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Sample records for 2-18ffluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission

  1. Positron-emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron-emission tomography (PET) combines early biochemical assessment of pathology achieved by nuclear medicine with the precise localization achieved by computerized image reconstruction. In this technique a chemical compound with the desired biological activity is labeled with a radioactive isotope that decays by emitting a positron, or positive electron. With suitable interpretation PET images can provide a noninvasive, regional assessment of many biochemical processes that are essential to the functioning of the organ that is being visualized

  2. Positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Paans, A M J

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for measuring biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a coincidence technique. This includes also the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labelled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs on metabolism. Also deviations of normal metabolism can be measured and insight into biological processes responsible for diseases can be obtained. At present the combined PET/CT scanner is the most frequently used scanner for whole-body scanning in the field of oncology.

  3. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  4. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  5. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs

  6. Positron Emission Mammography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, W.W. E-mail: wwmoses@lbl.gov

    2004-06-01

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and X-ray mammography, as well as PEM and X-ray guided biopsy). The ultimate utility of PEM may not be decided by instrument performance, but by biological and medical factors, such as the patient to patient variation in radiotracer uptake or the as yet undetermined role of PEM in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Positron emission mammography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.

    2003-10-02

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and x-ray mammography, as well as PEM and x-ray guided biopsy). The ultimate utility of PEM may not be decided by instrument performance, but by biological and medical factors, such as the patient to patient variation in radiotracer uptake or the as yet undetermined role of PEM in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  8. NMF on positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bödvarsson, Bjarni; Hansen, Lars Kai; Svarer, Claus;

    2007-01-01

    In positron emission tomography, kinetic modelling of brain tracer uptake, metabolism or binding requires knowledge of the cerebral input function. Traditionally, this is achieved with arterial blood sampling in the arm or as shown in (Liptrot, M, et al., 2004) by non-invasive K-means clustering....... We propose another method to estimate time-activity curves (TAC) extracted directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Since the scaling of the basis curves is lost in the NMF the estimated TAC is scaled by a vector alpha which...

  9. Instrumentation in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a three-dimensional medical imaging technique that noninvasively measures the concentration of radiopharmaceuticals in the body that are labeled with positron emitters. With the proper compounds, PET can be used to measure metabolism, blood flow, or other physiological values in vivo. The technique is based on the physics of positron annihilation and detection and the mathematical formulations developed for x-ray computed tomography. Modern PET systems can provide three-dimensional images of the brain, the heart, and other internal organs with resolutions on the order of 4 to 6 mm. With the selectivity provided by a choice of injected compounds, PET has the power to provide unique diagnostic information that is not available with any other imaging modality. This is the first five reports on the nature and uses of PET that have been prepared for the American Medical Association's Council on Scientific Affairs by an authoritative panel

  10. Positron emission tomography basic sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, D W; Valk, P E; Maisey, M N

    2003-01-01

    Essential for students, science and medical graduates who want to understand the basic science of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), this book describes the physics, chemistry, technology and overview of the clinical uses behind the science of PET and the imaging techniques it uses. In recent years, PET has moved from high-end research imaging tool used by the highly specialized to an essential component of clinical evaluation in the clinic, especially in cancer management. Previously being the realm of scientists, this book explains PET instrumentation, radiochemistry, PET data acquisition and image formation, integration of structural and functional images, radiation dosimetry and protection, and applications in dedicated areas such as drug development, oncology, and gene expression imaging. The technologist, the science, engineering or chemistry graduate seeking further detailed information about PET, or the medical advanced trainee wishing to gain insight into the basic science of PET will find this book...

  11. Positron emission tomography in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed with the 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose method on 29 patients with epilepsy (generalized epilepsy, 4; partial epilepsy, 24; undetermined type, 1). The subjects were restricted to patients with epilepsy without focal abnormality on X-CT. All the patients with generalized epilepsy showed a normal pattern on PET. Fourteen out of the 24 patients with partial epilepsy and the 1 with epilepsy of undermined type showed focal hypometabolism on PET. The hypometabolic zone was localized in areas including the temporal cortex in 11 patients, frontal in 2 and thalamus in 1. The location of hypometabolic zone and that of interictal paroxysmal activity on EEG were well correlated in most patients. The patients with poorly-controlled seizure showed a higher incidence of PET abnormality (12 out of 13) than those with well-controlled seizures (2 out of 11). The incidence of abnormality on PET and MRI and the location of both abnormality were not necessarily coincident. These results indicated that the PET examination in epilepsy provides valuable information about the location of epileptic focus, and that the findings on PET in patients with partial epilepsy may be one of the good indicators about the intractability of partial epilepsy, and that PET and MRI provide complementary information in the diagnosis of epilepsy. (author)

  12. Cyclotron, positrons and PET [positron emission tomography]. An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET (positron emission tomography) is a powerful new scientific tool which is capable of revealing biochemical transformations while they are occurring in the brain and other organs in the living human body. The application of PET to problems in biology and medicine is dominated by the short half-life of the isotopes used to prepare the radiotracers. The most commonly used positron emitting isotopes are carbon-11, fluorine-18, nitrogen-13, and oxygen-15 which have half-lives of 20.4, 110, 10 and 2 minutes, respectively. Their incorporation into radiotracers having diverse chemical structures and biochemical specificities has allowed the study of blood flow, sugar metabolism, oxygen metabolism, neurotransmission, enzyme activity and binding sites for therapeutic drugs and substances of abuse. PET research is most commonly carried out at a Cyclotron-PET Center (cyclotron, positron emission tomography, chemistry laboratory) where the short-lived isotopes can be produced and used efficiently. The number of Cyclotron-PET Centers has grown from 4 in 1976 to several dozen in 1988 and the number is expected to double in the next five years attesting to the vitality of the field and the current and anticipated contributions to research in biology and medicine

  13. Ionization and positron emission in giant quasiatoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron excitation processes in superheavy quasiatoms are treated within a relativistic framework. Theoretical results on K-hole production rates as well as delta-electron and positron spectra are compared with experimental data. It is demonstrated that the study of heavy ion collisions with nuclear time delay promises a signature for the spontaneous positron formation in overcritical systems. Corresponding experimental results are confronted with our theoretical hypothesis. Recent speculations on the origin of the observed peak structures in positron spectra are critically reviewed. Atomic excitations are also employed to obtain information on the course of a nuclear reaction. Using a semiclassical picture we calculate the emission of delta-electrons and positrons in deep-inelastic nuclear reactions. Furthermore some consequences of conversion processes in giant systems are investigated. (orig.)

  14. Positron emission tomography imaging of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The merging of molecular biology and nuclear medicine is developed into molecular nuclear medicine. Positron emission tomography (PET) of gene expression in molecular nuclear medicine has become an attractive area. Positron emission tomography imaging gene expression includes the antisense PET imaging and the reporter gene PET imaging. It is likely that the antisense PET imaging will lag behind the reporter gene PET imaging because of the numerous issues that have not yet to be resolved with this approach. The reporter gene PET imaging has wide application into animal experimental research and human applications of this approach will likely be reported soon

  15. Advanced instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underly modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost. 71 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Positron emission tomography of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography enables the distribution of positron emitting isotopes to be imaged in a transverse plane through the body and the regional concentration of the isotope to be measured quantitatively. This thesis reports some applications of positron emission tomography to studies of pulmonary pathophysiology. Measurements in lung phantoms showed that regional lung density could be measured from a transmission tomogram obtained with an external source of positron emitting isotope. The regional, fractional blood volume was measured after labelling the blood with carbon-11-monoxide. Regional extravascular lung density (lung tissue and interstitial water per unit thoracic volume) was obtained by subtracting fractional blood volume from lung density. Measurements in normal subjects revealed large regional variations in lung density and fractional blood volume in the supine posture. Extravascular lung density showed a more uniform distribution. The technique has been used to study patients with chronic interstitial pulmonary oedema, pulmonary sarcoidosis and fibrosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension and patients with intracardiac, left-to-right shunt. Tomographic measurements of pulmonary tissue concentration of radionuclides are difficult, since corrections for the blood content and the inflation of the lung must be applied. A simultaneous measurement of lung density and fractional blood volume allows such corrections to be made and the extravascular tracer concentration to be calculated. This has been applied to measurements of the tissue penetration of carbon-11-labelled erythromycin in patients with lobar pneumonia. (author)

  17. Incidental colorectal polyps in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) is increasingly being used for diagnosing various malignancies and surveillance of cancer recurrence, staging and screening in high-risk individuals. Due to its high sensitivity in picking up small dysplastic lesions, incidental lesions are detected frequently. We present two patients who underwent PET CT as part of cancer screening and were incidentally detected with adenomatous colonic polyps. Colonoscopy and biopsy confirmed the diagnosis

  18. Positron Emission Tomography: Its 65 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Guerra, A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.

    2016-04-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a well-established imaging technique for in vivo molecular imaging. In this review after a brief history of PET there are presented its physical principles and the technology that has been developed for bringing PET from a bench experiment to a clinical indispensable instrument. The limitations and performance of the PET tomographs are discussed, both as for the hardware and software aspects. The status of art of clinical, pre-clinical and hybrid scanners (, PET/CT and PET/MR) is reported. Finally the actual trend and the recent and future technological developments are fully illustrated.

  19. Positron emission tomography tracers for imaging angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubner, Roland [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Beer, Ambros J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Wang, Hui [Sichuan University, Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Chengdu (China); Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Position emission tomography imaging of angiogenesis may provide non-invasive insights into the corresponding molecular processes and may be applied for individualized treatment planning of antiangiogenic therapies. At the moment, most strategies are focusing on the development of radiolabelled proteins and antibody formats targeting VEGF and its receptor or the ED-B domain of a fibronectin isoform as well as radiolabelled matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors or {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin antagonists. Great efforts are being made to develop suitable tracers for different target structures. All of the major strategies focusing on the development of radiolabelled compounds for use with positron emission tomography are summarized in this review. However, because the most intensive work is concentrated on the development of radiolabelled RGD peptides for imaging {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} expression, which has successfully made its way from bench to bedside, these developments are especially emphasized. (orig.)

  20. 77 FR 8262 - Draft Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... Positron Emission Tomography Drugs; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... entitled ``Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' The draft... Applications for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) drugs.'' The draft guidance summarizes the IND process...

  1. Positron Emission Tomography: A Basic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerbacher, M. E.; Deaton, J. W.; Phinney, L. C.; Mitchell, L. J.; Duggan, J. L.

    2007-10-01

    Positron Emission Tomography is useful in detecting biological abnormalities. The technique involves attaching radiotracers to a material used inside the body, in many cases glucose. Glucose is absorbed most readily in areas of unusual cell growth or uptake of nutrients so through natural processes the treated glucose highlights regions of tumors and other degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. The higher the concentration of isotopes, the more dynamic the area. Isotopes commonly used as tracers are 11C, 18F, 13N, and 15O due to their easy production and short half-lives. Once the tracers have saturated an area of tissue they are detected using coincidence detectors collinear with individual isotopes. As the isotope decays it emits a positron which, upon annihilating an electron, produces two oppositely directioned gamma rays. The PET machine consists of several pairs of detectors, each 180 degrees from their partner detector. When the oppositely positioned detectors are collinear with the area of the isotope, a computer registers the location of the isotope and can compile an image of the activity of the highlighted area based on the position and strength of the isotopes.

  2. Pulmonary studies using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detailed investigation of regional differences in lung function at a local level began when suitable γ-ray emitting isotopes and focused external radiation detectors (especially the Anger γ-camera) became available. A major recent advance has been the development of positron emission tomography (PET), which provides a powerful combination of highly accurate tomographic reconstruction of radioisotope concentration with a potentially unlimited list of biological compounds to be labelled with the positron emitting isotopes of oxygen, carbon and fluorine. Early studies using PET focused on the inhalation of 11CO (or C15O) and 19Ne gases and the intravenous injection of 13N in saline and H215O for the measurement of relatively simple aspects of regional lung function, such as tissue, blood and gas volumes, blood flow, ventilation and ventilation/perfusion (V'A/Q'). More recent work has been directed towards the more challenging areas of regional endothelial permeability, carbohydrate utilization, enzyme and receptor binding assays, and in vivo pharmacokinetics. The short physical half-lives of the isotopes (17 s to 2 h) and the noninvasive nature of PET allows serial measurements to be made on patients (within the constraints of permitted radiation doses) to assess the effect of physiological and therapeutic interventions. (au) 80 refs

  3. Motion correction in thoracic positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gigengack, Fabian; Dawood, Mohammad; Schäfers, Klaus P

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion leads to image degradation in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which impairs quantification. In this book, the authors present approaches to motion estimation and motion correction in thoracic PET. The approaches for motion estimation are based on dual gating and mass-preserving image registration (VAMPIRE) and mass-preserving optical flow (MPOF). With mass-preservation, image intensity modulations caused by highly non-rigid cardiac motion are accounted for. Within the image registration framework different data terms, different variants of regularization and parametric and non-parametric motion models are examined. Within the optical flow framework, different data terms and further non-quadratic penalization are also discussed. The approaches for motion correction particularly focus on pipelines in dual gated PET. A quantitative evaluation of the proposed approaches is performed on software phantom data with accompanied ground-truth motion information. Further, clinical appl...

  4. Positron Emission Tomography of the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease.

  5. Compact conscious animal positron emission tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyler, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois; Volkow, Nora

    2006-10-24

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal for an event, generating an address signal representing a detecting channel, generating a detector channel signal including the time and address signals, and generating a composite signal including the channel signal and similarly generated signals. The composite signal includes events from detectors in a block and is serially output. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information from a block includes time signal generators for detectors in a block and an address and channel signal generator. The PET scanner includes a ring tomograph that mounts onto a portion of an animal, which includes opposing block pairs. Each of the blocks in a block pair includes a scintillator layer, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoder includes time signal generators and an address signal and channel signal generator.

  6. Positron emission tomography and basal ganglia functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), studies on the human brain function and pathophysiology of brain damage have been extremely progressed. It is well-known that the basal ganglia plays an important role as one of the central nervous system involved in exercise regulation. More recently, the potential involvement of the basal ganglia in psychological processes, such as cognitive function, has been pointed out, receiving much attention. In spite of such a lot of studies, however, basal ganglia function remains unclear. This paper describes the relationships between PET findings and basal ganglia function. PET findings are discussed in relation to brain energy metabolism and striatal dopamine function. Pathophysiology of the basal ganglia are described in terms of the following diseases: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy, Huntington's disease, and dystonia. Physiological backgrounds of the basal ganglia for PET images are also referred to. (N.K.) 75 refs

  7. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease

  8. Instrumentation optimization for positron emission mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2003-06-05

    The past several years have seen designs for PET cameras optimized to image the breast, commonly known as Positron Emission Mammography or PEM cameras. The guiding principal behind PEM instrumentation is that a camera whose field of view is restricted to a single breast has higher performance and lower cost than a conventional PET camera. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules, although geometries that encircle the breast have also been proposed. The ability of the detector modules to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) is also a relevant feature. This paper finds that while both the additional solid angle coverage afforded by encircling the breast and the decreased blurring afforded by the DOI measurement improve performance, the ability to measure DOI is more important than the ability to encircle the breast.

  9. Positron emission tomography and radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, PhD, Gary D.; Fox, MD, Peter; Phillips, MD, William T.

    2001-10-01

    Medical physics research is providing new avenues for addressing the fundamental problem of radiation therapy-how to provide a tumor-killing dose while reducing the dose to a non-lethal level for critical organs in adjacent portions of the patient anatomy. This talk reviews the revolutionary impact of Positron Emission Tomography on the practice of radiation oncology. The concepts of PET imaging and the development of "tumor" imaging methods using 18F-DG flouro-deoxyglucose are presented to provide the foundation for contemporary research and application to therapy. PET imaging influences radiation therapy decisions in multiple ways. Imaging of occult but viable tumor metastases eliminates misguided therapy attempts. The ability to distinguish viable tumor from scar tissue and necroses allows reduction of treatment portals and more selective treatments. Much research remains before the clinical benefits of these advances are fully realized.

  10. Positron emission tomography in drug development and drug evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, AMJ; Vaalburg, W

    2000-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an imaging modality which can determine biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitting radionuclides as C-11, N-13, O-15 and F-18 and by measuring the annihilation radiation usin

  11. Simulation of the annihilation emission of galactic positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positrons annihilate in the central region of our Galaxy. This has been known since the detection of a strong emission line centered on an energy of 511 keV in the direction of the Galactic center. This gamma-ray line is emitted during the annihilation of positrons with electrons from the interstellar medium. The spectrometer SPI, onboard the INTEGRAL observatory, performed spatial and spectral analyses of the positron annihilation emission. This thesis presents a study of the Galactic positron annihilation emission based on models of the different interactions undergone by positrons in the interstellar medium. The models are relied on our present knowledge of the properties of the interstellar medium in the Galactic bulge, where most of the positrons annihilate, and of the physics of positrons (production, propagation and annihilation processes). In order to obtain constraints on the positrons sources and physical characteristics of the annihilation medium, we compared the results of the models to measurements provided by the SPI spectrometer. (author)

  12. Utility of positron emission tomography in schwannomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Bryan; Han, ByoungJun; Allen, Jeffrey; Fatterpekar, Girish; Agarwal, Nitin; Kazemi, Noojan; Zagzag, David

    2016-08-01

    Schwannomatosis is characterized by multiple non-intradermal schwannomas with patients often presenting with a painful mass in their extremities. In this syndrome malignant transformation of schwannomas is rare in spite of their large size at presentation. Non-invasive measures of assessing the biological behavior of plexiform neurofibromas in neurofibromatosis type 1 such as positron emission tomography (PET), CT scanning and MRI are well characterized but little information has been published on the use of PET imaging in schwannomatosis. We report a unique clinical presentation portraying the use of PET imaging in schwannomatosis. A 27-year-old woman presented with multiple, rapidly growing, large and painful schwannomas confirmed to be related to a constitutional mutation in the SMARCB1 complex. Whole body PET/MRI revealed numerous PET-avid tumors suggestive of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Surgery was performed on multiple tumors and none of them had histologic evidence of malignant transformation. Overall, PET imaging may not be a reliable predictor of malignant transformation in schwannomatosis, tempering enthusiasm for surgical interventions for tumors not producing significant clinical signs or symptoms. PMID:26960263

  13. Resistive plate chambers in positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Paulo; Blanco, Alberto; Couceiro, Miguel; Ferreira, Nuno C.; Lopes, Luís; Martins, Paulo; Ferreira Marques, Rui; Fonte, Paulo

    2013-07-01

    Resistive plate chambers (RPC) were originally deployed for high energy physics. Realizing how their properties match the needs of nuclear medicine, a LIP team proposed applying RPCs to both preclinical and clinical positron emission tomography (RPC-PET). We show a large-area RPC-PET simulated scanner covering an axial length of 2.4m —slightly superior to the height of the human body— allowing for whole-body, single-bed RPC-PET acquisitions. Simulations following NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association, USA) protocols yield a system sensitivity at least one order of magnitude larger than present-day, commercial PET systems. Reconstruction of whole-body simulated data is feasible by using a dedicated, direct time-of-flight-based algorithm implemented onto an ordered subsets estimation maximization parallelized strategy. Whole-body RPC-PET patient images following the injection of only 2mCi of 18-fluorodesoxyglucose (FDG) are expected to be ready 7 minutes after the 6 minutes necessary for data acquisition. This compares to the 10-20mCi FDG presently injected for a PET scan, and to the uncomfortable 20-30minutes necessary for its data acquisition. In the preclinical field, two fully instrumented detector heads have been assembled aiming at a four-head-based, small-animal RPC-PET system. Images of a disk-shaped and a needle-like 22Na source show unprecedented sub-millimeter spatial resolution.

  14. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters ε2τ's are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs

  15. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, M. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Perez-Mendez, V. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  16. Application of positron emission tomography in neurophysiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET measures the distribution of positron-emitting radiotracers in the organs of living subjects, by means of the angular correlation of the gamma-rays originating from positron annihilation. The UBC/TRIUMF Program focusses the technique on measurements of brain physiology, and radio-labelled tracers have been developed for measurements of regional cerebral glucose metabolism, regional cerebral blood flow, regional synthesis of dopamine neurotransmitter, and regional density and kinetics of dopamine receptor sites. Data have been obtained on normal physiology, and deranged physiology in Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and astrocytoma brain tumors undergoing pion radiation treatment

  17. [Assessing myocardial perfusion with positron emission tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    vom Dahl, J

    2001-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of the heart has gained widespread scientific and clinical acceptance with regard to two indications: 1) The detection of perfusion abnormalities by qualitative and semiquantitative analyses of perfusion images at rest and during physical or pharmacological stress using well-validated perfusion tracers, such as N-13 ammonia, Rb-82 rubidium chloride, or O-15 labeled water. 2) Viability imaging of myocardial regions with reduced contractility by combining perfusion measurements with substrate metabolism as assessed from F-18 deoxyglucose utilization. This overview summarizes the use of PET as a perfusion imaging method. With a sensitivity > 90% in combination with high specificity, PET is today the best-validated available nuclear imaging technique for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The short half-life of the perfusion tracers in combination with highly sophisticated hard- and software enables rapid PET studies with high patient throughput. The high diagnostic accuracy and the methological advantages as compared to conventional scintigraphy allows one to use PET perfusion imaging to detect subtle changes in the perfusion reserve for the detection of CAD in high risk but asymptomatic patients as well as in patients with proven CAD undergoing various treatment forms such as risk factor reduction or coronary revascularization. In patients following orthotopic heart transplantation, evolving transplant vasculopathy can be detected at an early stage. Quantitative PET imaging at rest allows for detection of myocardial viability since cellular survival is based on maintenance of a minimal perfusion and structural changes correlate to the degree of perfusion reduction. Furthermore, quantitative assessment of the myocardial perfusion reserve detects the magnitude and competence of collaterals in regions with occluded epicardial collaterals and, thus, imaging of several coronary distribution territories in one noninvasive

  18. Human cerebral circulation. Positron emission tomography studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reviewed the literature on human cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism, as measured by positron emission tomography (PET), with respect to normal values and of regulation of cerebral circulation. A multicenter study in Japan showed that between-center variations in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) values were not considerably larger than the corresponding within-center variations. Overall mean±SD values in cerebral cortical regions of normal human subjects were as follows: CBF=44.4±6.5 ml/100 ml/min; CBV=3.8±0.7 ml/100 ml; OEF=0.44±0.06; CMRO2=3.3±0.5 ml/100 ml/min (11 PET centers, 70 subjects). Intrinsic regulation of cerebral circulation involves several factors. Autoregulation maintains CBF in response to changes in cerebral perfusion pressure; chemical factors such as PaCO2 affect cerebral vascular tone and alter CBF; changes in neural activity cause changes in cerebral energy metabolism and CBF; neurogenic control of CBF occurs by sympathetic innervation. Regional differences in vascular response to changes in PaCO2 have been reported, indicating regional differences in cerebral vascular tone. Relations between CBF and CBV during changes in PaCO2 and during changes in neural activity were in good agreement with Poiseuille's law. The mechanisms of vascular response to neural activation and deactivation were independent on those of responses to PaCO2 changes. CBV in a brain region is the sum of three components: arterial, capillary and venous blood volumes. It has been reported that the arterial blood volume fraction is approximately 30% in humans and that changes in human CBV during changes in PaCO2 are caused by changes in arterial blood volume without changes in venous blood volume. These findings should be considered in future studies of the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular diseases. (author) 136 refs

  19. Positron emission tomography : measurement of transgene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EFJ; Vaalburg, W

    2002-01-01

    Noninvasive and repetitive imaging of transgene expression can play a pivotal role in the development of gene therapy strategies, as it offers investigators a means to determine the effectiveness of their gene transfection protocols. In the last decade, imaging of transgene expression using positron

  20. Positron-emission tomography and cerebral metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the fact that radio-isotopes allow iso-atom labelling, they are short-lived and consequently may be injected into humans without serious problems of radiation damage. They disintegrate by emitting positrons which can be detected by external counting by virtue of the two 511 keV gamma rays emitted at the same time in opposite directions. These properties are used for tomographic detection and permit quantitative measurements of the radio-activity method will be described. The first concerns the transport of amino-acids into the brain, the second, the metabolism of psychoactive drugs. (orig./VJ)

  1. Positron emission tomography/computerized tomography in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sahiner, Ilgin; Vural, Gulin Ucmak

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-(18F)-flouro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has emerged as a useful tool in the clinical work-up of lung cancer. This review article provides an overview of applications of PET in diagnosis, staging, treatment response evaluation, radiotherapy planning, recurrence assessment and prognostication of lung cancer.

  2. Skeletal muscle perfusion measured by positron emission tomography during exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, W; Lubbers, J; Rakhorst, G; Vaalburg, W; Verkerke, GJ; Paans, AMJ; Willemsen, ATM

    1998-01-01

    The applicability of (H2O)-O-15-positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging for the assessment of skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise was investigated in five healthy subjects performing intermittent isometric contractions on a calf ergometer. The workload of the left calf muscles was kept con

  3. Positron emission particle tracking-Application and labelling techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David J.Parker; Xianfeng Fan

    2008-01-01

    The positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) technique has been widely used in science and engineering to obtain detailed information on the motion and flow fields of fluids or granular materials in multiphase systems, for example, fluids in rock cracks, chemical reactors and food processors; dynamic behaviour of granular materials in chemical reactors, granulators, mixers, dryers, rotating kilns and ball mills. The information obtained by the PEPT technique can be used to optimise the design, operational conditions for a wide range of industrial process systems, and to evaluate modelling work. The technique is based on tracking radioactively labelled particles (up to three particles) by detecting the pairs of back-to-back 511 ke V -γ-rays arising from annihilation of emitted positrons. It therefore involves a positron camera, location algorithms for calculating the tracer location and speed, and tracer labelling techniques. This paper will review the particle tracking technique from tracking algorithm, tracer labelling to their application.

  4. False-positive FDG positron emission tomography in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ihn Ho; Chun, Kyung A; Won, Chang Won; Lee, Hyung Woo; Shin, Kyung Chul; Jung, Jin Hong; Lee, Kwan Ho [Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is frequently used to characterize malignant mediastinal lymphadenopathy suspected of being malignant. However, increased FDG activity in benign mediastinal lymphadenopathy is not uncommon and can be seen with active granulomatous disease (tuberculosis, fungal infections, and sarcoidosis) producing false-positive FDG results. An 58-year-old man presented to our PET Center for FDG positron emission tomography (PET) evaluation of a multiple mediastinal lymphadenopathy found on computed tomography (HRCT). The multiple lymphadenopathy was moderate FDG-avid, raising the possibility of malignancy. In addition, FDG-avid skin lesion and lymphadenopathy in left parotid gland was noted. A mediastinoscopic biopsy was performed and the lymphadenopathy was found to be sarcoidosis. This case emphasizes the limitations of specificity of FDG PET in mediastinal lymphadenopathy and the importance of confirming suspected malignancy with histology before potentially curative treatment is undertaken.

  5. Nonhuman Primate Positron Emission Tomography Neuroimaging in Drug Abuse Research

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, Leonard Lee; Murnane, Kevin Sean

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) neuroimaging in nonhuman primates has led to significant advances in our current understanding of the neurobiology and treatment of stimulant addiction in humans. PET neuroimaging has defined the in vivo biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of abused drugs and related these findings to the time course of behavioral effects associated with their addictive properties. With novel radiotracers and enhanced resolution, PET neuroimaging techniques have also charac...

  6. Amyloid-β positron emission tomography imaging probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C; Långström, Bengt;

    2013-01-01

    , a number of factors appear to preclude these probes from clinical utilization. As the available "amyloid specific" positron emission tomography imaging probes have failed to demonstrate diagnostic value and have shown limited utility for monitoring therapeutic interventions in humans, a debate...... on their significance has emerged. The aim of this review is to identify and discuss critically the scientific issues contributing to the extensive inconsistencies reported in the literature on their purported in vivo amyloid specificity and potential utilization in patients....

  7. ENVISION, developing Positron Emission Tomography for particle therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Particle therapy is an advanced technique of cancer radiation therapy, using protons or other ions to target the cancerous mass. ENVISION aims at developing medical imaging tools to improve the dose delivery to the patient, to ensure a safer and more effective treatment. The animation illustrates the use of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for monitoring the dose during treatment. Produced by: CERN KT/Life Sciences and ENVISION Project Management: Manuela Cirilli 3D animation: Jeroen Huijben, Nymus3d

  8. Introducing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Janevik-Ivanovska, Emilija; Avmedovski, Fatmir; Yamamoto, Mayumi; Bhonsle, Uday

    2009-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a major diagnostic imaging technique predominantly used in determining the presence and severity of cancers, neurological conditions, and cardiovascular diseases. It is currently the most effective way to check for cancer recurrences and it offers significant advantages over other forms of imaging such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in detecting disease in many patients. In the USA, an estimated 1 129 900 clinical PE...

  9. Positron-based attenuation correction for Positron Emission Tomography data using MCNP6 code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the Monte Carlo simulation of the attenuation correction for Positron Emission Tomography (PET data using MCNP6 code. Two attenuation correction maps have been generated, one for correcting the attenuation effect in a homogeneous phantom, which is a cylindrical volume of water and the other for correcting the attenuation effect in a heterogeneous phantom, which is a cylindrical volume of water within which, there are two small cylinders of bone-equivalent materials. These maps are derived from the data acquired as a result of transmission scans using a positron-emitting rod source. The attenuation map generated using this method does not need to be scaled because it is directly built for an energy of 511 keV. For each phantom, three types of simulations are done, one to estimate the radiotracer distribution in the phantom (emission scan and two to estimate the distribution of attenuation coefficients in this phantom (transmission scans, the first with a blank field of view (FOV and the second when the phantom exists in the FOV. From the transmission scans data, the attenuation map for each phantom is derived and after that it has been applied to the corresponding emission scan data during PET image reconstruction process to obtain the attenuation-corrected image. The images of the radiotracer distribution in each phantom reached in this study illustrate the quantitative and qualitative improvements in the image quality after attenuation correction than that before the attenuation correction.

  10. Investigation of granular impact using positron emission particle tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy O.

    2015-04-01

    We present results from an experimental study of granular impact using a combination of high-speed video and positron emission particle tracking (PEPT). The PEPT technique exploits the annihilation of photons from positron decay to determine the position of tracer particles either inside a small granular bed or attached to the object which impacts the bed. We use dense spheres as impactors and the granular beds are comprised of glass beads which are fluidised to achieve a range of different initial packing states. For the first time, we have simultaneously investigated both the trajectory of the sphere, the motion of particles in a 3-D granular bed and particles which jump into the resultant jet, which arises from the collapse of the cavity formed by the impacting sphere.

  11. The investigation of cerebrovascular disorders with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a non-invasive, regional, in vivo method to measure physiological parameters including cerebral blood flow, glucose and oxygen metabolism, blood volume, and pH. Measurement of these parameters not only enables a more complete understanding of the pathophysiology of acute cerebral ischemia and infarction, but provides objective criteria with which to better manage patients. This chapter will first discuss PET methodology and tracer techniques used in the investigation of patients with cerebrovascular disease and then describe the progress that has already resulted from applying these methods. 73 refs.; 7 figs

  12. Positron emission tomography: diagnostic imaging on a molecular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In human medicine positron emission tomography (PET) is a modern diagnostic imaging method. In the present paper we outline the physical principles of PET and give an overview over the main clinic fields where PET is being used, such as neurology, cardiology and oncology. Moreover, we present a current project in veterinary medicine (in collaboration with the Paul Scherrer Institute and the University Hospital Zurich), where a hypoxia tracer is applied to dogs and cats suffering from spontaneous tumors. Finally new developments in the field of PET were discussed

  13. Imaging of brain activity by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain function is associated with regional energy metabolism and blood flow increase. Such brain activity is visualized by using external scintigraphy. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the currently available most superior technique, allowing three-dimensional imaging of subtle blood flow. In this article, imaging methods and application of PET are discussed in terms of the following items: (1) measurement of cerebral glucose consumption, (2) PET in persons with visual impairment, (3) association between brain function and regional cerebral blood flow, (4) measurement of cerebral blood flow, (5) method for decreasing noise in PET imaging, (6) anatomic standardization of PET images, and (7) speech load and regional cerebral activity images. (N.K.)

  14. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Regional Pulmonary Perfusion and Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Musch, Guido; Venegas, Jose G.

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is a noninvasive, quantitative method to assess pulmonary perfusion and ventilation in vivo. The core of this article focuses on the use of [13N]nitrogen (13N2) and PET to assess regional gas exchange. Regional perfusion and shunt can be measured with the 13N2–saline bolus infusion technique. A bolus of 13N2, dissolved in saline solution, is injected intravenously at the start of a brief apnea, while the tracer kinetics in the lung is measured by a s...

  15. Low-resource synchronous coincidence processor for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sportelli, Giancarlo, E-mail: gsportelli@die.upm.es [Biomedical Image Technologies, E.T.S.I.T., Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Research Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Belcari, Nicola [Department of Physics ' E. Fermi' , Universita di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Guerra, Pedro [Research Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Santos, Andres [Biomedical Image Technologies, E.T.S.I.T., Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Research Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    We developed a new FPGA-based method for coincidence detection in positron emission tomography. The method requires low device resources and no specific peripherals in order to resolve coincident digital pulses within a time window of a few nanoseconds. This method has been validated with a low-end Xilinx Spartan-3E and provided coincidence resolutions lower than 6 ns. This resolution depends directly on the signal propagation properties of the target device and the maximum available clock frequency, therefore it is expected to improve considerably on higher-end FPGAs.

  16. Kinetic modeling in pre-clinical positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntner, Claudia [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Seibersdorf (Austria). Biomedical Systems, Health and Environment Dept.

    2014-07-01

    Pre-clinical positron emission tomography (PET) has evolved in the last few years from pure visualization of radiotracer uptake and distribution towards quantification of the physiological parameters. For reliable and reproducible quantification the kinetic modeling methods used to obtain relevant parameters of radiotracer tissue interaction are important. Here we present different kinetic modeling techniques with a focus on compartmental models including plasma input models and reference tissue input models. The experimental challenges of deriving the plasma input function in rodents and the effect of anesthesia are discussed. Finally, in vivo application of kinetic modeling in various areas of pre-clinical research is presented and compared to human data.

  17. Simulation of the annihilation emission of galactic positrons; Modelisation de l'emission d'annihilation des positrons Galactiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, W

    2008-01-15

    Positrons annihilate in the central region of our Galaxy. This has been known since the detection of a strong emission line centered on an energy of 511 keV in the direction of the Galactic center. This gamma-ray line is emitted during the annihilation of positrons with electrons from the interstellar medium. The spectrometer SPI, onboard the INTEGRAL observatory, performed spatial and spectral analyses of the positron annihilation emission. This thesis presents a study of the Galactic positron annihilation emission based on models of the different interactions undergone by positrons in the interstellar medium. The models are relied on our present knowledge of the properties of the interstellar medium in the Galactic bulge, where most of the positrons annihilate, and of the physics of positrons (production, propagation and annihilation processes). In order to obtain constraints on the positrons sources and physical characteristics of the annihilation medium, we compared the results of the models to measurements provided by the SPI spectrometer. (author)

  18. A controlled study of positron-emission-tomography and positron-emission-tomography/computed tomography in differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules-report of 60 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Qi-yong; HUA Yan-qing; ZHANG Guo-zhen; ZHAO Jun; GUAN Yi-hui; GE Xiao-jun; MAO Ding-biao; ZUO Chuan-tao

    2005-01-01

    @@ The differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) remains a challenge. It is acknowledged that combining positron-emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) offers the most reliable noninvasive method for the diagnosis of SPNs.

  19. 77 FR 21783 - Guidance on Media Fills for Validation of Aseptic Preparations for Positron Emission Tomography...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... the same title was announced in the Federal Register on September 30, 2011 (76 FR 60847), and Docket... Preparations for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance entitled ``Media Fills for Validation of Aseptic Preparations for Positron Emission...

  20. 77 FR 71802 - Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... announced in the Federal Register on February 14, 2012 (77 FR 8262), and Docket No. FDA-2012-D- 0081 was... Positron Emission Tomography Drugs; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... ``Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' The guidance is intended...

  1. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005

  2. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavayssiere, Robert [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France)], E-mail: cab.lav@wanadoo.fr; Cabee, Anne-Elizabeth [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); Centre RMX, 80, avenue Felix Faure, 75105 Paris (France); Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel [Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); American Hospital of Paris, Nuclear Medicine, 63, boulevard Victor Hugo - BP 109, 92202 Neuilly sur Seine Cedex (France)

    2009-01-15

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005].

  3. The next generation of positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Samuel L; Roney, Celeste A; Daumar, Pierre; Lewis, Jason S

    2011-07-01

    Although (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) is still the most widely used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer, there are a few well-known limitations to its use. The last decade has seen the development of new PET probes for in vivo visualization of specific molecular targets, along with important technical advances in the production of positron-emitting radionuclides and their related labeling methods. As such, a broad range of new PET tracers are in preclinical development or have recently entered clinical trials. The topics covered in this review include labeling methods, biological targets, and the most recent preclinical or clinical data of some of the next generation of PET radiopharmaceuticals. This review, which is by no means exhaustive, has been separated into sections related to the PET radionuclide used for radiolabeling: fluorine-18, for the labeling of agents such as FACBC, FDHT, choline, and Galacto-RGD; carbon-11, for the labeling of choline; gallium-68, for the labeling of peptides such as DOTATOC and bombesin analogs; and the long-lived radionuclides iodine-124 and zirconium-89 for the labeling of monoclonal antibodies cG250, and J591 and trastuzumab, respectively.

  4. A Case of Corticobasal Degeneration Studied with Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nagasawa

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured cerebral blood flow, oxygen metabolism, glucose utilization, and dopamine metabolism in the brain of a patient with corticobasal degeneration using positron emission tomography (PET. The clinical picture is distinctive, comprising features referable to both cortical and basal ganglionic dysfunction. Brain imagings of glucose and dopamine metabolism can demonstrate greater abnormalities in the cerebral cortex and in the striatum contralateral to the more affected side than those of blood flow and oxygen metabolism. This unique combination study measuring both cerebral glucose utilization and dopamine metabolism in the nigrostriatal system can provide efficient information about the dysfunctions which are correlated with individual clinical symptoms, and this study is essential to diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration.

  5. Magnet development for the BRF positron emission tomography accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collaboration involving the Biomedical Research Foundation, Science Applications International Corporation, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and the University of Washington is developing an accelerator for producing isotopes for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans. The Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) section of this accelerator takes a small beam from a first RFQ acceleration device and matches it into a small 3D-acceptance at a second RFQ section. The beam transport system was designed to prevent beam losses due to emittance growth. The system includes two bending dipoles and seven quadrupoles of three different types. This report contains a brief description of the MEBT magnets and their electric, magnetic and thermal properties. The magnet measurements show that each of the magnets meets the system requirements

  6. Knowledge-based automated radiopharmaceutical manufacturing for Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the application of basic knowledge engineering principles to the design of automated synthesis equipment for radiopharmaceuticals used in Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Before discussing knowledge programming, an overview of the development of automated radiopharmaceutical synthesis systems for PET will be presented. Since knowledge systems will rely on information obtained from machine transducers, a discussion of the uses of sensory feedback in today's automated systems follows. Next, the operation of these automated systems is contrasted to radiotracer production carried out by chemists, and the rationale for and basic concepts of knowledge-based programming are explained. Finally, a prototype knowledge-based system supporting automated radiopharmaceutical manufacturing of 18FDG at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is described using 1stClass, a commercially available PC-based expert system shell

  7. FDG positron emission computed tomography in a study of aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission computed tomography (PECT) using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) was used to investigate the correlations between clinical status, anatomy (as described by CT), and metabolism in five patients with stable aphasia resulting from ischemic cerebral infarction. Local cerebral metabolic activity was diminished in an area larger than the area of infarction demonstrated by CT. In one patient, FDG PECT revealed a metabolic lesion that probably caused the aphasic syndrome and was not apparent by CT. The data suggest that reliance on CT in delineating the extent of the brain lesion in aphasia or other neuropsychological defects can be misleading; FDG PECT may provide important additional information. Two patients with similar metabolic lesions had very different clinical syndromes, showing that even when currently available methods are combined, major gaps remain in clinicoanatomical correlations in aphasia

  8. Positron Emission Tomography: state of the art and future developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzichemi, M.

    2016-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays a fundamental role in medical imaging, with a wide range of applications covering, among the others, oncology, neurology and cardiology. PET has undergone a steady technological evolution since its introduction in mid 20th century, from the development of 3D PET in the late 1980s, to the invention of PET/CT in the 1990s and more recently with the introduction of PET/MR scanners. The current research topics aiming to develop the next generation of PET scanners are summarized in this paper, focusing on the efforts to increase the sensitivity of the detectors, as long as improving their timing, spatial and energy resolutions, with the final goal of reducing the amount of radioactive dose received by the patients and the duration of the exams while improving at the same time the detectability of lesions.

  9. [TUBERCULOUS CONSTRICTIVE PERICARDITIS DETECTED ON POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Hiroki; Sunada, Kouichi; Shimizu, Kunihiko

    2016-02-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with fever, dyspnea, and weight loss. He was referred to our hospital for further examination of the cause of the pleural effusions. Chest computed tomography showed pleural effusions, a pericardial effusion, and enlarged lymph nodes in the carina tracheae. We administered treatment for heart failure and conducted analyses for a malignant tumor. The pericardial effusion improved, but the pericardium was thickened. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) showed fluorine-18 deoxyglucose accumulation at the superior fovea of the right clavicle, carina tracheae, superior mediastinum lymph nodes, and a thickened pericardium. Because these findings did not suggest malignancy, we assumed this was a tuberculous lesion. Echocardiography confirmed this finding as constrictive pericarditis; therefore, pericardiolysis was performed. Pathological examination showed features of caseous necrosis and granulomatous changes. Hence, the patient was diagnosed with tuberculous constrictive pericarditis. PET-CT serves as a useful tool for the diagnosis of tuberculous pericarditis. PMID:27263228

  10. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available

  11. Positron emission tomography of incidentally detected small pulmonary nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Dirksen, A;

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging of small pulmonary nodules incidentally detected by spiral computed tomography (CT) in a high-risk population. Ten patients (five females, five males, aged 54-72 years) were recruited...... (approx. 3.3% of the entire study population). The prevalence of malignancy in this group was 50%. The accuracy of PET was high, in spite of the fact that seven patients had nodules smaller than 15 mm and two patients had bronchoalveolar cell carcinoma. This small prospective study indicates...... that subsequent assessment with FDG PET of small pulmonary nodules incidentally detected by CT has the potential to minimize the numbers of invasive procedures performed in individuals with a benign pulmonary lesion. FDG PET also increases the possibility of an early diagnosis as compared to the strategy...

  12. Non-oncological positron emission tomography (PET): brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows evaluation of the central nervous system function. Imaging of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, and of several neurotransmission systems may be obtained using PET. PET quantification is accurate and has good test-retest reliability. For research purposes, PET has been used to study brain physiology, to explore neurological and psychiatric diseases pathophysiology and for the new drugs research and development. F.D.G. is the only PET radioligand with clinical application. Following criteria of evidence-based medicine, the clinical indications of F.D.G.-PET are: evaluation of treated gliomas, pre surgical study of partial refractory epilepsy and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease when it is impossible to differentiate clinically from fronto-temporal dementia

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography investigations of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common degenerative neurological disease that is an increasing medical, economical, and social problem. There is evidence that a long ''asymptomatic'' phase of the disease exists where functional changes in the brain are present, but structural imaging for instance with magnetic resonance imaging remains normal. Positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the tools by which it is possible to explore changes in cerebral blood flow and metabolism and the functioning of different neurotransmitter systems. More recently, investigation of protein aggregations such as amyloid deposits or neurofibrillary tangles containing tau-protein has become possible. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on various 18F- and 11C-labelled PET tracers that could be used to study the pathophysiology of AD, to be used in the early or differential diagnosis or to be used in development of treatment and in monitoring of treatment effects. (orig.)

  14. Development of the LBNL positron emission mammography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the construction status of the LBNL Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) camera, which utilizes a PET detector module with depth of interaction measurement consisting of 64 LSO crystals (3x3x30 mm3) coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) and on the opposite end to a 64 pixel array of silicon photodiodes (PDs). The PMT provides an accurate timing pulse, the PDs identify the crystal of interaction, the sum provides a total energy signal, and the PD/(PD+PMT) ratio determines the depth of interaction. We have completed construction of all 42 PEM detector modules. All data acquisition electronics have been completed, fully tested and loaded onto the gantry. We have demonstrated that all functions of the custom IC work using the production rigid-flex boards and data acquisition system. Preliminary detector module characterization and coincidence data have been taken using the production system, including initial images

  15. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available.

  16. Temporoparietal cortex in aphasia. Evidence from positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metter, E.J.; Hanson, W.R.; Jackson, C.A.; Kempler, D.; van Lancker, D.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E. (National Institute of Aging, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Forty-four aphasic patients were examined with (F18)-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in a resting state to determine whether consistent glucose metabolic abnormalities were present. Ninety-seven percent of subjects showed metabolic abnormalities in the angular gyrus, 89% in the supramarginal gyrus, and 87% in the lateral and transverse superior temporal gyrus. Pearson product moment correlations were calculated between regional metabolic measures and performance on the Western Aphasia Battery. No significant correlations were found between the Western Aphasia Battery scores and right hemisphere metabolic measures. Most left hemisphere regions correlated with more than one score from the Western Aphasia Battery. Temporal but not frontal regions had significant correlations to the comprehension score. The left temporoparietal region was consistently affected in these subjects, suggesting that common features in the aphasias were caused by left temporoparietal dysfunction, while behavioral differences resulted from (1) the extent of temporoparietal changes, and (2) dysfunction elsewhere in the brain, particularly the left frontal and subcortical areas.

  17. Investigation of language lateralization mechanism by Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As language lateralization in the brain left hemisphere is one of the most well known but less understood characteristics of the human brain, this research thesis reports the use of brain functional imaging to address some specific aspects of this lateralization. In a first part, the author reports the study of mechanisms of recovery from aphasia after a left hemisphere lesion within a population of aphasic right-handers. Based on a contrast between patients with a persistent aphasia despite usual language therapies, and patients with a significant recovery after a melodic and rhythmic therapy (TMR), a PET-based (positron emission tomography) activation study has been developed, based on the opposition between usual language stimuli and stimuli accentuated by TMR. In the second part, the author explored more systematically on sane patients the influence of some physical characteristics of auditory stimulation on the induced functional asymmetry

  18. Guideline for performance evaluation of positron emission tomographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This supplement presents guideline for performance evaluation of positron emission tomographies (PET). The purpose of this guideline is to define measurement methods for evaluating both the performance of PET equipment and the accuracy of various data corrections in the clinical setting. The guideline has 8 items. The first four items, consisting of spatial dose distributions, scattering fraction, sensitivity, and counting loss and accidental coincidence counting, deals with the basic performance of PET equipment. The next three items, including image uniformity, accuracy of absorption and scattering correction, and characteristics of high counting rate (accuracy of counting loss corrections and S/N ratio), are designed to provide the quantitative evaluation of images reconstructed by various data corrections for absorption, scattering, counting loss, and others. The last item is partial volume effect (recovery coefficient), which is important for the quantitative analysis of PET images, with the aim of both the measurement method of partial volume effect and the definition of phantoms required. (N.K.)

  19. Development of radiotracers for imaging NR2B subtype NMDA receptors with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis was to develop new radioactive tracers for imaging NR2B subtype NMDA receptors with positron emission tomography. Several compounds including 4-(4-fluoro-benzyl)piperidine and presenting interesting in vivo biological properties were the object of a labelling with a positrons emitter atom (11C or 18F)

  20. Synthesis of the radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper is shown a short overview of the biogenic positron radiopharmaceuticals production and a brief summary of some PET preparation synthesis. At the end the overview of some forward-looking positron radionuclides, which can be used for a preparation of the PET radiopharmaceuticals is said. A short review of diagnostic use of PET radiopharmaceuticals is presented (authors)

  1. Utilisation of spatial and temporal correlations in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis we propose, implement, and evaluate algorithms improving spatial resolution in reconstructed images and reducing data noise in positron emission tomography imaging. These algorithms have been developed for a high resolution tomograph (HRRT) and applied to brain imaging, but can be used for other tomographs or studies. We first developed an iterative reconstruction algorithm including a stationary and isotropic model of resolution in image space, experimentally measured. We evaluated the impact of such a model of resolution in Monte-Carlo simulations, physical phantom experiments and in two clinical studies by comparing our algorithm with a reference reconstruction algorithm. This study suggests that biases due to partial volume effects are reduced, in particular in the clinical studies. Better spatial and temporal correlations are also found at the voxel level. However, other methods should be developed to further reduce data noise. We then proposed a maximum a posteriori de-noising algorithm that can be used for dynamic data to de-noise temporally raw data (sino-grams) or reconstructed images. The a priori modeled the coefficients in a wavelet basis of all the signals without noise (in an image or sinogram). We compared this technique with a reference de-noising method on replicated simulations. This illustrates the potential benefits of our approach of sinogram de-noising. (author)

  2. Epithelioid sarcoma with muscle metastasis detected by positron emission tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oya Masafumi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelioid sarcoma is an uncommon high-grade sarcoma, mostly involving the extremities. Case presentation A 33-year-old man was referred to our institute with a diagnosis of Volkmann's contracture with the symptom of flexion contracture of the fingers associated with swelling in his left forearm. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed abnormal signal intensity, comprising iso-signal intensity on T1- and high-signal intensity on T2-weighted images surrounding the flexor tendons in the forearm. Diagnosis of epithelioid sarcoma was made by open biopsy, and amputation at the upper arm was then undertaken. [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET detected multiple lesions with an increased uptake in the right neck, the bilateral upper arms and the right thigh, as well as in the left axillary lymph nodes, with maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax ranging from 2.0 to 5.5 g/ml. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed that there was a lesion within the right thigh muscle which was suggestive of metastasis, even though the lesion was occult clinically. Conclusion Increased uptake on FDG-PET might be representative of epithelioid sarcoma, and for this reason FDG-PET may be useful for detecting metastasis. Muscle metastasis is not well documented in epithelioid sarcoma. Accordingly, the frequency of muscle metastasis, including occult metastasis, needs to be further analyzed.

