its adverse medical consequences differ markedly among individuals, which reflects in part differences in alcohol's absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME properties. The ADME of alcohol in the body and its relationship with alcohol's brain bioavailability, however, is not well understood. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: The ADME of C-11 labeled alcohol, CH(3 (11CH(2OH, 1 and C-11 and deuterium dual labeled alcohol, CH(3 (11CD(2OH, 2 in baboons was compared based on the principle that C-D bond is stronger than C-H bond, thus the reaction is slower if C-D bond breaking occurs in a rate-determining metabolic step. The following ADME parameters in peripheral organs and brain were derived from time activity curve (TAC of positron emission tomography (PET scans: peak uptake (C(max; peak uptake time (T(max, half-life of peak uptake (T(1/2, the area under the curve (AUC(60 min, and the residue uptake (C(60 min. KEY RESULTS: For 1 the highest uptake occurred in the kidney whereas for 2 it occurred in the liver. A deuterium isotope effect was observed in the kidneys in both animals studied and in the liver of one animal but not the other. The highest uptake for 1 and 2 in the brain was in striatum and cerebellum but 2 had higher uptake than 1 in all brain regions most evidently in thalamus and cingulate. Alcohol's brain uptake was significantly higher when given intravenously than when given orally and also when the animal was pretreated with a pharmacological dose of alcohol. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS: The study shows that alcohol metabolism in peripheral organs had a large effect on alcohol's brain bioavailability. This study sets the stage for clinical investigation on how genetics, gender and alcohol abuse affect alcohol's ADME and its relationship to intoxication and medical consequences.

  14. Contrast-enhanced fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/contrast-enhanced computed tomography in mediastinal T-cell lymphoma with superior vena cava syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Sampath; Gorla, Arun Kumar Reddy; Bhattacharya, Anish; Varma, Subhash Chander; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is a routine investigation for the staging of lymphomas. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is mandatory whenever parenchymal lesions, especially in the liver and spleen are suspected. We report a rare case of primary mediastinal T-cell lymphoma evaluated with contrast-enhanced PET/CT that showed features of superior vena cava syndrome.

  15. High-resolution PET [Positron Emission Tomography] for Medical Science Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, T. F.; Derenzo, S. E.; Huesman, R. H.; Jagust, W. J.; Valk, P. E.

    1989-09-01

    One of the unexpected fruits of basic physics research and the computer revolution is the noninvasive imaging power available to today's physician. Technologies that were strictly the province of research scientists only a decade or two ago now serve as the foundations for such standard diagnostic tools as x-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), ultrasound, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). Furthermore, prompted by the needs of both the practicing physician and the clinical researcher, efforts to improve these technologies continue. This booklet endeavors to describe the advantages of achieving high resolution in PET imaging.

  16. Does positron emission tomography/computed tomography aid the diagnosis of prosthetic valve infective endocarditis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmforth, Damian; Chacko, Jacob; Uppal, Rakesh

    2016-10-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) aids the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE)? A total of 107 publications were found using the reported search, of which 6 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. The reported outcome of all studies was a final diagnosis of confirmed endocarditis on follow-up. All the six studies were non-randomized, single-centre, observational studies and thus represented level 3 evidence. The diagnostic capability of PET/CT for PVE was compared with that of the modified Duke Criteria and echocardiography, and reported in terms of sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values. All studies demonstrated an increased sensitivity for the diagnosis of PVE when PET/CT was combined with the modified Duke Criteria on admission. A higher SUVmax on PET was found to be significantly associated with a confirmed diagnosis of endocarditis and an additional diagnostic benefit of PET/CT angiography over conventional PET/non-enhanced CT is reported due to improved anatomical resolution. However, PET/CT was found to be unreliable in the early postoperative period due to its inability to distinguish between infection and residual postoperative inflammatory changes. PET/CT was also found to be poor at diagnosing cases of native valve endocarditis. We conclude that PET/CT aids in the diagnosis of PVE when combined with the modified Duke Criteria on admission by increasing the diagnostic sensitivity. The diagnostic ability of PET/CT can be potentiated by the use of PET/CTA; however, its use may be unreliable in the early postoperative period or in native valve endocarditis. © The Author 2016. Published by

  17. [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in predicting radiation pneumonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Hao; YU Jin-ming; Feng-ming Kong; LU Jie; BAI Tong; MA Li; FU Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Background Prevention is presently the only available method to limit radiation-induced lung morbidity. A good predictor is the key point of prevention. This study aimed to investigate if [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake changes in the lung after radiotherapy could be used as a new predictor for acute radiation pneumonitis (RP). Methods Forty-one patients with lung cancer underwent FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging before and after radiotherapy. The mean standardized uptake value (SUV) was measured for the isodose regions of 0-9 Gy, 10-19 Gy, 20-29 Gy, 30-39 Gy, 40-49 Gy. The mean SUV of these regions after radiotherapy was compared with baseline. The mean SUV in patients who developed RP was also compared with that in those who did not. The statistical difference was determined by matched pair t test. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)criteria were used for diagnosis and grading of RP.Results With a median follow-up of 12 months, 11 (26.8%) of the 41 patients developed grade 2 and above acute RP.The mean SUV of regions (10-19 Gy, 20-29 Gy, 30-39 Gy, 40-49 Gy) increased after radiation therapy in all 41 patients.The mean SUVs after radiation therapy were 0.54, 0.68, 1.31, 1.74 and 2.27 for 0-9 Gy, 10-19 Gy, 20-29 Gy, 30-39 Gy and 40-49 Gy, respectively. Before the radiation therapy, the mean SUV in each region was 0.53, 0.52, 0.52, 0.53 and 0.54, respectively. These patients had significantly higher FDG activities in regions receiving 10 Gy or more (P <0.001).Compared with their counterparts, the elevation of SUV was significantly greater in those patients who developed acute RP subsequently.Conclusion The mean SUV of the lung tissue may be a useful predictor for the acute RR FDG-PET/CT may play a new role in the study of the radiation damage of the lung.

  18. Budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography – computed tomography for staging lung cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Navega Biz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To estimate the budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET in mediastinal and distant staging of non-small cell lung cancer.METHODS The estimates were calculated by the epidemiological method for years 2014 to 2018. Nation-wide data were used about the incidence; data on distribution of the disease´s prevalence and on the technologies’ accuracy were from the literature; data regarding involved costs were taken from a micro-costing study and from Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS database. Two strategies for using PET were analyzed: the offer to all newly-diagnosed patients, and the restricted offer to the ones who had negative results in previous computed tomography (CT exams. Univariate and extreme scenarios sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the influence from sources of uncertainties in the parameters used.RESULTS The incorporation of PET-CT in SUS would imply the need for additional resources of 158.1 BRL (98.2 USD million for the restricted offer and 202.7 BRL (125.9 USD million for the inclusive offer in five years, with a difference of 44.6 BRL (27.7 USD million between the two offer strategies within that period. In absolute terms, the total budget impact from its incorporation in SUS, in five years, would be 555 BRL (345 USD and 600 BRL (372.8 USD million, respectively. The costs from the PET-CT procedure were the most influential parameter in the results. In the most optimistic scenario, the additional budget impact would be reduced to 86.9 BRL (54 USD and 103.8 BRL (64.5 USD million, considering PET-CT for negative CT and PET-CT for all, respectively.CONCLUSIONS The incorporation of PET in the clinical staging of non-small cell lung cancer seems to be financially feasible considering the high budget of the Brazilian Ministry of Health. The potential reduction in the number of unnecessary surgeries may cause the available resources to be more efficiently allocated.

  19. Comparison of diffuse optical tomography of human breast with whole-body and breast-only positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecky, Soren D; Choe, Regine; Corlu, Alper; Lee, Kijoon; Wiener, Rony; Srinivas, Shyam M; Saffer, Janet R; Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S; Hajjioui, Nassim; Azar, Fred; Yodh, Arjun G

    2008-02-01

    We acquire and compare three-dimensional tomographic breast images of three females with suspicious masses using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Co-registration of DOT and PET images was facilitated by a mutual information maximization algorithm. We also compared DOT and whole-body PET images of 14 patients with breast abnormalities. Positive correlations were found between total hemoglobin concentration and tissue scattering measured by DOT, and fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake. In light of these observations, we suggest potential benefits of combining both PET and DOT for characterization of breast lesions.

  20. Recurrent proliferating trichilemmal tumor with malignant change on the f-18 fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography/computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Eun Ha; Kim, Young Jun; Yoo, Seol Bong; Nam, Kyung Hwa [Presbyterian Medical Center, Seonam University College of Medicine, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan has been used for the diagnosis, assessment of treatment response, and follow-up of various neoplasms. Proliferating trichilemmal cyst or tumor (PTT) is a rare neoplasm, originated from the outer root sheath of a hair follicle. Because this tumor has unpredictable biological and clinical behavior, the long-term clinical follow-up is necessary to detect metastasis or recurrence. We reported a case of recurrent malignant PTT on scalp that showed increased FDG uptake.

  1. Role of F18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography in the management of Askin's tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Sampath; Kashyap, Raghava; Bhattacharya, Anish; Kumar Jindal, Surinder; Rai Mittal, Bhagwant

    2013-07-01

    A primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of the thoraco-abdominal region is one of a group of small round cell tumors usually found in children and young adults, originally described by Askin et al. Most cases arise in the soft-tissues of the thorax, but may rarely occur within the lung with the symptoms of chest wall pain, pleural effusion and dyspnea. The authors present two cases demonstrating the utility of F18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography in the staging and prognosis of PNET of the chest wall.

  2. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography and biomarkers for early treatment response evaluation in metastatic colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Bodil E.; Loft, Annika; Kjær, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment options for metastatic colon cancer (mCC) are widening. We prospectively evaluated serial 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and measurements of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), carcinoembryonic antigen...... evaluated by PET/CT before treatment, after one and four treatment series. Morphological and metabolic response was independently assessed according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer PET criteria. Plasma TIMP-1, plasma u...

  3. Computed tomography angiography and perfusion to assess coronary artery stenosis causing perfusion defects by single photon emission computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rochitte, Carlos E; George, Richard T; Chen, Marcus Y

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the diagnostic power of integrating the results of computed tomography angiography (CTA) and CT myocardial perfusion (CTP) to identify coronary artery disease (CAD) defined as a flow limiting coronary artery stenosis causing a perfusion defect by single photon emission computed...... tomography (SPECT). METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted a multicentre study to evaluate the accuracy of integrated CTA-CTP for the identification of patients with flow-limiting CAD defined by ≥50% stenosis by invasive coronary angiography (ICA) with a corresponding perfusion deficit on stress single photon...

  4. The accuracy of positron emission tomography in the detection of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierickx, Daan; Tousseyn, Thomas; Requilé, Annelies; Verscuren, Raf; Sagaert, Xavier; Morscio, Julie; Wlodarska, Iwona; Herreman, An; Kuypers, Dirk; Van Cleemput, Johan; Nevens, Frederik; Dupont, Lieven; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Pirenne, Jacques; De Wolf-Peeters, Christiane; Verhoef, Gregor; Brepoels, Lieselot; Gheysens, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    We investigated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in 170 cases with suspected or biopsy-proven posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. All solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients who underwent an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scan between 2003 and 2010 in our center for the indication posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder, were retrospectively reviewed and results were compared with tissue biopsy whenever possible. One hundred and seventy positron emission tomography scans in 150 patients were eligible for evaluation. In 45 cases, the patient had a biopsy-confirmed posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder before positron emission tomography scanning and positron emission tomography was performed for staging purposes. In the remaining 125 cases, positron emission tomography was performed to differentiate between posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder and other diseases. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-uptake was quantitatively expressed by calculation of maximum and mean standardized uptake value in the most intense lesion or, in the absence of attenuation corrected positron emission tomography scans, by comparing uptake in target lesion to liver and mediastinal uptake. We found an overall sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 89%, positive predictive value of 91% and negative predictive value of 87% for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder detection by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. In a subanalysis of the 125 scans performed for differentiating posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder from other diseases, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 90%, 89%, 85% and 93%, respectively. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-uptake in posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder was generally high with a median mean and maximum standardized uptake

  5. Attenuation correction for X-ray emission computed tomography of laser-produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yen-Wei; Nakao, Zensho [Ryukyus Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Tamura, Shinichi

    1996-08-01

    An attenuation correction method was proposed for laser-produced plasma emission computed tomography (ECT), which is based on a relation of the attenuation coefficient and the emission coefficient in plasma. Simulation results show that the reconstructed images are dramatically improved in comparison to the reconstructions without attenuation correction. (J.P.N.)

  6. Practical implementation of tetrahedral mesh reconstruction in emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutchko, R.; Sitek, A.; Gullberg, G. T.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a practical implementation of image reconstruction on tetrahedral meshes optimized for emission computed tomography with parallel beam geometry. Tetrahedral mesh built on a point cloud is a convenient image representation method, intrinsically three-dimensional and with a multi-level resolution property. Image intensities are defined at the mesh nodes and linearly interpolated inside each tetrahedron. For the given mesh geometry, the intensities can be computed directly from tomographic projections using iterative reconstruction algorithms with a system matrix calculated using an exact analytical formula. The mesh geometry is optimized for a specific patient using a two stage process. First, a noisy image is reconstructed on a finely-spaced uniform cloud. Then, the geometry of the representation is adaptively transformed through boundary-preserving node motion and elimination. Nodes are removed in constant intensity regions, merged along the boundaries, and moved in the direction of the mean local intensity gradient in order to provide higher node density in the boundary regions. Attenuation correction and detector geometric response are included in the system matrix. Once the mesh geometry is optimized, it is used to generate the final system matrix for ML-EM reconstruction of node intensities and for visualization of the reconstructed images. In dynamic PET or SPECT imaging, the system matrix generation procedure is performed using a quasi-static sinogram, generated by summing projection data from multiple time frames. This system matrix is then used to reconstruct the individual time frame projections. Performance of the new method is evaluated by reconstructing simulated projections of the NCAT phantom and the method is then applied to dynamic SPECT phantom and patient studies and to a dynamic microPET rat study. Tetrahedral mesh-based images are compared to the standard voxel-based reconstruction for both high and low signal-to-noise ratio

  7. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Using Radiolabeled Inorganic Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolian; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Positron emission tomography (PET) is a radionuclide imaging technology that plays an important role in preclinical and clinical research. With administration of a small amount of radiotracer, PET imaging can provide a noninvasive, highly sensitive, and quantitative readout of its organ/tissue targeting efficiency and pharmacokinetics. Various radiotracers have been designed to target specific molecular events. Compared with antibodies, proteins, peptides, and other biologically relevant molecules, nanoparticles represent a new frontier in molecular imaging probe design, enabling the attachment of different imaging modalities, targeting ligands, and therapeutic payloads in a single vector. We introduce the radiolabeled nanoparticle platforms that we and others have developed. Due to the fundamental differences in the various nanoparticles and radioisotopes, most radiolabeling methods are designed case-by-case. We focus on some general rules about selecting appropriate isotopes for given types of nanoparticles, as well as adjusting the labeling strategies according to specific applications. We classified these radiolabeling methods into four categories: (1) complexation reaction of radiometal ions with chelators via coordination chemistry; (2) direct bombardment of nanoparticles via hadronic projectiles; (3) synthesis of nanoparticles using a mixture of radioactive and nonradioactive precursors; (4) chelator-free postsynthetic radiolabeling. Method 1 is generally applicable to different nanomaterials as long as the surface chemistry is well-designed. However, the addition of chelators brings concerns of possible changes to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and detachment of the radiometal. Methods 2 and 3 have improved radiochemical stability. The applications are, however, limited by the possible damage to the nanocomponent caused by the proton beams (method 2) and harsh synthetic conditions (method 3). Method 4 is still in its infancy

  8. Data on analysis of coronary atherosclerosis on computed tomography and 18F-sodium fluoride positron emission tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiro Kitagawa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article contains the data showing illustrative examples of plaque classification on coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA and measurement of 18F-sodium fluoride (18F-NaF uptake in coronary atherosclerotic lesions on positron emission tomography (PET. We divided the lesions into one of three plaque types on CCTA (calcified plaque, non-calcified plaque, partially calcified plaque. Focal 18F-NaF uptake of each lesion was quantified using maximum tissue-to-background ratio. This article also provides a representative case with a non-calcified coronary plaque detected on CCTA and identified on 18F-NaF PET/non-contrast computed tomography based on a location of a vessel branch as a landmark. These complement the data reported by Kitagawa et al. (2017 [1].

  9. Computed tomography and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings in adrenal candidiasis and histoplasmosis: two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinmakas, Emre; Guo, Ming; Kundu, Uma R; Habra, Mouhammed Amir; Ng, Chaan

    2015-01-01

    We report the contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography findings in adrenal histoplasmosis and candidiasis. Both demonstrated bilateral hypermetabolic heterogeneous adrenal masses with limited wash-out on delayed CT. Adrenal candidiasis has not been previously reported, nor have the CT wash-out findings in either infection. The adrenal imaging findings are indistinguishable from malignancy, which is more common; but in this setting, physicians should be alert to the differential diagnosis of fungal infections, since it can be equally deadly.

  10. Fabrication of polycrystalline scintillators for the positron emission tomography (PET); Herstellung polykristalliner Szintillatoren fuer die Positronen-Emissions-Tomographie (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Kamran Said

    2010-07-01

    Transparent ceramics are becoming more and more important for two new types of applications. On the one hand in cases where high mechanical and thermal demands in combination with optical properties are required, on the other hand where the optical properties of transparent materials like glass are not sufficient e.g. in positron-emission-tomography (PET) diagnostics. Most state of the art PET-scanners are using high-priced single crystals as scintillator material. The technological challenge is to replace single crystal by cost-efficient transparent ceramics. Producing transparent ceramics is ordered in synthesis of the powders and in manufacturing of these into transparent ceramics. The aim of this work was to synthesize single phase yttrium-alumina-and Luthetiumalumina-garnet (YAG, LuAG) powders partially doped with neodymium or praseodymium by four different synthesis routes (Pechini-synthesis, sol-gel-route, coprecipitation and solid state reactions). Additionally industrial LuAG and LuPO{sub 4} powders were characterized and manufactured. The powders were processed as submicron- and nanopowders. The compaction of nanopowder greenbodies sintered at high temperatures leads to a ''cross-over'' between both manufacturing route. Newly produced single-phase powders were homogenized with additions of sintering additives like tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and binders like polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Moulding the powders were carried out by uniaxial pressing, cold isostatic pressing and in individual cases also by slip casting. The achieved green densities were in a range of 25-42 %. Examination of calcination behaviour leads to a calcination temperature of 1000 C with 2 hours dwell time in air atmosphere. Only solid state reactions resulted into transparent YAG, YAG:Pr, LuAG, LuAG:Pr ceramics. Solid state reactions of nanopowders resulted in heterogeneously transparent samples. Ceramics made by powders of other synthetic routes gave nontransparent

  11. Imaging Prostate Cancer: An Update on Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter; Capala, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an essential role in the clinical management of patients. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the de...

  12. Myocardial blood flow quantification for evaluation of coronary artery disease by positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Alfonso H; Blankstein, Ron; Kwong, Raymond Y; Di Carli, Marcelo F

    2014-05-01

    The noninvasive detection of the presence and functional significance of coronary artery stenosis is important in the diagnosis, risk assessment, and management of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion can provide an objective and reproducible estimate of myocardial ischemia and risk prediction. Positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and cardiac computed tomography perfusion are modalities capable of measuring myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve. In this review, we will discuss the technical aspects of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography, and its emerging clinical applications.

  13. Molecular Imaging of Transporters with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Gunnar; Sörensen, Jens; Hall, Håkan

    Positron emission tomography (PET) visualization of brain components in vivo is a rapidly growing field. Molecular imaging with PET is also increasingly used in drug development, especially for the determination of drug receptor interaction for CNS-active drugs. This gives the opportunity to relate clinical efficacy to per cent receptor occupancy of a drug on a certain targeted receptor and to relate drug pharmacokinetics in plasma to interaction with target protein. In the present review we will focus on the study of transporters, such as the monoamine transporters, the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) transporter, the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2, and the glucose transporter using PET radioligands. Neurotransmitter transporters are presynaptically located and in vivo imaging using PET can therefore be used for the determination of the density of afferent neurons. Several promising PET ligands for the noradrenaline transporter (NET) have been labeled and evaluated in vivo including in man, but a really useful PET ligand for NET still remains to be identified. The most promising tracer to date is (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2. The in vivo visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) may give clues in the evaluation of conditions related to dopamine, such as Parkinson's disease and drug abuse. The first PET radioligands based on cocaine were not selective, but more recently several selective tracers such as [11C]PE2I have been characterized and shown to be suitable as PET radioligands. Although there are a large number of serotonin transporter inhibitors used today as SSRIs, it was not until very recently, when [11C]McN5652 was synthesized, that this transporter was studied using PET. New candidates as PET radioligands for the SERT have subsequently been developed and [11C]DASB and [11C]MADAM and their analogues are today the most promising ligands. The existing radioligands for Pgp transporters seem to be suitable tools for the study of both peripheral and central drug

  14. Respiratory motion in positron emission tomography for oncology applications: Problems and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609, Brest (France)]. E-mail: Visvikis.Dimitris@univ-brest.fr; Lamare, F. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609, Brest (France); Bruyant, P. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609, Brest (France); Boussion, N. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609, Brest (France); Cheze Le Rest, C. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609, Brest (France)

    2006-12-20

    The effect of physiological motion in emission tomography is a reduction in overall image contrast and loss of sensitivity. In particular, respiratory motion affects imaging in the thoracic and the upper abdomen area, leading to a reduction in lesion detection as a result of the associated blurring. Furthermore, respiratory motion leads to a compromise in quantitative accuracy in terms of functional volume determination and activity concentration recovery for oncology imaging. This paper presents a review of the current state of the art in the implementation of respiratory motion compensation techniques in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for oncology applications.

  15. Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT in Neuropsychiatry: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. K. Puri

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Cranial single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT or SPET can now give regional cerebral blood flow images with a resolution approaching that of positron emission tomography (PET. In this paper, the use of high resolution SPECT neuroimaging in neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, multi-infarct dementia, Pick's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, Korsakoff's psychosis, Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, schizophrenia, mood disorders, obsessive–compulsive disorder, HIV infection and AIDS is reviewed. Finally, further potential research and clinical uses, based on ligand studies, are outlined.

  16. Massively parallel computers for 3D single-photon-emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, C.S.; Miller, M.I. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Electronic Systems and Signals Research Lab.); Miller, T.R.; Wallis, J.W. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Edward Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology)

    1994-03-01

    Since the introduction of the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for generating maximum-likelihood (ML) and maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimates in emission tomography, there have been many investigators applying the ML method. However, almost all of the previous work has been restricted to two-dimensional (2D) reconstructions. The major focus and contribution of this paper is to demonstrate a fully three-dimensional (3D) implementation of the MAP method for single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT). The 3D reconstruction exhibits an improvement in resolution when compared to the generation of the series of separate 2D slice reconstructions. (Author).

  17. Position emission tomography with or without computed tomography in the primary staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Hansen, Mads;

    2006-01-01

    In order to receive the most appropriate therapy, patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) must be accurately stratified into different prognostic staging groups. Computed tomography (CT) plays a pivotal role in the conventional staging. The aim of the present study was to investigate the value...

  18. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computed Tomography (CT) in Suspected Recurrent Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Malene Grubbe; Gerke, Oke; Baun, Christina;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively investigate the diagnostic accuracy of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with dual-time-point imaging, contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT), and bone scintigraphy (BS) in patients with suspected breast cancer recurrence....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred women with suspected recurrence of breast cancer underwent 1-hour and 3-hour FDG-PET/CT, ceCT, and BS within approximately 10 days. The study was powered to estimate the precision of the individual imaging tests. Images were visually interpreted using a four...... the receiver operating curve and higher sensitivity, specificity, and superior likelihood ratios. CONCLUSION: FDG-PET/CT was accurate in diagnosing recurrence in breast cancer patients. It allowed for distant recurrence to be correctly ruled out and resulted in only a small number of false-positive cases...

  19. Positron emission tomography/computerized tomography in the evaluation of primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bo; Han, Jian-Kui; Wang, Shi-Cun; Xu, Ao

    2013-10-21

    Primary malignant lymphoma of the prostate is exceedingly rare. Here we report a case of a 65-year-old man who presented with increased urinary frequency, urinary urgency, and urinary incontinence for two years. Benign prostatic hypertrophy was suspected at primary impression. Ultrasound revealed a hypoechoic lesion of the prostate. The total serum prostate-specific antigen was within normal range. Positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) showed a hypermetabolic prostatic lesion. Prostate biopsy was consistent with a non-germinal center diffuse large B cell lymphoma. There was complete remission of the prostatic lesion following six cycles of chemotherapy as shown on the second PET/CT imaging. ¹⁸F-fluoro-deoxy glucose PET/CT is not only a complement to conventional imaging, but also plays a significant role in the diagnosis and evaluation of treatment response of prostatic lymphoma.

  20. Are we ready for positron emission tomography/computed tomography-based target volume definition in lymphoma radiation therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, Kheng-Wei; Mikhaeel, N George

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has become indispensable for the clinical management of lymphomas. With consistent evidence that it is more accurate than anatomic imaging in the staging and response assessment of many lymphoma subtypes, its utility continues to increase. There have therefore been efforts to incorporate PET/CT data into radiation therapy decision making and in the planning process. Further, there have also been studies investigating target volume definition for radiation therapy using PET/CT data. This article will critically review the literature and ongoing studies on the above topics, examining the value and methods of adding PET/CT data to the radiation therapy treatment algorithm. We will also discuss the various challenges and the areas where more evidence is required.

  1. Bilateral diffuse fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in thyroid gland diagnosed by fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Zaw; Aparici, Carina Mari

    2014-05-01

    Our patient is a female who was first diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 23. A follow-up fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) at age 44 revealed diffuse high FDG uptake in an enlarged thyroid gland. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of the thyroid mass revealed estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor negative, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2+ breast cancer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case to report breast cancer metastasis to the thyroid in a diffuse pattern on FDG-PET/CT. Bilateral diffuse uptake of FDG in thyroid is the most commonly associated with benign conditions. However, FNA biopsies need to be done to rule out metastatic disease in thyroid lesions with diffuse high FDG uptake, especially for patients with history of cancer.

  2. Contrast-enhanced fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Sampath; Lakshmanan, Ramesh Kumar; Sonik, Bhavay; Padmavathy, Rajagopalan; Gunaseelan, Rajamani Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas is a rare pancreatic tumor with low malignant potential. It occurs characteristically more often in young women. Radiological and pathological studies have revealed that the tumor is quite different from other pancreatic tumors. Limited information is available in the literature reporting their accumulation of fluorine-(18) fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Here, we report a case of pancreatic SPN imaged with contrast-enhanced FDG PET/CT. A percutaneous fine needle aspiration from the metabolically active lesion revealed SPN, and it was confirmed with histopathological results. Recurrence or metastasis was not found after 7 months of follow-up.

  3. Benign thyroid and neck lesions mimicking malignancy with false positive findings on positron emission tomography-computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ye Ri; Kim, Shin Young; Lee, Sang Mi [Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Deuk Young [Dept. of Surgery, Younsei Angelot Women' s Clinic, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The increasing use of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) has led to the frequent detection of incidental thyroid and neck lesions with increased 18F-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. Although lesions with increased FDG uptake are commonly assumed to be malignant, benign lesions may also exhibit increased uptake. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to demonstrate that benign thyroid and neck lesions can produce false-positive findings on PET/CT, and to identify various difficulties in interpretation. It is crucial to be aware that differentiating between benign and malignant lesions is difficult in a considerable proportion of cases, when relying only on PET/CT findings. Correlation of PET/CT findings with additional imaging modalities is essential to avoid misdiagnosis.

  4. Diagnostic performance of exercise bicycle testing and single-photon emission computed tomography: Comparison with 64-slice computed tomography coronary angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Weustink (Annick); L.A.E. Neefjes (Lisan); A. Rossi (Alexia); W.B. Meijboom (Willem Bob); K. Nieman (Koen); E. Capuano (Ermanno); H. Boersma (Eric); N.R.A. Mollet (Nico); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel); P.J. de Feyter (Pim)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractTo conduct a comparison of the diagnostic performance of exercise bicycle testing and singlephoton emission computed tomography (SPECT) with computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with stable angina. 376

  5. 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography in diagnosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Max; Dyrvig, Anne-Kirstine; Johansen, Jørgen;

    2014-01-01

    18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography-scan (PET/CT) is used increasingly for detection of cancer. Precise diagnostic assessment of tumour extension in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is of critical importance for ensuring that patients receive...

  6. Clinical Relevance of Incidental Prostatic Lesions on FDG-Positron Emission Tomography/Computerized Tomography-Should Patients Receive Further Evaluation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reesink, Daan J; Fransen van de Putte, Elisabeth E; Vegt, Erik; De Jong, Jeroen; van Werkhoven, Erik; Mertens, Laura S; Bex, Axel; van der Poel, Henk G; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Horenblas, Simon; Meijer, Richard P

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: FDG ((18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose)-PET/CT (positron emission tomography)/(computerized tomography) is a widely used diagnostic tool for whole body imaging. Incidental prostatic uptake is often found on FDG-PET/CT. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical relevance of inci

  7. FDG-positron emission tomography/computed tomography and standardized uptake value in the primary diagnosis and staging of hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.T. Ruys; R.J. Bennink; H.L. van Westreenen; M.R. Engelbrecht; O.R. Busch; D.J. Gouma; T.M. van Gulik

    2011-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis and staging of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCCA) remain challenging despite recent advances in imaging. Little is known about the use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in HCCA. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the additional value of FDG-PET

  8. High-resolution PET (positron emission tomography) for medical science studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budinger, T.F.; Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman, R.H.; Jagust, W.J.; Valk, P.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-09-01

    One of the unexpected fruits of basic physics research and the computer revolution is the noninvasive imaging power available to today's physician. Technologies that were strictly the province of research scientists only a decade or two ago now serve as the foundations for such standard diagnostic tools as x-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), ultrasound, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). Furthermore, prompted by the needs of both the practicing physician and the clinical researcher, efforts to improve these technologies continue. This booklet endeavors to describe the advantages of achieving high resolution in PET imaging. 6 refs., 21 figs.

  9. Cobalt-55 positron emission tomography of ipsilateral thalamic and crossed cerebellar hypometabolism after supratentorial ischaemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Reuck, J; Stevens, H; Jansen, H; Keppens, J; Strijckmans, K; Goethals, P; Lemahieu, [No Value; Santens, P; Korf, J

    1999-01-01

    Cobalt-55 (Co-55) is a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer used to demonstrate brain damage, possibly associated to calcium-mediated processes. The degree of Co-55 accumulation correlates with the severity of ischaemia in stroke patients. It is still a matter of debate whether ipsilateral thal

  10. A New Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Radioligand for Imaging Sigma-1 Receptors in Living Subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    James, Michelle L; Shen, Bin; Zavaleta, Cristina L

    2012-01-01

    ]13 was synthesized by nucleophilic fluorination, affording a product with >99% radiochemical purity (RCP) and specific activity (SA) of 2.6 ± 1.2 Ci/µmol (n = 13) at end of synthesis (EOS). Positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo autoradiography studies of [(18)F]13 in mice showed high uptake...

  11. Activity-based costing evaluation of a [F-18]-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krug, Bruno; Van Zanten, Annie; Pirson, Anne-Sophie; Crott, Ralph; Vander Borght, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to use the activity-based costing approach to give a better insight in the actual cost structure of a positron emission tomography procedure (FDG-PET) by defining the constituting components and by simulating the impact of possible resource or practice changes. Met

  12. Diagnosis of heterotopic bone marrow in the mediastinum using /sup 52/Fe and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgies, P. (Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Hematology; Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Ferrant, A. (Louvain Univ., Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Lab. of Positron Emission Tomography); Leners, N.; Michaux, J.L.; Bol, A.; Michel, C.; Cogneau, M.; Sokal, G.

    1989-11-01

    A patient with hereditary spherocytosis was admitted with mediastinal masses on the chest X-ray. /sup 52/Fe and positron emission tomography (PET) showed uptake of /sup 52/Fe in the masses and established the diagnosis of thoracic extra medullary hematopoiesis. (orig.).

  13. A 5D computational phantom for pharmacokinetic simulation studies in dynamic emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A.; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; Polycarpou, Irene; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Dynamic image acquisition protocols are increasingly used in emission tomography for drug development and clinical research. As such, there is a need for computational phantoms to accurately describe both the spatial and temporal distribution of radiotracers, also accounting for period

  14. Positron emission tomography (PET) methodology for small animals and its application in radiopharmaceutical preclinical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, Susan P.; Jones, Terry

    1998-11-01

    The use and usefulness of positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify the specific and selective in vivo binding of radioligands in small laboratory animals is briefly reviewed up to the end of 1996. Emphasis is placed on practical experience with a dedicated, small diameter, tomograph (built in collaboration with CTI, Knoxville, TN), implementing conventional PET methodology.

  15. Positron emission tomography in presurgical diagnosis of partial epilepsies. Praeoperative Lokalisationsdiagnostik bei fokaler Epilepsie durch PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, M.; Leenders, K.L. (Universitaetsspital Zurich (Switzerland). Neurologische Klinik Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)); Wieser, H.G. (Universitaetsspital Zurich (Switzerland). Neurologische Klinik)

    1992-06-01

    We present results of studies in which positron emission tomography was applied to the presurgical evaluation of epileptics. Emphasis is placed on results of PET studies with various tracers in partial epilepsies and on the use of PET in age-related epileptic syndromes in children. (orig.).

  16. Detection of unknown primary head and neck tumors by positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braams, JW; Pruim, J; Kole, AC; Nikkels, PGJ; Vaalburg, W; Vermey, A; Roodenburg, JLN

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of using positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-labeled fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) to detect unknown primary tumors of cervical metastases. Thirteen patients with various histologic types of cervical metastases of unknown primary

  17. Small animal positron emission tomography imaging and in vivo studies of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hag, Anne Mette Fisker; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Pedersen, Sune Folke

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a growing health challenge globally, and despite our knowledge of the disease has increased over the last couple of decades, many unanswered questions remain. As molecular imaging can be used to visualize, characterize and measure biological processes at the molecular and cellu...... knowledge obtained from in vivo positron emission tomography studies of atherosclerosis performed in small animals....

  18. Measuring endogenous 5-HT release by emission tomography: promises and pitfalls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paterson, Louise M; Tyacke, Robin J; Nutt, David J;

    2010-01-01

    emission tomography, but has not yet been adequately extended to other neurotransmitter systems. This review focuses on how the technique has been applied to the study of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) system. The principles behind visualising fluctuations in neurotransmitters are introduced...

  19. Synthesis and biodistribution of [C-11]procaterol, a beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonist for positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, TJ; van der Wouden, EA; van Waarde, A; Doze, P; Elsinga, PH; Vaalburg, W

    The potent, subtype-selective radioligand (+/-)-erythro-5-(1-hydroxy-2-[C-11]isopropyl-aminobutyl)-8-hydroxy-carbostyril ([C-11]procaterol) was synthesized and evaluated for visualization of pulmonary beta(2)-adrenoceptors with positron emission tomography (PET). Procaterol was labelled by reductive

  20. MRI and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in hemimegalencephaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, K.T.; Liebig, T.; Hosten, N. [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Virchow-Klinikum, Charite, Berlin (Germany); Amthauer, H.; Farahati, J.; Felix, R. [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Virchow-Klinikum, Charite, Berlin (Germany); PET-Centre Berlin, Virchow-Klinikum, Charite, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany); Etou, A.; Lehmann, T.N. [Department of Neurosurgery, Virchow-Klinikum, Charite, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany)

    2000-10-01

    We report hemimegalencephaly in a 44-year-old woman with mental retardation, epilepsy and a mild hemiparesis. In addition to typical findings on MRI, 2-deoxy-2[{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (PET) demonstrated glucose hypometabolism of the affected hemisphere. The results of PET have been coregistered with morphological information from the MRI studies by image fusion. (orig.)

  1. Detection of unknown primary head and neck tumors by positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braams, JW; Pruim, J; Kole, AC; Nikkels, PGJ; Vaalburg, W; Vermey, A; Roodenburg, JLN

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of using positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-labeled fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) to detect unknown primary tumors of cervical metastases. Thirteen patients with various histologic types of cervical metastases of unknown primary o

  2. 77 FR 8262 - Draft Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft...

  3. Monitoring of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase enzyme activity using positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospers, GAP; Calogero, Anna; van Waarde, A; Doze, P; Vaalburg, W; Mulder, NH; de Vries, EFJ

    2000-01-01

    9-[(1-[F-18]Fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine ([F-18]FHPG) wasevaluated as a tracer for noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene expression. C6 rat glioma cells with and without the HSV-tk gene were incubated with

  4. Impact of [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography on surgical management of melanoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaannet, E; Oyen, WJG; Meijer, S; Hoekstra, OS; Wobbes, T; Jager, PL; Hoekstra, HJ

    Background: Several studies have shown adequate sensitivity and specificity of [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for the detection of metastases from melanoma, but few have addressed its impact on treatment. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the impact

  5. Capillaries within compartments: microvascular interpretation of dynamic positron emission tomography data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, O L; Keiding, S; Bass, L

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of exchange of substances between blood and tissue has been a long-lasting challenge to physiologists, and considerable theoretical and experimental accomplishments were achieved before the development of the positron emission tomography (PET). Today, when modeling data from modern PE...

  6. Evaluation of a 99Tcm bound brain scanning agent for single photon emission computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A R; Hasselbalch, S G; Paulson, O B

    1986-01-01

    D,L HM-PAO-99Tcm (PAO) is a lipophilic tracer complex which is avidly taken up by the brain. We have compared the regional distribution of PAO with regional cerebral blood flow (CBF). CBF was measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) by Tomomatic 64 after 133Xe inhalation in 41...

  7. Plastic scintillators for positron emission tomography obtained by the bulk polymerization method

    CERN Document Server

    Kapłon, Łukasz; Molenda, Marcin; Moskal, Paweł; Wieczorek, Anna; Bednarski, Tomasz; Białas, Piotr; Czerwiński, Eryk; Korcyl, Grzegorz; Kowal, Jakub; Kowalski, Paweł; Kozik, Tomasz; Krzemień, Wojciech; Niedźwiecki, Szymon; Pałka, Marek; Pawlik, Monika; Raczyński, Lech; Rudy, Zbigniew; Salabura, Piotr; Gupta-Sharma, Neha; Silarski, Michał; Słomski, Artur; Smyrski, Jerzy; Strzelecki, Adam; Wiślicki, Wojciech; Zieliński, Marcin; Zoń, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes three methods regarding the production of plastic scintillators. One method appears to be suitable for the manufacturing of plastic scintillator, revealing properties which fulfill the requirements of novel positron emission tomography scanners based on plastic scintillators. The key parameters of the manufacturing process are determined and discussed.

  8. Activity-based costing evaluation of a [F-18]-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krug, Bruno; Van Zanten, Annie; Pirson, Anne-Sophie; Crott, Ralph; Vander Borght, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to use the activity-based costing approach to give a better insight in the actual cost structure of a positron emission tomography procedure (FDG-PET) by defining the constituting components and by simulating the impact of possible resource or practice changes.

  9. Right parietal stroke with Gerstmann's syndrome. Appearance on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and single-photon emission computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M R; Saver, J L; Johnson, K A; Romero, J A

    1991-04-01

    We examined a patient who exhibited Gerstmann's syndrome (left-right disorientation, finger agnosia, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia) in association with a perioperative stroke in the right parietal lobe. This is the first description of the Gerstmann tetrad occurring in the setting of discrete right hemisphere pathologic findings. A well-localized vascular lesion was demonstrated by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and single-photon emission computed tomographic studies. The patient had clinical evidence of reversed functional cerebral dominance and radiologic evidence of reversed anatomic cerebral asymmetries.

  10. An index of pulmonary edema measured with emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, B.D.; Brownell, G.L.; Hales, C.A.; Kazemi, H.

    1981-10-01

    Positron camera and short-lived biological isotopes are used to obtain transverse sections of lung volume, blood volume, and total lung water of dog lungs to assess the degree of pulmonary edema in normal and edematous dogs. At equilibration with specific isotope, 30 equally spaced angular profiles of the distribution are collected to obtain transverse section images. Emission computed number is obtained in the lung and heart areas for the images obtained with an intravascular marker (11CO) and intra- and extravascular marker (C15O2). The emission computed number ratio of lung to heart for C15O2 images is an index that is related to degree of edema. Emission computed number related to extravascular water can be obtained from normalized (C15O2--11CO) scintigrams. The technique is noninvasive.

  11. Increased fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose uptake on positron emission tomography-computed tomography postbronchoalveolar lavage: a potential cause of radiologic misinterpretation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leong, Sum

    2011-08-01

    Cytologic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is used for lung cancer diagnosis. We describe a patient with a history of rectal carcinoma who presented with a new lung mass. BAL was performed, with positron emission tomography-computed tomography the following day. There was mildly increased fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose uptake in areas of the lung parenchyma with new ground-glass opacification. This created ambiguity in staging, clarified 2 weeks later by a computed tomography showing complete resolution of the ground-glass opacity. Clinicians should be aware that BAL may cause increased pulmonary fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose uptake, making accurate radiologic interpretation problematic. We suggest that to optimize positron emission tomography-computed tomography, studies should not be performed within 24 hours of BAL.

  12. Positron Emission Tomography: Current Challenges and Opportunities for Technological Advances in Clinical and Preclinical Imaging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Juan José; Kinahan, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is based on detecting two time-coincident high-energy photons from the emission of a positron-emitting radioisotope. The physics of the emission, and the detection of the coincident photons, give PET imaging unique capabilities for both very high sensitivity and accurate estimation of the in vivo concentration of the radiotracer. PET imaging has been widely adopted as an important clinical modality for oncological, cardiovascular, and neurological applications. PET imaging has also become an important tool in preclinical studies, particularly for investigating murine models of disease and other small-animal models. However, there are several challenges to using PET imaging systems. These include the fundamental trade-offs between resolution and noise, the quantitative accuracy of the measurements, and integration with X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In this article, we review how researchers and industry are addressing these challenges.

  13. Position emission tomography with or without computed tomography in the primary staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Loft, Annika; Hansen, Mads

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In order to receive the most appropriate therapy, patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) must be accurately stratified into different prognostic staging groups. Computed tomography (CT) plays a pivotal role in the conventional staging. The aim of the present study...... standard limits the reliability of accuracy calculations. RESULTS: FDG-PET would have upstaged 19% of patients and downstaged 5% of patients, leading to a different treatment in 9% of patients. For FDG-PET/CT, the corresponding figures are 17%, 5%, and 7%. In nodal regions, the sensitivity of FDG...

  14. Degenerative dementia: nosological aspects and results of single photon emission computed tomography; Les demences degeneratives: aspects nosologiques et resultats de la tomographie d'emission monophotonique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, B.; Habert, M.O. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-12-01

    Ten years ago, the diagnosis discussion of a dementia case for the old patient was limited to two pathologies: the Alzheimer illness and the Pick illness. During these last years, the frame of these primary degenerative dementia has fallen into pieces. The different diseases and the results got with single photon emission computed tomography are discussed. for example: fronto-temporal dementia, primary progressive aphasia, progressive apraxia, visio-spatial dysfunction, dementia at Lewy's bodies, or cortico-basal degeneration. (N.C.)

  15. The positrons emission tomography in cardiology on expecting for the rubidium 82; La tomographie par emission de positons en cardiologie en attendant le rubidium-82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, D. [Societe Francaise de Cardiologie Nucleaire et IRM, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-11-15

    The positron emission tomography in cardiology has an important place in France. A new tracer, the rubidium 82 can be used for the detection of myocardium ischemia among the patients where the SPECT was ineffective or not very useful, it will be necessary to propose a permit to market the tracer in the two next years.Recently, the Food drug administration in Usa has allowed the repayment of the rubidium 82 for the myocardium detection as normal or abnormal in the post myocardium infarction. (N.C.)

  16. [Approach to fever of unknown origin: the role of positron-emission tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncini, Gabriele; Nendaz, Mathieu

    2010-02-03

    Despite important advances in diagnostic medical techniques, feverof unknown origin (FUO) still remains a major challenge. This article tries to determine how much the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography coupled to computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) contributes to the final diagnosis explaining FUO. It also analyzes whether its position in the investigation algorithm may be defined precisely. Our literature review revealed that FDG-PET/CT demonstrates an important potential to replace some traditional radiographic tests but that its position in the strategy of investigations remains to be further defined. The available studies are presently scarce, heterogeneous, and sometimes discordant.

  17. First experiences from Copenhagen with paediatric single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jann; Bech, Birthe Højlund; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the diagnostic value of single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT)/multislice computed tomographic (MSCT) fusion images compared with planar scintigraphy in children. METHODS: Fifteen children [eight girls, mean age 13 years (range 2-17 years)] who were...

  18. Evaluation of focal thyroid lesions incidentally detected in fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Yaylali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Increased uptake in the thyroid gland (TG is often identified as an incidental finding on the whole body fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT in non-thyroid cancer patients. Currently, there is no consensus on the appropriate approach for the management of these cases. Thyroid ultrasound, scintigraphy and fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB are suggested to exclude malignant thyroid lesions. Our aim is to determine the importance of increased F-18-FDG uptake in the TG on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT scans in patients who are being screened for various forms of non-thyroid cancer. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 2000 cases undergoing whole body PET/CT scanning between April 2011 and October 2012. The age, sex, type of primary cancer, maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max , size of the thyroid nodules and cervical lymph nodes (CLNs on 18 F-FDG PET/CT images and if available, the biopsy results were evaluated. Results: In total, 57 patients (23 men, 34 women, mean age ± standard deviation (SD, 60.89 ± 14 years showed an increased fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG uptake by the TG (average SUV max : 4.07 ± 3.7. The CLNs were detected in 19/57 patients (33%. Only 20 cases (35% received FNAB. The final histopathological diagnosis was papillary thyroid carcinoma in seven patients (mean SUV max ± SD: 6.0 ± 5.43 and benign thyroid disease in seven patients (mean SUV max ± SD: 2.36 ± 0.63. The FNAB results were undetermined for six patients. Conclusion: Focal high 18 F-FDG uptake in the TG may be associated with an increased risk of malignancy, but the clinical significance is unclear. More data are needed to elucidate the role of the SUV in the differentiation of benign and malign thyroid lesions. If a focal increase in 18 F-FDG uptake in the TG on PET/CT is present, a prompt histopathological evaluation should be

  19. Recent innovations in the detection systems of Positron Emission Tomography; Innovations technologiques recentes en detection pour la Tomographie par Emission de Positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebossen, R. [CEA-Service Hospitalier Frederic-Joliot, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2007-04-15

    Since the recognition of the clinical value of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for the diagnosis and staging of several cancers, the PET systems have evolved to systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT). The main constraint for clinical imaging is to reduce the acquisition duration. As a consequence, PET detectors are faster and emit more light than the BGO crystal used previously. These detectors allow an improvement of the count rate performance of the PET systems, reducing the scattered and the random events while increasing the true events at high activity concentration. Among the new crystals, some allow measuring the time of flight of the annihilation photons. This measurement further improves the performance of the systems. The spatial resolution of clinical PET systems is still equal to 5 mm at best. High spatial resolution PET systems dedicated to small animal imaging have been developed. These systems use similar crystal materials as the clinical systems. However, in order to permit spatial resolution close to 1 mm, the crystal elements have much smaller transverse dimensions than that of clinical systems. The detectors are compact using position sensitive photomultipliers or photodiodes. In order to preserve the uniformity of the spatial resolution over the transverse field of view of the tomography, solutions allowing the measurement of the depth of interaction of the photons in the crystal have been designed. New compact detectors based on semi conductors are currently investigated. (author)

  20. Novel detector systems for the Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Silarski, M; Smyrski, J; Zdebik, J; Zieliński, M

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we describe a novel solution for the construction of Positron Emission Tomograph. We present the device allowing for determination of the impact position as well as time and deph of interaction of the annihilation gamma quanta. The device is comprised of scintillation chamber consisting of organic scintillators surrounding the body of the patient. We discuss two possible solutions: (i) the tomograph built out of scintillator strips, and (ii) the tomograph built out of the scintillator plates. The application of the fast scintillators will enable to take advantage of the difference between time of the registration of the annihilation quanta. The invented method will permit to use a thick layers of detector material with the possibility of measuring the depth of the gamma quantum interaction (DOI) and the determination of their time of flight (TOF), and will allow for increasing the size of the diagnostic chamber without a significant increase of costs. The method is a subject of two patent...

  1. Resting state rCBF mapping with single-photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography: magnitude and origin of differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, C.; Kimiaei, S.; Larsson, S.A. [Section of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Hospital Physics, Karolinska Hospital and Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Pagani, M. [Institute of Experimental Medicine, CNR, Rome (Italy); Ingvar, M. [Section of Cognitive Neurophysiology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Thurfjell, L. [Center of Image Analysis, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Jacobsson, H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-02-01

    Single-photon emission tomography (SPET), using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime, and positron emission tomography (PET), using oxygen-15 butanol were compared in six healthy male volunteers with regard to the mapping of resting state regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). A computerized brain atlas was utilized for 3D regional analyses and comparison of 64 selected and normalized volumes of interest (VOIs). The normalized mean rCBF values in SPET, as compared to PET, were higher in most of the Brodmann areas in the frontal and parietal lobes (4.8% and 8.7% respectively). The average differences were small in the temporal (2.3%) and occipital (1.1%) lobes. PET values were clearly higher in small VOIs like the thalamus (12.3%), hippocampus (12.3%) and basal ganglia (9.9%). A resolution phantom study showed that the in-plane SPET/PET system resolution was 11.0/7.5 mm. In conclusion, SPET and PET data demonstrated a fairly good agreement despite the superior spatial resolution of PET. The differences between SPET and PET rCBF are mainly due to physiological and physical factors, the data processing, normalization and co-registration methods. In order to further improve mapping of rCBF with SPET it is imperative not only to improve the spatial resolution but also to apply accurate correction techniques for scatter, attenuation and non-linear extraction. (orig.) With 6 figs., 3 tabs., 23 refs.

  2. Regional myocardial blood flow, metabolism and function assessed noninvasively by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.; Hoffman, E.; Huang, S.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography is a new technique for the noninvasive measure of myocardial blood flow, mechanical function and, in particular, metabolism. The capability of this new study means is due to the technological innovations of the imaging device and the availability of radioactive tracers that are specific for blood flow and metabolism. The device permits recording of cross-sectional images of the left ventricular myocardium that reflect quantitatively regional tracer tissue concentrations. By employing tracer kinetic models this new technique permits the measurement of regional glucose and fatty acid metabolism of the heart. While already an important new tool for investigative studies into cardiac physiology and pathophysiology, the clinical utility of positron emission tomography remains to be defined.

  3. Positron emission tomography scanning is coming to a hospital near you soon!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Humayun; Shabo, Gregory; Nunan, T O

    2008-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is still generally not available in the UK; however, there are plans to introduce a national service in England from April 2008. Plans are also at an advanced stage in Scotland and Wales. The main uses of PET are in preoperative staging of lung cancer, detection of recurrent colorectal cancer, and management of patients with lymphoma. Although these provide the bulk of the referral base, PET is also of use in specific situations in patients with less common cancers, such as head and neck cancer, gynaecological cancer, and melanoma. In its more common uses, PET has been shown to be cost effective. Positron emission tomography will play an increasing role in the evaluation of response to treatment to enable early separation of patients who are responding well to chemotherapy from those who are not responding and need to be transferred to another therapy.

  4. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in the management of adult multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obert, Julie [Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Centre National de Reference de l' Histiocytose Langerhansienne, Service de Pneumologie, Hopital Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Vercellino, Laetitia [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Van der Gucht, Axel [Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital Saint-Louis, Paris (France); De Margerie-Mellon, Constance [Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Radiologie, Hopital Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Bugnet, Emmanuelle; Lorillon, Gwenael [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Centre National de Reference de l' Histiocytose Langerhansienne, Service de Pneumologie, Hopital Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Chevret, Sylvie [Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Biostatistique et Information Medicale, Hopital Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology Research Team, U1153 CRESS, Paris (France); Tazi, Abdellatif [Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Centre National de Reference de l' Histiocytose Langerhansienne, Service de Pneumologie, Hopital Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology Research Team, U1153 CRESS, Paris (France)

    2017-04-15

    The standard evaluation of multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) includes a clinical evaluation, laboratory tests and a skeleton/skull X-ray survey, with chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in the case of pulmonary involvement. Preliminary reports suggest that {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT) may be useful for evaluating patients with LCH. Fourteen consecutive adult patients with multisystem LCH were included in this retrospective study, and were evaluated using standard procedures and {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT. The two sets of findings were compared both at baseline and during follow-up. Serial HRCT and pulmonary function tests were used to evaluate outcome in patients with lung involvement. At the baseline evaluation, PET-CT identified every LCH localization found with the standard evaluation (except a mild cecum infiltration). PET-CT showed additional lesions in seven patients, mostly involving bones, and differentiated inactive from active lesions. Thyroid {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was identified in three cases. No pituitary stalk {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was observed in patients with pituitary LCH. Only 3/12 (25 %) patients with pulmonary LCH displayed moderate pulmonary {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. During follow-up, variations (≥50 % of maximum standardized uptake) in bone {sup 18}F-FDG uptake intensity were correlated with disease state and response to treatment. The absence of lung {sup 18}F-FDG uptake did not preclude lung function improvement after treatment. Except for cases with pulmonary and pituitary involvement, {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT could replace the standard evaluation for staging of adult patients with multisystem LCH. Serial PET-CT scans are useful for evaluating treatment responses, particularly in cases with bone LCH involvement. (orig.)

  5. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease mimicking tuberculous lymphadenitis or lymphoma on fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahim N

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Noraini Abdul Rahim,1 Abdul Jalil Nordin,2 Chiara Rusconi,3 Cristina Gabutti,3 Erika Ravelli,4 Claudio Rossetti5 1Diagnostic Imaging Department, Serdang Hospital, Selangor, 2Centre for Diagnostic Nuclear Imaging, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia; 3Department of Haematology, Ospedale Niguarda, Milan, 4Unit of Haematology, Valduce Hospital, Como, 5Department of Advance Technology (Nuclear Medicine, Ospedale Niguarda, Milan, Italy Abstract: Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease, also known as histiocytic lymphadenitis is a rare and benign disease characterized by regional cervical lymphadenopathy with fever of unknown origin, affecting mainly young women. We describe a case of a young Asian female who was initially misdiagnosed as having tuberculous lymphadenitis because of multiple lymphadenopathies with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake on positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Final histologic diagnosis of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease was made after excisional biopsy of the affected lymph node. The cervical lymphadenopathy has reduced in size and lung lesions disappeared after 2 months without specific treatment. Keywords: cervical lymphadenopathy, Kikuchi disease, PET/CT features

  6. Corrected coronary opacification decrease from coronary computed tomography angiography: Validation with quantitative 13N-ammonia positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Dominik C; Gräni, Christoph; Ferro, Paola; Neumeier, Luis; Messerli, Michael; Possner, Mathias; Clerc, Olivier F; Gebhard, Catherine; Gaemperli, Oliver; Pazhenkottil, Aju P; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Buechel, Ronny R

    2017-07-06

    To assess the functional relevance of a coronary artery stenosis, corrected coronary opacification (CCO) decrease derived from coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) has been proposed. The present study aims at validating CCO decrease with quantitative 13N-ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). This retrospective study consists of 39 patients who underwent hybrid CCTA/PET-MPI. From CCTA, attenuation in the coronary lumen was measured before and after a stenosis and corrected to the aorta to calculate CCO and its decrease. Relative flow reserve (RFR) was calculated by dividing the stress myocardial blood flow (MBF) of a vessel territory subtended by a stenotic coronary by the stress MBF of the reference territories without stenoses. RFR was abnormal in 11 vessel territories (27%). CCO decrease yielded a sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and accuracy for prediction of an abnormal RFR of 73%, 70%, 88%, 47%, and 70%, respectively. CCTA-derived CCO decrease has moderate diagnostic accuracy to predict an abnormal RFR in PET-MPI. However, its high negative predictive value to rule out functional relevance of a given lesion may confer clinical implications in the diagnostic work-up of patients with a coronary stenosis.

  7. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging of brown tumors mimicking multiple skeletal metastases in patient with primary hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sait Sager

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brown tumors of bone are highly vascular, lytic bone lesions representing a reparative cellular process rather than a neoplastic process usually seen in patients with hyperparathyroidism. These tumors can behave aggressively and be destructive. We report a 49-year-old male patient who was admitted to our hospital with a long-term history of right shoulder and right hip pain. Multiple lytic and destructive bone lesions were found in X-ray graphy and CT images. These bone lesions mimicked multiple skeletal metastatic lesions and seemed to be those of the terminal stage of malignancy. PET scan was requested for the evaluation of FDG uptake of these lesions and to search the unknown primary tumor site. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT images showed multiple hypermetabolic malignant or metastatic FDG avid bone lesions in skeletal system. However the biopsy results revealed no signs of malignancy and laboratory data showed elevated serum calcium, alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, low serum phosphate and parathyroid scintigraphy was performed. Adenoma in the left parathyroid gland was seen with Tc-99m MIBI parathyroid scintigraphy. Pathological results confirmed the diagnosis of parathyroid adenoma. Brown tumor is the potential cause of false-positive result in evaluation of a patient for unknown primary tumor or skeletal metastases with PET/CT imaging.

  8. Clinico-radiological correlation of Wilson's disease by magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Ken; Sakata, Chigusa; Nemoto, Hiroshi; Yokoi, Fuji; Sunohara, Nobuhiko (National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan)); Iio, Masaaki

    1991-02-01

    Five patients with Wilson's disease received repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) examinations at intervals from 6 to 29 months. Four patients, except for asymptomatic one, also underwent positron emission tomography (PET). The significance and limitations of these imaging modalities were examined in the light of their correlation with clinical manifestations and their therapeutic evaluation. The following focal regions, detected on MRI, had a strong positive correlation with clinical manifestations: the lenticular nuclei for dystonia, the brain stem for abnormality of smooth persuit eye movements, and the caudate and lenticular nuclei for severe dysarthria/dysphagia. Follow-up MRI for 3 patients showed an improvement of findings in the lenticular nuclei, lateral part of the putamen, and brain stem, that was in accordance with improved clinical or neurologic manifestations, such as dystonia and cerebellar symptoms. Severe abnormality in the caudate nucleus was associated with poor prognosis. Repeated CT failed to show serial changes in any of the patients. Regional blood flow and oxygen metabolic rate, obtained by PET examinations, were slightly decreased in the thalamus that had normal findings on both MRI and CT, as well as in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. PET was, however, inferior to MRI in detecting fine foci within the basal ganglia. In conclusion, there was a good correlation between MRI findings, particularly foci of the caudate and lenticular nuclei, and clinical manifestations. Repeated MRI examinations were the most useful approach to the evaluation of therapeutic effects and prognosis. (N.K.).

  9. Application of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in radiation treatment planning for head and neck cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Musaddiq; J; Awan; Farzan; Siddiqui; David; Schwartz; Jiankui; Yuan; Mitchell; Machtay; Min; Yao

    2015-01-01

    18-fluorodeoxygluocose positron emission tomography/computed tomography(18FDG-PET/CT) provides significant information in multiple settings in the management of head and neck cancers(HNC). This article seeks to define the additional benefit of PET/CT as related to radiation treatment planning for squamous cell carcinomas(SCCs) of the head and neck through a review of relevant literature. By helping further define both primary and nodal volumes, radiation treatment planning can be improved using PET/CT. Special attention is paid to the independent benefit of PET/CT in targeting mucosal primaries as well as in detecting nodal metastases. The utility of PET/CT is also explored for treatment planning in the setting of SCC of unknown primary as PET/CT may help define a mucosal target volume by guiding biopsies for examination under anesthesia thus changing the treatment paradigm and limiting the extent of therapy. Implications of the use of PET/CT for proper target delineation in patients with artifact from dental procedures are discussed and the impact of dental artifact on CT-based PET attenuation correction is assessed. Finally, comment is made upon the role of PET/CT in the high-risk post-operative setting, particularly in the context of radiation dose escalation. Real case examples are used in these settings to elucidate the practical benefits of PET/CT as related to radiation treatment planning in HNCs.

  10. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the evaluation of germ cell tumours at relapse

    OpenAIRE

    Hain, S F; O’Doherty, M J; Timothy, A R; Leslie, M D; Harper, P. G.; Huddart, R A

    2000-01-01

    Differentiation of active disease from fibrosis/mature teratoma in patients with residual masses or identifying of sites of recurrence in patients with raised markers following treatment of their testicular cancer remains a problem.18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has the potential to identify active disease and thereby influence further management in these patients. We performed a retrospective study of the use of FDG-PET in detecting residual/recurrent testicula...

  11. Cancer Localization in the Prostate with F-18 Fluorocholine Position Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    sterile in- ammatory lesion was much less than uptake in an im- lanted tumor, whereas the uptake of tritium-labeled deoxy- lucose was relatively increased...injection. Al- hough the renal excretion of FCH is not ideal for evaluations f the urinary tract, it has not proven intractable in actual ractice...emission tomography for prostate, bladder, and renal cancer. Semin Nucl Med 34:274-292, 2004 0. Shreve PD, Grossman HB, Gross MD, et al: Metastatic

  12. Usefulness of myocardial positron emission tomography/nuclear imaging in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marzia; Testa; Mauro; Feola

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To analyse and summarize all the articles related to positron emission tomography and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy(TTC).METHODS:We performed a systematic review of the existing literature on positron emission tomography/nuclear imaging and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy using PUBMED database.We combined search terms such as"takotsubo","takotsubo syndrome","myocardial positron emission tomography","positron emission tomography".All case reports were excluded.The list included only four articles which were reviewed by two independent investigators.It was not possible to undertake a formal meta-analysis because of the heterogeneity of the studies;therefore,we made a narrative synthesis of the collected data.RESULTS:Nuclear medicine techniques can be useful employed in the differential diagnosis of TTC from an acute coronary syndrome(ACS).In fact,transient left ventricular(LV)apical ballooning is a syndrome frequently misdiagnosed as an ACS and can mimic symptoms of myocardial infarction with ST-T segments changes on electrocardiography(ECG),a limited re-lease of myocardial enzyme,mainly reported after sudden emotional or physical stress,and an akinesis or dyskinesis of the left ventricle apex which are completely reversible in a few weeks.In the studies included in this review,nuclear medicine techniques have demonstrated a discrepancy between normal perfusion and a reduced glucose utilization in TTC,commonly known as"inverse flow metabolism mismatch".This suggests that apical ballooning represents a transient metabolic disorder on the cellular level,rather than a structural contractile disease of the myocardium,due to a transient decrease of glucose metabolism that might be related to a coronary microcirculation impairment followed by prolonged myocardial stunning.CONCLUSION:Nuclear medicine techniques can be usefully used for the diagnosis of TTC and can increase our knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TTC.

  13. The establishment of crystal position look-up table for positron emission tomography with block detectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAI Pei; SHAN BaoCi

    2009-01-01

    A method has been developed to establish the crystal position look-up table for positron emission tomography with block detectors.It is based on the principle that the counts in crystal position histogram obey the Gaussian mixture model(GMM).This method has taken full consideration of the characteristics of the GMM and the detector itself.The experimental results have proved that it is simple,reliable,and universal.

  14. Detection of Gastroesophageal Reflux Esophagitis Using 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose Positron Emission Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Min-Kuei Tsai; Hueisch-Jy Ding; Hsueh-Chou Lai; Kuo-Yang Yen; Chia-Ing Li; Yu-Yi Lin; Kai-Yuan Cheng; Keh-Bin Wang; Chia-Hung Kao

    2012-01-01

    Background. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease and a major upper gastrointestinal problem. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the use of noninvasive 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) to detect gastroesophageal reflux esophagitis. Materials and Methods. This is a retrospective study reviewing 408 healthy check-up subjects (169 females and 239 men), who underwent both FDG-PET and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy during Septemb...

  15. Imaging Chronic Pain and Inflammation : Positron Emission Tomography Studies of Whiplash Associated Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is on chronic neck pain after a rear impact car injury, so called whiplash associated disorder (WAD). Three empirical studies using positron emission tomography (PET) with different radioligands have been performed. The first study evaluated resting state regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in WAD patients and in healthy, pain-free controls, by use of oxygen-15 labeled water. Patients had heightened resting rCBF bilaterally in the posterior parahippocampal and the posterior cingul...

  16. Advances in Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography Hardware and Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinelli, Marina; Garcia, Ernest V

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear imaging techniques remain today's most reliable modality for the assessment and quantification of myocardial perfusion. In recent years, the field has experienced tremendous progress both in terms of dedicated cameras for cardiac applications and software techniques for image reconstruction. The most recent advances in single-photon emission computed tomography hardware and software are reviewed, focusing on how these improvements have resulted in an even more powerful diagnostic tool with reduced injected radiation dose and acquisition time.

  17. Brady-tachycardia syndrome after radiotherapy for lung cancer. Assessment by computed tomography and carbon-11 methionine positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Takuya; Michihata, Tetsuo; Katagiri, Takashi [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Okazaki, Osamu; Izumo, Kazuhide; Harumi, Kenichi

    1999-09-01

    A 74-year-old male who had received radiotherapy (total 54 Gy) for right lung cancer 7 months earlier developed a symptomatic brady-tachycardia syndrome requiring the implantation of a permanent pacemaker. Chest CT showed a pulmonary tumor of 2-cm diameter in the right lower lobe with direct extension into the surrounding tissue, suggesting the possibility of cardiac invasion. Carbon-11 methionine positron emission tomography (PET) indicated the absence of visible invasion of the heart with lung cancer. The brady-tachycardia syndrome, therefore, was considered to be associated with sinus node injury due to radiation. Carbon-11 methionine PET metabolic imaging might play an important role in evaluating noninvasively the cause of the arrhythmia in this patient. (author)

  18. When to perform positron emission tomography/computed tomography or radionuclide bone scan in patients with recently diagnosed prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caldarella C

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Carmelo Caldarella,1 Giorgio Treglia,2 Alessandro Giordano,1 Luca Giovanella2 1Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT Centre, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland Abstract: Skeletal metastases are very common in prostate cancer and represent the main metastatic site in about 80% of prostate cancer patients, with a significant impact in patients' prognosis. Early detection of bone metastases is critical in the management of patients with recently diagnosed high-risk prostate cancer: radical treatment is recommended in case of localized disease; systemic therapy should be preferred in patients with distant secondary disease. Bone scintigraphy using radiolabeled bisphosphonates is of great importance in the management of these patients; however, its main drawback is its low overall accuracy, due to the nonspecific uptake in sites of increased bone turnover. Positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, such as fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose, choline-derived drugs (fluorine-18-fluorocholine and carbon-11-choline and sodium fluorine-18-fluoride, are increasingly used in clinical practice to detect metastatic spread, and particularly bone involvement, in patients with prostate cancer, to reinforce or substitute information provided by bone scan. Each radiopharmaceutical has a specific mechanism of uptake; therefore, diagnostic performances may differ from one radiopharmaceutical to another on the same lesions, as demonstrated in the literature, with variable sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy values in the same patients. Whether bone scintigraphy can be substituted by these new methods is a matter of debate. However, greater radiobiological burden, higher costs, and the necessity of an in-site cyclotron limit the use of these positron emission tomography methods as first-line investigations in patients with prostate cancer

  19. Effect of tissue heterogeneity on quantification in positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomqvist, G. [Dept. of Clinical Neuroscience, Experimental Alcohol and Drug Addiction Research Section, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Lammertsma, A.A. [PET Methodology Group, Cyclotron Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Mazoyer, B. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot CEA/Dept. de Biologie, Hopital d`Orsay and Antenne d`Informatique Medicale, Hopital Robert Debre, Paris (France); Wienhard, K. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Neurologische Forschung, Koeln (Germany)

    1995-07-01

    As a result of the limited spatial resolution of positron emission tomographic scanners, the measurements of physiological parameters are compromised by tissue heterogeneity. The effect of tissue heterogeneity on a number of parameters was studied by simulation and an analytical method. Five common tracer models were assessed. The input and tissue response functions were assumed to be free from noise and systematic errors. The kinetic model was assumed to be perfect. Two components with different kinetics were mixed in different proportions and contrast with respect to the model parameters. Different experimental protocols were investigated. Of three methods investigated for the measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) (steady state, dynamic, integral), the second one was least sensitive to errors caused by tissue heterogeneity and the main effect was an underestimation of the distribution volume. With the steady state method, errors in oxygen extraction fraction caused by tissue heterogeneity were always found to be less than the corresponding errors in CBF. For myocardial blood flow the steady state method was found to perform better than the bolus method. The net accumulation of substrate (i.e. rCMR{sub glc} in the case of glucose analogs) was found to be comparatively insensitive to tissue heterogeneity. Individual rate constans such as k{sub 2} and k{sub 3} for efflux and metabolism of the substrate in the pool of unmetabolized substrate in the tissue, respectively, were found to be more sensitive. In studies of radioligand binding, using only tracer doses, the effect of tissue heterogeneity on the parameter k{sub on}.B{sub max} could be considerable. In studies of radioligand binding using a protocol with two experiments, one with high and one with low specific activity, B{sub max} was found to be insensitive while K{sub d} was very sensitive to tissue heterogeneity. (orig.)

  20. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche.

  1. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography in anaplastic thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poisson, Thomas [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital Bichat, Paris (France); Deandreis, Desiree; Leboulleux, Sophie; Lumbroso, Jean; Baudin, Eric [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Bidault, Francois [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Radiology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Bonniaud, Guillaume [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Medical Physics, Villejuif Cedex (France); Baillot, Sylvain; Auperin, Anne [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Epidemiology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Ghuzlan, Abir Al [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Pathology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Travagli, Jean-Paul [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Endocrine Surgery, Villejuif Cedex (France); Schlumberger, Martin [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et de Cancerologie Endocrinienne, Villejuif (France)

    2010-12-15

    Our aim was to evaluate in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) patients the value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT compared with total body computed tomography (CT) using intravenous contrast material for initial staging, prognostic assessment, therapeutic monitoring and follow-up. Twenty consecutive ATC patients underwent PET/CT for initial staging. PET/CT was performed again during follow-up. The gold standard was progression on imaging follow-up (CT or PET/CT) or confirmation with another imaging modality. A total of 265 lesions in 63 organs were depicted in 18 patients. Thirty-five per cent of involved organs were demonstrated only with PET/CT and one involved organ only with CT. In three patients, the extent of disease was significantly changed with PET/CT that demonstrated unknown metastases. Initial treatment modalities were modified by PET/CT findings in 25% of cases. The volume of FDG uptake ({>=}300 ml) and the intensity of FDG uptake (SUV{sub max} {>=}18) were significant prognostic factors for survival. PET/CT permitted an earlier assessment of tumour response to treatment than CT in 4 of the 11 patients in whom both examinations were performed. After treatment with combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy, only the two patients with a negative control PET/CT had a confirmed complete remission at 14 and 38 months; all eight patients who had persistent FDG uptake during treatment had a clinical recurrence and died. FDG PET/CT appears to be the reference imaging modality for ATC at initial staging and seems promising in the early evaluation of treatment response and follow-up. (orig.)

  2. Pancreatic tuberculosis: Evaluation of therapeutic response using F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Srinivasan, Radhika; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2014-10-01

    F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) is a functional imaging technique that monitors glucose metabolism in tissues. Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) has been reported to show intense uptake of FDG, with a decrease in metabolism of the tuberculous lesions after successful anti-tubercular treatment (ATT). The authors present a patient with pancreatic TB and demonstrate the usefulness of FDG PET/CT in monitoring the response to ATT.

  3. Noninvasive evaluation of active pan-ulcerative colitis with multiple strictures using Fluorine-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Gupta, Rajesh; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory bowel disease characterized by waxing and waning inflammation that changes in severity and extent and may progress to neoplasia, especially in the presence of strictures. When patients have nonnegotiable strictures or severe inflammation with ulcers, colonoscopy is difficult and carries the risk of perforation. The authors present a patient with pan-UC with multiple strictures, in whom fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography was used to noninvasively evaluate the extent and severity of the disease.

  4. Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy on bone scintigraphy and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a patient with lung adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cengiz, Arzu; Eren, Mine Şencan; Polatli, Mehmet; Yürekli, Yakup

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy (HPOA) is not an uncommon paraneoplastic syndrome that is frequently associated with lung cancer. A 54-year-old male patient with lung adenocarcinoma underwent bone scintigraphy and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning for initial staging. Bone scintigraphy revealed increased periosteal activity in lower extremities. FDG PET/CT revealed hypermetabolic right lung mass, mediastinal lymph nodes, and mi...

  5. Review of cardiovascular imaging in the journal of nuclear cardiology in 2015. Part 1 of 2: Plaque imaging, positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJaroudi, Wael A; Hage, Fadi G

    2016-02-01

    In 2015, many original articles pertaining to cardiovascular imaging with impressive quality were published in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology. In a set of 2 articles, we provide an overview of these contributions to facilitate for the interested reader a quick review of the advancements that occurred in the field over this year. In this first article, we focus on arterial plaque imaging, cardiac positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Malignancies of the Thyroid and in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Jeppe Kiilerich; Rohde, Max; Thomassen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is a valuable diagnostic tool in a spectrum of malignant and benign conditions, because of a high sensitivity to detect even very small lesions with increased metabolism. This review focuses on the use of FDG-PET......-PET/CT in malignancies of the thyroid gland and in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma....

  7. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography finding of left gonadal vein thrombosis in a case of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Ravishwar; Ravishankar, Uma; Natarajan, Savita; Vohra, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Tumor thrombus from renal cell carcinoma is commonly reported in renal vein and inferior vena cava with a few reports of gonadal vein involvement. Here, we report a case of an elderly female who underwent fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan for initial staging of left renal cell carcinoma. Along with an FDG avid left renal mass lesion, scan also revealed FDG avid tumor thrombus in the entire length of the left gonadal vein.

  8. 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography improves the diagnostic accuracy of osteoid osteoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squier, Samuel Brian; Lewis, Jacob Ian; Accurso, Joseph Matthew; Jain, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 17-year-old football player who had previously received multiple facet joint injections for presumed secondary osteoarthritis. 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography imaging of the cervical spine demonstrated focal increased radiopharmaceutical activity in the right C2 lamina, which was associated with an osteolytic lesion with a central irregular sclerotic nidus. Surgical pathology confirmed an osteoid osteoma. PMID:27833319

  9. Prognostic value of positron emission tomography for non-small cell lung cancer survival; analysis of 268 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, H; Post, W J; Groen, H J M

    2004-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is more accurate than computed tomography (CT) in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed the prognostic value of PET for survival in NSCLC patients. METHODS: Consecutive patients with proven NSCLC who had PET for staging were selected. All

  10. The prognostic value of positron emission tomography in non-small cell lung cancer : Analysis of 266 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, H.; Post, W.J.; Pruim, J.; Groen, H.J.M.

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is more accurate than computed tomography (CT) in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed the prognostic value of PET for survival in NSCLC patients. Methods: Consecutive patients with proven NSCLC with PET for staging were selected. Staging

  11. The prognostic value of positron emission tomography in non-small cell lung cancer : Analysis of 266 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, H.; Post, W.J.; Pruim, J.; Groen, H.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is more accurate than computed tomography (CT) in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed the prognostic value of PET for survival in NSCLC patients. Methods: Consecutive patients with proven NSCLC with PET for staging were selected. Staging

  12. Monolithic LaBr3 : Ce crystals on silicon photomultiplier arrays for time-of-flight positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifert, Stefan; van Dam, Herman T.; Huizenga, Jan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Löhner, Herbert; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography detectors based on monolithic scintillation crystals exhibit good spatial and energy resolution, intrinsically provide depth-of-interaction information, have high gamma-photon capture efficiency, and may reduce the manufacturing costs compared to pixelated crystal

  13. Cost Effectiveness of Positron Emission Tomography for the Management of Potentially Operable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Hung Nguyen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The potential benefits of positron emission tomography (PET scanning stem from the fact that it can reduce the number of diagnostic examinations; particularly, the number of unnecessary thoracic surgeries.

  14. Monolithic LaBr3 : Ce crystals on silicon photomultiplier arrays for time-of-flight positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifert, Stefan; van Dam, Herman T.; Huizenga, Jan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Löhner, Herbert; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography detectors based on monolithic scintillation crystals exhibit good spatial and energy resolution, intrinsically provide depth-of-interaction information, have high gamma-photon capture efficiency, and may reduce the manufacturing costs compared to pixelated crystal arrays

  15. Combined use of positron emission tomography and volume doubling time in lung cancer screening with low-dose CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, H; Dirksen, A; Jakobsen, Annika Loft

    2011-01-01

    In lung cancer screening the ability to distinguish malignant from benign nodules is a key issue. This study evaluates the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) and volume doubling time (VDT) to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules....

  16. 2-¹⁸fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for postchemotherapy seminoma residual lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bachner, M; Loriot, Y; Gross-Goupil, M

    2012-01-01

    2-¹⁸fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been recommended in international guidelines in the evaluation of postchemotherapy seminoma residuals. Our trial was designed to validate these recommendations in a larger group of patients.......2-¹⁸fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been recommended in international guidelines in the evaluation of postchemotherapy seminoma residuals. Our trial was designed to validate these recommendations in a larger group of patients....

  17. Combined use of positron emission tomography and volume doubling time in lung cancer screening with low-dose CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, H; Dirksen, A; Jakobsen, Annika Loft

    2011-01-01

    In lung cancer screening the ability to distinguish malignant from benign nodules is a key issue. This study evaluates the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) and volume doubling time (VDT) to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules.......In lung cancer screening the ability to distinguish malignant from benign nodules is a key issue. This study evaluates the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) and volume doubling time (VDT) to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules....

  18. 18F-FLT Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging in Pancreatic Cancer: Determination of Tumor Proliferative Activity and Comparison with Glycolytic Activity as Measured by 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senait Aknaw Debebe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This phase-I imaging study examined the imaging characteristic of 3’-deoxy-3’-(18F-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT positron emission tomography (PET in patients with pancreatic cancer and comparisons were made with (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG. The ultimate aim was to develop a molecular imaging tool that could better define the biologic characteristics of pancreas cancer, and to identify the patients who could potentially benefit from surgical resection who were deemed inoperable by conventional means of staging. Methods: Six patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer underwent a combined FLT and FDG computed tomography (CT PET/CT imaging protocol. The FLT PET/CT scan was performed within 1 week of FDG PET/CT imaging. Tumor uptake of a tracer was determined and compared using various techniques; statistical thresholding (z score=2.5, and fixed standardized uptake value (SUV thresholds of 1.4 and 2.5, and applying a threshold of 40% of maximum SUV (SUVmax and mean SUV (SUVmean. The correlation of functional tumor volumes (FTV between 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT was assessed using linear regression analysis. Results: It was found that there is a correlation in FTV due to metabolic and proliferation activity when using a threshold of SUV 2.5 for FDG and 1.4 for FLT (r=0.698, p=ns, but a better correlation was obtained when using SUV of 2.5 for both tracers (r=0.698, p=ns. The z score thresholding (z=2.5 method showed lower correlation between the FTVs (r=0.698, p=ns of FDG and FLT PET. Conclusion: Different tumor segmentation techniques yielded varying degrees of correlation in FTV between FLT and FDGPET images. FLT imaging may have a different meaning in determining tumor biology and prognosis.

  19. The contribution of single photon emission computed tomography in the clinical assessment of Alzheimer type dementia; Apport de la tomographie d'emission monophonique cerebrale dans l'evaluation des demences de type Alzheimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudousq, V.; Collombier, L.; Kotzki, P.O. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nimes, 30 (France)

    1999-12-01

    Interest of brain single-photon emission computed tomography to support clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer-type dementia is now established. Numerous studies have reported a decreased perfusion in the association cortex of the parietal lobe and the posterior temporal regions. In patients with mild cognitive complaints, the presence of focal hypoperfusion may increase substantially the probability of the disease. In addition, emission tomography emerges as a helpful tool in situation in which there is diagnostic doubt. In this case, the presence of temporo-parietal perfusion deficit associated with hippocampal atrophy on MRI or X-ray computed tomography contributes to diagnostic accuracy. However, some studies suggest that emission tomography may be useful for preclinical prediction of Alzheimer's disease and to predict cognitive decline. (author)

  20. Positron emission tomography in digestive neuroendocrine tumors: choice of the tracer; Apport de la tomographie par emission de positons dans les tumeurs endocrines digestives: choix du traceur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taieb, D.; Tessonnier, L.; Mundler, O. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de La Timone, Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2009-11-15

    Digestive endocrine tumors represent a heterogeneous group of neoplasm sharing common characteristics such as their high density of peptide receptors, their ability to take up amino acids and de-carboxylate them into biogenic amines and their low glycolytic activity. These features are used for nuclear imaging targeting. To date, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is considered the 'gold standard' imaging procedure of well-differentiated tumors. Despite the significant contribution of SPECT/CT, the use of positron emission tomography imaging (PET) is growing rapidly. Three PET imaging modalities are currently available: {sup 68}Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs PET, {sup 18}F-dihydroxy-phenylalanine PET ({sup 18}F-DOPA) and {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose PET ({sup 18}F-F.D.G.). This article focuses on the current targets of molecular imaging and highlights the potential clinical applications of new targets. (authors)

  1. Non-oncological positron emission tomography (PET): brain imaging; La tomographie par emission de positons (TEP) hors oncologie: l'exploration du cerveau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomena, F. [Centro de Diagnostico por la imagen (CDIC), Hospital Clinic, Servicio de medicina nuclear, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-10-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows evaluation of the central nervous system function. Imaging of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, and of several neurotransmission systems may be obtained using PET. PET quantification is accurate and has good test-retest reliability. For research purposes, PET has been used to study brain physiology, to explore neurological and psychiatric diseases pathophysiology and for the new drugs research and development. F.D.G. is the only PET radioligand with clinical application. Following criteria of evidence-based medicine, the clinical indications of F.D.G.-PET are: evaluation of treated gliomas, pre surgical study of partial refractory epilepsy and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease when it is impossible to differentiate clinically from fronto-temporal dementia.

  2. Characterization of pulmonary lesions in patients with suspected lung cancer: computed tomography versus [¹⁸F] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harders, Stefan Walbom; Madsen, Hans Henrik; Hjorthaug, Karin; Arveschoug, Anne Kirstine; Rasmussen, Torben Riis; Meldgaard, Peter; Andersen, Johanne Bach; Pilegaard, Hans Kristian; Hager, Henrik; Rehling, Michael; Rasmussen, Finn

    2012-10-16

    Pulmonary nodules are of high clinical importance, given they may prove to be an early manifestation of lung cancer. Pulmonary nodules are small, focal, radiographic opacities that may be solitary or multiple. A solitary pulmonary nodule is a single, small (pulmonary nodules remains unclear. However, the question of malignancy of any given nodule remains the same. A standard contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan is often the first examination, followed by a number of other examinations. The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical feasibility of CT versus integrated [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET)/low-dose CT scan in patients with suspected lung cancer and pulmonary lesions on CT. All results were controlled for reproducibility. We found that when used early in the work-up of the lesions, CT raised the prevalence of lung cancer in the population to the point where further diagnostic imaging examination could be considered futile. We also found that the overall diagnostic accuracy, as well as the classification probabilities and predictive values of the two modalities were not significantly different; the reproducibility of these results was substantial.

  3. Comparison of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography, hydro-stomach computed tomography, and their combination for detecting primary gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hye Young; Chung, Woo Suk; Song, E Rang; Kim, Jin Suk [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Konyang University Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    To retrospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy for detecting primary gastric cancer on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and hydro-stomach CT (S-CT) and determine whether the combination of the two techniques improves diagnostic performance. A total of 253 patients with pathologically proven primary gastric cancer underwent PET/CT and S-CT for the preoperative evaluation. Two radiologists independently reviewed the three sets (PET/CT set, S-CT set, and the combined set) of PET/CT and S-CT in a random order. They graded the likelihood for the presence of primary gastric cancer based on a 4-point scale. The diagnostic accuracy of the PET/CT set, the S-CT set, and the combined set were determined by the area under the alternative-free receiver operating characteristic curve, and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and NPV for detecting all gastric cancers and early gastric cancers (EGCs) were significantly higher with the combined set than those with the PET/CT and S-CT sets. Specificity and PPV were significantly higher with the PET/CT set than those with the combined and S-CT set for detecting all gastric cancers and EGCs. The combination of PET/CT and S-CT is more accurate than S-CT alone, particularly for detecting EGCs.

  4. Whole body muscle activity during the FIFA 11+ program evaluated by positron emission tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsuke Nakase

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study investigated the effect of the FIFA 11+ warm-up program on whole body muscle activity using positron emission tomography. METHODS: Ten healthy male volunteers were divided into a control group and a group that performed injury prevention exercises (The 11+. The subjects of the control group were placed in a sitting position for 20 min and 37 MBq of (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG was injected intravenously. The subjects then remained seated for 45 min. The subjects of the exercise group performed part 2 of the 11+for 20 min, after which FDG was injected. They then performed part 2 of the 11+for 20 min, and rested for 25 min in a sitting position. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography images were obtained 50 min after FDG injection in each group. Regions of interest were defined within 30 muscles. The standardized uptake value was calculated to examine the FDG uptake of muscle tissue per unit volume. RESULTS: FDG accumulation within the abdominal rectus, gluteus medius and minimus were significantly higher in the exercise group than in the control group (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: The hip abductor muscles and abdominal rectus were active during part 2 of the FIFA 11+ program.

  5. Positron emission tomography for measurement of copper fluxes in live organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fangyu

    2014-05-01

    Copper is an essential nutrient for the physiology of live organisms, but excessive copper can be harmful. Copper radioisotopes are used for measurement of copper fluxes in live organisms using a radioactivity assay of body fluids or whole-body positron emission tomography (PET). Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is a versatile tool for real-time measurement of copper fluxes combining the high sensitivity and quantification capability of PET and the superior spatial resolution of CT for anatomic localization of radioactive tracer activity. Kinetic analysis of copper metabolism in the liver and extrahepatic tissues of Atp7b(-/-) knockout mice, a mouse model of Wilson's disease, demonstrated the feasibility of measuring copper fluxes in live organisms with PET/CT using copper-64 chloride ((64) CuCl2 ) as a radioactive tracer ((64) CuCl2 -PET/CT). (64) CuCl2 -PET/CT holds potential as a useful tool for the diagnosis of inherited and acquired human copper metabolism disorders and for monitoring the effects of copper-modulating therapy. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramar, M. [Physics Department, The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Lin, H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 34 Ohia Ku Street, Pukalani, Maui, HI 96768 (United States); Tomczyk, S., E-mail: kramar@cua.edu, E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: tomczyk@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  7. 18-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography: an additional tool in the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Alessandra; Sordillo, Pasquale; Ceccarelli, Laura; Maffongelli, Gaetano; Calisti, Giorgio; Di Pietro, Barbara; Caracciolo, Cristiana Ragano; Schillaci, Orazio; Pellegrino, Antonio; Chiariello, Luigi; Andreoni, Massimo; Sarmati, Loredana

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the role of 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET-CT) in the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis (IE). We retrospectively examined 27 consecutive patients who were admitted to the Infectious Diseases Department of Tor Vergata University Hospital between 2009 and 2013 with a suspicion of IE. The final IE diagnosis was defined according to the modified Duke criteria, and the microbiological and diagnostic results were collected for each patient. Twenty out of 27 patients had a suspected prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) and seven had a suspected native valve endocarditis (NVE). Twenty-five out of 27 patients (92%) had a confirmed diagnosis of IE (18/25 PVE and 7/25 NVE); 16 had a positive echocardiography evaluation and 16 had positive (18)F-FDG-PET-CT findings. Echocardiography showed a higher sensitivity as a diagnostic tool for the detection of IE compared to (18)F-FDG-PET-CT (80% vs. 55%). However, a greater number of PVE had positive (18)F-FDG-PET-CT results compared to those with positive echocardiography findings (11/13 vs. 9/13), and overall 89% (16/18) of confirmed PVE resulted (18)F-FDG-PET-CT positive. Analyzing only the cases who underwent transoesophageal echocardiography, (18)F-FDG-PET-CT showed a sensitivity of 85% in PVE (vs. 69% for echocardiography and 77% for the Duke criteria). All seven patients with NVE had a positive echocardiography and negative (18)F-FDG-PET-CT findings (p<0.001). The results of this study further highlight the limitations of echocardiography in the diagnosis of PVE and the potential advantages of (18)F-FDG-PET-CT in these cases.

  8. Whole-body positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose for staging of lymphoma: effectiveness and comparison with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpe, K.D.M.; Urbinelli, M.; Steinert, H.C.; Glanzmann, C.; Buck, A.; von Schulthess, G.K. [Department of Medical Radiology, University Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whole-body positron emission tomography (WB-PET) as a staging modality in Hodgkin`s disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and to compare it with computed tomography (CT) in a retrospective study. Seventy-one WB-PET studies using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 49 CT examinations were performed in 19 women and 31 men. Transaxial images were acquired and reformatted coronally and sagittally in PET. CT sections were obtained from the skull base to the pelvic floor. The written reports of the imaging data were compared with a reference standard constructed on the basis of all the data on the individual patients, including clinical follow-up of at least 6 months. The sensitivity and specificity of PET were, respectively, 86% and 96% for HD (n=53), and 89% and 100% for NHL (n=18). For CT sensitivity and specificity were 81% and 41% for HD (n=33) and 86% and 67% for NHL (n=16). Differences between PET and CT sensitivities were not significant, while in HD there was a significant difference in the specificity of PET and CT examinations, mainly because CT was unable to distinguish between active or recurrent disease and residual scar tissue after therapy. FDG tumour uptake was found in high- as well as low-grade NHL patients. In conclusion, PET appears to be highly sensitive and specific for staging of lymphoma. It is at least as sensitive as CT, and more specific, particularly in patients undergoing restaging, where a well-recognized diagnostic dilemma in CT is the presence of a post-therapeutic residual mass. (orig.) With 4 figs., 3 tabs., 23 refs.

  9. Computed tomography myocardial perfusion vs {sup 15}O-water positron emission tomography and fractional flow reserve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Michelle C.; Dweck, Marc R.; Golay, Saroj K. [University of Edinburgh/British Heart Foundation Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Mirsadraee, Saeed; Weir, Nicholas W.; Fletcher, Alison; Lucatelli, Christophe; Reid, John H. [University of Edinburgh, Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); MacGillivray, Tom; Van Beek, Edwin J.R.; Newby, David E. [University of Edinburgh/British Heart Foundation Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); University of Edinburgh, Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Cruden, Nicholas L.; Henriksen, Peter A.; Uren, Neal [Edinburgh Heart Centre, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); McKillop, Graham; Patel, Dilip [Department of Radiology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Lima, Joao A.C. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Departments of Medicine and Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Computed tomography (CT) can perform comprehensive cardiac imaging. We compared CT coronary angiography (CTCA) and CT myocardial perfusion (CTP) with {sup 15}O-water positron emission tomography (PET) and invasive coronary angiography (ICA) with fractional flow reserve (FFR). 51 patients (63 (61-65) years, 80 % male) with known/suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent 320-multidetector CTCA followed by ''snapshot'' adenosine stress CTP. Of these 22 underwent PET and 47 ICA/FFR. Obstructive CAD was defined as CTCA stenosis >50 % and CTP hypoperfusion, ICA stenosis >70 % or FFR <0.80. PET hyperaemic myocardial blood flow (MBF) was lower in obstructive than non-obstructive territories defined by ICA/FFR (1.76 (1.32-2.20) vs 3.11 (2.44-3.79) mL/(g/min), P < 0.001) and CTCA/CTP (1.76 (1.32-2.20) vs 3.12 (2.44-3.79) mL/(g/min), P < 0.001). Baseline and hyperaemic CT attenuation density was lower in obstructive than non-obstructive territories (73 (71-76) vs 86 (84-88) HU, P < 0.001 and 101 (96-106) vs 111 (107-114) HU, P 0.001). PET hyperaemic MBF corrected for rate pressure product correlated with CT attenuation density (r = 0.579, P < 0.001). There was excellent per-patient sensitivity (96 %), specificity (85 %), negative predictive value (90 %) and positive predictive value (94 %) for CTCA/CTP vs ICA/FFR. CT myocardial attenuation density correlates with {sup 15}O-water PET MBF. CTCA and CTP can accurately identify obstructive CAD. (orig.)