  3. European health telematics networks for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontaxakis, George [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain)]. E-mail: g.kontaxakis@upm.es; Pozo, Miguel Angel [Centro PET Complutense, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto Pluridisciplinar, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ohl, Roland [MedCom Gesellschaft fuer medizinische Bildverarbeitung mbH, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Visvikis, Dimitris [U650 INSERM, Lab. du Traitement de L' Information Medicale, University of Brest Occidentale, CHU Morvan, Brest 29609 (France); Sachpazidis, Ilias [Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Ortega, Fernando [Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia 46009 (Spain); Guerra, Pedro [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Cheze-Le Rest, Catherine [Dept. Medicine Nucleaire, CHU Morvan, Brest 29609 (France); Selby, Peter [MedCom Gesellschaft fuer medizinische Bildverarbeitung mbH, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Pan, Leyun [German Cancer Research Centre, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Diaz, Javier [Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia 46009 (Spain); Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia [German Cancer Research Centre, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Santos, Andres [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Strauss, Ludwig [German Cancer Research Centre, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Sakas, Georgios [MedCom Gesellschaft fuer medizinische Bildverarbeitung mbH, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics, Darmstadt 64283 (Germany)

    2006-12-20

    A pilot network of positron emission tomography centers across Europe has been setup employing telemedicine services. The primary aim is to bring all PET centers in Europe (and beyond) closer, by integrating advanced medical imaging technology and health telematics networks applications into a single, easy to operate health telematics platform, which allows secure transmission of medical data via a variety of telecommunications channels and fosters the cooperation between professionals in the field. The platform runs on PCs with Windows 2000/XP and incorporates advanced techniques for image visualization, analysis and fusion. The communication between two connected workstations is based on a TCP/IP connection secured by secure socket layers and virtual private network or jabber protocols. A teleconsultation can be online (with both physicians physically present) or offline (via transmission of messages which contain image data and other information). An interface sharing protocol enables online teleconsultations even over low bandwidth connections. This initiative promotes the cooperation and improved communication between nuclear medicine professionals, offering options for second opinion and training. It permits physicians to remotely consult patient data, even if they are away from the physical examination site.

  4. Carbon-11-methionine positron emission tomography imaging of chordoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hong [Department of Medical Imaging, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Medical Imaging, Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, 263-8555, Chiba (Japan); Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Tamura, Katsumi; Sagou, Kenji; Kandatsu, Susumu [Clinical Diagnosis Section, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tian, Mei; Suhara, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Tanada, Shuji [Department of Medical Imaging, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tsujii, Hirohiko [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2004-09-01

    Chordoma is a rare malignant bone tumor that arises from notochord remnants. This is the first trial to investigate the utility of {sup 11}C-methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET) in the imaging of chordoma before and after carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT). Fifteen patients with chordoma were investigated with MET-PET before and after CIRT and the findings analyzed visually and quantitatively. Tumor MET uptake was evaluated by tumor-to-nontumor ratio (T/N ratio). In 12 (80%) patients chordoma was clearly visible in the baseline MET-PET study with a mean T/N ratio of 3.3{+-}1.7. The MET uptake decreased significantly to 2.3{+-}1.4 after CIRT (P<0.05). A significant reduction in tumor MET uptake of 24% was observed after CIRT. Fourteen (93%) patients showed no local recurrence after CIRT with a median follow-up time of 20 months. This study has demonstrated that MET-PET is feasible for imaging of chordoma. MET-PET could provide important tumor metabolic information for the therapeutic monitoring of chordoma after CIRT. (orig.)

  5. Simultaneous laser speckle imaging and positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramer, M.; Feuerstein, D.; Backes, H.; Takagaki, M.; Kumagai, T.; Graf, R.

    2013-06-01

    Complex biological systems often require measurements of multiple parameters with high temporal and spatial resolution. Multimodal approaches and the combination of methods are therefore a powerful tool to address such scientific questions. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is an optical method that monitors dynamic changes in cortical blood flow (CBF) with high temporal resolution. Positron emission tomography (PET) allows for quantitative imaging of physiological processes and is a gold standard method to determine absolute cerebral blood flow. We developed a setup that allows simultaneous measurement with both modalities. Here, we simultaneously measured CBF with PET and LSI in rats and analyzed how the correlation of PET and LSI is modified when (1) different methods are used for the calculation of speckle inverse correlation time (ICT), (2) speckle data is acquired through thinned or craniectomized skull, (3) influence of surface vessels is removed from the speckle data. For the latter, a method for automated vessel segmentation from LSI data was developed. We obtained the best correlation (R² = 0.890, p<0.001) when correcting for surface vessel structures taking into account the contribution of static scatterers while keeping the coherence factor constant. However, using the originally published relation, which allows a 900 times faster computation of blood flow maps, still provided a good correlation (R2 = 0.879, p<0.001). Given the good correlation between LSI and PET we used our data to calibrate the speckle ICT. Thus, LSI provides CBF in absolute units at high temporal resolution.

  6. Silicon as an unconventional detector in positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinthorne, Neal; Brzezinski, Karol; Chesi, Enrico; Cochran, Eric; Grkovski, Milan; Grošičar, Borut; Honscheid, Klaus; Huh, Sam; Kagan, Harris; Lacasta, Carlos; Linhart, Vladimir; Mikuž, Marko; Smith, D. Shane; Stankova, Vera; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Žontar, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a widely used technique in medical imaging and in studying small animal models of human disease. In the conventional approach, the 511 keV annihilation photons emitted from a patient or small animal are detected by a ring of scintillators such as LYSO read out by arrays of photodetectors. Although this has been successful in achieving ˜5 mm FWHM spatial resolution in human studies and ˜1 mm resolution in dedicated small animal instruments, there is interest in significantly improving these figures. Silicon, although its stopping power is modest for 511 keV photons, offers a number of potential advantages over more conventional approaches including the potential for high intrinsic spatial resolution in 3D. To evaluate silicon in a variety of PET "magnifying glass" configurations, an instrument was constructed that consists of an outer partial-ring of PET scintillation detectors into which various arrangements of silicon detectors are inserted to emulate dual-ring or imaging probe geometries. Measurements using the test instrument demonstrated the capability of clearly resolving point sources of 22Na having a 1.5 mm center-to-center spacing as well as the 1.2 mm rods of a 18F-filled resolution phantom. Although many challenges remain, silicon has potential to become the PET detector of choice when spatial resolution is the primary consideration.

  7. Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal advantage of positron emission tomography over other methods for measuring cerebral blood flow stems from the accurate, quantitative three-dimensional measurements of regional brain radioactivity that are possible with this technique. As a result, accurate quantitative measurements of regional cerebral blood flow can be obtained for both superficial and deep cerebral structures. The value of PET for investigating central nervous system physiology and pathology extends far beyond this, however. Through the use of different radiotracers and appropriate mathematical models, PET can be applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physiologic variables. Measurements of rCBF tell only part of the story. Experience with PET and with a variety of other techniques has taught us that rCBF is at times a poor indicator of the metabolic, functional, and biochemical status of cerebral tissue. It is only by understanding the interaction of all of these factors that our understanding of neurologic disease can advance. It is in the investigation of these complex relationships that the real value of PET resides

  8. Characterization of time resolved photodetector systems for Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Powolny, François

    The main topic of this work is the study of detector systems composed of a scintillator, a photodetector and readout electronics, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In particular, the timing properties of such detector systems are studied. The first idea is to take advantage of the good timing properties of the NINO chip, which is a fast preamplifier-discriminator developed for the ALICE Time of flight detector at CERN. This chip uses a time over threshold technique that is to be applied for the first time in medical imaging applications. A unique feature of this technique is that it delivers both timing and energy information with a single digital pulse, the time stamp with the rising edge and the energy from the pulse width. This entails substantial simplification of the entire readout architecture of a tomograph. The scintillator chosen in the detector system is LSO. Crystals of 2x2x10mm3 were used. For the photodetector, APDs were first used, and were then replaced by SiPMs to make use of their highe...

  9. Positron Emission Tomography Detector Development for Plant Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisenberger, A G; McKisson, J; Stolin, A; Zorn, C; Howell, C R; Crowell, A S; Reid, C D; Majewski, S

    2010-01-01

    There are opportunities for the development of new tools to advance plant biology research through the use of radionuclides. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Duke University, West Virginia University and the University of Maryland are collaborating on the development of radionuclide imaging technologies to facilitate plant biology research. Biological research into optimizing plant productivity under various environmental constraints, biofuel and carbon sequestration research are areas that could potentially benefit from new imaging technologies. Using 11CO2 tracers, the investigators at Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory / Duke University Phytotron are currently researching the dynamical responses of plants to environmental changes forecasted from increasing greenhouse trace gases involved in global change. The biological research primary focus is to investigate the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nutrients limitation on carbon and nitrogen dynamics in plants. We report here on preliminary results of 11CO2 plant imaging experiments involving barley plants using Jefferson Lab dual planar positron emission tomography detectors to image 11CO2 in live barley plants. New detector designs will be developed based on the preliminary studies reported here and further planned.

  10. Anaesthesia for positron emission tomography scanning of animal brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Smith, Donald F

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a means of studying physiological and pharmacological processes as they occur in the living brain. Mice, rats, dogs, cats, pigs and non-human primates are often used in studies using PET. They are commonly anaesthetized with ketamine, propofol or isoflurane in order to prevent them from moving during the imaging procedure. The use of anaesthesia in PET studies suffers, however, from the drawback of possibly altering central neuromolecular mechanisms. As a result, PET findings obtained in anaesthetized animals may fail to correctly represent normal properties of the awake brain. Here, we review findings of PET studies carried out either in both awake and anaesthetized animals or in animals given at least two different anaesthetics. Such studies provide a means of estimating the extent to which anaesthesia affects the outcome of PET neuroimaging in animals. While no final conclusion can be drawn concerning the 'best' general anaesthetic for PET neuroimaging in laboratory animals, such studies provide findings that can enhance an understanding of neurobiological mechanisms in the living brain. PMID:23349451

  11. Positron emission tomography in degenerative disorders of the dopaminergic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    21 patients who had Parkinson's disease (PD), PD plus dementia of Alzheimer type (PDAT) or progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), were studied with positron emission tomography (PET) using (18F)-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). In one patient with strictly unilateral PD side differences in striatal dopa uptake were studied with 6-(18F)fluoro-L-dopa (F-dopa). In patients with PD PET with FDG did not show any significant change in regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (rCMR(Glu)). In PDAT glucose metabolism was generally reduced, the most severe decrease was found in parietal cortex. The metabolic pattern was similar to that typically found in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the patient with strictly unilateral PD rCMR(Glu) was normal, F-dopa PET, however, revealed a distinct reduction of dopa uptake in the contralateral putamen. In PSP glucose metabolism was significantly decreased in subcortical regions (caudatum, putamen and brainstem) and in frontal cortex. Thus PET demonstrated a clear difference of metabolic pattern between PDAT and PSP. (authors)

  12. Recent innovations in the detection systems of Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the recognition of the clinical value of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for the diagnosis and staging of several cancers, the PET systems have evolved to systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT). The main constraint for clinical imaging is to reduce the acquisition duration. As a consequence, PET detectors are faster and emit more light than the BGO crystal used previously. These detectors allow an improvement of the count rate performance of the PET systems, reducing the scattered and the random events while increasing the true events at high activity concentration. Among the new crystals, some allow measuring the time of flight of the annihilation photons. This measurement further improves the performance of the systems. The spatial resolution of clinical PET systems is still equal to 5 mm at best. High spatial resolution PET systems dedicated to small animal imaging have been developed. These systems use similar crystal materials as the clinical systems. However, in order to permit spatial resolution close to 1 mm, the crystal elements have much smaller transverse dimensions than that of clinical systems. The detectors are compact using position sensitive photomultipliers or photodiodes. In order to preserve the uniformity of the spatial resolution over the transverse field of view of the tomography, solutions allowing the measurement of the depth of interaction of the photons in the crystal have been designed. New compact detectors based on semi conductors are currently investigated. (author)

  13. Florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hake, Ann; Trzepacz, Paula T.; Wang, Shufang; Yu, Peng; Case, Michael; Hochstetler, Helen; Witte, Michael M.; Degenhardt, Elisabeth K.; Dean, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the relationship between florbetapir-F18 positron emission tomography (FBP PET) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers. Methods Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI)-GO/2 healthy control (HC), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia subjects with clinical measures and CSF collected ±90 days of FBP PET data were analyzed using correlation and logistic regression. Results In HC and MCI subjects, FBP PET anterior and posterior cingulate and composite standard uptake value ratios correlated with CSF amyloid beta (Aβ1-42) and tau/Aβ1-42 ratios. Using logistic regression, Aβ1-42, total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181P (p-tau), and FBP PET composite each differentiated HC versus AD. Aβ1-42 and t-tau distinguished MCI versus AD, without additional contribution by FBP PET. Total tau and p-tau added discriminative power to FBP PET when classifying HC versus AD. Conclusion Based on cross-sectional diagnostic groups, both amyloid and tau measures distinguish healthy from demented subjects. Longitudinal analyses are needed. PMID:25916563

  14. Positron Emission Tomography with Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandsson, K.

    1996-10-01

    The development of two different low-cost scanners for positron emission tomography (PET) based on 3D acquisition are presented. The first scanner consists of two rotating scintillation cameras, and produces quantitative images, which have shown to be clinically useful. The second one is a system with two opposed sets of detectors, based on the limited angle tomography principle, dedicated for mammographic studies. The development of low-cost PET scanners can increase the clinical impact of PET, which is an expensive modality, only available at a few centres world-wide and mainly used as a research tool. A 3D reconstruction method was developed that utilizes all the available data. The size of the data-sets is considerably reduced, using the single-slice rebinning approximation. The 3D reconstruction is divided into 1D axial deconvolution and 2D transaxial reconstruction, which makes it relatively fast. This method was developed for the rotating scanner, but was also implemented for multi-ring scanners with and without inter plane septa. An iterative 3D reconstruction method was developed for the limited angle scanner, based on the new concept of `mobile pixels`, which reduces the finite pixel errors and leads to an improved signal to noise ratio. 100 refs.

  15. Therapy response evaluation with positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, George M

    2010-12-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose is widely used for evaluation of therapy response in patients with solid tumors but has not been as readily adopted in clinical trials because of the variability of acquisition and processing protocols and the absence of universal response criteria. Criteria proposed for clinical trials are difficult to apply in clinical practice, and gestalt impression is probably accurate in individual patients, especially with respect to the presence of progressive disease and complete response. Semiquantitative methods of determining tissue glucose metabolism, such as standard uptake value, can be a useful descriptor for levels of tissue glucose metabolism and changes in response to therapy if technical quality control measures are carefully maintained. The terms partial response, complete response, and progressive disease are best used in clinical trials in which the terms have specific meanings and precise definitions. In clinical practice, it may be better to use descriptive terminology agreed upon by imaging physicians and clinicians in their own practice. PMID:21147376

  16. Geoscientific process monitoring with positron emission tomography (GeoPET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulenkampff, Johannes; Gründig, Marion; Zakhnini, Abdelhamid; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2016-08-01

    Transport processes in geomaterials can be observed with input-output experiments, which yield no direct information on the impact of heterogeneities, or they can be assessed by model simulations based on structural imaging using µ-CT. Positron emission tomography (PET) provides an alternative experimental observation method which directly and quantitatively yields the spatio-temporal distribution of tracer concentration. Process observation with PET benefits from its extremely high sensitivity together with a resolution that is acceptable in relation to standard drill core sizes. We strongly recommend applying high-resolution PET scanners in order to achieve a resolution on the order of 1 mm. We discuss the particularities of PET applications in geoscientific experiments (GeoPET), which essentially are due to high material density. Although PET is rather insensitive to matrix effects, mass attenuation and Compton scattering have to be corrected thoroughly in order to derive quantitative values. Examples of process monitoring of advection and diffusion processes with GeoPET illustrate the procedure and the experimental conditions, as well as the benefits and limits of the method.

  17. 76 FR 47593 - Guidance for Small Business Entities on Current Good Manufacturing Practice for Positron Emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... a guidance for small business entities entitled ``PET Drugs--Current Good Manufacturing Practice... entitled ``PET Drugs--Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP); Small Entity Compliance Guide.'' This... Manufacturing Practice for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  18. Measurement of regional cerebral glucose utilization in man by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various methods available for the study of regional cerebral glucose consumption in man by positron emission tomography are described and their applications, limitations and principal physiopathological results are presented

  19. Silicon as an unconventional detector in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a widely used technique in medical imaging and in studying small animal models of human disease. In the conventional approach, the 511 keV annihilation photons emitted from a patient or small animal are detected by a ring of scintillators such as LYSO read out by arrays of photodetectors. Although this has been successful in achieving ∼5mm FWHM spatial resolution in human studies and ∼1mm resolution in dedicated small animal instruments, there is interest in significantly improving these figures. Silicon, although its stopping power is modest for 511 keV photons, offers a number of potential advantages over more conventional approaches including the potential for high intrinsic spatial resolution in 3D. To evaluate silicon in a variety of PET “magnifying glass” configurations, an instrument was constructed that consists of an outer partial-ring of PET scintillation detectors into which various arrangements of silicon detectors are inserted to emulate dual-ring or imaging probe geometries. Measurements using the test instrument demonstrated the capability of clearly resolving point sources of 22Na having a 1.5 mm center-to-center spacing as well as the 1.2 mm rods of a 18F-filled resolution phantom. Although many challenges remain, silicon has potential to become the PET detector of choice when spatial resolution is the primary consideration. -- Highlights: ► We examine the use of position-sensitive silicon detectors in magnifying PET geometries. ► A demonstrator using silicon detectors and BGO scintillation detectors was constructed. ► Both single-slice and volume PET configurations were tested. ► For a 4.5 cm field-of-view, resolutions <1mm were achievable. ► Resolution will improve further with higher resolution silicon detectors.

  20. Alcohol ADME in primates studied with positron emission tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zizhong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The sensitivity to the intoxicating effects of alcohol as well as its adverse medical consequences differ markedly among individuals, which reflects in part differences in alcohol's absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME properties. The ADME of alcohol in the body and its relationship with alcohol's brain bioavailability, however, is not well understood. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: The ADME of C-11 labeled alcohol, CH(3 (11CH(2OH, 1 and C-11 and deuterium dual labeled alcohol, CH(3 (11CD(2OH, 2 in baboons was compared based on the principle that C-D bond is stronger than C-H bond, thus the reaction is slower if C-D bond breaking occurs in a rate-determining metabolic step. The following ADME parameters in peripheral organs and brain were derived from time activity curve (TAC of positron emission tomography (PET scans: peak uptake (C(max; peak uptake time (T(max, half-life of peak uptake (T(1/2, the area under the curve (AUC(60 min, and the residue uptake (C(60 min. KEY RESULTS: For 1 the highest uptake occurred in the kidney whereas for 2 it occurred in the liver. A deuterium isotope effect was observed in the kidneys in both animals studied and in the liver of one animal but not the other. The highest uptake for 1 and 2 in the brain was in striatum and cerebellum but 2 had higher uptake than 1 in all brain regions most evidently in thalamus and cingulate. Alcohol's brain uptake was significantly higher when given intravenously than when given orally and also when the animal was pretreated with a pharmacological dose of alcohol. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS: The study shows that alcohol metabolism in peripheral organs had a large effect on alcohol's brain bioavailability. This study sets the stage for clinical investigation on how genetics, gender and alcohol abuse affect alcohol's ADME and its relationship to intoxication and medical consequences.

  1. Positron emission tomography in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography with 18Fluor-deoxyglucose (18FDG PET) was introduced as method of evaluation of the cerebral metabolism in the early 80s. 18FDG PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) has rapidly become a method of epileptogenic zone localization because of the hypometaboilsm of this zone during the interictal period. This paper represents the first Bulgarian series of patients with drug- resistant epilepsy who were evaluated with 18FDG PET as part of the presurgical work-up. Our study has included 21 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy who were evaluated with 18FDG PET/CT from January 2010 to May 2013. All patients were evaluated with dedicated MRI epilepsy protocol. PET/CT study was fused with 3D MRI study using FSL or GE software. Video EEG monitoring was performed in all 21 patients and seizures were recorded in 18 patients. Hypometabolic zones were found in 15 patients. The hypometabolism was focal in 5 patients, multilobar in 9 patients and hemispheric in 1 patient. The MRI was normal in 8 patients. Hypometabolic zones were found in 3 of these 8 patients with cryptogenic epilepsy. Epilepsy surgery was performed in 6 cases. All operated patients were with hypometabolic zones. Significant seizure reduction after surgery was observed in 5 of 6 operated patients. 18FDG PET/CT is a valuable method for epileptogenic zone localization in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. The introduction of this method in the bulgarian epilepsy surgery program increases the chances for successful resective surgery. (authors)

  2. Noninvasive imaging of islet grafts using positron-emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuxin; Dang, Hoa; Middleton, Blake; Zhang, Zesong; Washburn, Lorraine; Stout, David B.; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Atkinson, Mark A.; Phelps, Michael; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Tian, Jide; Kaufman, Daniel L.

    2006-07-01

    Islet transplantation offers a potential therapy to restore glucose homeostasis in type 1 diabetes patients. However, islet transplantation is not routinely successful because most islet recipients gradually lose graft function. Furthermore, serological markers of islet function are insensitive to islet loss until the latter stages of islet graft rejection. A noninvasive method of monitoring islet grafts would aid in the assessment of islet graft survival and the evaluation of interventions designed to prolong graft survival. Here, we show that recombinant adenovirus can engineer isolated islets to express a positron-emission tomography (PET) reporter gene and that these islets can be repeatedly imaged by using microPET after transplantation into mice. The magnitude of signal from engineered islets implanted into the axillary cavity was directly related to the implanted islet mass. PET signals attenuated over the following weeks because of the transient nature of adenovirus-mediated gene expression. Because the liver is the preferred site for islet implantation in humans, we also tested whether islets could be imaged after transfusion into the mouse liver. Control studies revealed that both intrahepatic islet transplantation and hyperglycemia altered the biodistribution kinetics of the PET probe systemically. Although transplanted islets were dispersed throughout the liver, clear signals from the liver region of mice receiving PET reporter-expressing islets were detectable for several weeks. Viral transduction, PET reporter expression, and repeated microPET imaging had no apparent deleterious effects on islet function after implantation. These studies lay a foundation for noninvasive quantitative assessments of islet graft survival using PET. diabetes | transplantation

  3. Analysis of Factors Affecting Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) Image Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image reconstruction for positron emission mammography (PEM) with the breast positioned between two parallel, planar detectors is usually performed by backprojection to image planes. Three important factors affecting PEM image reconstruction by backprojection are investigated: (1) image uniformity (flood) corrections, (2) image sampling (pixel size) and (3) count allocation methods. An analytic expression for uniformity correction is developed that incorporates factors for spatial-dependent detector sensitivity and geometric effects from acceptance angle limits on coincidence events. There is good agreement between experimental floods from a PEM system with a pixellated detector and numerical simulations. The analytic uniformity corrections are successfully applied to image reconstruction of compressed breast phantoms and reduce the necessity for flood scans at different image planes. Experimental and simulated compressed breast phantom studies show that lesion contrast is improved when the image pixel size is half of, rather than equal to, the detector pixel size, though this occurs at the expense of some additional image noise. In PEM reconstruction counts usually are allocated to the pixel in the image plane intersected by the line of response (LOR) between the centers of the detection pixels. An alternate count allocation method is investigated that distributes counts to image pixels in proportion to the area of the tube of response (TOR) connecting the detection pixels that they overlay in the image plane. This TOR method eliminates some image artifacts that occur with the LOR method and increases tumor signal-to-noise ratios at the expense of a slight decrease in tumor contrast. Analysis of image uniformity, image sampling and count allocation methods in PEM image reconstruction points to ways of improving image formation. Further work is required to optimize image reconstruction parameters for particular detection or quantitation tasks

  4. Positron emission tomography displacement sensitivity: predicting binding potential change for positron emission tomography tracers based on their kinetic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Evan D; Yoder, Karmen K

    2007-03-01

    There is great interest in positron emission tomography (PET) as a noninvasive assay of fluctuations in synaptic neurotransmitter levels, but questions remain regarding the optimal choice of tracer for such a task. A mathematical method is proposed for predicting the utility of any PET tracer as a detector of changes in the concentration of an endogenous competitor via displacement of the tracer (a.k.a., its 'vulnerability' to competition). The method is based on earlier theoretical work by Endres and Carson and by the authors. A tracer-specific predictor, the PET Displacement Sensitivity (PDS), is calculated from compartmental model simulations of the uptake and retention of dopaminergic radiotracers in the presence of transient elevations of dopamine (DA). The PDS predicts the change in binding potential (DeltaBP) for a given change in receptor occupancy because of binding by the endogenous competitor. Simulations were performed using estimates of tracer kinetic parameters derived from the literature. For D(2)/D(3) tracers, the calculated PDS indices suggest a rank order for sensitivity to displacement by DA as follows: raclopride (highest sensitivity), followed by fallypride, FESP, FLB, NMSP, and epidepride (lowest). Although the PDS takes into account the affinity constant for the tracer at the binding site, its predictive value cannot be matched by either a single equilibrium constant, or by any one rate constant of the model. Values for DeltaBP have been derived from published studies that employed comparable displacement paradigms with amphetamine and a D(2)/D(3) tracer. The values are in good agreement with the PDS-predicted rank order of sensitivity to displacement. PMID:16788713

  5. Catecholaminergic neurotransmission in heart and brain, development of tracers for positron emission tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Langer, Claus Oliver

    2000-01-01

    The catecholamines norepinephrine and its biosynthetic precursor dopamine are two principal neurotransmitters in the human central nervous system (CNS). Moreover, norepinephrine is a major transmitter substance in the peripheral, autonomic nervous system. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses positron-labeled molecules to image and measure the function of biological processes in vivo. Neuronal catecholaminergic pathways, both in CNS...

  6. Fabrication of polycrystalline scintillators for the positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent ceramics are becoming more and more important for two new types of applications. On the one hand in cases where high mechanical and thermal demands in combination with optical properties are required, on the other hand where the optical properties of transparent materials like glass are not sufficient e.g. in positron-emission-tomography (PET) diagnostics. Most state of the art PET-scanners are using high-priced single crystals as scintillator material. The technological challenge is to replace single crystal by cost-efficient transparent ceramics. Producing transparent ceramics is ordered in synthesis of the powders and in manufacturing of these into transparent ceramics. The aim of this work was to synthesize single phase yttrium-alumina-and Luthetiumalumina-garnet (YAG, LuAG) powders partially doped with neodymium or praseodymium by four different synthesis routes (Pechini-synthesis, sol-gel-route, coprecipitation and solid state reactions). Additionally industrial LuAG and LuPO4 powders were characterized and manufactured. The powders were processed as submicron- and nanopowders. The compaction of nanopowder greenbodies sintered at high temperatures leads to a ''cross-over'' between both manufacturing route. Newly produced single-phase powders were homogenized with additions of sintering additives like tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and binders like polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Moulding the powders were carried out by uniaxial pressing, cold isostatic pressing and in individual cases also by slip casting. The achieved green densities were in a range of 25-42 %. Examination of calcination behaviour leads to a calcination temperature of 1000 C with 2 hours dwell time in air atmosphere. Only solid state reactions resulted into transparent YAG, YAG:Pr, LuAG, LuAG:Pr ceramics. Solid state reactions of nanopowders resulted in heterogeneously transparent samples. Ceramics made by powders of other synthetic routes gave nontransparent ceramics due to porosity

  7. Reconstruction Algorithms for Positron Emission Tomography and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography and their Numerical Implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Fokas, A S; Marinakis, V

    2004-01-01

    The modern imaging techniques of Positron Emission Tomography and of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography are not only two of the most important tools for studying the functional characteristics of the brain, but they now also play a vital role in several areas of clinical medicine, including neurology, oncology and cardiology. The basic mathematical problems associated with these techniques are the construction of the inverse of the Radon transform and of the inverse of the so called attenuated Radon transform respectively. We first show that, by employing mathematical techniques developed in the theory of nonlinear integrable equations, it is possible to obtain analytic formulas for these two inverse transforms. We then present algorithms for the numerical implementation of these analytic formulas, based on approximating the given data in terms of cubic splines. Several numerical tests are presented which suggest that our algorithms are capable of producing accurate reconstruction for realistic phanto...

  8. Laparoscopic Scar: a mimicker of Sister Mary Joseph's nodule on positron emission tomography/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography/CT is an established imaging method in the diagnosis and staging of cancers. 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is the most commonly used radiotracer in positron emission tomography/CT. It is a tumour viability agent and usually its uptake within a lesion reflects the presence of a viable tumour tissue. However, false-positive FDG uptake is known to occur in benign processes of either inflammatory or infectious aetiology. We describe FDG uptake at the site of laparoscopic scar that mimicked Sister Mary Joseph's nodule in a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma. Here, the knowledge of the patient's history and subtle imaging findings helped in accurate staging of the patient. In this case report, we emphasize the value of the knowledge of the patient history and awareness of different pitfalls of FDG to achieve a correct diagnosis on positron emission tomography/CT

  9. The 511 keV emission from positron annihilation in the Galaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prantzos, N.; Boehm, C.; Bykov, A. M.; Diehl, R.; Ferriere, K.; Guessoum, N.; Jean, P.; Knoedlseder, J.; Marcowith, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Strong, A.; Weidenspointner, G. [CNRS, UMR7095, UMPC and Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014, Paris (France) and LAPP, 9 Chemin de Bellevue, BP 110 F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); A. F. Ioffe Institute of Physics and Technology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Toulouse-Tarbes, Universite de Toulouse, CNRS, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); American University of Sharjah, College of Arts and Sciences/Physics Department, P.O. Box 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); CESR, Universite de Toulouse, CNRS, 9, Avenue du Colonel Roche, Boite Postal 4346, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); L.U.P.M., Universite Montpellier II, CNRS, Place Eugene Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85741, Garching (Germany); Max Planck Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching, D-85741 Germany, and MPI Halbleiterlabor, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, D-81739 Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The first {gamma}-ray line originating from outside the Solar System that was ever detected is the 511 keV emission from positron annihilation in the Galaxy. Despite 30 years of intense theoretical and observational investigation, the main sources of positrons have not been identified up to now. Observations in the 1990s with OSSE/CGRO (Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment on GRO satellite/Compton Gamma Ray Observatory) showed that the emission is strongly concentrated toward the Galactic bulge. In the 2000s, the spectrometer SPI aboard the European Space Agency's (ESA) International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) allowed scientists to measure that emission across the entire Galaxy, revealing that the bulge-to-disk luminosity ratio is larger than observed at any other wavelength. This mapping prompted a number of novel explanations, including rather ''exotic'' ones (e.g., dark matter annihilation). However, conventional astrophysical sources, such as type Ia supernovae, microquasars, or x-ray binaries, are still plausible candidates for a large fraction of the observed total 511 keV emission of the bulge. A closer study of the subject reveals new layers of complexity, since positrons may propagate far away from their production sites, making it difficult to infer the underlying source distribution from the observed map of 511 keV emission. However, in contrast to the rather well-understood propagation of high-energy (>GeV) particles of Galactic cosmic rays, understanding the propagation of low-energy ({approx}MeV) positrons in the turbulent, magnetized interstellar medium still remains a formidable challenge. The spectral and imaging properties of the observed 511 keV emission are reviewed and candidate positron sources and models of positron propagation in the Galaxy are critically discussed.

  10. Molecular Imaging of Transporters with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Gunnar; Sörensen, Jens; Hall, Håkan

    Positron emission tomography (PET) visualization of brain components in vivo is a rapidly growing field. Molecular imaging with PET is also increasingly used in drug development, especially for the determination of drug receptor interaction for CNS-active drugs. This gives the opportunity to relate clinical efficacy to per cent receptor occupancy of a drug on a certain targeted receptor and to relate drug pharmacokinetics in plasma to interaction with target protein. In the present review we will focus on the study of transporters, such as the monoamine transporters, the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) transporter, the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2, and the glucose transporter using PET radioligands. Neurotransmitter transporters are presynaptically located and in vivo imaging using PET can therefore be used for the determination of the density of afferent neurons. Several promising PET ligands for the noradrenaline transporter (NET) have been labeled and evaluated in vivo including in man, but a really useful PET ligand for NET still remains to be identified. The most promising tracer to date is (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2. The in vivo visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) may give clues in the evaluation of conditions related to dopamine, such as Parkinson's disease and drug abuse. The first PET radioligands based on cocaine were not selective, but more recently several selective tracers such as [11C]PE2I have been characterized and shown to be suitable as PET radioligands. Although there are a large number of serotonin transporter inhibitors used today as SSRIs, it was not until very recently, when [11C]McN5652 was synthesized, that this transporter was studied using PET. New candidates as PET radioligands for the SERT have subsequently been developed and [11C]DASB and [11C]MADAM and their analogues are today the most promising ligands. The existing radioligands for Pgp transporters seem to be suitable tools for the study of both peripheral and central drug

  11. Positron emission tomography and migraine. Tomographie par emission de positons et migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabriat, H. (CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot)

    1992-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a brain imaging technique that allows in vivo studies of numerous physiological parameters. There have been few PET studies in migraine patients. Cerebral blood flow changes with no variations in brain oxygen consumption have been reported in patients with prolonged neurologic manifestations during migraine attacks. Parenteral administration of reserpine during migraine headache has been followed by a fall in the overall cerebral uptake of glucose. The small sample sizes and a number of methodologic problems complicate the interpretation of these results. Recent technical advances and the development of new PET tracers can be expected to provide further insight into the pathophysiology of migraine. Today cerebral cortex 5 HT{sub 2} serotonin receptors can be studied in migraine patients with PET.

  12. The review of myocardial positron emission computed tomography and positron imaging by gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtake, Tohru [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-04-01

    To measure myocardial blood flow, Nitrogen-13 ammonia, Oxygen-15 water, Rubidium-82 and et al. are used. Each has merit and demerit. By measuring myocardial coronary flow reserve, the decrease of flow reserve during dipyridamole in patients with hypercholesterolemia or diabetes mellitus without significant coronary stenosis was observed. The possibility of early detection of atherosclerosis was showed. As to myocardial metabolism, glucose metabolism is measured by Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and it is considered as useful for the evaluation of myocardial viability. We are using FDG to evaluate insulin resistance during insulin clamp in patients with diabetes mellitus by measuring glucose utilization rate of myocardium and skeletal muscle. FFA metabolism has been measured by {sup 11}C-palmitate, but absolute quantification has not been performed. Recently the method for absolute quantification was reported, and new radiopharmaceutical {sup 18}F-FTHA was reported. Oxygen metabolism has been estimated by {sup 11}C-acetate. Myocardial viability, cardiac efficiency was evaluated by oxygen metabolism. As to receptor or sympathetic nerve end, cardiac insufficiency or cardiac transplantation was evaluated. Imaging of positron emitting radiopharmaceutical by gamma camera has been performed. Collimator method is clinically useful for cardiac imaging of viability study. (author). 54 refs.

  13. Time resolution in scintillator based detectors for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the domain of medical photon detectors L(Y)SO scintillators are used for positron emission tomography (PET). The interest for time of flight (TOF) in PET is increasing since measurements have shown that new crystals like L(Y)SO coupled to state of the art photodetectors, e.g. silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), can reach coincidence time resolutions (CTRs) of far below 500ps FWHM. To achieve these goals it is important to study the processe in the whole detection chain, i.e. the high energy particle or gamma interaction in the crystal, the scintillation process itself, the light propagation in the crystal with the light transfer to the photodetector, and the electronic readout. In this thesis time resolution measurements for a PET like system are performed in a coincidence setup utilizing the ultra fast amplifier discriminator NINO. We found that the time-over-threshold energy information provided by NINO shows a degradation in energy resolution for higher SiPM bias voltages. This is a consequence of the increasing dark count rate (DCR) of the SiPM with higher bias voltages together with the exponential decay of the signal. To overcome this problem and to operate the SiPM at its optimum voltage in terms of timing we developed a new electronic board that employs NINO only as a low noise leading edge discriminator together with an analog amplifier which delivers the energy information. With this new electronic board we indeed improved the measured CTR by about 15%. To study the limits of time resolution in more depth we measured the CTR with 2x2x3mm3 LSO:Ce codoped 0.4%Ca crystals coupled to commercially available SiPMs (Hamamatsu S10931-50P MPPC) and achieved a CTR of 108±5ps FWHM at an energy of 511keV. We determined the influence of the data acquisition system and the electronics on the CTR to be 27±2ps FWHM and thus negligible. To quantitatively understand the measured values, we developed a Monte Carlo simulation tool in MATLAB that incorporates the timing

  14. Tomography by positrons emission: integral unit to the service of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of the Positron emission tomography (PET) together with the one radiopharmaceutical 2 - [18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in the area of the medical imaging is expanding quickly and it possesses a bigger impact at the moment in favor of those patient to who suffers an oncological, cardiac or neurological illness in Mexico. (Author)

  15. Positron emission tomography for serial imaging of the contused adult rat spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandoe, R.D.S.; Yu, J.; Seidel, J.; Rahiem, S.T.; Hurtado, A.; Tsui, B.M.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Pomper, M.G.; Oudega, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) could be used in combination with computed tomography (CT) imaging techniques for longitudinal monitoring of the injured spinal cord. In adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6), the ninth thoracic (T9) spinal cord segment was e

  16. Positron emission tomography in presurgical diagnosis of partial epilepsies. Praeoperative Lokalisationsdiagnostik bei fokaler Epilepsie durch PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, M.; Leenders, K.L. (Universitaetsspital Zurich (Switzerland). Neurologische Klinik Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)); Wieser, H.G. (Universitaetsspital Zurich (Switzerland). Neurologische Klinik)

    1992-06-01

    We present results of studies in which positron emission tomography was applied to the presurgical evaluation of epileptics. Emphasis is placed on results of PET studies with various tracers in partial epilepsies and on the use of PET in age-related epileptic syndromes in children. (orig.).

  17. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography for optimized colon cancer staging and follow up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Bodil Elisabeth; Loft, Annika; Kjær, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Optimal management of colon cancer (CC) requires detailed assessment of extent of disease. This study prospectively investigates the diagnostic accuracy of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for staging and detection of recurrence...

  18. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle Westergren;

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present s...

  19. Activity-based costing evaluation of a [F-18]-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krug, Bruno; Van Zanten, Annie; Pirson, Anne-Sophie; Crott, Ralph; Vander Borght, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to use the activity-based costing approach to give a better insight in the actual cost structure of a positron emission tomography procedure (FDG-PET) by defining the constituting components and by simulating the impact of possible resource or practice changes. Met

  20. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in evaluation of residual intramuscular myxoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intramuscular myxoma (IM) is a rare benign neoplasm. In a patient diagnosed with IM of left thigh, we report the utility of a postoperative fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan in assessing the efficacy of surgical excision

  1. Predictive value of early F-18-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in chemosensitive relapsed lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, B; van Imhoff, G; Pruim, J; Sluiter, W; Vaalburg, W; Vellenga, E

    2003-01-01

    F-18-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) might be a better tool than computerized tomography (CT) in predicting long-term treatment outcome in patients with relapsed chemosensitive lymphoma who are candidates for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). We studied patien

  2. Plastic scintillators for positron emission tomography obtained by the bulk polymerization method

    CERN Document Server

    Kapłon, Łukasz; Molenda, Marcin; Moskal, Paweł; Wieczorek, Anna; Bednarski, Tomasz; Białas, Piotr; Czerwiński, Eryk; Korcyl, Grzegorz; Kowal, Jakub; Kowalski, Paweł; Kozik, Tomasz; Krzemień, Wojciech; Niedźwiecki, Szymon; Pałka, Marek; Pawlik, Monika; Raczyński, Lech; Rudy, Zbigniew; Salabura, Piotr; Gupta-Sharma, Neha; Silarski, Michał; Słomski, Artur; Smyrski, Jerzy; Strzelecki, Adam; Wiślicki, Wojciech; Zieliński, Marcin; Zoń, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes three methods regarding the production of plastic scintillators. One method appears to be suitable for the manufacturing of plastic scintillator, revealing properties which fulfill the requirements of novel positron emission tomography scanners based on plastic scintillators. The key parameters of the manufacturing process are determined and discussed.

  3. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle W;

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...

  4. Characterisation of beta(2)-adrenoceptors, using the agonist [C-11]formoterol and positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, T.J; van Waarde, Aaren; Doze, P; Elsinga, P.H; van der Mark, Thomas W.; Kraan, Jan; Ensing, Kees; Vaalburg, W.

    1998-01-01

    The agonist radioligand N-[2-hydroxy-5-[1-hydroxy-2-[[2-(4-[C-11]-methoxyphenyl)-1-methylethyl]amino]ethyl]phenyl]formamide ([C-11]formoterol) was synthesised in order to test its ability to visualise pulmonary beta(2)-adrenoceptors in vivo, with positron emission tomography (PET). Formoterol was la

  5. Positron emission imaging device and method of using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Philip R.; Mullens, James Allen

    2013-01-15

    An imaging system and method of imaging are disclosed. The imaging system can include an external radiation source producing pairs of substantially simultaneous radiation emissions of a picturization emission and a verification emissions at an emission angle. The imaging system can also include a plurality of picturization sensors and at least one verification sensor for detecting the picturization and verification emissions, respectively. The imaging system also includes an object stage is arranged such that a picturization emission can pass through an object supported on said object stage before being detected by one of said plurality of picturization sensors. A coincidence system and a reconstruction system can also be included. The coincidence can receive information from the picturization and verification sensors and determine whether a detected picturization emission is direct radiation or scattered radiation. The reconstruction system can produce a multi-dimensional representation of an object imaged with the imaging system.

  6. High-density avalanche chambers for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manfrass, P.; Enghardt, W.; Fromm, W.D.; Wohlfarth, D.; Hohmuth, K.

    1988-12-15

    A positron tomograph for radiopharmaceutical and medical research is under construction. In its final stage it will cover six high-density avalanche chambers (HIDAC) in a hexagonal arrangement. Each detector with a sensitive area of 50x28 cm/sup 2/ will consist of a stack of four pairs of multihole photon-to-electron converters with a multiwire proportional counter (MWPC) in between. An experimental investigation of detector properties as time and spatial resolutions as well as detector efficiency in dependence to converter structure, electric field strength and counting gas mixture preceded the final design of these detectors. Results of these studies are outlined. Furthermore, longitudinal tomograms taken with a stationary test camera are presented.

  7. A new method of detection for a positron emission tomograph using a time of flight method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first chapter, it is shown the advantages of positron radioemitters (β+) of low period, and the essential characteristics of positron tomographs realized at the present time. The second chapter presents the interest of an original technique of image reconstruction: the time of flight technique. The third chapter describes the characterization methods which were set for verifying the feasibility of cesium fluoride in tomography. Chapter four presents the results obtained by these methods. It appears that the cesium fluoride constitute presently the best positron emission associated to time of flight technique. The hypotheses made on eventual performances of such machines are validated by experiments with phantom. The results obtained with a detector (bismuth germanate) conserves all its interest in skull tomography

  8. Determination of the positron diffusion length in Kapton by analysing the positronium emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacio, C.A. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Institute of Physics, University of Antioquia, A.A. 1226, Medellin (Colombia)], E-mail: Carlos.Palacio@UGent.be; De Baerdemaeker, J.; Dauwe, C. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-10-31

    Doppler profile spectroscopy and Compton-to-peak ratio analysis have been used to study the positronium (Ps) emission from the Kapton surface as a function of the positron implantation energy E. Two different positions for the sample have been performed in the experiment. In the first case the sample and the Ge-detector are perpendicular to the positron beam. With this geometry the emission of para-positronium (p-Ps) is detected as a narrow central peak. In the second case, by rotating the sample 45 deg. with respect to the beam axis, the emission of p-Ps is detected as a blue-shifted fly away peak. The implantation of the positrons is described by the Makhov profile, where we used the modified median implantation for polymers as given by Algers et al. [J. Algers, P. Sperr, W. Egger, G. Koegel, F.H.J. Maurer, Phys. Rev. B 67 (2003) 125404]. Thermalised positrons can diffuse to the surface and may pick up an electron to be emitted as Ps. We found a thermal and or epithermal positron diffusion length L{sub +} = 5.43 {+-} 0.71 nm and L{sub +} = 5.51 {+-} 0.28 nm correspondingly for both cases, which is much more than the one found by Brusa et al. [R.S. Brusa, A. Dupasquier, E. Galvanetto, A. Zecca, Appl. Phys. A 54 (1992) 233]. The respective efficiency for the emission of Ps by picking up an electron from the surface is found to be f{sub pu} = 0.247 {+-} 0.012 and f{sub pu} = 0.156 {+-} 0.003.

  9. Positron Emission Tomography: Current Challenges and Opportunities for Technological Advances in Clinical and Preclinical Imaging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Juan José; Kinahan, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is based on detecting two time-coincident high-energy photons from the emission of a positron-emitting radioisotope. The physics of the emission, and the detection of the coincident photons, give PET imaging unique capabilities for both very high sensitivity and accurate estimation of the in vivo concentration of the radiotracer. PET imaging has been widely adopted as an important clinical modality for oncological, cardiovascular, and neurological applications. PET imaging has also become an important tool in preclinical studies, particularly for investigating murine models of disease and other small-animal models. However, there are several challenges to using PET imaging systems. These include the fundamental trade-offs between resolution and noise, the quantitative accuracy of the measurements, and integration with X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In this article, we review how researchers and industry are addressing these challenges.

  10. Single-photon emission computed tomography and positron-emission tomography assays for tissue oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J D; Schneider, R F; Urbain, J L; Hanks, G E

    2001-01-01

    Radiotherapy prescription can now be customized to target the major mechanism(s) of resistance of individual tumors. In that regard, functional imaging techniques should be exploited to identify the dominant mechanism(s). Tumor biology research has identified several mechanisms of tumor resistance that may be unique to radiation treatments. These fall into 3 broad areas associated with (1) tumor hypoxic fraction, (2) tumor growth rate, (3) and the intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumor clonogens. Imaging research has markers in various stages of development for quantifying relevant information about each of these mechanisms, and those that measure tumor oxygenation and predict for radioresistance are the most advanced. Positron-emission tomography (PET) measurement of oxygen 15 has yielded important information, particularly about brain tissue perfusion, metabolism, and function. Indirect markers of tumor hypoxia have exploited the covalent binding of bioreductive intermediates of azomycin-containing compounds whose uptakes are inversely proportional to intracellular oxygen concentrations. Pilot clinical studies with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and PET detection of radiolabeled markers to tumor hypoxia have been reported. Recently, other studies have attempted to exploit the reduction properties of both technetium and copper chelates for the selective deposition of radioactive metals in hypoxic tissues. A growing number of potentially useful isotopes are now available for labeling several novel chemicals that could have the appropriate specificity and sensitivity. Preclinical studies with "microSPECT" and "microPET" will be important to define the optimal radiodiagnostic(s) for measuring tissue oxygenation and for determining the time after their administration for optimal hypoxic signal acquisition. Radiolabeled markers of growth kinetics and intrinsic radiosensitivity of cells in solid tumors are also being developed. We conclude that

  11. Basal ganglia disorders studied by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent development of positron emitting radioligands has made it possible to investigate the alterations of neurotransmitter systems associated with basal ganglia disorders in vivo. The functional integrity of nigro-striatal dopaminergic terminals may be studied with [18F]6-fluoro-L-dopa ([18F]dopa), and striatal dopamine receptor density with suitable PET ligands. [18F]dopa uptake in the striatum (putamen) is markedly reduced in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). [18F]dopa-PET is capable of detecting sub-clinical nigral dysfunction in asymptomatic patients with familial PD and those who become Parkinsonian on conventional doses of dopamine receptor antagonists. While putamen [18F]dopa uptake is reduced to a similar level in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) and PD, caudate [18F] dopa uptake is lower in MSA than PD. However, [18F]dopa PET cannot consistently distinguish MSA from PD because individual ranges of caudate [18F]dopa uptake overlap. D1 and D2 receptor binding is markedly reduced in the striatum (posterior putamen) of MSA patients. Therefore, dopamine receptor imaging is useful for the differential diagnosis of MSA and PD. Similar marked reductions in putamen and caudate [18F]dopa uptake have been observed in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Moderate reductions in D2 receptor binding have been reported in the striatum of PSP patients. The reduction in D2 receptor binding is more prominent in the caudate than putamen. Striatal [18F]dopa uptake is normal or only mildly reduced in patients with dopa responsive dystonia (DRD). D2 receptor binding is markedly reduced in patients with Huntington's disease, while striatal [18F]dopa uptake is normal or mildly reduced. In summary, PET can demonstrate characteristic patterns of disruption of dopaminergic systems associated with basal ganglia disorders. These PET findings are useful in the differential diagnosis of basal ganglia disorders. (J.P.N.) 55 refs

  12. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions

  13. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma mimicking multiple lung metastases: report of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Chi-Tun; Yang, Chih-Jen; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Chou, Shah-Hwa; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2010-05-01

    Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) is a rare disease characterized by multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules of uncertain etiology. We describe a 71-year-old female patient with thyroid papillary carcinoma in whom bilateral pulmonary nodules were found during a routine chest radiography examination. Subsequent fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan gave the impression of multiple pulmonary metastases based on high maximum standardized uptake value. She underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery with wedge resection, and PHG was diagnosed on the basis of histopathologic findings. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PHG developing in a patient as a solid cancer, mimicking multiple pulmonary metastases. We also present the first description of positron emission tomography in PHG, according to a Medline search. PMID:20351580

  14. The electronics system for the LBNL positron emission mammography (PEM) camera

    CERN Document Server

    Moses, W W; Baker, K; Jones, W; Lenox, M; Ho, M H; Weng, M

    2001-01-01

    Describes the electronics for a high-performance positron emission mammography (PEM) camera. It is based on the electronics for a human brain positron emission tomography (PET) camera (the Siemens/CTI HRRT), modified to use a detector module that incorporates a photodiode (PD) array. An application-specified integrated circuit (ASIC) services the photodetector (PD) array, amplifying its signal and identifying the crystal of interaction. Another ASIC services the photomultiplier tube (PMT), measuring its output and providing a timing signal. Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and lookup RAMs are used to apply crystal-by-crystal correction factors and measure the energy deposit and the interaction depth (based on the PD/PMT ratio). Additional FPGAs provide event multiplexing, derandomization, coincidence detection, and real-time rebinning. Embedded PC/104 microprocessors provide communication, real-time control, and configure the system. Extensive use of FPGAs make the overall design extremely flexible, all...

  15. An 8×8 Row-Column Summing Readout Electronics for Preclinical Positron Emission Tomography Scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Shih, Y. C.; Sun, F. W.; MacDonald, L R; Otis, B. P.; Miyaoka, R S; McDougald, W.; Lewellen, T K

    2009-01-01

    This work presents a row/column summing readout electronics for an 8×8 silicon photomultiplier array. The summation circuit greatly reduces the number of electronic channels, which is desirable for pursuing higher resolution positron emission tomography scanners. By using a degenerated common source topology in the summation circuit, more fan-in is possible and therefore a greater reduction in the number of electronic channels can be achieved. The timing signal is retrieved from a common anod...

  16. [(18)F]Fluoroethyltyrosine- positron emission tomography-guided radiotherapy for high-grade glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Ratib Osman; Dipasquale Giovanna; Nouet Philippe; Rouzaud Michel; Haller Guy; Casanova Nathalie; Buchegger Franz; Zilli Thomas; Weber Damien C; Zaidi Habib; Vees Hansjorg; Miralbell Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background To compare morphological gross tumor volumes (GTVs), defined as pre- and postoperative gadolinium enhancement on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to biological tumor volumes (BTVs), defined by the uptake of 18F fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) for the radiotherapy planning of high-grade glioma, using a dedicated positron emission tomography (PET)-CT scanner equipped with three triangulation lasers for patient positioning. Methods Nineteen patients with malignant glioma were...

  17. Clinical Imaging Characteristics of the Positron Emission Mammography Camera: PEM Flex Solo II

    OpenAIRE

    MacDonald, Lawrence; Edwards, John; Lewellen, Thomas; Haseley, David; Rogers, James; Kinahan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated a commercial positron emission mammography (PEM) camera, the PEM Flex Solo II. This system comprises two 6 × 16.4 cm detectors that scan together covering up to a 24 × 16.4 cm field of view (FOV). There are no specific standards for testing this detector configuration. We performed several tests important to breast imaging, and we propose tests that should be included in standardized testing of PEM systems.

  18. Human hemispheric infarction studied by positron emission tomography and the 15O continuous inhalation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) offers an entirely new approach to the study of the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemic disorders. For the first time it is possible to obtain functional tomographic images that represent cerebral perfusion and metabolism on a regional basis. We report here a study of cerebral blood flow and oxygen extraction by means of the 15O inhalation technique in a large number of human hemispheric infarctions. (orig.)

  19. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle W;

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...... study investigates the positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of PET-CT in stage I disease and the clinical impact of the scan results in all disease stages....

  20. Regional structure-function correlations in chronic obstructive lung disease measured with positron emission tomography.

    OpenAIRE

    Brudin, L H; Rhodes, C G; Valind, S O; Buckingham, P D; Jones, T; Hughes, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Positron emission tomography, performed with isotopes of very short half life, can be used to relate local lung tissue density to local ventilation and to the ventilation:perfusion ratio. This method has been used in 10 patients with severe chronic airflow obstruction and differing values for carbon monoxide transfer factor (TLCO) and transfer coefficient (KCO). METHODS: Ventilation (VA) and the ventilation:perfusion ratio (V/Q), lung density, and blood volume were measured region...

  1. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia with unusual CT pattern and FDG positron emission tomography scan findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of an exogenous lipoid pneumonia that appeared as a spiculated calcified mass on CT scan in which a positron emission tomography (PET) scan was performed before histological analysis. The F-18 fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET showed a pattern highly suggestive of malignancy which, to our knowledge, has not yet been described. Similar to inflammatory and infectious lung diseases, lipoid pneumonia may be a false-positive case of F-18 FDG uptake. (orig.)

  2. Imaging Chronic Pain and Inflammation : Positron Emission Tomography Studies of Whiplash Associated Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Linnman, Clas

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is on chronic neck pain after a rear impact car injury, so called whiplash associated disorder (WAD). Three empirical studies using positron emission tomography (PET) with different radioligands have been performed. The first study evaluated resting state regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in WAD patients and in healthy, pain-free controls, by use of oxygen-15 labeled water. Patients had heightened resting rCBF bilaterally in the posterior parahippocampal and the posterior cingul...

  3. Transcutaneous measurement of the arterial input function in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a powerful tool in medical research. Biochemical function can be both precisely localized and quantitatively measured. To achieve reliable quantitation it is necessary to know the time course of activity concentration in the arterial blood during the measurement. In this study the arterial blood curve from the brachial artery is compared to the activity measured in the internal carotid artery with a new transcutaneous detector

  4. Usefulness of myocardial positron emission tomography/nuclear imaging in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marzia; Testa; Mauro; Feola

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To analyse and summarize all the articles related to positron emission tomography and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy(TTC).METHODS:We performed a systematic review of the existing literature on positron emission tomography/nuclear imaging and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy using PUBMED database.We combined search terms such as"takotsubo","takotsubo syndrome","myocardial positron emission tomography","positron emission tomography".All case reports were excluded.The list included only four articles which were reviewed by two independent investigators.It was not possible to undertake a formal meta-analysis because of the heterogeneity of the studies;therefore,we made a narrative synthesis of the collected data.RESULTS:Nuclear medicine techniques can be useful employed in the differential diagnosis of TTC from an acute coronary syndrome(ACS).In fact,transient left ventricular(LV)apical ballooning is a syndrome frequently misdiagnosed as an ACS and can mimic symptoms of myocardial infarction with ST-T segments changes on electrocardiography(ECG),a limited re-lease of myocardial enzyme,mainly reported after sudden emotional or physical stress,and an akinesis or dyskinesis of the left ventricle apex which are completely reversible in a few weeks.In the studies included in this review,nuclear medicine techniques have demonstrated a discrepancy between normal perfusion and a reduced glucose utilization in TTC,commonly known as"inverse flow metabolism mismatch".This suggests that apical ballooning represents a transient metabolic disorder on the cellular level,rather than a structural contractile disease of the myocardium,due to a transient decrease of glucose metabolism that might be related to a coronary microcirculation impairment followed by prolonged myocardial stunning.CONCLUSION:Nuclear medicine techniques can be usefully used for the diagnosis of TTC and can increase our knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TTC.

  5. The establishment of crystal position look-up table for positron emission tomography with block detectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A method has been developed to establish the crystal position look-up table for positron emission tomography with block detectors. It is based on the principle that the counts in crystal position histogram obey the Gaussian mixture model (GMM). This method has taken full consideration of the characteristics of the GMM and the detector itself. The experimental results have proved that it is simple, reliable, and universal.

  6. Value of positron emission tomography in diagnosing synchronous penile metastasis from urothelial bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rouanne, M.; Alhammadi, A.; Vilain, D.; Radulescu, C.; Lebret, T.

    2015-01-01

    Metastases to the penis are extremely rare events. Most frequently, penile metastases come from the urogenital system (bladder, prostate) or the rectum-sigmoid colon. Usually painful, penile lesions may be asymptomatic, making diagnosis more challenging. Hence, we report the adding value of 18F-fludeoxyglucose–positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in the detection of penile metastases originating from urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. Arguably, penile metastases...

  7. Positron emission tomography in cases of chorea with different underlying diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Hosokawa, S.; Ichiya, Y; Kuwabara, Y; Ayabe, Z; Mitsuo, K; Goto, I; Kato, M.

    1987-01-01

    Local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (LCMRglc) was measured with positron emission tomography using the 18F-fluorodeoxy-glucose method in five patients with chorea due to different underlying diseases. Hypometabolism was observed in the striatum bilaterally in patients with Huntington's disease, choreoacanthocytosis, sporadic progressive chorea and dementia, and pseudo-Huntington form of dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA). The patient with hemichorea showed hypometabolism in t...

  8. Noninvasive measurement of regional myocardial glucose metabolism by positron emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the results of regional myocardial glucose metabolism measurements using positron emission computed tomography (13N-ammonia) are promising, their utility and value remains to be determined in man. If this technique can be applied to patients with acute myocardial ischemia or infarction it may permit delineation of regional myocardial segments with altered, yet still active metabolism. Further, it may become possible to evaluate the effects of interventions designed to salvage reversibly injured myocardium by this technique

  9. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia with unusual CT pattern and FDG positron emission tomography scan findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahon, Florence; Berthezene, Yves; Blineau, Nadine; Marchand, Bruno [Department of Radiology, Hopital de la Croix-Rousse, 103 grande rue de la Croix-Rousse, 69317 Lyon Cedex (France); Hominal, Stephane; Guerin, Jean-Claude [Department of Chest, Hopital de la Croix-Rousse, 103 grande rue de la Croix-Rousse, 69317 Lyon Cedex (France); Cinotti, Luc [CERMEP, 59 bd Pinel, 69003 Lyon Cedex (France)

    2002-07-01

    We report a case of an exogenous lipoid pneumonia that appeared as a spiculated calcified mass on CT scan in which a positron emission tomography (PET) scan was performed before histological analysis. The F-18 fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET showed a pattern highly suggestive of malignancy which, to our knowledge, has not yet been described. Similar to inflammatory and infectious lung diseases, lipoid pneumonia may be a false-positive case of F-18 FDG uptake. (orig.)

  10. Dynamic positron emission tomography in man using small bismuth germanate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary considerations for the design of positron emission tomographs for medical studies in humans are the need for high imaging sensitivity, whole organ coverage, good spatial resolution, high maximum data rates, adequate spatial sampling with minimum mechanical motion, shielding against out of plane activity, pulse height discrimination against scattered photons, and timing discrimination against accidental coincidences. We discuss the choice of detectors, sampling motion, shielding, and electronics to meet these objectives

  11. Combined use of positron emission tomography and volume doubling time in lung cancer screening with low-dose CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, H; Dirksen, A; Jakobsen, Annika Loft;

    2011-01-01

    In lung cancer screening the ability to distinguish malignant from benign nodules is a key issue. This study evaluates the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) and volume doubling time (VDT) to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules....

  12. Cost Effectiveness of Positron Emission Tomography for the Management of Potentially Operable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Hung Nguyen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The potential benefits of positron emission tomography (PET scanning stem from the fact that it can reduce the number of diagnostic examinations; particularly, the number of unnecessary thoracic surgeries.

  13. Tomography by positrons emission: integral unit to the service of Mexico; Tomografia por emision de positrones: unidad integral al servicio de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez D, F.A. [Unidad PET-Ciclotron, Facultad de Medicina, UNAM (Mexico)]. e-mail: fred-alonso@correo.unam.mx

    2005-07-01

    The applications of the Positron emission tomography (PET) together with the one radiopharmaceutical 2 - [{sup 18} F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in the area of the medical imaging is expanding quickly and it possesses a bigger impact at the moment in favor of those patient to who suffers an oncological, cardiac or neurological illness in Mexico. (Author)

  14. High-resolution PET [Positron Emission Tomography] for Medical Science Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, T. F.; Derenzo, S. E.; Huesman, R. H.; Jagust, W. J.; Valk, P. E.

    1989-09-01

    One of the unexpected fruits of basic physics research and the computer revolution is the noninvasive imaging power available to today's physician. Technologies that were strictly the province of research scientists only a decade or two ago now serve as the foundations for such standard diagnostic tools as x-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), ultrasound, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). Furthermore, prompted by the needs of both the practicing physician and the clinical researcher, efforts to improve these technologies continue. This booklet endeavors to describe the advantages of achieving high resolution in PET imaging.

  15. Geneva University - The AX-PET experiment : A demonstrator for an axial Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2012-01-01

    Geneva University École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Wednesday 14 March 2012 SEMINAIRE DE PHYSIQUE CORPUSCULAIRE 11.15 a.m. - Science II, Auditoire 1S081, 30, quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Genève 4 The AX-PET experiment : A demonstrator for an axial Positron Emission Tomography Dr Chiara CASELLA   ETH Zurich   PET (Positron Emission Tomography) is a tool for in-vivo functional imaging, successfully used since the earliest days of nuclear medicine. It is based on the detection of the two coincident 511 keV photons from the annihilation of a positron, emitted from a radiotracer injected into the body. Tomographic analysis of the coincidence data allows for a 3D reconstructed image of the source distribution. The AX-PET experiment proposes a novel geometrical approach for a PET scanner, in which l...

  16. Cosmic Ray Electrons, Positrons and the Synchrotron emission of the Galaxy: consistent analysis and implications

    CERN Document Server

    Di Bernardo, Giuseppe; Gaggero, Daniele; Grasso, Dario; Maccione, Luca

    2012-01-01

    A multichannel analysis of cosmic ray electron and positron spectra and of the diffuse synchrotron emission of the Galaxy is performed by using the DRAGON code. This study is aimed at probing the interstellar electron source spectrum down to E ~ 1 GeV and at constraining several propagation parameters. We find that above 4 GeV the electron source spectrum is compatible with a power-law of index -2.5. Below 4 GeV instead it must be significantly suppressed and the total lepton spectrum is dominated by secondary particles. The positron spectrum and fraction measured below a few GeV are consistently reproduced only within low reacceleration models. We also constrain the scale-height zt of the cosmic-ray distribution using three independent (and, in two cases, original) arguments, showing that values of z_t < 2 kpc are excluded. This result may have strong implications for particle dark matter searches.

  17. The 511 keV emission from positron annihilation in the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Prantzos, N; Bykov, A M; Diehl, R; Ferriere, K; Guessoum, N; Jean, P; Knoedlseder, J; Marcowith, A; Moskalenko, I V; Strong, A; Weidenspointner, G

    2010-01-01

    The first gamma-ray line originating from outside the solar system that was ever detected is the 511 keV emission from positron annihilation in the Galaxy. Despite 30 years of intense theoretical and observational investigation, the main sources of positrons have not been identified up to now. Observations in the 1990's with OSSE/CGRO showed that the emission is strongly concentrated towards the Galactic bulge. In the 2000's, the SPI instrument aboard ESA's INTEGRAL gamma-ray observatory allowed scientists to measure that emission across the entire Galaxy, revealing that the bulge/disk luminosity ratio is larger than observed in any other wavelength. This mapping prompted a number of novel explanations, including rather "exotic ones (e.g. dark matter annihilation). However, conventional astrophysical sources, like type Ia supernovae, microquasars or X-ray binaries, are still plausible candidates for a large fraction of the observed total 511 keV emission of the bulge. A closer study of the subject reveals new...

  18. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labelled with bromine positron emitting isotopes for the study of dopaminergic receptors of the central nervous system using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vivo study of dopaminergic receptors of the central nervous system using positron emission tomography requires the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labelled with β+ emitting isotopes. The chemical and pharmacological properties of these ligands are evaluated. Cyclotron produced 75 and 76 bromine β+ emitting isotopes are incorporated into dopaminergic ligands by electrophilic substitution using peracetic acid in a no-carrier added form. Purity, lipophilicity and specific activity are analyzed. Pharmacological criteria (specificity, saturability, displacement, localization) required for ligand-receptor binding studies are evaluated in vitro on striatal membranes and in vivo in the rat. Positron emission tomographic studies show that the study of dopaminergic D2 receptors is possible using 75 and 76 bromine labelled bromospiperone and bromolisuride. These ligands are used in physiological and pharmacological studies of the central nervous system

  19. Positron Emission Tomography-Scanner at Children`s Hospital of Michigan at Detroit, Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0795, to support the DOE decision to provide a grant of $7,953,600 to be used in support of a proposed Positron Emission Tomography Scanner at Children`s Hospital of Michigan at Detroit, Michigan. Based upon the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affected the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  20. Human hemispheric infarction studied by positron emission tomography and the 150 continuous inhalation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) offers an entirely new approach to the study of the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemic disorders. This is so because for the first time it is possible to obtain functional tomographic images that represent cerebral perfusion and metabolism in a regional basis. We report here a study of cerebral blood flow and oxygen extraction by means of the 15O inhalation technique in a large number of human hemispheric infarctions. PET imaging with this non-invasive technique has permitted the description of hitherto unreported focal patterns of changes in the CBF/EO2 couple that may have important pathophysiologic and prognostic implications

  1. Dead time correction in positron emission tomograph. A method using single photon rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senda, Michio; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Mukai, Takao; Fujita, Toru; Torizuka, Kanji

    1987-06-01

    The count rate linearity and dead time count losses were evaluated in Positologica III, a wholebody multislice positron emission tomograph, using several kinds of phantoms. A wide variation was observed in the relationship between count loss and true coincidence count rate depending on the source distribution, and the dead time correction using the count rate itself was unsuccessful. Since most count losses of this PET scanner occur when the single photon signals were encoded at the circuitry, we measured the single rate to correct for the count loss. This method enabled dead time correction independent of the distribution of source and attenuation material.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Palmqvist, Sebastian; Mattsson, Niklas; Hansson, Oskar; ,

    2016-01-01

    See Rabinovici (doi:10.1093/brain/aww025) for a scientific commentary on this article. Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET ...

  3. In vivo dopamine receptor assessment for clinical studies using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A discussion is presented of techniques to determine cerebral DA-receptor function in vivo and possible (future) applications of such techniques in clinical studies. A brief summary is given on existing approaches that are of particular clinical interest. The emphasis is laid on the in vivo receptor binding techniques, which have become of clinical interest with the advent of positron emission tomography. Both possibilities and limitations of the present methods to assess DA receptors and possible relationships to pathological or behavioral manifestations are described. (author)

  4. Brain dopaminergic system changes in drug addiction: a review of positron emission tomography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Haifeng; Wang, Chunyan; Jia, Shaowei; Hu, Shu; Tian, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Dopamine (DA) is considered crucial for the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, but its role in addiction remains unclear. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the first technology used for in vivo measurement of components of the dopaminergic system in the human brain. In this article, we review the major findings from PET imaging studies on the involvement of DA in drug addiction, including presynaptic DA synthesis, vesicular monoamine transporter 2, the DA transporter, and postsynaptic DA receptors. These results have corroborated the role of DA in addiction and increased the understanding of its underlying mechanisms. PMID:25260796

  5. A positron emission tomography study of wind-up pain in chronic postherniotomy pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Lonsdale, Markus Georg; Aasvang, Eske Kvanner;

    2011-01-01

    -induced wind-up pain in neuropathic pain patients. We therefore used positron emission tomography (PET) to investigate the cerebral response pattern of mechanical wind-up pain in a homogenous group of 10 neuropathic pain patients with long-standing postherniotomy pain in the groin area. Patients were scanned......) and the brain stem. A direct comparison between wind-up pain and pressure pain revealed that both activated a largely overlapping network. Since no de novo brain areas were activated by wind-up pain, our data suggest that the processes specific to wind-up pain do not occur at the cerebral level....

  6. Chemical neuroanatomy and in vitro receptor autoradiography: A basis for cerebral positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review chemical neuroanatomy and in vitro receptor (IVG) autoradiography as tools for the development of methods suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The organizations of monoaminergic, cholinergic, γ-aminobutyric acidergic (GABA), and excitatory amino acidergic (EAA) pathways within the central nervous system are summarized, as is the presently accepted classification of GABA and EAA receptors. We describe the technique of IVG and discuss its unique advantages for the selection of possible PET methods. Finally, we discuss receptor changes in Huntington's disease and olivopontocerebellar atrophy, two human diseases for which IVG has suggested possible targets for PET imaging

  7. Radiolabeled Phosphonium Salts as Mitochondrial Voltage Sensors for Positron Emission Tomography Myocardial Imaging Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Yeon; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Despite substantial advances in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, (18)F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals remain necessary to diagnose heart disease because clinical use of current PET tracers is limited by their short half-life. Lipophilic cations such as phosphonium salts penetrate the mitochondrial membranes and accumulate in mitochondria of cardiomyocytes in response to negative inner-transmembrane potentials. Radiolabeled tetraphenylphosphonium cation derivatives have been developed as myocardial imaging agents for PET. In this review, a general overview of these radiotracers, including their radiosynthesis, in vivo characterization, and evaluation is provided and clinical perspectives are discussed. PMID:27540422

  8. Flip-flop phenomenon in systemic sclerosis on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare autoimmune disease, which may affect multiple organ systems. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can demonstrate the degree and anatomical extent of involvement in the entire body and coexisting malignancies in connective tissue diseases. We present a case of SSc with an increased 18F-FDG uptake in the cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues even higher than the neighboring skeletal muscles (“flip-flop phenomenon,” that is, an increased 18F-FDG uptake in the skin but a decreased 18F-FDG uptake in the skeletal muscles)

  9. Benign breast lesions detected by positron emission tomography-computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benveniste, Ana P., E-mail: apbenveniste@mdanderson.org [Department of Diagnostic Radiology,The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yang, Wei, E-mail: wyang@mdanderson.org [Department of Diagnostic Radiology,The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Benveniste, Marcelo F., E-mail: mfbenveniste@mdanderson.org [Department of Diagnostic Radiology,The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mawlawi, Osama R., E-mail: omawlawi@mdanderson.org [Department of imaging physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Marom, Edith M., E-mail: emarom@mdanderson.org [Department of Diagnostic Radiology,The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission computed tomography (FDG PET-CT) is widely used in the initial staging and response evaluation of patients with malignancy. This review describes a spectrum of benign breast findings incidentally detected by FDG PET-CT at staging that may be misinterpreted as malignancy. We describe the pattern of distribution and intensity of FDG uptake in a spectrum of benign breast diseases with their corresponding typical morphological imaging characteristics to help the nuclear medicine physician and/or general radiologist identify benign lesions, avoiding unnecessary breast imaging work-up and biopsies.

  10. [18F]-fluoride positron emission tomography for imaging condylar hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverick, S; Bounds, G; Wong, Wai Lup

    2009-04-01

    The management of condylar hyperplasia depends on the diagnosis of continued growth in the affected condyle, and there is currently no satisfactory way of imaging it. [(18)F]-fluoride positron emission tomography (PET) was included in the investigation of 5 patients who were suspected of having condylar hyperplasia, and the results were correlated with the operative findings. The technique correctly identified condylar hyperplasia in all patients. Our results suggest that [(18)F]-fluoride PET is a valid way of assessing patients with condylar hyperplasia. PMID:18926607

  11. Estimation of intersubject variability of cerebral blood flow measurements using MRI and positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto Mølby; Larsson, Henrik B W; Hansen, Adam E;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the within and between subject variability of quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements in normal subjects using various MRI techniques and positron emission tomography (PET). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Repeated CBF measurements were performed in 17 healthy, young...... subjects using three different MRI techniques: arterial spin labeling (ASL), dynamic contrast enhanced T1 weighted perfusion MRI (DCE) and phase contrast mapping (PCM). All MRI measurements were performed within the same session. In 10 of the subjects repeated CBF measurements by (15) O labeled water PET...

  12. Risk of malignancy in thyroid incidentalomas detected by (18)f-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soelberg, Kerstin; Bonnema, Steen Joop; Brix, Thomas Heiberg;

    2012-01-01

    Background: The expanding use of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG PET) has led to the identification of increasing numbers of patients with an incidentaloma in the thyroid gland. We aimed to review the proportion of incidental thyroid cancers found by (18)F-FDG PET...... uptake, 7 of whom (4.4%) had thyroid malignancy. In the eight studies reporting individual maximum standardized uptake values (SUV(max)), the mean SUV(max) was 4.8 (standard deviation [SD] 3.1) and 6.9 (SD 4.7) in benign and malignant lesions, respectively (p...

  13. Distributed Microprocessor Automation Network for Synthesizing Radiotracers Used in Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J. A. G.; Alexoff, D. L.; Wolf, A. P.

    1984-09-01

    This presentation describes an evolving distributed microprocessor network for automating the routine production synthesis of radiotracers used in Positron Emission Tomography. We first present a brief overview of the PET method for measuring biological function, and then outline the general procedure for producing a radiotracer. The paper identifies several reasons for our automating the syntheses of these compounds. There is a description of the distributed microprocessor network architecture chosen and the rationale for that choice. Finally, we speculate about how this network may be exploited to extend the power of the PET method from the large university or National Laboratory to the biomedical research and clinical community at large. (DT)

  14. Receptor-specific positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals: 75Br-labeled butyrophenone neuroleptics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral dopaminergic D2 receptors are involved in several common disease states, such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's chorea. The use of radiolabeled D2 receptor-binding ligands with positron emission tomography (PET) to noninvasively quantitate D2 receptor densities thus has potential application in medicine. Butyrophenone neuroleptics have a high in vitro and in vivo binding affinity for cerebral D2 receptors, and due to the useful chemical and nuclear decay properties of 74Br (76% β+, half-life = 1.6 h), the authors have evaluated radiobrominated bromospiperone (BSP), brombenperidol (BBP), and bromperidol (BP) as radiopharmaceuticals for use with PET

  15. Positron emission tomography in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Højgaard, L

    2001-01-01

    positron emission tomography (PET) and gamma-camera PET in the diagnostic investigation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A systematic literature search was carried out in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. We identified 55 original works on the diagnostic......Lung cancer is the cause of 32% of all male cancer deaths and 25% of all female cancer deaths. Because the prognosis depends on early diagnosis and staging, continuous evaluation of the diagnostic tools available is important. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of dedicated...

  16. New techniques for positron emission tomography in the study of human neurological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We continue our focus to develop more cost effective and efficient means for producing new functionally specific tracers and more simple, less expensive, means for acquiring and interpreting quantitative data. These improved processes are required for the future growth of positron emission tomography (PET) as a sophisticated research meeting and for the transfer of this technology to clinical use. Our approach concentrates on two separate yet related areas, radiosynthesis and data analysis. The program is divided into four subprojects, the first pair related to radiosynthesis, and the second pair related to data analysis. Progress during the past project year has been excellent in both accomplishment and publication record. 26 refs

  17. Characterisation of beta(2)-adrenoceptors, using the agonist [C-11]formoterol and positron emission tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, T J; van Waarde, Aaren; Doze, P; Elsinga, P.H.; van der Mark, Thomas W.; Kraan, Jan; Ensing, Kees; Vaalburg, W.

    1998-01-01

    The agonist radioligand N-[2-hydroxy-5-[1-hydroxy-2-[[2-(4-[C-11]-methoxyphenyl)-1-methylethyl]amino]ethyl]phenyl]formamide ([C-11]formoterol) was synthesised in order to test its ability to visualise pulmonary beta(2)-adrenoceptors in vivo, with positron emission tomography (PET). Formoterol was labelled via reaction of a dibenzyl-protected precursor with [C-11]CH3I. Subsequent deprotection with Pd/C and H-2 yielded [C-11]formoterol in 5-15% (corrected for decay) and the specific activity ra...

  18. Whole body muscle activity during the FIFA 11+ program evaluated by positron emission tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsuke Nakase

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study investigated the effect of the FIFA 11+ warm-up program on whole body muscle activity using positron emission tomography. METHODS: Ten healthy male volunteers were divided into a control group and a group that performed injury prevention exercises (The 11+. The subjects of the control group were placed in a sitting position for 20 min and 37 MBq of (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG was injected intravenously. The subjects then remained seated for 45 min. The subjects of the exercise group performed part 2 of the 11+for 20 min, after which FDG was injected. They then performed part 2 of the 11+for 20 min, and rested for 25 min in a sitting position. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography images were obtained 50 min after FDG injection in each group. Regions of interest were defined within 30 muscles. The standardized uptake value was calculated to examine the FDG uptake of muscle tissue per unit volume. RESULTS: FDG accumulation within the abdominal rectus, gluteus medius and minimus were significantly higher in the exercise group than in the control group (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: The hip abductor muscles and abdominal rectus were active during part 2 of the FIFA 11+ program.

  19. Sensitivity estimation in time-of-flight list-mode positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J. L. [Madrid-MIT M+Visión Consortium, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 and Grupo de Física Nuclear, Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, CEI Moncloa, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Sitek, A., E-mail: sarkadiu@gmail.com [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: An accurate quantification of the images in positron emission tomography (PET) requires knowing the actual sensitivity at each voxel, which represents the probability that a positron emitted in that voxel is finally detected as a coincidence of two gamma rays in a pair of detectors in the PET scanner. This sensitivity depends on the characteristics of the acquisition, as it is affected by the attenuation of the annihilation gamma rays in the body, and possible variations of the sensitivity of the scanner detectors. In this work, the authors propose a new approach to handle time-of-flight (TOF) list-mode PET data, which allows performing either or both, a self-attenuation correction, and self-normalization correction based on emission data only. Methods: The authors derive the theory using a fully Bayesian statistical model of complete data. The authors perform an initial evaluation of algorithms derived from that theory and proposed in this work using numerical 2D list-mode simulations with different TOF resolutions and total number of detected coincidences. Effects of randoms and scatter are not simulated. Results: The authors found that proposed algorithms successfully correct for unknown attenuation and scanner normalization for simulated 2D list-mode TOF-PET data. Conclusions: A new method is presented that can be used for corrections for attenuation and normalization (sensitivity) using TOF list-mode data.

  20. Clinical experience with the first combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanner in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, W F Eddie; Binns, David S; Ware, Robert E; Ramdave, Shakher; Cachin, Florent; Pitman, Alexander G; Hicks, Rodney J

    2005-02-21

    Metabolic imaging with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is increasing rapidly worldwide because of superior accuracy compared with conventional non-invasive techniques used for evaluating cancer. Limited anatomical information from FDG-PET images alone dictates that complementary use with structural imaging is required to optimise benefit. Recently, combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners have overtaken standalone PET scanners as the most commonly purchased PET devices. We describe our experience of over 5500 scans performed since the first PET/CT scanner in Australia was commissioned at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (PMCC), Melbourne, in January 2002. Clinical indications for PET/CT scans performed at PMCC largely reflect current Medicare reimbursement policy. Advantages of PET/CT include greater patient comfort and higher throughput, greater diagnostic certainty and accuracy, improved biopsy methods, and better treatment planning. We believe PET/CT will underpin more effective and efficient imaging paradigms for many common tumours, and lead to a decrease in imaging costs. PMID:15720173

  1. Diagnostic utility of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in pyrexia of unknown origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the diagnostic utility of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) in patients presenting as pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO). Forty-seven patients (31 males and 16 females; mean age of 42.7 ± 19.96 years) presenting as PUO to the Department of Medicine at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi over a period of 2 years underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT. PET ⁄ CT was considered supportive when its results correlated with the final definitive diagnosis. Final diagnosis was made on the basis of combined evaluation of history, clinical findings, investigations, and response to treatment. Thirty-five PET/CT studies (74.5%) were positive. However, only 18 (38.3%) were supportive of the final diagnosis. In three patients (6.4%), PET/CT was considered diagnostic as none of the other investigations including contrast-enhanced computed tomography of chest and abdomen, and directed tissue sampling could lead to the final diagnosis. All these three patients were diagnosed as aortoarteritis. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography is an important emerging modality in the workup of PUO. It supported the final diagnosis in 38% of our patients and was diagnostic in 6.4% of patients. Thus, PET/CT should only be considered as second-line investigation for the diagnostic evaluation of PUO; especially in suspected noninfectious inflammatory disorders

  2. Positron emission tomography studies in the normal and abnormal ageing of human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until recently, the investigation of the neurophysiological correlates of normal and abnormal ageing of the human brain was limited by methodological constraints, as the technics available provided only a few parameters (e.g. electroencephalograms, cerebral blood flow) monitored in superficial brain structures in a grossly regional and poorly quantitative way. Lately several non invasive techniques have been developed which allow to investigate in vivo both quantitatively and on local basis a number of previously inaccessible important aspects of brain function. Among these techniques, such as single photon emission tomography imaging of computerized electric events, nuclear magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography stands out as the most powerful and promising method since it allows the in vivo measurement of biochemical and pharmacological parameters

  3. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging in brain tumours : The Western Australia positron emission tomography/cyclotron service experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans in the first 49 patients referred with either possible brain tumour or brain tumour recurrence were reviewed. FDG-PET imaging was reported with reference to anatomical imaging. Based on the report the FDG study was classified as either positive or negative for the presence of tumour. Thirty-eight cases were included in the analysis, 21 having pathological data and 17 with diagnostic clinical follow up. Eleven were excluded, as they had inadequate follow-up data. Of the 21 cases with pathology, 18 were shown to have tumour. In this group there were five false-negative scans and two false-positive PET scans. Seventeen cases were assessed by clinical follow up, nine were considered to have been tumour. There were two false negatives with one false positive. The overall sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were 74, 73, 87 and 53% respectively. This is similar to figures previously quoted in published work. Despite relatively limited numbers, the utility of FDG PET imaging in our hands is similar to published reports. With a positive predictive value of 87%, a positive FDG study indicates a high likelihood that there is brain tumour present. A negative study does not exclude the presence of tumour

  4. Gamma camera based Positron Emission Tomography: a study of the viability on quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a Nuclear Medicine imaging modality for diagnostic purposes. Pharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitters are used and images which represent the in vivo biochemical process within tissues can be obtained. The positron/electron annihilation photons are detected in coincidence and this information is used for object reconstruction. Presently, there are two types of systems available for this imaging modality: the dedicated systems and those based on gamma camera technology. In this work, we utilized PET/SPECT systems, which also allows for the traditional Nuclear Medicine studies based on single photon emitters. There are inherent difficulties which affect quantification of activity and other indices. They are related to the Poisson nature of radioactivity, to radiation interactions with patient body and detector, noise due to statistical nature of these interactions and to all the detection processes, as well as the patient acquisition protocols. Corrections are described in the literature and not all of them are implemented by the manufacturers: scatter, attenuation, random, decay, dead time, spatial resolution, and others related to the properties of each equipment. The goal of this work was to assess these methods adopted by two manufacturers, as well as the influence of some technical characteristics of PET/SPECT systems on the estimation of SUV. Data from a set of phantoms were collected in 3D mode by one camera and 2D, by the other. We concluded that quantification is viable in PET/SPECT systems, including the estimation of SUVs. This is only possible if, apart from the above mentioned corrections, the camera is well tuned and coefficients for sensitivity normalization and partial volume corrections are applied. We also verified that the shapes of the sources used for obtaining these factors play a role on the final results and should be delt with carefully in clinical quantification. Finally, the choice of the region

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the follow-up of papillary or follicular thyroid cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, L.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Devillé, W.; Lips, W.; Teule, J.J.; Boers, M.; Tulder, M.W. van

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose is a relatively new nuclear imaging technique in oncology. We conducted a systematic review to determine the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in patients suspected of recurrent papillary or follicular

  6. In vivo evaluation of [11C]preladenant positron emission tomography for quantification of adenosine A2A receptors in the rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Xiaoyun; Khanapur, Shivashankar; de Jong, Johan R; Willemsen, Antoon T.M.; Dierckx, Rudi Ajo; Elsinga, Philip H; de Vries, Erik Fj

    2016-01-01

    [(11)C]Preladenant was developed as a novel adenosine A2A receptor positron emission tomography radioligand. The present study aims to evaluate the suitability of [(11)C]preladenant positron emission tomography for the quantification of striatal A2A receptor density and the assessment of striatal A2

  7. Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance hybrid scanner imaging of cerebral blood flow using 15O-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in newborn piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Julie B; Henning, William S; Lindberg, Ulrich;

    2015-01-01

    Abnormality in cerebral blood flow (CBF) distribution can lead to hypoxic-ischemic cerebral damage in newborn infants. The aim of the study was to investigate minimally invasive approaches to measure CBF by comparing simultaneous (15)O-water positron emission tomography (PET) and single TI pulsed...

  8. Decision logic for retreatment of asymptomatic lung cancer recurrence based on positron emission tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine if Positron emission tomography (PET) 2-[F-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) imaging could detect subclinical local lung cancer recurrence and whether retreatment of such recurrence was feasible and beneficial. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with biopsy proven lung cancer were studied with Positron emission tomography for the purpose of detecting subclinical lung cancer recurrence over a period of 4.25 years. All patients were treated with external radiation as part or all of their therapy. Twenty patients had baseline PET and computed tomography (CT) studies for comparison with later studies. Surviving patients had a total of 40 sequential PET scans and 35 CT scans. The follow-up interval ranged from 5 to 40 months posttreatment. The differential uptake ratio (DUR) was determined for regions of interest of increased FDG uptake. Results: The median DUR value of the 20 baseline PET studies was 5.59. The DUR value of greater than 3 was empirically selected as being positive for tumor detection. On baseline studies, PET had a 100% correlation with the CT findings in regard to detection of the site of primary tumor involvement. Four of 20 patients showed areas of discordance in the mediastinal and hilar areas on initial PET and CT studies. Seven of 17 patients showed discordant posttreatment PET-CT findings. Two false positive PET studies were due to radiation pneumonitis and one to macrophage glycolysis in tumor necrosis. For detection of asymptomatic tumor recurrence, analysis of sequential PET and CT studies, biopsy results, and the patient's clinical course suggested that PET had a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 89.3%, and accuracy of 92.5%. Computerized Tomography was found to have a sensitivity of 67%, specificity of 85%, and accuracy of 82% for detection of such early-stage recurrence. Five patients went on to have retreatment with external irradiation based upon the PET evidence. Four retreated

  9. Use of positron emission tomography for real-time imaging of biodistribution of green tea catechin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Shimizu

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to achieve real-time imaging of the in vivo behavior of a green tea polyphenol, catechin, by positron emission tomography (PET. Positron-labeled 4″ -[(11C]methyl-epigallocatechin gallate ([(11C]Me-EGCG was orally administered to rats, and its biodistribution was imaged for 60 min by using a small animal PET system. As the result, images of [(11C]Me-EGCG passing through the stomach into the small intestines were observed; and a portion of it was quantitatively detected in the liver. On the other hand, intravenous injection of [(11C]Me-EGCG resulted in a temporal accumulation of the labeled catechin in the liver, after which almost all of it was transferred to the small intestines within 60 min. In the present study, we succeeded in obtaining real-time imaging of the absorption and biodistribution of [(11C]Me-EGCG with a PET system.

  10. Pretargeted Positron Emission Tomography Imaging That Employs Supramolecular Nanoparticles with in Vivo Bioorthogonal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shuang; Choi, Jin-Sil; Garcia, Mitch Andre; Xing, Yan; Chen, Kuan-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ming; Jiang, Ziyue K; Ro, Tracy; Wu, Lily; Stout, David B; Tomlinson, James S; Wang, Hao; Chen, Kai; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Lin, Wei-Yu

    2016-01-26

    A pretargeted oncologic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging that leverages the power of supramolecular nanoparticles with in vivo bioorthogonal chemistry was demonstrated for the clinically relevant problem of tumor imaging. The advantages of this approach are that (i) the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of tumor-targeting and imaging agents can be independently altered via chemical alteration to achieve the desired in vivo performance and (ii) the interplay between the two PKs and other controllable variables confers a second layer of control toward improved PET imaging. In brief, we utilized supramolecular chemistry to synthesize tumor-targeting nanoparticles containing transcyclooctene (TCO, a bioorthogonal reactive motif), called TCO⊂SNPs. After the intravenous injection and subsequent concentration of the TCO⊂SNPs in the tumors of living mice, a small molecule containing both the complementary bioorthogonal motif (tetrazine, Tz) and a positron-emitting radioisotope ((64)Cu) was injected to react selectively and irreversibly to TCO. High-contrast PET imaging of the tumor mass was accomplished after the rapid clearance of the unreacted (64)Cu-Tz probe. Our nanoparticle approach encompasses a wider gamut of tumor types due to the use of EPR effects, which is a universal phenomenon for most solid tumors.

  11. An 8×8 Row-Column Summing Readout Electronics for Preclinical Positron Emission Tomography Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Y C; Sun, F W; Macdonald, L R; Otis, B P; Miyaoka, R S; McDougald, W; Lewellen, T K

    2009-10-24

    This work presents a row/column summing readout electronics for an 8×8 silicon photomultiplier array. The summation circuit greatly reduces the number of electronic channels, which is desirable for pursuing higher resolution positron emission tomography scanners. By using a degenerated common source topology in the summation circuit, more fan-in is possible and therefore a greater reduction in the number of electronic channels can be achieved. The timing signal is retrieved from a common anode, which allows the use of a single fast-sampling analog to digital converter (ADC) for the timing channel and slower, lower power ADCs for the 64 spatial channels. Preliminary results of one row summation of the 8×8 readout electronics exhibited FWHM energy resolution of 17.8% and 18.3% with and without multiplexing, respectively. The measured timing resolution is 2.9ns FWHM. PMID:20729983

  12. Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography to visualize and quantify fluid flow in sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernø, M. A.; Gauteplass, J.; Hauge, L. P.; Abell, G. E.; Adamsen, T. C. H.; Graue, A.

    2015-09-01

    Here we show for the first time the combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) imaging of flow processes within porous rocks to quantify the development in local fluid saturations. The coupling between local rock structure and displacement fronts is demonstrated in exploratory experiments using this novel approach. We also compare quantification of 3-D temporal and spatial water saturations in two similar CO2 storage tests in sandstone imaged separately with PET and CT. The applicability of each visualization technique is evaluated for a range of displacement processes, and the favorable implementation of combining PET/CT for laboratory core analysis is discussed. We learn that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is over an order of magnitude higher for PET compared with CT for the studied processes.

  13. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography predicts survival of patients with neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Tina; Knigge, Ulrich; Jakobsen, Annika Loft;

    2010-01-01

    -eight prospectively enrolled patients with NE tumors underwent FDG-PET imaging. FDG uptake was quantified by maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax). The prognostic value of FDG uptake, proliferation index, chromogranin A, and liver metastases were assessed. RESULTS: During the 1-year follow-up, 14 patients died......PURPOSE: (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is currently not used on a routine basis for imaging of neuroendocrine (NE) tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of FDG-PET in patients with NE tumors. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Ninety...... was the only predictor of progression-free survival (HR, 8.4; P value of FDG-PET for NE tumors, which exceeds the prognostic value of traditional markers such as Ki67, chromogranin A, and liver metastases. FDG-PET may obtain an important role for NE...

  14. Positron emission tomography in human hemispheric infarction: a study with 150 continuous inhalation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-invasive tomographic imaging of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism has now become possible with the 15O continuous inhalation technique coupled with positron emission tomography (PET). We have for the first time applied this procedure in a large scale study of human hemispheric infarction. From this study, it may be concluded that: various hitherto undescribed patterns of disturbances in the perfusion/metabolism couple that occur in cerebral infarction have been documented by PET imaging of CBF and EO2. The EO2 appears as an important physiological parameter in the study of recent cerebral infarction, and specific patterns of the CBF/EO2 relationship are now emerging that may have important pathophysiologic, prognostic and therapeutic implications. Despite some limitations, the non invasive 15O inhalation technique has a number of major specific advantages that make it particularly suited for the study of ischemic brain disorders

  15. An objective evaluation framework for segmentation techniques of functional positron emission tomography studies

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J; Eberl, S; Feng, D

    2004-01-01

    Segmentation of multi-dimensional functional positron emission tomography (PET) studies into regions of interest (ROI) exhibiting similar temporal behavior is useful in diagnosis and evaluation of neurological images. Quantitative evaluation plays a crucial role in measuring the segmentation algorithm's performance. Due to the lack of "ground truth" available for evaluating segmentation of clinical images, automated segmentation results are usually compared with manual delineation of structures which is, however, subjective, and is difficult to perform. Alternatively, segmentation of co-registered anatomical images such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as the ground truth to the PET segmentation. However, this is limited to PET studies which have corresponding MRI. In this study, we introduce a framework for the objective and quantitative evaluation of functional PET study segmentation without the need for manual delineation or registration to anatomical images of the patient. The segmentation ...

  16. Recommendations for measurement of tumour vascularity with positron emission tomography in early phase clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboagye, Eric O.; Kenny, Laura M.; Myers, Melvyn [Imperial College London, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Gilbert, Fiona J. [University of Cambridge, Radiology Department, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Fleming, Ian N. [University of Aberdeen, NCRI PET Research Network, Aberdeen Bioimaging Centre, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Beer, Ambros J. [Technische Universitaet Munchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Cunningham, Vincent J. [University of Aberdeen, Institute of Medical Sciences, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Marsden, Paul K. [St. Thomas' Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences, PET Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom); Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM National Institute of Health and Clinical Sciences LaTIM, CHU Morvan, Brest (France); Gee, Antony D. [St. Thomas' Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences, The Rayne Institute, London (United Kingdom); Groves, Ashley M. [University College London, University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Cook, Gary J. [St. Thomas' Hospital, KCL Division of Imaging, Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, PET Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom); Kinahan, Paul E. [University of Washington, 222 Old Fisheries Center (FIS), Box 357987, Seattle, WA (United States); Clarke, Larry [Cancer Imaging Program, Imaging Technology Development Branch, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The evaluation of drug pharmacodynamics and early tumour response are integral to current clinical trials of novel cancer therapeutics to explain or predict long term clinical benefit or to confirm dose selection. Tumour vascularity assessment by positron emission tomography could be viewed as a generic pharmacodynamic endpoint or tool for monitoring response to treatment. This review discusses methods for semi-quantitative and quantitative assessment of tumour vascularity. The radioligands and radiotracers range from direct physiological functional tracers like [{sup 15}O]-water to macromolecular probes targeting integrin receptors expressed on neovasculature. Finally we make recommendations on ways to incorporate such measurements of tumour vascularity into early clinical trials of novel therapeutics. (orig.)

  17. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an essential role in the clinical management of patients. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and...... molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI....../CT imaging of prostate cancer. Among these, choline (labeled with (18)F or (11)C), (11)C-acetate, and (18)F-fluoride have demonstrated promising results, and other new radiopharmaceuticals are currently under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies....

  18. Unusual case of infantile fibrosarcoma evaluated on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedmutha, Akshay; Singh, Natasha; Shivdasani, Divya; Gupta, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Infantile fibrosarcoma (IFS) is a rare soft-tissue sarcoma originating from extremities and occasionally from axial soft tissue. The prognosis is good with favorable long-term survival. It is rarely metastasizing tumor, the chances being lesser with IFS originating from extremities. Use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) as a treatment regime further reduces the chances of local relapse and distant metastasis. The organs commonly affected in metastatic IFS are lungs and lymph nodes. We report an unusual case of an IFS originating from extremity, which received NACT, yet presented with an early metastatic disease involving soft tissues and sparing lungs and lymph nodes, as demonstrated on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography. PMID:27385891

  19. Attenuation correction with Region Growing Method used in the Positron Emission Mammography System

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Xiao-Yue; Yin, Peng-Fei; Yun, Ming-Kai; Pei, Chai; Fan, Xin; Huang, Xian-Chao; Sun, Xiao-Li; Wei, Long

    2014-01-01

    Positron Emission Mammography imaging system (PEMi) is a nuclear medicine diagnosis method dedicated for breast imaging. It provides a better resolution in detection of millimeter-sized breast tumors than whole-body PET. To address the requirement of semi-quantitative analysis with the radiotracer concentration map of the breast, a new attenuation correction method based on three-dimensional seeded region growing image segmentation (3DSRG-AC) solution was developed. The method gives a 3D connected region as the segmentation result instead of image slices. The continuously segmentation property makes this new method free of activity variation of breast tissues. Threshold value chosen is the key point for the segmentation process. The first valley of the grey level histogram of the reconstruction image is set as the lower threshold, which works fine in clinical application. Results show that attenuation correction for PEMi improves the image quality and the quantitative accuracy of radioactivity distribution de...