  10. Prediction of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) positivity in patients with high-risk primary melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, Maria; Kjaer, Andreas; Wu, Max; Martineau, Lea; Nosrati, Mehdi; Leong, Stanley PL; Sagebiel, Richard W; III, James R Miller; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool to identify occult melanoma metastasis. To date, it is controversial which patients with primary cutaneous melanoma should have staging PET/CT. In this retrospective analysis of more than 800 consecutive patients with cutaneous melanoma, we sought to identify factors predictive of PET/CT positivity in the setting of newly-diagnosed high-risk primary melanoma to determine those patients most appropriate to undergo a PET/CT scan as part of their diagnostic work up. 167 patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk primary cutaneous melanoma underwent a PET/CT scan performed as part of their initial staging. Clinical and histologic factors were evaluated as possible predictors of melanoma metastasis identified on PET/CT scanning using both univariate and multivariate logistic regression. In all, 32 patients (19.2%) had a positive PET/CT finding of metastatic melanoma. In more than half of these patients (56.3%), PET/CT scanning identified disease that was not detectable on clinical examination. Mitotic rate, tumor thickness, lymphadenopathy, and bleeding were significantly predictive of PET/CT positivity. A combinatorial index constructed from these factors revealed a significant association between number of high-risk factors observed and prevalence of PET/CT positivity, which increased from 5.8% (with the presence of 0-2 factors) to 100.0%, when all four factors were present. These results indicate that combining clinical and histologic prognostic factors enables the identification of patients with a higher likelihood of a positive PET/CT scan.

  11. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography comparison of gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Fu, Qiang; Dong, You-Wen; Liu, Jian-Jing; Song, Xiu-Yu; Dai, Dong; Zuo, Cong; Xu, Wen-Gui

    2016-09-14

    To compare (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) features in gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma. Patients with newly diagnosed gastric lymphoma or gastric carcinoma who underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT prior to treatment were included in this study. We reviewed and analyzed the PET/CT features of gastric wall lesions, including FDG avidity, pattern (focal/diffuse), and intensity [maximal standard uptake value: (SUVmax)]. The correlation of SUVmax with gastric clinicopathological variables was investigated by χ(2) test, and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to determine the differential diagnostic value of SUVmax-associated parameters in gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma. Fifty-two patients with gastric lymphoma and 73 with gastric carcinoma were included in this study. Abnormal gastric FDG accumulation was found in 49 patients (94.23%) with gastric lymphoma and 65 patients (89.04%) with gastric carcinoma. Gastric lymphoma patients predominantly presented with type I and type II lesions, whereas gastric carcinoma patients mainly had type III lesions. The SUVmax (13.39 ± 9.24 vs 8.35 ± 5.80, P gastric lymphoma compared with gastric carcinoma. ROC curve analysis suggested a better performance of SUVmax/THKmax in the evaluation of gastric lesions between gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma in comparison with that of SUVmax alone. PET/CT features differ between gastric lymphoma and carcinoma, which can improve PET/CT evaluation of gastric wall lesions and help differentiate gastric lymphoma from gastric carcinoma.

  12. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography comparison of gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Fu, Qiang; Dong, You-Wen; Liu, Jian-Jing; Song, Xiu-Yu; Dai, Dong; Zuo, Cong; Xu, Wen-Gui

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) features in gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma. METHODS Patients with newly diagnosed gastric lymphoma or gastric carcinoma who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT prior to treatment were included in this study. We reviewed and analyzed the PET/CT features of gastric wall lesions, including FDG avidity, pattern (focal/diffuse), and intensity [maximal standard uptake value: (SUVmax)]. The correlation of SUVmax with gastric clinicopathological variables was investigated by χ2 test, and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to determine the differential diagnostic value of SUVmax-associated parameters in gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma. RESULTS Fifty-two patients with gastric lymphoma and 73 with gastric carcinoma were included in this study. Abnormal gastric FDG accumulation was found in 49 patients (94.23%) with gastric lymphoma and 65 patients (89.04%) with gastric carcinoma. Gastric lymphoma patients predominantly presented with type I and type II lesions, whereas gastric carcinoma patients mainly had type III lesions. The SUVmax (13.39 ± 9.24 vs 8.35 ± 5.80, P gastric lymphoma compared with gastric carcinoma. ROC curve analysis suggested a better performance of SUVmax/THKmax in the evaluation of gastric lesions between gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma in comparison with that of SUVmax alone. CONCLUSION PET/CT features differ between gastric lymphoma and carcinoma, which can improve PET/CT evaluation of gastric wall lesions and help differentiate gastric lymphoma from gastric carcinoma. PMID:27678362

  13. The clinical value of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in postoperative patients with gastrointestinal mucinous adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Yi; Hu, Si-Long; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Bei-Ling; Xu, Jun-Yan; Zhang, Ying-Jian

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the clinical value of F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT) in postoperative patients with gastrointestinal mucinous adenocarcinoma. From July 2007 to March 2009, 30 patients who had previous surgical resection of histopathologically diagnosed gastrointestinal mucinous adenocarcinoma underwent ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT scans in our center. The standard of reference for tumor recurrence, regional lymph node (LN) metastasis, peritoneal and distant metastasis consisted of histopathologic confirmation or clinical follow-up information for at least 6 months after PET/CT examinations. With final diagnosis, tumor recurrences were confirmed in eight of the 30 patients (26.7%). If a maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 2.5 or more was used as a cut-off point, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of PET/CT were 87.5, 77.3, and 80.0%, respectively. However, if an SUVmax of 4.0 or more was the criterion, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 25.0, 86.4, and 70.0%, respectively. A cut-off point of 2.5 showed a higher sensitivity (P=0.041), and there was no statistical difference in the specificity and the accuracy of these two criteria. For the diagnosis of metastasis in regional LNs and peritoneum, the detection rate was 95.2 and 86.4%, respectively. In addition, we followed up 20 patients with 26 suspicious distant lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 58.3, 92.9, and 76.9%, respectively. ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT may be effective to discriminate tumor recurrence, and to detect regional LNs, peritoneal and distant metastasis in postoperative patients with gastrointestinal mucinous adenocarcinoma.

  14. Clinical applications of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in carcinoma of unknown primary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Man; YU Jin-ming; ZHAO Wei; ZHANG Pin-liang; JU Gui-fang; FU Zheng; ZHANG Guo-li; KONG Li; YANG Yan-qin; MA Yi-dong

    2011-01-01

    Background Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) encompasses a heterogeneous group of tumors with varying clinical features. The management of patients of CUP remains a clinical challenge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical applications of integrated 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) information in patients with CUP,including detecting the occult primary tumor and effecting on disease therapy.Methods One hundred and forty-nine patients with histologically-proven metastases of CUP were included. For all patients,the conventional diagnostic work-up was unsuccessful in localizing the primary site. Whole-body PET/CT images were obtained approximately 60 minutes after intravenous injection of 350-425 MBq of 18F-FDG.Results In 24.8% of patients,FDG PET/CT detected primary tumors that were not apparent after conventional workup.In this group of patients,the overall sensitivity,specificity,and accuracy rates of FDG PET/CT in detecting unknown primary tumors were 86.0%,87.7%,and 87.2%,respectively. FDG PET/CT imaging also led to the detection of previously unrecognized metastases in 29.5% of patients. Forty-seven (31.5%,47 of 149) patients underwent a change in therapeutic management.Conclusions FDG PET/CT is a valuable tool in patients with CUP,because it assisted in detecting unknown primary tumors and previously unrecognized distant metastases,and optimized the mangement of these patients.

  15. Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Local Tumor Staging in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer: A Comparison With Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueneisen, Johannes; Nagarajah, James; Buchbender, Christian; Hoffmann, Oliver; Schaarschmidt, Benedikt Michael; Poeppel, Thorsten; Forsting, Michael; Quick, Harald H; Umutlu, Lale; Kinner, Sonja

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic performance of integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast for lesion detection and local tumor staging of patients with primary breast cancer in comparison to PET/computed tomography (CT) and MRI. The study was approved by the local institutional review board. Forty-nine patients with biopsy-proven invasive breast cancer were prospectively enrolled in our study. All patients underwent a PET/CT, and subsequently, a contrast-enhanced PET/MRI of the breast after written informed consent was obtained before each examination. Two radiologists independently evaluated the corresponding data sets (PET/CT, PET/MRI, and MRI) and were instructed to identify primary tumors lesions as well as multifocal/multicentric and bilateral disease. Furthermore, the occurrence of lymph node metastases was assessed, and the T-stage for each patient was determined. Histopathological verification of the local tumor extent and the axillary lymph node status was available for 30 of 49 and 48 of 49 patients, respectively. For the remaining patients, a consensus characterization was performed for the determination of the T-stage and nodal status, taking into account the results of clinical staging, PET/CT, and PET/MRI examinations. Statistical analysis was performed to test for differences in diagnostic performance between the different imaging procedures. P values less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Positron emission tomography/MRI and MRI correctly identified 47 (96%) of the 49 patients with primary breast cancer, whereas PET/CT enabled detection of 46 (94%) of 49 breast cancer patients and missed a synchronous carcinoma in the contralateral breast in 1 patient. In a lesion-by-lesion analysis, no significant differences could be obtained between the 3 imaging procedures for the identification of primary breast cancer lesions (P > 0.05). Positron emission tomography/MRI and

  16. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-09-09

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it.

  17. Single-photon emission computed tomography in human immunodeficiency virus encephalopathy: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masdeu, J.C.; Yudd, A.; Van Heertum, R.L.; Grundman, M.; Hriso, E.; O' Connell, R.A.; Luck, D.; Camli, U.; King, L.N. (St. Vincent' s Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Depression or psychosis in a previously asymptomatic individual infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be psychogenic, related to brain involvement by the HIV or both. Although prognosis and treatment differ depending on etiology, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are usually unrevealing in early HIV encephalopathy and therefore cannot differentiate it from psychogenic conditions. Thirty of 32 patients (94%) with HIV encephalopathy had single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings that differed from the findings in 15 patients with non-HIV psychoses and 6 controls. SPECT showed multifocal cortical and subcortical areas of hypoperfusion. In 4 cases, cognitive improvement after 6-8 weeks of zidovudine (AZT) therapy was reflected in amelioration of SPECT findings. CT remained unchanged. SPECT may be a useful technique for the evaluation of HIV encephalopathy.

  18. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an essential role in the clinical management of patients. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional......, and molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI...... allows functional assessment with techniques such as diffusion-weighted MRI, MR spectroscopy, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. The most common PET radiotracer, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose, is not very useful in prostate cancer. However, in recent years other PET tracers have improved the accuracy of PET...

  19. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the management of solitary pulmonary nodule: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divisi, Duilio; Barone, Mirko; Zaccagna, Gino; Crisci, Roberto

    2017-11-01

    Solitary pulmonary nodules are common radiologic findings and their detection has increased due to the introduction and improvement of diagnostics. Since a nodule can be an expression of early lung cancers, a proper classification and management are required because its treatment might lead to decreased morbidity and mortality. In this regard, prominent guidelines are available although they are characterized sometimes by discordant and misleading evidences. Furthermore, the same results of studies in the literature appear conflicting. Aim of this work is to evaluate the role of imaging through an extensive literature review but focusing on 18-fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) in order to assess the limits and future perspectives of solitary pulmonary nodule characterization in early detection of lung cancer. Key messages Detection of solitary pulmonary nodules has increased. Management of solitary pulmonary nodules is still debated. Future perspectives of early solitary pulmonary nodule characterization.

  20. Risk of malignancy in thyroid incidentalomas detected by (18)f-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soelberg, Kerstin; Bonnema, Steen Joop; Brix, Thomas Heiberg

    2012-01-01

    Background: The expanding use of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG PET) has led to the identification of increasing numbers of patients with an incidentaloma in the thyroid gland. We aimed to review the proportion of incidental thyroid cancers found by (18)F-FDG PET...... or PET/computed tomography imaging. Methods: Studies evaluating thyroid carcinomas discovered incidentally in patients or healthy volunteers by (18)F-FDG PET were systematically searched in the PubMed database from 2000 to 2011. The main exclusion criteria were known thyroid disease, lack of assigned...... diagnoses, investigation of diffuse uptake only, or investigation of patients with head and neck cancer, or cancer in the upper part of the thorax. Results: Twenty-two studies met our criteria comprising a total of 125,754 subjects. Of these, 1994 (1.6%) had unexpected focal hypermetabolic activity, while...

  1. Early detection of response to imatinib therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumor by using 18F-FDG-positron emission tomography and computed tomography imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sabri Zincirkeser; Alper Sevinc; M Emin Kalender; Celalettin Camci

    2007-01-01

    A 41-year old female with metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor was referred to 18F-FDG-positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) scan before and after one-month treatment with imatinib(Glivec(R), Gleevec(R), Novartis, Basel, Switzerland), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (400 mg/d). Metabolic response was evaluated before and after one month of therapy. The decrease of the maximum standardised uptake value (SUV)was 79% (from 9.8 to 2.1). Positron emission tomography demonstrated complete metabolic response after one-month of imatinib treatment. Additionally, the previous lesion was compared with the coronal computerized tomographic image. There was no difference in the size of the tumor before and after therapy according to CT images. However, metabolic activity was inhibited.18F-FDG-PET is a valuable method for the detection of response to one-month imatinib treatment in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  2. DETECTION OF MYOCARDIAL VIABILITY IN ISСHAEMIC DAMAGE USING MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Ussov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of modern methods of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and emission tomography (singlephoton emission and positron emission computer tomography – SPECT and PET as toos for diagnosis and prognosis of myocardial ischaemic damage, in particular in coronary revascularization. The definition of term “myocardial viability” is discussed. It has been shown that the integrity of blood-tissue barrier between myocardium and microcirculatory vessels is the most sensitive marker of tissue viability and of functional integrity of myocardium. It’s evaluation by means of contrast-enhanced MRI of myocardium is the most available and most precise technique of diagnosis and prognosis both in patients with postinfarction myocardiosclerosis and in patients with coronary disease without myocardial infarction. It is proposed that in the nearest future the combination of MR-coronarography and contrast-enhanced MRI of myocardium will provide a possibility to obtain the full set of data necessary for planning of endovascular and surgical treatment of various forms of coronary heart disease. PET and SPECT techniques currently are of some essential interest for pathophysiologic research of coronary ishaemia in clinical and experimental studies as well as for qualitative visual studies of pharmacokinetics.

  3. Prospective evaluation of 68Gallium‐prostate‐specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography/computed tomography for preoperative lymph node staging in prostate cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leeuwen, Pim J; Emmett, Louise; Ho, Bao; Delprado, Warick; Ting, Francis; Nguyen, Quoc; Stricker, Phillip D

    2017-01-01

    ... are inadequate for LN staging in PCa. MRI, CT, positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and fluorescence sentinel lymph node detection are neither sensitive nor specific enough to reliably detect LN metastases before RP . Recent data on the novel PET tracer agent Glu‐NH‐CO‐NH‐Lys‐(Ahx)‐[68Ga(HBED‐CC)](PSMA) has shown promising sensitivity (33–85%) and ...

  4. [Study of regional cerebral glucose metabolism, in man, while awake or asleep, by positron emission tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, G; Salmon, E; Poirrier, R; Sadzot, B; Franco, G

    1987-03-01

    Measurements of regional cerebral glucose uptake by the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose technique (18FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) along with polygraph recordings were made serially during relaxed wakefulness and different stages of nocturnal sleep in two right-handed normal volunteers. During stage III-IV sleep, values declined diffusely in both hemispheric regions (-31%), thalamus (-33%), cerebellum (-33%) and brain stem (-25%). During paradoxical sleep regional values increased diffusely compared with slow wave sleep. Compared to wakefulness, regional metabolic values seemed to increase but the results were more variable from one volunteer to the other. These preliminary data indicate important regional alterations in cerebral metabolism between sleep states.

  5. Distributed Microprocessor Automation Network for Synthesizing Radiotracers Used in Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J. A. G.; Alexoff, D. L.; Wolf, A. P.

    1984-09-01

    This presentation describes an evolving distributed microprocessor network for automating the routine production synthesis of radiotracers used in Positron Emission Tomography. We first present a brief overview of the PET method for measuring biological function, and then outline the general procedure for producing a radiotracer. The paper identifies several reasons for our automating the syntheses of these compounds. There is a description of the distributed microprocessor network architecture chosen and the rationale for that choice. Finally, we speculate about how this network may be exploited to extend the power of the PET method from the large university or National Laboratory to the biomedical research and clinical community at large. (DT)

  6. Painful spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis studied by radiography and single-photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, B.D.; Johnson, R.P.; Carrera, G.F.; Meyer, G.A.; Schwab, J.P.; Flatley, T.J.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Zielonka, J.S.; Knobel, J.

    1985-01-01

    Planar bone scintigraphy (PBS) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were compared in 19 adults with radiographic evidence of spondylolysis and/or spondylolisthesis. SPECT was more sensitive than PBS when used to identify symptomatic patients and sites of painful defects in the pars interarticularis. In addition, SPECT allowed more accurate localization than PBS. In 6 patients, spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis was unrealted to low back pain, and SPECT images of the posterior neural arch were normal. The authors conclude that when spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis is the cause of low back pain, pars defects are frequently heralded by increased scintigraphic activity which is best detected and localized by SPECT.

  7. Left ventricular volume determination from single-photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunker, S.R.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Schmidt, W.P.; Cawthon, M.A.; Karl, R.D. Jr.; Bauman, J.M.; Howard, W.H. III; Rubal, B.J.

    1985-02-01

    To compare the accuracy of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with that of contrast cineangiography in measuring left ventricular end-diastolic volume, 25 consecutive patients undergoing catheterizaiton for coronary artery or valvular heart disease were first evaluated scintigraphically. SPECT volume values showed a high degree of correlation with those determined by angiography with a standard error of the estimate of 23 ml. SPECT offers a highly accurate and essentially noninvasive method for measuring chamber volumes that is independent of geometric assumptions about ventricular configuration and chest wall attenuation and does not require blood sample counting.

  8. Single photon image from position emission tomography with insertable collimator for boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joo Young; Yoo, Do Kun; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Key Jo [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Dept. of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford (United States)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of our proposed system is to confirm the feasibility of extraction of two types of images from one positron emission tomography (PET) module with an insertable collimator for brain tumor treatment during the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The BNCT theory and conceptual diagram of our proposed system are shown fig.1. Data from the PET module, neutron source, and collimator was entered in the Monte Carlon-particle extende source code. We attempted to acquire the PET and SPECT images simultaneously using only PET without an additional isotope. Single photon images were acquired using an insertable collimator on a PET detector.

  9. Noninvasive xenon-133 measurements of cerebral blood flow using stationary detectors compared with dynamic emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Vorstrup, S; Lassen, N A;

    1986-01-01

    Repeated bedside measurements of CBF have been made possible by the recent development of a mobile unit with 10 stationary detectors using the intravenous xenon-133 method. To evaluate this technique, comparative CBF studies at rest and following the application of a cerebral vasodilatory stimulus...... (acetazolamide, 1 g i.v.) were performed with the mobile equipment and with xenon-133 single-photon emission inhalation tomography in patients with cerebrovascular disease. The CBF level and the flow response to acetazolamide as determined with the two methods were well correlated, although at low flow levels...

  10. Neuro-imaging and positron emission tomography of congenital homonymous hemianopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosley, T M; Kiyosawa, M; Moster, M; Harbour, R; Zimmerman, R; Savino, P J; Sergott, R C; Alavi, A; Reivich, M

    1991-04-15

    Congenital homonymous hemianopsia is an uncommon asymptomatic visual field defect discovered typically in young adult life that is caused by a diverse group of insults to the retrochiasmal afferent visual system occurring prenatally, at birth, or during early childhood. We treated eight patients with congenital homonymous hemianopsia; seven with damage involving the optic radiations and one with an abnormality of the optic tract. We performed positron emission tomography using 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose on two patients with dense homonymous hemianopsias, lesions of the contralateral optic radiations, and largely intact occipital cortex. These studies showed minimal abnormalities in resting visual cortex glucose metabolism of the affected visual cortex.

  11. Clinical correlates of decreased anteroposterior metabolic gradients in positron emission tomography (PET) of schizophrenic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLisi, L.E.; Buchsbaum, M.S.; Holcomb, H.H.; Dowling-Zimmerman, S.; Pickar, D.; Boronow, J.; Morihisa, J.M.; van Kammen, D.P.; Carpenter, W.; Kessler, R.

    1985-01-01

    The finding in schizophrenic patients of a reversal of the normal frontal to posterior pattern of brain metabolic activity with positron emission tomography (PET) is of interest, but its relevance to psychopathology is unknown. Using PET, the authors studied 21 patients with chronic schizophrenia and 21 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Although eight of the 21 patients and only one of the control subjects showed a relatively lower anteroposterior metabolic gradient, no clinical correlates of this finding were noted. In addition, cerebral atrophy, as determined by CAT scan, was not associated with this aberrant metabolic pattern.

  12. Radiolabeled phosphonium salts as mitocondrial voltage sensors for positron emission tomography myocardial imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Yon; Min, Jung Joon [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine,Chonnam National University Medical School and Hwasun Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Despite substantial advances in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, {sup 18}F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals remain necessary to diagnose heart disease because clinical use of current PET tracers is limited by their short half-life. Lipophilic cations such as phosphonium salts penetrate the mitochondrial membranes and accumulate in mitochondria of cardiomyocytes in response to negative inner-transmembrane potentials. Radiolabeled tetraphenyl phosphonium cation derivatives have been developed as myocardial imaging agents for PET. In this review, a general overview of these radiotracers, including their radiosynthesis, in vivo characterization, and evaluation is provided and clinical perspectives are discussed.

  13. A positron emission tomography study of wind-up pain in chronic postherniotomy pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Lonsdale, Markus Georg; Aasvang, Eske Kvanner;

    2011-01-01

    -induced wind-up pain in neuropathic pain patients. We therefore used positron emission tomography (PET) to investigate the cerebral response pattern of mechanical wind-up pain in a homogenous group of 10 neuropathic pain patients with long-standing postherniotomy pain in the groin area. Patients were scanned......) and the brain stem. A direct comparison between wind-up pain and pressure pain revealed that both activated a largely overlapping network. Since no de novo brain areas were activated by wind-up pain, our data suggest that the processes specific to wind-up pain do not occur at the cerebral level....

  14. Synthesis of analogues of (-)-cytisine for in vivo studies of nicotinic receptors using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrière, E; Rouden, J; Tadino, V; Lasne, M C

    2000-04-20

    [formula: see text] 9-Substituted analogues of (-)-cytisine were synthesized in high yields via palladium-mediated couplings of either 9-(-)-bromocytisine and organostannanes or 9-(-)-trimethylstannylcytisine and fluorobromobenzene. The protection of the amine with a nitroso group and the use of PdCl2(PPh3)2 to carry out the Stille reaction allowed the rapid synthesis of 9-(4'-[18F]fluorophenyl)cytisine (18F: t1/2 = 109.7 min), a new promising radioligand (radiochemical yield: 10% from [18F]KF, 150 min, four steps) for positron emission tomography studies of alpha 4 beta 2 nicotinic receptors.

  15. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for monitoring lymphadenopathy in the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V Koneti; Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Dale, Janet K; Bacharach, Stephen L; Whatley, Millie; Dugan, Faith; Tretler, Jean; Fleisher, Thomas; Puck, Jennifer M; Wilson, Wyndham; Jaffe, Elaine S; Avila, Nilo; Chen, Clara C; Straus, Stephen E

    2006-02-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is associated with mutations that impair the activity of lymphocyte apoptosis proteins, leading to chronic lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmunity, and an increased risk of lymphoma. We investigated the utility of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in discriminating benign from malignant lymphadenopathy in ALPS. We report that FDG avidity of benign lymph nodes in ALPS can be high and, hence, by itself does not imply presence of lymphoma; but FDG-PET can help guide the decision for selecting which of many enlarged nodes in ALPS patients to biopsy when lymphoma is suspected.

  16. New Cyclotron Targetry to Enhance F-18 clinical Position Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Michael Doster

    2008-12-19

    This project proposes to develop cyclotron targets that produce F-18 for clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) at significantly higher rates than that available from current targetry. This production rate of 18F is directly proportional to the beam current. Higher beam currents would result in increased 18F production but would be accompanied by higher heat loads to the target. The beam power available in most commercial cyclotrons exceeds the heat removal capacity of current target technology by a factor of two to four, significantly limiting the production rate of Fluorine-18.

  17. Positron emission tomography in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Højgaard, L

    2001-01-01

    positron emission tomography (PET) and gamma-camera PET in the diagnostic investigation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A systematic literature search was carried out in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. We identified 55 original works on the diagnostic......Lung cancer is the cause of 32% of all male cancer deaths and 25% of all female cancer deaths. Because the prognosis depends on early diagnosis and staging, continuous evaluation of the diagnostic tools available is important. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of dedicated...

  18. Positron emission tomography in the follow-up of cutaneous malignant melanoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Maria; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) has a high risk of dissemination to regional lymph nodes and visceral organs. Recurrences are most frequently seen within the first 2-3 years after initial treatment, but these patients have a life-long risk of relapse. The prognosis is highly dependent on lymph...... node involvement and distant metastases, accentuating the importance of close surveillance to identify disease progression at an early stage, and thereby detect recurrences amenable to treatment. Positron emission tomography (PET) has already been proven useful in the staging of CMM, but the utility...

  19. Corticobasal degeneration: structural and functional MRI and single-photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukmar, M. [Department of Radiology, University of Trieste (Italy); Moretti, R.; Bava, A. [Department of Physiology and Pathology, University of Trieste (Italy); Torre, P.; Antonello, R.M. [Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Neurology, University of Trieste (Italy); Longo, R. [Department of Physics, University of Trieste (Italy)

    2003-10-01

    We studied seven patients with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) from a clinical and imaging perspective. We describe the main morphological features of CBD and, using functional MRI, try to define the possible role of the parietal lobe in simple and complex learned motor sequences. We showed decreased activation of the parietal lobe contralateral to the more affected arm, when movements, simple or complex, are performed with that hand. Moreover we found that functional imaging can demonstrate parietal and motor cortex dysfunction before structural, and even single-photon emission computed tomography changes become evident. (orig.)

  20. 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging in paediatric oncology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John; Freebody; Eva; A; Wegner; Monica; A; Rossleigh

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography(PET) is a minimally in-vasive technique which has been well validated for the diagnosis, staging, monitoring of response to therapy, and disease surveillance of adult oncology patients. Tra-ditionally the value of PET and PET/computed tomogra-phy(CT) hybrid imaging has been less clearly defined for paediatric oncology. However recent evidence has emerged regarding the diagnostic utility of these mo-dalities, and they are becoming increasingly important tools in the evaluation and monitoring of children with known or suspected malignant disease. Important indi-cations for 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose(FDG) PET in paediatric oncology include lymphoma, brain tumours, sarcoma, neuroblastoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, urogenital tumours and neurofibromatosis type Ⅰ. This article aims to review current evidence for the use of FDG PET and PET/CT in these indications. Attention will also be given to technical and logistical issues, the description of common imaging pitfalls, and dosimetric concerns as they relate to paediatric oncology.

  1. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Three-Dimensional Positron Emission Mammography versus Whole Body Positron Emission Tomography in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Dai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional (3D positron emission mammography (PEM versus whole body positron emission tomography (WBPET for breast cancer. Methods. A total of 410 women with normal breast or benign or highly suspicious malignant tumors were randomized at 1 : 1 ratio to undergo 3D-PEM followed by WBPET or WBPET followed by 3D-PEM. Lumpectomy or mastectomy was performed on eligible participants after the scanning. Results. The sensitivity and specificity of 3D-PEM were 92.8% and 54.5%, respectively. WBPET showed a sensitivity of 95.7% and specificity of 56.8%. After exclusion of the patients with lesions beyond the detecting range of the 3D-PEM instrument, 3D-PEM showed higher sensitivity than WBPET (97.0% versus 95.5%, P = 0.913, particularly for small lesions (<1 cm (72.0% versus 60.0%, P = 0.685. Conclusions. The 3D-PEM appears more sensitive to small lesions than WBPET but may fail to detect lesions that are beyond the detecting range. This study was approved by the Ethics Committee (E2012052 at the Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital (Tianjin, China. The instrument positron emission mammography (PEMi was approved by China State Food and Drug Administration under the registration number 20153331166.

  2. Variabilities of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-, Computed Tomography-, and Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography-Based Tumor and Lymph Node Delineations for Lung Cancer Radiation Therapy Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Kishor; Saraiya, Siddharth; Hugo, Geoffrey D; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Jan, Nuzhat; Schuster, Jessica; Schutzer, Matthew; Fahrner, Lester; Groves, Robert; Olsen, Kathryn M; Ford, John C; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2017-09-01

    To investigate interobserver delineation variability for gross tumor volumes of primary lung tumors and associated pathologic lymph nodes using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to compare the results with computed tomography (CT) alone- and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT-based delineations. Seven physicians delineated the tumor volumes of 10 patients for the following scenarios: (1) CT only, (2) PET-CT fusion images registered to CT ("clinical standard"), and (3) postcontrast T1-weighted MRI registered with diffusion-weighted MRI. To compute interobserver variability, the median surface was generated from all observers' contours and used as the reference surface. A physician labeled the interface types (tumor to lung, atelectasis (collapsed lung), hilum, mediastinum, or chest wall) on the median surface. Contoured volumes and bidirectional local distances between individual observers' contours and the reference contour were analyzed. Computed tomography- and MRI-based tumor volumes normalized relative to PET-CT-based volumes were 1.62 ± 0.76 (mean ± standard deviation) and 1.38 ± 0.44, respectively. Volume differences between the imaging modalities were not significant. Between observers, the mean normalized volumes per patient averaged over all patients varied significantly by a factor of 1.6 (MRI) and 2.0 (CT and PET-CT) (P=4.10 × 10(-5) to 3.82 × 10(-9)). The tumor-atelectasis interface had a significantly higher variability than other interfaces for all modalities combined (P=.0006). The interfaces with the smallest uncertainties were tumor-lung (on CT) and tumor-mediastinum (on PET-CT and MRI). Although MRI-based contouring showed overall larger variability than PET-CT, contouring variability depended on the interface type and was not significantly different between modalities, despite the limited observer experience with MRI. Multimodality imaging and combining different imaging characteristics might be the best approach to define

  3. The role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in radiation therapy planning for patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Manus, Michael P; Hicks, Rodney J

    2012-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has rapidly assumed a critical role in the management of patients with locoregionally advanced lung cancers who are candidates for definitive radiation therapy (RT). Definitive RT is given with curative intent, but can only be successful in patients without distant metastasis and if all gross tumor is contained within the treated volume. An increasing body of evidence supports the use of PET-based imaging for selection of patients for both surgery and definitive RT. Similarly, the use of PET/CT images for accurate target volume definition in lung cancer is a dynamic area of research. Most available evidence on PET staging of lung cancer relates to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In general clinical use, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is the primary radiopharmaceutical useful in NSCLC. Other tracers, including proliferation markers and hypoxia tracers, may have significant roles in future. Much of the FDG-PET literature describing the impact of PET on actual patient management has concerned candidates for surgical resection. In the few prospective studies where PET was used for staging and patient selection in NSCLC candidates for definitive RT, 25%-30% of patients were denied definitive RT, generally because PET detected unsuspected advanced locoregional or distant metastatic disease. PET/CT and CT findings are often discordant in NSCLC but studies with clinical-pathological correlation always show that PET-assisted staging is more accurate than conventional assessment. In all studies in which "PET-defined" and "non-PET-defined" RT target volumes were compared, there were major differences between PET and non-PET volumes. Therefore, in cases where PET-assisted and non-PET staging are different and biopsy confirmation is unavailable, it is rational to use the most accurate modality (namely PET/CT) to define the target volume. The use of PET/CT in patient selection and target volume definition is likely

  4. Feasibility of Computed Tomography-Guided Methods for Spatial Normalization of Dopamine Transporter Positron Emission Tomography Image.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Su Kim

    Full Text Available Spatial normalization is a prerequisite step for analyzing positron emission tomography (PET images both by using volume-of-interest (VOI template and voxel-based analysis. Magnetic resonance (MR or ligand-specific PET templates are currently used for spatial normalization of PET images. We used computed tomography (CT images acquired with PET/CT scanner for the spatial normalization for [18F]-N-3-fluoropropyl-2-betacarboxymethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl nortropane (FP-CIT PET images and compared target-to-cerebellar standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR values with those obtained from MR- or PET-guided spatial normalization method in healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD.We included 71 healthy controls and 56 patients with PD who underwent [18F]-FP-CIT PET scans with a PET/CT scanner and T1-weighted MR scans. Spatial normalization of MR images was done with a conventional spatial normalization tool (cvMR and with DARTEL toolbox (dtMR in statistical parametric mapping software. The CT images were modified in two ways, skull-stripping (ssCT and intensity transformation (itCT. We normalized PET images with cvMR-, dtMR-, ssCT-, itCT-, and PET-guided methods by using specific templates for each modality and measured striatal SUVR with a VOI template. The SUVR values measured with FreeSurfer-generated VOIs (FSVOI overlaid on original PET images were also used as a gold standard for comparison.The SUVR values derived from all four structure-guided spatial normalization methods were highly correlated with those measured with FSVOI (P < 0.0001. Putaminal SUVR values were highly effective for discriminating PD patients from controls. However, the PET-guided method excessively overestimated striatal SUVR values in the PD patients by more than 30% in caudate and putamen, and thereby spoiled the linearity between the striatal SUVR values in all subjects and showed lower disease discrimination ability. Two CT-guided methods showed

  5. Pretreatment Staging Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Patients With Inflammatory Breast Cancer Influences Radiation Treatment Field Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Niikura, Naoki [Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Yang Wei [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rohren, Eric [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Valero, Vicente [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Woodward, Wendy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Alvarez, Ricardo H. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lucci, Anthony [Department of Surgical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ueno, Naoto T. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A., E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasingly being utilized for staging of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The purpose of this study was to define how pretreatment PET/CT studies affected postmastectomy radiation treatment (PMRT) planning decisions for IBC. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 62 patients diagnosed with IBC between 2004 and 2009, who were treated with PMRT in our institution and who had a staging PET/CT within 3 months of diagnosis. Patients received a baseline physical examination, staging mammography, ultrasonographic examination of breast and draining lymphatics, and chest radiography; most patients also had a bone scan (55 patients), liver imaging (52 patients), breast MRI (46 patients), and chest CT (25 patients). We compared how PET/CT findings affected PMRT, assuming that standard PMRT would target the chest wall, level III axilla, supraclavicular fossa, and internal mammary chain (IMC). Any modification of target volumes, field borders, or dose prescriptions was considered a change. Results: PET/CT detected new areas of disease in 27 of the 62 patients (44%). The areas of additional disease included the breast (1 patient), ipsilateral axilla (1 patient), ipsilateral supraclavicular (4 patients), ipsilateral infraclavicular (1 patient), ipsilateral IMC (5 patients), ipsilateral subpectoral (3 patients), mediastinal (8 patients), other distant/contralateral lymph nodes (15 patients), or bone (6 patients). One patient was found to have a non-breast second primary tumor. The findings of the PET/CT led to changes in PMRT in 11 of 62 patients (17.7%). These changes included additional fields in 5 patients, adjustment of fields in 2 patients, and higher doses to the supraclavicular fossa (2 patients) and IMC (5 patients). Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed IBC, pretreatment PET/CT provides important information concerning involvement of locoregional lymph nodes

  6. Positron emission tomography in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Towards targeting of molecular pathological hallmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willekens, Stefanie M.A.; Weehaeghe, Donatienne van [University Hospitals Leuven and KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Damme, Philip van [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Department of Neurosciences, Experimental Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); Leuven Research Institute for Neuroscience and Disease (LIND), Leuven (Belgium); VIB, Vesalius Research Center, Laboratory of Neurobiology, Leuven (Belgium); Laere, Koen van [University Hospitals Leuven and KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Leuven Research Institute for Neuroscience and Disease (LIND), Leuven (Belgium)

    2017-03-15

    During the past decades, extensive efforts have been made to expand the knowledge of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, clinical translation of this research, in terms of earlier diagnosis and improved therapy, remains challenging. Since more than 30% of motor neurons are lost when symptoms become clinically apparent, techniques allowing non-invasive, in vivo detection of motor neuron degeneration are needed in the early, pre-symptomatic disease stage. Furthermore, it has become apparent that non-motor signs play an important role in the disease and there is an overlap with cognitive disorders, such as frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Radionuclide imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), form an attractive approach to quantitatively monitor the ongoing neurodegenerative processes. Although [{sup 18}F]-FDG has been recently proposed as a potential biomarker for ALS, active targeting of the underlying pathologic molecular processes is likely to unravel further valuable disease information and may help to decipher the pathogenesis of ALS. In this review, we provide an overview of radiotracers that have already been applied in ALS and discuss possible novel targets for in vivo imaging of various pathogenic processes underlying ALS onset and progression. (orig.)

  7. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism during sevoflurane anaesthesia in healthy subjects studied with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlünzen, L; Juul, N; Hansen, K V; Gjedde, A; Cold, G E

    2010-05-01

    The precise mechanism by which sevoflurane exerts its effects in the human brain remains unknown. In the present study, we quantified the effects of sevoflurane on regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rGMR) in the human brain measured with positron emission tomography. Eight volunteers underwent two dynamic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) scans. One scan assessed conscious-baseline metabolism and the other scan assessed metabolism during 1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) sevoflurane anaesthesia. Cardiovascular and respiratory parameters were monitored and bispectral index responses were registered. Statistical parametric maps and conventional regions of interest analysis were used to determine rGMR differences. All subjects were unconsciousness at 1.0 MAC sevoflurane. Cardiovascular and respiratory parameters were constant over time. In the awake state, rGMR ranged from 0.24 to 0.35 mumol/g/min in the selected regions. Compared with the conscious state, total GMR decreased 56% in sevoflurane anaesthesia. In white and grey matter, GMR was averaged 42% and 58% of normal, respectively. Sevoflurane reduced the absolute rGMR in all selected areas by 48-71% of the baseline (P< or = 0.01), with the most significant reductions in the lingual gyrus (71%), occipital lobe in general (68%) and thalamus (63%). No increases in rGMR were observed. Sevoflurane caused a global whole-brain metabolic reduction of GMR in all regions of the human brain, with the most marked metabolic suppression in the lingual gyrus, thalamus and occipital lobe.

  8. Statistical parametric mapping in brain single photon computed emission tomography after carbon monoxide intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, N; Nohara, S; Matsuda, H; Sumiya, H; Noguchi, K; Shimizu, M; Tsuji, S; Kinuya, S; Shuke, N; Yokoyama, K; Seto, H

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess regional cerebral blood flow in patients after carbon monoxide intoxication by using brain single photon emission computed tomography and statistical parametric mapping. Eight patients with delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae and ten patients with no neuropsychiatric symptoms after carbon monoxide intoxication were studied with brain single photon emission tomography imaging with 99mTc-hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime. Forty-four control subjects were also studied. We used the adjusted regional cerebral blood flow images in relative flow distribution (normalization of global cerebral blood flow for each subject to 50 ml x 100 g(-1) x min(-1) with proportional scaling) to compare these groups with statistical parametric mapping. Using this technique, significantly decreased regional cerebral blood flow was noted extensively in the bilateral frontal lobes as well as the bilateral insula and a part of the right temporal lobe in the patients with delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae as compared with normal volunteers (Pparametric mapping is a useful technique for highlighting differences in regional cerebral blood flow in patients following carbon monoxide intoxication as compared with normal volunteers. The selectively reduced blood flow noted in this investigation supports the contention that the decrease following carbon monoxide intoxication may be prolonged and further worsen in the frontal lobe. In addition, the present study may help to clarify the characteristics of the pathophysiological alteration underlying delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae.

  9. Application of Positron Emission Tomography to Aerosol Transport Research in a Model of Human Lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Positron Emission Tomography (PET is a convenient method for measurement of aerosol deposition in complex models of lungs. It allows not only the evaluation of regional deposition characteristics but also precisely detects deposition hot spots. The method is based on a detection of a pair of annihilation photons moving in opposite directions as a result of positron – electron interaction after the positron emission decay of a suitable radioisotope. Liquid di(2-ethylhexyl sebacate (DEHS particles tagged with fluorine-18 as a radioactive tracer were generated by condensation monodisperse aerosol generator. Aerosol deposition was measured for three different inhalation flowrates and for two sizes of particles. Combination of PET with Computed Tomography (CT in one device allowed precise localisation of particular segments of the model. The results proved correlation of deposition efficiency with Stokes number, which means that the main deposition mechanism is inertial impaction. As a next task the methodology for tagging the solid aerosol particles with radioactive tracer will be developed and deposition of porous and fiber aerosols will be measured.

  10. Gamma knife treatment for refractory epilepsy in seizure focus localized by positron emission tomography/CT★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xia; Wang, Xuemei; Wang, Hongwei; Zhao, Shigang; Han, Xiaodong; Hao, Linjun; Wang, Xiangcheng

    2012-01-01

    A total of 80 patients with refractory epilepsy were recruited from the Inner Mongolia Medical College Affiliated Hospital. The foci of 60% of the patients could be positioned using a combined positron emission tomography/CT imaging modality. Hyper- and hypometabolism foci were examined as part of this study. Patients who had abnormal metabolism in positron emission tomography/CT imaging were divided into intermittent-phase group and the seizure-phase group. The intermittent-phase group was further divided into a single-focus group and a multiple-foci group according to the number of seizure foci detected by imaging. Following gamma knife treatment, seizure frequency was significantly lower in the intermittent-phase group and the seizure-phase group. Wieser’s classification reached Grade I or II in nearly 40% of patients. Seizure frequency was significantly lower following treatment, but Wieser’s classification score was significantly higher in the seizure-phase group compared with the intermittent-phase group. Seizure frequency was significantly lower following treatment in the single-focus group, but Wieser’s classification score was significantly higher in the single-focus group as compared with the multiple-foci group. PMID:25317147

  11. Geneva University - The AX-PET experiment : A demonstrator for an axial Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2012-01-01

    Geneva University École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Wednesday 14 March 2012 SEMINAIRE DE PHYSIQUE CORPUSCULAIRE 11.15 a.m. - Science II, Auditoire 1S081, 30, quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Genève 4 The AX-PET experiment : A demonstrator for an axial Positron Emission Tomography Dr Chiara CASELLA   ETH Zurich   PET (Positron Emission Tomography) is a tool for in-vivo functional imaging, successfully used since the earliest days of nuclear medicine. It is based on the detection of the two coincident 511 keV photons from the annihilation of a positron, emitted from a radiotracer injected into the body. Tomographic analysis of the coincidence data allows for a 3D reconstructed image of the source distribution. The AX-PET experiment proposes a novel geometrical approach for a PET scanner, in which l...

  12. DE-BLURRING SINGLE PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IMAGES USING WAVELET DECOMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neethu M. Sasi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Single photon emission computed tomography imaging is a popular nuclear medicine imaging technique which generates images by detecting radiations emitted by radioactive isotopes injected in the human body. Scattering of these emitted radiations introduces blur in this type of images. This paper proposes an image processing technique to enhance cardiac single photon emission computed tomography images by reducing the blur in the image. The algorithm works in two main stages. In the first stage a maximum likelihood estimate of the point spread function and the true image is obtained. In the second stage Lucy Richardson algorithm is applied on the selected wavelet coefficients of the true image estimate. The significant contribution of this paper is that processing of images is done in the wavelet domain. Pre-filtering is also done as a sub stage to avoid unwanted ringing effects. Real cardiac images are used for the quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the algorithm. Blur metric, peak signal to noise ratio and Tenengrad criterion are used as quantitative measures. Comparison against other existing de-blurring algorithms is also done. The simulation results indicate that the proposed method effectively reduces blur present in the image.

  13. Brown adipose tissue in humans: detection and functional analysis using PET (positron emission tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and DECT (dual energy computed tomography).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borga, Magnus; Virtanen, Kirsi A; Romu, Thobias; Leinhard, Olof Dahlqvist; Persson, Anders; Nuutila, Pirjo; Enerbäck, Sven

    2014-01-01

    If the beneficial effects of brown adipose tissue (BAT) on whole body metabolism, as observed in nonhuman experimental models, are to be translated to humans, tools that accurately measure how BAT influences human metabolism will be required. This chapter discusses such techniques, how they can be used, what they can measure and also some of their limitations. The focus is on detection and functional analysis of human BAT and how this can be facilitated by applying advanced imaging technology such as positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and dual energy computed tomography. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography screening for lung cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chien, Chun-Ru; Liang, Ji-An; Chen, Jin-Hua; Wang, Hsiao-Nin; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Chen, Chih-Yi; Wang, Pin-Hui; Kao, Chia-Hung; Yeh, Jun-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Rationale and objectives: Although low-dose computed tomography (CT) is a recommended modality for lung cancer screening in high-risk populations, the role of other modalities, such as [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET), is unclear. We conducted a systematic review to describe the role of PET in lung cancer screening. Materials and methods: A systematic review was conducted by reviewing primary studies focusing on PET screening for lung cancer until July 2012....

  15. Single-photon emission tomography of a computerised model of pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, J.S.; Chicco, P.; Bush, V.; Mackey, D.W.; Storey, G.; Magee, M.; Van der Wall, H. [Concord Hospital, Sydney (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Palmer, A.W. [St. George Hospital, Sydney (Australia). Dept. of Radiology; Bautovich, G. [Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1999-11-01

    Planar pulmonary scintigraphy is currently the standard investigation for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. There are a number of problems with the technique, particularly in patients with an intermediate scan report under the PIOPED criteria. The technique is also under threat from the increasing use of spiral CT angiography. A putative improvement may be gained by use of tomography. The incremental value of tomography over planar studies was therefore evaluated in a virtual model of pulmonary scintigraphy. A model of the segmental anatomy of the lungs was developed from computed tomography, cadaveric human lungs and available anatomical texts. Counts were generated within the phantom by Monte Carlo simulation of photon emission. Eighteen single segmental lesions were interspersed with 47 subsegmental defects and displayed on an Icon reporting station. These were presented in the transaxial, sagittal and coronal planes to four experienced reporters to obtain assessment of defect size. Planar studies of the same defects were displayed to the same observers in the standard eight views with a normal study for comparison. With planar studies, the accuracy of estimation of defect size was 51% compared with 97% using tomographic studies. Defects in the medial basal segment of the right lower lobe were not identified in planar studies but were easily seen by all observers in the tomographic study. It is concluded that there is marked improvement in the accuracy of determination of defect size for tomographic studies over the planar equivalents. This is especially important in the lung bases, the most common reported site of pulmonary emboli. Tomography permits visualisation of defects in the medial basal segment of the right lung, which are not seen in planar studies. (orig.)