  20. Hemiballismus: Study of a case using positron emission tomography with 18fluoro-2-deoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 64-year-old man had right-sided persistent hemiballismus. Cerebral computed tomography (CT) and 0.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no abnormalities, but 1.5-T MRI showed decreased signal intensity of the putamina, greater on the left than on the right. The subthalamic area was normal on CT and MRI. Positron emission tomography with 18fluoro2-deoxyglucose showed marked hypometabolism of the left putamen (60% of the right) and hypermetabolism of the left parietal lobe (138% of the right). The decreased metabolism of the left putamen may indicate a reduction in neuronal firing. The pathophysiology of the hemiballismus in this case may be loss of tonic inhibition of the lateral globus pallidus from the putamen, leading in turn to greater inhibition of the subthalamic nucleus, less excitation of the medial globus pallidus, and less inhibition of the thalamus and motor cortex, and thus allowing expression of the ballistic movements

  1. Evaluation of abdominal tumors with [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunishima, Satoshi [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). We performed FDG-PET in for 22 patients with suspected primary or recurrent cancer 23 cases. The FDG-PET findings were compared with the final diagnosis, which was obtained by histological examination of resected, or biopsy specimens, and the clinical course. In all patients, the sensitivity, specificity, and the accuracy of FDG-PET were 93.8%, 85.7%, 91.3%, respectively. In the patients with colo-rectal cancer, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 92.9%, 100%, 94.4%, respectively. FDG-PET was considered to be clinically useful for the detection of primary or recurrent malignant tumors, and for differentiating recurrent tumors from inflammatory scars. (author)

  2. EndoTOFPET-US a Novel Multimodal Tool for Endoscopy and Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Garutti, Erika

    2013-01-01

    The EndoTOFPET-US project aims to jointly exploit Time-Of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOFPET) and ultrasound endoscopy with a multi-modal instrument for the development of new biomarkers for pancreas and prostate oncology. The paper outlines the functionality of the proposed instrument and the challenges for its realization. The high level of miniaturization and integration poses strong demands to the fields of scintillating crystallography, ultra-fast photon detection, highly integrated electronics and system integration. Solutions are presented to obtain a coincidence time resolution better than 200 ps and a spatial resolution of ~1 mm with an asymmetric TOFPET detector. A tracking system with better than 1 mm spatial resolution precision enables the online alignment of the system. The detector design, the production and test status of the single detector

  3. Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain in Fabry Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Kirsten; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Granqvist, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    risk of cerebrovascular disease at a young age in addition to heart and kidney failure. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess brain function and structure in the Danish cohort of patients with Fabry disease in a prospective way using 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission...... tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PATIENTS: Forty patients with Fabry disease (14 males, 26 females, age at inclusion: 10-66 years, median: 39 years) underwent a brain F-18-FDG-PET-scan at inclusion, and 31 patients were followed with FDG-PET biannually for up to seven years. All...... patients (except one) had a brain MRI-scan at inclusion, and 34 patients were followed with MRI biannually for up to nine years. IMAGE ANALYSIS: The FDG-PET-images were inspected visually and analysed using a quantitative 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projection analysis (Neurostat). MRI images were...

  4. Image properties of list mode likelihood reconstruction for a rectangular positron emission mammography with DOI measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A positron emission mammography scanner is under development at our Laboratory. The tomograph has a rectangular geometry consisting of four banks of detector modules. For each detector, the system can measure the depth of interaction information inside the crystal. The rectangular geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling and spatially variant sensitivity that are different from conventional PET systems. Therefore, it is of importance to study the image properties of the reconstructions. We adapted the theoretical analysis that we had developed for conventional PET systems to the list mode likelihood reconstruction for this tomograph. The local impulse response and covariance of the reconstruction can be easily computed using FFT. These theoretical results are also used with computer observer models to compute the signal-to-noise ratio for lesion detection. The analysis reveals the spatially variant resolution and noise properties of the list mode likelihood reconstruction. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo results

  5. Marked reduction of cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with advanced cirrhosis; A positron emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawatoko, Toshiharu; Murai, Koichiro; Ibayashi, Setsurou; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Nomiyama, Kensuke; Sadoshima, Seizo; Eujishima, Masatoshi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (rCMRO{sub 2}), and oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) were measured using positron emission tomography (PET) in four patients with cirrhosis (two males and two females, aged 57 to 69 years) in comparison with those in five age matched controls with previous transient global amnesia. PET studies were carried out when the patients were fully alert and oriented after the episodes of encephalopathy. In the patients, rCBF tended to be lower, while rCMRO{sub 2} was significantly lowered in almost all hemisphere cortices, more markedly in the frontal cortex. Our results suggest that the brain oxygen metabolism is diffusely impaired in patients with advanced cirrhosis, and the frontal cortex seems to be more susceptible to the systemic metabolic derangements induced by chronic liver disease. (author).

  6. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate in human sleep assessed by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was measured during nighttime sleep in 36 normal volunteers using positron emission tomography and fluorine-18-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG). In comparison to waking controls, subjects given FDG during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep showed about a 23% reduction in metabolic rate across the entire brain. This decrease was greater for the frontal than temporal or occipital lobes, and greater for basal ganglia and thalamus than cortex. Subjects in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep tended to have higher cortical metabolic rates than walking subjects. The cingulate gyrus was the only cortical structure to show a significant increase in glucose metabolic rate in REM sleep in comparison to waking. The basal ganglia were relatively more active on the right in REM sleep and symmetrical in NREM sleep

  7. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate in human sleep assessed by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Wu, J.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N.; Bunney, W.E. Jr. (Univ. of California, Irvine (USA)); Gillin, J.C. (Univ. of California, San Diego (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was measured during nighttime sleep in 36 normal volunteers using positron emission tomography and fluorine-18-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG). In comparison to waking controls, subjects given FDG during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep showed about a 23% reduction in metabolic rate across the entire brain. This decrease was greater for the frontal than temporal or occipital lobes, and greater for basal ganglia and thalamus than cortex. Subjects in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep tended to have higher cortical metabolic rates than walking subjects. The cingulate gyrus was the only cortical structure to show a significant increase in glucose metabolic rate in REM sleep in comparison to waking. The basal ganglia were relatively more active on the right in REM sleep and symmetrical in NREM sleep.

  8. Nicotine Blocks Brain Estrogen Synthase (Aromatase): In Vivo Positron Emission Tomography Studies in Female Baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegon, A.; Biegon, A.; Kim, S.-W.; Logan, J.; Hooker, J.M.; Muench, L.; Fowler, J.S.

    2010-01-12

    Cigarette smoking and nicotine have complex effects on human physiology and behavior, including some effects similar to those elicited by inhibition of aromatase, the last enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis. We report the first in vivo primate study to determine whether there is a direct effect of nicotine administration on brain aromatase. Brain aromatase availability was examined with positron emission tomography and the selective aromatase inhibitor [{sup 11}C]vorozole in six baboons before and after exposure to IV nicotine at .015 and .03 mg/kg. Nicotine administration produced significant, dose-dependent reductions in [{sup 11}C]vorozole binding. The amygdala and preoptic area showed the largest reductions. Plasma levels of nicotine and its major metabolite cotinine were similar to those found in cigarette smokers. Nicotine interacts in vivo with primate brain aromatase in regions involved in mood, aggression, and sexual behavior.

  9. Experience with carbon-11 choline positron emission tomography in prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the potential of carbon-11 choline positron emission tomography (PET) for the detection of lymph node and bone metastases in prostate cancer. A total of 23 patients were studied (known metastases: 8; suspicion of metastases: 3; primary staging: 12). Whole-body PET imaging was performed 5 min after injection of the tracer and completed within 1 h. Focally increased tracer uptake in bone or abdominal lymph node regions was interpreted as representing tumour involvement. All known bone and lymph node metastases could be recognized by [11C]choline PET. One out of ten negative scans for primary staging was false-negative (lymph node 11C]choline PET is a promising new tool for the primary staging of prostate cancer, with lymph node and bone metastases demonstrating high tracer uptake. Therapeutic management could be influenced by these results in that the technique may permit avoidance of surgical lymph node exploration. (orig.)

  10. Short time bacterial endotoxins test for positron emission tomography by means of positively charged filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have very short physical half-lives. It is hard to complete a bacterial endotoxins test prior to release from medical institutes. For endotoxin quantitative determination, limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) reagent and kinetic-turbidimetry system were previously developed. We investigated the possibility of a short time test by means of positively charged filters. As a result of this study, the effects of positively charged filters on endotoxin removal were over 99.5% for [18F]FDG and [18F]NaF, which were contaminated with the indicated concentration of endotoxin. Combining this filter and the kinetic-turbidimetric method, it was possible to complete a bacterial endotoxins test in 5 min prior to the patient's administration. This test should be required prior to release for PET radiopharmaceutical quality control. It has been suggested that this combination is a good method for this purpose. (author)

  11. Drug washout issues in studies of cerebral metabolism by positron emission tomography in psychiatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many studies of brain glucose utilization by positron emission tomography attempt to describe the modifications of the brain activity during psychiatric diseases. A major difficulty in such studies is the necessity to assess patients free of pharmacological treatment, in order to relate the measured changes in glucose utilization to the pathopsychology, and not to a drug effect. In this paper are reviewed the arguments from the literature allowing to estimate the drug washout time for considering the patients as drug-free. The review is focussed on the known effects of the psychotrops on brain glucose utilization. This time is approximately six months for the neuroleptics given orally, one month for antidepressants, and five and a half half-lives for benzodiazepines. Alternative research strategies for avoiding a long drug washout are mentioned, and ethical limitations are considered. (author)

  12. Usefulness of positron emission tomography (TEP) in the assessment of osteo-articular prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joint arthroplasty is performed with increasing frequency as the population ages. Loosening or infection of the prosthesis is a relatively common event that can limit the lifetime of a prosthesis. Accuracy differentiation between aseptic and septic loosening of the prosthesis remains a challenge because of the consequences for patient management. Moreover, an early diagnosis of infected hip prosthesis is very important for optimal and cost-effective management. Various approaches have developed to visualize infection and inflammation by nuclear medicine techniques. Recently positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-l8 labelled 2 fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has been shown to delineate infectious and inflammatory foci with high sensitivity owing to the increased glucose metabolism in inflammatory cells. In this paper we review the role of FDG-PET in this common differential diagnosis in patients with total knee and hip prostheses. Different patterns of FDG-PET interpretation have been described as wed as methodological aspects. (author)

  13. Imaging Atherosclerosis with Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of atherosclerosis could potentially move patient management towards individualized triage, treatment, and followup. The newly introduced combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system could emerge as a key player in this context. Both...... PET and MRI have previously been used for imaging plaque morphology and function: however, the combination of the two methods may offer new synergistic opportunities. Here, we will give a short summary of current relevant clinical applications of PET and MRI in the setting of atherosclerosis....... Additionally, our initial experiences with simultaneous PET/MRI for atherosclerosis imaging are presented. Finally, future potential vascular applications exploiting the unique combination of PET and MRI will be discussed....

  14. Clinical use of amyloid-positron emission tomography neuroimaging: Practical and bioethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Michael M; Foster, Norman L; Fleisher, Adam S; Williams, Monique M; Quaid, Kimberly; Wasserman, Michael; Hunt, Gail; Roberts, J Scott; Rabinovici, Gil D; Levenson, James L; Hake, Ann Marie; Hunter, Craig A; Van Campen, Luann E; Pontecorvo, Michael J; Hochstetler, Helen M; Tabas, Linda B; Trzepacz, Paula T

    2015-09-01

    Until recently, estimation of β-amyloid plaque density as a key element for identifying Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology as the cause of cognitive impairment was only possible at autopsy. Now with amyloid-positron emission tomography (amyloid-PET) neuroimaging, this AD hallmark can be detected antemortem. Practitioners and patients need to better understand potential diagnostic benefits and limitations of amyloid-PET and the complex practical, ethical, and social implications surrounding this new technology. To complement the practical considerations, Eli Lilly and Company sponsored a Bioethics Advisory Board to discuss ethical issues that might arise from clinical use of amyloid-PET neuroimaging with patients being evaluated for causes of cognitive decline. To best address the multifaceted issues associated with amyloid-PET neuroimaging, we recommend this technology be used only by experienced imaging and treating physicians in appropriately selected patients and only in the context of a comprehensive clinical evaluation with adequate explanations before and after the scan. PMID:27239516

  15. Design And Development Of A Mammary And Axillary Region Positron Emission Tomography System (maxpet)

    CERN Document Server

    Doshi, N K

    2000-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women. Currently, mammography and physical breast examination, both non-invasive techniques, provide the two most effective methods available for screening potential breast cancer patients. During the management of patients, however, several invasive techniques such as axillary lymph node dissection, core biopsies and lumpectomies, are utilized to determine the stage or malignancy of the disease with significant cost and morbidity associated with them. Positron Emission Tomography (PET), using [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tracer is a sensitive and non-invasive imaging modality that may be a cost-effective alternative to certain invasive procedures. In this project we have developed a low cost, high performance, dedicated PET camera (maxPET) for mammary and axillary region imaging. The system consists of two 15x15 cm2 planar scintillation detector arrays composed of modular detectors operating in coincidence. The modular detectors are comprised of...

  16. Short time bacterial endotoxins test for positron emission tomography by means of positively charged filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazawa, Nobuhiro; Wakita, Kazuo [Nishijin Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Mineura, Katsuyoshi [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have very short physical half-lives. It is hard to complete a bacterial endotoxins test prior to release from medical institutes. For endotoxin quantitative determination, limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) reagent and kinetic-turbidimetry system were previously developed. We investigated the possibility of a short time test by means of positively charged filters. As a result of this study, the effects of positively charged filters on endotoxin removal were over 99.5% for [{sup 18}F]FDG and [{sup 18}F]NaF, which were contaminated with the indicated concentration of endotoxin. Combining this filter and the kinetic-turbidimetric method, it was possible to complete a bacterial endotoxins test in 5 min prior to the patient's administration. This test should be required prior to release for PET radiopharmaceutical quality control. It has been suggested that this combination is a good method for this purpose. (author)

  17. Test-Retest Repeatability of Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements using Rubidium-82 Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efseaff, Matthew

    Rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been proposed for routine myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantification. Few studies have investigated the test-retest repeatability of this method. Same-day repeatability of rest MBF imaging was optimized with a highly automated analysis program using image-derived input functions and a dual spillover correction (SOC). The effects of heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and subject hemodynamics on test-retest repeatability were investigated at rest and during hyperemic stress. Factors affecting rest MBF repeatability included gender, suspected coronary artery disease, and dual SOC (p stress, and 0.95 for stress / rest myocardial flow reserve (MFR). Subjects with heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and hemodynamic conditions had significantly less repeatable MBF measurements at rest, stress, and stress/rest flow reserve (p < 0.05).

  18. Greater left cerebral hemispheric metabolism in bulimia assessed by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.C.; Hagman, J.; Buchsbaum, M.S.; Blinder, B.; Derrfler, M.; Tai, W.Y.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N. (Univ. of California, Irvine (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Eight women with bulimia and eight age- and sex-matched normal control subjects were studied with positron emission tomography using (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as a tracer of brain metabolic rate. Subjects performed a visual vigilance task during FDG uptake. In control subjects, the metabolic rate was higher in the right hemisphere than in the left, but patients with bulimia did not have this normal asymmetry. Lower metabolic rates in the basal ganglia, found in studies of depressed subjects, and higher rates in the basal ganglia, reported in a study of anorexia nervosa, were not found. This is consistent with the suggestion that bulimia is a diagnostic grouping distinct from these disorders.

  19. Fasciola Hepatica Mimicking Malignancy on 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Sürücü

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old female with complaints of gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, fatigue, vomiting, nausea, and weight loss was diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumor after removal of a 2 mm lesion from the stomach with endoscopic biopsy. Her magnetic resonance imaging that was performed due to on-going symptoms showed multiple linear hypointense lesions in the liver. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT scan was performed for differential diagnosis, which showed high fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG uptake in these lesions. Clinical and laboratory findings revealed the final diagnosis as Fasciola hepatica. The imaging features of this case is presented to aid in differentiating this infectious disease from malignancy and avoid misdiagnosis on FDG-PET/CT.

  20. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the detection of primary pulmonary angiosarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiosarcoma is a malignant vascular tumor that originates from the mesenchymal cells which have undergone angioblastic differentiation. Pulmonary angiosarcomas are invariably (>90%) metastatic tumors form primaries of the skin, bone, liver, breast, or heart. Primary pulmonary angiosarcomas are exceedingly rare, with just about 20 cases being reported in the literature. We report an additional case with a brief review of the literature of a primary pulmonary angiosarcoma in a 26-year-old lady who presented with intractable hemoptysis. In addition, we highlight the potential of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography as an important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of this tumor and thus contribute to the existing sparse literature on this fascinating yet devastating disease

  1. Detection of local recurrence of soft-tissue sarcoma with positron emission tomography using [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, AC; Nieweg, OE; vanGinkel, RJ; Pruim, J; Hoekstra, HJ; Paans, AMJ; Vaalburg, W; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    1997-01-01

    Background: It is often difficult to detect a local recurrence of soft-tissue sarcomas due to disturbance of the normal anatomy by previous surgery and radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to assess the value of positron emission tomography (PET) with [F-18]fluoro3-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) for detec

  2. Experimental validation of granular dynamics simulations of gas-fluidised beds with homogeneous inflow conditions using Positron Emission Particle Tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoomans, B.P.B.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Mohd Salleh, M.; Seville, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    A hard-sphere granular dynamics model of a two-dimensional gas-fluidised bed was experimentally validated using Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT). In the model the Newtonian equations of motion are solved for each solid particle while taking into account the particle¿particle and particle¿w

  3. Kinetic modeling of Fe-52/Mn-52m-citrate at the blood-brain barrier by positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonder, C; Wurtenberger, PI; Maguire, RP; Pellikka, R; Leenders, KL

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of iron at the blood-brain barrier of the monkey were studied in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET) and the tracer Fe-52/Mn-52m-citrate. Mn-52m is the beta(+)-emitting daughter nuclide of Fe-52 and therefore contributes to the observed signal and background in the PET images

  4. Regional myocardial oxygen consumption estimated by carbon-11 acetate and positron emission tomography before and after repetitive ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, K F; Hansen, P R; Holm, S;

    2011-01-01

    Preserved myocardial oxygen consumption estimated by carbon 11-acetate and positron emission tomography (PET) in myocardial regions with chronic but reversibly depressed contractile function in patients with ischemic heart disease have been suggested to be caused by repeated short episodes of acute...

  5. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography predictors of overall survival in stage IIIC/IV ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Signe; Loft, Annika; Engelholm, Svend Aage;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the role of 2-deoxy-2-(F)fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for selecting patients with extensive ovarian cancer (OC) for neoadjuvant chemotherapy by evaluating predictors of overall survival in patients with stage IIIC/IV OC....

  6. In Vivo Treatment Sensitivity Testing With Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography After One Cycle of Chemotherapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Kostakoglu, Lale; Zaucha, Jan Maciej;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Negative [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) -positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) after two cycles of chemotherapy indicates a favorable prognosis in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). We hypothesized that the negative predictive value would be even higher in patients responding...

  7. 18F-Fluoride bone positron emission tomography demonstrating changes related to finger clubbing and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy is manifested by clubbing and periostitis of bones. We present a very rare documentation of increased F18-sodium fluoride uptake in the distal phalanges of both hands correlating to clubbing of the fingers in a 55-year-old female patient with carcinoma of lung in whom bone positron emission tomography was performed for metastatic work-up

  8. F-18 fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a patient with corticobasal degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corticobasal degeneration is a rare neurodegenerative disorder that often eludes clinical diagnosis. The present case shows the F-18 fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) of a 62-year-old man with a progressive movement disorder with asymmetric features. PET/CT examination showed a markedly right-brain hemispheric hypometabolism also involving basal ganglia

  9. Marked uptake of fluorodeoxyglucose in a vocal cord after medialization: Acute and subacute positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 60-year-old male who underwent left upper lobectomy because of recently diagnosed lung cancer was admitted to the nuclear medicine department. A whole body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (CT) that was performed for staging purposes, revealed an intense hypermetabolism in left vocal cord region corresponding with hyperdense mass-like material on CT scan

  10. Report of two cases of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography appearance of hibernoma: A rare benign tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    False-positive findings are commonly seen in positron emission tomography computed tomography imaging. One of the most common false positive finding is uptake of fluorodeoxyglucose in brown adipose tissue. Herein, we report two cases with incidentally detected hibernomas-a brown fat containing tumor with metabolic activity

  11. Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Henry; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2016-05-31

    In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted.

  12. Positron emission tomography in Huntington's chorea using C15O2, 15O2 and 18 FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using C15 O2, 15O2 and 18FDG was performed in a father and his son with Huntington's chorea. It was suggested that striatal atrophy occurred before the extensive atrophy of the cerebral cortex and that the progression of atrophy of the right and left cerebral hemispheric cortexes was not uniform. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. The prognostic value of positron emission tomography in non-small cell lung cancer : Analysis of 266 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, H.; Post, W.J.; Pruim, J.; Groen, H.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is more accurate than computed tomography (CT) in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed the prognostic value of PET for survival in NSCLC patients. Methods: Consecutive patients with proven NSCLC with PET for staging were selected. Staging

  14. Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Henry; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2016-05-31

    In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted. PMID:27245647

  15. Better yield of (18)fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma during thyrotropin stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tol, KM; Jager, PL; Piers, DA; Pruim, J; de Vries, EGE; Dullaart, RPF; Links, TP

    2002-01-01

    To determine whether (18)fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for the detection of recurrences or metastases of differentiated thyroid carcinoma should be performed during thyrotropin (TSH) suppression or TSH stimulation, eight patients were studied sequentially. After the secon

  16. Implementation of sum-peak method for standardization of positron emission radionuclides; Implementacao do metodo pico-soma para padronizacao de radionuclideos emissores de positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fragoso, Maria da Conceicao de Farias; Oliveira, Mercia Liane de; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: mcfragoso@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is being increasingly recognized as an important quantitative imaging tool for diagnosis and assessing response to therapy. As correct dose administration plays a crucial part in nuclear medicine, it is important that the instruments used to assay the activity of the short-lived radionuclides are calibrated accurately, with traceability to the national or international standards. The sum-peak method has been widely used for radionuclide standardization. The purpose of this study was to implement the methodology for standardization of PET radiopharmaceuticals at the Regional Center for Nuclear Sciences of the Northeast (CRCN-NE). (author)

  17. Predicting Outcome in Patients with Rhabdomyosarcoma: Role of [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Dana L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Fox, Josef J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Dharmarajan, Kavita V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Schoder, Heiko [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Price, Alison N. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Surgery, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) response of the primary tumor after induction chemotherapy predicts outcomes in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: After excluding those with initial tumor resection, 107 patients who underwent FDG-PET after induction chemotherapy at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from 2002 to 2013 were reviewed. Local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to FDG-PET response and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) at baseline (PET1/SUV1), after induction chemotherapy (PET2/SUV2), and after local therapy (PET3/SUV3). Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to determine the optimal cutoff for dichotomization of SUV1 and SUV2 values. Results: The SUV1 (<9.5 vs ≥9.5) was predictive of PFS (P=.02) and OS (P=.02), but not LC. After 12 weeks (median) of induction chemotherapy, 45 patients had negative PET2 scans and 62 had positive scans: 3-year PFS was 72% versus 44%, respectively (P=.01). The SUV2 (<1.5 vs ≥1.5) was similarly predictive of PFS (P=.005) and was associated with LC (P=.02) and OS (P=.03). A positive PET3 scan was predictive of worse PFS (P=.0009), LC (P=.05), and OS (P=.03). Conclusions: [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is an early indicator of outcomes in patients with RMS. Future prospective trials may incorporate FDG-PET response data for risk-adapted therapy and early assessment of new treatment regimens.

  18. Positron emission tomography in pebble beds. Part 1: Liquid particle deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, T., E-mail: t.barth@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics (IFD), Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Ludwig, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics (IFD), Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Kulenkampff, J.; Gründig, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Franke, K. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmacy (IRP), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Lippmann-Pipke, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Hampel, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics (IFD), Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, AREVA Endowed Chair of Imaging Techniques in Energy and Process Engineering, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Particle deposition in a pebble bed was recorded by positron emission tomography. • The particles were radioactively labelled and their spatial distribution was recorded. • Particle deposition was mainly driven by particle inertia and turbulent dispersion. • Particle deposits form hot spots on the upstream face of the single pebbles. - Abstract: Accidental scenarios such as the depressurisation of the primary circuit of high temperature gas cooled pebble bed reactors may lead to the release of fission products via the discharge of radioactive graphite dust. For a detailed source term assessment in such accident scenarios knowledge of the flow mechanics of dust transport in complex coolant circuit components, like pebble beds, recuperator structures and pipe systems is necessary. In this article an experimental study of aerosol deposition in a pebble bed is described. We investigated the deposition of radiolabelled liquid aerosol particles in a scaled pebble bed in an air-driven small-scale aerosol flow test facility under isothermal ambient conditions. The aerosol particles were generated by means of a condensational aerosol generator with potassium-fluoride (KF) condensation nuclei. Particle concentration measurements upstream and downstream of the pebble bed were performed by isokinetic sampling and particle counting. The results agree with typical deposition curves for turbulent and inertia driven particle deposition. Furthermore, positron emission tomography (PET) was performed to visualize and measure particle deposition distributions in the pebble bed. Results of a selected deposition experiment with moderately large particles (d{sub aero} = 3.5 μm, Re{sup ′}{sub pb}=2200) show that the deposited particles are located in the vicinity of the upstream stagnation points of the pebbles. These findings support the thesis that inertia driven particle deposition is predominating.

  19. Stages in the development of a dedicated positron emission tomography system for imaging small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stages in the development of a small diameter positron emission tomograph for the study of small animals are described. Initial experiments were performed with a pair of commercial, 4 mm multicrystal detectors at an inter-detector separation of 100 mm. The system's performance in this geometry was evaluated using physical and biological studies. These indicated the feasibility of using such detectors at this separation to delineate regional tracer kinetic information from small experimental animals. A small diameter, septa-less tomograph incorporating the detectors was simulated and biological data acquired which indicated the benefits of tomography compared with planar studies for imaging small animals. A tomograph incorporating 16 of the latest generation of block detector (3 mm crystals) in a ring diameter of 115 mm was constructed. The detectors were mounted on a 1 m2 vertical gantry and the system incorporated commercial hardware and software for data acquisition. The physical performance of the tomograph indicated that the spatial resolutions expected from the crystal size could be achieved at the centre of the field of view for all axes. However, the small diameter of the system resulted in larger degradation of the spatial resolution off-axis due to non-uniformity of detector sampling and photon penetration into neighbouring crystals. In spite of the physical problems posed by the small diameter of the system, useful in vivo studies on small animals are being routinely performed which assist in the development of novel radioligands and the interpretation of clinical positron emission tomography data and, in addition, provide a unique methodology to study the serial aspects of animal models of human disease. (author). 15 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  20. Comparison of fluorine-18 and bromine-76 imaging in positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, M.J.; Ferreira, N. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA, Orsay (France)]|[Servico de Biofisica - IBILI - FMC, Coimbra (Portugal); Almeida, P.; Strul, D.; Loc`h, C.; Brulon, V.; Trebossen, R.; Maziere, B.; Bendriem, B. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA, Orsay (France)

    1999-07-01

    State of the art positron emission tomography (PET) systems allow for scatter and attenuation correction. However, the size of the structure being studied and the region of interest (ROI) chosen also influence the accuracy of measurements of radioactive concentration. Furthermore, the limited spatial resolution of PET tomographs, which depends, among other factors, on the range of positrons in matter, can also contribute to a loss in quantitation accuracy. In this paper we address the influence of positron range, structure size and ROI size on the quantitation of radioactive concentration using PET. ECAT EXACT HR+ (HR+) and ECAT 953B/31 (ECAT 953B) PET systems were used in phantom acquisitions performed with two radioisotopes with different positron ranges. The 3D Hoffman phantom was scanned on both scanners with both radioisotopes, to visually analyse the image quality. A resolution phantom having six spheres of different diameters in a Plexiglas cylinder was used to calculate the values of the contrast recovery coefficient or hot spot recovery coefficient and of the spill-over or cold spot recovery coefficient under different imaging conditions used in clinical routine at our institution. Activity ratios were varied between 2 and 30 or between 0.4 and 200 by filling the spheres with fluorine-18 or bromine-76 respectively and the cylinder with {sup 11}C. Dynamic scans were performed on each scanner. Data were reconstructed using the same parameters as are used in clinical protocols. The variations in sphere and cylinder activities with time were fitted using the function M(t)=k{sub 1}.A(t)+k{sub 2}.B(t), where M(t) is the radioactivity concentration measured in an ROI placed on each sphere and A(t) and B(t) represent the true radioactivity concentrations present at time t in the spheres and in the cylinder respectively. k{sub 1} and k{sub 2} are factors representing the contrast recovery coefficient and the spill-over from surrounding activity on measurements

  1. Sub-millimeter nuclear medical imaging with reduced dose application in positron emission tomography using beta-gamma coincidences

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, C; Parodi, K; Thirolf, P G

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) permits a functional understanding of the underlying causes of many diseases. Modern whole-body PET systems reach a spatial resolution of 2-6 mm (FWHM). A limitation of this technique occurs from the thermalization and diffusion of the positron before its annihilation, typically within the mm range. We present a nuclear medical imaging technique, able to reach sub-millimeter spatial resolution in 3 dimensions with a reduced effective dose application compared to conventional PET. This 'gamma-PET' technique draws on specific medical isotopes, simultaneously emitting an additional photon accompanying the beta^+ decay. Exploiting the triple coincidence between the positron annihilation and the third photon, it is possible to separate the reconstructed 'true' events from background. In order to characterize the potential of this technique, MC simulations and image reconstructions have been performed. The achievable spatial resolution has been found to reach ca. 0.4 mm (FWHM) in ...

  2. Vision 20/20: Positron emission tomography in radiation therapy planning, delivery, and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Katia

    2015-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is increasingly considered as an effective imaging method to support several stages of radiation therapy. The combined usage of functional and morphological imaging in state-of-the-art PET/CT scanners is rapidly emerging to support the treatment planning process in terms of improved tumor delineation, and to assess the tumor response in follow-up investigations after or even during the course of fractionated therapy. Moreover, active research is being pursued on new tracers capable of providing different insights into tumor function, in order to identify areas of the planning volume which may require additional dosage for improved probability of tumor control. In this respect, major progresses in the next years will likely concern the development and clinical investigation of novel tracers and image processing techniques for reliable thresholding and segmentation, of treatment planning and beam delivery approaches integrating the PET imaging information, as well as improved multimodal clinical instrumentation such as PET/MR. But especially in the rapidly emerging case of ion beam therapy, the usage of PET is not only limited to the imaging of external tracers injected to the patient. In fact, a minor amount of positron emitters is formed in nuclear fragmentation reactions between the impinging ions and the tissue, bearing useful information for confirmation of the delivered treatment during or after therapeutic irradiation. Different implementations of unconventional PET imaging for therapy monitoring are currently being investigated clinically, and major ongoing research aims at new dedicated detector technologies and at challenging applications such as real-time imaging and time-resolved in vivo verification of motion compensated beam delivery. This paper provides an overview of the different areas of application of PET in radiation oncology and discusses the most promising perspectives in the years to come for radiation therapy

  3. Vision 20/20: Positron emission tomography in radiation therapy planning, delivery, and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parodi, Katia, E-mail: Katia.parodi@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Faculty of Physics, Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Munich 85748 (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is increasingly considered as an effective imaging method to support several stages of radiation therapy. The combined usage of functional and morphological imaging in state-of-the-art PET/CT scanners is rapidly emerging to support the treatment planning process in terms of improved tumor delineation, and to assess the tumor response in follow-up investigations after or even during the course of fractionated therapy. Moreover, active research is being pursued on new tracers capable of providing different insights into tumor function, in order to identify areas of the planning volume which may require additional dosage for improved probability of tumor control. In this respect, major progresses in the next years will likely concern the development and clinical investigation of novel tracers and image processing techniques for reliable thresholding and segmentation, of treatment planning and beam delivery approaches integrating the PET imaging information, as well as improved multimodal clinical instrumentation such as PET/MR. But especially in the rapidly emerging case of ion beam therapy, the usage of PET is not only limited to the imaging of external tracers injected to the patient. In fact, a minor amount of positron emitters is formed in nuclear fragmentation reactions between the impinging ions and the tissue, bearing useful information for confirmation of the delivered treatment during or after therapeutic irradiation. Different implementations of unconventional PET imaging for therapy monitoring are currently being investigated clinically, and major ongoing research aims at new dedicated detector technologies and at challenging applications such as real-time imaging and time-resolved in vivo verification of motion compensated beam delivery. This paper provides an overview of the different areas of application of PET in radiation oncology and discusses the most promising perspectives in the years to come for radiation therapy

  4. Optimised motion tracking for positron emission tomography studies of brain function in awake rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Z Kyme

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is a non-invasive molecular imaging technique using positron-emitting radioisotopes to study functional processes within the body. High resolution PET scanners designed for imaging rodents and non-human primates are now commonplace in preclinical research. Brain imaging in this context, with motion compensation, can potentially enhance the usefulness of PET by avoiding confounds due to anaesthetic drugs and enabling freely moving animals to be imaged during normal and evoked behaviours. Due to the frequent and rapid motion exhibited by alert, awake animals, optimal motion correction requires frequently sampled pose information and precise synchronisation of these data with events in the PET coincidence data stream. Motion measurements should also be as accurate as possible to avoid degrading the excellent spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art scanners. Here we describe and validate methods for optimised motion tracking suited to the correction of motion in awake rats. A hardware based synchronisation approach is used to achieve temporal alignment of tracker and scanner data to within 10 ms. We explored the impact of motion tracker synchronisation error, pose sampling rate, rate of motion, and marker size on motion correction accuracy. With accurate synchronisation (20 Hz, and a small head marker suitable for awake animal studies, excellent motion correction results were obtained in phantom studies with a variety of continuous motion patterns, including realistic rat motion (<5% bias in mean concentration. Feasibility of the approach was also demonstrated in an awake rat study. We conclude that motion tracking parameters needed for effective motion correction in preclinical brain imaging of awake rats are achievable in the laboratory setting. This could broaden the scope of animal experiments currently possible with PET.

  5. Evaluation of various attenuation correction methods for brain imaging in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrections for photon attenuation in positron emission tomography (PET) will, in general, affect quantitative accuracy and noise characteristics of the reconstructed images. Each correction approach provides certain advantages as well as disadvantages. The choice of the best method for a particular study depends on the task objective, e.g., lesion detection or quantitation, and limits of acquisition and processing time. In the present study, the following attenuation correction methods have been systematically evaluated for brain imaging with PET: (1) analytical model method; (2) direct transmission measurement method; (3) smoothed transmission data method; (4) reconstructed transmission image method; (5) object contour method; and (6) boundary method. Criteria for evaluating the performance of these methods have been developed in terms of computation efficiency and image quality descriptors such as quantitative accuracy, reconstructed image resolution, and noise characteristics. Effects of total number of transmission counts, total number of emission counts, size of the region of interest, smoothing parameters, reconstruction filters, and object contrast have also been investigated. Based on the results of computer simulation studies, the establishment of a methodology for choosing the best attenuation correction method for a defined purpose, e.g., detecting a 2 cm diameter lesion or quantitating a 4 cm diameter region, has been attempted. This systematic approach has been applied to phantom and in vivo studies. In most cases, the smoothed transmission data method appears to be the best compromise of computation time and image quality

  6. A bismuth germanate-avalanche photodiode module designed for use in high resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A light-tight, hermetically sealed module for use in high resolution positron emission tomography systems is described. The module has external dimensions 3.8 x 13.2 x 33 mm and contains two 3 x 5 x 20 Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillators, each with its own 3 x 3 mm silicon avalanche photodiode. When stacked, the vertical packing fraction is 80%. As measured with a 137Cs (662 keV) source, the typical energy resolution is 20% at 220C, reducing to 16% at 00C. The single detector time resolution for the 22Na gamma at 511 keV is typically less 20 ns at 220C, reducing to less than 15 ns at 00C. Further cooling does not improve the performance since the emission time of light from BGO increases at lower temperature. Preliminary results with Gadolinium Orthosilicate show similar energy resolution, better timing resolution (under 10 ns), but as is known, a slightly poorer photofraction and stopping power

  7. Simulation study of respiratory-induced errors in cardiac positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heart disease is a leading killer in Canada and positron emission tomography (PET) provides clinicians with in vivo metabolic information for diagnosing heart disease. Transmission data are usually acquired with 68Ge, although the advent of PET/CT scanners has made computed tomography (CT) an alternative option. The fast data acquisition of CT compared to PET may cause potential misregistration problems, leading to inaccurate attenuation correction (AC). Using Monte Carlo simulations and an anthropomorphic dynamic computer phantom, this study determines the magnitude and location of respiratory-induced errors in radioactivity uptake measured in cardiac PET/CT. A homogeneous tracer distribution in the heart was considered. The AC was based on (1) a time-averaged attenuation map (2) CT maps from a single phase of the respiratory cycle, and (3) CT maps phase matched to the emission data. Circumferential profiles of the heart uptake were compared and differences of up to 24% were found between the single-phase CT-AC method and the true phantom values. Simulation results were supported by a PET/CT canine study which showed differences of up to 10% in the heart uptake in the lung-heart boundary region when comparing 68Ge- to CT-based AC with the CT map acquired at end inhalation

  8. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in carcinoma nasopharynx: Can we predict outcomes and tailor therapy based on postradiotherapy fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbani Ghosh Laskar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT is an emerging modality for staging and response evaluation in carcinoma nasopharynx. This study was conducted to evaluate the impact of PET-CT in assessing response and outcomes in carcinoma nasopharynx. Materials and Methods: Forty-five patients of nonmetastatic carcinoma nasopharynx who underwent PET-CT for response evaluation at 10-12 weeks posttherapy between 2004 and 2009 were evaluated. Patients were classified as responders (Group A if there was a complete response on PET-CT or as nonresponders (Group B if there was any uptake above the background activity. Data regarding demographics, treatment, and outcomes were collected from their records and compared across the Groups A and B. Results: The median age was 41 years. 42 out of 45 (93.3% patients had WHO Grade 2B disease (undifferentiated squamous carcinoma. 24.4%, 31.1%, 15.6, and 28.8% patients were in American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage IIb, III, Iva, and IVb. All patients were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Forty-five patients, 28 (62.2% were classified as responders, whereas 17 (37.8% were classified as nonresponders. There was no significant difference in the age, sex, WHO grade, and stage distribution between the groups. Compliance to treatment was comparable across both groups. The median follow-up was 25.3 months (759 days. The disease-free survival (DFS of the group was 57.3% at 3 years. The DFS at 3 years was 87.3% and 19.7% for Group A and B, respectively (log-rank test, P < 0.001. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed Groups to be the only significant factor predicting DFS (P value 0.002 and < 0.001, respectively. In Group B, the most common site of disease failure was distant (9, 53%. Conclusion: PET-CT can be used to evaluate response and as a tool to identify patients at higher risk of distant failure. Further, this could be exploited to

  9. Applications of Beta Particle Detection for Synthesis and Usage of Radiotracers Developed for Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooraghi, Alex Abreu

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a noninvasive molecular imaging tool that requires the use of a radioactive compound or radiotracer which targets a molecular pathway of interest. We have developed and employed three beta particle radiation detection systems to advance PET. Specifically, the goals of these systems are to: 1. Automate dispensing of solutions containing a positron emitting isotope. 2. Monitor radioactivity on-chip during synthesis of a positron emitting radiotracer. 3. Assay cellular uptake on-chip of a positron emitting radiotracer. Automated protocols for measuring and dispensing solutions containing radioisotopes are essential not only for providing an optimum environment for radiation workers, but also to ensure a quantitatively accurate workflow. For the first project, we describe the development and performance of a system for automated radioactivity distribution of beta particle emitting radioisotopes such as fluorine-18 (F-18). Key to the system is a radiation detector in-line with a peristaltic pump. The system demonstrates volume accuracy within 5 % for volumes of 20 muL or greater. When considering volumes of 20 muL or greater, delivered radioactivity is in agreement with the requested radioactivity as measured with the dose calibrator. The integration of the detector and pump leads to a flexible system that can accurately dispense solutions containing F-18 in radioactivity concentrations directly produced from a cyclotron (~ 0.1-1 mCi/muL), to low activity concentrations intended for preclinical mouse scans (~ 1-10 muCi/muL), and anywhere in between. Electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) is an attractive microfluidic platform for batch synthesis of PET radiotracers. Visualization of radioisotopes on-chip is critical for synthesis optimization and technological development. For the second project, we describe the development and performance of a Cerenkov/real-time imaging system for PET radiotracer synthesis on EWOD. We also investigate

  10. Modeling clustered activity increase in amyloid-beta positron emission tomographic images with statistical descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhi S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sepideh Shokouhi,1 Baxter P Rogers,1 Hakmook Kang,2 Zhaohua Ding,1 Daniel O Claassen,3 John W Mckay,1 William R Riddle1On behalf of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative1Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USABackground: Amyloid-beta (Aβ imaging with positron emission tomography (PET holds promise for detecting the presence of Aβ plaques in the cortical gray matter. Many image analyses focus on regional average measurements of tracer activity distribution; however, considerable additional information is available in the images. Metrics that describe the statistical properties of images, such as the two-point correlation function (S2, have found wide applications in astronomy and materials science. S2 provides a detailed characterization of spatial patterns in images typically referred to as clustering or flocculence. The objective of this study was to translate the two-point correlation method into Aβ-PET of the human brain using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB to characterize longitudinal changes in the tracer distribution that may reflect changes in Aβ plaque accumulation.Methods: We modified the conventional S2 metric, which is primarily used for binary images and formulated a weighted two-point correlation function (wS2 to describe nonbinary, real-valued PET images with a single statistical function. Using serial 11C-PiB scans, we calculated wS2 functions from two-dimensional PET images of different cortical regions as well as three-dimensional data from the whole brain. The area under the wS2 functions was calculated and compared with the mean/median of the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR. For three-dimensional data, we compared the area under the wS2 curves with the subjects’ cerebrospinal fluid measures.Results: Overall, the longitudinal changes in wS2

  11. High-speed digitization readout of silicon photomultipliers for time of flight positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Martens, M.; Ramberg, E.; /Fermilab; Kim, H.; Chen, C.; Kao, C.; /Chicago U.; Niessen, K.; /SUNY, Buffalo; Zatserklyaniy, A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez; Mazzillo, M.; Carbone, B.; /SGS Thomson, Catania

    2011-02-01

    We report on work to develop a system with about 100 picoseconds (ps) time resolution for time of flight positron emission tomography [TOF-PET]. The chosen photo detectors for the study were Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM's). This study was based on extensive experience in studying timing properties of SiPM's. The readout of these devices used the commercial high speed digitizer DRS4. We applied different algorithms to get the best time resolution of 155 ps Guassian (sigma) for a LYSO crystal coupled to a SiPM. We consider the work as a first step in building a prototype TOF-PET module. The field of positron-emission-tomography (PET) has been rapidly developing. But there are significant limitations in how well current PET scanners can reconstruct images, related to how fast data can be acquired, how much volume they can image, and the spatial and temporal resolution of the generated photons. Typical modern scanners now include multiple rings of detectors, which can image a large volume of the patient. In this type of scanner, one can treat each ring as a separate detector and require coincidences only within the ring, or treat the entire region viewed by the scanner as a single 3 dimensional volume. This 3d technique has significantly better sensitivity since more photon pair trajectories are accepted. However, the scattering of photons within the volume of the patient, and the effect of random coincidences limits the technique. The advent of sub-nanosecond timing resolution detectors means that there is potentially much better rejection of scattered photon events and random coincidence events in the 3D technique. In addition, if the timing is good enough, then the origin of photons pairs can be determined better, resulting in improved spatial resolution - so called 'Time-of-Flight' PET, or TOF-PET. Currently a lot of activity has occurred in applications of SiPMs for TOF-PET. This is due to the devices very good time resolution, low profile

  12. A novel image reconstruction methodology based on inverse Monte Carlo analysis for positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrolli, Haris A.

    2001-04-01

    A three dimensional (3D) reconstruction procedure for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) based on inverse Monte Carlo analysis is presented. PET is a medical imaging modality which employs a positron emitting radio-tracer to give functional images of an organ's metabolic activity. This makes PET an invaluable tool in the detection of cancer and for in-vivo biochemical measurements. There are a number of analytical and iterative algorithms for image reconstruction of PET data. Analytical algorithms are computationally fast, but the assumptions intrinsic in the line integral model limit their accuracy. Iterative algorithms can apply accurate models for reconstruction and give improvements in image quality, but at an increased computational cost. These algorithms require the explicit calculation of the system response matrix, which may not be easy to calculate. This matrix gives the probability that a photon emitted from a certain source element will be detected in a particular detector line of response. The ``Three Dimensional Stochastic Sampling'' (SS3D) procedure implements iterative algorithms in a manner that does not require the explicit calculation of the system response matrix. It uses Monte Carlo techniques to simulate the process of photon emission from a source distribution and interaction with the detector. This technique has the advantage of being able to model complex detector systems and also take into account the physics of gamma ray interaction within the source and detector systems, which leads to an accurate image estimate. A series of simulation studies was conducted to validate the method using the Maximum Likelihood - Expectation Maximization (ML-EM) algorithm. The accuracy of the reconstructed images was improved by using an algorithm that required a priori knowledge of the source distribution. Means to reduce the computational time for reconstruction were explored by using parallel processors and algorithms that had faster convergence rates

  13. Injectable silver nanosensors: in vivo dosimetry for external beam radiotherapy using positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, A. N.; Rydhög, J. S.; Søndergaard, R. V.; Andresen, T. L.; Holm, S.; Munck Af Rosenschöld, P.; Conradsen, K.; Jølck, R. I.

    2016-05-01

    Development of safe and efficient radiotherapy routines requires quantification of the delivered absorbed dose to the cancer tissue in individual patients. In vivo dosimetry can provide accurate information about the absorbed dose delivered during treatment. In the current study, a novel silver-nanosensor formulation based on poly(vinylpyrrolidinone)-coated silver nanoparticles formulated in a gelation matrix composed of sucrose acetate isobutyrate has been developed for use as an in vivo dosimeter for external beam radiotherapy. In situ photonuclear reactions trigger the formation of radioactive 106Ag, which enables post treatment verification of the delivered dose using positron emission tomography imaging. The silver-nanosensor was investigated in a tissue equivalent thorax phantom using clinical settings and workflow for both standard fractionated radiotherapy (2 Gy) and stereotactic radiotherapy (10- and 22 Gy) in a high-energy beam setting (18 MV). The developed silver-nanosensor provided high radiopacity on the planning CT-scans sufficient for patient positioning in image-guided radiotherapy and provided dosimetric information about the absorbed dose with a 10% and 8% standard deviation for the stereotactic regimens, 10 and 22 Gy, respectively.Development of safe and efficient radiotherapy routines requires quantification of the delivered absorbed dose to the cancer tissue in individual patients. In vivo dosimetry can provide accurate information about the absorbed dose delivered during treatment. In the current study, a novel silver-nanosensor formulation based on poly(vinylpyrrolidinone)-coated silver nanoparticles formulated in a gelation matrix composed of sucrose acetate isobutyrate has been developed for use as an in vivo dosimeter for external beam radiotherapy. In situ photonuclear reactions trigger the formation of radioactive 106Ag, which enables post treatment verification of the delivered dose using positron emission tomography imaging. The

  14. Imaging optimizations with non-pure and high-energy positron emitters in small animal positron computed tomography; Optimierung der Bildgebung mit nichtreinen und hochenergetischen Positronenstrahlern in der Kleintier-Positronen-Emissions-Tomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harzmann, Sophie

    2014-03-21

    The contribution on imaging optimizations with non-pure and high-energy positron emitters in small animal positron emission tomography (PET) covers the following topics: physical fundamentals of PET, mathematical image reconstruction and data analyses, Monte-Carlo simulations and implemented correction scheme, quantification of cascade gamma coincidences based on simulations and measurements, sinogram based corrections, restoration of the spatial resolution, implementation of full corrections.

  15. Development of small-diameter lead-glass-tube matrices for gamma-ray conversion in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gamma-ray converter for a multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) positron emission tomograph is described. The converter is made of small-diameter (0.48 mm inner diameter, 0.06 mm wall thickness) lead-oxide-glass tubes fused to form a honeycomb matrix. The surfaces of the tubes are reduced in a hydrogen atmosphere to provide the drift electric field for detection of the conversion electrons. The detection efficiency for a 10 mm thick converter is 6.65%, with a time resolution of 160 ns (FWHM). A scheme which will improve the spatial resolution of the tomograph by use of the self quenching streamer mode of chamber operation is described. Details of construction of the converters and the MWPC are presented, as well as the design performance of a high spatial resolution positron emission tomograph (HISPET). 40 refs., 22 figs

  16. A fast rebinning algorithm for 3D positron emission tomography using John's equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrise, Michel; Liu, Xuan

    1999-08-01

    Volume imaging in positron emission tomography (PET) requires the inversion of the three-dimensional (3D) x-ray transform. The usual solution to this problem is based on 3D filtered-backprojection (FBP), but is slow. Alternative methods have been proposed which factor the 3D data into independent 2D data sets corresponding to the 2D Radon transforms of a stack of parallel slices. Each slice is then reconstructed using 2D FBP. These so-called rebinning methods are numerically efficient but are approximate. In this paper a new exact rebinning method is derived by exploiting the fact that the 3D x-ray transform of a function is the solution to the second-order partial differential equation first studied by John. The method is proposed for two sampling schemes, one corresponding to a pair of infinite plane detectors and another one corresponding to a cylindrical multi-ring PET scanner. The new FORE-J algorithm has been implemented for this latter geometry and was compared with the approximate Fourier rebinning algorithm FORE and with another exact rebinning algorithm, FOREX. Results with simulated data demonstrate a significant improvement in accuracy compared to FORE, while the reconstruction time is doubled. Compared to FOREX, the FORE-J algorithm is slightly less accurate but more than three times faster.