  16. 18F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography in Alzheimer's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Luca; Vázquez Rodríguez, Patricia; Hong, Young T; Allinson, Kieren S J; Williamson, David; Borchert, Robin J; Sami, Saber; Cope, Thomas E; Bevan-Jones, W Richard; Jones, P Simon; Arnold, Robert; Surendranathan, Ajenthan; Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Fryer, Tim D; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; O'Brien, John T; Rowe, James B

    2017-03-01

    The ability to assess the distribution and extent of tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy in vivo would help to develop biomarkers for these tauopathies and clinical trials of disease-modifying therapies. New radioligands for positron emission tomography have generated considerable interest, and controversy, in their potential as tau biomarkers. We assessed the radiotracer 18F-AV-1451 with positron emission tomography imaging to compare the distribution and intensity of tau pathology in 15 patients with Alzheimer's pathology (including amyloid-positive mild cognitive impairment), 19 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, and 13 age- and sex-matched controls. Regional analysis of variance and a support vector machine were used to compare and discriminate the clinical groups, respectively. We also examined the 18F-AV-1451 autoradiographic binding in post-mortem tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and a control case to assess the 18F-AV-1451 binding specificity to Alzheimer's and non-Alzheimer's tau pathology. There was increased 18F-AV-1451 binding in multiple regions in living patients with Alzheimer's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy relative to controls [main effect of group, F(2,41) = 17.5, P AV-1451 binding was significantly increased in patients with Alzheimer's disease, relative to patients with progressive supranuclear palsy and with control subjects, in the hippocampus and in occipital, parietal, temporal, and frontal cortices (t's > 2.2, P's AV-1451 binding was elevated in the midbrain (t = 2.1, P AV-1451 uptake in the putamen, pallidum, thalamus, midbrain, and in the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum (t's > 2.7, P's AV-1451 strongly bound to Alzheimer-related tau pathology, but less specifically in progressive supranuclear palsy. 18F-AV-1451 binding to the basal ganglia was strong in all groups in vivo. Postmortem histochemical staining showed absence of

  17. Comparison of Positron Emission Tomography Quantification Using Magnetic Resonance- and Computed Tomography-Based Attenuation Correction in Physiological Tissues and Lesions: A Whole-Body Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Study in 66 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Schmidt, Holger; Bezrukov, Ilja; la Fougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Pfannenberg, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) in fully integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) systems plays a key role for the quantification of tracer uptake. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the accuracy of standardized uptake value (SUV) quantification using MR-based AC in direct comparison with computed tomography (CT)-based AC of the same PET data set on a large patient population. Sixty-six patients (22 female; mean [SD], 61 [11] years) were examined by means of combined PET/CT and PET/MR (11C-choline, 18F-FDG, or 68Ga-DOTATATE) subsequently. Positron emission tomography images from PET/MR examinations were corrected with MR-derived AC based on tissue segmentation (PET(MR)). The same PET data were corrected using CT-based attenuation maps (μ-maps) derived from PET/CT after nonrigid registration of the CT to the MR-based μ-map (PET(MRCT)). Positron emission tomography SUVs were quantified placing regions of interest or volumes of interest in 6 different body regions as well as PET-avid lesions, respectively. The relative differences of quantitative PET values when using MR-based AC versus CT-based AC were varying depending on the organs and body regions assessed. In detail, the mean (SD) relative differences of PET SUVs were as follows: -7.8% (11.5%), blood pool; -3.6% (5.8%), spleen; -4.4% (5.6%)/-4.1% (6.2%), liver; -0.6% (5.0%), muscle; -1.3% (6.3%), fat; -40.0% (18.7%), bone; 1.6% (4.4%), liver lesions; -6.2% (6.8%), bone lesions; and -1.9% (6.2%), soft tissue lesions. In 10 liver lesions, distinct overestimations greater than 5% were found (up to 10%). In addition, overestimations were found in 2 bone lesions and 1 soft tissue lesion adjacent to the lung (up to 28.0%). Results obtained using different PET tracers show that MR-based AC is accurate in most tissue types, with SUV deviations generally of less than 10%. In bone, however, underestimations can be pronounced, potentially leading to inaccurate SUV quantifications. In

  18. Methods and clinical applications of positron emission tomography in endocrinology. Methodologie et applications cliniques en endocrinologie de la tomographie a emission de positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landsheere, C. de; Lamotte, D. (Liege Univ. (BE))

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows to detect in coincidence photons issued from annihilation between positrons and electrons nearby situated. Tomographic detection (plane by plane) and tomographic reconstruction will lead to the quantitation of radioactive distribution per voxel, in the organ of interest. Recent tomographs can acquire simultaneously several transaxial slices, with a high sensitivity and a spatial resolution of 3-5 mm. Commonly used positron emitters have a short half-life: 2, 10, 20 and 110 min for {sup 15}0, {sup 13}N, {sup 11}C and {sup 18}F, respectively. The use of these isotopes requires on line production of radionuclides and synthesis of selected molecules. In endocrinology, PET allows among others to study noninvasively the receptor density of hormonodependent neoplasms such as breast, uterus, prostate tumors and prolactinomas. These last tumors represent a particular entity because of several combined characteristics: high turnover rate of amino acids, high density of dopaminergic receptors and response to bromocriptine (analogue of dopamine inhibiting the secretion of prolactine) in relation to the level of receptors. Because PET permits to evaluate the density of dopaminergic receptors and the metabolism of amino acids, theoretical response of the prolactinoma to bromocriptin can be predicted, the achieved therapeutic efficacy can be estimated and the long-term follow up of tumor growth can be assessed. This example illustrates the clinical value of PET in endocrinology.

  19. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in carcinoma nasopharynx: Can we predict outcomes and tailor therapy based on postradiotherapy fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbani Ghosh Laskar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT is an emerging modality for staging and response evaluation in carcinoma nasopharynx. This study was conducted to evaluate the impact of PET-CT in assessing response and outcomes in carcinoma nasopharynx. Materials and Methods: Forty-five patients of nonmetastatic carcinoma nasopharynx who underwent PET-CT for response evaluation at 10-12 weeks posttherapy between 2004 and 2009 were evaluated. Patients were classified as responders (Group A if there was a complete response on PET-CT or as nonresponders (Group B if there was any uptake above the background activity. Data regarding demographics, treatment, and outcomes were collected from their records and compared across the Groups A and B. Results: The median age was 41 years. 42 out of 45 (93.3% patients had WHO Grade 2B disease (undifferentiated squamous carcinoma. 24.4%, 31.1%, 15.6, and 28.8% patients were in American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage IIb, III, Iva, and IVb. All patients were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Forty-five patients, 28 (62.2% were classified as responders, whereas 17 (37.8% were classified as nonresponders. There was no significant difference in the age, sex, WHO grade, and stage distribution between the groups. Compliance to treatment was comparable across both groups. The median follow-up was 25.3 months (759 days. The disease-free survival (DFS of the group was 57.3% at 3 years. The DFS at 3 years was 87.3% and 19.7% for Group A and B, respectively (log-rank test, P < 0.001. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed Groups to be the only significant factor predicting DFS (P value 0.002 and < 0.001, respectively. In Group B, the most common site of disease failure was distant (9, 53%. Conclusion: PET-CT can be used to evaluate response and as a tool to identify patients at higher risk of distant failure. Further, this could be exploited to

  20. Segmentation-based attenuation correction in positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance: erroneous tissue identification and its impact on positron emission tomography interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendle, Cornelia; Schmidt, Holger; Oergel, Anja; Bezrukov, Ilja; Mueller, Mark; Schraml, Christina; Pfannenberg, Christina; la Fougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of artifacts in segmentation-based attenuation correction maps (μ-maps) of positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) and their impact on PET interpretation and the standardized uptake value (SUV) quantification in normal tissue and lesions. The study was approved by the local institutional review board. Attenuation maps of 100 patients with PET/MR and preceding PET/computed tomography examination were retrospectively inspected for artifacts (tracers: 2-deoxy-2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-D-glucose (¹⁸F-FDG), ¹¹C-Choline, ⁶⁸Ga-DOTATOC, ⁶⁸Ga-DOTATATE, ¹¹C-Methionine). The artifacts were subdivided into 9 different groups on the basis of their localization and appearance. The impact of μ-map artifacts in normal tissue and lesions on PET interpretation was evaluated qualitatively via visual analysis in synopsis with the non-attenuation-corrected (NAC) PET as well as quantitatively by comparing the SUV in artifact regions to reference regions. Attenuation map artifacts were found in 72% of the head/neck data sets, 61% of the thoracic data sets, 25% of the upper abdominal data sets, and 26% of the pelvic data sets. The most frequent localizations of the overall 276 artifacts were around metal implants (16%), in the lungs (19%), and outer body contours (31%). Twenty-one percent of all PET-avid lesions (38 of 184 lesions) were affected by artifacts in the majority without further consequences for visual PET interpretation. However, 9 PET-avid lung lesions were masked owing to μ-map artifacts and, thus, were only detectable on the NAC PET or additional MR imaging sequences. Quantitatively, μ-map artifacts led to significant SUV changes in areas with erroneous assignment of air instead of soft tissue (ie, metal artifacts) and of soft tissue instead of lung. Nevertheless, no change in diagnosis would have been caused by μ-map artifacts. Attenuation map artifacts that occur in a

  1. Evaluation of external beam hardening filters on image quality of computed tomography and single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Nivedita; Rawat, Dinesh; Parmar, Madan; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of external metal filters on the image quality of computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT images. Images of Jaszack phantom filled with water and containing iodine contrast filled syringes were acquired using CT (120 kV, 2.5 mA) component of SPECT/CT system, ensuring fixation of filter on X-ray collimator. Different thickness of filters of Al and Cu (1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm) and filter combinations Cu 1 mm, Cu 2 mm, Cu 3 mm each in combination with Al (1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm), respectively, were used. All image sets were visually analyzed for streak artifacts and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) was derived. Similar acquisition was done using Philips CT quality control (QC) phantom and CNR were calculated for its lexan, perspex, and teflon inserts. Attenuation corrected SPECT/CT images of Jaszack phantom filled with 444-555 MBq (12-15 mCi) of (99m)Tc were obtained by applying attenuation correction map generated by hardened X-ray beam for different filter combination, on SPECT data. Uniformity, root mean square (rms) and contrast were calculated in all image sets. Less streak artifacts at iodine water interface were observed in images acquired using external filters as compared to those without a filter. CNR for syringes, spheres, and inserts of Philips CT QC phantom was almost similar to Al 2 mm, Al 3 mm, and without the use of filters. CNR decreased with increasing copper thickness and other filter combinations. Uniformity and rms were lower, and value of contrast was higher for SPECT/CT images when CT was acquired with Al 2 mm and 3 mm filter than for images acquired without a filter. The study suggests that for Infinia Hawkeye 4, SPECT/CT system, Al 2 mm, and 3 mm are the optimum filters for improving image quality of SPECT/CT images of Jaszack or Philips CT QC phantom keeping other parameters of CT constant.

  2. Prospective, blinded trial of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography positron emission tomography in staging primary and recurrent cancer of the head and neck.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the use of computed tomography - positron emission tomography and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for the staging of head and neck cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January to July 2009, 15 consecutive head and neck cancer patients (11 men and four women; mean age 59 years; age range 19 to 81 years) underwent computed tomography - positron emission tomography and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for pre-therapeutic evaluation. All scans were staged, as per the American Joint Committee on Cancer tumour-node-metastasis classification, by two blinded consultant radiologists, in two sittings. Diagnoses were confirmed by histopathological examination of endoscopic biopsies, and in some cases whole surgical specimens. RESULTS: Tumour staging showed a 74 per cent concordance, node staging an 80 per cent concordance and metastasis staging a 100 per cent concordance, comparing the two imaging modalities. CONCLUSION: This study found radiological staging discordance between the two imaging modalities. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging is an emerging staging modality with superior visualisation of metastatic disease, which does not require exposure to ionising radiation.

  3. Monte-Carlo simulations and image reconstruction for novel imaging scenarios in emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillam, John E. [The University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences and The Brain and Mind Centre, Camperdown (Australia); Rafecas, Magdalena, E-mail: rafecas@imt.uni-luebeck.de [University of Lubeck, Institute of Medical Engineering, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany)

    2016-02-11

    Emission imaging incorporates both the development of dedicated devices for data acquisition as well as algorithms for recovering images from that data. Emission tomography is an indirect approach to imaging. The effect of device modification on the final image can be understood through both the way in which data are gathered, using simulation, and the way in which the image is formed from that data, or image reconstruction. When developing novel devices, systems and imaging tasks, accurate simulation and image reconstruction allow performance to be estimated, and in some cases optimized, using computational methods before or during the process of physical construction. However, there are a vast range of approaches, algorithms and pre-existing computational tools that can be exploited and the choices made will affect the accuracy of the in silico results and quality of the reconstructed images. On the one hand, should important physical effects be neglected in either the simulation or reconstruction steps, specific enhancements provided by novel devices may not be represented in the results. On the other hand, over-modeling of device characteristics in either step leads to large computational overheads that can confound timely results. Here, a range of simulation methodologies and toolkits are discussed, as well as reconstruction algorithms that may be employed in emission imaging. The relative advantages and disadvantages of a range of options are highlighted using specific examples from current research scenarios.

  4. Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT) images enhancement using a linear filter in the frequency domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, Rodrigo S.S.; Tardelli, Tiago C.; Yoriyaz, Helio, E-mail: hyoriyaz@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Jackowski, Marcel P., E-mail: mjack@ime.usp.b [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Computer Science

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, a new technique for in vivo spectrographic imaging of stable isotopes was presented as Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT). In this technique, a fast neutrons beam stimulates stable nuclei in a sample, which emit characteristic gamma radiation. The photon energy is unique and is used to identify the emitting nuclei. The emitted gamma energy spectra can be used for reconstruction of the target tissue image and for determination of the tissue elemental composition. Due to the stochastic nature of photon emission process by irradiated tissue, one of the most suitable algorithms for tomographic reconstruction is the Expectation-Maximization (E-M) algorithm, once on its formulation are considered simultaneously the probabilities of photons emission and detection. However, a disadvantage of this algorithm is the introduction of noise in the reconstructed image as the number of iterations increases. This increase can be caused either by features of the algorithm itself or by the low sampling rate of projections used for tomographic reconstruction. In this work, a linear filter in the frequency domain was used in order to improve the quality of the reconstructed images. (author)

  5. Development of radiotracers for imaging NR2B subtype NMDA receptors with positron emission tomography; Developpement de radiotraceurs pour la visualisation des recepteurs NMDA de sous-type NR2B par tomographie par emission de positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labas, R

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this thesis was to develop new radioactive tracers for imaging NR2B subtype NMDA receptors with positron emission tomography. Several compounds including 4-(4-fluoro-benzyl)piperidine and presenting interesting in vivo biological properties were the object of a labelling with a positrons emitter atom ({sup 11}C or {sup 18}F)

  6. Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance hybrid scanner imaging of cerebral blood flow using 15O-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in newborn piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Julie B; Henning, William S; Lindberg, Ulrich;

    2015-01-01

    Abnormality in cerebral blood flow (CBF) distribution can lead to hypoxic-ischemic cerebral damage in newborn infants. The aim of the study was to investigate minimally invasive approaches to measure CBF by comparing simultaneous (15)O-water positron emission tomography (PET) and single TI pulsed...

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the follow-up of papillary or follicular thyroid cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, L.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Devillé, W.; Lips, W.; Teule, J.J.; Boers, M.; Tulder, M.W. van

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose is a relatively new nuclear imaging technique in oncology. We conducted a systematic review to determine the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in patients suspected of recurrent papillary or follicular

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the follow-up of papillary or follicular thyroid cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, L.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Devillé, W.; Lips, W.; Teule, J.J.; Boers, M.; Tulder, M.W. van

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose is a relatively new nuclear imaging technique in oncology. We conducted a systematic review to determine the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in patients suspected of recurrent papillary or follicular

  9. In vivo evaluation of [11C]preladenant positron emission tomography for quantification of adenosine A2A receptors in the rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Xiaoyun; Khanapur, Shivashankar; de Jong, Johan R; Willemsen, Antoon T.M.; Dierckx, Rudi Ajo; Elsinga, Philip H; de Vries, Erik Fj

    2016-01-01

    [(11)C]Preladenant was developed as a novel adenosine A2A receptor positron emission tomography radioligand. The present study aims to evaluate the suitability of [(11)C]preladenant positron emission tomography for the quantification of striatal A2A receptor density and the assessment of striatal A2

  10. Association Between Choroidal Thickness and Metabolic Activity on Positron Emission Tomography in Eyes With Choroidal Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hwan; Lee, Sung Chul; Cho, Arthur; Keum, Ki Chang; Suh, Yang-Gun; Lee, Christopher Seungkyu

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between subfoveal choroidal thickness and metabolic activity in eyes with choroidal melanoma. Retrospective, interventional case series. The medical records of 16 patients with unilateral choroidal melanoma who underwent ruthenium (Ru) 106 brachytherapy with adjuvant transpupillary thermotherapy and who had available pretreatment positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) images were retrospectively reviewed. Subfoveal choroidal thickness was measured in tumor eyes and in unaffected fellow eyes using enhanced-depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (EDI OCT). Tumor eyes were divided into 2 groups (metabolically active and inactive) based on PET-CT findings and subfoveal choroidal thickness was compared between groups. Additionally, choroidal thickness measurements were compared before and after treatment. Before treatment, mean choroidal thickness was 293.31 ± 46.80 μm in tumor eyes and 242.44 ± 65.37 μm in fellow eyes, a difference that was statistically significant (P = .003). Eyes with metabolically active tumors had a significantly thicker choroid (348.00 ± 17.32 μm) than eyes with metabolically inactive tumors (280.69 ± 42.04 μm, P = .019). In tumor eyes, mean choroidal thickness significantly decreased from pretreatment values to 253.56 ± 61.27 μm 6 months after treatment (P = .018). Eyes with choroidal melanoma had thicker choroids than unaffected fellow eyes. Increased choroidal thickness was more prominent in metabolically active tumors. Choroidal thickness significantly decreased in tumor eyes 6 months after treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism for Broca's aphasia using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Toshiaki

    1987-12-01

    A total of 11 patients with Broca's aphasia (BA) underwent positron emission tomography (PET) with the purpose of investigating the responsible region and the symptomatic flow and metabolism thresholds for BA. Computed tomography (CT) was concurrently performed. In the group of 3 patients undergoing PET with C-11 glucose, both PET and CT provided abnormal findings in the region that is thought to be responsible for BA (Broca's area), including the cortex and subcortex in the anterior region to Sylvian fissure. The Broca's area in the remaining one was shown as low C-11 accumulation area on PET and as isodensity on CT. The second group, consisting of 8 BA patients and 30 control patients without BA, underwent PET using O-15 steady method. PET showed reduction of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolic rate (rCMRO/sub 2/) in the Broca's area in all BA patients. Computed tomography showed abnormal low density in the Broca's area in 3 patients, and abnormal findings in the basal ganglionic region and subcortex without evidence for abnormal low density in the Broca's area in the other 5 patients. Comparison of rCBF and rCMRO/sub 2/ in BA patients with those in control patients may show the symptomatic thresholds to be 20 - 27 ml100 gmin for rCBF and 2.0 ml100 gmin for rCMRO/sub 2/. (Namekawa, K.).

  12. Professional practice assessment. Pertinence of positron emission tomography clinical indications in oncology; Evaluation des pratiques professionnelles. Pertinence des indications de la tomographie a emission de positons en cancerologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Stanc, E.; Tainturier, C. [Hopital Foch, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 92 - Suresnes (France); Swaenepoel, J. [Hopital Foch, Cellule Qualite, 92 - Suresnes (France)

    2009-09-15

    Introduction As part of the health care quality and safety policy in France, Professional Practice Assessment (P.P.A.) are mandatory in the health services 'certification' process. We present our study regarding the pertinence of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) indications in oncology. Materials and methods A multidisciplinary task group used the Quick Audit method with two rounds of 100 request forms each. The assessment list of criteria comprised four items of decreasing relevance grading the PET scans clinical indications, which were derived from the three French published guidelines (S.O.R. [F.N.C.L.C.C]., 'Guide du bon usage des examens d'imagerie medicale' [S.F.R.-S.F.M.N.], 'Guide pour la redaction de protocoles pour la TEP au F.D.G. en cancerologie' [S.F.M.N.]) and five additional items: clinical information, patient's body weight, previous treatments dates, diabetes, claustrophobia. Results The first round showed that 68% of the requested scans corresponded to the two most relevant groups of indications (S.O.R. Standards and Options). The request forms were correctly filled in regarding the clinical information, but this was not the case for the other items we tested. Several actions were conducted: dedicated PET request form, availability of the S.O.R. on the hospital intranet, boost of the referring physicians awareness during the multidisciplinary oncology meetings (Reunions de Concertation Pluridisciplinaires RCP). The second round showed a better pertinence of the PET scans indications (75% versus 68%); the patient's body weight was more frequently mentioned on the request form. Discussion This study is an example of P.P.A. in our discipline. It led to an improvement of the oncologic PET scans clinical indications in our hospital. This work is pursued in everyday discussion with the referring clinicians, especially during the RCP. (authors)

  13. Positron Emission Tomography-Determined Hyperemic Flow, Myocardial Flow Reserve, and Flow Gradient—Quo Vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leucker, Thorsten M.; Valenta, Ines; Schindler, Thomas Hellmut

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) applied with positron-emitting flow tracers such as 13N-ammonia and 82Rubidium enables the quantification of both myocardial perfusion and myocardial blood flow (MBF) in milliliters per gram per minute for coronary artery disease (CAD) detection and characterization. The detection of a regional myocardial perfusion defect during vasomotor stress commonly identifies the culprit lesion or most severe epicardial narrowing, whereas adding regional hyperemic MBFs, myocardial flow reserve (MFR), and/or longitudinal flow decrease may also signify less severe but flow-limiting stenosis in multivessel CAD. The addition of regional hyperemic flow parameters, therefore, may afford a comprehensive identification and characterization of flow-limiting effects of multivessel CAD. The non-specific origin of decreases in hyperemic MBFs and MFR, however, prompts an evaluation and interpretation of regional flow in the appropriate context with the presence of obstructive CAD. Conversely, initial results of the assessment of a longitudinal hyperemic flow gradient suggest this novel flow parameter to be specifically related to increases in CAD caused epicardial resistance. The concurrent assessment of myocardial perfusion and several hyperemic flow parameters with PET/CT may indeed open novel avenues of precision medicine to guide coronary revascularization procedures that may potentially lead to a further improvement in cardiovascular outcomes in CAD patients. PMID:28770213

  14. The role of positron emission tomography in the detection of pancreatic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrota, A.; Duquesnoy, N.; Paraf, A.; Kellershohn, C.

    1982-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to assess possible pancreatic disease in 100 patients. Following injection of 10-15 mCi (370-740 MBq) of /sup 11/C-L-methionine, 4-12 transverse sections 2 cm thick were obtained. In 85 patients with a definite diagnosis (45 normal, 9 acute pancreatitis, 18 chronic pancreatitis, and 13 cancer), PET showed a sensitivity of 85.0%, a specificity of 97.8%, and an accuracy of 91.8%, higher than with transmission computed tomography (CT) or ultrasonography, despite relatively low spatial resolution; this can be explained by the fact that exocrine pancreatic function was altered prior to morphological change. In 22 normal subjects, 0.011 +/- 0.003% (mean +/- S.D.) of injected /sup 11/C was found in 1 ml of liver tissue and 0.015 +/- 0.005% in 1 ml of pancreatic tissue; the pancreas-to-liver concentration ratio was 1.3 +/- 0.4. Hepatic /sup 11/C concentration was identical in the four groups of patients. Pancreatic uptake of /sup 11/C-L-methionine was significantly lower in patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 13) and pancreatic carcinoma (n = 10) (p <0.001); however, it was not possible to distinguish cancer from chronic pancreatitis because the same functional alteration occurred in both.

  15. The role of positron emission tomography in the detection of pancreatic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrota, A.; Duquesnoy, N.; Paraf, A.; Kellershohn, C.

    1982-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to assess possible pancreatic disease in 100 patients. Following injection of 10-15 mCi (370-740 MBq) of 11C-L-methionine, 4-12 transverse sections 2 cm thick were obtained. In 85 patients with a definite diagnosis (45 normal, 9 acute pancreatitis, 18 chronic pancreatitis, and 13 cancer), PET showed a sensitivity of 85.0%, a specificity of 97.8%, and an accuracy of 91.8%, higher than with transmission computed tomography (CT) or ultrasonography, despite relatively low spatial resolution; this can be explained by the fact that exocrine pancreatic function was altered prior to morphological change. In 22 normal subjects, 0.011 +/- 0.003% (mean +/- S.D). of injected 11C was found in 1 ml of liver tissue and 0.015 +/- 0.005% in 1 ml of pancreatic tissue; the pancreas-to-liver concentration ratio was 1.3 +/- 0.4. Hepatic 11C concentration was identical in the four groups of patients. Pancreatic uptake of 11C-L-methionine was significantly lower in patients with chronic pancreatitis (n . 13) and pancreatic carcinoma (n . 10) (p less than 0.001); however, it was not possible to distinguish cancer from chronic pancreatitis because the same functional alteration occurred in both.

  16. Fluorine-18-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine Positron-emission Tomography Scans of Neuroendocrine Tumors (Carcinoids and Pheochromocytomas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanzi, Italo; Studentsova, Yana; Bjelke, David; Warner, Richard; Babchyck, Barry; Chaly, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Conventional methods of imaging neuroendocrine tumors with computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, indium-111-octreotide, or radiolabeled metaiodobenzilguanidine scintigraphy have limitations. This pilot study tried to improve the localization of these tumors with fluorine-18-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine (F-DOPA) positron-emission tomography (PET) scanning. Materials and Methods: We studied 22 patients, the majority of whom were referred with clinical diagnosis or suspicion of carcinoid (n = 11), neuroendocrine tumors (n = 7) or pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma (PGL) (n = 4). The comparison was made with the prior conventional imaging. Results: The F-DOPA findings were compared with the results of subsequent surgery (2), endoscopy (1), or a long-term follow-up (mean duration, 49 months) for 17 patients. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Foci of F-DOPA deposition were detected in eight patients (final diagnosis of carcinoid in six, of neuroendocrine tumors in one, and of PGL in another). Comparison with the final diagnoses revealed concordance in 16 of the 22 patients. F-DOPA results appeared superior to those obtained with conventional imaging. Despite the small number and diagnostic heterogeneity, in a substantial fraction of patients F-DOPA PET added information relevant to clinical management. Conclusion: F-DOPA scanning added prognostic value, particularly when multiple abnormal foci versus a negative examination were considered. PMID:28584687

  17. (68)Ga-DOTATATE-positron emission tomography imaging in spinal meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotty, Philipp Jörg; Behrendt, Florian Friedrich; Langen, Karl-Josef; Cornelius, Jan Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and (68)Ga-DOTA peptides is a promising method in intracranial meningiomas. Especially in recurrent meningioma discrimination between scar tissue and recurrent tumor tissue in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often difficult. We report the first case of (68)Ga-DOTATATE-PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging in recurrent spinal meningioma. A 64-year-old Caucasian female patient was referred to our department with the second recurrence of thoracic meningothelial meningioma. In MRI, it remained unclear if the multiple enhancements seen represented scar tissue or vital tumor. We offered (68)Ga-DOTATATE-PET/CT imaging in order to evaluate the best strategy. (68)Ga-DOTATATE-PET/CT imaging revealed strong tracer uptake in parts of the lesions. The pattern did distinctly differ from MRI enhancement. Multiple biopsies were performed in the PET-positive and PET-negative regions. Histological results confirmed the prediction of (68)Ga-DOTATATE-PET with vital tumor in PET-positive regions and scar tissue in PET-negative regions. Differentiating scar tissue from tumor can be challenging in recurrent spinal meningioma with MRI alone. In the presented case, (68)Ga-DOTATATE-PET imaging was able to differentiate noninvasively between tumor and scar.

  18. 68Ga-DOTATATE-positron emission tomography imaging in spinal meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Jorg Slotty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging with positron emission tomography (PET and 68 Ga-DOTA peptides is a promising method in intracranial meningiomas. Especially in recurrent meningioma discrimination between scar tissue and recurrent tumor tissue in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is often difficult. We report the first case of 68 Ga-DOTATATE-PET/computed tomography (PET/CT imaging in recurrent spinal meningioma. A 64-year-old Caucasian female patient was referred to our department with the second recurrence of thoracic meningothelial meningioma. In MRI, it remained unclear if the multiple enhancements seen represented scar tissue or vital tumor. We offered 68 Ga-DOTATATE-PET/CT imaging in order to evaluate the best strategy. 68 Ga-DOTATATE-PET/CT imaging revealed strong tracer uptake in parts of the lesions. The pattern did distinctly differ from MRI enhancement. Multiple biopsies were performed in the PET-positive and PET-negative regions. Histological results confirmed the prediction of 68 Ga-DOTATATE-PET with vital tumor in PET-positive regions and scar tissue in PET-negative regions. Differentiating scar tissue from tumor can be challenging in recurrent spinal meningioma with MRI alone. In the presented case, 68 Ga-DOTATATE-PET imaging was able to differentiate noninvasively between tumor and scar.

  19. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography might be useful for diagnosis of hepatic amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawada A

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Akinobu Tawada,1 Tatsuo Kanda,1 Takashi Oide,2 Toshio Tsuyuguchi,1 Fumio Imazeki,1,3 Yukio Nakatani,2 Osamu Yokosuka11Department of Gastroenterology, 2Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Chiba University Hospital, Chuo-ku, Chiba, Japan; 3Safety and Health Organization, Chiba University, Inage-ku, Chiba, JapanAbstract: We report on a woman with hepatic involvement of primary systemic (immunoglobulin light chain, AL amyloidosis. Her diagnosis was confirmed by liver biopsy. Clinical symptoms of hepatic amyloidosis are generally mild at its first stage, with most frequent findings being hepatomegaly and alkaline phosphatase elevation. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of systemic amyloidosis have made several treatments available. However, its prognosis is occasionally poor. Because liver biopsy is not always safe, other modalities for the diagnosis are needed. Of interest was that fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG uptake into the liver was observed, compared with that into the spleen, in this patient, indicating that FDG positron emission tomography and computed tomography might be useful for the diagnosis of hepatic amyloidosis with mild liver dysfunction.Keywords: amyloidosis, diagnosis, hepatic involvement, FDG PET

  20. Use of positron emission tomography (PET) for the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loricera, J; Blanco, R; Hernández, J L; Martínez-Rodríguez, I; Carril, J M; Lavado, C; Jiménez, M; González-Vela, C; González-Gay, M Á

    2015-01-01

    The term vasculitis encompasses a heterogeneous group of diseases that share the presence of inflammatory infiltrates in the vascular wall. The diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis is often a challenge because the presenting clinical features are nonspecific in many cases and they are often shared by different types of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases including other systemic vasculitides. Moreover, the pathogenesis of large-vessel vasculitis is not fully understood. Nevertheless, the advent of new imaging techniques has constituted a major breakthrough to establish an early diagnosis and a promising tool to monitor the follow-up of patients with largevessel vasculitis. This is the case of the molecular imaging with the combination of positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) using different radiotracers, especially the (18)F-fluordeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). In this review we have focused on the contribution of (18)F-FDG PET in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  1. The Use of Positron Emission Tomography in Soft Tissue Sarcoma Patients under Therapy with Trabectedin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlinde Egerer

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: We used 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG positron emission tomography (PET to evaluate the FDG uptake in patients with advanced and/or metastatic soft tissue sarcoma (STS undergoing therapy with Ecteinascidin-743 (ET-743, Trabectedin, YondelisTM. Patients and Methods: The pilot study included nine patients with metastatic STS receiving a minimum of one cycle of treatment with trabectedin. Patients were examined using PET prior to onset of therapy and after completion of one or three cycles of trabectedin. Restaging according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST was performed in parallel using computed tomography (CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and served for reference. Results: Clinical outcome of nine evaluable patients was as follows: one patient with partial remission (PR, three patients with stable disease (SD, and five patients with progressive disease (PD. A more than 40% decrease of the standardized uptake value (SUV of sequential PET examination could be demonstrated for the responding patient (PR, whereas patients with SD or PD showed a stable SUV, but no increase in SUV. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first small series of patients being treated with trabectedin and monitored using sequential PET imaging demonstrating SUV stabilization in nearly all monitored patients.

  2. Application of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography in Diagnosis of Malignant Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-hong Ning; Qiu-li Meng; Yu-zhou Wang; Chun-mei Bai

    2009-01-01

    To testify the efficacy of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomo-graphy (PET) in the diagnosis of cancer.Methods A total of 170 patients with diagnosed cancer or suspicious cancer were enrolled in this study, and underwent 18F-FDG PET. The standard uptake value (SUV) and diameter for each abnormal region in PET images were analyzed. All data were analyzed by SPSS 11.5.Results PET scan identified a primary cancer in 45.8% (11/24) patients. The sensitivity and specificity of PET scan in differentiating malignant lesions from benign ones were 78.8% (52/66) and 77.1% (27/35) respectively. Twenty-nine out of 68 (42.6%) lesions were detected earlier by PET than by computed tomography. The SUV of primary cancer was significantly higher than that of metastatic lymph nodes (5.84±3.12 vs. 3.14±2.24, P<0.O01). And SUV of primary lung cancer was also significantly higher than that of metastatic lung cancer (6.30±3.01 vs. 2.86±2.37, P<0.01).Conclusion 18F-FDG PET plays a very important role in cancer diagnosis.

  3. Development of X-ray Emission Computed Tomography for Laser-Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao'En, Jiang; Zhongli, Liu; Nan, Li; Zhijian, Zheng; Dao'Yuan, Tang; Yongkun, Ding; Xin, Hu

    1996-11-01

    A computed tomography (CT) technique has been developed to diagnose laser produced plasma using X-ray emission. The three dimensional X-ray distribution was reconstructed by using a multiplicate algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) from five pinhole camera images obtained along different sight directions. A three dimensional reconstruction program (CT3D) has been worked out, the accuracy of which reaches 92% and 86%, without and with noise (S/N-10), respectively. The experimental data, obtained from the ICF on the ``Xinguang-II'' facilities (λ = 0.35 μm, EL = 100J, τ = 700ps), are processed by using the CT3D program and good reconstruction results have been obtained.

  4. Interstitial brachytherapy for liver metastases and assessment of response by positron emission tomography: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goura Kishor Rath

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available For liver metastases (LM, image guided percutaneous ablative procedures such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA, laser induced thermal therapy (LITT and trans-arterial chemo-embolisation (TACE are increasingly being used because they are relatively safer, less invasive and equally effective. CT scan guided interstitial brachytherapy (IBT with a single large dose of radiation by high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy is a novel technique of treating LM and has shown good results. Positron emission tomography (PET scan may provide better information for assessing the response toIBT procedures. We hereby report a case of LM that was treated by HDR IBT and PET scan was done in addition to CT scan for assessing the response.

  5. Transthoracic Doppler echocardiography compared with positron emission tomography for assessment of coronary microvascular dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Marie Mide; Mygind, Naja Dam; Pena, Adam

    2017-01-01

    stenosis at invasive coronary angiography, TTDE CFVR by dipyridamole induced stress and MBFR by rubidium-82 PET with adenosine was successfully measured in 107 subjects. Repeatability of TTDE CFVR was assessed in 10 symptomatic women and in 10 healthy individuals. RESULTS: MBFR was systematically higher......BACKGROUND: Coronary microvascular function can be assessed by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography as a coronary flow velocity reserve (TTDE CFVR) and by positron emission tomography as a myocardial blood flow reserve (PET MBFR). PET MBFR is regarded the noninvasive reference standard...... for measuring coronary microvascular function but has limited availability. We compared TTDE CFVR with PET MBFR in women with angina pectoris and no obstructive coronary artery disease and assessed repeatability of TTDE CFVR. METHODS: From a cohort of women with angina and no obstructive coronary artery...

  6. Imaging amyloid in Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David J

    2009-01-01

    Although Parkinson's disease with later dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are pathologically characterized by the presence of intraneuronal Lewy inclusion bodies, amyloid deposition is also associated to varying degrees with both these disorders. Fibrillar amyloid load can now be quantitated in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET) using imaging biomarkers. Here the reported findings of 11C-PIB PET studies concerning the amyloid load associated with PD and its influence on dementia are reviewed. It is concluded that the presence of amyloid acts to accelerate the dementia process in Lewy body disorders, though has little influence on its nature. Anti-amyloid strategies could be a relevant approach for slowing dementia in a number of DLB and PDD cases.

  7. Short time bacterial endotoxins test for positron emission tomography by means of positively charged filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazawa, Nobuhiro; Wakita, Kazuo [Nishijin Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Mineura, Katsuyoshi [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have very short physical half-lives. It is hard to complete a bacterial endotoxins test prior to release from medical institutes. For endotoxin quantitative determination, limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) reagent and kinetic-turbidimetry system were previously developed. We investigated the possibility of a short time test by means of positively charged filters. As a result of this study, the effects of positively charged filters on endotoxin removal were over 99.5% for [{sup 18}F]FDG and [{sup 18}F]NaF, which were contaminated with the indicated concentration of endotoxin. Combining this filter and the kinetic-turbidimetric method, it was possible to complete a bacterial endotoxins test in 5 min prior to the patient's administration. This test should be required prior to release for PET radiopharmaceutical quality control. It has been suggested that this combination is a good method for this purpose. (author)

  8. PET and paediatrics; La tomographie par emission de positons (ou PET scan) en pediatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boddaert, N. [Necker Enfants Malades, AP-HP, Serv Radiol Pediat, Paris (France); Ribeiro, M.J. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, F-91406 Orsay (France)

    2008-07-01

    Positon emission tomography (PET scan) is a functional imagery technique.As in scintigraphy, a radioactive tracer is administrated to the patient and its distribution into the organism is detected by a tomograph or a PET scanner. The nuclear medicine techniques which use radioactive tracers allow to obtain an imagery of the regional metabolism of glucose, blood flow or of different neurotransmitters. The PET-TDM (tomodensitometry) is an hybrid imagery system which associates a PET to a multi-bars scanner (4 to 64 bars). The use of hybrid imagery systems allows an anatomic register of the metabolic anomalies or others, as well as the adjustment of the attenuation of the emitted particles. (O.M.)

  9. Nicotine Blocks Brain Estrogen Synthase (Aromatase): In Vivo Positron Emission Tomography Studies in Female Baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegon, A.; Biegon, A.; Kim, S.-W.; Logan, J.; Hooker, J.M.; Muench, L.; Fowler, J.S.

    2010-01-12

    Cigarette smoking and nicotine have complex effects on human physiology and behavior, including some effects similar to those elicited by inhibition of aromatase, the last enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis. We report the first in vivo primate study to determine whether there is a direct effect of nicotine administration on brain aromatase. Brain aromatase availability was examined with positron emission tomography and the selective aromatase inhibitor [{sup 11}C]vorozole in six baboons before and after exposure to IV nicotine at .015 and .03 mg/kg. Nicotine administration produced significant, dose-dependent reductions in [{sup 11}C]vorozole binding. The amygdala and preoptic area showed the largest reductions. Plasma levels of nicotine and its major metabolite cotinine were similar to those found in cigarette smokers. Nicotine interacts in vivo with primate brain aromatase in regions involved in mood, aggression, and sexual behavior.

  10. Greater left cerebral hemispheric metabolism in bulimia assessed by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.C.; Hagman, J.; Buchsbaum, M.S.; Blinder, B.; Derrfler, M.; Tai, W.Y.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N. (Univ. of California, Irvine (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Eight women with bulimia and eight age- and sex-matched normal control subjects were studied with positron emission tomography using (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as a tracer of brain metabolic rate. Subjects performed a visual vigilance task during FDG uptake. In control subjects, the metabolic rate was higher in the right hemisphere than in the left, but patients with bulimia did not have this normal asymmetry. Lower metabolic rates in the basal ganglia, found in studies of depressed subjects, and higher rates in the basal ganglia, reported in a study of anorexia nervosa, were not found. This is consistent with the suggestion that bulimia is a diagnostic grouping distinct from these disorders.

  11. An objective evaluation framework for segmentation techniques of functional positron emission tomography studies

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J; Eberl, S; Feng, D

    2004-01-01

    Segmentation of multi-dimensional functional positron emission tomography (PET) studies into regions of interest (ROI) exhibiting similar temporal behavior is useful in diagnosis and evaluation of neurological images. Quantitative evaluation plays a crucial role in measuring the segmentation algorithm's performance. Due to the lack of "ground truth" available for evaluating segmentation of clinical images, automated segmentation results are usually compared with manual delineation of structures which is, however, subjective, and is difficult to perform. Alternatively, segmentation of co-registered anatomical images such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as the ground truth to the PET segmentation. However, this is limited to PET studies which have corresponding MRI. In this study, we introduce a framework for the objective and quantitative evaluation of functional PET study segmentation without the need for manual delineation or registration to anatomical images of the patient. The segmentation ...

  12. Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography with quantum correlation of γ-ray photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K; Kobayashi, Y

    2015-05-01

    Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography (PET) has long been discussed with respect to imaging instrumentation and algorithms for data treatment. Here, the molecular sensitivity in PET is discussed on the basis of 2-dimensional coincident measurements of 511 keV γ ray photons resultant from two-photon annihilation. Introduction of an additional selection window based on the energy sum and difference of the coincidently measured γ ray photons, without any significant instrumental and algorithmic changes, showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by an order of magnitude. Improvement of performance characteristics in the PET imaging system was demonstrated by an increase in the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) which takes both the SNR and the detection efficiency into consideration. A further improvement of both the SNR and the NECR is expected for the present system in real clinical and in-vivo environments, where much stronger positron sources are employed.

  13. EndoTOFPET-US a Novel Multimodal Tool for Endoscopy and Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Garutti, Erika

    2013-01-01

    The EndoTOFPET-US project aims to jointly exploit Time-Of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOFPET) and ultrasound endoscopy with a multi-modal instrument for the development of new biomarkers for pancreas and prostate oncology. The paper outlines the functionality of the proposed instrument and the challenges for its realization. The high level of miniaturization and integration poses strong demands to the fields of scintillating crystallography, ultra-fast photon detection, highly integrated electronics and system integration. Solutions are presented to obtain a coincidence time resolution better than 200 ps and a spatial resolution of ~1 mm with an asymmetric TOFPET detector. A tracking system with better than 1 mm spatial resolution precision enables the online alignment of the system. The detector design, the production and test status of the single detector

  14. Imaging Atherosclerosis with Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of atherosclerosis could potentially move patient management towards individualized triage, treatment, and followup. The newly introduced combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system could emerge as a key player in this context. Both...... PET and MRI have previously been used for imaging plaque morphology and function: however, the combination of the two methods may offer new synergistic opportunities. Here, we will give a short summary of current relevant clinical applications of PET and MRI in the setting of atherosclerosis....... Additionally, our initial experiences with simultaneous PET/MRI for atherosclerosis imaging are presented. Finally, future potential vascular applications exploiting the unique combination of PET and MRI will be discussed....

  15. Characterization of hepatic tumors using [11C]metomidate through positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roivainen, Anne; Naum, Alexandru; Nuutinen, Heikki

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Using positron emission tomography (PET), we compared two tracers, [11C]metomidate ([11C]MTO) and [11C]acetate ([11C]ACE), for the characterization of hepatic tumors. METHODS: Thirty-three patients underwent PET with [11C]MTO and [11C]ACE and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI......). Based on the histology of the tumor biopsy, 14 patients had hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 9 patients had focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), and 10 patients had other types of hepatic tumors. Tumor uptake was evaluated by calculating the maximum and mean standardized uptake value and tumor-to-liver ratio....... RESULTS: Altogether, 120 hepatic lesions (59 HCC, 18 FNH, 30 metastases of different primaries, 9 adenomas, and 4 regenerating nodules of liver cirrhosis) were detected by MRI. The overall tumor detection rate was slightly higher for [11C]MTO (39%) than for [11C]ACE (33%). [11C]ACE was more sensitive...

  16. Speech processing system demonstrated by positron emission tomography (PET). A review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Shigeru; Naito, Yasushi; Kojima, Hisayoshi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    We review the literature on speech processing in the central nervous system as demonstrated by positron emission tomography (PET). Activation study using PET has been proved to be a useful and non-invasive method of investigating the speech processing system in normal subjects. In speech recognition, the auditory association areas and lexico-semantic areas called Wernicke`s area play important roles. Broca`s area, motor areas, supplementary motor cortices and the prefrontal area have been proved to be related to speech output. Visual speech stimulation activates not only the visual association areas but also the temporal region and prefrontal area, especially in lexico-semantic processing. Higher level speech processing, such as conversation which includes auditory processing, vocalization and thinking, activates broad areas in both hemispheres. This paper also discusses problems to be resolved in the future. (author) 42 refs.

  17. Estimation of intersubject variability of cerebral blood flow measurements using MRI and positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto Mølby; Larsson, Henrik B W; Hansen, Adam E;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the within and between subject variability of quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements in normal subjects using various MRI techniques and positron emission tomography (PET). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Repeated CBF measurements were performed in 17 healthy, young...... subjects using three different MRI techniques: arterial spin labeling (ASL), dynamic contrast enhanced T1 weighted perfusion MRI (DCE) and phase contrast mapping (PCM). All MRI measurements were performed within the same session. In 10 of the subjects repeated CBF measurements by (15) O labeled water PET......L/100 g/min, 16.2% and 4.8%, for DCE 43.0 mL/100 g/min, 20.0%, 15.1% and for PET 41.9 mL/100 g/min, 16.5% and 11.9%, respectively. Only for DCE and PCM a significant positive correlation between measurements was demonstrated. CONCLUSION: These findings confirm large between subject variability in CBF...

  18. Injectable silver nanosensors: in vivo dosimetry for external beam radiotherapy using positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Nymark; Rydhög, J. S.; Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki;

    2016-01-01

    Development of safe and efficient radiotherapy routines requires quantification of the delivered absorbed dose to the cancer tissue in individual patients. In vivo dosimetry can provide accurate information about the absorbed dose delivered during treatment. In the current study, a novel silver......-nanosensor formulation based on poly(vinylpyrrolidinone)-coated silver nanoparticles formulated in a gelation matrix composed of sucrose acetate isobutyrate has been developed for use as an in vivo dosimeter for external beam radiotherapy. In situ photonuclear reactions trigger the formation of radioactive (106)Ag......, which enables post treatment verification of the delivered dose using positron emission tomography imaging. The silver-nanosensor was investigated in a tissue equivalent thorax phantom using clinical settings and workflow for both standard fractionated radiotherapy (2 Gy) and stereotactic radiotherapy...