  17. PETALO, a new concept for a Positron Emission TOF Apparatus based on Liquid xenOn

    CERN Document Server

    Benlloch-Rodriguez, J M

    2016-01-01

    This master thesis presents a new type of Positron Emission TOF Apparatus using Liquid xenOn (PETALO). The detector is based in the Liquid Xenon Scintillating Cell (LXSC). The cell is a box filled with liquid xenon (LXe) whose transverse dimensions are chosen to optimize packing and with a thickness optimized to contain a large fraction of the incoming photons. The entry and exit faces of the box (relative to the incoming gammas direction) are instrumented with large silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), coated with a wavelength shifter, tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB). The non-instrumented faces are covered by reflecting Teflon coated with TPB. In this thesis we show that the LXSC can display an energy resolution of 5% FWHM, much better than that of conventional solid scintillators such as LSO/LYSO. The LXSC can measure the interaction point of the incoming photon with a resolution in the three coordinates of 1 mm. The very fast scintillation time of LXe (2 ns) and the availability of suitable sensors and electronic...

  18. Positron emission tomography / computerized tomography evaluation of primary Hodgkin's disease of liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, V S; Purandare, N C; Gujral, S; Shah, S; Nair, R; Rangarajan, V

    2009-01-01

    Occurrence of primary Hodgkin's lymphoma (PHL) of the liver is extremely rare. We report on a case of a 60-year-old male who presented with liver mass and B-symptomatology. Hepatoma or hepatic metastasis from a gastrointestinal primary was initially suspected. Tumor markers like AFP, CEA, Total PSA, and CA-19.9 were within normal limits. Positron Emission Tomography / Computerized Tomography (PET/CT) revealed a large hepatic lesion and a nodal mass in the porta hepatis. A liver biopsy was consistent with Hodgkin's lymphoma. There was complete regression of the hepatic lesion and evidence of shrinkage of the nodal mass following four cycles of chemotherapy. 18F Fluro -de-oxy Glucose (FDG) PET / CT in this case helped in establishing a primary hepatic lymphoma by demonstrating the absence of pathologically hypermetabolic foci in any other nodes or organs. PET / CT scan is a useful adjunct to conventional imaging and histopathology, not only to establish the initial diagnosis, but also to monitor treatment response in PHL.

  19. Mycosis fungoides: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography in staging and monitoring the effect of therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 58-year-old woman, diagnosed as a case of mycosis fungoides (MF), underwent [18F]-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) examination. The study revealed intense FDG uptake in a large ulceroproliferative right thigh lesion, indurated plaques in the chest wall and left thigh, along with multiple sites of cutaneous involvement, axillary and inguinal lymphadenopathy. The patient underwent chemotherapy with CHOP regimen, radiotherapy for the right thigh lesion, along with topical corticosteroids and emollients for the disseminated cutaneous involvement. Repeat [18F]-FDG PET/CT study performed a year later, showed near complete disease regression specifically of the ulceroproliferative lesion and indurated cutaneous plaques, no change in lymphadenopathy, and a subtle diffuse progression of the remaining cutaneous lesions. A multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis, staging and treatment of MF has long been suggested for optimizing outcomes from management of patients with this disease. This case highlights the potential role of incorporating PET/CT as a single modality imaging technique in the staging and assessment of response to therapy

  20. Application of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography in Diagnosis of Malignant Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-hong Ning; Qiu-li Meng; Yu-zhou Wang; Chun-mei Bai

    2009-01-01

    To testify the efficacy of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomo-graphy (PET) in the diagnosis of cancer.Methods A total of 170 patients with diagnosed cancer or suspicious cancer were enrolled in this study, and underwent 18F-FDG PET. The standard uptake value (SUV) and diameter for each abnormal region in PET images were analyzed. All data were analyzed by SPSS 11.5.Results PET scan identified a primary cancer in 45.8% (11/24) patients. The sensitivity and specificity of PET scan in differentiating malignant lesions from benign ones were 78.8% (52/66) and 77.1% (27/35) respectively. Twenty-nine out of 68 (42.6%) lesions were detected earlier by PET than by computed tomography. The SUV of primary cancer was significantly higher than that of metastatic lymph nodes (5.84±3.12 vs. 3.14±2.24, P<0.O01). And SUV of primary lung cancer was also significantly higher than that of metastatic lung cancer (6.30±3.01 vs. 2.86±2.37, P<0.01).Conclusion 18F-FDG PET plays a very important role in cancer diagnosis.

  1. Preliminary assessment of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in patients with bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of imaging of bladder cancer with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scanning. We studied 12 patients with histologically proven bladder cancer who had undergone surgical procedures and/or radiotherapy. Retrograde irrigation of the urinary bladder with 1000-3710 ml saline was performed during nine of the studies. Dynamic and static PET images were obtained, and standardized uptake value images were reconstructed. FDG-PET scanning was true-positive in eight patients (66.7%), but false-negative in four (33.3%). Of 20 organs with tumor mass lesions confirmed pathologically or clinically, 16 (80%) were detected by FDG-PET scanning. FDG-PET scanning detected all of 17 distant metastatic lesions and two of three proven regional lymph node metastases. FDG-PET was also capable of differentiating viable recurrent bladder cancer from radiation-induced alterations in two patients. In conclusion, these preliminary data indicate the feasibility of FDG-PET imaging in patients with bladder cancer, although a major remaining pitfall is intense FDG accumulation in the urine. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Dynamic study of methionine positron emission tomography in patients with glioblastoma with oligodendroglial components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Hirohito; Ohe, Naoyuki; Nakayama, Noriyuki; Nomura, Yu-Ichi; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Shinoda, Jun; Iwama, Toru

    2015-10-01

    Anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) with necrosis is classified as glioblastoma (GBM) with oligodendroglioma component (GBMO), according to the 2007 World Health Organization classification. The prognosis of GBMO remains controversial because definitive diagnostic criteria regarding the percentage of the oligodendroglial components (OC) in the GBM do not exist. We previously reported dynamic methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with these tumors. A significant decrease in the MET signal was seen in oligodendrocytic tumors, in contrast to a significant MET increase in GBMs. In this study, we analyzed the dynamic MET PET signal in four patients with primary (n = 2) and secondary (n = 2) GBMOs. Static PET scanning was performed in three consecutive phases. Both cases of primary GBMOs and one case of secondary GBMO presented with a gradual decrease in MET PET signal over the consecutive phases. In contrast, the remaining case of secondary GBMO presented with a pattern of slight increase. It is likely that the dynamic change of MET in patients with GBMO resemble those in patients with oligodendroglial tumor, however, further studies are needed to confirm them. We discuss the mechanisms from a viewpoint of pathological findings.

  3. Effect of Harderian adenectomy on the statistical analyses of mouse brain imaging using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minsoo; Woo, Sang-Keun; Yu, Jung Woo; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Eom, Kidong; Nahm, Sang-Soep

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) as a radioactive tracer is a useful technique for in vivo brain imaging. However, the anatomical and physiological features of the Harderian gland limit the use of FDG-PET imaging in the mouse brain. The gland shows strong FDG uptake, which in turn results in distorted PET images of the frontal brain region. The purpose of this study was to determine if a simple surgical procedure to remove the Harderian gland prior to PET imaging of mouse brains could reduce or eliminate FDG uptake. Measurement of FDG uptake in unilaterally adenectomized mice showed that the radioactive signal emitted from the intact Harderian gland distorts frontal brain region images. Spatial parametric measurement analysis demonstrated that the presence of the Harderian gland could prevent accurate assessment of brain PET imaging. Bilateral Harderian adenectomy efficiently eliminated unwanted radioactive signal spillover into the frontal brain region beginning on postoperative Day 10. Harderian adenectomy did not cause any post-operative complications during the experimental period. These findings demonstrate the benefits of performing a Harderian adenectomy prior to PET imaging of mouse brains.

  4. Incidental finding of a left over guide wire on a positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Seldinger technique is commonly used cannulate vessels for radiographical procedures. Loss of a guide wire into the circulation is a rare and preventable complication. It is often noticed by chance during routine radiographs. However, there is a lack of reported cases of incidental fin dings of leftover guide wire on a PET scan. An intravascular foreign body should be retrieved as soon as the diagnosis is made, to prevent complications such as embolisation or vascular damage by fractured wires. Interventional radiology is the method of choice for retrieval. We report a rare case of the coincidental finding of a lost guide wire on a PET scan. A 37 year old man presented with psychotic episodes, thigh weakness, weight gain, increased appetite and leg cramps. He was subsequently diagnosed with cushing syndrome secondary to ectopic adrenocorticotropic secretion from a right lung tumour. He subsequently underwent a staging positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The lung tumour had no uptake on PET bit had increased activity uptake on octreotide scanning. These appearances were suggestive of with carcinoid tumour. The PET scan also revealed an incidental finding of a leftover guide wire used during peripheral inserted central catheter (PICC) recently. The wire extended from right atrium to inferior vena cava. It also showed a high uptake in the adrenal glands, indicating hyperplasia, which was most likely due to adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation. He underwent a percutaneous wire retrieval via the right femoral vein in a cardiac catheterisation laboratory and was transferred to a thoracic surgical unit for lung tumor resection

  5. Positron Emission Tomography (PET Quantification of GABAA Receptors in the Brain of Fragile X Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte D'Hulst

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, evidence has accumulated that the GABAA receptor is compromised in animal models for fragile X syndrome (FXS, a common hereditary form of intellectual disability. In mouse and fly models, agonists of the GABAA receptor were able to rescue specific consequences of the fragile X mutation. Here, we imaged and quantified GABAA receptors in vivo in brain of fragile X patients using Positron Emission Topography (PET and [11C]flumazenil, a known high-affinity and specific ligand for the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors. We measured regional GABAA receptor availability in 10 fragile X patients and 10 control subjects. We found a significant reduction of on average 10% in GABAA receptor binding potential throughout the brain in fragile X patients. In the thalamus, the brain region showing the largest difference, the GABAA receptor availability was even reduced with 17%. This is one of the first reports of a PET study of human fragile X brain and directly demonstrates that the GABAA receptor availability is reduced in fragile X patients. The study reinforces previous hypotheses that the GABAA receptor is a potential target for rational pharmacological treatment of fragile X syndrome.

  6. Novel electro-optical coupling technique for magnetic resonance-compatible positron emission tomography detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcott, Peter D; Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible positron emission tomography (PET) detector design is being developed that uses electro-optical coupling to bring the amplitude and arrival time information of high-speed PET detector scintillation pulses out of an MRI system. The electro-optical coupling technology consists of a magnetically insensitive photodetector output signal connected to a nonmagnetic vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diode that is coupled to a multimode optical fiber. This scheme essentially acts as an optical wire with no influence on the MRI system. To test the feasibility of this approach, a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a single pixel of a solid-state photomultiplier array was placed in coincidence with a lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube with both the new nonmagnetic VCSEL coupling and the standard coaxial cable signal transmission scheme. No significant change was observed in 511 keV photopeak energy resolution and coincidence time resolution. This electro-optical coupling technology enables an MRI-compatible PET block detector to have a reduced electromagnetic footprint compared with the signal transmission schemes deployed in the current MRI/PET designs. PMID:19397853

  7. Kinetic analysis of [11C]vorozole binding in the human brain with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jean; Kim, Sung Won; Pareto, Deborah; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Fowler, Joanna S; Biegon, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Using positron emission tomography, we investigated the kinetics of [11C]vorozole ([11C]VOR), a radiotracer for the enzyme aromatase that catalyzes the last step in estrogen biosynthesis. Six subjects were scanned under baseline conditions followed by retest 2 weeks later. The retest was followed by a blocking study with 2.5 mg of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. The binding potential (BP(A)ND) was estimated from a Lassen plot using the total tissue distribution volume (VT) for baseline and blocked. for the thalamus was found to be 15 times higher than that for the cerebellum. From the letrozole studies, we found that [11C]VOR exhibits a slow binding compartment (small k4) that has a nonspecific and a blockable component. Because of the sensitivity of VT to variations in k4, a common value was used for the four highest binding regions. We also considered the tissue uptake to plasma ratio for 60 to 90 minutes as an outcome measure. Using the ratio method, the difference between the highest and lowest was 2.4 compared to 3.5 for the VT. The ratio method underestimates the high regions but is less variable and may be more suitable for patient studies. Because of its kinetics and distribution, this tracer is not a candidate for a bolus infusion or reference tissue methods.

  8. Positron emission mammography with tomographic acquisition using dual planar detectors: initial evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark F Smith; Raymond R Raylman; Stan Majewski; Andrew G Weisenberger

    2004-05-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) with tomographic acquisition using dual planar detectors rotating about the breast can obtain complete angular sampling and has the potential to improve activity estimation compared with PEM using stationary detectors. PEM tomography (PEMT) was compared with stationary PEM for point source and compressed breast phantom studies performed with a compact dual detector system. The acquisition geometries were appropriate for the target application of PEM guidance of stereotactic core biopsy. Images were reconstructed with a three-dimensional iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm. PEMT eliminated blurring normal to the detectors seen with stationary PEM. Depth of interaction effects distorted the shape of the point spread functions for PEMT as the angular range from normal incidence of lines of response used in image reconstruction increased. Streak artifacts in PEMT for large detector rotation increments led to the development of an expression for the maximum rotation increment that maintains complete angular sampling. Studies with a compressed breast phantom were used to investigate contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) trade-offs for different sized spherical tumor models. PEMT and PEM both had advantages depending on lesion size and detector separation. The most appropriate acquisition method for specific detection or quantitation tasks requires additional investigation.

  9. Photo-Detectors for Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (ToF-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig S. Levin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the most recent advances in photo-detector design employed in time of flight positron emission tomography (ToF-PET. PET is a molecular imaging modality that collects pairs of coincident (temporally correlated annihilation photons emitted from the patient body. The annihilation photon detector typically comprises a scintillation crystal coupled to a fast photo-detector. ToF information provides better localization of the annihilation event along the line formed by each detector pair, resulting in an overall improvement in signal to noise ratio (SNR of the reconstructed image. Apart from the demand for high luminosity and fast decay time of the scintillation crystal, proper design and selection of the photo-detector and methods for arrival time pick-off are a prerequisite for achieving excellent time resolution required for ToF-PET. We review the two types of photo-detectors used in ToF-PET: photomultiplier tubes (PMTs and silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs with a special focus on SiPMs.

  10. Optimisation of time resolution in Positron Emission Tomography dedicated to dose control in hadron-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadron-therapy is a tumor treatment technique based on irradiation by ions beams. The dose distribution can be controlled during the treatment by Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Indeed, the nuclear collisions between the incident ions and the target medium produce β+ emitters, whose spatial distribution is correlated to the dose distribution. However, this application of PET suffers from a low β+ activity, a high parasitic activity, and requires fast reconstruction. The Time-Of-Flight technique appears as a key factor to make the in beam PET technique feasible. This work starts from a front-end concept based on fast digital sampling of the detector signals and digital processing for energy and time extraction. The statistical limitations to time resolution determined by the scintillation process are first examined. An experimental set-up with two scintillation detectors in coincidence is then used to test various algorithms: digital discriminators (leading-edge, constant fraction), and filters (least squares, optimal filter, low-pass interpolating filter). The timing performances of all the algorithms are very similar, except the least squares filter, which is not adapted to the non-stationary noise conditions resulting from the scintillation process. Various scintillator materials and configurations are tested, confirming the importance of light yield, scintillation time constants and photodetector response. An avalanche photodiode detector is tested and used for a multichannel demonstrator, which will be used for in-beam tests. (author)

  11. Redistribution of whole-body energy metabolism by exercise. A positron emission tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our aim was to evaluate changes in glucose metabolism of skeletal muscles and viscera induced by different workloads using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) and three-dimensional positron emission tomography (3-D PET). Five male volunteers performed ergometer bicycle exercise for 40 min at 40% and 70% of the maximal O2 consumption (VO2max). [18]FDG was injected 10 min later following the exercise task. Whole-body 3-D PET was performed. Five other male volunteers were studied as a control to compare with the exercise group. The PET image data were analyzed using manually defined regions of interest to quantify the regional metabolic rate of glucose (rMRGlc). Group comparisons were made using analysis of variance, and significant differences (P18F]FDG-PET can be used as an index of organ energy metabolism for moderate exercise workloads (70% VO2max). The results of this investigation may contribute to sports medicine and rehabilitation science. (author)

  12. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an essential role in the clinical management of patients. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and ....../CT imaging of prostate cancer. Among these, choline (labeled with (18)F or (11)C), (11)C-acetate, and (18)F-fluoride have demonstrated promising results, and other new radiopharmaceuticals are currently under evaluation in preclinical and clinical studies.......Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an essential role in the clinical management of patients. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional......, and molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI...

  13. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it. PMID:27618106

  14. Re-Evaluation of Clinical Dementia Diagnoses with Pittsburgh Compound B Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Degerman Gunnarsson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There is an overlap regarding Pittsburgh compound B (PIB retention in patients clinically diagnosed as Alzheimer's disease (AD and non-AD dementia. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether there are any differences between PIB-positive and PIB-negative patients in a mixed cohort of patients with neurodegenerative dementia of mild severity regarding neuropsychological test performance and regional cerebral glucose metabolism measured with [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG positron emission tomography (PET. Methods: Eighteen patients clinically diagnosed as probable AD or frontotemporal dementia were examined with PIB PET, FDG PET and neuropsychological tests and followed for 5-9 years in a clinical setting. Results: The PIB-positive patients (7 out of 18 had slower psychomotor speed and more impaired visual episodic memory than the PIB-negative patients; otherwise performance did not differ between the groups. The initial clinical diagnoses were changed in one third of the patients (6 out of 18 during follow-up. Conclusions: The subtle differences in neuropsychological performance, the overlap of hypometabolic patterns and clinical features between AD and non-AD dementia highlight the need for amyloid biomarkers and a readiness to re-evaluate the initial diagnosis.

  15. Neural correlates of sensorimotor gating: A metabolic positron emission tomography study in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathrin eRohleder

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Impaired sensorimotor gating occurs in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and can be measured using the prepulse inhibition (PPI paradigm of the acoustic startle response. This assay is frequently used to validate animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders and to explore the therapeutic potential of new drugs. The underlying neural network of PPI has been extensively studied with invasive methods and genetic modifications. However, its relevance for healthy untreated animals and the functional interplay between startle- and PPI-related areas during a PPI session is so far unknown. Therefore, we studied awake rats in a PPI paradigm, startle control and background noise control, combined with behavioral [18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET. Subtractive analyses between conditions were used to identify brain regions involved in startle and PPI processing in well-hearing Black hooded rats. For correlative analysis with regard to the amount of PPI we also included hearing-impaired Lister hooded rats that startled more often, because their hearing threshold was just below the lowest prepulses. Metabolic imaging showed that the brain areas proposed for startle and PPI mediation are active during PPI paradigms in healthy untreated rats. More importantly, we show for the first time that the whole PPI modulation network is active during passive PPI sessions, where no selective attention to prepulse or startle stimulus is required. We conclude that this reflects ongoing monitoring of stimulus significance and constant adjustment of sensorimotor gating.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography Reveals Abnormal Topological Organization in Functional Brain Network in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu eXiangzhe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated alterations in the topological organization of structural brain networks in diabetes mellitus (DM. However, the DM-related changes in the topological properties in functional brain networks are almost unexplored so far. We therefore used fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET data to construct functional brain networks of 73 DM patients and 91 sex- and age-matched normal controls (NCs, followed by a graph theoretical analysis. We found that both DM patients and NCs had a small-world topology in functional brain network. In comparison to the NC group, the DM group was found to have significantly lower small-world index, lower normalized clustering coefficients and higher normalized shortest path length. Moreover, for diabetic patients, the nodal centrality was significantly reduced in the right rectus, the right cuneus, the left middle occipital gyrus, and the left postcentral gyrus, and it was significantly increased in the orbitofrontal region of the left middle frontal gyrus, the left olfactory region, and the right paracentral lobule. Our results demonstrated that the diabetic brain was associated with disrupted topological organization in the functional PET network, thus providing the functional evidence for the abnormalities of brain networks in DM.

  17. Fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in lymphoma: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F-18 fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has emerged as a powerful imaging modality in the field of oncology. F-18 FDG PET/CT is now an established tool in the management of lymphoma. This has been shown to be useful in staging, detection of bone marrow involvement (BMI), early response assessment and end of therapy response assessment in lymphoma. Interpretation of F-18 FDG PET/CT in lymphoma is carried out by various qualitative response assessment criteria. London criteria are used for interpretation of interim PET/CT and International Harmonization Project (IHP) criteria are used to interpret PET/CT done after the end of chemotherapy. Quantitative analysis is also found to be useful in assessment of response early after two cycles of chemotherapy in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This pictorial essay provides few images describing the FDG avidity of lymphoma, patterns of bone marrow uptake and their relevance in predicting BMI, role of staging PET/CT, quantitative analysis in response assessment, example images of response according to London criteria and IHP criteria. Few pitfalls in imaging of lymphoma with PET/CT are also discussed in the images legend. (author)

  18. Cerebral hypometabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy studied with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, N.L.; Gilman, S.; Berent, S.; Morin, E.M.; Brown, M.B.; Koeppe, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is characterized by supranuclear palsy of gaze, axial dystonia, bradykinesia, rigidity, and a progressive dementia. Pathological changes in this disorder are generally restricted to subcortical structures, yet the type and range of cognitive deficits suggest the involvement of many cerebral regions. We examined the extent of functional impairment to cerebral cortical and subcortical structures as measured by the level of glucose metabolic activity at rest. Fourteen patients with PSP were compared to 21 normal volunteers of similar age using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography. Glucose metabolism was reduced in the caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, pons, and cerebral cortex, but not in the cerebellum in the patients with PSP as compared to the normal subjects. Analysis of individual brain regions revealed significant declines in cerebral glucose utilization in most regions throughout the cerebral cortex, particularly those in the superior half of the frontal lobe. Declines in the most affected regions of cerebral cortex were greater than those in any single subcortical structure. Although using conventional neuropathological techniques the cerebral cortex appears to be unaffected in PSP, significant and pervasive functional impairments in both cortical and subcortical structures are present. These observations help to account for the constellation of cognitive symptoms in individual patients with PSP and the difficulty encountered in identifying a characteristic psychometric profile for this group of patients.

  19. Radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography investigations of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naagren, Kjell [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET and Cyclotron Unit, Odense C (Denmark); Halldin, Christer [Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Stockholm (Sweden); Rinne, Juha O. [Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland)

    2010-08-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common degenerative neurological disease that is an increasing medical, economical, and social problem. There is evidence that a long ''asymptomatic'' phase of the disease exists where functional changes in the brain are present, but structural imaging for instance with magnetic resonance imaging remains normal. Positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the tools by which it is possible to explore changes in cerebral blood flow and metabolism and the functioning of different neurotransmitter systems. More recently, investigation of protein aggregations such as amyloid deposits or neurofibrillary tangles containing tau-protein has become possible. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on various {sup 18}F- and {sup 11}C-labelled PET tracers that could be used to study the pathophysiology of AD, to be used in the early or differential diagnosis or to be used in development of treatment and in monitoring of treatment effects. (orig.)

  20. Positron emission tomography/computer tomography in guidance of extrahepatic hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common primary cancers in the world. Surgery is the gold standard for treatment of patients with HCC. Recurrence and metastasis are the major obstacles to further improve the prognosis of HCC. Most recurrences are intrahepatic. However, 30% of the recurrences are extrahepatic. The role of resection in intrahepatic recurrences is widely accepted. The role of resection in extrahepatic HCC recurrence and metastasis is not well established. 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computer tomography (PET/CT) is useful in detecting distant metastasis from a variety of malignancies and shows superior accuracy to conventional imaging modalities in identification of intrahepatic and extrahepatic metastasis. We present one patient with one new isolated omental lymph node metastasis, who had a history of huge HCC resected six years ago. The metastatic focus was identified with 18 F-FDG PET/CT and resected. The follow-up revealed good prognosis with a long-term survival potential after resection of the omental lymphatic metastasis.

  1. Use of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Radiation Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezban Berberoğlu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy (RT plays an important role in the treatment of lung cancer. Accurate diagnosis and staging are crucial in the delivery of RT with curative intent. Target miss can be prevented by accurate determination of tumor contours during RT planning. Currently, tumor contours are determined manually by computed tomography (CT during RT planning. This method leads to differences in delineation of tumor volume between users. Given the change in RT tools and methods due to rapidly developing technology, it is now more significant to accurately delineate the tumor tissue. F18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (F18 FDG PET/CT has been established as an accurate method in correctly staging and detecting tumor dissemination in lung cancer. Since it provides both anatomic and biologic information, F18 FDG PET decreases interuser variability in tumor delineation. For instance, tumor volumes may be decreased as atelectasis and malignant tissue can be more accurately differentiated, as well as better evaluation of benign and malignant lymph nodes given the difference in FDG uptake. Using F18 FDG PET/CT, the radiation dose can be escalated without serious adverse effects in lung cancer. In this study, we evaluated the contribution of F18 FDG PET/CT for RT planning in lung cancer.

  2. Optimized separation procedure for production of no-carrier-added radiomanganese for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, Martin; Spahn, Ingo; Coenen, Heinz H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Medizin (INM), Nuklearchemie (INM-5)

    2015-07-01

    The {sup nat}Cr(p,xn)-process is a very efficient route for production of {sup 52g}Mn(T{sub 1/2} = 5.59 d). Based on measurements of distribution coefficients with different media and ion-exchange resins, an optimized chromatographic separation of radiomanganese from {sup nat}Cr with the resin Amberlite CG400 was developed. With this system {sup nat}Cr is eluted first with an acetic acid/methanol 1:1 mixture at room temperature and {sup 52g}Mn thereafter with 3 M HCl at 50 C. Within a separation time of 4 h the method yielded 99.5% of the n.c.a. {sup 52g}Mn in 2-3 mL of 3 M HCl. An ICP-MS analysis revealed a chromium impurity of 0.07 mg (0.014%) in the n.c.a. {sup 52g}Mn solution, making this separation method suitable for the production of {sup 52g}Mn for medical applications like positron emission tomography (PET).

  3. Preparation of a potential positron emission tomographic radioligand for the dopamine transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NNC 12-0722 (1-[2-(bis(4-fluorophenyl)-methoxy)ethyl]-4-methyl piperazine) is a new selective inhibitor of the dopamine transporter. [11C]NNC 12-0722 was prepared by N-methylation of the desmethyl compound with [11C]methyl iodide. The total radiochemical yield of [11C]NNC 12-0722 was 40%-50% with an overall synthesis time of 30-35 min. The radiochemical purity was higher than 99% and the specific radioactivity about 1500 Ci/mmol (55 GBq/μmol). Autoradiographic examination of [11C]NNC 12-0722 binding on whole hemisphere cryosections from human brain post mortem demonstrated specific binding in the caudate nucleus and putamen. In a positron emission tomographic examination of [11C]NNC 12-0722 in a cynomolgus monkey there was a rapid uptake of radioactivity in the brain. In the striatum, a region with a high density of dopamine transporters, the radioactivity was two times higher than in the cerebellum. These results indicate that [11C]NNC 12-0722 may be a useful radioligand for labelling of the dopamine transporter in man. (orig.)

  4. [(18F]Fluoroethyltyrosine- positron emission tomography-guided radiotherapy for high-grade glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratib Osman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare morphological gross tumor volumes (GTVs, defined as pre- and postoperative gadolinium enhancement on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to biological tumor volumes (BTVs, defined by the uptake of 18F fluoroethyltyrosine (FET for the radiotherapy planning of high-grade glioma, using a dedicated positron emission tomography (PET-CT scanner equipped with three triangulation lasers for patient positioning. Methods Nineteen patients with malignant glioma were included into a prospective protocol using FET PET-CT for radiotherapy planning. To be eligible, patients had to present with residual disease after surgery. Planning was performed using the clinical target volume (CTV = GTV ∪ BTV and planning target volume (PTV = CTV + 20 mm. First, the interrater reliability for BTV delineation was assessed among three observers. Second, the BTV and GTV were quantified and compared. Finally, the geometrical relationships between GTV and BTV were assessed. Results Interrater agreement for BTV delineation was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.9. Although, BTVs and GTVs were not significantly different (p = 0.9, CTVs (mean 57.8 ± 30.4 cm3 were significantly larger than BTVs (mean 42.1 ± 24.4 cm3; p 3; p Conclusion Using FET, the interrater reliability had excellent agreement for BTV delineation. With FET PET-CT planning, the size and geometrical location of GTVs and BTVs differed in a majority of patients.

  5. Attenuation correction with region growing method used in the positron emission mammography imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiao-Yue; Li, Lin; Yin, Peng-Fei; Yun, Ming-Kai; Chai, Pei; Huang, Xian-Chao; Sun, Xiao-Li; Wei, Long

    2015-10-01

    The Positron Emission Mammography imaging system (PEMi) provides a novel nuclear diagnosis method dedicated for breast imaging. With a better resolution than whole body PET, PEMi can detect millimeter-sized breast tumors. To address the requirement of semi-quantitative analysis with a radiotracer concentration map of the breast, a new attenuation correction method based on a three-dimensional seeded region growing image segmentation (3DSRG-AC) method has been developed. The method gives a 3D connected region as the segmentation result instead of image slices. The continuity property of the segmentation result makes this new method free of activity variation of breast tissues. The threshold value chosen is the key process for the segmentation method. The first valley in the grey level histogram of the reconstruction image is set as the lower threshold, which works well in clinical application. Results show that attenuation correction for PEMi improves the image quality and the quantitative accuracy of radioactivity distribution determination. Attenuation correction also improves the probability of detecting small and early breast tumors. Supported by Knowledge Innovation Project of The Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-EW-N06)

  6. Iterative reconstruction using a Monte Carlo based system transfer matrix for dedicated breast positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Krishnendu; Straus, Kenneth J; Chen, Yu; Glick, Stephen J

    2014-08-28

    To maximize sensitivity, it is desirable that ring Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems dedicated for imaging the breast have a small bore. Unfortunately, due to parallax error this causes substantial degradation in spatial resolution for objects near the periphery of the breast. In this work, a framework for computing and incorporating an accurate system matrix into iterative reconstruction is presented in an effort to reduce spatial resolution degradation towards the periphery of the breast. The GATE Monte Carlo Simulation software was utilized to accurately model the system matrix for a breast PET system. A strategy for increasing the count statistics in the system matrix computation and for reducing the system element storage space was used by calculating only a subset of matrix elements and then estimating the rest of the elements by using the geometric symmetry of the cylindrical scanner. To implement this strategy, polar voxel basis functions were used to represent the object, resulting in a block-circulant system matrix. Simulation studies using a breast PET scanner model with ring geometry demonstrated improved contrast at 45% reduced noise level and 1.5 to 3 times resolution performance improvement when compared to MLEM reconstruction using a simple line-integral model. The GATE based system matrix reconstruction technique promises to improve resolution and noise performance and reduce image distortion at FOV periphery compared to line-integral based system matrix reconstruction.

  7. Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography fusion imaging: An emerging gold standard in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET has emerged as an important diagnostic tool in the management of lung cancers. Although PET is sensitive in detection of lung cancer, but FDG (2-deoxy-2- 18 fluro-D-glucose is not tumor specific and may accumulate in a variety of nonmalignant conditions occasionally giving false positive result. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity foremost, but also sensitivity in tumor imaging. Thus, PET/CT fusion images are a more accurate test than either of its individual components and are probably also better than side-by-side viewing of images from both modalities. PET/CT fusion images are useful in differentiating between malignant and benign disease, fibrosis and recurrence, staging and in changing patient management to more appropriate therapy. With analysis and discussion it appears that PET/ CT fusion images have the potential to dramatically improve our ability to manage the patients with lung cancer and is contributing to our understanding of cancer cell biology and in development of new therapies.

  8. Evaluation of Glucose Uptake in Normal and Cancer Cell Lines by Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, Francesca; Lettini, Giacomo; Gallicchio, Rosj; Sisinni, Lorenza; Simeon, Vittorio; Nardelli, Anna; Venetucci, Angela Assunta; Storto, Giovanni; Landriscina, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    To date, there is no definitive demonstration of the utility of positron emission tomography (PET) in studying glucose metabolism in cultured cell lines. Thus, this study was designed to compare PET to more standardized methods for the quantitative assessment of glucose uptake in nontransformed and transformed living cells and to validate PET for metabolic studies in vitro. Human colon and breast carcinoma cell lines and mouse embryo fibroblasts were evaluated for [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) uptake by PET and autoradiography and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) incorporation by colorimetric assay and analyzed for the radiotoxic effects of [(18)F]FDG and the expression levels of glucose transporters. Indeed, [(18)F]FDG incorporation on PET was comparable to [(18)F]FDG uptake by autoradiography and 2-DG incorporation by colorimetric assay, although radiotracer-based methods exhibited more pronounced differences between individual cell lines. As expected, these data correlated with glucose transporters 1 to 4 and hexokinase II expression in tumor cell lines and mouse fibroblasts. Notably, [(18)F]FDG incorporation resulted in low apoptotic rates, with fibroblasts being slightly more sensitive to radiotracer-induced cell death. The quantitative analysis of [(18)F]FDG uptake in living cells by PET represents a valuable and reproducible method to study tumor cell metabolism in vitro, being representative of the differences in the molecular profile of normal and tumor cell lines.

  9. Regional myocardial perfusion assessed by N-13 labeled ammonia and positron emission computerized axial tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of 13NH3 as an indicator of regional myocardial perfusion suitable for positron emission computerized axial tomography (PCT) has been suggested. However, the relationship between myocardial blood flow and uptake of 13NH3 has not been examined quantitatively. It was therefore the purpose of the current investigation to quantitate the relationship of myocardial 13NH3 tissue concentration to myocardial blood flow and to examine its suitability for PCT imaging. Twelve open chest dogs were studied. In 8 of the dogs 25 imaging procedures with 13NH3 and PCT were performed. In the remaining four dogs the relationship between flow and myocardial 13NH3 tissue concentration was assessed by in vitro techniques. The PCT technique provided high quality cross-sectional images of the distribution of 13NH3 in left ventricular myocardium. No significant redistribution of 13NH3 in myocardium occurred with time. Alterations in regional myocardial blood flow resulted in changes of the regional distribution of 13NH3 that were readily appreciated on the PCT images

  10. Instrumentation and Methodology for Correction of Photon Scatter Effects in Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Paul Jeffrey

    Corrections for the effects of photon scatter in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are presented. Novel solid state electronics developed by the manufacturer, CTI, Inc. Knoxville, TN to provide greater flexibility in characterizing position and energy of detected photons are tested and their measurements characterized. Methods to exploit improved flexibility are developed. The instrument known as the CTI-713 Animal Tomograph is first characterized and shown to provide superior performance for animal PET studies. Special features resulting from a new digital front end processing system were tested: (1) Dual energy window acquisition provides data which can be used to estimate and remove unwanted scattered coincidences from 2D and 3D measurements. Characterization of dual energy parameters is tedious and implementation of the technique awkward. Results are similar in accuracy and precision to methods of scatter correction not requiring a second energy window. (2) Software methods are also developed to modify front end processing of detected photons to account for effects of inter-detector scatter. Modified position and energy characterization algorithms are implemented and tested to compensate for non-uniform sensitivity across the array of detector elements which results from variations in scatter, light collection, and photocathode sensitivity. Improvements in resolution and sensitivity are demonstrated while improvements in sensitivity uniformity provide gains in noise performance in reconstructed images.

  11. Study of regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose with positron emission computed tomography in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using positron emission computed tomography with F-18 fluoro-D-deoxyglucose, regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglc) was measured in 8 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 3 healthy volunteers. A decreased rCMRglc was observed in the widespread cortex and basal ganglia of the cerebrum, but not observed in white matter, thalamus, and cerebellum. There was no bilateral difference. rCMRglc was the lowest in the parietal lobe, followed by the temporal lobe and the curvature of the frontal lobe. A decrease in rCMRglu was relatively mild in the inner part of the frontal lobe, primary sensory and motor area of the cerebral cortex, and cerebral basilar ganglia. Alzheimer's disease proved to be characterized by severe glucose metabolic disorder in the association area of the bilateral cerebral cortices. The degree of metabolic disorder was correlated with the degree of dementia in the outer part of the left frontal lobe and the curvature of the cerebral cortex. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Detection of amyloid in Alzheimer's disease with positron emission tomography using [11C]AZD2184

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands for detection of Aβ amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not ideal for quantification. To improve the signal to noise ratio we have developed the radioligand [11C]AZD2184 and report here the first clinical evaluation. Eight AD patients and four younger control subjects underwent 93-min PET measurements with [11C]AZD2184. A ratio approach using the cerebellum as reference region was applied to determine binding parameters. Brain uptake of [11C]AZD2184 peaked within 1 min at 3-4% of injected radioactivity. AD patients had high radioactivity in cortical regions while controls had uniformly low radioactivity uptake. Specific binding peaked within 30 min at which time standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR) ranged between 1.19 and 2.57. [11C]AZD2184 is a promising radioligand for detailed mapping of Aβ amyloid depositions in Alzheimer's disease, due to low non-specific binding, high signal to background ratio and reversible binding as evident from early peak equilibrium. (orig.)

  13. Cerebral hypometabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy studied with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is characterized by supranuclear palsy of gaze, axial dystonia, bradykinesia, rigidity, and a progressive dementia. Pathological changes in this disorder are generally restricted to subcortical structures, yet the type and range of cognitive deficits suggest the involvement of many cerebral regions. We examined the extent of functional impairment to cerebral cortical and subcortical structures as measured by the level of glucose metabolic activity at rest. Fourteen patients with PSP were compared to 21 normal volunteers of similar age using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography. Glucose metabolism was reduced in the caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, pons, and cerebral cortex, but not in the cerebellum in the patients with PSP as compared to the normal subjects. Analysis of individual brain regions revealed significant declines in cerebral glucose utilization in most regions throughout the cerebral cortex, particularly those in the superior half of the frontal lobe. Declines in the most affected regions of cerebral cortex were greater than those in any single subcortical structure. Although using conventional neuropathological techniques the cerebral cortex appears to be unaffected in PSP, significant and pervasive functional impairments in both cortical and subcortical structures are present. These observations help to account for the constellation of cognitive symptoms in individual patients with PSP and the difficulty encountered in identifying a characteristic psychometric profile for this group of patients

  14. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and its application in clinical diagnosis and functional brain organization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in positron emission tomography (PET) and other brain-imaging techniques have made it possible to visualize the working brain while the human subject is thinking, speaking or planning an action. PET provides researches with an opportunity to infer the neuroanatomy of a given function. Subjects either inhale or are injected with a radioactive material that binds to a physiologically active compound in the body. This serves as a tracer of blood flow and metabolic processes that reflect the activation of a given structure by emitting gamma rays which may be detected through a tomograph. PET research has produced findings that extend our knowledge on several important issues such as cerebral representation of language, perception, attention or memory. It has also proven to be an important source of information for clinical diagnosis of various neurological and psychiatric diseases. The present article provides a short review of main achievements in those fields. However, functional brain imaging is not exempt from methodological and theoretical difficulties. The main limitations of the method have been outlined. (author)

  15. Metabolizer in vivo of fullerenes and metallofullerenes by positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Yang, Wenjiang; Cui, Rongli; Wang, Dongliang; Chang, Yanan; Gu, Weihong; Yin, Wenyan; Bai, Xue; Chen, Kui; Xia, Lin; Geng, Huan; Xing, Gengmei

    2016-04-01

    Fullerenes (C60) and metallofullerenes (Gd@C82) have similar chemical structure, but the bio-effects of both fullerene-based materials are distinct in vivo. Tracking organic carbon-based materials such as C60 and Gd@C82 is difficult in vivo due to the high content of carbon element in the living tissues themselves. In this study, the biodistribution and metabolism of fullerenes (C60 and Gd@C82) radiolabeled with 64Cu were observed by positron emission tomography (PET). 64Cu-C60 and 64Cu-Gd@C82 were prepared using 1, 4, 7, 10-tetrakis (carbamoylmethyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetra-azacyclodo-decanes grafted on carbon cages as a chelator for 64Cu, and were obtained rapidly with high radiochemical yield (≥90%). The new radio-conjugates were evaluated in vivo in the normal mouse model and tissue distribution by small animal PET/CT imaging and histology was carried out. The PET imaging, the biodistribution and the excretion of C60 and Gd@C82 indicated that C60 samples have higher blood retention and lower renal clearance than the Gd@C82 samples in vivo and suggested that the differences in metabolism and distribution in vivo were caused by the structural differences of the groups on the fullerene cages though there is chemical similarity between C60 and Gd@C82.

  16. Detection of unknown primary head and neck tumors by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of using positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-labeled fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) to detect unknown primary tumors of cervical metastases. Thirteen patients with various histologic types of cervical metastases of unknown primary origin were studied. Patients received 185-370 MBq FDG intravenously and were scanned from 30 min after injection onward. Whole-body scans were made with a Siemens ECAT 951/31 PET camera. PET identified the primary tumor in four patients: plasmocytoma, squamous cell cacinoma of the oropharynx, squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, and bronchial carcinoma, respectively. All known metastatic tumor sites were visualized. PET did not identify a primary tumor in one patient in whom a squamous cell carcinoma at the base of the tongue was found in a latr phase. In the remaining eight patients, a primary lesion was never found. The follow up ranged from 18 to 30 months. A previously unknown primary tumor can be identified with FDG-PET in approximately 30% of patients with cervical metastases. PET can reveal useful information that results in more appropriate treatment, and it can be of value in guiding endoscopic biopsies for histologic diagnosis. (au)

  17. Myocardial uptake of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose in whole body positron emission tomography studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to correlate the degree of myocardial fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in routine oncology positron emission tomography (PET) studies with fasting blood sugar level (FBSL), fasting period (FP) and age of the patient. Ninety-one patients (62 males and 29 females, age range: 7-78 years) with malignant diseases were included in the study. Whole body FDF-PET study was carried out after 1 h of intravenous injection of 296-370 MBq (8-10 mCi) F-18 FDG. Images were interpreted visually and patients were classified into four grades of myocardial uptake: No myocardial uptake = Grade 0; mild uptake = Grade 1; moderate uptake = Grade 2; and Marked uptake = Grade 3. Quantitative analysis was done by calculating Standardized uptake value (SUV max). Age, FBSL and FP were recorded. The degree of myocardial FDG uptake did not show significant correlation with FBSL, FP or age of the patient. Perhaps the reason lies elsewhere like insulin levels, medical treatments, fat metabolism, and myocardium status or some unexplored factors

  18. Positron emission tomography imaging of tumor cell metabolism and application to therapy response monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarnath eChallapalli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells do reprogramme their energy metabolism to enable several functions such as generation of biomass including membrane biosynthesis, and overcoming bioenergetic and redox stress. In this article we review both established and evolving radioprobes developed in association with positron emission tomography (PET to detect tumor cell metabolism and effect of treatment. Measurement of enhanced tumor cell glycolysis using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose is well established in the clinic. Analogues of choline including [11C]-choline and various fluorinated derivatives are being tested in several cancer types clinically with PET. In addition to these, there is an evolving array of metabolic tracers for measuring intracellular transport of glutamine and other amino acids or for measuring glycogenesis, as well as probes used as surrogates for fatty acid synthesis or precursors for fatty acid oxidation. In addition to providing us with opportunities for examining the complex regulation of reprogrammed energy metabolism in living subjects, the PET methods open up opportunities for monitoring pharmacological activity of new therapies that directly or indirectly inhibit tumor cell metabolism.

  19. Low background high efficiency radiocesium detection system based on positron emission tomography technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    After the 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, radiocesium contamination in food became a serious concern in Japan. However, low background and high efficiency radiocesium detectors are expensive and huge, including semiconductor germanium detectors. To solve this problem, we developed a radiocesium detector by employing positron emission tomography (PET) technology. Because {sup 134}Cs emits two gamma photons (795 and 605 keV) within 5 ps, they can selectively be measured with coincidence. Such major environmental gamma photons as {sup 40}K (1.46 MeV) are single photon emitters and a coincidence measurement reduces the detection limit of radiocesium detectors. We arranged eight sets of Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO) scintillation detectors in double rings (four for each ring) and measured the coincidence between these detectors using PET data acquisition system. A 50 × 50 × 30 mm BGO was optically coupled to a 2 in. square photomultiplier tube (PMT). By measuring the coincidence, we eliminated most single gamma photons from the energy distribution and only detected those from {sup 134}Cs at an average efficiency of 12%. The minimum detectable concentration of the system for the 100 s acquisition time is less than half of the food monitor requirements in Japan (25 Bq/kg). These results show that the developed radiocesium detector based on PET technology is promising to detect low level radiocesium.

  20. Modelling Random Coincidences in Positron Emission Tomography by Using Singles and Prompts: A Comparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Random coincidences degrade the image in Positron Emission Tomography, PET. To compensate for their degradation effects, the rate of random coincidences should be estimated. Under certain circumstances, current estimation methods fail to provide accurate results. We propose a novel method, “Singles–Prompts” (SP), that includes the information conveyed by prompt coincidences and models the pile–up. The SP method has the same structure than the well-known “Singles Rate” (SR) approach. Hence, SP can straightforwardly replace SR. In this work, the SP method has been extensively assessed and compared to two conventional methods, SR and the delayed window (DW) method, in a preclinical PET scenario using Monte–Carlo simulations. SP offers accurate estimates for the randoms rates, while SR and DW tend to overestimate the rates (∼10%, and 5%, respectively). With pile-up, the SP method is more robust than SR (but less than DW). At the image level, the contrast is overestimated in SR-corrected images, +16%, while SP produces the correct value. Spill–over is slightly reduced using SP instead of SR. The DW images values are similar to those of SP except for low-statistic scenarios, where DW behaves as if randoms were not compensated for. In particular, the contrast is reduced, −16%. In general, the better estimations of SP translate into better image quality. PMID:27603143

  1. Novel electro-optical coupling technique for magnetic resonance-compatible positron emission tomography detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcott, Peter D; Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible positron emission tomography (PET) detector design is being developed that uses electro-optical coupling to bring the amplitude and arrival time information of high-speed PET detector scintillation pulses out of an MRI system. The electro-optical coupling technology consists of a magnetically insensitive photodetector output signal connected to a nonmagnetic vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diode that is coupled to a multimode optical fiber. This scheme essentially acts as an optical wire with no influence on the MRI system. To test the feasibility of this approach, a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a single pixel of a solid-state photomultiplier array was placed in coincidence with a lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube with both the new nonmagnetic VCSEL coupling and the standard coaxial cable signal transmission scheme. No significant change was observed in 511 keV photopeak energy resolution and coincidence time resolution. This electro-optical coupling technology enables an MRI-compatible PET block detector to have a reduced electromagnetic footprint compared with the signal transmission schemes deployed in the current MRI/PET designs.

  2. Incidental finding of a left over guide wire on a positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Kok Hooi; Lee, Phong Teck; Buch, Mamta; Rammohan, Kandadai Seshadri

    2012-12-15

    The Seldinger technique is commonly used cannulate vessels for radiographical procedures. Loss of a guide wire into the circulation is a rare and preventable complication. It is often noticed by chance during routine radiographs. However, there is a lack of reported cases of incidental fin dings of leftover guide wire on a PET scan. An intravascular foreign body should be retrieved as soon as the diagnosis is made, to prevent complications such as embolisation or vascular damage by fractured wires. Interventional radiology is the method of choice for retrieval. We report a rare case of the coincidental finding of a lost guide wire on a PET scan. A 37 year old man presented with psychotic episodes, thigh weakness, weight gain, increased appetite and leg cramps. He was subsequently diagnosed with cushing syndrome secondary to ectopic adrenocorticotropic secretion from a right lung tumour. He subsequently underwent a staging positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The lung tumour had no uptake on PET bit had increased activity uptake on octreotide scanning. These appearances were suggestive of with carcinoid tumour. The PET scan also revealed an incidental finding of a leftover guide wire used during peripheral inserted central catheter (PICC) recently. The wire extended from right atrium to inferior vena cava. It also showed a high uptake in the adrenal glands, indicating hyperplasia, which was most likely due to adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation. He underwent a percutaneous wire retrieval via the right femoral vein in a cardiac catheterisation laboratory and was transferred to a thoracic surgical unit for lung tumor resection.

  3. The Use of Positron Emission Tomography in Soft Tissue Sarcoma Patients under Therapy with Trabectedin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlinde Egerer

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: We used 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG positron emission tomography (PET to evaluate the FDG uptake in patients with advanced and/or metastatic soft tissue sarcoma (STS undergoing therapy with Ecteinascidin-743 (ET-743, Trabectedin, YondelisTM. Patients and Methods: The pilot study included nine patients with metastatic STS receiving a minimum of one cycle of treatment with trabectedin. Patients were examined using PET prior to onset of therapy and after completion of one or three cycles of trabectedin. Restaging according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST was performed in parallel using computed tomography (CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and served for reference. Results: Clinical outcome of nine evaluable patients was as follows: one patient with partial remission (PR, three patients with stable disease (SD, and five patients with progressive disease (PD. A more than 40% decrease of the standardized uptake value (SUV of sequential PET examination could be demonstrated for the responding patient (PR, whereas patients with SD or PD showed a stable SUV, but no increase in SUV. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first small series of patients being treated with trabectedin and monitored using sequential PET imaging demonstrating SUV stabilization in nearly all monitored patients.