  19. High power laser production of short-lived isotopes for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledingham, K W D [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); McKenna, P [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); McCanny, T [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Shimizu, S [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Yang, J M [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Robson, L [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Zweit, J [CR-UK/UMIST Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Gillies, J M [CR-UK/UMIST Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Bailey, J [CR-UK/UMIST Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Chimon, G N [CR-UK/UMIST Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Clarke, R J [Central Laser Facility, CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX110QX (United Kingdom); Neely, D [Central Laser Facility, CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX110QX (United Kingdom); Norreys, P A [Central Laser Facility, CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX110QX (United Kingdom); Collier, J L [Central Laser Facility, CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX110QX (United Kingdom); Singhal, R P [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Wei, M S [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2004-08-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful diagnostic/imaging technique requiring the production of the short-lived positron emitting isotopes {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N, {sup 15}O and {sup 18}F by proton irradiation of natural/enriched targets using cyclotrons. The development of PET has been hampered due to the size and shielding requirements of nuclear installations. Recent results show that when an intense laser beam interacts with solid targets, megaelectronvolt (MeV) protons capable of producing PET isotopes are generated. This report describes how to generate intense PET sources of {sup 11}C and {sup 18}F using a petawatt laser beam. The work describing the laser production of {sup 18}F through a (p,n) {sup 18}O reaction, and the subsequent synthesis of 2-[{sup 18}F] is reported for the first time. The potential for developing compact laser technology for this purpose is discussed.

  20. Refraction-compensated motion tracking of unrestrained small animals in positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyme, Andre; Meikle, Steven; Baldock, Clive; Fulton, Roger

    2012-08-01

    Motion-compensated radiotracer imaging of fully conscious rodents represents an important paradigm shift for preclinical investigations. In such studies, if motion tracking is performed through a transparent enclosure containing the awake animal, light refraction at the interface will introduce errors in stereo pose estimation. We have performed a thorough investigation of how this impacts the accuracy of pose estimates and the resulting motion correction, and developed an efficient method to predict and correct for refraction-based error. The refraction model underlying this study was validated using a state-of-the-art motion tracking system. Refraction-based error was shown to be dependent on tracking marker size, working distance, and interface thickness and tilt. Correcting for refraction error improved the spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy of motion-corrected positron emission tomography images. Since the methods are general, they may also be useful in other contexts where data are corrupted by refraction effects.

  1. Florbetapir (18F) for brain amyloid positron emission tomography: highlights on the European marketing approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Blanco, Anabel; Prieto-Yerro, Concha; Martinez-Lazaro, Raul; Zamora, Javier; Jiménez-Huete, Adolfo; Haberkamp, Marion; Pohly, Johannes; Enzmann, Harald; Zinserling, Jörg; Strassmann, Valerie; Broich, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Florbetapir (18F) for brain amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been recently approved in Europe to estimate β-amyloid neuritic plaque density in the brain when the subject is still alive. Such density is one of the key issues for the definitive diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) at autopsy. This capability of florbetapir (18F) is regarded as a significant improvement in the diagnostic procedures for adult patients with cognitive impairment who are being evaluated for AD and other causes of cognitive impairment. The current paper highlights the specific characteristics of the European marketing authorization of florbetapir (18F). Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Design And Development Of A Mammary And Axillary Region Positron Emission Tomography System (maxpet)

    CERN Document Server

    Doshi, N K

    2000-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women. Currently, mammography and physical breast examination, both non-invasive techniques, provide the two most effective methods available for screening potential breast cancer patients. During the management of patients, however, several invasive techniques such as axillary lymph node dissection, core biopsies and lumpectomies, are utilized to determine the stage or malignancy of the disease with significant cost and morbidity associated with them. Positron Emission Tomography (PET), using [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tracer is a sensitive and non-invasive imaging modality that may be a cost-effective alternative to certain invasive procedures. In this project we have developed a low cost, high performance, dedicated PET camera (maxPET) for mammary and axillary region imaging. The system consists of two 15x15 cm2 planar scintillation detector arrays composed of modular detectors operating in coincidence. The modular detectors are comprised of...

  3. Characterization of Silicon Photomultiplier Readout Designs for Use in Positron Emission Tomography Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Yi

    Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes, or silicon photomultipliers, are promising light sensors for the next generation Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners. The sensor is being used in the scanner's gamma ray detector to measure scintillation light. This thesis describes the test results of three gamma ray detectors that utilize silicon photomultipliers. The first one is a commercial detector, and the other two are custom made. The detectors are tested for their 511 keV photon energy and timing resolution, as well as their ability to measure light from small scintillator crystals. The two custom made detectors had smaller active area, but outperformed the commercial detector in energy resolution. The introduction of buffer amplifiers improved the timing resolution of one detector. All three detectors had their crystal decoding ability limited by signal multiplexing and the sensor's dark noise. Finally, a detector design was proposed for the PET system being developed in our group.

  4. Measuring endogenous 5-HT release by emission tomography: promises and pitfalls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paterson, Louise M; Tyacke, Robin J; Nutt, David J;

    2010-01-01

    emission tomography, but has not yet been adequately extended to other neurotransmitter systems. This review focuses on how the technique has been applied to the study of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) system. The principles behind visualising fluctuations in neurotransmitters are introduced......, with reference to the dopaminergic system. Studies that aim to image acute, endogenous 5-HT release or depletion at 5-HT receptor targets are summarised, with particular attention to studies in humans. Radiotracers targeting the 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A), and 5-HT(4) receptors and the serotonin reuptake transporter...... have been explored for their sensitivity to 5-HT fluctuations, but with mixed outcomes; tracers for these targets cannot reliably image endogenous 5-HT in humans. Shortcomings in our basic knowledge of the mechanisms underlying changes in binding potential are addressed, and suggestions are made...

  5. Hemodynamic and metabolic studies in patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus using positron-emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, Akihiko; Taketomo, Shigenobu (Saiseikai Kyoto-fu Hospital, Nagaokakyo (Japan)); Tenjin, Hiroshi; Imahori, Yoshio; Mizukawa, Norihiko; Hirakawa, Kimiyoshi; Nakahashi, Hisamitsu

    1989-02-01

    The cerebral blood flow (CBF), the oxygen-extraction fraction (OEF), and the metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO/sub 2/) were measured in 5 cases with normal-pressure hydrocephalus by means of positron emission tomography (PET). The regions of interest (ROI) were set over the entire cortex and in the periventricular white matter on CT images. Preoperative PET studies revealed an overall reduction in the cortical CBF and the cortical CMRO/sub 2/. However, these values were found to be reduced most remarkably in the frontal lobes. A reduction in the CBF with an elevation of the OEF was demonstrated in the periventricular white matter. No definitive correlation could be found between the preoperative PET findings and the clinical improvement after shunting. (author).

  6. Initial characterization of a position-sensitive photodiode/BGO detector for PET (positron emission tomography)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.; Jackson, H.G.; Turko, B.T.; Cahoon, J.L.; Geyer, A.B.; Vuletich, T.

    1988-11-01

    We present initial results of a position-sensitive photodiode/BGO detector for high resolution, multi-layer positron emission tomography (PET). Position sensitivity is achieved by dividing the 3 mm /times/ 20 mm rectangular photosensitive area along the diagonal to form two triangular segments. Each segment was individually connected to a low-noise amplifier. The photodiodes and crystals were cooled to /minus/100/degree/C to reduce dark current and increase the BGO signal. With an amplifier peaking time of 17 ..mu..sec, the sum of the signals (511 keV photopeak) was 3200 electrons with a full width at half maximum (fwhm) of 750 electrons. The ratio of one signal to the sum determined the depth of interaction with a resolution of 11 mm fwhm. 27 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Hypoxia imaging using Positron Emission Tomography in non-small cell lung cancer: implications for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Wiegman, Erwin M; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J M; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2012-12-01

    Tumour hypoxia is an important contributor to radioresistance. Thus, increasing the radiation dose to hypoxic areas may result in improved locoregional tumour control. However, this strategy requires accurate detection of the hypoxic sub-volume using PET imaging. Secondly, hypoxia imaging may also provide prognostic information and may be of help to monitor treatment response. Therefore, a systematic review of the scientific literature was carried out on the use of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) to image Tumour hypoxia in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). More specifically, the purpose of this review was (1) to summarize the different hypoxia tracers used, (2) to investigate whether Tumour hypoxia can be detected in NSCLC and finally (3) whether the presence of hypoxia can be used to predict outcome.

  8. In vivo neurochemistry with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sole, Angelo; Gambini, Anna; Falini, Andrea; Lecchi, Michela; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2002-10-01

    The assessment of neurochemical processes in vivo has received much attention in the past decade as techniques such as positron or single photon emission tomography (PET and SPET), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become more available. With PET and SPET, basic processes, such as blood flow and oxygen or glucose metabolism, can be regionally assessed, along with more specific functions such as the production, release, and reuptake of neurotransmitters and their occupancy of specific receptors. At the same time, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate compounds in the brain. All these methods have been extensively applied for research in neurology, and some applications have reached the clinical level, namely for the study of degenerative diseases, motor-neuron diseases, movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, and epilepsy. This article focuses on the most relevant information that can be obtained with these complementary techniques to help clinicians in the assessment of neurological diseases.

  9. In vivo neurochemistry with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sole, Angelo Del [Azienda Ospedaliera San Paolo e Universita di Milano, 20142 Milan (Italy); Gambini, Anna; Falini, Andrea [IRCCS H San Raffaele e Universita Vita e Salute, 20132 Milan (Italy); Lecchi, Michela [Azienda Ospedaliera L. Sacco e Universita di Milano, 20157 Milan (Italy); Lucignani, Giovanni [Azienda Ospedaliera L. Sacco e Universita di Milano, 20157 Milan (Italy); Universita di Milano, Istituto di Scienze Radiologiche, Cattedra di Medicina Nucleare c/o Ospedale L. Sacco, Via G.B. Grassi, 74, 20157 Milan (Italy)

    2002-10-01

    The assessment of neurochemical processes in vivo has received much attention in the past decade as techniques such as positron or single photon emission tomography (PET and SPET), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become more available. With PET and SPET, basic processes, such as blood flow and oxygen or glucose metabolism, can be regionally assessed, along with more specific functions such as the production, release, and reuptake of neurotransmitters and their occupancy of specific receptors. At the same time, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate compounds in the brain. All these methods have been extensively applied for research in neurology, and some applications have reached the clinical level, namely for the study of degenerative diseases, motor-neuron diseases, movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, and epilepsy. This article focuses on the most relevant information that can be obtained with these complementary techniques to help clinicians in the assessment of neurological diseases. (orig.)

  10. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) in detecting neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, N C; Hellman, R S; Tikofsky, R S; Prost, R W; Mark, L P; Elejalde, B R; Lebel, R; Hamsher, K S; Swanson, S; Benezra, E E

    2002-01-01

    Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies were performed on 34 manifest Huntington's disease (HD) patients at various stages of clinical pathology ranging from early chorea to late dystonia with or without signs of dementia and 12 pre-symptomatic patients with abnormal terminal CAG expansions. Thirty HD patients with obvious clinical signs and seven pre-symptomatic patients without signs or symptoms of HD displayed selective caudate hypoperfusion by direct visual inspection. Such qualitative, selective striatal hypoperfusion patterns can be indicative of early and persistent metabolic changes in striatal neuropathology. SPECT studies can be useful in documenting early pre-clinical changes in patients with abnormal terminal CAG expansions and in confirming the presence of caudate pathology in patients with clinical signs of HD.

  11. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography predicts survival of patients with neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Tina; Knigge, Ulrich; Jakobsen, Annika Loft;

    2010-01-01

    -eight prospectively enrolled patients with NE tumors underwent FDG-PET imaging. FDG uptake was quantified by maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax). The prognostic value of FDG uptake, proliferation index, chromogranin A, and liver metastases were assessed. RESULTS: During the 1-year follow-up, 14 patients died......PURPOSE: (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is currently not used on a routine basis for imaging of neuroendocrine (NE) tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of FDG-PET in patients with NE tumors. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Ninety...... was the only predictor of progression-free survival (HR, 8.4; P value of FDG-PET for NE tumors, which exceeds the prognostic value of traditional markers such as Ki67, chromogranin A, and liver metastases. FDG-PET may obtain an important role for NE...

  12. Hot water epilepsy: Phenotype and single photon emission computed tomography observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehul Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the anatomical correlates of reflex hot water epilepsy (HWE using multimodality investigations viz. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, electroencephalography (EEG, and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. Five men (mean age: 27.0 ΁ 5.8 years with HWE were subjected to MRI of brain, video-EEG studies, and SPECT scan. These were correlated with phenotypic presentations. Seizures could be precipitated in three patients with pouring of hot water over the head and semiology of seizures was suggestive of temporal lobe epilepsy. Ictal SPECT showed hyperperfusion in: left medial temporal - one, left lateral temporal - one, and right parietal - one. Interictal SPECT was normal in all five patients and did not help in localization. MRI and interictal EEG was normal in all the patients. The clinical and SPECT studies suggested temporal lobe as the seizure onset zone in some of the patients with HWE.

  13. Recommendations for measurement of tumour vascularity with positron emission tomography in early phase clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboagye, Eric O.; Kenny, Laura M.; Myers, Melvyn [Imperial College London, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Gilbert, Fiona J. [University of Cambridge, Radiology Department, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Fleming, Ian N. [University of Aberdeen, NCRI PET Research Network, Aberdeen Bioimaging Centre, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Beer, Ambros J. [Technische Universitaet Munchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Cunningham, Vincent J. [University of Aberdeen, Institute of Medical Sciences, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Marsden, Paul K. [St. Thomas' Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences, PET Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom); Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM National Institute of Health and Clinical Sciences LaTIM, CHU Morvan, Brest (France); Gee, Antony D. [St. Thomas' Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences, The Rayne Institute, London (United Kingdom); Groves, Ashley M. [University College London, University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Cook, Gary J. [St. Thomas' Hospital, KCL Division of Imaging, Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, PET Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom); Kinahan, Paul E. [University of Washington, 222 Old Fisheries Center (FIS), Box 357987, Seattle, WA (United States); Clarke, Larry [Cancer Imaging Program, Imaging Technology Development Branch, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The evaluation of drug pharmacodynamics and early tumour response are integral to current clinical trials of novel cancer therapeutics to explain or predict long term clinical benefit or to confirm dose selection. Tumour vascularity assessment by positron emission tomography could be viewed as a generic pharmacodynamic endpoint or tool for monitoring response to treatment. This review discusses methods for semi-quantitative and quantitative assessment of tumour vascularity. The radioligands and radiotracers range from direct physiological functional tracers like [{sup 15}O]-water to macromolecular probes targeting integrin receptors expressed on neovasculature. Finally we make recommendations on ways to incorporate such measurements of tumour vascularity into early clinical trials of novel therapeutics. (orig.)

  14. [(18) F]AV-1451 tau positron emission tomography in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Jennifer L; Lowe, Val J; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Weigand, Stephen D; Senjem, Matthew L; Schwarz, Christopher G; Spychalla, Anthony J; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford R; Josephs, Keith A

    2017-01-01

    The [(18) F]AV-1451 positron emission tomography ligand allows the in vivo assessment of tau proteins in the brain. It shows strong binding in Alzheimer's dementia, but little is known about how it performs in progressive supranuclear palsy, a primary 4R tauopathy. The objectives of this study were to determine whether [(18) F]AV-1451 uptake can be observed in progressive supranuclear palsy and to characterize the regional distribution when compared with controls and Alzheimer's dementia. [(18) F]AV-1451 positron emission tomography was performed in 10 patients with probable progressive supranuclear palsy. These patients were age- and gender-matched to 50 controls and 10 Alzheimer's dementia patients who had undergone identical [(18) F]AV-1451 imaging. Regional comparisons of [(18) F]AV-1451 uptake were performed across the whole brain using region-of-interest and voxel-level analyses, and correlations between regional [(18) F]AV-1451 and the progressive supranuclear palsy rating scale were assessed. An elevated [(18) F]AV-1451 signal was observed in progressive supranuclear palsy when compared with controls in the pallidum, midbrain, dentate nucleus of the cerebellum, thalamus, caudate nucleus, and frontal regions. Signal in the cerebellar dentate and pallidum were also greater in progressive supranuclear palsy when compared with Alzheimer's dementia. Conversely, the [(18) F]AV-1451 signal across the cortex was higher in Alzheimer's dementia when compared with progressive supranuclear palsy. The [(18) F]AV-1451 signal in a number of regions correlated with the progressive supranuclear palsy rating scale. Progressive supranuclear palsy is associated with an elevated [(18) F]AV-1451 signal in a characteristic and distinct regional pattern that correlates with disease severity and differs from the patterns observed in Alzheimer's dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Positron emission tomography in pebble beds. Part 1: Liquid particle deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, T., E-mail: t.barth@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics (IFD), Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Ludwig, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics (IFD), Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Kulenkampff, J.; Gründig, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Franke, K. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmacy (IRP), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Lippmann-Pipke, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Hampel, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics (IFD), Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, AREVA Endowed Chair of Imaging Techniques in Energy and Process Engineering, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Particle deposition in a pebble bed was recorded by positron emission tomography. • The particles were radioactively labelled and their spatial distribution was recorded. • Particle deposition was mainly driven by particle inertia and turbulent dispersion. • Particle deposits form hot spots on the upstream face of the single pebbles. - Abstract: Accidental scenarios such as the depressurisation of the primary circuit of high temperature gas cooled pebble bed reactors may lead to the release of fission products via the discharge of radioactive graphite dust. For a detailed source term assessment in such accident scenarios knowledge of the flow mechanics of dust transport in complex coolant circuit components, like pebble beds, recuperator structures and pipe systems is necessary. In this article an experimental study of aerosol deposition in a pebble bed is described. We investigated the deposition of radiolabelled liquid aerosol particles in a scaled pebble bed in an air-driven small-scale aerosol flow test facility under isothermal ambient conditions. The aerosol particles were generated by means of a condensational aerosol generator with potassium-fluoride (KF) condensation nuclei. Particle concentration measurements upstream and downstream of the pebble bed were performed by isokinetic sampling and particle counting. The results agree with typical deposition curves for turbulent and inertia driven particle deposition. Furthermore, positron emission tomography (PET) was performed to visualize and measure particle deposition distributions in the pebble bed. Results of a selected deposition experiment with moderately large particles (d{sub aero} = 3.5 μm, Re{sup ′}{sub pb}=2200) show that the deposited particles are located in the vicinity of the upstream stagnation points of the pebbles. These findings support the thesis that inertia driven particle deposition is predominating.

  16. Predicting Outcome in Patients with Rhabdomyosarcoma: Role of [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Dana L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Fox, Josef J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Dharmarajan, Kavita V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Schoder, Heiko [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Price, Alison N. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Surgery, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) response of the primary tumor after induction chemotherapy predicts outcomes in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: After excluding those with initial tumor resection, 107 patients who underwent FDG-PET after induction chemotherapy at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from 2002 to 2013 were reviewed. Local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to FDG-PET response and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) at baseline (PET1/SUV1), after induction chemotherapy (PET2/SUV2), and after local therapy (PET3/SUV3). Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to determine the optimal cutoff for dichotomization of SUV1 and SUV2 values. Results: The SUV1 (<9.5 vs ≥9.5) was predictive of PFS (P=.02) and OS (P=.02), but not LC. After 12 weeks (median) of induction chemotherapy, 45 patients had negative PET2 scans and 62 had positive scans: 3-year PFS was 72% versus 44%, respectively (P=.01). The SUV2 (<1.5 vs ≥1.5) was similarly predictive of PFS (P=.005) and was associated with LC (P=.02) and OS (P=.03). A positive PET3 scan was predictive of worse PFS (P=.0009), LC (P=.05), and OS (P=.03). Conclusions: [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is an early indicator of outcomes in patients with RMS. Future prospective trials may incorporate FDG-PET response data for risk-adapted therapy and early assessment of new treatment regimens.

  17. Attenuation correction in pulmonary and myocardial single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almquist, H

    2000-01-01

    The objective was to develop and validate methods for single photon emission computed tomography, SPECT, allowing quantitative physiologic and diagnostic studies of lung and heart. A method for correction of variable attenuation in SPECT, based on transmission measurements before administration of an isotope to the subject, was developed and evaluated. A protocol based upon geometrically well defined phantoms was developed. In a mosaic pattern phantom count rates were corrected from 39-43% to 101-110% of reference. In healthy subjects non-gravitational pulmonary perfusion gradients observed without attenuation correctionwere artefacts caused by attenuation. Pulmonary density in centre of right lung, obtained from the transmission measurement, was 0.28 {+-} 0.03 g/ml in normal subjects. Mean density was lower in large lungs compared to smaller ones. We also showed that regional ventilation/perfusion ratios could be measured with SPECT, using the readily available tracer {sup 133}Xe. Because of the low energy of {sup 133}Xe this relies heavily upon attenuation correction. A commercially available system for attenuation correction with simultaneous emission and transmission, considered to improve myocardial SPECT, performed erroneously. This could lead to clinical misjudgement. We considered that manufacturer-independent pre-clinical tests are required. In a test of two other commercial systems, based on different principles, an adapted variant of our initial protocol was proven useful. Only one of the systems provided correct emission count rates independently on phantom configuration. Errors in the other system were related to inadequate compensation of the influence of emission activity on the transmission study.

  18. Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Henry; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2016-05-31

    In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted.

  19. Regional myocardial oxygen consumption estimated by carbon-11 acetate and positron emission tomography before and after repetitive ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, K F; Hansen, P R; Holm, S

    2011-01-01

    Preserved myocardial oxygen consumption estimated by carbon 11-acetate and positron emission tomography (PET) in myocardial regions with chronic but reversibly depressed contractile function in patients with ischemic heart disease have been suggested to be caused by repeated short episodes of acu...

  20. 76 FR 54473 - Guidance on Positron Emission Tomography Drug Applications-Content and Format for New Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 6143), and Docket No. FDA- 2000-D-1542 was open for comments until April 4, 2011. The... Emission Tomography Drug Products,'' issued on March 10, 2000 (65 FR 13010). The February 3, 2011, revised...-- Content and Format for New Drug Applications and Abbreviated New Drug Applications; Availability AGENCY...

  1. Textural features of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scanning in diagnosing aortic prosthetic graft infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saleem, Ben R; Beukinga, Roelof J.; Boellaard, Ronald; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Reijnen, Michel M P J; Zeebregts, Clark J; Slart, Riemer H J A

    BACKGROUND: The clinical problem in suspected aortoiliac graft infection (AGI) is to obtain proof of infection. Although (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography scanning (PET) has been suggested to play a pivotal role, an evidence-based interpretation is lacking. The

  2. Better yield of (18)fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma during thyrotropin stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tol, KM; Jager, PL; Piers, DA; Pruim, J; de Vries, EGE; Dullaart, RPF; Links, TP

    2002-01-01

    To determine whether (18)fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for the detection of recurrences or metastases of differentiated thyroid carcinoma should be performed during thyrotropin (TSH) suppression or TSH stimulation, eight patients were studied sequentially. After the secon

  3. Regional myocardial oxygen consumption estimated by carbon-11 acetate and positron emission tomography before and after repetitive ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, K F; Hansen, P R; Holm, S

    2011-01-01

    Preserved myocardial oxygen consumption estimated by carbon 11-acetate and positron emission tomography (PET) in myocardial regions with chronic but reversibly depressed contractile function in patients with ischemic heart disease have been suggested to be caused by repeated short episodes of acute...

  4. Serotonin transporter in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder--preliminary results from a positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Linnea; Tuominen, Lauri; Huotarinen, Antti; Leppämäki, Sami; Sihvola, Elina; Helin, Semi; Sipilä, Maria; Tani, Pekka; Hirvonen, Jussi; Hietala, Jarmo; Karlsson, Hasse

    2013-05-30

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients has not been explored by earlier positron emission tomography (PET) studies. We measured SERT availability in female ADHD patients (n=8) and healthy controls (n=14) with PET and [11C]MADAM as a tracer. No significant group differences in [11C]MADAM binding potential were noted.

  5. MeV-range velocity-space tomography from gamma-ray and neutron emission spectrometry measurements at JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Nocente, M.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of a 2D MeV-range ion velocity distribution function by velocity-space tomography at JET. Deuterium ions were accelerated into the MeV-range by third harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating. We made measurements with three neutron emission spectrometers and a high-...

  6. Few-view single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction based on a blurred piecewise constant object model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, Paul A.; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Schmidt, Taly G.

    2013-01-01

    A sparsity-exploiting algorithm intended for few-view Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) reconstruction is proposed and characterized. The algorithm models the object as piecewise constant subject to a blurring operation. To validate that the algorithm closely approximates the true...

  7. Lhermitte-Duclos disease presenting with positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance fusion imaging: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calabria Ferdinando

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lhermitte-Duclos disease or dysplastic gangliocytoma of the cerebellum is an extremely rare tumor. It is a slowly enlarging mass within the cerebellar cortex. The majority of cases are diagnosed in the third or fourth decade of life. Case presentation We report the case of a 37-year-old Caucasian woman who underwent positron emission tomography-computed tomography with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose for evaluation of a solitary lung node. No pathological uptake was detected in the solitary lung node but the positron emission tomography-computed tomography of her brain showed intense tracer uptake, suggestive of a malignant neoplasm, in a mass in her left cerebellar lobe. Our patient had experienced two years of occipital headache and movement disorder. Subsequently, magnetic resonance imaging was performed with contrast agent administration, showing a large subtentorial mass in her left cerebellar hemisphere, with compression and dislocation of the fourth ventricle. Metabolic data provided by positron emission tomography and morphological magnetic resonance imaging views were fused in post-processing, allowing a diagnosis of dysplastic gangliocytoma with increased glucose metabolism. Total resection of the tumor was performed and histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of Lhermitte-Duclos disease. Conclusions Our case indicates that increased uptake of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose may be misinterpreted as a neoplastic process in the evaluation of patients with Lhermitte-Duclos disease, but supports the usefulness of integrated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging in the exact pathophysiologic explanation of this disease and in making the correct diagnosis. However, an accurate physical examination and exact knowledge of clinical data is of the utmost importance.

  8. Graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated particle filter framework for positron emission tomography image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengchao; Liu, Huafeng; Hu, Zhenghui; Shi, Pengcheng

    2012-04-01

    As a consequence of the random nature of photon emissions and detections, the data collected by a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging system can be shown to be Poisson distributed. Meanwhile, there have been considerable efforts within the tracer kinetic modeling communities aimed at establishing the relationship between the PET data and physiological parameters that affect the uptake and metabolism of the tracer. Both statistical and physiological models are important to PET reconstruction. The majority of previous efforts are based on simplified, nonphysical mathematical expression, such as Poisson modeling of the measured data, which is, on the whole, completed without consideration of the underlying physiology. In this paper, we proposed a graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated reconstruction strategy that can take both statistical model and physiological model into consideration with the aid of state-space evolution equations. The proposed strategy formulates the organ activity distribution through tracer kinetics models and the photon-counting measurements through observation equations, thus making it possible to unify these two constraints into a general framework. In order to accelerate reconstruction, GPU-based parallel computing is introduced. Experiments of Zubal-thorax-phantom data, Monte Carlo simulated phantom data, and real phantom data show the power of the method. Furthermore, thanks to the computing power of the GPU, the reconstruction time is practical for clinical application.

  9. An automatic classification technique for attenuation correction in positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettinardi, V.; Pagani, E.; Gilardi, M.C.; Landoni, C.; Riddell, C.; Rizzo, G.; Castiglioni, I.; Belluzzo, D.; Lucignani, G.; Fazio, F. [INB-CNR, Scientific Inst. H San Raffaele, Univ. of Milan (Italy); Schubert, S. [GE Medical System, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1999-05-01

    In this paper a clustering technique is proposed for attenuation correction (AC) in positron emission tomography (PET). The method is unsupervised and adaptive with respect to counting statistics in the transmission (TR) images. The technique allows the classification of pre- or post-injection TR images into main tissue components in terms of attenuation coefficients. The classified TR images are then forward projected to generate new TR sinograms to be used for AC in the reconstruction of the corresponding emission (EM) data. The technique has been tested on phantoms and clinical data of brain, heart and whole-body PET studies. The method allows: (a) reduction of noise propagation from TR into EM images, (b) reduction of TR scanning to a few minutes (3 min) with maintenance of the quantitative accuracy (within 6%) of longer acquisition scans (15-20 min), (c) reduction of the radiation dose to the patient, (d) performance of quantitative whole-body studies. (orig.) With 8 figs., 4 tabs., 25 refs.

  10. Sensitivity estimation in time-of-flight list-mode positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J. L. [Madrid-MIT M+Visión Consortium, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 and Grupo de Física Nuclear, Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, CEI Moncloa, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Sitek, A., E-mail: sarkadiu@gmail.com [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: An accurate quantification of the images in positron emission tomography (PET) requires knowing the actual sensitivity at each voxel, which represents the probability that a positron emitted in that voxel is finally detected as a coincidence of two gamma rays in a pair of detectors in the PET scanner. This sensitivity depends on the characteristics of the acquisition, as it is affected by the attenuation of the annihilation gamma rays in the body, and possible variations of the sensitivity of the scanner detectors. In this work, the authors propose a new approach to handle time-of-flight (TOF) list-mode PET data, which allows performing either or both, a self-attenuation correction, and self-normalization correction based on emission data only. Methods: The authors derive the theory using a fully Bayesian statistical model of complete data. The authors perform an initial evaluation of algorithms derived from that theory and proposed in this work using numerical 2D list-mode simulations with different TOF resolutions and total number of detected coincidences. Effects of randoms and scatter are not simulated. Results: The authors found that proposed algorithms successfully correct for unknown attenuation and scanner normalization for simulated 2D list-mode TOF-PET data. Conclusions: A new method is presented that can be used for corrections for attenuation and normalization (sensitivity) using TOF list-mode data.

  11. Evaluation of non-uniform attenuation correction using simultaneous transmission and emission computed tomography. Basic analysis with myocardial phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otake, Hidenori; Yukihiro, Masashi; Fukushima, Yumi [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Simultaneous transmission emission protocol (STEP), developed for the non-uniform attenuation correction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was evaluated using the cardiac phantom prepared with and without a myocardial wall defect. Emission computed tomography (ECT) of the cardiac phantom using {sup 201}Tl was acquired. Transmission data (TCT) were taken using a line source of {sup 99m}Tc. Myocardial images with STEP method were superior in the homogeneity of intramyocardial radioactivity and spatial resolution to the conventional SPECT images. This is an excellent method because of the accurate matching position between TCT and ECT images and shortening the examination time by simultaneous data acquisition. It would be clinically useful for diagnosing various myocardial diseases. (author).

  12. [Evaluation of non-uniform attenuation correction using simultaneous transmission and emission computed tomography--basic analysis with myocardial phantom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otake, H; Yukihiro, M; Fukushima, Y; Imai, T; Hosono, K; Hatori, N; Watanabe, N; Hirano, T; Inoue, T; Takahashi, M; Ban, R; Endo, K

    1996-03-01

    Simultaneous transmission emission protocol (STEP), developed for the non-uniform attenuation correction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was evaluated using the cardiac phantom prepared with and without a myocardial wall defect. Emission computed tomography (ECT) of the cardiac phantom using 201Tl was acquired. Transmission data (TCT) were taken using a line source of 99mTc. Myocardial images with STEP method were superior in the homogeneity of intramyocardial radioactivity and spatial resolution to the conventional SPECT images. This is an excellent method because of the accurate matching position between TCT and ECT images and shortening the examination time by simultaneous data acquisition. It would be clinically useful for diagnosing various myocardial diseases.

  13. Isolated thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis discovered on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turpin, Sophie [CHU Sainte-Justine, Nuclear Medicine, Montreal (Canada); Carret, Anne-Sophie [CHU Sainte-Justine, Hemato-Oncology, Montreal (Canada); Dubois, Josee [CHU Sainte-Justine, Radiology, Montreal (Canada); Buteau, Chantal [CHU Sainte-Justine, Infectious Diseases, Montreal (Canada); Patey, Natalie [CHU Sainte-Justine, Pathology, Montreal (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    The thymic infiltration in young patients with multisystemic Langerhans cell histiocytosis and its radiologic features are well known. However, isolated thymic disease has seldom been reported in the literature. We report the case of a 10-month-old child admitted for fever of unknown origin. Whole-body F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) was performed to identify a focus of infection. It demonstrated an unusual aspect of the thymus, which led to further investigation and revealed isolated infiltration of the thymus by Langerhans cell histiocytosis. The patient was treated accordingly and is now disease free. As evaluation of Langerhans cell histiocytosis patients with F-18 FDG PET/CT is becoming more frequent, it is important to be aware of the scintigraphical characteristics of thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis. (orig.)

  14. Hypermetabolic Calcified Lymph Nodes on 18Fludeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in a Case of Treated Ovarian Cancer Recurrence: Residual Disease or Benign Formation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Nikaki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT with 18F-fludeoxyglucose (FDG in evaluating ovarian cancer recurrence even after a prolonged disease-free interval, and in therapy response is well-described. Calcifications observed in CT, although usually attributed to benign conditions, may actually represent active disease. Such an example of calcified formations is psammoma bodies. We present a case of 56-y. o. patient with ovarian cancer relapse at the supraclavicular area 18 years after complete response and disease-free interval. The patient received chemotherapy and underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of treatment response. Both CT corrected and uncorrected PET images showed hypermetabolism in the massively calcified lymph nodes in the neck, mediastinum, axilla and abdomen, indicative of active residual disease

  15. Gallium-68 DOTA-TATE Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography: Scintigraphic Changes of Adrenal Glands Following Management of Ectopic Cushing's Syndrome by Steroidogenesis Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Aziz, Shaikh Irfan; Ravi Kumar, Aravind S

    2014-09-01

    In the era of emerging functional imaging techniques, an understanding of the effects of hormonal therapies on the scintigraphic appearance of endocrine organs is desirable to minimize the erroneous scan interpretation. The mechanisms by which changes in the scintigraphic appearance of endocrine organs occur however sometimes remain ambiguous. This case demonstrates the gallium-68 (Ga-68) DOTA-TATE positron emission tomography/computed tomography (CT) appearance of adrenal glands following management with steroidogenesis inhibitors. The potential mechanisms underlying this change are discussed. A 17-year-old boy with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) dependent Cushing's syndrome secondary to ectopic ACTH secretion underwent pre- and post-metyrapone and dexamethasone treatment Ga-68 DOTA-TATE scans 4 months apart. Pretreatment, both adrenals demonstrated normal symmetrical prominent Ga-68 DOTA-TATE uptake and normal CT appearance. The posttherapy scan revealed marked symmetrical suppression of Ga-68 DOTA-TATE uptake, but with bilateral adrenal hypertrophy on CT.

  16. Extrapulmonary Small Cell Carcinoma of the Seminal Vesicles and Prostate Demonstrated on 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizipour, Amir Iravani; Shen, Lily; Mansberg, Robert; Chuong, Bui

    2016-02-01

    Extrapulmonary primary small cell carcinomas arising from the urogenital tract is infrequent. It can rarely arise from the prostate and even more rarely from the seminal vesicles. We present a 79-year-old male who was admitted due to acute renal failure with a history of radical radiotherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma 13 years ago. The prostate specific antigen level was not elevated. An abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan showed markedly enlarged seminal vesicles causing bilateral ureteral obstruction and a mildly enlarged prostate. Further evaluation with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/CT demonstrated extensive 18F-FDG uptake in the pelvis with diffuse involvement of both seminal vesicles and the prostate without pathologic uptake in the lungs or elsewhere in the body. Core biopsies of the prostate and both seminal vesicles revealed diffuse involvement by small cell carcinoma. Therapy could not be instituted due to a rapid deterioration in the patient's clinical condition.

  17. Infective endocarditis detected by 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a patient with occult infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Lu Yeh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrated 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT has been clinically used to detect infectious lesions. We present a case with pyrexia and bacteremia of unknown origin. Whole body FDG PET/CT was arranged to look for an occult source of infection and it revealed a focal lesion with increased FDG uptake in the mitral valve area. Under suspicion of infective endocarditis, transthoracic echocardiography was repeated and then the presence of linear vegetation over the calcified mitral annulus was confirmed. Ultimately, definite infective endocarditis was diagnosed according to the Duke criteria. The patient recovered after the antibiotic therapy. In our case, FDG PET/CT can help to localize the exact site of occult infection, thereby guiding additional testing and facilitating timely definitive diagnosis and therapy.

  18. Normal Positron Emission Tomography-Computerized Tomogram in a Patient with Apparent Mesenteric Panniculitis: Biopsy Is Still the Answer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli D. Ehrenpreis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mesenteric panniculitis (also known as sclerosing mesenteritis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the mesenteric connective tissue. It is known to have a wide spectrum of clinical and radiological presentations. In general, biopsy is recommended for diagnosis; however, a recent study proposed that a negative positron emission tomography- computerized tomography (PET-CT scan is accurate in differentiating benign and neoplastic mesenteric processes [Br J Radiol 2006;79:37–43]. The following case report questions the accuracy of PET-CT in this setting and confirms the requirement for biopsy to rule out the presence of mesenteric lymphoma.

  19. Two Cases of Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia with Prolonged Neurologic Symptoms and Brain Hypoperfusion on Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromitsu Ohta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral and cerebellar symptoms are frequently associated with Legionnaires’ disease. However, corresponding brain lesions are difficult to demonstrate using either computed tomography (CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We report here two patients with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia accompanied by prolonged neurologic symptoms. In contrast to brain CT and MRI, which failed to detect any abnormalities, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT showed multiple sites of hypoperfusion within the brains of both patients. These cases suggest that vasculopathy, which is detectable by SPECT, might be one of the causes of neurologic symptoms in patients with Legionnaires’ disease.

  20. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the initial staging of germ cell tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hain, S.F.; O' Doherty, M.J. [Clinical PET Centre, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospitals, London (United Kingdom); Timothy, A.R.; Leslie, M.D.; Partridge, S.E. [Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospitals, London (United Kingdom); Huddart, R.A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Royal Marsden, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2000-05-01

    Testicular cancer is a rare tumour with the potential for cure at diagnosis. It is important, however, to identify those patients with metastases at presentation so as to ensure that the optimum treatment strategy is employed. Many criteria have been used to try to place patients into high- or low-risk groups, with variable success. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has the potential to identify active disease and thereby influence further management. Here we report on a retrospective study of the use of FDG-PET in the detection of metastatic testicular carcinoma at diagnosis. Thirty-one patients [13 with seminoma and 18 with non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (13 teratomas, 5 mixed)] were staged by FDG-PET scanning. The imaging was performed using a Siemens ECAT 951 scanner. All results were assessed on the basis of histology or clinical follow-up. FDG-PET scan identified metastatic disease in ten and was negative in 16; there were no false-positives and five false-negatives. There were six patients in whom FDG-PET was negative and computed tomography was regarded as suspicious but follow-up was inconclusive. The positive predictive value was 100%. The negative predictive value was 76% or 91%, depending on whether the aforementioned six cases were regarded as true-negatives or false-negatives. It may be concluded that FDG-PET is capable of detecting metastatic disease at diagnosis that is not identified by other imaging techniques. These preliminary results are sufficient to suggest that a large prospective study should be performed to evaluate the role of FDG-PET in primary staging of disease. (orig.)

  1. Role of (18F) 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in upper gastrointestinal malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth C Smyth; Manish A Shah

    2011-01-01

    The role of whole-body FDG [(18F) 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose] positron emission tomography (PET) scanning as an imaging modality in the management of patients with malignancy has evolved enormously over the past two decades. FDG-PET has demonstrated significant efficacy in the staging, prognostication and detection of occult metastatic disease in malignancies of the gastrointestinal tract, in addition to assessment of the response to cytotoxic chemotherapy in a more timely manner than has traditionally been possible by more conventional imaging tools. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for the detection and staging of malignancy depend not only on the site and size of the primary tumor and metastases, but also on histological cell type, reflecting underlying disparities in glucose metabolism. The metabolic response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy or to chemo-radiotherapy in cancers of the gastro-esophageal junction or stomach has been demonstrated in several prospective studies to correlate significantly with both the histological tumor response to treatment and with consequent improvements in overall survival. This may offer a future paradigm of personalized treatment based on the PET response to chemotherapy. FDG-PET has been less successful in efforts to screen for and detect recurrent upper gastrointestinal malignancies, and in the detection of low volume metastatic peritoneal disease. Efforts to improve the accuracy of PET include the use of novel radiotracers such as (18F) FLT (3-deoxy-3-fluorothymidine) or 11C-choline, or fusion PET-CT with concurrent high-resolution computed tomography. This review focuses on the role of FDG-PET scanning in staging and response assessment in malignancies of the upper gastrointestinal tract, specifically gastric, esophageal and pancreas carcinoma.

  2. Safety of ventilation/perfusion single photon emission computed tomography for pulmonary embolism diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Palard, Xavier; Robin, Philippe; Abgral, Ronan; Querellou, Solene; Salaun, Pierre-Yves [Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Brest (France); Universite de Brest, Brest (France); CHRU de la Cavale Blanche, Service de medecine nucleaire, Brest (France); Delluc, Aurelien; Couturaud, Francis [Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Brest (France); Universite de Brest, Brest (France); CHRU de la Cavale Blanche, Departement de medecine interne et de pneumologie, Brest (France); Le Gal, Gregoire [Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, Brest (France); University of Ottawa, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa (Canada); CHRU de la Cavale Blanche, Departement de medecine interne et de pneumologie, Brest (France); Universite de Brest, Brest (France)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this management outcome study was to assess the safety of ventilation/perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) using for interpretation the criteria proposed in the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) guidelines for V/Q scintigraphy. A total of 393 patients with clinically suspected PE referred to the Nuclear Medicine Department of Brest University Hospital from April 2011 to March 2013, with either a high clinical probability or a low or intermediate clinical probability but positive D-dimer, were retrospectively analysed. V/Q SPECT were interpreted by the attending nuclear medicine physician using a diagnostic cut-off of one segmental or two subsegmental mismatches. The final diagnostic conclusion was established by the physician responsible for patient care, based on clinical symptoms, laboratory test, V/Q SPECT and other imaging procedures performed. Patients in whom PE was deemed absent were not treated with anticoagulants and were followed up for 3 months. Of the 393 patients, the prevalence of PE was 28 %. V/Q SPECT was positive for PE in 110 patients (28 %) and negative in 283 patients (72 %). Of the 110 patients with a positive V/Q SPECT, 78 (71 %) had at least one additional imaging test (computed tomography pulmonary angiography or ultrasound) and the diagnosis of PE was eventually excluded in one patient. Of the 283 patients with a negative V/Q SPECT, 74 (26 %) patients had another test. The diagnosis of PE was finally retained in one patient and excluded in 282 patients. The 3-month thromboembolic risk in the patients not treated with anticoagulants was 1/262: 0.38 % (95 % confidence interval 0.07-2.13). A diagnostic management including V/Q SPECT interpreted with a diagnostic cut-off of ''one segmental or two subsegmental mismatches'' appears safe to exclude PE. (orig.)

  3. Utility of positron emission tomography for tumour surveillance in children with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moharir, Mahendranath [Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Neurology, Ontario (Canada); London, Kevin [Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney (Australia); Howman-Giles, Robert [University of Sydney, Discipline of Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Sydney (Australia); North, Kathryn [Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Institute for Neuroscience and Muscle Research, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2010-07-15

    There is little consensus regarding optimal surveillance of optic pathway glioma (OPG) and plexiform neurofibroma (PNF) in childhood neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). {sup 18}F-2-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is employed in the surveillance of adult PNFs; but its utility has neither been specifically studied in children with PNFs nor in children with OPG. Review of PET/CT studies was performed in NF1 children with OPG or PNF. FDG-avidity of tumours was semi-quantitatively analysed and graded by calculating the maximum standardised uptake value (SUV{sub max}) [grade 1: <3 (low), grade 2: >3-<4 (intermediate), grade 3: >4 (intense)]. Eighteen children (ten girls; median age: 8.5-years) had PET/CT. Nineteen OPGs were imaged. The SUV{sub max} could be measured in 16. Ten were grade 1 and three each were grade 2 and grade 3. FDG-avidity reduced from grade 3 to grade 1 in two symptomatic OPGs following chemotherapy and this was associated with clinical improvement. PET/CT diagnosed symptomatic OPGs with a sensitivity of 0.625 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.259-0.897] and specificity of 0.875 (95% CI: 0.466-0.993). Sixteen PNFs were imaged. Twelve were grade 1 and two each were grade 2 and grade 3. The two grade 3 PNFs were confirmed malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours. PET/CT diagnosed malignant transformation with a sensitivity of 1.0 (95% CI: 0.197-1.0) and specificity of 0.857 (95% CI: 0.561-0.974). PET/CT may contribute useful information to the surveillance of OPG in childhood NF1 - particularly to identify progressive, symptomatic tumours. As in adults, PET/CT is useful for the detection of malignant transformation in PNFs in children with NF1. (orig.)

  4. Use of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the detection of thymoma: a preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Renshyan [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming Univ. School of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Def. Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Yeh Shinhwa [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming Univ. School of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Huang Minhsiung [Div. of Thoracic Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming Univ. School of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Wang Liangshun [Div. of Thoracic Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming Univ. School of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chu Leeshing [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming Univ. School of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Def. Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chang Chenpei [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming Univ. School of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chu Yumkung [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming Univ. School of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Wu Lingchi [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming Univ. School of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1995-12-01

    This study aimed to analyse the uptake patterns of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in thymomas of different stages. FDG positron emission tomography (PET) scan was performed in 12 patients suspected of having thymoma and in nine controls. Qualitative visual interpretation was used to detect the foci with FDG uptake higher than that of normal mediastinum. Tumour/lung ratio (TLR) was calculated from the counts of ROIs over the mass and over comparable normal lung tissue in thymoma patients. Mediastinum/lung ratio (MLR) was calculated from the counts of ROIs over the anterior mediastinum and lung in controls. The PET scan patterns of distribution of foci with FDG uptake and TLRs were correlated with the computed tomography (CT) of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and staging of the thymomas. Thymectomy was performed in ten patients and thoracoscopy was done in two patients. The results revealed ten thymomas (two stage I tumours, two stage II, four stage III and two stage IV, according to the Masaoka classification), and two cases of thymic hyperplasia associated with myasthenia gravis. Myasthenia gravis was also noted in four thymoma patients. FDG studies showed (a) diffuse uptake in the widened anterior mediastinum in patients with thymic hyperplasia, (b) confined focal FDG uptake in the non-invasive or less invasive, stage I and II thymomas, and (c) multiple discrete foci of FDG uptake in the mediastinum and thoraci structures in stage III and IV advanced invasive thymomas. The thymomas had the highest TLRs, followed by the TLRs of thymic hyperplasia and the MLRs of control subjects. No significant difference was found between thymomas in different stages or between thymomas with and thymomas without myasthenia gravis. In comparison with CT and/or MRI, FDG/PET detected more lesions in patients with invasive thymomas and downgraded the staging of thymoma in four patients. (orig./MG)

  5. Occupational Exposure to Veterinary Workers from the Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Agent 64Cu-ATSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetrick, Lucas D; Kraft, Susan L; Johnson, Thomas E

    2015-11-01

    Cu-ATSM is an emerging radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic use in positron emission tomography (PET), but to date there are no studies that assess the potential occupational doses to workers in either human or veterinary medicine. This study was aimed at determining the external radiation dose to veterinary workers from clinical PET/CT (PET combined with computed tomography) procedures using Cu-ATSM. To determine the dose to the workers, each worker was assigned two Electronic Personal Dosimeters (EPDs) to be worn on the chest and waist during the entirety of each procedure. The workers monitored during this study included a radiobiologist, a nuclear medicine technologist, an anesthesiologist, and a veterinary surgeon. Seven canine patients were imaged with an average mass of 33.7 kg (a range of 20.0-55.1 kg) with an average injected activity of 5 MBq kg. The dose range for the radiobiologist was 2-17 μSv (mean of 7.1 μSv), for the nuclear medicine technologist 0-14 μSv (mean of 5.6 μSv), for the anesthesiologist 0-12 μSv (mean of 4.0 μSv), and for the surgeon 0-10 μSv (mean of 3.6 μSv). In a comparison between the results of this study and published literature on occupational exposures from veterinary FDG PET/CT procedures, Cu-ATSM veterinary PET/CT procedures, on a per patient bias, exposed workers to less radiation.

  6. Brain glucose utilization in systemic lupus erythematosus with neuropsychiatric symptoms: a controlled positron emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otte, A. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)]|[Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Weiner, S.M. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Peter, H.H. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Mueller-Brand, J. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Goetze, M. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Moser, E. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Gutfleisch, J. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Hoegerle, S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Juengling, F.D. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Nitzsche, E.U. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    In contrast to morphological imaging [such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography], functional imaging may be of advantage in the detection of brain abnormalities in cases of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therefore, we studied 13 patients (aged 40{+-}14 years, 11 female, 2 male) with neuropsychiatric SLE who met four of the American Rheumatism Association criteria for the classification of SLE. Ten clinically and neurologically healthy volunteers served as controls (aged 40{+-}12 years, 5 female, 5 male). Both groups were investigated using fluorine-18-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography (PET) and cranial MRI. The normal controls and 11 of the 13 patients showed normal MRI scans. However, PET scan was abnormal in all 13 SLE patients. Significant group-to-group differences in the glucose metabolic index (GMI=region of interest uptake/global uptake at the level of the basal ganglia and thalamus) were found in the parieto-occipital region on both sides: the GMI of the parieto-occipital region on the right side was 0.922{+-}0.045 in patients and 1.066{+-}0.081 in controls (P<0.0001, Mann Whitney U test), while on the left side it was 0.892{+-}0.060 in patients and 1.034{+-}0.051 in controls (P=0.0002). Parieto-occipital hypometabolism is a conspicuous finding in mainly MRI-negative neuropsychiatric SLE. As the parieto-occipital region is located at the boundary of blood supply of all three major arteries, it could be the most vulnerable zone of the cerebrum and may be affected at an early stage of the cerebrovascular disease. (orig.). With 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Positron emission tomography of malignant tumours at head and neck. Evaluation of the diagnostic value of positron emission tomography by comparison with computed tomography; Positronenemissionstomographie bei malignen Tumoren im Kopf- und Halsbereich. Beurteilung der diagnostischen Wertigkeit der Positronenemissionstomographie im Vergleich zur Computertomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettler, Nele

    2011-12-02

    Imaging methods for early, accurate diagnosis and aftercare of malignant growths is currently one of the most important research topics. The objective of this thesis is to evaluate the diagnostic value of FDG-positron emission tomography by comparison with computed tomography for patients with squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma or sarcoma at head and neck. Measurement criteria are sensitivity and specificity. A retrospective evaluation of 100 examinations on 85 patients of University clinic Aachen was performed. The examination reports were supported by reports from histology, positron emission tomography and computed tomography. In each case, the histological results were assumed to provide a reliable benchmark. Sensitivity and specificity for the primary tumour site, metastatic lymphatic nodes and defined anatomic structures were compared across all patients. Comparisons were also performed on sub groups separated by gender, cancer type and the time and frequency at which tumours arose. The statistic analysis was done with MedCalc. Results: The results for sensitivity and specificity of the primary tumour site were 86.42% and 42.86%, and 64.71% and 66.07%, for positron emission tomography and computed tomography respectively. The results for the lymphatic nodes were 51.52% and 92.86% and 64.71% and 66.07%. When the constituent anatomic structures were evaluated separately, the specificity was significantly higher. The separation by gender showed no difference. Because the classification by tumor type resulted in samples that were of varying size, a comparison was difficult. For the diagnosis of primary tumours, the examination with positron emission tomography was superior, whereas computed tomography proved more effective for the diagnosis of recurrent tumours. For the diagnosis of the main tumour site, both methods were shown to be equally suitable. For the assessment of lymphatic nodes, positron emission tomography was superior to computed tomography

  8. Early Lung Cancer Detection Using Spiral Computed Tomography and Positron Emission Tomography%低剂量螺旋GT与PET联合筛查早期肺癌的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈婉莹; 周清

    2007-01-01

    @@ 1 文献类型 诊断. 2证据水平 2b. 3文献来源 Bastarrika G,Garcia-Velloso MJ,Lozano MD et al. Early lung cancer detection using spiral computed tomography and positron emission tomography[J].Am J Respir Crit Care Med,2005,171(12):1378-1383.

  9. Impact of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography on computed tomography defined target volumes in radiation treatment planning of esophageal cancer : reduction in geographic misses with equal inter-observer variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, Liesbeth; Busz, D. M.; Paardekooper, G. M. R. M.; Beukema, J. C.; Jager, P. L.; Van der Jagt, E. J.; van Dam, G. M.; Groen, H.; Plukker, J. Th. M.; Langendijk, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    P>Target volume definition in modern radiotherapy is based on planning computed tomography (CT). So far, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has not been included in planning modality in volume definition of esophageal cancer. This study evaluates fusion of FDG-PET and CT in

  10. Design of a portable optical emission tomography system for microwave induced compact plasma for visible to near-infrared emission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Kavita; Munshi, Prabhat; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2016-03-01

    A new non-invasive diagnostic system is developed for Microwave Induced Plasma (MIP) to reconstruct tomographic images of a 2D emission profile. A compact MIP system has wide application in industry as well as research application such as thrusters for space propulsion, high current ion beams, and creation of negative ions for heating of fusion plasma. Emission profile depends on two crucial parameters, namely, the electron temperature and density (over the entire spatial extent) of the plasma system. Emission tomography provides basic understanding of plasmas and it is very useful to monitor internal structure of plasma phenomena without disturbing its actual processes. This paper presents development of a compact, modular, and versatile Optical Emission Tomography (OET) tool for a cylindrical, magnetically confined MIP system. It has eight slit-hole cameras and each consisting of a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear image sensor for light detection. The optical noise is reduced by using aspheric lens and interference band-pass filters in each camera. The entire cylindrical plasma can be scanned with automated sliding ring mechanism arranged in fan-beam data collection geometry. The design of the camera includes a unique possibility to incorporate different filters to get the particular wavelength light from the plasma. This OET system includes selected band-pass filters for particular argon emission 750 nm, 772 nm, and 811 nm lines and hydrogen emission Hα (656 nm) and Hβ (486 nm) lines. Convolution back projection algorithm is used to obtain the tomographic images of plasma emission line. The paper mainly focuses on (a) design of OET system in detail and (b) study of emission profile for 750 nm argon emission lines to validate the system design.

  11. Injectable silver nanosensors: in vivo dosimetry for external beam radiotherapy using positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, A. N.; Rydhög, J. S.; Søndergaard, R. V.; Andresen, T. L.; Holm, S.; Munck Af Rosenschöld, P.; Conradsen, K.; Jølck, R. I.

    2016-05-01

    Development of safe and efficient radiotherapy routines requires quantification of the delivered absorbed dose to the cancer tissue in individual patients. In vivo dosimetry can provide accurate information about the absorbed dose delivered during treatment. In the current study, a novel silver-nanosensor formulation based on poly(vinylpyrrolidinone)-coated silver nanoparticles formulated in a gelation matrix composed of sucrose acetate isobutyrate has been developed for use as an in vivo dosimeter for external beam radiotherapy. In situ photonuclear reactions trigger the formation of radioactive 106Ag, which enables post treatment verification of the delivered dose using positron emission tomography imaging. The silver-nanosensor was investigated in a tissue equivalent thorax phantom using clinical settings and workflow for both standard fractionated radiotherapy (2 Gy) and stereotactic radiotherapy (10- and 22 Gy) in a high-energy beam setting (18 MV). The developed silver-nanosensor provided high radiopacity on the planning CT-scans sufficient for patient positioning in image-guided radiotherapy and provided dosimetric information about the absorbed dose with a 10% and 8% standard deviation for the stereotactic regimens, 10 and 22 Gy, respectively.Development of safe and efficient radiotherapy routines requires quantification of the delivered absorbed dose to the cancer tissue in individual patients. In vivo dosimetry can provide accurate information about the absorbed dose delivered during treatment. In the current study, a novel silver-nanosensor formulation based on poly(vinylpyrrolidinone)-coated silver nanoparticles formulated in a gelation matrix composed of sucrose acetate isobutyrate has been developed for use as an in vivo dosimeter for external beam radiotherapy. In situ photonuclear reactions trigger the formation of radioactive 106Ag, which enables post treatment verification of the delivered dose using positron emission tomography imaging. The

  12. Positron emission tomography in the management of cervix cancer patients; Tomographie par emission de positons dans la prise en charge des cancers du col de l'uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonardel, G.; Gontier, E.; Soret, M.; Dechaud, C.; Fayolle, M.; Foehrenbach, H. [Hopital d' Instruction des Armees du Val-de-Grace, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France); Chargari, C.; Bauduceau, O. [Hopital d' Instruction des Armees du Val-de-Grace, Service de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-10-15

    Since its introduction in clinical practice in the 1990 s, positron emission tomography (PET), usually with {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-F.D.G.), has become an important imaging modality in patients with cancer. For cervix carcinoma, F.D.G.-PET is significantly more accurate than computed tomography (CT) and is recommended for loco-regional lymph node and extra pelvic staging. The metabolic dimension of the technique provides additional prognostic information. Ongoing studies now concentrate on more advanced clinical applications, such as the planning of radiotherapy, the response evaluation after the induction of therapy, the early detection of recurrence. Technical innovations, such as PET cameras with better spatial resolution and hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT), available now on the whole territory, provide both anatomic and metabolic information in the same procedure. From the point of view of biological metabolism, new radiopharmaceutical probes are being developed. Those hold promise for future refinements in this field. This article reviews the current applications of F.D.G.-PET in patients with cervix cancer. (authors)

  13. 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan findings in Rosai-Dorfman disease with IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration mimicking breast malignancy: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Liping

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rosai-Dorfman disease, also known as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy, is a rare benign disorder characterized histologically by lymphatic sinus dilatation due to histiocyte proliferation. Rosai-Dorfman disease accompanied by IgG4+ plasma cell infiltration is an even rarer situation. To the best of our knowledge, no imaging report of fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings of Rosai-Dorfman disease with IgG4+ plasma cell infiltration has been published, although a series of pathological research has focused on this phenomenon. Case presentation We reviewed the 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan of a 78-year-old Chinese woman with a solid mass that was found in her right breast during a health checkup. 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography showed a hypermetabolic nodule in her right breast and slightly heterogeneous increased fluoro-deoxyglucose uptake of the pulmonary nodules, which were histologically proven to be mammary Rosai-Dorfman disease with IgG4+ plasma cell infiltration and pulmonary amyloidosis, respectively. A literature review was performed to gather information on this rare disease process. Conclusions Although distinguishing benign lymphoplasmacytic proliferation from malignancy may be difficult with 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in light of the pattern and intensity of fluoro-deoxyglucose uptake, our case highlights that whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging not only can display the extent of the disease to help complete staging but also can provide functional information about disease activity to guide biopsy.

  14. Development of a dedicated positron emission tomography system for the detection and biopsy of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Proffitt, James; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randy

    2006-12-01

    Dedicated positron emission mammography breast imaging systems have shown great promise for the detection of small, radiotracer-avid lesions. Our group (a collaboration consisting of West Virginia University, Jefferson Lab and the University of Washington) is extending this work by developing a positron emission mammography-tomography (PEM-PET) system for imaging and biopsy of breast lesions. The system will have four planar detector heads that will rotate about the breast to acquire multi-view data suitable for tomographic reconstruction. Each detector head will consist of a 96×72 array of 2×2×15 mm 3 LYSO detector elements (pitch=2.1 mm) mounted on a 3×4 array of 5×5 cm 2 flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. PEM-PET is expected to have approximately two-millimeter resolution and possess the ability to guide the needle biopsy of suspicious lesions seen on the PET images. Initial tests of the scintillator arrays yielded excellent results. Pixel maps for all four scintillator arrays demonstrated that separation of the LYSO elements was very good; all of the LYSO array elements were observed, even in areas between individual PSPMTs. System energy resolution was measured to be 25% FWHM at 511 keV. Future work includes the use of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) to replace the current VME-based data acquisition system, a PSPMT gain normalization procedure to help improve response uniformity and energy resolution, and the addition of an x-ray source and detector to produce multi-modality PEM-PET-CT images of the breast.

  15. High-performance computing and networking as tools for accurate emission computed tomography reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passeri, A. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Formiconi, A.R. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); De Cristofaro, M.T.E.R. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Pupi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Meldolesi, U. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy)

    1997-04-01

    It is well known that the quantitative potential of emission computed tomography (ECT) relies on the ability to compensate for resolution, attenuation and scatter effects. Reconstruction algorithms which are able to take these effects into account are highly demanding in terms of computing resources. The reported work aimed to investigate the use of a parallel high-performance computing platform for ECT reconstruction taking into account an accurate model of the acquisition of single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) data. An iterative algorithm with an accurate model of the variable system response was ported on the MIMD (Multiple Instruction Multiple Data) parallel architecture of a 64-node Cray T3D massively parallel computer. The system was organized to make it easily accessible even from low-cost PC-based workstations through standard TCP/IP networking. A complete brain study of 30 (64 x 64) slices could be reconstructed from a set of 90 (64 x 64) projections with ten iterations of the conjugate gradients algorithm in 9 s, corresponding to an actual speed-up factor of 135. This work demonstrated the possibility of exploiting remote high-performance computing and networking resources from hospital sites by means of low-cost workstations using standard communication protocols without particular problems for routine use. The achievable speed-up factors allow the assessment of the clinical benefit of advanced reconstruction techniques which require a heavy computational burden for the compensation effects such as variable spatial resolution, scatter and attenuation. The possibility of using the same software on the same hardware platform with data acquired in different laboratories with various kinds of SPET instrumentation is appealing for software quality control and for the evaluation of the clinical impact of the reconstruction methods. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. A Conway-Maxwell-Poisson (CMP) model to address data dispersion on positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarelli, Maria Filomena; Della Latta, Daniele; Scipioni, Michele; Positano, Vincenzo; Landini, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) in medicine exploits the properties of positron-emitting unstable nuclei. The pairs of γ- rays emitted after annihilation are revealed by coincidence detectors and stored as projections in a sinogram. It is well known that radioactive decay follows a Poisson distribution; however, deviation from Poisson statistics occurs on PET projection data prior to reconstruction due to physical effects, measurement errors, correction of deadtime, scatter, and random coincidences. A model that describes the statistical behavior of measured and corrected PET data can aid in understanding the statistical nature of the data: it is a prerequisite to develop efficient reconstruction and processing methods and to reduce noise. The deviation from Poisson statistics in PET data could be described by the Conway-Maxwell-Poisson (CMP) distribution model, which is characterized by the centring parameter λ and the dispersion parameter ν, the latter quantifying the deviation from a Poisson distribution model. In particular, the parameter ν allows quantifying over-dispersion (νdispersion (ν>1) of data. A simple and efficient method for λ and ν parameters estimation is introduced and assessed using Monte Carlo simulation for a wide range of activity values. The application of the method to simulated and experimental PET phantom data demonstrated that the CMP distribution parameters could detect deviation from the Poisson distribution both in raw and corrected PET data. It may be usefully implemented in image reconstruction algorithms and quantitative PET data analysis, especially in low counting emission data, as in dynamic PET data, where the method demonstrated the best accuracy.

  17. Effective dose to staff members in a positron emission tomography/CT facility using zirconium-89

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Positron emission tomography (PET) using zirconium-89 (89Zr) is complicated by its complex decay scheme. In this study, we quantified the effective dose from 89Zr and compared it with fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). Methods: Effective dose distribution in a PET/CT facility in Riyadh was calculated by Monte Carlo simulations using MCNPX. The positron bremsstrahlung, the annihilation photons, the delayed gammas from 89Zr and those emissions from 18F-FDG were modelled in the simulations but low-energy characteristic X-rays were ignored. Results: On the basis of injected activity, the dose from 89Zr was higher than that of 18F-FDG. However, the dose per scan from 89Zr became less than that from 18F-FDG near the patient, owing to the difference in injected activities. In the corridor and control rooms, the 89Zr dose was much higher than 18F-FDG, owing to the difference in attenuation by the shielding materials. Conclusion: The presence of the high-energy photons from 89Zr-labelled immuno-PET radiopharmaceuticals causes a significantly higher effective dose than 18F-FDG to the staff outside the patient room. Conversely, despite the low administered activity of 89Zr, it gives rise to a comparable or even lower dose than 18F-FDG to the staff near the patient. This interesting result raises apparently contradictory implications in the radiation protection considerations of a PET/CT facility. Advances in knowledge: To the best of our knowledge, radiation exposure to staff and public in the PET/CT unit using 89Zr has not been investigated. The ultimate output of this study will lead to the optimal design of the facility for routine use of 89Zr. PMID:23934963

  18. A behavioral and micro positron emission tomography imaging study in a rat model of hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Tang, Yi-Yuang; Feng, Hong-Bo; Cheng, Xiao-Xin

    2014-09-01

    Hypothyroidism leads to somatic, neuropsychological, and psychiatric changes that are similar to depression. The mechanisms underlying the behavioral abnormalities in adult onset hypothyroidism remain ambiguous. Hypothyroidism was induced in adult male Wistar rats by the maintenance of 0.05% propylthiouracil (PTU) in drinking water for 5 weeks (hypothyroid group; HP group); control rats (CON group) received an equivalent amount of water. The open field and sucrose preference tests were employed, and the link between behavioral changes and brain glucose metabolism was evaluated using micro positron emission tomography imaging. The open field test revealed slightly decreased locomotor activity and significantly reduced rearing and defecation in the hypothyroid group. Hypothyroid rats were also characterized by decreased body weight, sucrose preference, and relative sucrose intake compared to control rats. Hypothyroidism induced reduced brain glucose metabolism in the bilateral motor cortex, the caudate putamen, the cortex cingulate, the nucleus accumbens, and the frontal association cortex. A decreased sucrose preference was positively correlated with metabolic glucose changes in the caudate putamen and the nucleus accumbens. The results indicate that the activity pattern in adult onset hypothyroidism is different from the activity pattern when hypothyroidism is induced in the developmental period of the central nervous system. Decreased sucrose preference in hypothyroid rats may be attributed to anhedonia. Furthermore, these findings suggest there may be a common mechanism underlying adult onset hypothyroidism and depression.

  19. Advances in pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators for single photon emission computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Azazrm, AhmadReza; Mahmoudian, Babak; Gharapapagh, Esmail

    2015-01-01

    The collimator in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is an important part of the imaging chain. One of the most important collimators that used in research, preclinical study, small animal, and organ imaging is the pinhole collimator. Pinhole collimator can improve the tradeoff between sensitivity and resolution in comparison with conventional parallel-hole collimator and facilities diagnosis. However, a major problem with pinhole collimator is a small field of view (FOV). Multi-pinhole collimator has been investigated in order to increase the sensitivity and FOV with a preserved spatial resolution. The geometry of pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators is a critical factor in the image quality and plays a key role in SPECT imaging. The issue of the material and geometry for pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators have been a controversial and much disputed subject within the field of SPECT imaging. On the other hand, recent developments in collimator optimization have heightened the need for appropriate reconstruction algorithms for pinhole SPECT imaging. Therefore, iterative reconstruction algorithms were introduced to minimize the undesirable effect on image quality. Current researches have focused on geometry and configuration of pinhole and multi-pinhole collimation rather than reconstruction algorithm. The lofthole and multi-lofthole collimator are samples of novel designs. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review on recent researches in the pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators for SPECT imaging.

  20. Software development for dynamic position emission tomography: Dynamic image analysis (DIA) tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyeon, Do Yeong; Jung, Young Jin [Dongseo University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Su [Dept. of Radilogical Science, Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Positron Emission Tomography(PET) is nuclear medical tests which is a combination of several compounds with a radioactive isotope that can be injected into body to quantitatively measure the metabolic rate (in the body). Especially, Phenomena that increase (sing) glucose metabolism in cancer tissue using the 18F-FDG (Fluorodeoxyglucose) is utilized widely in cancer diagnosis. And then, Numerous studies have been reported that incidence seems high availability even in the modern diagnosis of dementia and Parkinson's (disease) in brain disease. When using a dynamic PET image including the time information in the static information that is provided for the diagnosis many can increase the accuracy of diagnosis. For this reason, clinical researchers getting great attention but, it is the lack of tools to conduct research. And, it interfered complex mathematical algorithm and programming skills for activation of research. In this study, in order to easy to use and enable research dPET, we developed the software based graphic user interface(GUI). In the future, by many clinical researcher using DIA-Tool is expected to be of great help to dPET research.

  1. Optimized separation procedure for production of no-carrier-added radiomanganese for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, Martin; Spahn, Ingo; Coenen, Heinz H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Medizin (INM), Nuklearchemie (INM-5)

    2015-07-01

    The {sup nat}Cr(p,xn)-process is a very efficient route for production of {sup 52g}Mn(T{sub 1/2} = 5.59 d). Based on measurements of distribution coefficients with different media and ion-exchange resins, an optimized chromatographic separation of radiomanganese from {sup nat}Cr with the resin Amberlite CG400 was developed. With this system {sup nat}Cr is eluted first with an acetic acid/methanol 1:1 mixture at room temperature and {sup 52g}Mn thereafter with 3 M HCl at 50 C. Within a separation time of 4 h the method yielded 99.5% of the n.c.a. {sup 52g}Mn in 2-3 mL of 3 M HCl. An ICP-MS analysis revealed a chromium impurity of 0.07 mg (0.014%) in the n.c.a. {sup 52g}Mn solution, making this separation method suitable for the production of {sup 52g}Mn for medical applications like positron emission tomography (PET).

  2. Bone single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT in a patient with Pancoast tumor: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Javadi

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs of the superior sulcus are considered to be the most challenging type of malignant thoracic disease. In this disease, neoplasms originating mostly from the extreme apex of the lung expand to the chest wall and thoracic inlet structures. Multiple imaging procedures have been applied to identify tumors and to stage and predict tumor resectability in surgical operations. Clinical examinations to localize pain complaints in shoulders and down the arms, and to screen for Horner's syndrome and abnormalities seen in paraclinical assessments, have been applied extensively for differential diagnosis of superior sulcus tumors. Although several types of imaging have been utilized for diagnosing and staging Pancoast tumors, there have been almost no reports on the efficiency of whole-body bone scans (WBBS for detecting the level of abnormality in cases of superior sulcus tumors. CASE REPORT: We describe a case of Pancoast tumor in which technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate (Tc-99m MDP bone single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT was able to accurately detect multiple areas of abnormality in the vertebrae and ribs. In describing this case, we stress the clinical and diagnostic points, in the hope of stimulating a higher degree of suspicion and thereby facilitating appropriate diagnosis and treatment. From the results of this study, further clinical trials to evaluate the potential of SPECT as an efficient imaging tool for the work-up on cases of Pancoast tumor are recommended.

  3. Utility of positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging in musculoskeletal imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ammar A Chaudhry; Maryam Gul; Elaine Gould; Mathew Teng; Kevin Baker; Robert Matthews

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between neoplastic and nonneoplastic conditions magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) has established itself as one of the key clinical tools in evaluation of musculoskeletal pathology. However, MRI still has several key limitations which require supplemental information from additional modalities to complete evaluation of various disorders. This has led to the development hybrid positron emission tomography(PET)-MRI which is rapidly evolving to address key clinical questions by using the morphological strengths of MRI and functional information of PET imaging. In this article, we aim to review physical principles and techniques of PET-MRI and discuss clinical utility of functional information obtained from PET imaging and structural information obtained from MRI imaging for the evaluation of musculoskeletal pathology. More specifically, this review highlights the role of PET-MRI in musculoskeletal oncology including initial diagnosis and staging, treatment planning and posttreatment follow-up. Also we will review utility of PET-MRI in evaluating musculoskeletal infections(especially in the immunocompromised and diabetics) and inflammatory condition. Additionally, common pitfalls of PET-MRI will be addressed.

  4. Eyeblink conditioning in unmedicated schizophrenia patients: a positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Krystal L; Andreasen, Nancy C; Liu, Dawei; Freeman, John H; O'Leary, Daniel S

    2013-12-30

    Previous studies suggest that patients with schizophrenia exhibit dysfunctions in a widely distributed circuit-the cortico-cerebellar-thalamic-cortical circuit, or CCTCC-and that this may explain the multiple cognitive deficits observed in the disorder. This study uses positron emission tomography (PET) with O(15) H₂O to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in response to a classic test of cerebellar function, the associative learning that occurs during eyeblink conditioning, in a sample of 20 unmedicated schizophrenia patients and 20 closely matched healthy controls. The PET paradigm examined three phases of acquisition and extinction (early, middle and late). The patients displayed impaired behavioral performance during both acquisition and extinction. The imaging data indicate that, compared to the control subjects, the patients displayed decreases in rCBF in all three components of the CCTCC during both acquisition and extinction. Specifically, patients had less rCBF in the middle and medial frontal lobes, anterior cerebellar lobules I/V and VI, as well as the thalamus during acquisition and although similar areas were found in the frontal lobe, ipsilateral cerebellar lobule IX showed consistently less activity in patients during extinction. Thus this study provides additional support for the hypothesis that patients with schizophrenia have a cognitive dysmetria--an inability to smoothly coordinate many different types of mental activity--that affects even a very basic cognitive task that taps into associative learning.

  5. FPGA-Based Front-End Electronics for Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselman, Michael; Dewitt, Don; McDougald, Wendy; Lewellen, Thomas K; Miyaoka, Robert; Hauck, Scott

    2009-02-22

    Modern Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are capable of performing complex discrete signal processing algorithms with clock rates above 100MHz. This combined with FPGA's low expense, ease of use, and selected dedicated hardware make them an ideal technology for a data acquisition system for positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. Our laboratory is producing a high-resolution, small-animal PET scanner that utilizes FPGAs as the core of the front-end electronics. For this next generation scanner, functions that are typically performed in dedicated circuits, or offline, are being migrated to the FPGA. This will not only simplify the electronics, but the features of modern FPGAs can be utilizes to add significant signal processing power to produce higher resolution images. In this paper two such processes, sub-clock rate pulse timing and event localization, will be discussed in detail. We show that timing performed in the FPGA can achieve a resolution that is suitable for small-animal scanners, and will outperform the analog version given a low enough sampling period for the ADC. We will also show that the position of events in the scanner can be determined in real time using a statistical positioning based algorithm.

  6. Dynamic positron emission tomography image restoration via a kinetics-induced bilateral filter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoying Bian

    Full Text Available Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET imaging is a powerful tool that provides useful quantitative information on physiological and biochemical processes. However, low signal-to-noise ratio in short dynamic frames makes accurate kinetic parameter estimation from noisy voxel-wise time activity curves (TAC a challenging task. To address this problem, several spatial filters have been investigated to reduce the noise of each frame with noticeable gains. These filters include the Gaussian filter, bilateral filter, and wavelet-based filter. These filters usually consider only the local properties of each frame without exploring potential kinetic information from entire frames. Thus, in this work, to improve PET parametric imaging accuracy, we present a kinetics-induced bilateral filter (KIBF to reduce the noise of dynamic image frames by incorporating the similarity between the voxel-wise TACs using the framework of bilateral filter. The aim of the proposed KIBF algorithm is to reduce the noise in homogeneous areas while preserving the distinct kinetics of regions of interest. Experimental results on digital brain phantom and in vivo rat study with typical (18F-FDG kinetics have shown that the present KIBF algorithm can achieve notable gains over other existing algorithms in terms of quantitative accuracy measures and visual inspection.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography Reveals Abnormal Topological Organization in Functional Brain Network in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu eXiangzhe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated alterations in the topological organization of structural brain networks in diabetes mellitus (DM. However, the DM-related changes in the topological properties in functional brain networks are almost unexplored so far. We therefore used fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET data to construct functional brain networks of 73 DM patients and 91 sex- and age-matched normal controls (NCs, followed by a graph theoretical analysis. We found that both DM patients and NCs had a small-world topology in functional brain network. In comparison to the NC group, the DM group was found to have significantly lower small-world index, lower normalized clustering coefficients and higher normalized shortest path length. Moreover, for diabetic patients, the nodal centrality was significantly reduced in the right rectus, the right cuneus, the left middle occipital gyrus, and the left postcentral gyrus, and it was significantly increased in the orbitofrontal region of the left middle frontal gyrus, the left olfactory region, and the right paracentral lobule. Our results demonstrated that the diabetic brain was associated with disrupted topological organization in the functional PET network, thus providing the functional evidence for the abnormalities of brain networks in DM.

  8. Reversible Electroencephalographic and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography Abnormalities in Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Lin Chen

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE is a well-established disease that occurs most commonly in patients with euthyroidism. We report 3 patients diagnosed with HE. Cases 1 and 2 were young females who had experienced intractable seizures and presented with cognitive impairment. Reversible slow waves on the electroencephalogram (EEG, and nearly complete recovery of cognition, were noted after steroid treatment. Case 3 was an elderly male who presented with a sudden onset of vertigo, diplopia, and recurrent gait ataxia. Reversible hypoperfusion in the upper portion of the left cerebellum, on 99mTc hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, was noted after steroid treatment. We also review 25 cases from the literature of patients diagnosed with HE. All patients had antithyroid antibodies. A reversible inflammatory process is supported by brain magnetic resonance imaging, SPECT, EEG and cerebrospinal fluid studies. Vasculitis is the most probable pathogenesis according to laboratory findings. Steroids are the treatment of choice, and result in a favorable outcome when administered early in the disease course.

  9. Imaging of lesions in the posterior cranial fossa using single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Michiro; Uesugi, Yasuo; Higashikawa, Masahiko; Ochi, Mari; Makimoto, Kazuo; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Shin, Akinori; Utsunomiya, Keita; Akagi, Hiroaki

    1988-10-01

    Lesions in the posterior cranial fossa were visualized by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with /sup 123/I-IMP (N-isopropyl-p-/sup 123/I-iodoamphetamine) and /sup 99m/Tc-HM-PAO (/sup 99m/Tc-hexametylpropyleneamine oxime). It is generally held that these radiopharmaceuticals penetrate the walls of cerebral blood vessels and that their accumulations in the brain tissue may reflect the cerebral blood flow. Six patients with lesions in the central nervous system all showed wider areas of abnormality in SPECT than in X-ray CT, indicating a larger lesion of blood flow disturbance. In the next series of 11 patients with vertigo or dizziness of unknown etiology, eight had abnormal findings in the scan with /sup 123/I-IMP as did four of the nine in the scan with /sup 99m/Tc-HM-PAO. Thus, most patients with dizziness of unknown etiology may have some vertebral blood flow disorder, which in some cases is not clearly diagnosed by conventional vestibular examinations or even by X-ray CT scan. The accuracy of the diagnostic measures for otoneurological problems awaits further studies of their sensitivity and specificity.

  10. Development of analog solid-state photo-detectors for Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina, E-mail: giuseppina.bisogni@pi.infn.it; Morrocchi, Matteo

    2016-02-11

    Solid-state photo-detectors are one of the main innovations of past century in the field of sensors. First produced in the early forties with the invention of the p–n junction in silicon and the study of its optical properties, photo-detectors received a major boost in the sixties when the p-i-n (PIN) photodiode was developed and successfully used in several applications. The development of devices with internal gain, avalanche photodiodes (APD) first and then Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes, named single photon avalanche diode (SPAD), leads to a substantial improvement in sensitivity and allowed single photon detection. Later on, thousands of SPADs have been assembled in arrays of few millimeters squared (named SiPM, silicon photo-multiplier) with single photon resolution. The high internal gain of SiPMs, together with other features peculiar of the silicon technology like compactness, speed and compatibility with magnetic fields, promoted SiPMs as the principal photo-detector competitor of photomultipliers in many applications from radiation detection to medical imaging. This paper provides a review of the properties of analog solid-state photo-detectors. Particular emphasis is given to latest advances on Positron Emission Tomography instrumentation boosted by the adoption of the silicon photo-detectors as an alternative to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Special attention is dedicated to the SiPMs, which are playing a key role in the development of innovative scanners.

  11. Kinetic analysis of [11C]vorozole binding in the human brain with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jean; Kim, Sung Won; Pareto, Deborah; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Fowler, Joanna S; Biegon, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Using positron emission tomography, we investigated the kinetics of [11C]vorozole ([11C]VOR), a radiotracer for the enzyme aromatase that catalyzes the last step in estrogen biosynthesis. Six subjects were scanned under baseline conditions followed by retest 2 weeks later. The retest was followed by a blocking study with 2.5 mg of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. The binding potential (BP(A)ND) was estimated from a Lassen plot using the total tissue distribution volume (VT) for baseline and blocked. for the thalamus was found to be 15 times higher than that for the cerebellum. From the letrozole studies, we found that [11C]VOR exhibits a slow binding compartment (small k4) that has a nonspecific and a blockable component. Because of the sensitivity of VT to variations in k4, a common value was used for the four highest binding regions. We also considered the tissue uptake to plasma ratio for 60 to 90 minutes as an outcome measure. Using the ratio method, the difference between the highest and lowest was 2.4 compared to 3.5 for the VT. The ratio method underestimates the high regions but is less variable and may be more suitable for patient studies. Because of its kinetics and distribution, this tracer is not a candidate for a bolus infusion or reference tissue methods.

  12. Molecular imaging of neuroinflammation in preclinical rodent models using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Sara; Coda, Anna R; Panico, Mariarosaria; Gramanzini, Matteo; Moresco, Rosa M; Chalon, Sylvie; Pappatà, Sabina

    2017-03-01

    Neuroinflammation (NI) is an adaptive response to different noxious stimuli, involving microglia, astrocytes and peripheral immune cells. NI is a hallmark of several acute and chronic diseases of central nervous system (CNS) and contributes to both damage and repair of CNS tissue. Interventional or genetically modified rodent models mimicking human neuropathologies may provide valuable insights on basic mechanisms of NI, but also for improving the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Preclinical positron emission tomography (PET) allows to investigate noninvasively the inflammatory response in CNS of rodent models at a molecular level, validating innovative probes for early diagnosis, and characterizing the time course of neuroinflammatory changes and their relationship with disease progression, as well as the effects of experimental treatments with high translational potential. In particular, recent efforts of preclinical PET field are intended to develop specific and selective radiotracers that target the activation of innate immune system in CNS. Here, we have reviewed the state of art for PET in relevant rodent models of acute and chronic neuropathologies associated with NI, with particular regard on imaging of activated microglia and astrocytes.

  13. Amyloid deposition after cerebral hypoperfusion: evidenced on [(18)F]AV-45 positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Lun; Lin, Kun-Ju; Ho, Meng-Yang; Chang, Yeu-Jhy; Chang, Chien-Hung; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Lee, Tsong-Hai

    2012-08-15

    Animal studies have shown that cerebral hypoperfusion may be associated with amyloid plaque accumulation. Amyloid plaque is known to be associated with dementia and [(18)F]AV-45 is a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand that binds to extracelluar plaques. We hypothesized that demented patients with cerebral hypoperfusion may have increased [(18)F]AV-45 uptake. Five demented patients with cerebral hypoperfusion due to unilateral carotid artery stenosis (CAS) were examined with [(18)F]AV-45 PET, and the results were compared with six elderly controls. The standard uptake value ratio (SUVR) of each region of interest (ROI) was created using whole cerebellum as the reference region. All subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for obtaining structural information. Patients with dementia and unilateral CAS had a higher global [(18)F]AV-45 SUVR (1.34 ± 0.06) as compared with controls (1.10 ± 0.04, p=0.0043), especially over the frontal, temporal, precuneus, anterior cingulate and occipital regions. The statistical distribution maps revealed a significantly increased [(18)F]AV-45 SUVR in the medial frontal, caudate, thalamus, posterior cingulate, occipital and middle and superior temporal regions ipsilateral to the side of CAS (pAV-45 binding is increased in demented patients with CAS, and its distribution is lateralized to the CAS side, suggesting that amyloid-related dementia may occur under cerebral hypoperfusion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel electro-optical coupling technique for magnetic resonance-compatible positron emission tomography detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcott, Peter D; Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible positron emission tomography (PET) detector design is being developed that uses electro-optical coupling to bring the amplitude and arrival time information of high-speed PET detector scintillation pulses out of an MRI system. The electro-optical coupling technology consists of a magnetically insensitive photodetector output signal connected to a nonmagnetic vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diode that is coupled to a multimode optical fiber. This scheme essentially acts as an optical wire with no influence on the MRI system. To test the feasibility of this approach, a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a single pixel of a solid-state photomultiplier array was placed in coincidence with a lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube with both the new nonmagnetic VCSEL coupling and the standard coaxial cable signal transmission scheme. No significant change was observed in 511 keV photopeak energy resolution and coincidence time resolution. This electro-optical coupling technology enables an MRI-compatible PET block detector to have a reduced electromagnetic footprint compared with the signal transmission schemes deployed in the current MRI/PET designs.

  15. Novel Electro-Optical Coupling Technique for Magnetic Resonance-Compatible Positron Emission Tomography Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D. Olcott

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-compatible positron emission tomography (PET detector design is being developed that uses electro-optical coupling to bring the amplitude and arrival time information of high-speed PET detector scintillation pulses out of an MRI system. The electro-optical coupling technology consists of a magnetically insensitive photodetector output signal connected to a nonmagnetic vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL diode that is coupled to a multimode optical fiber. This scheme essentially acts as an optical wire with no influence on the MRI system. To test the feasibility of this approach, a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a single pixel of a solid-state photomultiplier array was placed in coincidence with a lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube with both the new nonmagnetic VCSEL coupling and the standard coaxial cable signal transmission scheme. No significant change was observed in 511 keV photopeak energy resolution and coincidence time resolution. This electro-optical coupling technology enables an MRI-compatible PET block detector to have a reduced electromagnetic footprint compared with the signal transmission schemes deployed in the current MRI/PET designs.

  16. A promising new mechanism of ionizing radiation detection for positron emission tomography: modulation of optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Daghighian, Henry M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2016-11-01

    Using conventional scintillation detection, the fundamental limit in positron emission tomography (PET) time resolution is strongly dependent on the inherent temporal variances generated during the scintillation process, yielding an intrinsic physical limit for the coincidence time resolution of around 100 ps. On the other hand, modulation mechanisms of the optical properties of a material exploited in the optical telecommunications industry can be orders of magnitude faster. In this paper we borrow from the concept of optics pump-probe measurement to for the first time study whether ionizing radiation can produce modulations of optical properties, which can be utilized as a novel method for radiation detection. We show that a refractive index modulation of approximately 5× {{10}-6} is induced by interactions in a cadmium telluride (CdTe) crystal from a 511 keV photon source. Furthermore, using additional radionuclide sources, we show that the amplitude of the optical modulation signal varies linearly with both the detected event rate and average photon energy of the radiation source.

  17. Positron emission tomography molecular imaging of dopaminergic system in drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Haifeng; Tian, Mei; Zhang, Hong

    2012-05-01

    Dopamine (DA) is involved in drug reinforcement, but its role in drug addiction remains unclear. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the first technology used for the direct measurement of components of the dopaminergic system in the living human brain. In this article, we reviewed the major findings of PET imaging studies on the involvement of DA in drug addiction, especially in heroin addiction. Furthermore, we summarized PET radiotracers that have been used to study the role of DA in drug addiction. To investigate presynaptic function in drug addiction, PET tracers have been developed to measure DA synthesis and transport. For the investigation of postsynaptic function, several radioligands targeting dopamine one (D1) receptor and dopamine two (D2) receptor are extensively used in PET imaging studies. Moreover, we also summarized the PET imaging findings of heroin addiction studies, including heroin-induced DA increases and the reinforcement, role of DA in the long-term effects of heroin abuse, DA and vulnerability to heroin abuse and the treatment implications. PET imaging studies have corroborated the role of DA in drug addiction and increase our understanding the mechanism of drug addiction.

  18. Effect of Harderian adenectomy on the statistical analyses of mouse brain imaging using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minsoo; Woo, Sang-Keun; Yu, Jung Woo; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Eom, Kidong; Nahm, Sang-Soep

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) as a radioactive tracer is a useful technique for in vivo brain imaging. However, the anatomical and physiological features of the Harderian gland limit the use of FDG-PET imaging in the mouse brain. The gland shows strong FDG uptake, which in turn results in distorted PET images of the frontal brain region. The purpose of this study was to determine if a simple surgical procedure to remove the Harderian gland prior to PET imaging of mouse brains could reduce or eliminate FDG uptake. Measurement of FDG uptake in unilaterally adenectomized mice showed that the radioactive signal emitted from the intact Harderian gland distorts frontal brain region images. Spatial parametric measurement analysis demonstrated that the presence of the Harderian gland could prevent accurate assessment of brain PET imaging. Bilateral Harderian adenectomy efficiently eliminated unwanted radioactive signal spillover into the frontal brain region beginning on postoperative Day 10. Harderian adenectomy did not cause any post-operative complications during the experimental period. These findings demonstrate the benefits of performing a Harderian adenectomy prior to PET imaging of mouse brains.

  19. Quality assurance set-up for a new positron emission tomography detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortinovis, Daniele; Xu, Chen; Zvolsky, Milan [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany); Garutti, Erika [Hamburg Univ. (Germany); Silenzi, Alessandro [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The PicoSEC-MCNet Project (PICOsecond Siliconphotomultiplier-Electronics- and Crystal research-Marie-Curie-Network) aims to develop a new class of ultra-fast photon detectors for High Energy Physics (HEP) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). This actual technology development is covered in the EndoTOFPET-US project. A new Time Of Flight PET detector will improve the diagnosis capability of pancreatic and prostate tumors with unprecedented spatial resolution. The detector consists of two parts: a PET head mounted on an ultrasound probe and an external plate. Photons are detected by scintillating crystals individually readout by silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Their fast response allows to meet the critical requirement of at least 200 ps (FWHM) coincidence time resolution, essential for a spatial resolution of 3 cm along the Line Of Response (LOR) and efficient background rejection. DESY together with Hamburg University are responsible for the quality assurance and the commissioning of the whole system, and the necessary infrastructure is being set up. Within this task, the light yield uniformity for the combined scintillator-SiPM system of the external plate must be measured. This talk will introduce and describe the set-up which will allows a fast, automatic and high precision measurement of the light yield for the 4096 combined scintillator-SiPMs of the external plate.

  20. Evaluation of Glucose Uptake in Normal and Cancer Cell Lines by Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, Francesca; Lettini, Giacomo; Gallicchio, Rosj; Sisinni, Lorenza; Simeon, Vittorio; Nardelli, Anna; Venetucci, Angela Assunta; Storto, Giovanni; Landriscina, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    To date, there is no definitive demonstration of the utility of positron emission tomography (PET) in studying glucose metabolism in cultured cell lines. Thus, this study was designed to compare PET to more standardized methods for the quantitative assessment of glucose uptake in nontransformed and transformed living cells and to validate PET for metabolic studies in vitro. Human colon and breast carcinoma cell lines and mouse embryo fibroblasts were evaluated for [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) uptake by PET and autoradiography and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) incorporation by colorimetric assay and analyzed for the radiotoxic effects of [(18)F]FDG and the expression levels of glucose transporters. Indeed, [(18)F]FDG incorporation on PET was comparable to [(18)F]FDG uptake by autoradiography and 2-DG incorporation by colorimetric assay, although radiotracer-based methods exhibited more pronounced differences between individual cell lines. As expected, these data correlated with glucose transporters 1 to 4 and hexokinase II expression in tumor cell lines and mouse fibroblasts. Notably, [(18)F]FDG incorporation resulted in low apoptotic rates, with fibroblasts being slightly more sensitive to radiotracer-induced cell death. The quantitative analysis of [(18)F]FDG uptake in living cells by PET represents a valuable and reproducible method to study tumor cell metabolism in vitro, being representative of the differences in the molecular profile of normal and tumor cell lines.

  1. Single photon emission computed tomography in the diagnosis of Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Asano, Tetsuichi; Abe, Shin`e; Arai, Hisayuki; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Takasaki, Masaru; Shindo, Hiroaki; Abe, Kimihiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1997-06-01

    Studies with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have shown temporoparietal (TP) hypoperfusion in patients with Alzheimer`s disease (AD). We evaluated the utility of this findings in the diagnosis of AD. SPECT images with {sup 123}I-iodoamphetamine were analyzed qualitatively by a rater without knowledge of the subject`s clinical status. Sixty-seven of 302 consecutive patients were judged as having TP hypoperfusion by SPECT imaging. This perfusion pattern was observed in 44 of 51 patients with AD, in 5 with mixed dementia, 8 with cerebrovascular disease (including 5 with dementia), 4 with Parkinson`s disease (including 2 with dementia), 1 with normal pressure hydrocephalus, 1 with slowly progressive aphasia, 1 with progressive autonomic failure, 2 with age-associated memory impairment, and 1 with unclassified dementia. The sensitivity for AD was 86.3% (44 of 51 AD), and the specificity was 91.2% (229 of 251 non-AD). Next, we looked for differences in perfusion images between patients with AD and without AD. Some patients without AD had additional hypoperfusion beyond TP areas: deep gray matter hypoperfusion and diffuse frontal hypoperfusion, which could be used to differentiate them from the patients with AD. Others could not be distinguished from patients with AD by their perfusion pattern. Although patients with other cerebral disorders occasionally have TP hypoperfusion, this finding makes the diagnosis of AD very likely. (author)

  2. Preclinical positron emission tomography scanner based on a monolithic annulus of scintillator: initial design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolin, Alexander V; Martone, Peter F; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar; Raylman, Raymond R

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) scanners designed for imaging of small animals have transformed translational research by reducing the necessity to invasively monitor physiology and disease progression. Virtually all of these scanners are based on the use of pixelated detector modules arranged in rings. This design, while generally successful, has some limitations. Specifically, use of discrete detector modules to construct PET scanners reduces detection sensitivity and can introduce artifacts in reconstructed images, requiring the use of correction methods. To address these challenges, and facilitate measurement of photon depth-of-interaction in the detector, we investigated a small animal PET scanner (called AnnPET) based on a monolithic annulus of scintillator. The scanner was created by placing 12 flat facets around the outer surface of the scintillator to accommodate placement of silicon photomultiplier arrays. Its performance characteristics were explored using Monte Carlo simulations and sections of the NEMA NU4-2008 protocol. Results from this study revealed that AnnPET's reconstructed spatial resolution is predicted to be [Formula: see text] full width at half maximum in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. Peak detection sensitivity is predicted to be 10.1%. Images of simulated phantoms (mini-hot rod and mouse whole body) yielded promising results, indicating the potential of this system for enhancing PET imaging of small animals.