  4. New techniques for positron emission tomography in the study of human neurological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report represents a summary of our performance during the two year period following initial start-up of these research activities at Michigan. Productivity has been excellent; already over 47 papers and abstracts have been published or accepted for publication from this still young program. They represent significant contributions to extending the technology of positron emission tomography in the study of human neurological disorders. Our focus is to develop more cost effective and efficient means for producing new functionally specific tracers and simpler, less expensive, means for acquiring and interpreting quantitative data. These improved processes are required for the future growth of PET as a sophisticated research tool and for the transfer of this technology to clinical use. Our approach concentrates on two separate yet related areas, radiosynthesis and data analysis. In subproject 1, Drs. Jewett and Mulholland have introduced innovative methods for improving 11C and 18F synthetic processes. In Subproject 2, Dr. Hutchins has laid the foundations for an objective analysis of the limitations and opportunities for quantifying regional PET data. In Subproject 3, Dr. Koeppe has extended rapid techniques for parameter estimation in kinetic modeling of new ligands. Finally, in Subproject 4, Dr. Frey has applied kinetic analysis to ligand tracing of the cholinergic neurotransmitter system in animal and human brain. These DOE supported studies have direct impact on clinical research here and elsewhere which is expected to improve diagnosis and treatment of degenerative neurological diseases, mental illness and brain tumors. 47 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Positron Emission Tomography to Assess the Outcome of Intraportal Islet Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Olof; Selvaraju, Ramkumar; Eich, Torsten; Willny, Mariam; Brismar, Torkel B; Carlbom, Lina; Ahlström, Håkan; Tufvesson, Gunnar; Lundgren, Torbjörn; Korsgren, Olle

    2016-09-01

    No imaging methodology currently exists to monitor viable islet mass after clinical intraportal islet transplantation. We investigated the potential of the endocrine positron emission tomography (PET) marker [(11)C]5-hydroxytryptophan ([(11)C]5-HTP) for this purpose. In a preclinical proof-of-concept study, the ex vivo and in vivo [(11)C]5-HTP signal was compared with the number of islets transplanted in rats. In a clinical study, human subjects with an intraportal islet graft (n = 8) underwent two [(11)C]5-HTP PET and MRI examinations 8 months apart. The tracer concentration in the liver as a whole, or in defined hotspots, was correlated to measurements of islet graft function. In rat, hepatic uptake of [(11)C]5-HTP correlated with the number of transplanted islets. In human subjects, uptake in hepatic hotspots showed a correlation with metabolic assessments of islet function. Change in hotspot standardized uptake value (SUV) predicted loss of graft function in one subject, whereas hotspot SUV was unchanged in subjects with stable graft function. The endocrine marker [(11)C]5-HTP thus shows a correlation between hepatic uptake and transplanted islet function and promise as a tool for noninvasive detection of viable islets. The evaluation procedure described can be used as a benchmark for novel agents targeting intraportally transplanted islets. PMID:27325286

  6. Oxygen extraction fraction measurement using quantitative susceptibility mapping: Comparison with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Kohsuke; Liu, Tian; Murakami, Toshiyuki; Goodwin, Jonathan; Uwano, Ikuko; Yamashita, Fumio; Higuchi, Satomi; Wang, Yi; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ogawa, Akira; Sasaki, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    The purposes of this study are to establish oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) measurements using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to compare QSM-OEF data with the gold standard (15)O positron emission tomography (PET). Twenty-six patients with chronic unilateral internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion, and 15 normal subjects were included. MRI scans were conducted using a 3.0 Tesla scanner with a three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled sequence. QSM images were created using the morphology-enabled dipole inversion method, and OEF maps were generated from QSM images using extraction of venous susceptibility induced by deoxygenated hemoglobin. Significant correlation of relative OEF ratio to contra-lateral hemisphere between QSM-OEF and PET-OEF was observed (r = 0.62, p < 0.001). The local (intra-section) correlation was also significant (r = 0.52, p < 0.001) in patients with increased PET-OEF. The sensitivity and specificity of OEF increase in QSM was 0.63 (5/8) and 0.89 (16/18), respectively, in comparison with PET. In conclusion, good correlation was achieved between QSM-OEF and PET-OEF in the identification of elevated OEF in affected hemispheres of patients with unilateral chronic steno-occlusive disease. PMID:26661168

  7. The electronics system for the LBNL positron emission tomography (PEM) camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the electronics for a high performance Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) camera. It is based on the electronics for a human brain PET camera (the Siemens/CTI HRRT), modified to use a detector module that incorporates a photodiode (PD) array. An ASIC services the PD array, amplifying its signal and identifying the crystal of interaction. Another ASIC services the photomultiplier tube (PMT), measuring its output and providing a timing signal. Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and lookup RAMs are used to apply crystal by crystal correction factors and measure the energy deposit and the interaction depth (based on the PD/PMT ratio). Additional FPGAs provide event multiplexing, derandomization, coincidence detection, and real-time rebinning. Embedded PC/104 microprocessors provide communication, real-time control, and configure the system. Extensive use of FPGAs makes the overall design extremely flexible, allowing many different functions (or design modifications) to be realized without hardware changes. Incorporation of extensive onboard diagnostics, implemented in the FPGAs, is required by the very high level of integration and density achieved by this system

  8. Future imaging of atherosclerosis: molecular imaging of coronary atherosclerosis with (18)F positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Daniel J; Psaltis, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the formation of complex atheroma lesions (plaques) in arteries that pose risk by their flow-limiting nature and propensity for rupture and thrombotic occlusion. It develops in the context of disturbances to lipid metabolism and immune response, with inflammation underpinning all stages of plaque formation, progression and rupture. As the primary disease process responsible for myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease, atherosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality on a global scale. A precise understanding of its pathogenic mechanisms is therefore critically important. Integral to this is the role of vascular wall imaging. Over recent years, the rapidly evolving field of molecular imaging has begun to revolutionize our ability to image beyond just the anatomical substrate of vascular disease, and more dynamically assess its pathobiology. Nuclear imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) can target specific molecular and biological pathways involved in atherosclerosis, with the application of (18)Fluoride PET imaging being widely studied for its potential to identify plaques that are vulnerable or high risk. In this review, we discuss the emergence of (18)Fluoride PET as a promising modality for the assessment of coronary atherosclerosis, focusing on the strengths and limitations of the two main radionuclide tracers that have been investigated to date: 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) and sodium (18)F-fluoride ((18)F-NaF). PMID:27500093

  9. Assessment of myocardial metabolism by positron emission tomography; Stoffwechseluntersuchungen des Herzens mit der Positronenemissionstomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengel, F.M.; Schwaiger, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik

    1999-06-01

    In combination with a variety of tracers, positron emission tomography does provide noninvasive quantitative information not only about myocardial utilisation of substrates such as glucose or free fatty acids, but also about overall oxidative metabolism. PET studies of myocardial metabolism have substantially contributed to an improved understanding of regulatory mechanism as well as interaction between different substrates under normal conditions as well as under pathologic conditions such as ischemia, heart failure or diabetes mellitus, and will continue to do so in the future. (orig.) [German] Fuer die Positronenemissionstomographie stehen verschiedene Tracer zur Verfuegung, die am menschlichen Herzen nichtinvasive Quantifizierung der Utilisation von Substraten wie Glukose oder freien Fettsaeuren, aber auch des gesamten sauerstoffabhaengigen Metabolismus ermoeglichen. Stoffwechseluntersuchungen des Herzens mit der PET haben zu einem genaueren Verstaendnis von Regulationsmechanismen und Interaktionen zwischen verschiedenen Substraten sowohl im Normalzustand als auch unter pathologischen Bedingungen wie etwa bei ischaemischen Syndromen, Herzinsuffizienz oder Diabetis mellitus beigetragen. Insbesondere durch Untersuchungen von metabolischen Auswirkungen verschiedener Therapieansaetze bei Herzerkrankungen und zur Vorhersage der Effektivitaet solcher therapeutischer Strategien kann die PET auch in Zukunft einen Beitrag zur Weiterentwicklung der Kardiologie leisten. (orig.)

  10. New Glucocyclic RGD Dimers for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumor Integrin Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Woong; Park, Ji-Ae; Lee, Yong Jin; Shin, Un Chol; Kim, Suhng Wook; Kim, Byung Il; Lim, Sang Moo; An, Gwang Il; Kim, Jung Young; Lee, Kyo Chul

    2016-08-01

    Most studies of radiolabeled arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides have shown in vitro affinity for integrin ανβ3, allowing for the targeting of receptor-positive tumors in vivo. However, major differences have been found in the pharmacokinetic profiles of different radiolabeled RGD peptide analogs. The purposes of this study were to prepare (64)Cu-DOTA-gluco-E[c(RGDfK)]2 (R8), (64)Cu-NOTA-gluco-E[c(RGDfK)]2 (R9), and (64)Cu-NODAGA-gluco-E[c(RGDfK)]2 (R10) and compare their pharmacokinetics and tumor imaging properties using small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). All three compounds were produced with high specific activity within 10 minutes. The IC50 values were similar for all the substances, and their affinities were greater than that of c(RGDyK). R8, R9, and R10 were stable for 24 hours in human and mouse serums and showed high uptake in U87MG tumors with high tumor-to-blood ratios. Compared to the control, a cyclic RGD peptide dimer without glucosamine, R10, showed low uptake in the liver. Because of their good imaging qualities and improved pharmacokinetics, (64)Cu-labeled dimer RGD conjugates (R8, R9, and R10) may have potential applications as PET radiotracers. R9 (NOTA) with highly in vivo stability consequentially showed an improved PET tumor uptake than R8 (DOTA) or R10 (NODAGA). PMID:27403677

  11. Port site and distant metastases of gallbladder cancer after laparoscopic cholecystectomy diagnosed by positron emission tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Bin Hu; Xiao-Nan Sun; Jing Xu; Chao He

    2008-01-01

    We report port site and distant metastases of unsuspected gallbladder cancer after laparoscopic cholecystectomy diagnosed by positron emission tomography (PET) in two patients. Patient 1, a 72-year-old woman was diagnosed as cholelithiasis and cholecystitis and received laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Unsuspected gallbladder cancer was discovered with histological result of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the gallbladder infiltrating the entire wall. A PET scan using F-18-fluorodeoxygluccee (FDG-PET) before radical resed:ion revealed residual tumor in the gallbladder fossa and recurrence at port site and metastases in bilateral hilar lymph nodes. Patient 2, a 69-year-old woman underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy more than one year ago with pathologically confirmed unsuspected adenosquamous carcinoma of stage pTlb. At 7-mo follow-up after surgery, the patient presented with nodules in the periumbilical incision. Excisional biopsy of the nodule revealed adenosquamous carcinoma. The patient was examined by FDG-PET, demonstrating increased FDG uptake in the right lobe of the liver and mediastinal lymph nodes consistent with metastatic disease. This report is followed by a discussion about the utility of FDG-PET in the gallbladder cancer.

  12. Regional Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Novelty Seeking and Antisocial Personality: A Positron Emission Tomography Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Hyeon; Park, Hyun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Novelty seeking (NS) and antisocial personality (ASP) are commonly exhibited by those who suffer from addictions, such as substance abuse. NS has been suggested to be a fundamental aspect of ASP. To investigate the neurobiological substrate of NS and ASP, we tested the relationship between regional cerebral glucose metabolism and the level of NS, determining the differences between individuals with and without ASP. Seventy-two healthy adults (43 males, mean age±SD=38.8±16.6 years, range=20~70 years; 29 females, 44.2±20.1 years, range=19~72 years) underwent resting-state brain positron emission tomography (PET) 40 minutes after 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) injection. Within 10 days of the FDG PET study, participants completed Cloninger's 240-item Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) to determine NS scores. Participants with and without ASP were grouped according to their TCI profiles. Statistical parametric mapping analysis was performed using the FDG PET and TCI profile data. NS scores positively correlated with metabolism in the left anterior cingulate gyrus and the insula on both sides of the brain and negatively correlated with metabolism in the right pallidum and putamen. Participants with ASP showed differences in cerebral glucose metabolism across various cortical and subcortical regions, mainly in the frontal and prefrontal areas. These data demonstrate altered regional cerebral glucose metabolism in individuals with NS and ASP and inform our understanding of the neurobiological substrates of problematic behaviors and personality disorders. PMID:27574485

  13. A positron emission tomography study of self-paced finger movements at different frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow was measured in six right-handed volunteers using positron emission tomography during tasks involving repetitive self-paced finger tapping at five different frequencies. The contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex, the pre-supplementary motor area and the cingulate motor area showed significant activation during self-paced finger tapping tasks, compared with the resting state. A positive correlation between the regional cerebral blood flow and the movement frequency was found only in the primary sensorimotor cortex. In the pre-supplementary motor area and the cingulate motor area, however, activity increased when the subject employed movement frequencies faster or slower than his own pace. The same tendency was noted with respect to the relative variability of the inter-tapping interval.The results therefore indicate that the activity of the pre-supplementary motor area and the cingulate motor area may well be related to the increased difficulty in motor control rather than to the execution of the movement itself. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  14. Injectable silver nanosensors: in vivo dosimetry for external beam radiotherapy using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, A N; Rydhög, J S; Søndergaard, R V; Andresen, T L; Holm, S; Munck Af Rosenschöld, P; Conradsen, K; Jølck, R I

    2016-06-01

    Development of safe and efficient radiotherapy routines requires quantification of the delivered absorbed dose to the cancer tissue in individual patients. In vivo dosimetry can provide accurate information about the absorbed dose delivered during treatment. In the current study, a novel silver-nanosensor formulation based on poly(vinylpyrrolidinone)-coated silver nanoparticles formulated in a gelation matrix composed of sucrose acetate isobutyrate has been developed for use as an in vivo dosimeter for external beam radiotherapy. In situ photonuclear reactions trigger the formation of radioactive (106)Ag, which enables post treatment verification of the delivered dose using positron emission tomography imaging. The silver-nanosensor was investigated in a tissue equivalent thorax phantom using clinical settings and workflow for both standard fractionated radiotherapy (2 Gy) and stereotactic radiotherapy (10- and 22 Gy) in a high-energy beam setting (18 MV). The developed silver-nanosensor provided high radiopacity on the planning CT-scans sufficient for patient positioning in image-guided radiotherapy and provided dosimetric information about the absorbed dose with a 10% and 8% standard deviation for the stereotactic regimens, 10 and 22 Gy, respectively. PMID:27174233

  15. Evaluation and optimization of occupational eye lens dosimetry during positron emission tomography (PET) procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiu-Souto, Jacobo; Sánchez-García, Manuel; Vázquez-Vázquez, Rubén; Otero, Carlos; Luna, Victor; Mosquera, Javier; Busto, Ramón Lobato; Aguiar, Pablo; Ruibal, Álvaro; Pardo-Montero, Juan; Pombar-Cameán, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    The last recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for eye lens dose suggest an important reduction on the radiation limits associated with early and late tissue reactions. The aim of this work is to quantify and optimize the eye lens dose associated to nurse staff during positron emission tomography (PET) procedures. PET is one of the most important diagnostic methods of oncological and neurological cancer disease involving an important number of workers exposed to the high energy isotope F-18. We characterize the relevant stages as preparation and administration of monodose syringes in terms of occupational dose. A direct reading silicon dosimeter was used to measure the lens dose to staff. The highest dose of radiation was observed during preparation of the fluorodesoxyglucose (FDG) syringes. By optimizing a suitable vials' distribution of FDG we find an important reduction in occupational doses. Extrapolation of our data to other clinical scenarios indicates that, depending on the work load and/or syringes activity, safety limits of the dose might be exceeded.

  16. Cerebello-cerebral functional relationship in spinocerebellar degeneration using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshi, Yasuhiko; Kitamura, Shin; Sakayori, Osamu; Komaba, Yuichi; Terashi, Akiro [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    In order to investigate the laterality of cerebellar ataxia and its influence for the cerebral cortex in spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured using positron emission tomography (PET) in 10 patients with sporadic olivopontocerebellar atrophy (sOPCA), 7 patients with hereditary SCD (hSCD), and 10 age matched control subjects. The laterality of cerebellar ataxia was evaluated by the total score of the difference between left and right limbs of three limb-coordination tests. The lateralities of rCBF were calculated by asymmetry indices (AIs) of each region of interest in the cerebellum, thalamus, caudate, putamen, cerebral cortices. The laterality of cerebellar ataxia was significantly correlated with AI in the cerebellum in patients with sOPCA. Furthermore, significant negative correlations were observed between AI in the cerebellum and each AI in the thalamus, frontal cortex in patients with sOPCA. However, no correlations were observed between AI in the cerebellum and the other AIs in controls and patients with h SCD. Duration of illness in patients with sOPCA with laterality is shorter than that in patients without laterality. These results suggest that the existence of crossed cerebello-cerebral diaschisis (CCCD) resulting from transneuronal deactivation through cerebello-thalamo-cerebral pathway in patients with the early stage of sOPCA with laterality. (author).

  17. Eyeblink conditioning in unmedicated schizophrenia patients: a positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Krystal L; Andreasen, Nancy C; Liu, Dawei; Freeman, John H; O'Leary, Daniel S

    2013-12-30

    Previous studies suggest that patients with schizophrenia exhibit dysfunctions in a widely distributed circuit-the cortico-cerebellar-thalamic-cortical circuit, or CCTCC-and that this may explain the multiple cognitive deficits observed in the disorder. This study uses positron emission tomography (PET) with O(15) H₂O to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in response to a classic test of cerebellar function, the associative learning that occurs during eyeblink conditioning, in a sample of 20 unmedicated schizophrenia patients and 20 closely matched healthy controls. The PET paradigm examined three phases of acquisition and extinction (early, middle and late). The patients displayed impaired behavioral performance during both acquisition and extinction. The imaging data indicate that, compared to the control subjects, the patients displayed decreases in rCBF in all three components of the CCTCC during both acquisition and extinction. Specifically, patients had less rCBF in the middle and medial frontal lobes, anterior cerebellar lobules I/V and VI, as well as the thalamus during acquisition and although similar areas were found in the frontal lobe, ipsilateral cerebellar lobule IX showed consistently less activity in patients during extinction. Thus this study provides additional support for the hypothesis that patients with schizophrenia have a cognitive dysmetria--an inability to smoothly coordinate many different types of mental activity--that affects even a very basic cognitive task that taps into associative learning.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Biological imaging in radiation therapy: role of positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, Ursula; Weber, Wolfgang; Hentschel, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2009-01-01

    In radiation therapy (RT), staging, treatment planning, monitoring and evaluation of response are traditionally based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These radiological investigations have the significant advantage to show the anatomy with a high resolution, being also called anatomical imaging. In recent years, so called biological imaging methods which visualize metabolic pathways have been developed. These methods offer complementary imaging of various aspects of tumour biology. To date, the most prominent biological imaging system in use is positron emission tomography (PET), whose diagnostic properties have clinically been evaluated for years. The aim of this review is to discuss the valences and implications of PET in RT. We will focus our evaluation on the following topics: the role of biological imaging for tumour tissue detection/delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) and for the visualization of heterogeneous tumour biology. We will discuss the role of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET in lung and head and neck cancer and the impact of amino acids (AA)-PET in target volume delineation of brain gliomas. Furthermore, we summarize the data of the literature about tumour hypoxia and proliferation visualized by PET. We conclude that, regarding treatment planning in radiotherapy, PET offers advantages in terms of tumour delineation and the description of biological processes. However, to define the real impact of biological imaging on clinical outcome after radiotherapy, further experimental, clinical and cost/benefit analyses are required.

  19. Positron emission tomographic studies using C-11-glucose in normal aging and cerebrovascular dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven normal volunteers and 11 patients with cerebrovascular dementia were studied about the relations between effect of aging, severity of dementia, cerebral glucose metabolism and metabolic response to verbal stimuli by positron emission tomography (PET) using C-11-glucose. Regional distribution of glycogenic metabolites (RDGM: mg/100 g brain), which was a semi-quantitation of the pool of glycogenic metabolites mainly amino acids, were calculated. The RDGM values in elder normal subjects were significantly low compared with young normal subjects in frontal cortex (p < 0.05). The decline in frontal cortex metabolism could have been caused by the morphological changes in the course of aging. In temporal cortex, there was no significance between two groups. RDGM increased significantly respond to the verbal stimuli in frontal and temporal cortex both young and elder normal subjects. The RDGM values in vascular dementias were significantly low (p < 0.001) compared with elder normal subjects' in frontal and temporal cortex. Significant difference existed between mild and severe dementia in frontal cortex (p < 0.05). However, there was no significance between mild and severe dementias in temporal cortex. In mild dementias, RDGM increased significantly respond to the verbal stimuli in frontal and temporal cortex. In severe dementias, metabolic response to the verbal stimuli was less or lacking. Our results suggest that the cerebral metabolic functional reserve and the ability of the cerebral cortex to function respond to psychophysiologic stimulation are preserved in young and elder normal subjects and mild cerebrovascular dementias. (J.P.N.)

  20. Determination of cerebral metabolic patterns in dementia using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the introduction of the Kety-Schmidt method whole brain measurements of blood flow and metabolism were first applied to normal aged and demented patients. Chronically demented patients were consistently found to have marked reductions in cerebral blood flow, oxygen utilization, and glucose utilization when dementia was severe, and lesser reductions when it was mild. Others found that cerebral blood flow, oxygen utilization, and glucose utilization were decreased in parallel in late stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and multiple infarct dementia (MID). The intraarterial /sup 133/Xe method has been used to determine abnormalities in regional cerebral blood flow that correlate with cognitive deficits in patients with organic dementia, mostly Alzheimer's cases. Positron emission tomography (PET) and the /sup 18/F fluorodeoxyglycose (FDG) method have been applied to small numbers of demented patients with advanced AD. In general, decreases were found in global cerebral glucose utilization, but especially in temporal and parietal cortex. Others, using PET and the /sup 15/O/sub 2/ steady-state method, found a coupled decline in global cerebral blood flow and oxygen utilization that was correlated with increasing severity of dementia in both AD and MID, but there was no increase in oxygen extraction ratio, and therefore no evidence to support the existence of a chronic ischemic brain process. In this chapter, the author reviews some of the recent findings at UCLA using PET and the method in the study of normal aging and dementing disorders

  1. A behavioral and micro positron emission tomography imaging study in a rat model of hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Tang, Yi-Yuang; Feng, Hong-Bo; Cheng, Xiao-Xin

    2014-09-01

    Hypothyroidism leads to somatic, neuropsychological, and psychiatric changes that are similar to depression. The mechanisms underlying the behavioral abnormalities in adult onset hypothyroidism remain ambiguous. Hypothyroidism was induced in adult male Wistar rats by the maintenance of 0.05% propylthiouracil (PTU) in drinking water for 5 weeks (hypothyroid group; HP group); control rats (CON group) received an equivalent amount of water. The open field and sucrose preference tests were employed, and the link between behavioral changes and brain glucose metabolism was evaluated using micro positron emission tomography imaging. The open field test revealed slightly decreased locomotor activity and significantly reduced rearing and defecation in the hypothyroid group. Hypothyroid rats were also characterized by decreased body weight, sucrose preference, and relative sucrose intake compared to control rats. Hypothyroidism induced reduced brain glucose metabolism in the bilateral motor cortex, the caudate putamen, the cortex cingulate, the nucleus accumbens, and the frontal association cortex. A decreased sucrose preference was positively correlated with metabolic glucose changes in the caudate putamen and the nucleus accumbens. The results indicate that the activity pattern in adult onset hypothyroidism is different from the activity pattern when hypothyroidism is induced in the developmental period of the central nervous system. Decreased sucrose preference in hypothyroid rats may be attributed to anhedonia. Furthermore, these findings suggest there may be a common mechanism underlying adult onset hypothyroidism and depression.

  2. Patterns of brown fat uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has become the common imaging modality in oncological practice. FDG uptake is seen in brown adipose tissue in a significant number of patients. Recognizing the uptake patterns is important for optimal FDG PET interpretation. The introduction of PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) revolutionized PET imaging, bringing much-needed anatomical information. Careful review and correlation of FDG PET images with anatomical imaging should be performed to characterize accurately any lesion having high FDG uptake

  3. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism in late-life depression and Alzheimer disease: a preliminary positron emission tomography study.

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, A; Newberg, A; A. Alavi; Berlin, J; Smith, R.; Reivich, M

    1993-01-01

    Eight subjects with late-life depression, eight subjects with probable Alzheimer disease, and eight healthy age-matched controls were studied using 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography in the resting state with their eyes open and ears unoccluded. The depressed subjects showed widespread reductions in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in most major neocortical, subcortical, and paralimbic regions that were significantly different from control values (P <...

  4. The role of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computerized tomography in resolving therapeutic dilemmas in pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Seth, Rachna; Puri, Kriti; Singh, Prashant; Selvam, Panneer; Kumar, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a highly curable lymphoma with cure rates of over 80% and even higher with limited stage disease. Computerized tomography (CT) scan is currently the recommended modality in staging and assessment of response to therapy in patients with HL. However, CT has its limitations. This study describes our experience with patients of HL where fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)-CT scan helped decide further management, after completion of che...

  5. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of uterine leiomyosarcomas: 2 cases report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui-juan; ZHAN Feng-hua; LI Ya-jun; SUN Hao-ran; BAI Ren-ju; GAO Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Uterine leiomyosarcoma is an uncommon malignant neoplasm of smooth muscle origination and is associated with a poor prognosis. We report two cases of uterine leiomyosarcoma that presented with pulmonary metastases.2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) was performed to identify the primary carcinoma and found the focus located in the uterus. The follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the diagnosis was uterine leiomyosarcoma.

  6. Economic Evaluation of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC), CHERE Working Paper 2007/6

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Bird; Richard Norman; Stephen Goodall

    2007-01-01

    Background: There are several perceived benefits from introducing positron emission tomography (PET) scanning into the staging of non small lung cancer (NSCLC). However, its greatest primary benefit is the role it can potential perform in reducing the number of unnecessary diagnostic examinations and futile surgeries. Objectives: To evaluate the economic impact and cost effectiveness of PET scanning in the management of potentially operable NSCLC patients using a cost-utility model. Methods: ...

  7. Significance of incidental focal uptake in prostate on 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography CT images

    OpenAIRE

    Han, E J; H O, J; Choi, W H; Yoo, I R; Chung, S K

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of incidental focal prostate fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake, we reviewed 18-F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scans from 2003 to 2007 and selected cases with focal FDG uptake in prostate. Cases of known prostate cancer were excluded. The maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax), site (central or peripheral) and pattern (discrete or ill-defined) of FDG uptake, calcification (present or absent) and prostate volume (

  8. Characteristics of glucose metabolism and amyloid deposition by positron emission tomography images in Alzheimer’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪勇

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate positron emission tomography (PET) image characteristics of glucose metabolism and amyloid deposition as demonstrated by fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) .Methods Patients with mild AD and moderate AD (n=6,each) were included in this study.6 healthy subjects were selected as normal controls.Cognitive function was assessed by the minimental state examination,Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Clinical Dementia Rating.Ventricular dilation,cor-

  9. What have positron emission tomography and ‘Zippy’ told us about the neuropharmacology of drug addiction?

    OpenAIRE

    Cumming, Paul; Caprioli, Daniele; Dalley, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Translational molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and allied technologies offer unrivalled applications in the discovery of biomarkers and aetiological mechanisms relevant to human disease. Foremost among clinical PET findings during the past two decades of addiction research is the seminal discovery of reduced dopamine D2/3 receptor expression in the striatum of drug addicts, which could indicate a predisposing factor and/or compensatory reaction to the chronic abuse of...

  10. 11C-Methionine positron emission tomography-computed tomography in localization of methoxyisobutyl isonitrile negative ectopic parathyroid adenoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seniaray, Nikhil; Sharma, Harshul; Arbind, Arpana; Jaimini, Abhinav; D’souza, Maria; Saw, Sanjeev; Hazari, Puja Panwar; Mishra, A. K.; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is caused by parathyroid adenomas in 85% of the cases. Since parathyroid adenomas are known for their ectopic location, presurgical localization of the suspected site of adenoma is desirable. However, current imaging modalities are not always successful in localizing ectopic parathyroid adenomas. The aim of this case report is to show that 11C-methionine positron emission tomography could accurately localize ectopic parathyroid adenomas in patients in whom conventional imaging had failed or is inconclusive. PMID:26917896

  11. Kinetic Analysis of Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography Data using Open-Source Image Processing and Statistical Inference Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Hawe, David; Hernández Fernández, Francisco R.; O’Suilleabháin, Liam; Huang, Jian; Wolsztynski, Eric; O’Sullivan, Finbarr

    2012-01-01

    In dynamic mode, positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to track the evolution of injected radio-labelled molecules in living tissue. This is a powerful diagnostic imaging technique that provides a unique opportunity to probe the status of healthy and pathological tissue by examining how it processes substrates. The spatial aspect of PET is well established in the computational statistics literature. This article focuses on its temporal aspect. The interpretation of PET time-course da...

  12. Optimization of Quantitative Processing Data of Positron Emission Tomography with 18F-FDG in Patients with Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Granov A.M.; Tyutin L.А.; Tlostanova М.S.; Avetisyan А.О.; Ryzhkova D.V.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to increase efficiency of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-FDG in differential diagnostics of ung cancer and non-neoplastic diseases by means of quantitative processing data optimization. Materials and Methods. PET findings of 347 patients with focal or infiltrative changes in the lungs were studied. Quantitative processing of the findings included the measurement of scintigraphic size of the focus, SUV index calculations and SUV/size. Diagnostic...

  13. Noninvasive quantification of regional blood flow in the human heart using N-13 ammonia and dynamic positron emission tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of regional myocardial blood flow by conventional scintigraphic techniques is limited to the qualitative assessment of regional tracer distribution. Dynamic imaging with positron emission tomography allows the quantitative delineation of myocardial tracer kinetics and, hence, the measurement of physiologic processes such as myocardial blood flow. To test this hypothesis, positron emission tomographic imaging in combination with N-13 ammonia was performed at rest and after pharmacologically induced vasodilation in seven healthy volunteers. Myocardial and blood time-activity curves derived from regions of interest over the heart and ventricular chamber were fitted using a three compartment model for N-13 ammonia, yielding rate constants for tracer uptake and retention. Myocardial blood flow (K1) averaged 88 +/- 17 ml/min per 100 g at rest and increased to 417 +/- 112 ml/min per 100 g after dipyridamole infusion (0.56 mg/kg) and handgrip exercise. The coronary reserve averaged 4.8 +/- 1.3 and was not significantly different in the septal, anterior and lateral walls of the left ventricle. Blood flow values showed only a minor dependence on the correction for blood metabolites of N-13 ammonia. These data demonstrate that quantification of regional myocardial blood flow is feasible by dynamic positron emission tomographic imaging. The observed coronary flow reserve after dipyridamole is in close agreement with the results obtained by invasive techniques, indicating accurate flow estimates over a wide range. Thus, positron emission tomography may provide accurate and noninvasive definition of the functional significance of coronary artery disease and may allow the improved selection of patients for revascularization

  14. Diagnostic Value of Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in a Patient with Adrenal Involvement of Hodgkin Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Doğan Köse; Yavuz Köksal

    2016-01-01

    Improved success with the modern management of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) leaded new method searches to diminish treatment intensities in order to prevent late effects. Sensitivity and specificity of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is advanced in the determination of malign cell infiltrations in adrenal glands in patients with HL which is a rare finding. A 7.5 year old female patient that was investigated due to pubic hairs and breast development ...

  15. Splenic and lymph nodal involvement in sarcoidosis mimicking lymphoma on fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Rayamajhi Sampanna; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Maturu, Nagarjuna Venkata; Bal, Amanjit; Bhattacharya, Anish; Gupta, Dheeraj

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease presenting with well-defined, bilateral, symmetric hilar and right paratracheal lymph node enlargement. Recently, fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) has been used to stage and detect occult site of active inflammation in sarcoidosis. F-18 FDG PET/CT has become a cornerstone imaging modality in the modern lymphoma management, which can present with generalized lymphadenopathy including mediast...

  16. 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography – An Innovative Technique for the Diagnosis of a Canine Lameness

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Kelly; Hart, Juliette; Duerr, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) is widely known for its use in the diagnosis and tracking of primary and metastatic tumors via uptake and retention of the radiopharmaceutical by hypermetabolic cells. 18F-FDG is also used to study the normal physiology of glucose uptake, metabolism, and muscle activity during and after exercise. Background A pilot study adding PET imaging to the diagnostic evaluation of canine patients under...

  17. Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow with H215O positron emission tomography during Matas test - report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors carried out a Matas test with a regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) study using H215O positron emission tomography (PET) for three cases of large internal carotid artery aneurysms. There is a likely correlation between the cerebral blood flow (CBF) reduction rate obtained by PET, and the mean stump pressure available from a conventional balloon occlusion test. The advantages of this noninvasive and quantitative method are presented in comparison with other methods. (author)

  18. Arterial Stiffness Is Positively Associated With 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography-Assessed Subclinical Vascular Inflammation in People With Early Type 2 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Stefanie A; Hovinga-de Boer, Marieke C; Heerspink, Hiddo J L; Lefrandt, Joop D; van Roon, Arie M; Lutgers, Helen L; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Kamphuisen, Pieter W; Slart, Riemer H J A; Mulder, Douwe J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Type 2 diabetes is accompanied by premature atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. The underlying association remains incompletely understood. The possible relationship between subclinical arterial inflammation assessed by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/compu

  19. Highly metabolic thrombus of the portal vein: 18F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography demonstration and clinical significance in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Long; Guan, Yong-Song; Pan, Wei-Ming; Chen, Gui-Bing; Luo, Zuo-Ming; Wei, Ji-Hong; Wu, Hua

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the ability of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) to differentiate between benign and malignant portal vein thrombosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients.

  20. Quantification of myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging correlates significantly to rubidium-82 positron emission tomography in patients with severe coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas A; Hasbak, Philip; Larsson, Henrik B W;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Aim was to compare absolute myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution and rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (Rb-82 PET). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen patients with coronary artery stenosis underwent ...

  1. Traditional versus up-front [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography staging of non-small-cell lung cancer : A Dutch cooperative randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herder, GJM; Kramer, H; Hoekstra, OS; Smit, EF; Pruim, J; van Tinteren, H; Comans, EF; Verboom, P; Uyl-De Groot, CA; Welling, A; Paul, MA; Boers, M; Postmus, PE; Teule, GJ; Groen, HJM

    2006-01-01

    Purpose We investigated whether application of positron emission tomography (PET) immediately after first presentation might simplify staging while maintaining accuracy, as compared with traditional strategy in routine clinical setting. Methods At first presentation, patients with a provisional diag

  2. Positron emission tomography: Which indications, which benefits?; Tomographie par emission de positons (TEP): quelles indications, quels benefices?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassoux, F. [Ctr Hosp St Anne, Serv Neurochirurg, F-75014 Paris (France); Chassoux, F.; Chiron, C. [CEA, I2BM, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, F-91 Orsay (France); Chiron, C. [Hop Necker Enfants Malad, INSERM, U663, F-75015 Paris (France); Chassoux, F.; Chiron, C. [Univ Paris 06, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is currently used in the pre-surgical workup for drug-resistant partial epilepsies in addition to MRI. Inter-ictal metabolism is studied in clinical practice using {sup 18}fluoro-desoxy-glucose ({sup 18}FDG). In medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) associated with hippocampal sclerosis, hypo-metabolism ipsilateral to the epileptogenic focus is found in 70-90% of cases. However, hypo-metabolism is larger than the structural lesion observed on MRI and includes the epileptogenic zone and ictal discharge spread areas. Hypo-metabolism is related to surgical outcome and cognitive disturbances in MTLE. Although the usefulness of PET appears less well-established in extra-temporal lobe epilepsy and in children, its sensitivity may be improved by co-registration and superimposition of PET on MRI at any age. Focal hypo-metabolism can be easily detected by visual analysis, allowing detection of minor gyral abnormalities that may correspond to focal cortical dysplasias. Moreover, in cases of negative MRI, focal hypo-metabolism findings may help invasive monitoring planning and deep electrode placement for SEEG, and finally improve surgical outcome. (authors)

  3. Fundamental studies of myocardial defect size quantification using positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneyama, Tatsuya [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-04-01

    In Flurine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) acquisition, a transmission scan is usually performed before the PET tracer injection (cold transmission method), followed by a subsequent emission scan. However, this procedure is time consuming. An alternative approach, in which the transmission scan is performed after the emission scan (hot transmission method), would significantly reduce the time required for data acquisition. Recently, three-dimensional PET acquisition (3D PET) has become available. The counting sensitivity is much higher in 3D PET than in conventional two-dimensional PET (2D PET), resulting in a shorter acquisition time and reduced radiation exposure for the patient. On the other hand, {sup 18}F-FDG imaging using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), a more widely available method than PET, has emerged as an alternative to PET. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of measurement of myocardial defect sizes by these new techniques, using a chest phantom. Acquisitions were performed using an elliptical cylinder chest phantom. Plastic inserts, ranging in size from 2-60% of the myocardium (n=12), were used as simulated models of transmural myocardial infarction. Fluorine-18 was given into each part of the phantom. PET imaging with cold and hot transmission methods, 3D PET, and SPECT imaging were performed with different acquisition times and different radioisotope concentrations. All PET and SPECT data were analyzed using a semiquantitative polar map approach. Defect sizes were quantified using various cutoff thresholds, and were expressed as a percentage of the left ventricular myocardium. The PET and SPECT measurements were compared with the true defect sizes. Among the various cutoff levels tested, the mean absolute difference between the measured and true defect sizes was minimal at 50% of peak activity for both PET and SPECT. The PET measurements with the hot transmission

  4. Positron emission mammography in breast cancer presurgical planning: comparisons with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, Kathy; The, Juliette; Velasquez, Maria Victoria; Kahn, Simone; Saady, Matthew; Mahal, Ravinder; Chrystal, Larraine [Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Radiology Department, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Narayanan, Deepa [Naviscan, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kalinyak, Judith E. [Naviscan, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the performance characteristics of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission mammography (PEM) with breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a presurgical imaging and planning option for index and ipsilateral lesions in patients with newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven breast cancer. Two hundred and eight women >25 years of age (median age = 59.7 {+-} 14.1 years) with biopsy-proven primary breast cancer enrolled in this prospective, single-site study. MRI, PEM, and whole-body positron emission tomography (WBPET) were conducted on each patient within 7 business days. PEM and WBPET images were acquired on the same day after intravenous administration of 370 MBq of FDG (median = 432.9 MBq). PEM and MRI images were blindly evaluated, compared with final surgical histopathology, and the sensitivity determined. Substudy analysis compared the sensitivity of PEM versus MRI in patients with different menopausal status, breast density, and use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) as well as determination of performance characteristics for additional ipsilateral lesion detection. Two hundred and eight patients enrolled in the study of which 87% (182/208) were analyzable. Of these analyzable patients, 26.4% (48/182), 7.1% (13/182), and 64.2% (120/182) were pre-, peri-, and postmenopausal, respectively, and 48.4% (88/182) had extremely or heterogeneously dense breast tissue, while 33.5% (61/182) had a history of HRT use. Ninety-two percent (167/182) underwent core biopsy for index lesion diagnosis. Invasive cancer was found in 77.5% (141/182), while ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and/or Paget's disease were found in 22.5% (41/182) of patients. Both PEM and MRI had index lesion depiction sensitivity of 92.8% and both were significantly better than WBPET (67.9%, p < 0.001, McNemar's test). For index lesions, PEM and MRI had equivalent sensitivity of various tumors, categorized by tumor stage as well as similar invasive

  5. {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography in the early diagnosis of enterocolitis: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kresnik, E.; Gallowitsch, H.J.; Igerc, I.; Kumnig, G.; Gomez, I.; Lind, P. [Nuclear Medicine and Special Endocrinology, PET Centre, General Hospital, St. Veiterstrasse 47, 9020 Klagenfurt (Austria); Mikosch, P.; Alberer, D.; Hebenstreit, A. [Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, General Hospital, Klagenfurt (Austria); Wuertz, F. [Department of Pathology, General Hospital, Klagenfurt (Austria); Kogler, D.; Gasser, J. [Department of Radiology, General Hospital, Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2002-10-01

    Collagenous and eosinophilic colitis are rare diseases characterised by chronic watery diarrhoea. Radiographic evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract and colonoscopy are usually non-diagnostic since as many as one-third of patients will have minor abnormalities. To date a few investigators have reported increased fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with acute enterocolitis, but there have been no reports on the use of {sup 18}F-FDG PET for the diagnosis of collagenous or eosinophilic colitis in an early clinical stage. The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in the early diagnosis of patients with colitis. We investigated five women (mean age 61.2{+-}12.1 years) who had been diagnosed as having colitis in an early clinical stage. In all but one of the patients, the diagnosis of colitis was based on biopsy. Magnetic resonance colonography, ultrasonography and colonoscopy were performed in all but one of the patients. Two women were identified as having collagenous colitis in an early clinical stage. Another two patients had eosinophilic colitis. The morphological imaging methods, magnetic resonance colonography and ultrasonography, yielded no suspicious findings, and the results of colonoscopy similarly showed no abnormalities. One patient had colitis due to bacterial infection. In all patients {sup 18}F-FDG PET showed a pathological increase in tracer uptake in the large bowel, suggestive of colitis. In four of the five patients, colitis was confirmed by histology, and in one, by bacterial analysis. {sup 18}F-FDG PET was able to detect colitis in an early clinical stage, when morphological imaging methods and colonoscopy were non-diagnostic. The early performance of {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging in patients with possible colitis is encouraging. (orig.)

  6. Positron emission tomography (PET) study of patients with pituitary adenoma using labeled amino acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineura, Katsuyoshi; Sasajima, Toshio; Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Kowada, Masayoshi (Akita Univ. (Japan). Hospital); Shishido, Fumio; Uemura, Kazuo

    1989-12-01

    Four cases with pituitary adenomas were studied using {sup 11}C-L-methionine (C-11 Met) positron-emission tomography (PET). The C-11 Met was intravenously administered at a dose of 0.6 mCi/kg. The uptake of the tracer for tumors was calculated on the PET images 45 min after the injection; the uptake index was represented as a percentage of the total count in the arterial blood over a period of 45 min. In all cases, the C-11 Met accumulated intensely in the tumor regions; the PET images clearly delineated the extent of the tumor. The C-11 Met uptake index for pituitary adenomas varied widely from 3.94 x 10{sup -2}% to 15.36 x 10{sup -2}%, with a mean of 7.87 x 10{sup -2}%. These indices for the tumors increased markedly in comparison with that of the contralateral left temporal gray matter as a nontumor region (1.89 x 10{sup -2}% to 2.43 x 10{sup -2}% with a mean of 2.06 x 10{sup -2}%). In a case of prolactinoma, repeated PET following bromocriptine treatment showed a decrease in the C-11 Met uptake index; this decrease reflected changes in the serum prolactin value. In another case with ACTH-producing adenoma, the T/NT (tumor/nontumor) ratio fell from 3.44 to 2.40; however, the C-11 Met index remained unchanged. C-11 Met PET images facilitate determining the extent of pituitary adenomas and the monitoring of tumor response to treatment. Further application may give useful knowledge on the amino-acid metabolism of the tumor. (author).

  7. Digital contrast enhancement of 18Fluorine-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography images in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Sharma, Punit; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The role of 18fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) is limited for detection of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to low contrast to the tumor, and normal hepatocytes (background). The aim of the present study was to improve the contrast between the tumor and background by standardizing the input parameters of a digital contrast enhancement technique. Materials and Methods: A transverse slice of PET image was adjusted for the best possible contrast, and saved in JPEG 2000 format. We processed this image with a contrast enhancement technique using 847 possible combinations of input parameters (threshold “m” and slope “e”). The input parameters which resulted in an image having a high value of 2nd order entropy, and edge content, and low value of absolute mean brightness error, and saturation evaluation metrics, were considered as standardized input parameters. The same process was repeated for total nine PET-computed tomography studies, thus analyzing 7623 images. Results: The selected digital contrast enhancement technique increased the contrast between the HCC tumor and background. In seven out of nine images, the standardized input parameters “m” had values between 150 and 160, and for other two images values were 138 and 175, respectively. The value of slope “e” was 4 in 4 images, 3 in 3 images and 1 in 2 images. It was found that it is important to optimize the input parameters for the best possible contrast for each image; a particular value was not sufficient for all the HCC images. Conclusion: The use of above digital contrast enhancement technique improves the tumor to background ratio in PET images of HCC and appears to be useful. Further clinical validation of this finding is warranted. PMID:26917889

  8. Positron emission tomography 2008 in Germany. Results of the query and current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The working group on positron emission tomography (PET) of the DGN (German Society of Nuclear Medicine) initiated this first survey to collect and analyse information on the practise of PET in Germany in the year 2008. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to PET performing facilities (medical practices, hospitals, university hospitals and others) for retrospective data acquisition. Details regarding the equipment and examination procedures were examined as well as indications and number of studies. In addition, the role of PET within the diagnostic process was evaluated. Results: Responses from 65 sites were analysed. Their technical equipment consisted of 77 PET scanners (40 of them were combined PET/CT devices). About 63 500 PET studies had been performed with 86% in the field of oncology, 8% in neurology and 3% in cardiology. The radiotracers were labelled with 18F in 91% of the studies, whereas 68Ga was used in 4% and 11C in 3%. The analyses revealed lung tumours as the most investigated tumour entity, followed by malignant lymphoma, tumours of the gastro-intestinal tract and prostate cancer (about 14 000, 6000, 5000 and 2000). Corresponding to the new scanners and software procedures, the number of studies with attenuation correction by CT was high (68%) and nearly all studies were reconstructed iteratively (99%). The PET images were analysed quantitatively in the majority of cases (91%). The clinical reports, which included image documentation for the greater part, were posted regularly within 3 days. However, in 70% of the sites electronic transfer possibilities were used additionally to speed up the diagnostic process. The high standard of quality was demonstrated by the fact, that 40 facilities were engaged in a tumour board. Further on, one third of the physicians had gained a PET certification awarded by the DGN. Conclusion: Relative to the high general standard of diagnostic instrumentation in Germany, PET is less established, in particular when

  9. Diagnostic value for extrahepatic metastases of hepatocellular carcinoma in positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Eun Lee; Jae Young Jang; Soung Won Jeong; Sae Hwan Lee; Sang Gyune Kim; Sang-Woo Cha; Young Seok Kim

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluated the value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scan in diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and extrahepatic metastases.METHODS:A total of 138 patients with HCC who had both conventional imaging modalities and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan done between November 2006 and March 2011 were enrolled.Diagnostic value of each imaging modality for detection of extrahepatic metastases was evaluated.Clinical factors and tumor characteristics including PET imaging were analyzed as indicative factors for metastases by univariate and multivariate methods.RESULTS:The accuracy of chest CT was significantly superior compared with the accuracy of PET imaging for detecting lung metastases.The detection rate of metastatic pulmonary nodule ≥ 1 cm was 12/13(92.3%),when < 1 cm was 2/10 (20%) in PET imaging.The accuracy of PET imaging was significantly superior compared with the accuracy of bone scan for detecting bone metastases.In multivariate analysis,increased tumor size (≥ 5 cm) (P =0.042) and increased average standardized uptake value (SUV)uptake (P =0.028) were predictive factors for extrahepatic metastases.Isometabolic HCC in PET imaging was inversely correlated in multivariate analysis (P =0.035).According to the receiver operating characteristic curve,the optimal cutoff of average SUV to predict extrahepatic metastases was 3.4.CONCLUSION:18F-FDG PET/CT scan is invaluable for detection of lung metastases larger than 1 cm and bone metastases.Primary HCC having larger than 5 cm and increased average SUV uptake more than 3.4should be considered for extrahepatic metastases.

  10. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in infectious bone diseases: results of histologically confirmed cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical use of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in acute and chronic osteomyelitis and inflammatory spondylitis. The study population comprised 21 patients suspected of having acute or chronic osteomyelitis or inflammatory spondylitis. Fifteen of these patients subsequently underwent surgery. FDG-PET results were correlated with histopathological findings. The remaining six patients, who underwent conservative therapy, were excluded from any further evaluation due to the lack of histopathological data. The histopathological findings revealed osteomyelitis or inflammatory spondylitis in all 15 patients: seven patients had acute osteomyelitis and eight patients had chronic osteomyelitis or inflammatory spondylitis. FDG-PET yielded 15 true-positive results. The tracer uptake correlated with the histopathological findings in each case. Bone scintigraphy performed in 11 patients yielded ten true-positive results and one false-negative result. Follow-up carried out on two patients revealed normal or clearly reduced tracer uptake, which correlated with a normalisation of clinical data. In early postoperative follow-up it was impossible to differentiate between postsurgical reactive changes and further infection using FDG-PET. It is concluded that acute and chronic osteomyelitis of the peripheral as well as the central skeleton can be detected using FDG-PET. Osteomyelitis can be differentiated from soft tissue infection surrounding the bone. Unlike computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, FDG-PET is not affected by metal implants used for fixing fractures. FDG-PET demonstrated promising initial results with respect to treatment monitoring. Nevertheless, in the early postoperative phase FDG-PET seems to be of limited value owing to unspecific tracer uptake. (orig.)

  11. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in infectious bone diseases: results of histologically confirmed cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaelicke, T. [Dept. of Surgery, University of Bochum (Germany); Schmitz, A.; Schmitt, O. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, University of Bonn (Germany); Risse, J.H.; Biersack, H.J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, University of Bonn (Germany); Arens, S.; Hansis, M. [Dept. of Trauma Surgery, University of Bonn (Germany); Keller, E. [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Gruenwald, F. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical use of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in acute and chronic osteomyelitis and inflammatory spondylitis. The study population comprised 21 patients suspected of having acute or chronic osteomyelitis or inflammatory spondylitis. Fifteen of these patients subsequently underwent surgery. FDG-PET results were correlated with histopathological findings. The remaining six patients, who underwent conservative therapy, were excluded from any further evaluation due to the lack of histopathological data. The histopathological findings revealed osteomyelitis or inflammatory spondylitis in all 15 patients: seven patients had acute osteomyelitis and eight patients had chronic osteomyelitis or inflammatory spondylitis. FDG-PET yielded 15 true-positive results. The tracer uptake correlated with the histopathological findings in each case. Bone scintigraphy performed in 11 patients yielded ten true-positive results and one false-negative result. Follow-up carried out on two patients revealed normal or clearly reduced tracer uptake, which correlated with a normalisation of clinical data. In early postoperative follow-up it was impossible to differentiate between postsurgical reactive changes and further infection using FDG-PET. It is concluded that acute and chronic osteomyelitis of the peripheral as well as the central skeleton can be detected using FDG-PET. Osteomyelitis can be differentiated from soft tissue infection surrounding the bone. Unlike computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, FDG-PET is not affected by metal implants used for fixing fractures. FDG-PET demonstrated promising initial results with respect to treatment monitoring. Nevertheless, in the early postoperative phase FDG-PET seems to be of limited value owing to unspecific tracer uptake. (orig.)