  3. Towards an optimal reference region in single-photon emission tomography difference images in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussion, N.; Ryvlin, P.; Isnard, J.; Mauguiere, F. [Neurologie Fonctionnelle et Epilepsie, Hopital Neurologique, Lyon (France); Houzard, C. [Centre de Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital Neuro-Cardiologique, Lyon (France); Cinotti, L. [Neurologie Fonctionnelle et Epilepsie, Hopital Neurologique, Lyon (France); Centre de Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital Neuro-Cardiologique, Lyon (France); CERMEP, Hopital Neuro-Cardiologique, Lyon (France)

    2000-02-01

    There is marked variability in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) between the ictal and interictal state in epilepsy, and it would therefore be desirable to increase the reliability of ictal/interictal single-photon emission tomography (SPET) difference images. We aimed to improve the step of quantitative normalization of images by finding the best possible reference region. In 16 patients (11 with lateralization of the epileptogenic focus, five with bilateral foci) both ictal and inter-ictal SPET scans were performed after injection of technetium-99m labelled tracer. Then, each region among a selected set (brain+cerebellum, brain, cerebellum, hemispheres, and for patients with an expected lateralization, cortical lobe containing the focus and symmetrical contralateral lobe) was investigated by comparison of the regional ictal/inter-ictal variance in counts. Among patients with a suspected lateralized focus, the distribution of CBF in the contralateral cortical lobe appeared to vary less between ictal and inter-ictal states than in other investigated areas. As a consequence, this latter region constitutes the best choice as a reference region. For patients with bilateral foci, the cerebellum appears to be a good compromise even though it presents with significant CBF changes. (orig.)

  4. [(18)F]T807, a novel tau positron emission tomography imaging agent for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chun-Fang; Arteaga, Janna; Chen, Gang; Gangadharmath, Umesh; Gomez, Luis F; Kasi, Dhanalakshmi; Lam, Chung; Liang, Qianwa; Liu, Changhui; Mocharla, Vani P; Mu, Fanrong; Sinha, Anjana; Su, Helen; Szardenings, A Katrin; Walsh, Joseph C; Wang, Eric; Yu, Chul; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Tieming; Kolb, Hartmuth C

    2013-11-01

    We wished to develop a highly selective positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent targeting PHF-tau in human Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. To screen potential tau binders, human AD brain sections were used as a source of native paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and Aβ rather than synthetic tau aggregates or Aβ fibrils generated in vitro to measure the affinity and selectivity of [(18)F]T807 to tau and Aβ. Brain uptake and biodistribution of [(18)F]T807 in mice were also tested. In vitro autoradiography results show that [(18)F]T807 exhibits strong binding to PHF-tau-positive human brain sections. A dissociation constant (Kd) of [(18)F]T807 (14.6 nM) was measured using brain sections from the frontal lobe of AD patients. A comparison of autoradiography and double immunohistochemical staining of PHF-tau and Aβ on adjacent sections demonstrated that [(18)F]T807 binding colocalized with immunoreactive PHF-tau pathology, but did not highlight Aβ plaques. In vivo studies in mice demonstrated that [(18)F]T807 was able to cross the blood-brain barrier and washed out quickly. [(18)F]T807 demonstrates high affinity and selectivity to PHF-tau as well as favorable in vivo properties, making this a promising candidate as an imaging agent for AD. Copyright © 2013 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of Cancer-Associated Biomarkers by Positron Emission Tomography: Advances and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lee Collier

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET provides a powerful means to non-invasively image and quantify protein expression and biochemical changes in living subjects at nano- and picomolar levels. As the field of molecular imaging develops, and as advances in the biochemistry, pharmacology, therapeutics, and molecular biology of disease are made, there is a corresponding increase in the number of clinically relevant, novel disease-associated biomarkers that are brought to the attention of those developing imaging probes for PET. In addition, due to the high specificity of the PET radiotracers being developed, there is a demand for PET cameras with higher sensitivity and resolution. This manuscript reviews advances over the past five years in clinical and pre-clinical PET instrumentation and in new PET probes and imaging methods associated with the latest trends in the molecular imaging of cancer. Included in the PET tracer review is a description of new radioligands for steroid receptors, growth factor receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, sigma receptors, tumor-associated enzymes, gene reporter probes, markers for tumor hypoxia and metabolism, and sites associated with angiogenesis and cellular proliferation. The use of PET imaging in drug development, including the monitoring of cancer chemotherapy, also is discussed.

  6. Photo-Detectors for Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (ToF-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig S. Levin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the most recent advances in photo-detector design employed in time of flight positron emission tomography (ToF-PET. PET is a molecular imaging modality that collects pairs of coincident (temporally correlated annihilation photons emitted from the patient body. The annihilation photon detector typically comprises a scintillation crystal coupled to a fast photo-detector. ToF information provides better localization of the annihilation event along the line formed by each detector pair, resulting in an overall improvement in signal to noise ratio (SNR of the reconstructed image. Apart from the demand for high luminosity and fast decay time of the scintillation crystal, proper design and selection of the photo-detector and methods for arrival time pick-off are a prerequisite for achieving excellent time resolution required for ToF-PET. We review the two types of photo-detectors used in ToF-PET: photomultiplier tubes (PMTs and silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs with a special focus on SiPMs.

  7. Development of analog solid-state photo-detectors for Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina; Morrocchi, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state photo-detectors are one of the main innovations of past century in the field of sensors. First produced in the early forties with the invention of the p-n junction in silicon and the study of its optical properties, photo-detectors received a major boost in the sixties when the p-i-n (PIN) photodiode was developed and successfully used in several applications. The development of devices with internal gain, avalanche photodiodes (APD) first and then Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes, named single photon avalanche diode (SPAD), leads to a substantial improvement in sensitivity and allowed single photon detection. Later on, thousands of SPADs have been assembled in arrays of few millimeters squared (named SiPM, silicon photo-multiplier) with single photon resolution. The high internal gain of SiPMs, together with other features peculiar of the silicon technology like compactness, speed and compatibility with magnetic fields, promoted SiPMs as the principal photo-detector competitor of photomultipliers in many applications from radiation detection to medical imaging. This paper provides a review of the properties of analog solid-state photo-detectors. Particular emphasis is given to latest advances on Positron Emission Tomography instrumentation boosted by the adoption of the silicon photo-detectors as an alternative to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Special attention is dedicated to the SiPMs, which are playing a key role in the development of innovative scanners.

  8. Radiolabelled molecules for imaging the translocator protein (18 kDa) using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolle, F.; Luus, C.; Reynolds, A.; Kassiou, M. [CEA, Institut d' Imagerie BioMedicale, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France)

    2009-07-01

    The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO), formerly known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), was originally identified as an alternate binding site for the central benzodiazepine receptor (CBR) ligand, diazepam, in the periphery, but has now been distinguished as a novel site. The TSPO is ubiquitously expressed in peripheral tissues but only minimally in the healthy brain and increased levels of TSPO expression have been noted in neuro inflammatory conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and stroke. This increase in TSPO expression has been reported to coincide with the process of micro-glial activation, whereby the brain's intrinsic immune system becomes active. Therefore, by using recently developed high affinity, selective TSPO ligands in conjunction with functional imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET), it becomes possible to study the process of micro-glial activation in the living brain. A number of high affinity ligands, the majority of which are C, N-substituted acetamide derivatives, have been successfully radiolabelled and used in in vivo studies of the TSPO and the process of micro-glial activation. This review highlights recent achievements (up to December 2008) in the field of functional imaging of the TSPO as well as the radio-syntheses involved in such studies. (authors)

  9. Cerebral hypometabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy studied with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, N.L.; Gilman, S.; Berent, S.; Morin, E.M.; Brown, M.B.; Koeppe, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is characterized by supranuclear palsy of gaze, axial dystonia, bradykinesia, rigidity, and a progressive dementia. Pathological changes in this disorder are generally restricted to subcortical structures, yet the type and range of cognitive deficits suggest the involvement of many cerebral regions. We examined the extent of functional impairment to cerebral cortical and subcortical structures as measured by the level of glucose metabolic activity at rest. Fourteen patients with PSP were compared to 21 normal volunteers of similar age using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography. Glucose metabolism was reduced in the caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, pons, and cerebral cortex, but not in the cerebellum in the patients with PSP as compared to the normal subjects. Analysis of individual brain regions revealed significant declines in cerebral glucose utilization in most regions throughout the cerebral cortex, particularly those in the superior half of the frontal lobe. Declines in the most affected regions of cerebral cortex were greater than those in any single subcortical structure. Although using conventional neuropathological techniques the cerebral cortex appears to be unaffected in PSP, significant and pervasive functional impairments in both cortical and subcortical structures are present. These observations help to account for the constellation of cognitive symptoms in individual patients with PSP and the difficulty encountered in identifying a characteristic psychometric profile for this group of patients.

  10. Low background high efficiency radiocesium detection system based on positron emission tomography technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune

    2013-09-01

    After the 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, radiocesium contamination in food became a serious concern in Japan. However, low background and high efficiency radiocesium detectors are expensive and huge, including semiconductor germanium detectors. To solve this problem, we developed a radiocesium detector by employing positron emission tomography (PET) technology. Because 134Cs emits two gamma photons (795 and 605 keV) within 5 ps, they can selectively be measured with coincidence. Such major environmental gamma photons as 40K (1.46 MeV) are single photon emitters and a coincidence measurement reduces the detection limit of radiocesium detectors. We arranged eight sets of Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) scintillation detectors in double rings (four for each ring) and measured the coincidence between these detectors using PET data acquisition system. A 50 × 50 × 30 mm BGO was optically coupled to a 2 in. square photomultiplier tube (PMT). By measuring the coincidence, we eliminated most single gamma photons from the energy distribution and only detected those from 134Cs at an average efficiency of 12%. The minimum detectable concentration of the system for the 100 s acquisition time is less than half of the food monitor requirements in Japan (25 Bq/kg). These results show that the developed radiocesium detector based on PET technology is promising to detect low level radiocesium.

  11. Incidental finding of a left over guide wire on a positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Kok Hooi; Lee, Phong Teck; Buch, Mamta; Rammohan, Kandadai Seshadri

    2012-12-15

    The Seldinger technique is commonly used cannulate vessels for radiographical procedures. Loss of a guide wire into the circulation is a rare and preventable complication. It is often noticed by chance during routine radiographs. However, there is a lack of reported cases of incidental fin dings of leftover guide wire on a PET scan. An intravascular foreign body should be retrieved as soon as the diagnosis is made, to prevent complications such as embolisation or vascular damage by fractured wires. Interventional radiology is the method of choice for retrieval. We report a rare case of the coincidental finding of a lost guide wire on a PET scan. A 37 year old man presented with psychotic episodes, thigh weakness, weight gain, increased appetite and leg cramps. He was subsequently diagnosed with cushing syndrome secondary to ectopic adrenocorticotropic secretion from a right lung tumour. He subsequently underwent a staging positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The lung tumour had no uptake on PET bit had increased activity uptake on octreotide scanning. These appearances were suggestive of with carcinoid tumour. The PET scan also revealed an incidental finding of a leftover guide wire used during peripheral inserted central catheter (PICC) recently. The wire extended from right atrium to inferior vena cava. It also showed a high uptake in the adrenal glands, indicating hyperplasia, which was most likely due to adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation. He underwent a percutaneous wire retrieval via the right femoral vein in a cardiac catheterisation laboratory and was transferred to a thoracic surgical unit for lung tumor resection.

  12. A fast rebinning algorithm for 3D positron emission tomography using John's equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrise, Michel; Liu, Xuan

    1999-08-01

    Volume imaging in positron emission tomography (PET) requires the inversion of the three-dimensional (3D) x-ray transform. The usual solution to this problem is based on 3D filtered-backprojection (FBP), but is slow. Alternative methods have been proposed which factor the 3D data into independent 2D data sets corresponding to the 2D Radon transforms of a stack of parallel slices. Each slice is then reconstructed using 2D FBP. These so-called rebinning methods are numerically efficient but are approximate. In this paper a new exact rebinning method is derived by exploiting the fact that the 3D x-ray transform of a function is the solution to the second-order partial differential equation first studied by John. The method is proposed for two sampling schemes, one corresponding to a pair of infinite plane detectors and another one corresponding to a cylindrical multi-ring PET scanner. The new FORE-J algorithm has been implemented for this latter geometry and was compared with the approximate Fourier rebinning algorithm FORE and with another exact rebinning algorithm, FOREX. Results with simulated data demonstrate a significant improvement in accuracy compared to FORE, while the reconstruction time is doubled. Compared to FOREX, the FORE-J algorithm is slightly less accurate but more than three times faster.

  13. Experience with carbon-11 choline positron emission tomography in prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotzerke, J.; Neumaier, B.; Guhlmann, A.; Reske, S.N. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Prang, J.; Volkmer, B.; Kleinschmidt, K.; Hautmann, R. [Dept. of Urology, Univ. of Ulm (Germany)

    2000-09-01

    We investigated the potential of carbon-11 choline positron emission tomography (PET) for the detection of lymph node and bone metastases in prostate cancer. A total of 23 patients were studied (known metastases: 8; suspicion of metastases: 3; primary staging: 12). Whole-body PET imaging was performed 5 min after injection of the tracer and completed within 1 h. Focally increased tracer uptake in bone or abdominal lymph node regions was interpreted as representing tumour involvement. All known bone and lymph node metastases could be recognized by [{sup 11}C]choline PET. One out of ten negative scans for primary staging was false-negative (lymph node <1 cm) and one out of two positive scans was false-positive with regard to lymph node involvement (focal bowel activity). It is concluded that [{sup 11}C]choline PET is a promising new tool for the primary staging of prostate cancer, with lymph node and bone metastases demonstrating high tracer uptake. Therapeutic management could be influenced by these results in that the technique may permit avoidance of surgical lymph node exploration. (orig.)

  14. Assessment of myocardial metabolism by positron emission tomography; Stoffwechseluntersuchungen des Herzens mit der Positronenemissionstomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengel, F.M.; Schwaiger, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik

    1999-06-01

    In combination with a variety of tracers, positron emission tomography does provide noninvasive quantitative information not only about myocardial utilisation of substrates such as glucose or free fatty acids, but also about overall oxidative metabolism. PET studies of myocardial metabolism have substantially contributed to an improved understanding of regulatory mechanism as well as interaction between different substrates under normal conditions as well as under pathologic conditions such as ischemia, heart failure or diabetes mellitus, and will continue to do so in the future. (orig.) [German] Fuer die Positronenemissionstomographie stehen verschiedene Tracer zur Verfuegung, die am menschlichen Herzen nichtinvasive Quantifizierung der Utilisation von Substraten wie Glukose oder freien Fettsaeuren, aber auch des gesamten sauerstoffabhaengigen Metabolismus ermoeglichen. Stoffwechseluntersuchungen des Herzens mit der PET haben zu einem genaueren Verstaendnis von Regulationsmechanismen und Interaktionen zwischen verschiedenen Substraten sowohl im Normalzustand als auch unter pathologischen Bedingungen wie etwa bei ischaemischen Syndromen, Herzinsuffizienz oder Diabetis mellitus beigetragen. Insbesondere durch Untersuchungen von metabolischen Auswirkungen verschiedener Therapieansaetze bei Herzerkrankungen und zur Vorhersage der Effektivitaet solcher therapeutischer Strategien kann die PET auch in Zukunft einen Beitrag zur Weiterentwicklung der Kardiologie leisten. (orig.)

  15. Speech disorders in olivopontocerebellar atrophy correlate with positron emission tomography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluin, K.J.; Gilman, S.; Markel, D.S.; Koeppe, R.A.; Rosenthal, G.; Junck, L.

    1988-06-01

    We compared the severity of ataxic and spastic dysarthria with local cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (lCMRGlc) in 30 patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA). Perceptual analysis was used to examine the speech disorders, and rating scales were devised to quantitate the degree of ataxia and spasticity in the speech of each patient. lCMRGlc was measured with /sup 18/F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography (PET). PET studies revealed marked hypometabolism in the cerebellar hemispheres, cerebellar vermis, and brainstem of OPCA patients compared with 30 control subjects. With data normalized to the cerebral cortex, a significant inverse correlation was found between the severity of ataxia in speech and the lCMRGlc within the cerebellar vermis, cerebellar hemispheres, and brainstem, but not within the thalamus. No significant correlation was found between the severity of spasticity in speech and lCMRGlc in any of these structures. The findings support the view that the severity of ataxia in speech in OPCA is related to the functional activity of the cerebellum and its connections in the brainstem.

  16. Photo-Detectors for Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (ToF-PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Virginia Ch.; Levin⋆, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    We present the most recent advances in photo-detector design employed in time of flight positron emission tomography (ToF-PET). PET is a molecular imaging modality that collects pairs of coincident (temporally correlated) annihilation photons emitted from the patient body. The annihilation photon detector typically comprises a scintillation crystal coupled to a fast photo-detector. ToF information provides better localization of the annihilation event along the line formed by each detector pair, resulting in an overall improvement in signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image. Apart from the demand for high luminosity and fast decay time of the scintillation crystal, proper design and selection of the photo-detector and methods for arrival time pick-off are a prerequisite for achieving excellent time resolution required for ToF-PET. We review the two types of photo-detectors used in ToF-PET: photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) with a special focus on SiPMs. PMID:22163482

  17. Iterative reconstruction using a Monte Carlo based system transfer matrix for dedicated breast positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Krishnendu; Straus, Kenneth J; Chen, Yu; Glick, Stephen J

    2014-08-28

    To maximize sensitivity, it is desirable that ring Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems dedicated for imaging the breast have a small bore. Unfortunately, due to parallax error this causes substantial degradation in spatial resolution for objects near the periphery of the breast. In this work, a framework for computing and incorporating an accurate system matrix into iterative reconstruction is presented in an effort to reduce spatial resolution degradation towards the periphery of the breast. The GATE Monte Carlo Simulation software was utilized to accurately model the system matrix for a breast PET system. A strategy for increasing the count statistics in the system matrix computation and for reducing the system element storage space was used by calculating only a subset of matrix elements and then estimating the rest of the elements by using the geometric symmetry of the cylindrical scanner. To implement this strategy, polar voxel basis functions were used to represent the object, resulting in a block-circulant system matrix. Simulation studies using a breast PET scanner model with ring geometry demonstrated improved contrast at 45% reduced noise level and 1.5 to 3 times resolution performance improvement when compared to MLEM reconstruction using a simple line-integral model. The GATE based system matrix reconstruction technique promises to improve resolution and noise performance and reduce image distortion at FOV periphery compared to line-integral based system matrix reconstruction.

  18. Positron emission tomography imaging of tumor cell metabolism and application to therapy response monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarnath eChallapalli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells do reprogramme their energy metabolism to enable several functions such as generation of biomass including membrane biosynthesis, and overcoming bioenergetic and redox stress. In this article we review both established and evolving radioprobes developed in association with positron emission tomography (PET to detect tumor cell metabolism and effect of treatment. Measurement of enhanced tumor cell glycolysis using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose is well established in the clinic. Analogues of choline including [11C]-choline and various fluorinated derivatives are being tested in several cancer types clinically with PET. In addition to these, there is an evolving array of metabolic tracers for measuring intracellular transport of glutamine and other amino acids or for measuring glycogenesis, as well as probes used as surrogates for fatty acid synthesis or precursors for fatty acid oxidation. In addition to providing us with opportunities for examining the complex regulation of reprogrammed energy metabolism in living subjects, the PET methods open up opportunities for monitoring pharmacological activity of new therapies that directly or indirectly inhibit tumor cell metabolism.

  19. Monitoring of patients treated with particle therapy using positron-emission-tomography (PET: the MIRANDA study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combs Stephanie E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this clinical study is to investigate the clinical feasibility and effectiveness of offline Positron-Emission-Tomography (PET quality assurance for promoting the accuracy of proton and carbon ion beam therapy. Methods/Design A total of 240 patients will be recruited, evenly sampled among different analysis groups including tumors of the brain, skull base, head and neck region, upper gastrointestinal tract including the liver, lower gastrointestinal tract, prostate and pelvic region. From the comparison of the measured activity with the planned dose and its corresponding simulated activity distribution, conclusions on the delivered treatment will be inferred and, in case of significant deviations, correction strategies will be elaborated. Discussion The investigated patients are expected to benefit from this study, since in case of detected deviations between planned and actual treatment delivery a proper intervention (e.g., correction could be performed in a subsequent irradiation fraction. In this way, an overall better treatment could be achieved than without any in-vivo verification. Moreover, site-specific patient-population information on the precision of the ion range at HIT might enable improvement of the CT-range calibration curve as well as safe reduction of the treatment margins to promote enhanced treatment plan conformality and dose escalation for full clinical exploitation of the promises of ion beam therapy. Trial Registration NCT01528670

  20. The value of positron emission tomography in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kee, Frank [Centre for Public Health, Queen' s University Belfast, Mulhouse Building, Royal Victoria Hospital Site, Grosvenor Road, Belfast BT12 6BJ, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.kee@qub.ac.uk; Erridge, Sara [Edinburgh Cancer Centre, University of Edinburgh, Crewe Road South, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Scotland (United Kingdom); Bradbury, Ian [Frontier Science (Scotland) Ltd., Grampian View, Kincraig, Inverness-shire PH21 1NA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Cairns, Karen [School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, David Bates Building, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Background: Pre-operative assessment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a major application of positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Despite substantial evidence of diagnostic accuracy, relatively little attention has been paid to its effects on patient outcomes. This paper addresses this by extending an existing decision model to include patient-elicited utilities. Patients and methods: A decision-tree model of the effect of FDG-PET on pre-operative staging was converted to a Markov model. Utilities for futile and appropriate thoracotomy were elicited from 75 patients undergoing staging investigation for NSCLC. The decision model was then used to estimate the expected value of perfect information (EVPI) associated with three sources of uncertainty-the accuracy of PET, the accuracy of CT and the patient related utility of a futile thoracotomy. Results: The model confirmed the apparent cost-effectiveness of FDG-PET and indicated that the EVPI associated with the utility of futile thoracotomy considerably exceeds that associated with measures of accuracy. Conclusion: The study highlights the importance of patient related utilities in assessing the cost-effectiveness of diagnostic technologies. In the specific case of PET for pre-operative staging of NSCLC, future research effort should focus on such elicitation, rather than further refinement of accuracy estimates.

  1. Function of the shoulder muscles during arm elevation: an assessment using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omi, Rei; Sano, Hirotaka; Ohnuma, Masahiro; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Watanuki, Shoichi; Tashiro, Manabu; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-05-01

    Although 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has been used for the assessment of skeletal muscle activities, its application to the shoulder muscles is only sparse. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activities of the shoulder muscles during arm elevation using PET. Six healthy volunteers performed an arm elevation exercise before and after FDG injection. The exercise consisted of 200 repetitions of arm elevation in the scapular plane with a 0.25-kg weight fixed to the wrist on both arms. PET examination was performed 50 min after FDG injection. For control data, PET scan was repeated for each subject on a separate day without any exercise. The volume of interest was established for each shoulder muscle. The subscapularis was divided into three portions (superior, middle, and inferior). The standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated in each muscle to quantify its activity. The SUVs increased significantly after exercise in the deltoid, supraspinatus, and the superior portion of subscapularis. Among three divided portions of the subscapularis, the SUV of the superior one-third was significantly greater than the rest of the muscle after exercise. Our current study clearly indicated that there were two functionally different portions in the subscapularis muscle and the superior one-third played an important role during arm elevation in the scapular plane.

  2. Emission line tomography of the short period cataclysmic variables CC Scl and V2051 Oph

    CERN Document Server

    Longa-Peña, P; Marsh, T

    2014-01-01

    We present time-series spectroscopy of two short period cataclysmic variables, CC Scl and V2051 Oph, to test the efficiency of Doppler tomography-based methods in constraining orbital parameters of evolved cataclysmic variables. We find that the Ca~II triplet lines offer superior diagnostics, revealing emission components from the mass donors and sharp images of the accretion discs. Furthermore, we use Monte-Carlo methods to estimate the uncertainties from ensembles of Doppler maps. We compare our new methods against traditional radial velocity methods and show that they offer a valid route towards system parameter determination. Our analysis of CC Scl suggests a low mass ratio of $q=0.08\\pm0.03$ with a primary velocity of $K_1=37\\pm14$ km/s. This mass ratio is in between the pre- and post-period minimum status, however our $K_1$ solution favours a post-period minimum system. Our derived parameters for V2051 Oph ($q= 0.16\\pm 0.03$, $K_1=97\\pm10$ km/s) are in agreement with the eclipse solution ($q=0.19\\pm0.03...

  3. INSIDE in-beam positron emission tomography system for particle range monitoring in hadrontherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina; Attili, Andrea; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Belcari, Nicola; Camarlinghi, Niccolo'; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Coli, Silvia; Del Guerra, Alberto; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ferrero, Veronica; Fiorina, Elisa; Giraudo, Giuseppe; Kostara, Eleftheria; Morrocchi, Matteo; Pennazio, Francesco; Peroni, Cristiana; Piliero, Maria Antonietta; Pirrone, Giovanni; Rivetti, Angelo; Rolo, Manuel D; Rosso, Valeria; Sala, Paola; Sportelli, Giancarlo; Wheadon, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The quality assurance of particle therapy treatment is a fundamental issue that can be addressed by developing reliable monitoring techniques and indicators of the treatment plan correctness. Among the available imaging techniques, positron emission tomography (PET) has long been investigated and then clinically applied to proton and carbon beams. In 2013, the Innovative Solutions for Dosimetry in Hadrontherapy (INSIDE) collaboration proposed an innovative bimodal imaging concept that combines an in-beam PET scanner with a tracking system for charged particle imaging. This paper presents the general architecture of the INSIDE project but focuses on the in-beam PET scanner that has been designed to reconstruct the particles range with millimetric resolution within a fraction of the dose delivered in a treatment of head and neck tumors. The in-beam PET scanner has been recently installed at the Italian National Center of Oncologic Hadrontherapy (CNAO) in Pavia, Italy, and the commissioning phase has just started. The results of the first beam test with clinical proton beams on phantoms clearly show the capability of the in-beam PET to operate during the irradiation delivery and to reconstruct on-line the beam-induced activity map. The accuracy in the activity distal fall-off determination is millimetric for therapeutic doses.

  4. Photo-detectors for time of flight positron emission tomography (ToF-PET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Virginia Ch; Levin, Craig S

    2010-01-01

    We present the most recent advances in photo-detector design employed in time of flight positron emission tomography (ToF-PET). PET is a molecular imaging modality that collects pairs of coincident (temporally correlated) annihilation photons emitted from the patient body. The annihilation photon detector typically comprises a scintillation crystal coupled to a fast photo-detector. ToF information provides better localization of the annihilation event along the line formed by each detector pair, resulting in an overall improvement in signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image. Apart from the demand for high luminosity and fast decay time of the scintillation crystal, proper design and selection of the photo-detector and methods for arrival time pick-off are a prerequisite for achieving excellent time resolution required for ToF-PET. We review the two types of photo-detectors used in ToF-PET: photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) with a special focus on SiPMs.

  5. A new mechanism of ionizing radiation detection for positron emission tomography: modulation of optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Daghighian, Henry M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2016-10-01

    Using conventional scintillation detection, the fundamental limit in positron emission tomography (PET) annihilation photon pair coincidence time resolution is strongly dependent on the inherent temporal variances generated during the scintillation process, yielding an intrinsic physical limit of around 100 ps. On the other hand, modulation mechanisms of a material's optical properties as exploited in the optical telecommunications industry can be orders of magnitude faster. In this paper we borrow from the concept of optics pump-probe measurement to study whether ionizing radiation can also produce fast modulations of optical properties, which can be utilized as a novel method for radiation detection. We show that a refractive index modulation of approximately 5x10-6 is induced by interactions in a cadmium telluride (CdTe) crystal from a 511 keV photon source. Furthermore, using additional radionuclide sources, we show that the amplitude of the optical modulation signal varies linearly with both the radiation source flux rate and average photon energy.

  6. Modelling Random Coincidences in Positron Emission Tomography by Using Singles and Prompts: A Comparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Random coincidences degrade the image in Positron Emission Tomography, PET. To compensate for their degradation effects, the rate of random coincidences should be estimated. Under certain circumstances, current estimation methods fail to provide accurate results. We propose a novel method, “Singles–Prompts” (SP), that includes the information conveyed by prompt coincidences and models the pile–up. The SP method has the same structure than the well-known “Singles Rate” (SR) approach. Hence, SP can straightforwardly replace SR. In this work, the SP method has been extensively assessed and compared to two conventional methods, SR and the delayed window (DW) method, in a preclinical PET scenario using Monte–Carlo simulations. SP offers accurate estimates for the randoms rates, while SR and DW tend to overestimate the rates (∼10%, and 5%, respectively). With pile-up, the SP method is more robust than SR (but less than DW). At the image level, the contrast is overestimated in SR-corrected images, +16%, while SP produces the correct value. Spill–over is slightly reduced using SP instead of SR. The DW images values are similar to those of SP except for low-statistic scenarios, where DW behaves as if randoms were not compensated for. In particular, the contrast is reduced, −16%. In general, the better estimations of SP translate into better image quality. PMID:27603143

  7. List-mode image reconstruction for positron emission tomography using tetrahedral voxels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, John E.; Angelis, Georgios I.; Meikle, Steven R.

    2016-09-01

    Image space decomposition based on tetrahedral voxels are interesting candidates for use in emission tomography. Tetrahedral voxels provide many of the advantages of point clouds with irregular spacing, such as being intrinsically multi-resolution, yet they also serve as a volumetric partition of the image space and so are comparable to more standard cubic voxels. Additionally, non-rigid displacement fields can be applied to the tetrahedral mesh in a straight-forward manner. So far studies incorporating tetrahedral decomposition of the image space have concentrated on pre-calculated, node-based, system matrix elements which reduces the flexibility of the tetrahedral approach and the capacity to accurately define regions of interest. Here, a list-mode on-the-fly calculation of the system matrix elements is described using a tetrahedral decomposition of the image space and volumetric elements—voxels. The algorithm is demonstrated in the context of awake animal PET which may require both rigid and non-rigid motion compensation, as well as quantification within small regions of the brain. This approach allows accurate, event based, motion compensation including non-rigid deformations.

  8. Detection of neuronal damage in degenerative brain disease with cobalt-55 and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, H.M.L.; Pruim, J.; Paans, A.M.J. [Univ. Hospital Groningen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    We suggest Cobalt-55 (Co) as a Calcium (Ca)-marker to visualize Ca transport across the neuronal membrane. Elevation of intracellular Ca is closely linked with the process of neuronal cell-decay. Co-uptake is correlated with Ca-accumulation through divalent cation-permeable kainate (KA)-activated receptor-operated channels in the neuronal membrane. This hypothesis was studied with position emission tomography (PET) both in patients with a ischemic cerebro-vascular accident (CVA) and in patients with relapsing progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Co-PET studies were performed in a dynamic mode (6 frames of 10 minutes) 20-25 hours after iv.-administration of 1-2 mCi Co. Regional specific accumulation irrespective of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity in the (clinically appropriate) affected cerebral region could be demonstrated in CVA-patients, thus suggesting neuronal decay in (the early phase of) infarction. In MS, inhomogeneous cerebral distribution of Co was detected, in contrast to healthy volunteers. This suggests focal accumulation of Co in multiple spots of neuronal decay, possibly related to MS-lesions on MRI. In conclusion, Co-PET may prove to be a valuable tool for the early detection of neuronal decay not only in CVA and MS, but in other brain-pathology as well. The usefulness of Co-PET in imaging brain-tumors and myocardial ischemia has already been established.

  9. Brain Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography in Anosmic Subjects Ater Closed Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Banan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anosmia following head trauma is relatively common and in many cases is persistent and irreversible. The ability to objectively measure such a decline in smelling, for both clinical and medicolegal goals, is very important. The aim of this study was to find results of brain Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT in anosmic subjects after closed head trauma. This case-control cross sectional study was conducted in a tertiary referral University Hospital. The brain perfusion state of nineteen anosmic patients and thirteen normal controls was evaluated by means of the SPECT with 99mtc- ECD infusion- before and after olfactory stimulation. The orbitofrontal lobe of the brain was assumed as the region of interest and changes in perfusion of this area before and after the stimulations were compared in two groups. The mean of brain perfusion in controls before and after the stimulation was 8.26% ± 0.19% and 9.89% ± 0.54%, respectively (P < 0.0001. Among patients group, these quantities were 7.97% ± 1.05% and 8.49% ± 1.5%, respectively (P < 0.004. The difference between all the measures in cases and controls were statistically significant (P < 0.0001. There were no differences in age and sex between two groups. The brain SPECT is an objective technique suitable for evaluating anosmia following the head trauma and it may be used with other diagnostic modalities

  10. Low background high efficiency radiocesium detection system based on positron emission tomography technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    After the 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, radiocesium contamination in food became a serious concern in Japan. However, low background and high efficiency radiocesium detectors are expensive and huge, including semiconductor germanium detectors. To solve this problem, we developed a radiocesium detector by employing positron emission tomography (PET) technology. Because {sup 134}Cs emits two gamma photons (795 and 605 keV) within 5 ps, they can selectively be measured with coincidence. Such major environmental gamma photons as {sup 40}K (1.46 MeV) are single photon emitters and a coincidence measurement reduces the detection limit of radiocesium detectors. We arranged eight sets of Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO) scintillation detectors in double rings (four for each ring) and measured the coincidence between these detectors using PET data acquisition system. A 50 × 50 × 30 mm BGO was optically coupled to a 2 in. square photomultiplier tube (PMT). By measuring the coincidence, we eliminated most single gamma photons from the energy distribution and only detected those from {sup 134}Cs at an average efficiency of 12%. The minimum detectable concentration of the system for the 100 s acquisition time is less than half of the food monitor requirements in Japan (25 Bq/kg). These results show that the developed radiocesium detector based on PET technology is promising to detect low level radiocesium.

  11. A study of cerebral perfusion using single photon emission computed tomography in neonates with brain lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, J.; Contantinesco, A.; Brunot, B.; Messer, J. (Hospital Universitaire de Strasbourg (France))

    1994-03-01

    In this study the authors used a single photon emission computed tomography technique (SPECT) with radiolabelled [sup 99m]Tc HMPAO to assess cerebral perfusion in newborn infants with documented cerebral lesions and to determine to what extent brain SPECT might be useful in the neonatal period. A total of 15 newborn infants with the following cerebral pathologies were enrolled: severe parietal bilateral periventricular leucomalacia; moderate parietal bilateral PVL; intraventricular haemorrhage grade II with unilateral parietal parenchymal extension; cerebral infarction in the zone of middle cerebral artery; and post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus. Follow-up was available in all infants. Alterations in cerebral perfusion were seen in only 12 of 15 infants and at the location of severe PVL, PE and CI. It was noted that the regions of diminished perfusion extended beyond the apparent extent of cerebral pathology delineated by ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. Markedly diminished perfusion was seen in one infant with hydrocephalus, which recovered following placement of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. Regarding outcome, SPECT data failed to provide additional information than that of neuroradiological investigations. It is concluded that the use of SPECT, under these conditions, to assess alteration of cerebral perfusion in the neonatal period will not provide any additional information than that of neuroradiological investigations. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Fluorodeoxyglucose-based positron emission tomography imaging to monitor drug responses in hematological tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbold, Andrea; Martin, Ben P; Cullinane, Carleen; Bots, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to monitor the uptake of the labeled glucose analog fluorodeoxyglucose (¹⁸F-FDG), a process that is generally believed to reflect viable tumor cell mass. The use of ¹⁸F-FDG PET can be helpful in documenting over time the reduction in tumor mass volume in response to anticancer drug therapy in vivo. In this protocol, we describe how to monitor the response of murine B-cell lymphomas to an inducer of apoptosis, the anticancer drug vorinostat (a histone deacetylase inhibitor). B-cell lymphoma cells are injected into recipient mice and, on tumor formation, the mice are treated with vorinostat. The tracer ¹⁸F-FDG is then injected into the mice at several time points, and its uptake is monitored using PET. Because the uptake of ¹⁸F-FDG is not a direct measure of apoptosis, an additional direct method proving that apoptotic cells are present should also be performed.

  13. Neural correlates of sensorimotor gating: A metabolic positron emission tomography study in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathrin eRohleder

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Impaired sensorimotor gating occurs in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and can be measured using the prepulse inhibition (PPI paradigm of the acoustic startle response. This assay is frequently used to validate animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders and to explore the therapeutic potential of new drugs. The underlying neural network of PPI has been extensively studied with invasive methods and genetic modifications. However, its relevance for healthy untreated animals and the functional interplay between startle- and PPI-related areas during a PPI session is so far unknown. Therefore, we studied awake rats in a PPI paradigm, startle control and background noise control, combined with behavioral [18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET. Subtractive analyses between conditions were used to identify brain regions involved in startle and PPI processing in well-hearing Black hooded rats. For correlative analysis with regard to the amount of PPI we also included hearing-impaired Lister hooded rats that startled more often, because their hearing threshold was just below the lowest prepulses. Metabolic imaging showed that the brain areas proposed for startle and PPI mediation are active during PPI paradigms in healthy untreated rats. More importantly, we show for the first time that the whole PPI modulation network is active during passive PPI sessions, where no selective attention to prepulse or startle stimulus is required. We conclude that this reflects ongoing monitoring of stimulus significance and constant adjustment of sensorimotor gating.

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography investigations of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naagren, Kjell [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET and Cyclotron Unit, Odense C (Denmark); Halldin, Christer [Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Stockholm (Sweden); Rinne, Juha O. [Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland)

    2010-08-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common degenerative neurological disease that is an increasing medical, economical, and social problem. There is evidence that a long ''asymptomatic'' phase of the disease exists where functional changes in the brain are present, but structural imaging for instance with magnetic resonance imaging remains normal. Positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the tools by which it is possible to explore changes in cerebral blood flow and metabolism and the functioning of different neurotransmitter systems. More recently, investigation of protein aggregations such as amyloid deposits or neurofibrillary tangles containing tau-protein has become possible. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on various {sup 18}F- and {sup 11}C-labelled PET tracers that could be used to study the pathophysiology of AD, to be used in the early or differential diagnosis or to be used in development of treatment and in monitoring of treatment effects. (orig.)

  15. Metabolizer in vivo of fullerenes and metallofullerenes by positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Yang, Wenjiang; Cui, Rongli; Wang, Dongliang; Chang, Yanan; Gu, Weihong; Yin, Wenyan; Bai, Xue; Chen, Kui; Xia, Lin; Geng, Huan; Xing, Gengmei

    2016-04-01

    Fullerenes (C60) and metallofullerenes (Gd@C82) have similar chemical structure, but the bio-effects of both fullerene-based materials are distinct in vivo. Tracking organic carbon-based materials such as C60 and Gd@C82 is difficult in vivo due to the high content of carbon element in the living tissues themselves. In this study, the biodistribution and metabolism of fullerenes (C60 and Gd@C82) radiolabeled with 64Cu were observed by positron emission tomography (PET). 64Cu-C60 and 64Cu-Gd@C82 were prepared using 1, 4, 7, 10-tetrakis (carbamoylmethyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetra-azacyclodo-decanes grafted on carbon cages as a chelator for 64Cu, and were obtained rapidly with high radiochemical yield (≥90%). The new radio-conjugates were evaluated in vivo in the normal mouse model and tissue distribution by small animal PET/CT imaging and histology was carried out. The PET imaging, the biodistribution and the excretion of C60 and Gd@C82 indicated that C60 samples have higher blood retention and lower renal clearance than the Gd@C82 samples in vivo and suggested that the differences in metabolism and distribution in vivo were caused by the structural differences of the groups on the fullerene cages though there is chemical similarity between C60 and Gd@C82.

  16. Iterative reconstruction using a Monte Carlo based system transfer matrix for dedicated breast positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Krishnendu [Ohio Medical Physics Consulting, Dublin, Ohio 43017 (United States); Straus, Kenneth J.; Glick, Stephen J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Chen, Yu. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    To maximize sensitivity, it is desirable that ring Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems dedicated for imaging the breast have a small bore. Unfortunately, due to parallax error this causes substantial degradation in spatial resolution for objects near the periphery of the breast. In this work, a framework for computing and incorporating an accurate system matrix into iterative reconstruction is presented in an effort to reduce spatial resolution degradation towards the periphery of the breast. The GATE Monte Carlo Simulation software was utilized to accurately model the system matrix for a breast PET system. A strategy for increasing the count statistics in the system matrix computation and for reducing the system element storage space was used by calculating only a subset of matrix elements and then estimating the rest of the elements by using the geometric symmetry of the cylindrical scanner. To implement this strategy, polar voxel basis functions were used to represent the object, resulting in a block-circulant system matrix. Simulation studies using a breast PET scanner model with ring geometry demonstrated improved contrast at 45% reduced noise level and 1.5 to 3 times resolution performance improvement when compared to MLEM reconstruction using a simple line-integral model. The GATE based system matrix reconstruction technique promises to improve resolution and noise performance and reduce image distortion at FOV periphery compared to line-integral based system matrix reconstruction.

  17. Compton Positron Emission Tomography with a Liquid Xenon Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Giboni, K; Doke, T; Suzuki,, S; Fernandes, L M P; Lopes, J A M; Dos Santos, J M F

    2007-01-01

    Most background noise in medical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging originates from photons which Compton scatter before they leave the body of the patient. In only 4% of total events do both photons leave the body un-scattered and are therefore useful for current PET imaging. In an additional 8% of the events one of the photons scatters only once. This class of events can be analyzed correctly with Compton reconstruction. A detector with sufficiently good energy, position, and multiple hit resolution can recognize these events and process them properly. By virtue of recent technological progress, Liquid Xenon Time Projection Chambers (LXeTPCs) match these requirements. A ring of small LXeTPCs can measure the energy with better than 4% FWHM and the position with less than 1 mm RMS. It also has the capability to reconstruct all interaction points. These data are required for Compton imaging. With an improved energy resolution over existing crystal scintillators (LSO/LYSO,BGO and GSO), more of the remai...

  18. Aspects of positron emission tomography radiochemistry as relevant for food chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, F

    2005-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a medical imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron emitting radioisotopes to obtain functional information of physiological, biochemical and pharmacological processes in vivo. The need to understand the potential link between the ingestion of individual dietary agents and the effect of health promotion or health risk requires the exact metabolic characterization of food ingredients in vivo. This exciting but rather new research field of PET would provide new insights and perspectives on food chemistry by assessing quantitative information on pharmocokinetics and pharmacodynamics of food ingredients and dietary agents. To fully exploit PET technology in food chemistry appropriately radiolabelled compounds as relevant for food sciences are needed. The most widely used short-lived positron emitters are (11)C (t(1/2) = 20.4 min) and (18)F (t(1/2) = 109.8 min). Longer-lived radioisotopes are available by using (76)Br (t(1/2) = 16.2 h) and (124)I (t(1/2) = 4.12 d). The present review article tries to discuss some aspects for the radiolabelling of food ingredients and dietary agents either by means of isotopic labelling with (11)C or via prosthetic group labelling approaches using the positron emitting halogens (18)F, (76)Br and (124)I.

  19. Pretargeted Positron Emission Tomography Imaging That Employs Supramolecular Nanoparticles with in Vivo Bioorthogonal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shuang; Choi, Jin-Sil; Garcia, Mitch Andre; Xing, Yan; Chen, Kuan-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ming; Jiang, Ziyue K; Ro, Tracy; Wu, Lily; Stout, David B; Tomlinson, James S; Wang, Hao; Chen, Kai; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Lin, Wei-Yu

    2016-01-26

    A pretargeted oncologic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging that leverages the power of supramolecular nanoparticles with in vivo bioorthogonal chemistry was demonstrated for the clinically relevant problem of tumor imaging. The advantages of this approach are that (i) the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of tumor-targeting and imaging agents can be independently altered via chemical alteration to achieve the desired in vivo performance and (ii) the interplay between the two PKs and other controllable variables confers a second layer of control toward improved PET imaging. In brief, we utilized supramolecular chemistry to synthesize tumor-targeting nanoparticles containing transcyclooctene (TCO, a bioorthogonal reactive motif), called TCO⊂SNPs. After the intravenous injection and subsequent concentration of the TCO⊂SNPs in the tumors of living mice, a small molecule containing both the complementary bioorthogonal motif (tetrazine, Tz) and a positron-emitting radioisotope ((64)Cu) was injected to react selectively and irreversibly to TCO. High-contrast PET imaging of the tumor mass was accomplished after the rapid clearance of the unreacted (64)Cu-Tz probe. Our nanoparticle approach encompasses a wider gamut of tumor types due to the use of EPR effects, which is a universal phenomenon for most solid tumors.

  20. Function of the shoulder muscles during arm elevation: an assessment using positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omi, Rei; Sano, Hirotaka; Ohnuma, Masahiro; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Watanuki, Shoichi; Tashiro, Manabu; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    Although 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has been used for the assessment of skeletal muscle activities, its application to the shoulder muscles is only sparse. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activities of the shoulder muscles during arm elevation using PET. Six healthy volunteers performed an arm elevation exercise before and after FDG injection. The exercise consisted of 200 repetitions of arm elevation in the scapular plane with a 0.25-kg weight fixed to the wrist on both arms. PET examination was performed 50 min after FDG injection. For control data, PET scan was repeated for each subject on a separate day without any exercise. The volume of interest was established for each shoulder muscle. The subscapularis was divided into three portions (superior, middle, and inferior). The standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated in each muscle to quantify its activity. The SUVs increased significantly after exercise in the deltoid, supraspinatus, and the superior portion of subscapularis. Among three divided portions of the subscapularis, the SUV of the superior one-third was significantly greater than the rest of the muscle after exercise. Our current study clearly indicated that there were two functionally different portions in the subscapularis muscle and the superior one-third played an important role during arm elevation in the scapular plane. PMID:20298439

  1. Assessment of diabetic neuropathy with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harshvardhan; Gaur, Neeraj; Tipre, Dnyanesh

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic neuropathies (DNs) are nerve-damaging disorders associated with diabetes. They are commonly attributed to peripheral nerves and primarily affect the limbs of the patient. They cause altered sensitivity to external stimuli along with loss in balance and reflexes of the affected patient. DNs are associated with a variety of clinical manifestations including autonomic failure and are caused by poor management of blood sugar levels. Imaging modalities provide vital information about early physiological changes in DNs. This review summarizes contributions by various teams of scientists in developing imaging methods to assess physiological changes in DNs and ongoing clinical trials where imaging modalities are applied to evaluate therapeutic intervention in DNs. Development of PET, single photon emission computed tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy methods over the past 20 years are reviewed in the diagnostic assessment of DNs. Abnormal radiotracer pharmacokinetics and neurometabolite spectra in affected organs confirm physiological abnormalities in DN. With the use of the Siemens Biograph mMR and GE Signa - 60 cm (PET/MRI scanner), simultaneous acquisition of physiological and anatomical information could enhance understanding of DNs and accelerate drug development.

  2. Exploring the nature of atheroma and cardiovascular inflammation in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, J R

    2015-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become widely established in oncology. Subsequently, a whole new “toolbox” of tracers have become available to look at different aspects of cancer cell function and dysfunction, including cell protein production, DNA synthesis, hypoxia and angiogenesis. In the past 5 years, these tools have been used increasingly to look at the other great killer of the developed world: cardiovascular disease. For example, inflammation of the unstable plaque can be imaged with 18-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), and this uptake can be quantified to show the effect that statins have in reducing inflammation and explains how these drugs can reduce the risk of stroke. 18F-FDG has also become established in diagnosing and monitoring large-vessel vasculitis and has now entered routine practice. Other agents such as gallium-68 (68Ga) octreotide have been shown to identify vascular inflammation possibly more specifically than 18FFDG.Hypoxia within the plaque can be imaged with 18F-fluoromisonidazole and resulting angiogenesis with 18F-RGD peptides. Active calcification such as that found in unstable atheromatous plaques can be imaged with 18F-NaF. PET imaging enables us to understand the mechanisms by which cardiovascular disease, including atheroma, leads tomorbidity and death and thus increases the chance of finding new and effective treatments.

  3. Emission Computed Tomography: A New Technique for the Quantitative Physiologic Study of Brain and Heart in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, M. E.; Hoffman, E. J.; Huang, S. C.; Schelbert, H. R.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    Emission computed tomography can provide a quantitative in vivo measurement of regional tissue radionuclide tracer concentrations. This facility when combined with physiologic models and radioactively labeled physiologic tracers that behave in a predictable manner allow measurement of a wide variety of physiologic variables. This integrated technique has been referred to as Physiologic Tomography (PT). PT requires labeled compounds which trace physiologic processes in a known and predictable manner, and physiologic models which are appropriately formulated and validated to derive physiologic variables from ECT data. In order to effectively achieve this goal, PT requires an ECT system that is capable of performing truly quantitative or analytical measurements of tissue tracer concentrations and which has been well characterized in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity and signal to noise ratios in the tomographic image. This paper illustrates the capabilities of emission computed tomography and provides examples of physiologic tomography for the regional measurement of cerebral and myocardial metabolic rate for glucose, regional measurement of cerebral blood volume, gated cardiac blood pools and capillary perfusion in brain and heart. Studies on patients with stroke and myocardial ischemia are also presented.

  4. The impact of integrating images of positron emission tomography with computed tomography simulation on radiation therapy planning; Tomographie par emission de positons et fusion d'images de simulation virtuelle par tomodensitometrie: impact sur la planification de la radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touboul, E.; Deniaud-Alexandre, E.; Moureau-Zabotto, L.; Lerouge, D. [Hopital Tenon AP-HP, Service d' Oncologie-Radiotherapie, Cancerest, Universite Paris-6, CHU-Est, 75 - Paris (France)

    2004-11-01

    The co-registration of planning CT and {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxy-2-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) with patient in the sane treatment position is the principally well-established tool for improving the target coverage defined and the target planning volume to treat the metabolic target volume. Most of the interest in the co-registered CT/PET images on volume delineation has focused on conformal radiation therapy of non-small cell lung cancer. In spite of technical difficulties related to the target volume displacements, and the sensitivity and the specificity of FDG-PET images < 100 %, the target volume delineation is significantly changed by the co-registration of FDG-PET images and planning CT by either reduction of the radiation volume (excluding atelectasis or mediastinal lymph node) or the increasing of mediastinal lymph node involvement. Image fusion technique reduces the interobserver variability in target volume delineation. Furthermore, after induction chemotherapy image fusion leads to improve the patient management by detecting locoregional progression disease or the presence of metastatic disease. Other anatomic tumor sites are going to investigate such as: head-and-neck cancer, gynecologic cancer, oesophageal cancer, anal cancer, Hodgkin's disease, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The impact on treatment outcome remains to be demonstrated. (authors)

  5. Heterogeneity of Monosymptomatic Resting Tremor in a Prospective Study: Clinical Features, Electrophysiological Test, and Dopamine Transporter Positron Emission Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Hua-Guang Zheng; Rong Zhang; Xin Li; Fang-Fei Li; Ya-Chen Wang; Xue-Mei Wang; Ling-Long Lu; Tao Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background: The relationship between monosymptomatic resting tremor (mRT) and Parkinson′s disease (PD) remains controversial. In this study, we aimed to assess the function of presynaptic dopaminergic neurons in patients with mRT by dopamine transporter positron emission tomography (DAT-PET) and to evaluate the utility of clinical features or electrophysiological studies in differential diagnosis. Methods: Thirty-three consecutive patients with mRT were enrolled prospectively. The Unified...

  6. Lymphocytic Thyroiditis Presenting as a Focal Uptake on 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Tae Seok; Kim, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sarah; Moon, Hee Jung; Kwak, Jin Young [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Diffuse increased uptake on 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (18F FDG PET) is a well-known finding of the lymphocytic thyroiditis. Nevertheless, a pathologic confirmation is needed in cases of a focal 18F FDG uptake in the thyroid gland. This article reports a rare case of a focal 18F FDG uptake lesion by PET, which was revealed pathologically to be lymphocytic thyroiditis

  7. Significance of incidental focal uptake in prostate on 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography CT images

    OpenAIRE

    Han, E J; H O, J; Choi, W H; Yoo, I R; Chung, S K

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of incidental focal prostate fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake, we reviewed 18-F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scans from 2003 to 2007 and selected cases with focal FDG uptake in prostate. Cases of known prostate cancer were excluded. The maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax), site (central or peripheral) and pattern (discrete or ill-defined) of FDG uptake, calcification (present or absent) and prostate volume (

  8. Characteristics of glucose metabolism and amyloid deposition by positron emission tomography images in Alzheimer’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪勇

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate positron emission tomography (PET) image characteristics of glucose metabolism and amyloid deposition as demonstrated by fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) .Methods Patients with mild AD and moderate AD (n=6,each) were included in this study.6 healthy subjects were selected as normal controls.Cognitive function was assessed by the minimental state examination,Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Clinical Dementia Rating.Ventricular dilation,cor-

  9. The impact of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography on the staging, management and outcome of anal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    De Winton, E.; Heriot, A. G.; Ng, M; Hicks, R.J.; Hogg, A; Milner, A.; Leong, T; Fay, M; MacKay, J.; Drummond, E.; Ngan, S Y

    2009-01-01

    Accurate inguinal and pelvic nodal staging in anal cancer is important for the prognosis and planning of radiation fields. There is evidence for the role of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the staging and management of cancer, with early reports of an increasing role in outcome prognostication in a number of tumours. We aimed to determine the effect of FDG-PET on the nodal staging, radiotherapy planning and prognostication of patients with primary anal cancer. ...

  10. Particle physics methodologies applied to time-of-flight positron emission tomography with silicon-photomultipliers and inorganic scintillators

    OpenAIRE

    Leming, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography, or PET, is a medical imaging technique which has been used in clinical environments for over two decades. With the advent of fast timing detectors and scintillating crystals, it is possible to envisage improvements to the technique\\ud with the inclusion of time-of-flight capabilities. In this context, silicon photomultipliers coupled to fast inorganic LYSO crystals are investigated as a possible technology choice. As part of the ENVISION collaboration a range of ...

  11. [Analysis of single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with hypertensive encephalopathy complicated with previous hypertensive crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustkova, H S

    2012-01-01

    In cerebrovascular diseases pefuzionnaya single photon emission computed tomography with lipophilic amines used for the diagnosis of functional disorders of cerebral blood flow. Quantitative calculations helps clarify the nature of vascular disease and clarify the adequacy and effectiveness of the treatment. In this modern program for SPECT ensure conduct not only as to the calculation of blood flow, but also make it possible to compute also the absolute values of cerebral blood flow.

  12. Kinetic Analysis of Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography Data using Open-Source Image Processing and Statistical Inference Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Hawe, David; Hernández Fernández, Francisco R.; O’Suilleabháin, Liam; Huang, Jian; Wolsztynski, Eric; O’Sullivan, Finbarr

    2012-01-01

    In dynamic mode, positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to track the evolution of injected radio-labelled molecules in living tissue. This is a powerful diagnostic imaging technique that provides a unique opportunity to probe the status of healthy and pathological tissue by examining how it processes substrates. The spatial aspect of PET is well established in the computational statistics literature. This article focuses on its temporal aspect. The interpretation of PET time-course da...

  13. Impact of Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography (SPECT/CT) and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) in the Diagnosis of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Vicenty, Irma L; Santiago-Sánchez, Michelaldemar; Vélez-Miró, Iván; Motta-Valencia, Keryl

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as damage to the brain resulting from an external force. TBI, a global leading cause of death and disability, is associated with serious social, economic, and health problems. In cases of mild-to-moderate brain damage, conventional anatomical imaging modalities may or may not detect the cascade of metabolic changes that have occurred or are occurring at the intracellular level. Functional nuclear medicine imaging and neurophysiological parameters can be used to characterize brain damage, as the former provides direct visualization of brain function, even in the absence of overt behavioral manifestations or anatomical findings. We report the case of a 30-year-old Hispanic male veteran who, after 2 traumatic brain injury events, developed cognitive and neuropsychological problems with no clear etiology in the presence of negative computed tomography (CT) findings.

  14. Dual time point imaging fluorine-18 flourodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for evaluation of large loco-regional recurrences of breast cancer treated with electrochemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Louise Wichmann; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Skougaard, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    18-Flourine-Flourodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG-PET/CT) could be a method for response evaluation. However, a standard FDG-PET/CT scan cannot differentiate inflammatory tissue from malignant tissue. Dual point time imaging (DTPI) FDG-PET has the potential of doing...

  15. Comparison of five segmentation tools for 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-based target volume definition in head and neck cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinagl, D.A.X.; Vogel, W.V.; Hoffmann, A.L.; Dalen, J.A. van; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Target-volume delineation for radiation treatment to the head and neck area traditionally is based on physical examination, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging. Additional molecular imaging with (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) may imp

  16. Neurofibroma of the breast detected on position emission tomography-CT in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Seok; Kim, Hye Jung; Yang, Bang; Lee So Mi; Jeong, Ji Yun [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Neurofibromas of the breast are rare. They are commonly found as solitary lesions or parts of neurofibromatosis type 1 and are usually located on the nipple-areolar area. We describe a case of neurofibroma of the breast in the retromammary space, which was detected on positron emission tomography-computed tomography after hysterectomy due to endometrial cancer.

  17. A Gaussian mixture model for definition of lung tumor volumes in positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Penney, Bill C; Martel, Mary K; Pelizzari, Charles A

    2007-11-01

    The increased interest in 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in radiation treatment planning in the past five years necessitated the independent and accurate segmentation of gross tumor volume (GTV) from FDG-PET scans. In some studies the radiation oncologist contours the GTV based on a computed tomography scan, while incorporating pertinent data from the PET images. Alternatively, a simple threshold, typically 40% of the maximum intensity, has been employed to differentiate tumor from normal tissue, while other researchers have developed algorithms to aid the PET based GTV definition. None of these methods, however, results in reliable PET tumor segmentation that can be used for more sophisticated treatment plans. For this reason, we developed a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based segmentation technique on selected PET tumor regions from non-small cell lung cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a GMM-based tumor volume definition in a robust, reliable and reproducible way. A GMM relies on the idea that any distribution, in our case a distribution of image intensities, can be expressed as a mixture of Gaussian densities representing different classes. According to our implementation, each class belongs to one of three regions in the image; the background (B), the uncertain (U) and the target (T), and from these regions we can obtain the tumor volume. User interaction in the implementation is required, but is limited to the initialization of the model parameters and the selection of an "analysis region" to which the modeling is restricted. The segmentation was developed on three and tested on another four clinical cases to ensure robustness against differences observed in the clinic. It also compared favorably with thresholding at 40% of the maximum intensity and a threshold determination function based on tumor to background image intensities proposed in a recent paper. The parts of the

  18. In vivo imaging of schistosomes to assess disease burden using positron emission tomography (PET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Salem

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomes are chronic intravascular helminth parasites of humans causing a heavy burden of disease worldwide. Diagnosis of schistosomiasis currently requires the detection of schistosome eggs in the feces and urine of infected individuals. This method unreliably measures disease burden due to poor sensitivity and wide variances in egg shedding. In vivo imaging of schistosome parasites could potentially better assess disease burden, improve management of schistosomiasis, facilitate vaccine development, and enhance study of the parasite's biology. Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni have a high metabolic demand for glucose. In this work we investigated whether the parasite burden in mice could be assessed by positron emission tomography (PET imaging with 2-deoxy-2[(18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Live adult S. mansoni worms FDG uptake in vitro increased with the number of worms. Athymic nude mice infected with S. mansoni 5-6 weeks earlier were used in the imaging studies. Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT imaging with Prosense 680 was first performed. Accumulation of the imaging probe in the lower abdomen correlated with the number of worms in mice with low infection burden. The total FDG uptake in the common portal vein and/or regions of elevated FDG uptake in the liver linearly correlated to the number of worms recovered from infected animals (R(2 =0.58, P<0.001, n = 40. FDG uptake showed a stronger correlation with the worm burden in mice with more than 50 worms (R(2 = 0.85, P<0.001, n = 17. Cryomicrotome imaging confirmed that most of the worms in a mouse with a high infection burden were in the portal vein, but not in a mouse with a low infection burden. FDG uptake in recovered worms measured by well counting closely correlated with worm number (R(2 = 0.85, P<0.001, n = 21. Infected mice showed a 32% average decrease in total FDG uptake after three days of praziquantel treatment (P = 0.12. The

  19. Spatiotemporal Stability of Cu-ATSM and FLT Positron Emission Tomography Distributions During Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, Tyler J.; Yip, Stephen; Jallow, Ngoneh [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Forrest, Lisa J. [Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Jeraj, Robert, E-mail: rjeraj@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In dose painting, in which functional imaging is used to define biological targets for radiation therapy dose escalation, changes in spatial distributions of biological properties during treatment can compromise the quality of therapy. The goal of this study was to assess the spatiotemporal stability of 2 potential dose painting targets—hypoxia and proliferation—in canine tumors during radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two canine patients with sinonasal tumors (14 carcinoma and 8 sarcoma) were imaged before hypofractionated radiation therapy with copper(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for hypoxia and 3′-deoxy-3′-{sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT) PET/CT for proliferation. The FLT scans were repeated after 2 fractions and the Cu-ATSM scans after 3 fractions. Midtreatment PET/CT images were deformably registered to pretreatment PET/CT images. Voxel-based Spearman correlation coefficients quantified the spatial stability of Cu-ATSM and FLT uptake distributions between pretreatment and midtreatment scans. Paired t tests determined significant differences between the patients' respective Cu-ATSM and FLT correlations coefficients. Standardized uptake value measures were also compared between pretreatment and midtreatment scans by use of paired t tests. Results: Spatial distributions of Cu-ATSM and FLT uptake were stable through midtreatment for both sarcomas and carcinomas: the population mean ± standard deviation in Spearman correlation coefficient was 0.88 ± 0.07 for Cu-ATSM and 0.79 ± 0.13 for FLT. The patients' Cu-ATSM correlation coefficients were significantly higher than their respective FLT correlation coefficients (P=.001). Changes in Cu-ATSM SUV measures from pretreatment to midtreatment were histology dependent: carcinomas experienced significant decreases in Cu-ATSM uptake (P<.05), whereas sarcomas did not (P>.20). Both histologies

  20. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the diagnosis of small pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keiichi Okano; Keitaro Kakinoki; Shintaro Akamoto; Masanobu Hagiike; Hisashi Usuki; Yuka Yamamoto; Yoshihiro Nishiyama; Yasuyuki Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the diagnosis of small pancreatic cancer.METHODS: This study involved 31 patients with proven invasive ductal cancer of the pancreas. The patients were divided into 3 groups according to the maximum diameter of the tumor: TS1 (maximum tumor size ≤ 2.0 cm),TS2 (> 2.0 cm and ≤ 4.0 cm) or TS3-4 (> 4.0 cm). The relationships between the TS and various diagnostic tools, including FDG-PET with dual time point evaluation,were analyzed.RESULTS: The tumors ranged from 1.3 to 11.0 cm in diameter. Thirty of the 31 patients (97%) had a positive FDG-PET study. There were 5 patients classified as TS1,15 as TS2 and 11 as TS3-4. The sensitivity of FDG-PET,computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were 100%, 40%, 0% in TS1, 93%,93%, 89% in TS2 and 100%, 100%, 100% in TS3-4.The sensitivity of FDG-PET was significantly higher in comparison to CT and MRI in patients with TS1 (P <0.032). The mean standardized uptake values (SUVs)did not show a significant difference in relation to the TS (TS1: 5.8 ± 4.5, TS2: 5.7 ± 2.2, TS3-4: 8.2 ± 3.9),respectively. All the TS1 tumors (from 13 to 20 mm)showed higher SUVs in FDG-PET with dual time point evaluation in the delayed phase compared with the early phase, which suggested the lesions were malignant.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that FDG-PET with dual time point evaluation is a useful modality for the detection of small pancreatic cancers with a diameter of less than 20 mm.

  1. Quantification of myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging correlates significantly to rubidium-82 positron emission tomography in patients with severe coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas A; Hasbak, Philip; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Aim was to compare absolute myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution and rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (Rb-82 PET). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen patients with coronary artery stenosis underwent ...

  2. Traditional versus up-front [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography staging of non-small-cell lung cancer : A Dutch cooperative randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herder, GJM; Kramer, H; Hoekstra, OS; Smit, EF; Pruim, J; van Tinteren, H; Comans, EF; Verboom, P; Uyl-De Groot, CA; Welling, A; Paul, MA; Boers, M; Postmus, PE; Teule, GJ; Groen, HJM

    2006-01-01

    Purpose We investigated whether application of positron emission tomography (PET) immediately after first presentation might simplify staging while maintaining accuracy, as compared with traditional strategy in routine clinical setting. Methods At first presentation, patients with a provisional diag

  3. Dynamic Imaging of Fluid Flow in Sandstones by Nuclear Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Ronny; Benson, Sally; Druhan, Jenny; Hingerl, Ferdinand; O'Neil, James P.; Vandehey, Nicholas T.

    2014-05-01

    The heterogeneity of geological formations varies over a wide range of length-scales and represents a major challenge for predicting the movement of fluids in the subsurface. Millimeters to cm-scale features that are commonly observed in sedimentary rocks have been shown to greatly influence fluid transport over much larger observational scales. From a practical perspective, these features give rise to capillary phenomena that affect process-relevant parameters, such as sweep or trapping efficiencies. Measurements on core samples represent a major input for field-scale flow models and the latter adopt multistage up-scaling approaches to link the core-scale to the size of a grid-block. The lack of access to information about rock property heterogeneity at the sub-core scale has restricted the ability to fully take advantage of these methods; in fact, properties derived from the latter are inherently "effective", their spatial resolution being limited to a minimum of several centimeters by the measurement or sampling technique. However, making accurate predictions of multiphase flows and dispersion coefficients for single phase flow requires making measurements at the full range of relevant spatial scales, thus referring to the internal structure of the sample and the small-scale features described above. Essential components in this description include continuum properties that are related to the rock (porosity and permeability), to the fluids (saturation) and to both of them (capillary pressure-saturation relationship); the ability to create a link among all these properties is key to a physically-sound description of these naturally complex systems. One way to accomplish this is by adopting an integrated approach that combines displacement experiments in naturally heterogeneous core-samples with the simultaneous imaging of flow as well as with the support of detailed numerical simulations. In this paper, nuclear emission tomography is applied to visualize fluid

  4. A Study on Determination of an Optimized Detector for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Abedi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Babak; Mardanshahi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    The detector is a critical component of the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system for giving accurate information from the exact pattern of radionuclide distribution in the target organ. The SIMIND Monte Carlo program was utilized for the simulation of a Siemen's dual head variable angle SPECT imaging system with a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator. The Planar and SPECT scans for a (99m)Tc point source and a Jaszczak Phantom with the both experiment and simulated systems were prepared and after verification and validation of the simulated system, the similar scans of the phantoms were compared (from the point of view of the images' quality), namely, the simulated system with the detectors including bismuth germanate (BGO), yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce), Cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce), yttrium aluminum perovslite (YAP:Ce), lutetium aluminum garnet (LuAG:Ce), cerium activated lanthanum bromide (LaBr3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), and sodium iodide activated with thallium [NaI(Tl)]. The parameters of full width at half maximum (FWHM), energy and special resolution, sensitivity, and also the comparison of images' quality by the structural similarity (SSIM) algorithm with the Zhou Wang and Rouse/Hemami methods were analyzed. FWHMs for the crystals were calculated at 13.895, 14.321, 14.310, 14.322, 14.184, and 14.312 keV and the related energy resolutions obtained 9.854, 10.229, 10.221, 10.230, 10.131, and 10.223 %, respectively. Finally, SSIM indexes for comparison of the phantom images were calculated at 0.22172, 0.16326, 0.18135, 0.17301, 0.18412, and 0.20433 as compared to NaI(Tl). The results showed that BGO and LuAG: Ce crystals have high sensitivity and resolution, and better image quality as compared to other scintillation crystals.

  5. Localized fetomaternal hyperglycemia: spatial and kinetic definition by positron emission tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianrong Yao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complex but common maternal diseases such as diabetes and obesity contribute to adverse fetal outcomes. Understanding of the mechanisms involved is hampered by difficulty in isolating individual elements of complex maternal states in vivo. We approached this problem in the context of maternal diabetes and sought an approach to expose the developing fetus in vivo to isolated hyperglycemia in the pregnant rat. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesized that glucose infused into the arterial supply of one uterine horn would more highly expose fetuses in the ipsilateral versus contralateral uterine horn. To test this, the glucose tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG was infused via the left uterine artery. Regional glucose uptake into maternal tissues and fetuses was quantified using positron emission tomography (PET. Upon infusion, FDG accumulation began in the left-sided placentae, subsequently spreading to the fetuses. Over two hours after completion of the infusion, FDG accumulation was significantly greater in left compared to right uterine horn fetuses, favoring the left by 1.9+/-0.1 and 2.8+/-0.3 fold under fasted and hyperinsulinemic conditions (p<10(-11 n=32-35 and p<10(-12 n=27-45 respectively. By contrast, centrally administered [3H]-2-deoxyglucose accumulated equally between the fetuses of the two uterine horns. Induction of significant hyperglycemia (10(3 mg/dL localized to the left uterine artery was sustained for at least 48 hours while maternal euglycemia was maintained. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This approach exposes selected fetuses to localized hyperglycemia in vivo, minimizing exposure of the mother and thus secondary effects. Additionally, a set of less exposed internal control fetuses are maintained for comparison, allowing direct study of the in vivo fetal effects of isolated hyperglycemia. Broadly, this approach can be extended to study a variety of maternal-sided perturbations suspected to directly

  6. [Nationwide survey on radioactive waste management related to positron emission tomography in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Kida, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Shinji

    2009-12-20

    A clearance system for medical radioactive solid waste has not yet been implemented in Japan. Since 2004 new regulations have allowed institutions using positron emission tomography(PET)to handle totally decayed radioactive waste as non-radioactive waste after decay-in-storage. It was expected that this new regulation would mediate the installation of clearance systems in Japan. In order to assess the current situation of radiation safety management in PET institutions, we conducted a nationwide survey. The study design was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted by questionnaire. The subjects of this survey were all the PET institutions in Japan. Among 224 institutes, 128 institutes are equipped with cyclotrons and 96 institutes are not. The number of returned questionnaires was 138. Among institutes that are using delivered radiopharmaceuticals, 80% treat their waste as non-radioactive according to the new regulation. The impact of new regulations for reducing radioactive waste in PET institutes without a cyclotron was estimated at about $400 thousand per year. The main concern of medical institutes was assessment of the contamination caused by by-products of radioactive nuclides generated in target water during the operation of a cyclotron. It was thought that a rational rule based on scientific risk management should be established because these by-products of radioactive nuclides are negligible for radiation safety. New regulation has had a good influence on medical PET institutes, and it is expected that a clearance system for medical radioactive waste will be introduced in the near future, following these recent experiences in PET institutes.

  7. Comparing propofol versus sevoflurane anesthesia for epileptogenic focus detection during positron emission tomography in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, K J; Schulz, C M; Sprenger, T; Pieper, T; Heuser, F; Hohmann, C P; Wermke, M; Martin, J; Drzezga, A

    2013-11-01

    Fluoro-D-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a standard procedure for interictal assessment and accurate pre-surgical evaluation of presumed epileptogenic zone localization. Profound sedation or general anesthesia is frequently required to reduce movement artefacts in young or cognitively impaired patients during image acquisition. This study compares the impact of propofol and sevoflurane anesthesia on overall quality of PET images, detectability of a hypometabolic lesion and demarcation of the detected lesion in pediatric patients suffering from focal epilepsia. Pediatric patients with focal epilepsia were anesthesized using propofol (N.=37) or sevoflurane (N.=43). Two independent blinded investigators rated the PET-scans on a 3-point Likert scale with respect to overall quality of PET images, detectability of a hypometabolic lesion and demarcation of the detected lesion. Mann-Whitney-U-Test was conducted to compare the rating results between the two anesthesia regimes. Inter-rater reliability was calculated using Cohen's Kappa. Anesthesia was throughout uneventful and there was no clinical evidence for peridiagnostic seizures. Differences in neither single dimension ratings nor in sum scores (mean 5.8 ± SD 1.5 for propofol, and 5.7 ± SD 1.5 for sevoflurane; P=0.567) were statistically significant. Cohen's Kappa was between 0.428 and 0.499. For surgical planning in patients with epilepsy, FDG-PET imaging is an indispensable functional imaging technique to detect hypometabolism. We conclude that both, sevoflurane and propofol based anesthetic regimes are suitable to detect hypometabolic cerebral lesions during FDG-PET.

  8. Positron emission tomography thyroid incidentaloma: Is it different in Indian subcontinent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Vaish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Positron emission tomography (PET forms an integral part in work-up and follow-up of various malignancies. With the increased use of PET in oncology, finding of an incidental focal thyroid uptake (incidentaloma is not unusual and presents a diagnostic challenge. Aim: The aim of the following study is to evaluate the frequency and radio-pathologic correlation of focal 18-fluoro deoxyglucose uptake (FDG on PET within the thyroid from a large series. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of 37,000 consecutive patients who underwent FDG-PET at tertiary cancer center in India. Radiological, pathological, PET scan and follow-up details were evaluated. Statistical analyzes were carried out using Mann Whitney test and Pearson correlation. Results: Abnormal thyroid uptake was seen in 78 (0.2% patients. Nearly 61 (0.16% scans had focal and 17 (0.04% had diffuse FDG uptake. A total of 57 patients with focal uptake were available for further evaluation. No further evaluation was done in 24 (42.1% patients who had advanced index malignancy. Of the remaining 33 patients 26 were benign and seven were a cause for concern (four primary thyroid cancers, one follicular neoplasm with hurthle cell change and two metastatic cancers. There was no significant correlation in Standardized uptake value (SUV max of benign and malignant lesion (P = 0.5 on Mann Whitney or size (r = 0.087 Pearson correlation co-efficient P= 0.667. Conclusion: Incidence of PET incidentaloma is low in this large cohort of Indian patients. Nearly 27% of focal incidentaloma were malignant. There was no correlation between the SUVmax, size and malignancy.

  9. Tomography of the fast electron Bremsstrahlung emission during lower hybrid current drive on Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peysson, Y.; Imbeaux, F. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1999-04-01

    A new tomography dedicated to detailed studies of the fast electron Bremsstrahlung emission in the hard X-ray (HXR) energy range between 20 and 200 keV during lower hybrid (LH) current drive experiments on the TORE SUPRA tokamak [Equipe TORE SUPRA, in Proceedings of the 15. Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Seville (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1995), 1, AIEA-CN-60 / A1-5, p. 105] is presented. Radiation detection is performed by cadmium telluride(CdTe) semiconductors, which have most of the desirable features for a powerful diagnosing of magnetically confined hot plasmas - compact size, high X-ray stopping efficiency, fast timing characteristics, good energy resolution, no sensitivity to magnetic field, reasonable susceptibility to performance degradation from neutron/{gamma}-induced damages. This instrument is made of two independent cameras viewing a poloidal cross-section of the plasma, with respectively 21 and 38 detectors. A coarse spectrometry - 8 energy channels - is carried out for each chord, with an energy resolution of 20 keV. The spatial resolution in the core of the plasma is 4-5 cm, while the time sampling may be lowered down to of 2-4 ms. Powerful inversion techniques based on maximum entropy or regularization algorithms take fully advantage of the large number of line-integrated measurements for very robust estimates of the local HXR profiles as a function of time and photon energy. A detailed account of main characteristics and performances of the diagnostic is reported as well as preliminary results on LH current drive experiments. (authors)

  10. Whole-body energy mapping under physical exercise using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iemitsu, M; Itoh, M; Fujimoto, T; Tashiro, M; Nagatomi, R; Ohmori, H; Ishii, K

    2000-12-01

    We attempted to visualize dynamic adjustment of glucose utilization in humans in the whole-body organs during physical exercise by using three-dimensional positron emission tomography (3D-PET) and [18F]-2-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG). Twelve healthy male volunteers collaborated on the study; six subjects were assigned to the resting control group (C) and the other six to the running group (E). Group E subjects performed running on a flat road for 35 min. After 15 min of running, subjects injected FDG and kept on running thereafter for another 20 min. Group C subjects sat on a comfortable chair in a quiet room for 35 min after the injection of FDG. After scanning by PET, the regions of interest (ROIs) were manually set on brain, heart, thorax, abdomen, lower extremities, and the rest of the body on the corresponding transaxial images. The uptake of FDG in each region was evaluated as the % fraction of FDG accumulation relative to the total amount of whole-body accumulation. The results revealed increase of FDG uptake after running in the lower leg muscles from 24.6 +/- 9.5% to 43.1 +/- 4.7% and in the heart from 2.3 +/- 0.4% to 2.8 +/- 0.6%. The differences were significant (P body. FDG uptake in the abdominal region reduced from 37.3 +/- 7.2% to 19.7 +/- 4.9%. However, FDG uptake in the brain remained stable, i.e., 11.9 +/- 2.8% at rest and 10.3 +/- 2.5% after exercise. Thus, 3D-PET is a tool to visualize the dynamic adjustment of energy consumption during physical exercise in humans.

  11. Imaging glucose metabolism in perfluorocarbon-perfused hepatocyte bioreactors using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwoudt, Martin; Wiggett, Scholtz; Malfeld, Susan; van der Merwe, Schalk W

    2009-01-01

    In vitro hepatocyte bioreactor functionality depends particularly on maintaining appropriate oxygen levels and exposure to nonparenchymal cells. An attractive solution without immunological consequences to the patient is incorporating a perfluorocarbon oxygen carrier in the circulating medium and co-culturing hepatocytes with stellate cells. Since bioreactors are normally sealed sterile units, demonstrating metabolic functionality is hindered by limited access to the cells after their aggregation in the matrix. A novel possibility is to use positron emission tomography (PET) to image cellular radioactive glucose uptake under O(2)-limited conditions. In this study, primary cell isolation procedures were carried out on eight pigs. Pairs of cell-seeded and cell-free (control) bioreactors with and without perfluorocarbon were cultured under identical conditions and were oxygenated using hypoxic (5% O(2)) and ambient (20% O(2)) gas mixes. Sixteen PET scans were conducted 24 h after cell isolation, the same timescale as that involved in treating a liver failure patient with a primary-cell bioreactor. In all cases, cell-seeded bioreactors without perfluorocarbon were more radioactive, i.e., were more glycolytic, than those with perfluorocarbon. This difference was significant in the hypoxic pair of bioreactors but not in the ambient pair of bioreactors. Additionally, in the same hypoxic bioreactors, circulating extracellular steady-state glucose levels were significantly lower and lactate levels were higher than those in the ambient bioreactors. Similar findings have been made in other in vitro hepatocyte studies investigating the effects of perfluorocarbons. PET is attractive for studying in situ O(2)-dependent bioreactor metabolism because of its visual and numerically quantifiable outputs. Longer-term metabolic studies (e.g., 5-10 days) investigating the effect of perfluorocarbon on bioreactor longevity will complement these findings in the future.

  12. [11C]metomidate positron emission tomography of adrenocortical tumors in correlation with histopathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, Joakim; Lindhe, Orjan; Bergström, Mats; Långström, Bengt; Sundin, Anders; Hellman, Per

    2006-04-01

    Adrenal incidentalomas are common findings necessitating extensive laboratory work-up and repetitive radiological examinations. Positron emission tomography (PET) using (11)C-labeled metomidate (MTO) has previously been described as a tool for specific adrenocortical imaging. We evaluated 212 MTO-PET examinations in 173 patients to identify its role in the management of adrenal tumors. Seventy-five histopathological examinations from 73 patients were retrospectively analyzed. All examinations were performed at a referral center. Patients who were operated or biopsied due to adrenal tumors had histopathological diagnoses of adrenocortical adenoma (n = 26), adrenocortical cancer (ACC; n = 13), adrenocortical hyperplasia (n = 8), pheochromocytoma (n = 6), metastasis (n = 3), and tumors of nonadrenal origin (n = 19). The main outcome measures were statistical analyses and findings while scrutinizing images. The hypothesis that MTO-PET is of value in the management of adrenal tumors, especially incidentaloma, was stated before data collection. Sensitivity was 0.89 and specificity was 0.96 for MTO-PET in proving adrenocortical origin of the lesions. Pheochromocytomas, metastases to the adrenal gland, and nonadrenal masses were all MTO negative. PET measurements using standardized uptake values (SUV) in pathological adrenocortical tissue could differentiate lesions larger than 1-1.5 cm from normal adrenocortical tissue. SUV was higher in aldosterone-hypersecreting adenomas, and the SUV ratio between the tumor and the contralateral gland was significantly higher in all hormonally hypersecreting adenomas as well as in ACC. MTO-PET is a specific and sensitive method for diagnosing adrenocortical tumors. MTO-PET is useful in the imaging work-up of adrenal incidentalomas and may be beneficial for the examination of patients with primary aldosteronism or ACC.

  13. Clinical utility of 11C-flumazenil positron emission tomography in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma M

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 11C-flumazenil (FMZ positron emission tomography (PET is a new entrant into the armamentarium for pre-surgical evaluation of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. AIMS: To analyze the clinical utility of FMZ PET to detect lesional and remote cortical areas of abnormal benzodiazepine receptor binding in relation to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, 2-Deoxy-2 [18F] fluoro-D-glucose, (18F FDG PET, electrophysiological findings and semiology of epilepsy in patients with intractable TLE. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients underwent a high resolution MRI, prolonged Video-EEG monitoring before 18F FDG and 11C FMZ PET studies. Regional cortical FMZ PET abnormalities were defined on co-registered PET images using an objective method based on definition of areas of abnormal asymmetry (asymmetry index {AI}>10%. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Prospective. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Student′s "t" test. RESULTS: Twenty patients (Mean age: 35.2 years [20-51]; M:F=12:8 completed the study. Mean age at seizure onset was 10.3 years (birth-38 years; mean duration, 23.9 years (6-50 years. Concordance with the MRI lesion was seen in 10 patients (nine with hippocampal sclerosis and one with tuberous sclerosis. In the other 10, with either normal or ambiguous MRI findings, FMZ and FDG uptake were abnormal in all, concordant with the electrophysiological localization of the epileptic foci. Remote FMZ PET abnormalities (n=18 were associated with early age of seizure onset (P=0.005 and long duration of epilepsy (P=0.01. CONCLUSIONS: FMZ-binding asymmetry is a sensitive method to detect regions of epileptic foci in patients with intractable TLE.

  14. PETPVC: a toolbox for performing partial volume correction techniques in positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Benjamin A.; Cuplov, Vesna; Bousse, Alexandre; Mendes, Adriana; Thielemans, Kris; Hutton, Brian F.; Erlandsson, Kjell

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) images are degraded by a phenomenon known as the partial volume effect (PVE). Approaches have been developed to reduce PVEs, typically through the utilisation of structural information provided by other imaging modalities such as MRI or CT. These methods, known as partial volume correction (PVC) techniques, reduce PVEs by compensating for the effects of the scanner resolution, thereby improving the quantitative accuracy. The PETPVC toolbox described in this paper comprises a suite of methods, both classic and more recent approaches, for the purposes of applying PVC to PET data. Eight core PVC techniques are available. These core methods can be combined to create a total of 22 different PVC techniques. Simulated brain PET data are used to demonstrate the utility of toolbox in idealised conditions, the effects of applying PVC with mismatched point-spread function (PSF) estimates and the potential of novel hybrid PVC methods to improve the quantification of lesions. All anatomy-based PVC techniques achieve complete recovery of the PET signal in cortical grey matter (GM) when performed in idealised conditions. Applying deconvolution-based approaches results in incomplete recovery due to premature termination of the iterative process. PVC techniques are sensitive to PSF mismatch, causing a bias of up to 16.7% in GM recovery when over-estimating the PSF by 3 mm. The recovery of both GM and a simulated lesion was improved by combining two PVC techniques together. The PETPVC toolbox has been written in C++, supports Windows, Mac and Linux operating systems, is open-source and publicly available.

  15. SINGLE PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY STUDY OF REGIONAL CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW IN PATIENTS WITH HEMISPATIAL NEGLECT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹雅芙; 任艳; 李亚明

    2003-01-01

    Objective.To explore the correlations between the occurrence and severity of neglect and the region,range or extent of the decrease in regional cerebral blood flow(rCBF). Methods. Nineteen dextromanual patients who were diagnosed as unilateral stroke clinically and hemispatial neglect by a neglect test battery received single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) scans. Results. On images,the damages of patients with neglect were seen most frequently in the frontal cortex,and then in turn in the parietal cortex,occipital cortex,temporal cortex,basal ganglia and thalamus. Most patients with neglect had two or more regions damaged. The most significant region was temporal-parietal-occipi-tal(TPO)junction. The correlation coefficient between rCBF and the severity of neglect was -0.34(t=-1.5,P>0.05),and that between the decrease percentage of rCBF and the severity of neglect was 0.34(t=1.47,P>0.05). The correlation coefficients between the range,number of foci,the flow deficit size and the severity of neglect were 0.71(t=4.13,P<0.01),0.70(t=4.07,P<0.01)and 0.64(t=3.40, P<0.01),respectively. Conclusions. The severity of neglect correlates with rCBF and the decrease percentage of rCBF insignificantly,but correlates positively with the range,number of foci and the flow deficit size significantly. Hemispatial neglect is caused by the damage of multiple sites and combined damage results in more severe neglect.

  16. AV-1451 tau and β-amyloid positron emission tomography imaging in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, Kejal; Lowe, Val J; Boeve, Bradley F; Senjem, Matthew L; Tosakulwong, Nikki; Lesnick, Timothy G; Spychalla, Anthony J; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Fields, Julie A; Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Ferman, Tanis J; Jones, David T; Murray, Melissa E; Knopman, David S; Jack, Clifford R; Petersen, Ronald C

    2017-01-01

    Patients with probable dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) often have Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathology. Our objective was to determine the pattern of positron emission tomography (PET) tau tracer AV-1451 uptake in patients with probable DLB, compared to AD, and its relationship to β-amyloid deposition on PET. Consecutive patients with clinically probable DLB (n = 19) from the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center underwent magnetic resonance imaging, AV-1451, and Pittsburgh compound-B (PiB) PET examinations. Age- and sex-matched groups of AD dementia (n = 19) patients and clinically normal controls (n = 95) from an epidemiological cohort served as a comparison groups. Atlas- and voxel-based analyses were performed. The AD dementia group had significantly higher AV-1451 uptake than the probable DLB group, and medial temporal uptake completely distinguished AD dementia from probable DLB. Patients with probable DLB had greater AV-1451 uptake in the posterior temporoparietal and occipital cortex compared to clinically normal controls, and in probable DLB, the uptake in these regions correlated with global cortical PiB uptake (Spearman rho = 0.63; p = 0.006). Medial temporal lobe AV-1451 uptake distinguishes AD dementia from probable DLB, which may be useful for differential diagnosis. Elevated posterior temporoparietal and occipital AV-1451 uptake in probable DLB and its association with global cortical PiB uptake suggest an atypical pattern of tau deposition in DLB. ANN NEUROL 2017;81:58-67. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  17. Development of a multiplexed readout with high position resolution for positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangwon; Choi, Yong; Kang, Jihoon; Jung, Jin Ho

    2017-04-01

    Detector signals for positron emission tomography (PET) are commonly multiplexed to reduce the number of digital processing channels so that the system can remain cost effective while also maintaining imaging performance. In this work, a multiplexed readout combining Anger position estimation algorithm and position decoder circuit (PDC) was developed to reduce the number of readout channels by a factor of 24, 96-to-4. The data acquisition module consisted of a TDC (50 ps resolution), 4-channel ADCs (12 bit, 105 MHz sampling rate), 2 GB SDRAM and USB3.0. The performance of the multiplexed readout was assessed with a high-resolution PET detector block composed of 2×3 detector modules, each consisting of an 8×8 array of 1.52×1.52×6 mm3 LYSO, a 4×4 array of 3×3 mm2 silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) and 13.4×13.4 mm2 light guide with 0.7 mm thickness. The acquired flood histogram showed that all 384 crystals could be resolved. The average energy resolution at 511 keV was 13.7±1.6% full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and the peak-to-valley ratios of the flood histogram on the horizontal and vertical lines were 18.8±0.8 and 22.8±1.3, respectively. The coincidence resolving time of a pair of detector blocks was 6.2 ns FWHM. The reconstructed phantom image showed that rods down to a diameter of 1.6 mm could be resolved. The results of this study indicate that the multiplexed readout would be useful in developing a PET with a spatial resolution less than the pixel size of the photosensor, such as a SiPM array.

  18. Activity-based costing evaluation of a [(18)F]-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Bruno; Van Zanten, Annie; Pirson, Anne-Sophie; Crott, Ralph; Borght, Thierry Vander

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the study is to use the activity-based costing approach to give a better insight in the actual cost structure of a positron emission tomography procedure (FDG-PET) by defining the constituting components and by simulating the impact of possible resource or practice changes. The cost data were obtained from the hospital administration, personnel and vendor interviews as well as from structured questionnaires. A process map separates the process in 16 patient- and non-patient-related activities, to which the detailed cost data are related. One-way sensitivity analyses shows to which degree of uncertainty the different parameters affect the individual cost and evaluate the impact of possible resource or practice changes like the acquisition of a hybrid PET/CT device, the patient throughput or the sales price of a 370MBq (18)F-FDG patient dose. The PET centre spends 73% of time in clinical activities and the resting time after injection of the tracer (42%) is the single largest departmental cost element. The tracer cost and the operational time have the most influence on cost per procedure. The analysis shows a total cost per FDG-PET ranging from 859 Euro for a BGO PET camera to 1142 Euro for a 16 slices PET-CT system, with a distribution of the resource costs in decreasing order: materials (44%), equipment (24%), wage (16%), space (6%) and hospital overhead (10%). The cost of FDG-PET is mainly influenced by the cost of the radiopharmaceutical. Therefore, the latter rather than the operational time should be reduced in order to improve its cost-effectiveness.

  19. A new iterative reconstruction technique for attenuation correction in high-resolution positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knesaurek, K. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Neuroscience PET Lab., Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Machac, J. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Neuroscience PET Lab., Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Vallabhajosula, S. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Neuroscience PET Lab., Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Buchsbaum, M.S. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Neuroscience PET Lab., Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-06-01

    A new interative reconstruction technique (NIRT) for positron emission computed tomography (PET), which uses transmission data for nonuniform attenuation correction, is described. Utilizing the general inverse problem theory, a cost functional which includes a noise term was derived. The cost functional was minimized using a weighted-least-square maximum a posteriori conjugate gradient (CG) method. The procedure involves a change in the Hessian of the cost function by adding an additional term. Two phantoms were used in a real data acquisition. The first was a cylinder phantom filled with uniformly distributed activity of 74 MBq of fluorine-18. Two different inserts were placed in the phantom. The second was a Hoffman brain phantom filled with uniformly distributed activity of 7.4 MBq of {sup 18}F. Resulting reconstructed images were used to test and compare a new interative reconstruction technique with a standard filtered backprojection (FBP) method. The results confirmed that NIRT, based on the conjugate gradient method, converges rapidly and provides good reconstructed images. In comaprison with standard results obtained by the FBP method, the images reconstructed by NIRT showed better noise properties. The noise was measured as rms% noise and was less, by a factor of 1.75, in images reconstructed by NIRT than in the same images reconstructed by FBP. The distance between the Hoffman brain slice created from the MRI image was 0.526, while the same distance for the Hoffman brain slice reconstructed by NIRT was 0.328. The NIRT method suppressed the propagation of the noise without visible loss of resolution in the reconstructed PET images. (orig.)

  20. Development of correction methods for variable pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, S.; Bae, J.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a novel pinhole collimator in which the pinhole shape can be changed in real-time, and a new single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system that utilizes this variable pinhole (VP) collimator. The acceptance angle and distance between the collimator and the object of VP SPECT are varied so that the optimum value of the region-of-interest (ROI) can be obtained for each rotation angle. Because of these geometrical variations, new correction methods are required for image reconstruction. In this study, we developed two correction methods. The first is the sensitivity-correction algorithm, which minimizes the variation of a system matrix caused by varying the acceptance angle for each rotation angle. The second is the acquisition-time-correction method, which reduces the variation of uniformity caused by varying the distance between the collimator and the object for each rotation angle. A 3D maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm was applied to image reconstruction, and two digital phantoms were studied to evaluate the resolution and sensitivity of the images obtained using the proposed methods. The images obtained by using the proposed correction methods show higher uniformity and resolution than those obtained without using these methods. In particular, the results of the resolution phantom study show that hot rods (0.8-mm-diameter) can be clearly distinguished using the proposed correction methods. A quantitative analysis of the ROI phantom revealed that the mean square error (MSE) was 0.42 without the acquisition-time-correction method, and 0.04 with the acquisition-time-correction method. The MSEs of the resolution phantom without and with the acquisition-time-correction method were calculated as 55.14 and 14.69, respectively.