  12. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake on positron emission tomography in mucinous adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Shuji, E-mail: murakamis@kcch.jp [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Kanagawa Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Saito, Haruhiro; Karino, Fumi; Kondo, Tetsuro; Oshita, Fumihiro; Ito, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Haruhiko [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Kanagawa Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Yokose, Tomoyuki [Department of Pathology, Kanagawa Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Yamada, Kouzo [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Kanagawa Cancer Center Hospital (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Background: The prognostic value of maximum standardized uptake value (maxSUV) on {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is known for localized pulmonary adenocarcinoma, which is most commonly non-mucinous adenocarcinoma. We examined the validity of thin-section computed tomography (TS-CT) and FDG-PET findings in mucinous adenocarcinoma. Materials and Methods: TS-CT and FDG-PET were performed on 25 patients with mucinous lung adenocarcinoma that was subsequently resected between January 2009 and March 2013. Based on the percentage reduction of maximum tumor diameter on the mediastinal window image compared with the diameter on the lung window image on TS-CT, tumors were classified as air-type (≥50%) or solid-type (<50%). All resected specimens were pathologically diagnosed according to the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) classification, and the diameter of the pathological invasive area was assessed. Results: Most mucinous adenocarcinomas were located in the lower lobe. All except two were classified as solid-type tumor on TS-CT. Multiple regression analysis revealed the correlation of maxSUV with pathological tumor size and diameter of pathological invasive area; these two parameters showed no significant correlation with each other (r = 0.354, p = 0.083). maxSUV was significantly lower for tumors with invasive area ≤5 mm than for tumors with invasive area >5 mm (1.62 vs. 3.77, p = 0.01), but no statistically significant difference was found in terms of other pathological invasive findings such as the presence of lymphatic or vascular invasion, pleural involvement, or predominant histological subtype. Conclusions: Most mucinous adenocarcinomas had appearances of solid-type tumor on TS-CT. maxSUV on FDG-PET indicates the pathological invasive area in mucinous adenocarcinoma as well as non-mucinous adenocarcinoma.

  13. Imaging of peritoneal catheter tunnel infection using positron-emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pooja; Wiggins, Brenda; Sun, Yijuan; Servilla, Karen S; Last, Reuben E; Hartshorne, Michael F; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2010-01-01

    Imaging by ultrasonography or scintigraphy may assist in the diagnosis and management of tunnel infections of the peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter. Here, we report a case of tunnel infection in which imaging with positron-emission tomography (PET) correctly predicted failure of conservative management. A 61-year-old man with diabetic nephropathy commenced PD in January 2008. He developed erythema and drainage at the exit site, with negative cultures in February 2008, and frank exit-site infection (ESI) with purulent drainage growing methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus [MSSA (treated with 3 weeks of oral dicloxacillin)] in August 2008. Subsequently, MSSA-growing purulent drainage from the exit site persisted. Systemic antibiotics were not administered, but there was gradual improvement with gentamicin ointment alone. In November 2008, the patient developed partial extrusion of the outer cuff of the PD catheter. In January 2009, a new ESI developed. Despite a week of treatment with cefazolin and gentamicin, the patient still developed his first episode of peritonitis with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. He then received intraperitoneal vancomycin with good response. Although the ESI appeared to have responded to the treatment, PET imaging showed increased fludeoxyglucose (FDG) activity in the whole abdominal wall portion of the PD catheter. The patient resisted removal of the catheter and had no further signs of infection until June 2009. At that time he presented with exuberant inflammatory tissue ("proud flesh") at the exit site. Repeated PET imaging again showed increased FDG activity along the abdominal wall portion of the catheter. The PD catheter was removed and found to be infected. The patient was placed on temporary hemodialysis. This case demonstrates that PET imaging, in addition to other imaging techniques, may be useful for diagnosing and managing PD catheter infections. PMID:21348389

  14. Utility of positron emission tomography for tumour surveillance in children with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moharir, Mahendranath [Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Neurology, Ontario (Canada); London, Kevin [Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney (Australia); Howman-Giles, Robert [University of Sydney, Discipline of Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Sydney (Australia); North, Kathryn [Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Institute for Neuroscience and Muscle Research, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2010-07-15

    There is little consensus regarding optimal surveillance of optic pathway glioma (OPG) and plexiform neurofibroma (PNF) in childhood neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). {sup 18}F-2-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is employed in the surveillance of adult PNFs; but its utility has neither been specifically studied in children with PNFs nor in children with OPG. Review of PET/CT studies was performed in NF1 children with OPG or PNF. FDG-avidity of tumours was semi-quantitatively analysed and graded by calculating the maximum standardised uptake value (SUV{sub max}) [grade 1: <3 (low), grade 2: >3-<4 (intermediate), grade 3: >4 (intense)]. Eighteen children (ten girls; median age: 8.5-years) had PET/CT. Nineteen OPGs were imaged. The SUV{sub max} could be measured in 16. Ten were grade 1 and three each were grade 2 and grade 3. FDG-avidity reduced from grade 3 to grade 1 in two symptomatic OPGs following chemotherapy and this was associated with clinical improvement. PET/CT diagnosed symptomatic OPGs with a sensitivity of 0.625 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.259-0.897] and specificity of 0.875 (95% CI: 0.466-0.993). Sixteen PNFs were imaged. Twelve were grade 1 and two each were grade 2 and grade 3. The two grade 3 PNFs were confirmed malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours. PET/CT diagnosed malignant transformation with a sensitivity of 1.0 (95% CI: 0.197-1.0) and specificity of 0.857 (95% CI: 0.561-0.974). PET/CT may contribute useful information to the surveillance of OPG in childhood NF1 - particularly to identify progressive, symptomatic tumours. As in adults, PET/CT is useful for the detection of malignant transformation in PNFs in children with NF1. (orig.)

  15. Development of an angled Si-PM-based detector unit for positron emission mammography (PEM) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Kouhei; Yamamoto, Seiichi

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) systems have higher sensitivity than clinical whole body PET systems because they have a smaller ring diameter. However, the spatial resolution of PEM systems is not high enough to detect early stage breast cancer. To solve this problem, we developed a silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) based detector unit for the development of a PEM system. Since a Si-PM's channel is small, Si-PM can resolve small scintillator pixels to improve the spatial resolution. Also Si-PM based detectors have inherently high timing resolution and are able to reduce the random coincidence events by reducing the time window. We used 1.5×1.9×15 mm LGSO scintillation pixels and arranged them in an 8×24 matrix to form scintillator blocks. Four scintillator blocks were optically coupled to Si-PM arrays with an angled light guide to form a detector unit. Since the light guide has angles of 5.625°, we can arrange 64 scintillator blocks in a nearly circular shape (a regular 64-sided polygon) using 16 detector units. We clearly resolved the pixels of the scintillator blocks in a 2-dimensional position histogram where the averages of the peak-to-valley ratios (P/Vs) were 3.7±0.3 and 5.7±0.8 in the transverse and axial directions, respectively. The average energy resolution was 14.2±2.1% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). By including the temperature dependent gain control electronics, the photo-peak channel shifts were controlled within ±1.5% with the temperature from 23 °C to 28 °C. With these results, in addition to the potential high timing performance of Si-PM based detectors, our developed detector unit is promising for the development of a high-resolution PEM system.

  16. Occupational Exposure to Veterinary Workers from the Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Agent 64Cu-ATSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetrick, Lucas D; Kraft, Susan L; Johnson, Thomas E

    2015-11-01

    Cu-ATSM is an emerging radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic use in positron emission tomography (PET), but to date there are no studies that assess the potential occupational doses to workers in either human or veterinary medicine. This study was aimed at determining the external radiation dose to veterinary workers from clinical PET/CT (PET combined with computed tomography) procedures using Cu-ATSM. To determine the dose to the workers, each worker was assigned two Electronic Personal Dosimeters (EPDs) to be worn on the chest and waist during the entirety of each procedure. The workers monitored during this study included a radiobiologist, a nuclear medicine technologist, an anesthesiologist, and a veterinary surgeon. Seven canine patients were imaged with an average mass of 33.7 kg (a range of 20.0-55.1 kg) with an average injected activity of 5 MBq kg. The dose range for the radiobiologist was 2-17 μSv (mean of 7.1 μSv), for the nuclear medicine technologist 0-14 μSv (mean of 5.6 μSv), for the anesthesiologist 0-12 μSv (mean of 4.0 μSv), and for the surgeon 0-10 μSv (mean of 3.6 μSv). In a comparison between the results of this study and published literature on occupational exposures from veterinary FDG PET/CT procedures, Cu-ATSM veterinary PET/CT procedures, on a per patient bias, exposed workers to less radiation. PMID:26425985

  17. Muscle activity during a dash shown by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to examine muscle activity during running. The dash is a basic activity in various kinds of sports but differs from running in terms of intensity and severity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate muscle activity during running at full speed using FDG PET. Six healthy men were investigated during a dash for 10 min after intravenous injection of FDG (37 MBq). Another six healthy men were studied as controls. PET images were obtained 45 min after the FDG injection. Regions of interest were drawn on the anterior and posterior thighs and the anterior and posterior legs. The standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated to examine the FDG uptake of muscle tissue per unit volume according to an equation. In the control group, the mean SUVs of the anterior thigh, posterior thigh, anterior leg, and posterior leg were 0.49±0.04, 0.44±0.02, 0.46±0.05, and 0.44±0.07, respectively. In the dash group, the mean SUVs of the anterior thigh, posterior thigh, anterior leg, and posterior leg were 0.74±0.20, 0.79±0.08, 0.61±0.07, and 0.60±0.08, respectively. FDG accumulation of every one of the four compartments in the dash group was significantly higher than that in the control. FDG accumulation of the posterior thigh was significantly higher than that of the anterior and the posterior leg in the dash group (P<0.02). Based on the results of our investigation, posterior thigh muscles were especially active during a dash. (author)

  18. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Evaluation After Initial Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Predicts Local Control in Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmarajan, Kavita V., E-mail: dharmark@mskcc.org [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H.; Gavane, Somali; Fox, Josef J.; Schoder, Heiko; Tom, Ashlyn K.; Price, Alison N.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wolden, Suzanne L. [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) is already an integral part of staging in rhabdomyosarcoma. We investigated whether primary-site treatment response characterized by serial PET imaging at specific time points can be correlated with local control. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively examined 94 patients with rhabdomyosarcoma who received initial chemotherapy 15 weeks (median) before radiotherapy and underwent baseline, preradiation, and postradiation PET. Baseline PET standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and the presence or absence of abnormal uptake (termed PET-positive or PET-negative) both before and after radiation were examined for the primary site. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS) was calculated according to baseline SUVmax, PET-positive status, and PET-negative status by the Kaplan-Meier method, and comparisons were tested with the log-rank test. Results: The median patient age was 11 years. With 3-year median follow-up, LRFS was improved among postradiation PET-negative vs PET-positive patients: 94% vs 75%, P=.02. By contrast, on baseline PET, LRFS was not significantly different for primary-site SUVmax {<=}7 vs >7 (median), although the findings suggested a trend toward improved LRFS: 96% for SUVmax {<=}7 vs 79% for SUVmax >7, P=.08. Preradiation PET also suggested a statistically insignificant trend toward improved LRFS for PET-negative (97%) vs PET-positive (81%) patients (P=.06). Conclusion: Negative postradiation PET predicted improved LRFS. Notably, 77% of patients with persistent postradiation uptake did not experience local failure, suggesting that these patients could be closely followed up rather than immediately referred for intervention. Negative baseline and preradiation PET findings suggested statistically insignificant trends toward improved LRFS. Additional study may further understanding of relationships between PET findings at these time points and outcome in rhabdomyosarcoma.

  19. Preparation and characterization of radionuclide 64Cu for positron emission tomographic diagnosis and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We occupy ourselves with preparation of 64Cu using cyclotron IBA 18/9. 64Cu is a starting product for production of radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomographic diagnostics and therapy and metrological characterization as well. The use of non-traditional PET radionuclides has been spread in the world recently. Due to the physical properties (T1/2=12.7 h, β- 37.1 %, β+ 17.9 %), 64Cu is suitable for therapy (β-) and diagnosing as well (β+). 64Cu is suitable radionuclide for labeling of radiopharmaceuticals on the basis of bis-thiosemicarbazone for study of hypoxic tumors. The number and orientation of articles and papers at conferences show a great demand for 64Cu in the world. It is caused by specific physical properties and possibility of preparation in small biomedical cyclotrons as well. An electrolytic preparation of a target lies in a galvanostatic plating of 64Ni on a gold target. The target is irradiated by a cyclotron IBA Cyclone 18/9. COSTIS station (Compact Solid Target Irradiation System) is installed at the end of external proton beam. 64Cu is separated from the target material by ionex Bio-Rad AG1-X8 as [64Cu]CuCl2. The target material is recycled by a simple method. A process of 64Cu preparation is completely automated and runs in a separation module with Plc Simatin S-1200 developed by Biont a.s. The product was measured by an ionization chamber (Curiementor), HPGe detector and LSC method (TDCR). (author)

  20. Motion management in positron emission tomography/computed tomography for radiation treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinardi, Valentino; Picchio, Maria; Di Muzio, Nadia; Gilardi, Maria Carla

    2012-09-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scanners combine, in a unique gantry, 2 of the most important diagnostic imaging systems, a CT and a PET tomograph, enabling anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) studies to be performed in a single study session. Furthermore, as the 2 scanners use the same spatial coordinate system, the reconstructed CT and PET images are spatially co-registered, allowing an accurate localization of the functional signal over the corresponding anatomical structure. This peculiarity of the hybrid PET/CT system results in improved tumor characterization for oncological applications, and more recently, it was found to be also useful for target volume definition (TVD) and treatment planning in radiotherapy (RT) applications. In fact, the use of combined PET/CT information has been shown to improve the RT treatment plan when compared with that obtained by a CT alone. A limiting factor to the accuracy of TVD by PET/CT is organ and tumor motion, which is mainly due to patient respiration. In fact, respiratory motion has a degrading effect on PET/CT image quality, and this is also critical for TVD, as it can lead to possible tumor missing or undertreatment. Thus, the management of respiratory motion is becoming an increasingly essential component in RT treatment planning; indeed, it has been recognized that the use of personalized motion information can improve TVD and, consequently, permit increased tumor dosage while sparing surrounding healthy tissues and organs at risk. This review describes the methods used for motion management in PET/CT for radiation treatment planning. The article covers the following: (1) problems caused by organ and lesion motion owing to respiration, and the artifacts generated on CT, PET, and PET/CT images; (2) data acquisition and processing techniques used to manage respiratory motion in PET/CT studies; and (3) the use of personalized motion information for TVD and radiation treatment planning.

  1. Molecular imaging of atherosclerotic lesions by positron emission tomography - can it meet the expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammen, Lindsay; Steiner, Sabine; Berent, Robert; Sinzinger, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Early non-invasive imaging of atherosclerosis and in particular the detection of lesions at risk with high specificity could significantly affect cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Conventional nuclear medicine approaches, in particular using autologous radiolabeled lipoproteins, can be related to histopathological findings; however, they fail to identify lesions at risk. Positron emission tomography (PET) tracers with much better physical properties have been examined, the most detailed information being available for F-18-deoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18-sodium fluoride (NaF). These two approaches are sensitive to different biochemical mechanisms, i.e. inflammation and microcalcification. Initial enthusiasm, in particular for F-18-FDG, has disappeared, although for F-18-NaF there is some hope, but this is not a breakthrough. No tracer is available so far that is able to identify a specific characteristic of a lesion prone to rupture. Other PET tracers in the pipeline have been examined, mainly in experimental models and only a few in patients, but they failed to contribute significantly to early lesion discovery and do not support great expectations. The key question is: Do we understand what we see? Moreover, methodological problems, a lack of standardization of imaging protocols and aspects of quantification provide a wide range for potential future improvements. While monitoring a therapeutic intervention seems to be possible for both F-18-FDG and F-18-NaF, highly specific early identification of lesions at risk by PET imaging is still far away. As of today, PET is not ready for routine clinical judgment of atherosclerotic lesions at risk to rupture. Even if all these problems can be solved, radiation exposure will still remain a concern, in particular for repeated studies.

  2. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Evaluation After Initial Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Predicts Local Control in Rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) is already an integral part of staging in rhabdomyosarcoma. We investigated whether primary-site treatment response characterized by serial PET imaging at specific time points can be correlated with local control. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively examined 94 patients with rhabdomyosarcoma who received initial chemotherapy 15 weeks (median) before radiotherapy and underwent baseline, preradiation, and postradiation PET. Baseline PET standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and the presence or absence of abnormal uptake (termed PET-positive or PET-negative) both before and after radiation were examined for the primary site. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS) was calculated according to baseline SUVmax, PET-positive status, and PET-negative status by the Kaplan-Meier method, and comparisons were tested with the log-rank test. Results: The median patient age was 11 years. With 3-year median follow-up, LRFS was improved among postradiation PET-negative vs PET-positive patients: 94% vs 75%, P=.02. By contrast, on baseline PET, LRFS was not significantly different for primary-site SUVmax ≤7 vs >7 (median), although the findings suggested a trend toward improved LRFS: 96% for SUVmax ≤7 vs 79% for SUVmax >7, P=.08. Preradiation PET also suggested a statistically insignificant trend toward improved LRFS for PET-negative (97%) vs PET-positive (81%) patients (P=.06). Conclusion: Negative postradiation PET predicted improved LRFS. Notably, 77% of patients with persistent postradiation uptake did not experience local failure, suggesting that these patients could be closely followed up rather than immediately referred for intervention. Negative baseline and preradiation PET findings suggested statistically insignificant trends toward improved LRFS. Additional study may further understanding of relationships between PET findings at these time points and outcome in rhabdomyosarcoma.

  3. An occupational dose distribution study in a positron emission tomography service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Ana Luiza S.L.; Mauricio, Claudia Lucia P., E-mail: analuslima@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Monitoracao Individual Externa

    2011-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful diagnostic tool, especially for Oncology. In PET procedures, the hands exposition of the workers is potentially higher than the thorax exposition due to the direct handling of the high-energy photons radionuclide. As the dose distribution in the extremities is non-uniform, the conventional monitoring methods (dosimetric ring and bracelet) may underestimate the skin dose equivalent in the most exposed part of the hand, which usually are the fingertips. In this study, two PET services had their workers monitored during the tasks of preparation and injection of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in patients, using chips of LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100H). Each employee worn TLD sets attached on the wrist and fingers of the dominant hand, and on the thorax. The highest dose values were measured on the index finger, which received doses up to 0.4 mSv in a single procedure of {sup 18}F-FDG dose preparation and 0.27 mSv in one injection. In a potential annual dose extrapolation, assuming that this technician performs 840 PET scans (preparation and injection), with these doses values, in one year, his skin dose equivalent on the index finger would be 564 mSv, exceeding the annual skin dose equivalent limit of 500 mSv. Despite the hands dose distribution is very sensitive of how to hold the syringe, the dose near to the index fingertip are always the highest, can be, respectively, 4 and 12 times greater than in the position where dosimetric rings and bracelets are commonly used for routine individual monitoring. Thus, extremity individual monitoring, in addition to the mandatory whole body individual monitoring with thorax dosemeters, are important tools for occupational dose optimization and should also be mandatory for PET technician. (author)

  4. Positron emission tomographic localization of left-sided unilateral spatial agnosia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to clarify the localization and the underlying mechanisms of left-sided unilateral spatial agnosia (LUSA). Eleven right-handed patients with cerebral infarction in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery who had LUSA were included in this study. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) were measured with PET using 15O steady state method. Sixteen right-handed patients with cerebral infarction who did not exhibit LUSA served as a control group. The mean local values of CBF and CMRO2 in the control group were 37.4 ml/100 ml tissue/min and 2.66 ml/100 ml tissue/min, respectively. By contrast, those values of CBF and CMRO2 in the patients with LUSA were 21.7 ml/100 ml tissue/min and 1.43 ml/100 ml tissue/min, respectively. Both CBF and CMRO2 in the right posterior parietal region were significantly lower in the patients with LUSA as compared with the control group (p 2 between 1.8 and 2.2 ml/100 ml tissue/min. These ranges of CBF and CMRO2 in the right parietal region were considered to include the threshold level producing LUSA. The CMRO2 values were more stabilized in the course of cerebral infarction as compared with the CBF values which may be variable on account of luxury perfusion syndrome. The right posterior parietal CMRO2 values less than 2.0 ml/100 ml tissue/min was considered to be critical in causing LUSA. The above results may suggest that severe damages of CBF and metabolism in the posterior part of the right parietal lobe play an important role in the occurrence of LUSA. (J.P.N.)

  5. [Dynamic analysis of pharmacokinetics of orally administered drugs using positron emission tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful and noninvasive technology for molecular imaging in living systems. Its high sensitivity and high spatial-temporal resolution make this technology particularly useful to analyze the disposition of drugs in the body. PET technology could be applied to analyze the process of distribution of orally administered drugs on the basis of time-profiles of radioactivity in vivo. Kinetic analysis of radioactivity derived from 18F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose administered orally to rats under several conditions indicated that not only gastric emptying and intestinal transit but also the rate constant of intestinal absorption and limited process of oral absorption could be evaluated quantitatively. After oral administration of 11C-labeled telmisartan with or without non-radiolabeled telmisartan, systemic bioavailability and hepatic distribution of radioactivity significantly increased non-linearly with dose. In the intestinal lumen, telmisartan and its glucuronide, converted by UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT), were detected and the ratio of telmisartan decreased at a high dose of telmisartan. In vitro permeation study revealed that telmisartan is a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). It was reported that hepatic uptake of telmisartan is mediated by organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3) and most of the hepatic radioactivity in the liver is derived from telmisartan. These results indicated that P-gp for intestinal absorption, OATP1B3 for hepatic uptake and UGT for glucuronidation could be considered as limiting steps of orally administered telmisartan. Therefore, PET study is highly anticipated to be a potent tool for better understanding of gastrointestinal absorption and the subsequent tissue distribution of various drugs and candidates. PMID:22864349

  6. Utility of positron emission tomography for tumour surveillance in children with neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is little consensus regarding optimal surveillance of optic pathway glioma (OPG) and plexiform neurofibroma (PNF) in childhood neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). 18F-2-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is employed in the surveillance of adult PNFs; but its utility has neither been specifically studied in children with PNFs nor in children with OPG. Review of PET/CT studies was performed in NF1 children with OPG or PNF. FDG-avidity of tumours was semi-quantitatively analysed and graded by calculating the maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) [grade 1: 3-4 (intense)]. Eighteen children (ten girls; median age: 8.5-years) had PET/CT. Nineteen OPGs were imaged. The SUVmax could be measured in 16. Ten were grade 1 and three each were grade 2 and grade 3. FDG-avidity reduced from grade 3 to grade 1 in two symptomatic OPGs following chemotherapy and this was associated with clinical improvement. PET/CT diagnosed symptomatic OPGs with a sensitivity of 0.625 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.259-0.897] and specificity of 0.875 (95% CI: 0.466-0.993). Sixteen PNFs were imaged. Twelve were grade 1 and two each were grade 2 and grade 3. The two grade 3 PNFs were confirmed malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours. PET/CT diagnosed malignant transformation with a sensitivity of 1.0 (95% CI: 0.197-1.0) and specificity of 0.857 (95% CI: 0.561-0.974). PET/CT may contribute useful information to the surveillance of OPG in childhood NF1 - particularly to identify progressive, symptomatic tumours. As in adults, PET/CT is useful for the detection of malignant transformation in PNFs in children with NF1. (orig.)

  7. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism for Broca's aphasia using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Toshiaki

    1987-12-01

    A total of 11 patients with Broca's aphasia (BA) underwent positron emission tomography (PET) with the purpose of investigating the responsible region and the symptomatic flow and metabolism thresholds for BA. Computed tomography (CT) was concurrently performed. In the group of 3 patients undergoing PET with C-11 glucose, both PET and CT provided abnormal findings in the region that is thought to be responsible for BA (Broca's area), including the cortex and subcortex in the anterior region to Sylvian fissure. The Broca's area in the remaining one was shown as low C-11 accumulation area on PET and as isodensity on CT. The second group, consisting of 8 BA patients and 30 control patients without BA, underwent PET using O-15 steady method. PET showed reduction of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolic rate (rCMRO/sub 2/) in the Broca's area in all BA patients. Computed tomography showed abnormal low density in the Broca's area in 3 patients, and abnormal findings in the basal ganglionic region and subcortex without evidence for abnormal low density in the Broca's area in the other 5 patients. Comparison of rCBF and rCMRO/sub 2/ in BA patients with those in control patients may show the symptomatic thresholds to be 20 - 27 ml100 gmin for rCBF and 2.0 ml100 gmin for rCMRO/sub 2/. (Namekawa, K.).

  8. Positron emission tomography for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In mild or atypical cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) the differential diagnosis to other dementing diseases, such as vascular dementia (VD), may pose a difficult problem. Beside computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional neuroimaging by positron emission tomography (PET). Support the clinical diagnosis by visualizing cerebral function. PET of 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) for measurement of regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRGl) has shown a typical metabolic pattern in patients with probable AD: hypometabolism in temporoparietal and frontal association areas, but relative recessing of primary cortical areas, basal ganglia and cerebellum. In VD a different pattern is seen. It consists of scattered areas with reduction of rCMRGl typically extending over cortical and subcortical structures. Severity of dementia is correlated with rCMRGl reduction in the temporoparietal association cortex, irrespective of the cause of dementia. Also the total volume of hypometabolic regions is related to severity of dementia but did not differ between AD and VD, even in patients with small lacunar infarction. This indicates that the total volume of functional tissue loss is more important, since it also includes the effects of incompletely infarcted tissue and morphologically intact but deafferented cortex. The characteristic metabolic pattern has a high diagnostic accuracy for the discrimination between probable AD, normals and VD, even in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Under clinical and therapeutic aspects the analysis of longitudinal changes of rCMRGl has shown that neuropsychological and metabolic changes are closely related in both, AD and VD. (author)

  9. Human cerebral acetylcholinesterase activity measured with positron emission tomography: procedure, normal values and effect of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regional cerebral metabolic rate of [11C]N-methyl-4-piperidyl acetate, which is nearly proportional to regional cerebral acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, was measured by dynamic positron emission tomography in 20 healthy subjects with a wide age range (24-89 years). Quantitative measurement was achieved using a kinetic model which consisted of arterial plasma and cerebral tissue compartments. The plasma input function was obtained using thin-layer chromatography and an imaging phosphor plate system at frequent sampling intervals to catch the rapid metabolism of the tracer in the blood. The distribution of the rate constant k3, an index of AChE activity, agreed well with reported post-mortem AChE distribution in the cerebral cortex (0.067-0.097 min-1) and thalamus (0.268 min-1), where AChE activity was low to moderate. The k3 values in the striatum and cerebellum, where AChE activity was very high, did not respond linearly to AChE activity because of increased flow dependency. No significant effect of age was found on AChE activity of the cerebral cortex, suggesting that the ascending central cholinergic system is preserved in normal aging. This study has shown that quantitative measurement of enzyme activity in the living brain is possible through appropriate modelling of tracer kinetics and accurate measurement of the input function. The method should be applicable to patients with Alzheimer's disease and those with other kinds of dementia whose central cholinergic system has been reported to be disturbed. (orig.)

  10. Human cerebral acetylcholinesterase activity measured with positron emission tomography: procedure, normal values and effect of age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namba, Hiroki [Advanced Technology for Medical Imaging, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)]|[Division of Neurological Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Iyo, Masaomi [Advanced Technology for Medical Imaging, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)]|[Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan); Fukushi, Kiyoshi; Suhara, Tetsuya; Sudo, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Irie, Toshiaki [Advanced Technology for Medical Imaging, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shinotoh, Hitoshi [Advanced Technology for Medical Imaging, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)]|[Department of Neurology, Chiba University School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan); Nagatsuka, Shin-ichiro [Advanced Technology for Medical Imaging, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)]|[Tokai Research Laboratories, Daiichi Pure Chemical Co., Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    The regional cerebral metabolic rate of [{sup 11}C]N-methyl-4-piperidyl acetate, which is nearly proportional to regional cerebral acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, was measured by dynamic positron emission tomography in 20 healthy subjects with a wide age range (24-89 years). Quantitative measurement was achieved using a kinetic model which consisted of arterial plasma and cerebral tissue compartments. The plasma input function was obtained using thin-layer chromatography and an imaging phosphor plate system at frequent sampling intervals to catch the rapid metabolism of the tracer in the blood. The distribution of the rate constant k{sub 3}, an index of AChE activity, agreed well with reported post-mortem AChE distribution in the cerebral cortex (0.067-0.097 min{sup -1}) and thalamus (0.268 min{sup -1}), where AChE activity was low to moderate. The k{sub 3} values in the striatum and cerebellum, where AChE activity was very high, did not respond linearly to AChE activity because of increased flow dependency. No significant effect of age was found on AChE activity of the cerebral cortex, suggesting that the ascending central cholinergic system is preserved in normal aging. This study has shown that quantitative measurement of enzyme activity in the living brain is possible through appropriate modelling of tracer kinetics and accurate measurement of the input function. The method should be applicable to patients with Alzheimer`s disease and those with other kinds of dementia whose central cholinergic system has been reported to be disturbed. (orig.) With 8 figs., 1 tab., 21 refs.

  11. Optimal scan time for evaluating pancreatic disease with positron emission tomography using F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image interpretation in positron emission tomography (PET) using F-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is usually performed for images obtained at 1 h postinjection (PI) of FDG, but it remains unknown whether this is the optimal time for imaging patients with pancreatic disease. The aim of this study was to assess the optimal scan time for FDG-PET for patients suspected of having pancreatic cancer. Forty-four patients with suspected pancreatic cancer underwent FDG-PET scans at both 1 h and 2 h PI. Tracer uptake in the pancreatic lesions and possible liver metastasis was interpreted qualitatively, using a 5-point grading system (0=normal, 1=probably normal, 2=equivocal, 3=probably abnormal, and 4=definitely abnormal) by 4 nuclear medicine physicians independently, who were blind to all clinical information. Detection performance with each image was compared using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. An average score of the 4 readers for each patient was also defined as consensus average index (CAI) and compared between the two images. ROC results indicated no significant differences in detection performance (Averaged areas under ROC curves of 1 h vs. 2 h were 0.92 vs. 0.90 for primary tumor, and 0.81 vs. 0.85 for liver metastases). There were no significant differences in CAIs between 1 h and 2 h PI images in interpreting primary tumor and positive liver metastases, but a significant difference was observed for cases without liver metastases (p<0.05). The certainty of excluding liver metastases was increased when the 2 h image was used, although ROC analysis did not establish a difference between 1 h and 2 h imaging for differentiating malignant and benign lesions in primary pancreatic cancer or its liver metastases. (author)

  12. Pitfalls in Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging: Causes and Their Classifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-ran Li; Jia-he Tian; Hui Wang; Zi-qian Chen; Chun-lei Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe the pitfalls in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging and classify them according to the principles of their generation. Methods We summarized retrospectively the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDP) PET/CT imaging pitfalls through reviewing the PET/CT images of 872 patients. The pitfalls were divided into artifacts and infrequent physiological uptake, and the artifacts were further classified according to their causes. Meanwhile, we calculated the incidences of various pitfalls. Whether the PET/CT pitfalls influenced the diagnostic decision was analyzed. The appearances of pitfalls in PET were also described. Results Pitfalls could be found in PET/CT images of 684 (78.4%) patients. Artifacts were found in 664 (76.15%) patients, and could be classified into self-factor artifacts and equipment- or technology- related artifacts. Among self-factor artifacts, respiratory motion (57.5%), postprandial or hyperglycemia artifacts (2.41%), and metal or high density matter artifacts (1.38%) were frequent. As for equipment- or technology-related factors, injection point outleakage or radiotracer contamination (13.88%) and truncation artifacts (1.83%) were most common ones. Infrequent physiological FDG uptakes, including fatty uptake, endometrial uptake, and bilateral breast feeding period uptake, were found in 20 (2.29%) patients. Among all pitfalls, the artifacts in 92 (13.4%) patients and infrequent physiological uptakes in 6 (0.88%) patients affected the diagnostic results. Artifact images in PET could be described as hot or cold area and the images of infrequent physiological uptake were always shown as hot area. Conclusions The incidence of pitfall in PET/CT imaging was high and the causes of pitfalls are various. Among all causes that artifacts generated, respiratory motion is the most common. Some pitfalls may disturb clinical physicians' decision, so it is important to recognize artifacts and physiological uptake, and

  13. Enhancement of positron emission tomography-computed tomography image quality using the principle of stochastic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquisition of higher counts improves visual perception of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) image. Larger radiopharmaceutical doses (implies more radiation dose) are administered to acquire this count in a short time period. However, diagnostic information does not increase after a certain threshold of counts. This study was conducted to develop a post processing method based on principle of “stochastic resonance” to improve visual perception of the PET-CT image having a required threshold counts. PET-CT images (JPEG file format) with low, medium, and high counts in the image were included in this study. The image was corrupted with the addition of Poisson noise. The amplitude of the Poisson noise was adjusted by dividing each pixel by a constant 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32. The best amplitude of the noise that gave best images quality was selected based on high value of entropy of the output image, high value of structural similarity index and feature similarity index. Visual perception of the image was evaluated by two nuclear medicine physicians. The variation in structural and feature similarity of the image was not appreciable visually, but statistically images deteriorated as the noise amplitude increases although maintaining structural (above 70%) and feature (above 80%) similarity of input images in all cases. We obtained the best image quality at noise amplitude “4” in which 88% structural and 95% feature similarity of the input images was retained. This method of stochastic resonance can be used to improve the visual perception of the PET-CT image. This can indirectly lead to reduction of radiation dose

  14. Clinical utility of 11C-flumazenil positron emission tomography in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma M

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 11C-flumazenil (FMZ positron emission tomography (PET is a new entrant into the armamentarium for pre-surgical evaluation of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. AIMS: To analyze the clinical utility of FMZ PET to detect lesional and remote cortical areas of abnormal benzodiazepine receptor binding in relation to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, 2-Deoxy-2 [18F] fluoro-D-glucose, (18F FDG PET, electrophysiological findings and semiology of epilepsy in patients with intractable TLE. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients underwent a high resolution MRI, prolonged Video-EEG monitoring before 18F FDG and 11C FMZ PET studies. Regional cortical FMZ PET abnormalities were defined on co-registered PET images using an objective method based on definition of areas of abnormal asymmetry (asymmetry index {AI}>10%. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Prospective. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Student′s "t" test. RESULTS: Twenty patients (Mean age: 35.2 years [20-51]; M:F=12:8 completed the study. Mean age at seizure onset was 10.3 years (birth-38 years; mean duration, 23.9 years (6-50 years. Concordance with the MRI lesion was seen in 10 patients (nine with hippocampal sclerosis and one with tuberous sclerosis. In the other 10, with either normal or ambiguous MRI findings, FMZ and FDG uptake were abnormal in all, concordant with the electrophysiological localization of the epileptic foci. Remote FMZ PET abnormalities (n=18 were associated with early age of seizure onset (P=0.005 and long duration of epilepsy (P=0.01. CONCLUSIONS: FMZ-binding asymmetry is a sensitive method to detect regions of epileptic foci in patients with intractable TLE.

  15. Relationship of computed tomography perfusion and positron emission tomography to tumour progression in malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeung, Timothy P C [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5C1 (Canada); Yartsev, Slav [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Lee, Ting-Yim [Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, Victoria Hospital, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5W9 (Australia); Lawson Health Research Institute, St. Joseph' s Health Care London, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4V2 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 3K7 (Canada); He, Wenqing [Department of Statistical and Actuarial Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Fisher, Barbara; VanderSpek, Lauren L [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Macdonald, David [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5A5 (Canada); Bauman, Glenn, E-mail: glenn.bauman@lhsc.on.ca [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This study aimed to explore the potential for computed tomography (CT) perfusion and 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in predicting sites of future progressive tumour on a voxel-by-voxel basis after radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods: Ten patients underwent pre-radiotherapy magnetic resonance (MR), FDG-PET and CT perfusion near the end of radiotherapy and repeated post-radiotherapy follow-up MR scans. The relationships between these images and tumour progression were assessed using logistic regression. Cross-validation with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the value of these images in predicting sites of tumour progression. Results: Pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour; near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion; CT perfusion blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and permeability-surface area (PS) product; FDG-PET standard uptake value (SUV); and SUV:BF showed significant associations with tumour progression on follow-up MR imaging (P < 0.0001). The mean sensitivity (±standard deviation), specificity and area under the ROC curve (AUC) of PS were 0.64 ± 0.15, 0.74 ± 0.07 and 0.72 ± 0.12 respectively. This mean AUC was higher than that of the pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour and near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion (both AUCs = 0.6 ± 0.1, P ≤ 0.03). The multivariate model using BF, BV, PS and SUV had a mean AUC of 0.8 ± 0.1, but this was not significantly higher than the PS only model. Conclusion: PS is the single best predictor of tumour progression when compared to other parameters, but voxel-based prediction based on logistic regression had modest sensitivity and specificity.

  16. Positron emission tomography thyroid incidentaloma: Is it different in Indian subcontinent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Vaish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Positron emission tomography (PET forms an integral part in work-up and follow-up of various malignancies. With the increased use of PET in oncology, finding of an incidental focal thyroid uptake (incidentaloma is not unusual and presents a diagnostic challenge. Aim: The aim of the following study is to evaluate the frequency and radio-pathologic correlation of focal 18-fluoro deoxyglucose uptake (FDG on PET within the thyroid from a large series. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of 37,000 consecutive patients who underwent FDG-PET at tertiary cancer center in India. Radiological, pathological, PET scan and follow-up details were evaluated. Statistical analyzes were carried out using Mann Whitney test and Pearson correlation. Results: Abnormal thyroid uptake was seen in 78 (0.2% patients. Nearly 61 (0.16% scans had focal and 17 (0.04% had diffuse FDG uptake. A total of 57 patients with focal uptake were available for further evaluation. No further evaluation was done in 24 (42.1% patients who had advanced index malignancy. Of the remaining 33 patients 26 were benign and seven were a cause for concern (four primary thyroid cancers, one follicular neoplasm with hurthle cell change and two metastatic cancers. There was no significant correlation in Standardized uptake value (SUV max of benign and malignant lesion (P = 0.5 on Mann Whitney or size (r = 0.087 Pearson correlation co-efficient P= 0.667. Conclusion: Incidence of PET incidentaloma is low in this large cohort of Indian patients. Nearly 27% of focal incidentaloma were malignant. There was no correlation between the SUVmax, size and malignancy.

  17. A simple and improved digital timing method for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and improved digital timing method was developed for positron emission tomography (PET). This method, the so-called 'initial rise interpolation method', is based on an important characteristic of gamma signals: a properly pre-amplified and sampled gamma signal pulse can be characterized to arrive with an initial rise from the baseline and then reach a maximum rise. The pulse arrival time was obtained by calculating the intersection of the initial rise line with the baseline for each gamma signal pulse. Using an 8-channel 100 MHz free-running ADC and FPGA combined data acquisition (DAQ) card, three digital timing methods were employed to measure the coincidence timing resolution of two types of recently developed 3 mmx3 mm PET sensors (a fast and a slow GAPD). The results showed that the initial rise interpolation method provides the best timing resolution for both types of GAPDs: 0.7 ns FWHM for fast GAPD and 1.5 ns FWHM for slow GAPD (digital CFD: 1.5 and 2.2 ns FWHM; maximum rise interpolation: 1.8 and 2.7 ns FWHM). By implementing the initial rise interpolation method into the FPGA of DAQ card, PET images of two 18F line sources were acquired successfully using a pair of 4x4 GAPD-LYSO array detectors (single pixel size: 3 mmx3 mm). The acquired image spatial resolution was a 3.1 mm FWHM. Furthermore, the simulation was performed to evaluate the effects of the pulse rise time, pulse amplitude and front-end noise level on the timing resolution estimated using the three digital timing methods. In accordance with the measurement results, the simulation results also showed that the initial rise interpolation method provided the best timing resolution. These results show that this simple and improved digital timing method is reliable and useful for the development of high performance PET.

  18. Estimation of the input function in dynamic positron emission tomography applied to fluorodeoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method of functional imaging, used in particular for drug development and tumor imaging. In PET, the estimation of the arterial plasmatic activity concentration of the non-metabolized compound (the 'input function') is necessary for the extraction of the pharmacokinetic parameters. These parameters enable the quantification of the compound dynamics in the tissues. This PhD thesis contributes to the study of the input function by the development of a minimally invasive method to estimate the input function. This method uses the PET image and a few blood samples. In this work, the example of the FDG tracer is chosen. The proposed method relies on compartmental modeling: it deconvoluates the three-compartment-model. The originality of the method consists in using a large number of regions of interest (ROIs), a large number of sets of three ROIs, and an iterative process. To validate the method, simulations of PET images of increasing complexity have been performed, from a simple image simulated with an analytic simulator to a complex image simulated with a Monte-Carlo simulator. After simulation of the acquisition, reconstruction and corrections, the images were segmented (through segmentation of an IRM image and registration between PET and IRM images) and corrected for partial volume effect by a variant of Rousset's method, to obtain the kinetics in the ROIs, which are the input data of the estimation method. The evaluation of the method on simulated and real data is presented, as well as a study of the method robustness to different error sources, for example in the segmentation, in the registration or in the activity of the used blood samples. (author)

  19. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the initial staging of germ cell tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hain, S.F.; O' Doherty, M.J. [Clinical PET Centre, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospitals, London (United Kingdom); Timothy, A.R.; Leslie, M.D.; Partridge, S.E. [Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospitals, London (United Kingdom); Huddart, R.A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Royal Marsden, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2000-05-01

    Testicular cancer is a rare tumour with the potential for cure at diagnosis. It is important, however, to identify those patients with metastases at presentation so as to ensure that the optimum treatment strategy is employed. Many criteria have been used to try to place patients into high- or low-risk groups, with variable success. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has the potential to identify active disease and thereby influence further management. Here we report on a retrospective study of the use of FDG-PET in the detection of metastatic testicular carcinoma at diagnosis. Thirty-one patients [13 with seminoma and 18 with non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (13 teratomas, 5 mixed)] were staged by FDG-PET scanning. The imaging was performed using a Siemens ECAT 951 scanner. All results were assessed on the basis of histology or clinical follow-up. FDG-PET scan identified metastatic disease in ten and was negative in 16; there were no false-positives and five false-negatives. There were six patients in whom FDG-PET was negative and computed tomography was regarded as suspicious but follow-up was inconclusive. The positive predictive value was 100%. The negative predictive value was 76% or 91%, depending on whether the aforementioned six cases were regarded as true-negatives or false-negatives. It may be concluded that FDG-PET is capable of detecting metastatic disease at diagnosis that is not identified by other imaging techniques. These preliminary results are sufficient to suggest that a large prospective study should be performed to evaluate the role of FDG-PET in primary staging of disease. (orig.)

  20. Role of (18F) 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in upper gastrointestinal malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth C Smyth; Manish A Shah

    2011-01-01

    The role of whole-body FDG [(18F) 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose] positron emission tomography (PET) scanning as an imaging modality in the management of patients with malignancy has evolved enormously over the past two decades. FDG-PET has demonstrated significant efficacy in the staging, prognostication and detection of occult metastatic disease in malignancies of the gastrointestinal tract, in addition to assessment of the response to cytotoxic chemotherapy in a more timely manner than has traditionally been possible by more conventional imaging tools. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for the detection and staging of malignancy depend not only on the site and size of the primary tumor and metastases, but also on histological cell type, reflecting underlying disparities in glucose metabolism. The metabolic response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy or to chemo-radiotherapy in cancers of the gastro-esophageal junction or stomach has been demonstrated in several prospective studies to correlate significantly with both the histological tumor response to treatment and with consequent improvements in overall survival. This may offer a future paradigm of personalized treatment based on the PET response to chemotherapy. FDG-PET has been less successful in efforts to screen for and detect recurrent upper gastrointestinal malignancies, and in the detection of low volume metastatic peritoneal disease. Efforts to improve the accuracy of PET include the use of novel radiotracers such as (18F) FLT (3-deoxy-3-fluorothymidine) or 11C-choline, or fusion PET-CT with concurrent high-resolution computed tomography. This review focuses on the role of FDG-PET scanning in staging and response assessment in malignancies of the upper gastrointestinal tract, specifically gastric, esophageal and pancreas carcinoma.

  1. The relationship between cerebrospinal fluid markers of Alzheimer pathology and positron emission tomography tau imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Brian A; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brier, Matthew; Blazey, Tyler; Su, Yi; Christensen, Jon; Aldea, Patricia; McConathy, Jonathan; Holtzman, David M; Cairns, Nigel J; Morris, John C; Fagan, Anne M; Ances, Beau M; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2016-08-01

    The two primary molecular pathologies in Alzheimer's disease are amyloid-β plaques and tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles. Investigations into these pathologies have been restricted to cerebrospinal fluid assays, and positron emission tomography tracers that can image amyloid-β plaques. Tau tracers have recently been introduced into the field, although the utility of the tracer and its relationship to other Alzheimer biomarkers are still unknown. Here we examined tau deposition in 41 cognitively normal and 11 cognitively impaired older adults using the radioactive tau ligand (18)F-AV-1451 (previously known as T807) who also underwent a lumbar puncture to assess cerebrospinal fluid levels of total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau181) and amyloid-β42 Voxel-wise statistical analyses examined spatial patterns of tau deposition associated with cognitive impairment. We then related the amount of tau tracer uptake to levels of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. All analyses controlled for age and gender and, when appropriate, the time between imaging and lumbar puncture assessments. Symptomatic individuals (Clinical Dementia Rating > 0) demonstrated markedly increased levels of tau tracer uptake. This elevation was most prominent in the temporal lobe and temporoparietal junction, but extended more broadly into parietal and frontal cortices. In the entire cohort, there were significant relationships among all cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and tracer uptake, notably for tau-related cerebrospinal fluid markers. After controlling for levels of amyloid-β42, the correlations with tau uptake were r = 0.490 (P Alzheimer's disease, there is focal tauopathy in the medial temporal lobes and adjacent cortices. PMID:27286736

  2. Differentiation of autoimmune pancreatitis from suspected pancreatic cancer by fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been widely used for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Because autoimmune pancreatitis is easily misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer and can be tested for by FDG-PET analysis based on the presence of suspected pancreatic cancer, we attempted to clarify the differences in FDG-PET findings between the two conditions. We compared FDG-PET findings between 15 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis and 26 patients with pancreatic cancer. The findings were evaluated visually or semiquantitatively using the maximum standardized uptake value and the accumulation pattern of FDG. FDG uptake was found in all 15 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis, whereas it was found in 19 of 26 patients (73.1%) with pancreatic cancer. An accumulation pattern characterized by nodular shapes was significantly more frequent in pancreatic cancer, whereas a longitudinal shape indicated autoimmune pancreatitis. Heterogeneous accumulation was found in almost all cases of autoimmune pancreatitis, whereas homogeneous accumulation was found in pancreatic cancer. Significantly more cases of pancreatic cancer showed solitary localization, whereas multiple localization in the pancreas favored the presence of autoimmune pancreatitis. FDG uptake by the hilar lymph node was significantly more frequent in autoimmune pancreatitis than in pancreatic cancer, and uptake by the lachrymal gland, salivary gland, biliary duct, retroperitoneal space, and prostate were seen only in autoimmune pancreatitis. FDG-PET is a useful tool for differentiating autoimmune pancreatitis from suspected pancreatic cancer, if the accumulation pattern and extrapancreatic involvement are considered. IgG4 measurement and other current image tests can further confirm the diagnosis. (author)

  3. Prognostic value of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in resectable colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jang Eun Lee; Sang Woo Kim; Jin Su Kim; Kyu Yong Choi; Won Kyung Kang; Seong Taek Oh; Ie Ryung Yoo

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To assess the prognostic value of preoperative 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) in patients with resectable colorectal cancer.METHODS:One hundred sixty-three patients with resectable colorectal cancer who underwent FDG-PET/CT before surgery were included.Patient data including pathologic stage at presentation,histology,treatment,disease-free survival and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor on FDGPET/CT were retrospectively analyzed.Median follow up duration was 756 (range,419-1355).The primary end point was disease-free survival.RESULTS:Twenty-five of 163 patients (15.3%) had recurrences.The median SUVmax values of the recurrence and no-recurrence groups were 8.9 (range,5-24) and 8.2 (range,0-23,P =0.998).Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed no significant association between SUVmax and recurrence (area under the curve =0.5,P =0.998,95%CI:0.389-0.611).Because a statistically significant value was not found,SUVmax was dichotomized at its median of 8.6.The disease-free survival curve was analyzed using the median SUVmax (8.6) as the cut off.Univariate and multivariate analysis did not provide evidence that disease-free survival rates for the subgroups defined by the median SUVmax were significantly different (P =0.52,P =0.25).CONCLUSION:Our study suggests that the high FDG uptake of primary mass in resectable colorectal cancer doesn't have a significant relationship with tumor recurrence and disease-free survival.

  4. Lesion quantification in oncological positron emission tomography: a maximum likelihood partial volume correction strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bernardi, Elisabetta; Faggiano, Elena; Zito, Felicia; Gerundini, Paolo; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2009-07-01

    A maximum likelihood (ML) partial volume effect correction (PVEC) strategy for the quantification of uptake and volume of oncological lesions in 18F-FDG positron emission tomography is proposed. The algorithm is based on the application of ML reconstruction on volumetric regional basis functions initially defined on a smooth standard clinical image and iteratively updated in terms of their activity and volume. The volume of interest (VOI) containing a previously detected region is segmented by a k-means algorithm in three regions: A central region surrounded by a partial volume region and a spill-out region. All volume outside the VOI (background with all other structures) is handled as a unique basis function and therefore "frozen" in the reconstruction process except for a gain coefficient. The coefficients of the regional basis functions are iteratively estimated with an attenuation-weighted ordered subset expectation maximization (AWOSEM) algorithm in which a 3D, anisotropic, space variant model of point spread function (PSF) is included for resolution recovery. The reconstruction-segmentation process is iterated until convergence; at each iteration, segmentation is performed on the reconstructed image blurred by the system PSF in order to update the partial volume and spill-out regions. The developed PVEC strategy was tested on sphere phantom studies with activity contrasts of 7.5 and 4 and compared to a conventional recovery coefficient method. Improved volume and activity estimates were obtained with low computational costs, thanks to blur recovery and to a better local approximation to ML convergence. PMID:19673203

  5. Localized fetomaternal hyperglycemia: spatial and kinetic definition by positron emission tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianrong Yao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complex but common maternal diseases such as diabetes and obesity contribute to adverse fetal outcomes. Understanding of the mechanisms involved is hampered by difficulty in isolating individual elements of complex maternal states in vivo. We approached this problem in the context of maternal diabetes and sought an approach to expose the developing fetus in vivo to isolated hyperglycemia in the pregnant rat. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesized that glucose infused into the arterial supply of one uterine horn would more highly expose fetuses in the ipsilateral versus contralateral uterine horn. To test this, the glucose tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG was infused via the left uterine artery. Regional glucose uptake into maternal tissues and fetuses was quantified using positron emission tomography (PET. Upon infusion, FDG accumulation began in the left-sided placentae, subsequently spreading to the fetuses. Over two hours after completion of the infusion, FDG accumulation was significantly greater in left compared to right uterine horn fetuses, favoring the left by 1.9+/-0.1 and 2.8+/-0.3 fold under fasted and hyperinsulinemic conditions (p<10(-11 n=32-35 and p<10(-12 n=27-45 respectively. By contrast, centrally administered [3H]-2-deoxyglucose accumulated equally between the fetuses of the two uterine horns. Induction of significant hyperglycemia (10(3 mg/dL localized to the left uterine artery was sustained for at least 48 hours while maternal euglycemia was maintained. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This approach exposes selected fetuses to localized hyperglycemia in vivo, minimizing exposure of the mother and thus secondary effects. Additionally, a set of less exposed internal control fetuses are maintained for comparison, allowing direct study of the in vivo fetal effects of isolated hyperglycemia. Broadly, this approach can be extended to study a variety of maternal-sided perturbations suspected to directly

  6. Relationship of computed tomography perfusion and positron emission tomography to tumour progression in malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: This study aimed to explore the potential for computed tomography (CT) perfusion and 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in predicting sites of future progressive tumour on a voxel-by-voxel basis after radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods: Ten patients underwent pre-radiotherapy magnetic resonance (MR), FDG-PET and CT perfusion near the end of radiotherapy and repeated post-radiotherapy follow-up MR scans. The relationships between these images and tumour progression were assessed using logistic regression. Cross-validation with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the value of these images in predicting sites of tumour progression. Results: Pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour; near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion; CT perfusion blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and permeability-surface area (PS) product; FDG-PET standard uptake value (SUV); and SUV:BF showed significant associations with tumour progression on follow-up MR imaging (P < 0.0001). The mean sensitivity (±standard deviation), specificity and area under the ROC curve (AUC) of PS were 0.64 ± 0.15, 0.74 ± 0.07 and 0.72 ± 0.12 respectively. This mean AUC was higher than that of the pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour and near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion (both AUCs = 0.6 ± 0.1, P ≤ 0.03). The multivariate model using BF, BV, PS and SUV had a mean AUC of 0.8 ± 0.1, but this was not significantly higher than the PS only model. Conclusion: PS is the single best predictor of tumour progression when compared to other parameters, but voxel-based prediction based on logistic regression had modest sensitivity and specificity

  7. Determination of plasma protein binding of positron emission tomography radioligands by high-performance frontal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Nahid; Nakao, Ryuji; Schou, Magnus; Halldin, Christer

    2014-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging technique based on the use of radioligands labeled with short lived radionuclides, such as (11)C (t½=20.4min) and (18)F (t½=109.8min), which as a consequence often requires rapid plasma protein binding analysis methods. In addition, PET radioligands can suffer from non-specific binding to the membrane when ultrafiltraion, which is the most commonly used method for measuring protein binding in PET, is employed. In this study a high-performance frontal analysis (HPFA) method based on incorporation of a gel filtration column (discovery(®) BIO GFC 100, 50mm×4.6mm, 5μm, 100Å) into a radio-LC system with phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) at a flow rate of 3ml/min as mobile phase was developed and investigated for four PET radioligands. The minimum injection volume (MIV) of plasma, which is a crucial factor in HPFA, was determined to be 200μl (human), 500μl (monkey), 700μl (human) and 1000μl (monkey) for these four radioligands. The MIV values increased as a higher fraction of the radioligand was present in the protein-free form. The protein binding results obtained were in good agreement with ultrafiltration and the method did not suffer from non-specific binding. The short analysis time (<12min) allowed multiple protein binding measurements during time course of a human [(11)C]PBR28 PET study. PMID:24922085

  8. a Dynamic Technique for the Quantitation of Oxygen Utilization Rates Using Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Gary Dwight

    The conversion of oxygen to water in oxidative phosphorylation is required for the efficient production of adenosine triphosphate. This process can be monitored externally using oxygen-15 and positron emission tomography to allow estimation of metabolic rate in the human brain. A dynamic technique using ('15)O-O(,2) has been developed and compared to the existing steady state and autoradiographic approaches. These currently employed methods suffer from pitfalls associated with using assumed values for the tissue -blood partition coefficient of water. Computer simulations have been performed demonstrating the underestimation of physiological rates with the steady state technique and the time varying solutions of the autoradiographic approach. Experimental data agrees with the predicted behavior of each of these methods. The new technique requires the estimation of local cerebral blood volume and the tissue-blood partition coefficient value of water. The blood volume, necessary for a blood radioactivity correction, is estimated from the equilibrium distribution of ('15)O-CO. The tissue-blood partition coefficient is calculated using a rapid least squares analysis of ('15)O-H(,2)O dynamic blood flow data. The measured values of blood volume and partition coefficient are assumed to remain invariant with changes in the physiological state of the brain. The metabolic rate is then estimated by fitting the oxygen model to the observed kinetics in a one minute breathhold study. Alternatives to arterial blood sampling have been considered. Expired breath and lung activity concentrations used in conjunction with arterial blood sample data provide the required input functions. A time-of-flight probe has been developed as a non-invasive alternative and some intial measurements with the system are presented. The experimental data are in good agreement with the model predictions supporting the switch to a dynamic technique for the estimation of oxygen utilization rate using ('15

  9. Comparison study of positron emission tomography, X-ray CT and MRI in Parkinsonism with dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain atrophy and local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (LCMR-glc) in Parkinson's disease with dementia and Parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) were studied using positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose, X-ray CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The group of Parkinson's disease with dementia (n=7) had a significantly decreased LCMR-glc in all regions when compared with the age-matched normal group. In the group of Parkinson's disease without dementia (n=6), LCMR-glc was also significantly lower than the control group, although it was higher than the group with associated dementia. Some of the normal aged persons had cortical atrophy. There was no correlation between LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy. Six Guamnian patients had PDC associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and four patients had it without ALS. LCMR-glc did not differ in the two groups. It was, however, significantly lower than that in 5 Guamanian and 10 Caucasian normal persons. The group of PDC had a noticeable cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation, regardless of the presence or absence of ALS. There was correlation between decrease of LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy of the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. Parkinson's disease and PDC were different from Alzheimer's disease in which a decreased LCMR-glc has been reported to be usually confined to the cerebral cortex. Cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation were depicted on MRI and CT in the PDC group, but did not in the group of Parkinson's disease. PET was useful in the functional examination and both MRI and CT were useful in the anatomical examination of these diseases. (Namekawa, K)

  10. Brain glucose utilization in systemic lupus erythematosus with neuropsychiatric symptoms: a controlled positron emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otte, A. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)]|[Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Weiner, S.M. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Peter, H.H. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Mueller-Brand, J. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Goetze, M. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Moser, E. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Gutfleisch, J. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Hoegerle, S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Juengling, F.D. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Nitzsche, E.U. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    In contrast to morphological imaging [such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography], functional imaging may be of advantage in the detection of brain abnormalities in cases of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therefore, we studied 13 patients (aged 40{+-}14 years, 11 female, 2 male) with neuropsychiatric SLE who met four of the American Rheumatism Association criteria for the classification of SLE. Ten clinically and neurologically healthy volunteers served as controls (aged 40{+-}12 years, 5 female, 5 male). Both groups were investigated using fluorine-18-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography (PET) and cranial MRI. The normal controls and 11 of the 13 patients showed normal MRI scans. However, PET scan was abnormal in all 13 SLE patients. Significant group-to-group differences in the glucose metabolic index (GMI=region of interest uptake/global uptake at the level of the basal ganglia and thalamus) were found in the parieto-occipital region on both sides: the GMI of the parieto-occipital region on the right side was 0.922{+-}0.045 in patients and 1.066{+-}0.081 in controls (P<0.0001, Mann Whitney U test), while on the left side it was 0.892{+-}0.060 in patients and 1.034{+-}0.051 in controls (P=0.0002). Parieto-occipital hypometabolism is a conspicuous finding in mainly MRI-negative neuropsychiatric SLE. As the parieto-occipital region is located at the boundary of blood supply of all three major arteries, it could be the most vulnerable zone of the cerebrum and may be affected at an early stage of the cerebrovascular disease. (orig.). With 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Importance of defect detectability in Positron Emission Tomography imaging of abdominal lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shozo Yamashita

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: This study was designed to assess defect detectability in positron emission tomography (PET imaging of abdominal lesions. Methods: A National Electrical Manufactures Association International Electrotechnical Commission phantom was used. The simulated abdominal lesion was scanned for 10 min using dynamic list-mode acquisition method. Images, acquired with scan duration of 1-10 min, were reconstructed using VUE point HD and a 4.7 mm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM Gaussian filter. Iteration-subset combinations of 2-16 and 2-32 were used. Visual and physical analyses were performed using the acquired images. To sequentially evaluate defect detectability in clinical settings, we examined two middle-aged male subjects. One had a liver cyst (approximately 10 mm in diameter and the other suffered from pancreatic cancer with an inner defect region (approximately 9 mm in diameter. Results: In the phantom study, at least 6 and 3 min acquisition durations were required to visualize 10 and 13 mm defect spheres, respectively. On the other hand, spheres with diameters ≥17 mm could be detected even if the acquisition duration was only 1 min. The visual scores were significantly correlated with background (BG variability. In clinical settings, the liver cyst could be slightly visualized with an acquisition duration of 6 min, although image quality was suboptimal. For pancreatic cancer, the acquisition duration of 3 min was insufficient to clearly describe the defect region. Conclusion: The improvement of BG variability is the most important factor for enhancing lesion detection. Our clinical scan duration (3 min/bed may not be suitable for the detection of small lesions or accurate tumor delineation since an acquisition duration of at least 6 min is required to visualize 10 mm lesions, regardless of reconstruction parameters. Improvements in defect detectability are important for radiation treatment planning and accurate PET-based diagnosis.

  12. Positron emission tomography evaluation of somatostatin receptor targeted (64)Cu-TATE-liposomes in a human neuroendocrine carcinoma mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anncatrine Luisa; Binderup, Tina; Jølck, Rasmus Irming;

    2012-01-01

    -expressed in a variety of cancers, particularly neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and can be targeted with somatostatin peptide analogs such as octreotate (TATE). In the present study we investigate liposomes that target SSTR in a NET xenograft mouse model (NCI-H727) by use of TATE. TATE was covalently attached to the distal...... end of DSPE-PEG(2000) on PEGylated liposomes with an encapsulated positron emitter (64)Cu that can be utilized for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of the (64)Cu-loaded PEGylated liposomes with and without TATE was investigated and their ability...... to image NETs was evaluated using PET. Additionally, the liposome accumulation and imaging capability was compared with free radiolabelled TATE peptide administered as (64)Cu-DOTA-TATE. The presence of TATE on the liposomes resulted in a significantly faster initial blood clearance in comparison to control...

  13. Physiology and physiopathology of central type Benzodiazepine receptors: Study in the monkey and in human brain using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new non-invasive technique that allows to study in a living subject central type benzodiazepine receptors is developed. A combined approach is applied using a specific positron-emitting radiotracer for the in vivo labelling of the receptors and positron emission tomography allowing, by external detection, a quantitative determination of tissue radioactivity. The radioligand used for the in vivo labelling of benzodiazepine receptors is the antagonist RO 15-1788 labelled with carbon 11. The various stages of the study are described: in vivo characterization in the monkey of central type benzodiazepine receptors; characterization of central type benzodiazepine receptors in human brain using selective molecules for the BZ1 benzodiazepine subclass; demonstration of the heterogeneity of central type benzodiazepine receptors in the brain; study of pathological alteration of benzodiazepine receptors in experimental epilepsy

  14. Development of radiotracers for imaging NR2B subtype NMDA receptors with positron emission tomography; Developpement de radiotraceurs pour la visualisation des recepteurs NMDA de sous-type NR2B par tomographie par emission de positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labas, R

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this thesis was to develop new radioactive tracers for imaging NR2B subtype NMDA receptors with positron emission tomography. Several compounds including 4-(4-fluoro-benzyl)piperidine and presenting interesting in vivo biological properties were the object of a labelling with a positrons emitter atom ({sup 11}C or {sup 18}F)

  15. Intrinsic spatial resolution limitations due to differences between positron emission position and annihilation detection localization; Limitacoes da resolucao espacial intrinseca devido as diferencas entre a posicao da emissao do positron e a deteccao da localizacao de aniquilacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Pedro; Malano, Francisco; Valente, Mauro, E-mail: valente@famaf.unc.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina). Fac. de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica (FaMAF)

    2012-07-01

    Since its successful implementation for clinical diagnostic, positron emission tomography (PET) represents the most promising medical imaging technique. The recent major growth of PET imaging is mainly due to its ability to trace the biologic pathways of different compounds in the patient's body, assuming the patient can be labeled with some PET isotope. Regardless of the type of isotope, the PET imaging method is based on the detection of two 511-keV gamma photons being emitted in opposite directions, with almost 180 deg between them, as a consequence of electron-positron annihilation. Therefore, this imaging method is intrinsically limited by random uncertainties in spatial resolutions, related with differences between the actual position of positron emission and the location of the detected annihilation. This study presents an approach with the Monte Carlo method to analyze the influence of this effect on different isotopes of potential implementation in PET. (author)

  16. Correlation of PUV and SUV in the extremities while using PEM as a high-resolution positron emission scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahim, Sania [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mawlawi, Osama; Taylor, Shree; Millican, Richelle; Swanston, Nancy M.; Rohren, Eric M. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Fox, Patricia [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Biostatistics, Houston, TX (United States); Brown, J.E. [Yale University Hospital, Department of Radiology, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Owing to its unique configuration of two adjustable plate detectors positron emission mammography, or PEM, could theoretically also function as a high-resolution positron emission scanner for the extremities or neck. PEM quantitates its activity via a ''PEM uptake value,'' or PUV, and although its relationship to the standardized uptake value, or SUV, has been demonstrated in the breasts, to our knowledge there are no studies validating PUV in other sites such as the extremities. This was a retrospective chart review of two separate protocols of a total of 15 patients. The patients all had hypermetabolic lesions in the extremities or neck on imaging with PET/CT and were sent after their PET/CT to PEM for further imaging. Owing to the sequential nature of these examinations no additional radiotracer was administered. Spearman's rank order correlation was calculated between the PUVmax obtained from PEM images, and the SUVmax for all. Spearman's rank order correlation for all sites was 0.42, which is not significantly different from 0 (p = 0.13). When neck lesions were excluded from the group, there was a strong and statistically significant correlation between PUVmax and SUVmax, with Spearman's rank correlation of 0.73, and significantly different from 0 (p = 0.0068). The correlation of PUV and SUV in the extremities indicates the potential use of PEM as a semiquantitative, high-resolution positron emission scanner and warrants further investigation, especially in the realms of disease processes that often present in the extremities, such as melanoma, osteomyelitis, and arthritis, as well as playing a role in the imaging of patients with metallic hardware post-limb salvage surgery. (orig.)

  17. Positron emission tomography in diagnosis and follow-up of treatment of head and neck tumours. Our initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Positron emission tomography/ computed tomography (PET-CT) is one of the modalities that allow for imaging the metabolism of human cells. One of the indications for PET-CT is head and neck cancer staging and re staging. Aim of study: To test the diagnostic performance of PET-CT in a single centre study for head and neck cancer patients. Materials and methods: The study involved 60 patients with head and neck cancer diagnosed and treated in our department during 2008-2010. There were 71 PET-CT examinations (in 11 patients multiple studies were performed). In 40 patients PET-CT was performed for pre-operative staging, mainly to assess the presence of lymph node metastases. In 23 cases PET-CT was performed to confirm clinical suspicion of tumour recurrence. In 8 patients, the examination was performed to find the origin of the unknown primary cancer. Results: Positron emission tomography/ computed tomography results were compared with conventional imaging modalities and histopathology. In the surgical treatment group 4 false positive findings after histological examination were detected. PET-CT in 2 patients failed to show metastasis to the regional lymph nodes (false negative report). In patients with suspected recurrent tumour the diagnosis was confirmed in 14 cases. In all patients with metastases from an unknown primary origin, PET-CT was positive (4 cases were confirmed clinically). The results of PET-CT studies helped to change the method of treatment in 21 cases. Conclusion: Positron emission tomography/ computed tomography may be a valuable tool in detecting, staging and monitoring of selected patients with head and neck cancer, with a significant impact on clinical decision making. (authors)

  18. Spatiotemporal Stability of Cu-ATSM and FLT Positron Emission Tomography Distributions During Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, Tyler J.; Yip, Stephen; Jallow, Ngoneh [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Forrest, Lisa J. [Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Jeraj, Robert, E-mail: rjeraj@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In dose painting, in which functional imaging is used to define biological targets for radiation therapy dose escalation, changes in spatial distributions of biological properties during treatment can compromise the quality of therapy. The goal of this study was to assess the spatiotemporal stability of 2 potential dose painting targets—hypoxia and proliferation—in canine tumors during radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two canine patients with sinonasal tumors (14 carcinoma and 8 sarcoma) were imaged before hypofractionated radiation therapy with copper(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for hypoxia and 3′-deoxy-3′-{sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT) PET/CT for proliferation. The FLT scans were repeated after 2 fractions and the Cu-ATSM scans after 3 fractions. Midtreatment PET/CT images were deformably registered to pretreatment PET/CT images. Voxel-based Spearman correlation coefficients quantified the spatial stability of Cu-ATSM and FLT uptake distributions between pretreatment and midtreatment scans. Paired t tests determined significant differences between the patients' respective Cu-ATSM and FLT correlations coefficients. Standardized uptake value measures were also compared between pretreatment and midtreatment scans by use of paired t tests. Results: Spatial distributions of Cu-ATSM and FLT uptake were stable through midtreatment for both sarcomas and carcinomas: the population mean ± standard deviation in Spearman correlation coefficient was 0.88 ± 0.07 for Cu-ATSM and 0.79 ± 0.13 for FLT. The patients' Cu-ATSM correlation coefficients were significantly higher than their respective FLT correlation coefficients (P=.001). Changes in Cu-ATSM SUV measures from pretreatment to midtreatment were histology dependent: carcinomas experienced significant decreases in Cu-ATSM uptake (P<.05), whereas sarcomas did not (P>.20). Both histologies

  19. Lymphomatous involvement of gastrointestinal tract: Evaluation by positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sith Phongkitkarun; Vithya Varavithya; Toshiki Kazama; Silvana C Faria; Martha V Mar; Donald A Podoloff; Homer A Macapinlac

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) findings in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) involving the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the clinical utility of modality despite of the known normal uptake of FDG in the GI tract.METHODS: Thirty-three patients with biopsy-proven gastrointestinal NHL who had undergone FDG-PET scan were included. All the patients were injected with 10-15 mCi FDG and scanned approximately 60 min later with a CTI/Siemens HR (+) PET scanner. PET scans were reviewed and the maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the lesions was measured before and after the treatment,if data were available and compared with histologic diagnoses.RESULTS: Twenty-five patients had a high-grade lymphoma and eight had a low-grade lymphoma. The stomach was the most common site of the involvement (20 patients). In high-grade lymphoma, PET showed focal nodular or diffuse hypermetabolic activity. The average SUVmax±SD was 11.58±5.83. After the therapy,the patients whose biopsies showed no evidence of lymphoma had a lower uptake without focal lesions.The SUVmax±SD decreased from 11.58±5.83 to 2.21±0.78. In patients whose post-treatment biopsies showed lymphoma, the SUVmax±SD was 9.42±6.27. Low-grade follicular lymphomas of the colon and stomach showed diffuse hypermetabolic activity in the bowel wall (SUVmax 8.2 and 10.3, respectively). The SUVmax was 2.02-3.8 (mean 3.02) in the stomach lesions of patients with MALT lymphoma.CONCLUSION: 18F-FDG PET contributes to the diagnosis of high-grade gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma,even when there is the normal background FDG activity. Furthermore, the SUV plays a role in evaluating treatment response. Low-grade NHL demonstrates FDG uptake but at a lesser intensity than seen in high-grade NHL.

  20. [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in predicting radiation pneumonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Hao; YU Jin-ming; Feng-ming Kong; LU Jie; BAI Tong; MA Li; FU Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Background Prevention is presently the only available method to limit radiation-induced lung morbidity. A good predictor is the key point of prevention. This study aimed to investigate if [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake changes in the lung after radiotherapy could be used as a new predictor for acute radiation pneumonitis (RP). Methods Forty-one patients with lung cancer underwent FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging before and after radiotherapy. The mean standardized uptake value (SUV) was measured for the isodose regions of 0-9 Gy, 10-19 Gy, 20-29 Gy, 30-39 Gy, 40-49 Gy. The mean SUV of these regions after radiotherapy was compared with baseline. The mean SUV in patients who developed RP was also compared with that in those who did not. The statistical difference was determined by matched pair t test. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)criteria were used for diagnosis and grading of RP.Results With a median follow-up of 12 months, 11 (26.8%) of the 41 patients developed grade 2 and above acute RP.The mean SUV of regions (10-19 Gy, 20-29 Gy, 30-39 Gy, 40-49 Gy) increased after radiation therapy in all 41 patients.The mean SUVs after radiation therapy were 0.54, 0.68, 1.31, 1.74 and 2.27 for 0-9 Gy, 10-19 Gy, 20-29 Gy, 30-39 Gy and 40-49 Gy, respectively. Before the radiation therapy, the mean SUV in each region was 0.53, 0.52, 0.52, 0.53 and 0.54, respectively. These patients had significantly higher FDG activities in regions receiving 10 Gy or more (P <0.001).Compared with their counterparts, the elevation of SUV was significantly greater in those patients who developed acute RP subsequently.Conclusion The mean SUV of the lung tissue may be a useful predictor for the acute RR FDG-PET/CT may play a new role in the study of the radiation damage of the lung.

  1. Role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging in surgery for pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hisao Wakabayashi; Yoshihiro Nishiyama; Tsuyoshi Otani; Takanori Sano; Shinichi Yachida; Keiichi Okano; Kunihiko Izuishi; Yasuyuki Suzuki

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the role of positron emission tomo- graphy using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in the surgical management of patients with pancreatic cancer,including the diagnosis, staging, and selection of patients for the subsequent surgical treatment.METHODS: This study involved 53 patients with proven primary pancreatic cancer. The sensitivity of diagnosing the primary cancer was examined for FDG-PET, CT,cytological examination of the bile or pancreatic juice,and the serum levels of carcinoembrionic antigens (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9). Next, the accuracy of staging was compared between FDG-PET and CT. Finally, FDG-PET was analyzed semiquantitatively using the standard uptake value (SUV). The impact of the SUV on patient management was evaluated by examining the correlations between the SUV and the histological findings of cancer.RESULTS: The sensitivity of FDG-PET, CT, cytological examination of the bile or pancreatic juice, and the serum levels of CEA and CA19-9 were 92.5%, 88.7%, 46.4%, 37.7% and 69.8%, respectively. In staging, FDG-PET was superior to CT only in diagnosing distant disease (bone metastasis). For local staging, the sensitivity of CT was better than that of FDG-PET. The SUV did not correlate with the pTNM stage, grades, invasions to the vessels and nerve, or with the size of the tumor. However, there was a statistically significant difference (4.6±2.9 vs 7.8±4.5, P = 0.024) in the SUV between patients with respectable and unresectable disease. CONCLUSION: FDG-PET is thus considered to be useful in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. However, regarding the staging of the disease, FDG-PET is not considered to be a sufficiently accurate diagnostic modality. Although the SUV does not correlate with the patho-histological prognostic factors, it may be useful in selecting patients who should undergo subsequent surgical treatment.

  2. Multitracer study with positron emission tomography in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period February 1997 to April 2000, 15 patients with clinical symptoms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) were referred to Uppsala University PET Centre. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed to detect characteristic signs of the disease, e.g. neuronal death and/or astrocytosis in the brain. The examinations were performed in one session starting with oxygen-15 labelled water scan to measure regional cerebral blood flow, followed by imaging with the monoamine oxidase B inhibitor N-[11C-methyl]-L-deuterodeprenyl (DED) to assess astrocytosis in the brain and finally imaging with fluorine-18 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to assess regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRglu). Nine of the patients fulfilled the clinical criteria of probable CJD. In eight of them, FDG and DED imaging revealed, in comparison with normal controls, a typical pattern characterized by a pronounced regional decrease (2SD) in DED binding, indicating astrocytosis. These changes were most pronounced in the cerebellum and the frontal, occipital and parietal cortices, whereas the pons, the thalamus and the putamen were less affected and the temporal cortex appeared unaffected. The cerebral blood flow showed a pattern similar to that observed with FDG. In the ninth patient, analysis with DED was not possible. The diagnosis of definite CJD according to international consensus criteria was confirmed in six of these patients. In one patient with probable CJD, protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres) could not be demonstrated. In two patients with probable CJD, autopsy was not allowed. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, performed in four and seven of these nine patients respectively, showed unspecific, mainly atrophic changes. In six other patients, the PET examinations gave a different pattern. In three of them, high rCMRglu was noticed in parts of the brain, particularly in the temporal lobes and basal ganglia, which could suggest encephalitis. One of the

  3. Molecular Imaging Probes for Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Node and Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhengtao

    Molecular imaging is visualizations and measurements of in vivo biological processes at the molecular or cellular level using specific imaging probes. As an emerging technology, biocompatible macromolecular or nanoparticle based targeted imaging probes have gained increasing popularities. Those complexes consist of a carrier, an imaging reporter, and a targeting ligand. The active targeting ability dramatically increases the specificity. And the multivalency effect may further reduce the dose while providing a decent signal. In this thesis, sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and cancer imaging are two research topics. The focus is to develop molecular imaging probes with high specificity and sensitivity, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and optical imaging. The objective of this thesis is to explore dextran radiopharmaceuticals and porous silicon nanoparticles based molecular imaging agents. Dextran polymers are excellent carriers to deliver imaging reporters or therapeutic agents due to its well established safety profile and oligosaccharide conjugation chemistry. There is also a wide selection of dextran polymers with different lengths. On the other hand, Silicon nanoparticles represent another class of biodegradable materials for imaging and drug delivery. The success in fluorescence lifetime imaging and enhancements of the immune activation potency was briefly discussed. Chapter 1 begins with an overview on current molecular imaging techniques and imaging probes. Chapter 2 presents a near-IR dye conjugated probe, IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept. Fluorophore density was optimized to generate the maximum brightness. It was labeled with 68Ga and 99mTc and in vivo SLN mapping was successfully performed in different animals, such as mice, rabbits, dogs and pigs. With 99mTc labeled IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept, chapter 3 introduces a two-day imaging protocol with a hand-held imager. Chapter 4 proposed a method to dual radiolabel the IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept with both 68Ga and

  4. Budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography – computed tomography for staging lung cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Navega Biz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To estimate the budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET in mediastinal and distant staging of non-small cell lung cancer.METHODS The estimates were calculated by the epidemiological method for years 2014 to 2018. Nation-wide data were used about the incidence; data on distribution of the disease´s prevalence and on the technologies’ accuracy were from the literature; data regarding involved costs were taken from a micro-costing study and from Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS database. Two strategies for using PET were analyzed: the offer to all newly-diagnosed patients, and the restricted offer to the ones who had negative results in previous computed tomography (CT exams. Univariate and extreme scenarios sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the influence from sources of uncertainties in the parameters used.RESULTS The incorporation of PET-CT in SUS would imply the need for additional resources of 158.1 BRL (98.2 USD million for the restricted offer and 202.7 BRL (125.9 USD million for the inclusive offer in five years, with a difference of 44.6 BRL (27.7 USD million between the two offer strategies within that period. In absolute terms, the total budget impact from its incorporation in SUS, in five years, would be 555 BRL (345 USD and 600 BRL (372.8 USD million, respectively. The costs from the PET-CT procedure were the most influential parameter in the results. In the most optimistic scenario, the additional budget impact would be reduced to 86.9 BRL (54 USD and 103.8 BRL (64.5 USD million, considering PET-CT for negative CT and PET-CT for all, respectively.CONCLUSIONS The incorporation of PET in the clinical staging of non-small cell lung cancer seems to be financially feasible considering the high budget of the Brazilian Ministry of Health. The potential reduction in the number of unnecessary surgeries may cause the available resources to be more efficiently allocated.

  5. [Examination of myocardial perfusion with positron emission tomography: a clinically useful and valid method?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    vom Dahl, J

    1997-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of the heart has gained widespread scientific and clinical acceptance with regard to 2 indications: 1. the detection of perfusion abnormalities by qualitative and semiquantitative analyses of perfusion images at rest and during physical or pharmacological stress using well validated perfusion tracers such as N-13 ammonia, Rb-82 rubidiumchloride, or O-15 labeled water, 2. Viability imaging of myocardial regions with reduced contractility by combining perfusion measurements with substrate metabolism as assessed from F-18 deoxyglucose utilization. This overview summarizes the use of PET as a perfusion imaging method. With a sensitivity > 90% in combination with a high specificity, PET is today the best available nuclear imaging technique for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The short half-life of the perfusion tracers in combination with highly sophisticated hard- and software enables rapid PET studies with high patient throughput. The high diagnostic accuracy and the methological advantages as compared to conventional scintigraphy allows to use PET perfusion imaging for detection of subtle changes of the perfusion reserve for detection of CAD in high risk but asymptomatic patients as well as in patients with proven CAD undergoing various treatment forms such as risk factor reduction or coronary revascularization. In patients following orthotopic heart transplantation, evolving transplant vasculopathy can be detected at an early stage. Quantitative PET imaging at rest allows for detection of myocardial viability since cellular survival is based on maintenance of a minimal perfusion and structural changes correlate to the degree of perfusion reduction. Furthermore, quantitative assessment of the myocardial perfusion reserve detects the magnitude and competence of collaterals in regions with occluded epicardial arteries and thus, imaging of several coronary distribution territories in one noninvasive study. The cost of

  6. Preliminary safety evaluation of a cyclotron facility for positron emission tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the design characteristics of a medical imaging centre which uses positron emission tomography, with a cyclotron for fluorine-18 and nitrogen-13 production, and which has provided experimental information on operational data recorded by area dosimetry since 1995. Doses to radiopharmacy and medical staff have been measured both in normal work and in some handling incidents. Data on radiation levels in the installation have also been obtained and related to design details and shielding. Area dosimetry was carried out using a five-stationary detector network, with a sampling rate of 2 min-1, and by thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD). Staff were also monitored by TLD, using extra chips for finger dosimetry and to duplicate individual whole-body dosimetry in order to measure doses in certain single operations. For normal work, average whole-body doses to radiopharmacy staff were between 0.03 and 0.28 mSv/month, wrist doses were between 0.42 and 2.67 mSv/month, and finger doses were between 1.4 and 7.7 mSv/day for the left hand and 0.8 and 2.4 mSv/day for the right hand; such variation reflects the differing expertise of staff and the role played by optimisation. Finger doses between 16 and 131 mSv were measured in handling incidents, and finger doses of 20.2 and 20.7 mSv for the left hand and 22.0 and 22.3 mSv for the right hand were measured during handling of a syringe without shielding, containing 3 GBq. For medical staff, contributions to the whole-body dose of 2.0 and 1.9 μSv/procedure were measured for injection and placing the patient on the examination couch, respectively. Dose measurement on the middle finger of the right hand gives an average of 70 μSv during the injection. The provisions regarding the shielding design have proved to be adequate and effective during a 3-year operational period. Operational doses to medical staff are comparatively low, while radiopharmacy staff are the most exposed. The finger doses in these professionals

  7. In-vivo detection of the erythropoietin receptor in tumours using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuge, Felix; Doleschel, Dennis; Rix, Anne; Gremse, Felix; Lederle, Wiltrud; Kiessling, Fabian [RWTH Aachen University, Department for Experimental Molecular Imaging (ExMI), Medical Faculty, Aachen (Germany); Wessner, Axel [Roche Diagnostics GmbH, R and D RPD Protein Chemistry, Penzberg (Germany); Winz, Oliver; Mottaghy, Felix [University Clinic RWTH Aachen, Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2014-09-09

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhuEpo) is used clinically to treat anaemia. However, rhuEpo-treated cancer patients show decreased survival rates and erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) expression has been found in patient tumour tissue. Thus, rhuEpo application might promote EpoR{sup +} tumour progression. We therefore developed the positron emission tomography (PET)-probe {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-rhuEpo and evaluated its performance in EpoR{sup +} A549 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) xenografts. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-rhuEpo was generated by coupling DOTA-hydrazide to carbohydrate side-chains of rhuEpo. Biodistribution was determined in tumour-bearing mice 0.5, 3, 6, and 9 h after probe injection. Competition experiments were performed by co-injecting {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-rhuEpo and rhuEpo in five-fold excess. Probe specificity was further evaluated histologically using Epo-Cy5.5 stainings. The blood half-life of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-rhuEpo was 2.6 h and the unbound fraction was cleared by the liver and kidney. After 6 h, the highest tumour to muscle ratio was reached. The highest {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-rhuEpo accumulation was found in liver (10.06 ± 6.26%ID/ml), followed by bone marrow (1.87 ± 0.53%ID/ml), kidney (1.58 ± 0.39 %ID/ml), and tumour (0.99 ± 0.16%ID/ml). EpoR presence in these organs was histologically confirmed. Competition experiments showed significantly (p < 0.05) lower PET-signals in tumour and bone marrow at 3 and 6 h. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-rhuEpo shows favourable pharmacokinetic properties and detects EpoR specifically. Therefore, it might become a valuable radiotracer to monitor EpoR status in tumours and support decision-making in anaemia therapy. (orig.)

  8. Synthesis and positron emission tomography studies of carbon-11-labeled imatinib (Gleevec)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Kun-Eek [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Ding Yushin [Department of Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8048 (United States); Lin Kuoshyan [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Alexoff, David [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Kim, Sung Won [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Shea, Colleen [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Xu Youwen [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Muench, Lisa [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Fowler, Joanna S. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States) and Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States)]. E-mail: fowler@bnl.gov

    2007-02-15

    Introduction: Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) is a well known drug for treating chronic myeloid leukemia and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Its active ingredient, imatinib ([4-[(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)methyl]-N-[4-methyl-3-[[4-(3-pyridyl) -2-pyrimidinyl]amino]phenyl]benzamide), blocks the activity of several tyrosine kinases. Here we labeled imatinib with carbon-11 as a tool for determining the drug distribution and pharmacokinetics of imatinib, and we carried out positron emission tomography (PET) studies in baboons. Methods: [N-{sup 11}C-methyl]imatinib was synthesized from [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide and norimatinib was synthesized by the demethylation of imatinib (isolated from Gleevec tablets) according to a patent procedure [Collins JM, Klecker RW Jr, Anderson LW. Imaging of drug accumulation as a guide to antitumor therapy. US Patent 20030198594A1, 2003]. Norimatinib was also synthesized from the corresponding amine and acid. PET studies were carried out in three baboons to measure pharmacokinetics in the brain and peripheral organs and to determine the effect of a therapeutic dose of imatinib. Log D and plasma protein binding were also measured. Results: [N-{sup 11}C-methyl]imatinib uptake in the brain is negligible (consistent with P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux); it peaks and clears rapidly from the heart, lungs and spleen. Peak uptake and clearance occur more slowly in the liver and kidneys, followed by accumulation in the gallbladder and urinary bladder. Pretreatment with imatinib did not change uptake in the heart, lungs, kidneys and spleen, and increased uptake in the liver and gallbladder. Conclusions: [N-{sup 11}C-methyl]imatinib has potential for assessing the regional distribution and kinetics of imatinib in the human body to determine whether the drug targets tumors and to identify other organs to which the drug or its labeled metabolites distribute. Paired with tracers such as 2'deoxy-2'-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose ({sup 18}FDG) and 3&apos

  9. Radiolabeling human peripheral blood stem cells for positron emission tomography (PET imaging in young rhesus monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice F Tarantal

    Full Text Available These studies focused on a new radiolabeling technique with copper ((64Cu and zirconium ((89Zr for positron emission tomography (PET imaging using a CD45 antibody. Synthesis of (64Cu-CD45 and (89Zr-CD45 immunoconjugates was performed and the evaluation of the potential toxicity of radiolabeling human peripheral blood stem cells (hPBSC was assessed in vitro (viability, population doubling times, colony forming units. hPBSC viability was maintained as the dose of (64Cu-TETA-CD45 increased from 0 (92% to 160 µCi/mL (76%, p>0.05. Radiolabeling efficiency was not significantly increased with concentrations of (64Cu-TETA-CD45 >20 µCi/mL (p>0.50. Toxicity affecting both growth and colony formation was observed with hPBSC radiolabeled with ≥40 µCi/mL (p0.05, and a trend towards increased radiolabeling efficiency was noted as the dose of (89Zr-Df-CD45 increased, with a greater level of radiolabeling with 160 µCi/mL compared to 0-40 µCi/mL (p<0.05. A greater than 2,000 fold-increase in the level of (89Zr-Df-CD45 labeling efficiency was observed when compared to (64Cu-TETA-CD45. Similar to (64Cu-TETA-CD45, toxicity was noted when hPBSC were radiolabeled with ≥40 µCi/mL (p<0.05 (growth, colony formation. Taken together, 20 µCi/mL resulted in the highest level of radiolabeling efficiency without altering cell function. Young rhesus monkeys that had been transplanted prenatally with 25×10(6 hPBSC expressing firefly luciferase were assessed with bioluminescence imaging (BLI, then 0.3 mCi of (89Zr-Df-CD45, which showed the best radiolabeling efficiency, was injected intravenously for PET imaging. Results suggest that (89Zr-Df-CD45 was able to identify engrafted hPBSC in the same locations identified by BLI, although the background was high.

  10. Role of Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in the Management of Anal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistrangelo, Massimiliano, E-mail: mistrangelo@katamail.com [Digestive and Colorectal Surgical Department, Centre of Minimal Invasive Surgery, University of Turin, Molinette Hospital, Turin (Italy); Pelosi, Ettore [PET Center IRMET spa, Turin (Italy); Bello, Marilena [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Turin, Molinette Hospital (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Turin, Molinette Hospital (Italy); Milanesi, Enrica [Oncological Centre for Gastrointestinal Neoplasms, University of Turin, Molinette Hospital (Italy); Cassoni, Paola [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, University of Turin, Molinette Hospital (Italy); Baccega, Massimo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Molinette Hospital (Italy); Filippini, Claudia [Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, University of Turin, Molinette Hospital (Italy); Racca, Patrizia [Oncological Centre for Gastrointestinal Neoplasms, University of Turin, Molinette Hospital (Italy); Lesca, Adriana [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Molinette Hospital (Italy); Munoz, Fernando H. [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Turin, Molinette Hospital (Italy); Fora, Gianluca [Oncological Centre for Gastrointestinal Neoplasms, University of Turin, Molinette Hospital (Italy); Skanjeti, Andrea [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Turin, Molinette Hospital (Italy); Cravero, Francesca; Morino, Mario [Digestive and Colorectal Surgical Department, Centre of Minimal Invasive Surgery, University of Turin, Molinette Hospital, Turin (Italy)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Pre- and post-treatment staging of anal cancer are often inaccurate. The role of positron emission tomograpy-computed tomography (PET-CT) in anal cancer is yet to be defined. The aim of the study was to compare PET-CT with CT scan, sentinel node biopsy results of inguinal lymph nodes, and anal biopsy results in staging and in follow-up of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three consecutive patients diagnosed with anal cancer underwent PET-CT. Results were compared with computed tomography (CT), performed in 40 patients, and with sentinel node biopsy (SNB) (41 patients) at pretreatment workup. Early follow-up consisted of a digital rectal examination, an anoscopy, a PET-CT scan, and anal biopsies performed at 1 and 3 months after the end of treatment. Data sets were then compared. Results: At pretreatment assessment, anal cancer was identified by PET-CT in 47 patients (88.7%) and by CT in 30 patients (75%). The detection rates rose to 97.9% with PET-CT and to 82.9% with CT (P=.042) when the 5 patients who had undergone surgery prior to this assessment and whose margins were positive at histological examination were censored. Perirectal and/or pelvic nodes were considered metastatic by PET-CT in 14 of 53 patients (26.4%) and by CT in 7 of 40 patients (17.5%). SNB was superior to both PET-CT and CT in detecting inguinal lymph nodes. PET-CT upstaged 37.5% of patients and downstaged 25% of patients. Radiation fields were changed in 12.6% of patients. PET-CT at 3 months was more accurate than PET-CT at 1 month in evaluating outcomes after chemoradiation therapy treatment: sensitivity was 100% vs 66.6%, and specificity was 97.4% vs 92.5%, respectively. Median follow-up was 20.3 months. Conclusions: In this series, PET-CT detected the primary tumor more often than CT. Staging of perirectal/pelvic or inguinal lymph nodes was better with PET-CT. SNB was more accurate in staging inguinal lymph nodes.

  11. Reactive astrocytes over express TSPO and are detected by TSPO Positron Emission Tomography Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrocytes and micro-glia become reactive under most brain pathological conditions, making this neuro-inflammation process a surrogate marker of neuronal dysfunction. Neuro-inflammation is associated with increased levels of translocator protein 18kDa(TSPO) and binding sites for TSPO ligands. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of TSPO is thus commonly used to monitor neuro-inflammation in preclinical and clinical studies. It is widely considered that TSPO PET signal reveals reactive micro-glia, although a few studies suggested a potential contribution of reactive astrocytes. Because astrocytes and micro-glia play very different roles, it is crucial to determine whether reactive astrocytes can also over-express TSPO and yield to a detectable TSPO PET signal in vivo. We used a model of selective astrocyte activation through lentiviral gene transfer of the cytokine ciliary neuro-trophic factor (CNTF) into the rat striatum, in the absence of neuro-degeneration. CNTF induced an extensive activation of astrocytes, which over-expressed GFAP and become hypertrophic, whereas micro-glia displayed minimal increase in reactive markers.Two TSPO radioligands, [18F]DPA-714[N,N-diethyl-2-(2-(4-(2-[18F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl) - 5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)acetamide] and [11C]SSR180575 (7-chloro-N,N-dimethyl-5-[11C]methyl-4-oxo-3-phenyl - 3,5-dihydro-4H-pyridazino[4,5- b]indole-1-acetamide),showed a significant binding in the lenti-CNTF-injected striatum that was saturated and displaced by PK11195[N-methyl- N-(1-methylpropyl)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)-isoquinoline-3-carboxamide]. The volume of radioligand binding matched the GFAP immuno-positive volume. TSPO mRNA levels were significantly increased, and TSPO protein was over-expressed by CNTF-activated astrocytes. We show that reactive astrocytes over-express TSPO, yielding to a significant and selective binding of TSPO radioligands. Therefore, caution must be used when interpreting TSPO PET imaging in animals or

  12. Pathophysiological aspects of malignant brain tumors studied with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To further understand the control of brain tumor fluid balance and pH, the following studies were undertaken. The transport of a water soluble molecule across the brain and tumor capillary endothelium was studied during glucocorticoid and radiation treatment. The brain and brain-tumor acidity (pH) was evaluated as a single measurement in patients receiving a low maintenance dose of glucocorticoid. Transport changes and pH were measured in 61 patients with cerebral tumors using 82Rubidium (82Rb) and 11C-Dimethyloxa-zolidindione (11C-DMO), respectively, and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Supplementary studies of tumor and contralateral brain blood flow and blood volume using the C15O2/PET and C15O/PET technique, respectively, were included to validate the 82Rb/PET model and obtain further information. A total of 125 PET scans were performed. Supplementary studies were undertaken to estimate delay of blood registration and form distribution of arterial blood isotope activity curves. Blood-to-tumor barrier transport was outlined at baseline and at 6 and 24 hours after the start of glucocorticoid treatment, finding a significant decrease in the transpfort. Radiation treatment (2-6 gray) did not alter the blood-to-tumor barrier transport when restudied within one hour in patients receiving glucocorticoid. The pH in brain tumors was as high as 6.88-7.26, suggesting that tumors are more alkalotic than the normal brain. The permeability surface area product and the permeability coefficient were determined form the 82Rb/PET transport and C15O2/PET flow studies. Baseline permeability values were comparable to the literature values both for 82Rb and potassium. No difference in tissue blood volume was seen between 82Rb/PET and C15O/PET models and was of the same magnitude in the tumor and the contralateral tissue. Aspects of tumor alkalosis, tumor edema production, glucocorticoid edema clearance, and relationship between the anti-edema effect of glucocorticoid and the

  13. Characterization of positron emission tomography hypoxia tracer uptake and tissue oxygenation via electrochemical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, Stephen R., E-mail: srbowen@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kogel, Albert J. van der [University Medical Centre St. Radboud, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nordsmark, Marianne [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus (Denmark); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Human Oncology, Clinical Sciences Center, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Jeraj, Robert [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Human Oncology, Clinical Sciences Center, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Unique uptake and retention mechanisms of positron emission tomography (PET) hypoxia tracers make in vivo comparison between them challenging. Differences in imaged uptake of two common hypoxia radiotracers, [{sup 61}Cu]Cu-ATSM and [{sup 18}F]FMISO, were characterized via computational modeling to address these challenges. Materials and Methods: An electrochemical formalism describing bioreductive retention mechanisms of these tracers under steady-state conditions was adopted to relate time-averaged activity concentration to tissue partial oxygen tension (PO{sub 2}), a common metric of hypoxia. Chemical equilibrium constants of product concentration to reactant concentration ratios were determined from free energy changes and reduction potentials of pertinent reactions reported in the literature. Resulting transformation functions between tracer uptake and PO{sub 2} were compared against measured values in preclinical models. Additionally, calculated PO{sub 2} distributions from imaged Cu-ATSM tracer activity concentrations of 12 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients were validated against microelectrode PO{sub 2} measurements in 69 HNSCC patients. Results: Both Cu-ASTM- and FMISO-modeled PO{sub 2} transformation functions were in agreement with preclinical measured values within single-deviation confidence intervals. High correlation (r{sup 2}=0.94, P<.05) was achieved between modeled PO{sub 2} distributions and measured distributions in the patient populations. On average, microelectrode hypoxia thresholds (2.5 and 5.0 mmHg) corresponded to higher Cu-ATSM uptake [2.5 and 2.0 standardized uptake value (SUV)] and lower FMISO uptake (2.0 and 1.4 SUV). Uncertainties in the models were dominated by variations in the estimated specific activity and intracellular acidity. Conclusions: Results indicated that the high dynamic range of Cu-ATSM uptake was representative of a narrow range of low oxygen tension whose values were dependent on

  14. Ventilation/Perfusion Positron Emission Tomography—Based Assessment of Radiation Injury to Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate 68Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) as a novel imaging modality for assessment of perfusion, ventilation, and lung density changes in the context of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In a prospective clinical trial, 20 patients underwent 4-dimensional (4D)-V/Q PET/CT before, midway through, and 3 months after definitive lung RT. Eligible patients were prescribed 60 Gy in 30 fractions with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Functional images were registered to the RT planning 4D-CT, and isodose volumes were averaged into 10-Gy bins. Within each dose bin, relative loss in standardized uptake value (SUV) was recorded for ventilation and perfusion, and loss in air-filled fraction was recorded to assess RT-induced lung fibrosis. A dose-effect relationship was described using both linear and 2-parameter logistic fit models, and goodness of fit was assessed with Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Results: A total of 179 imaging datasets were available for analysis (1 scan was unrecoverable). An almost perfectly linear negative dose-response relationship was observed for perfusion and air-filled fraction (r2=0.99, P<.01), with ventilation strongly negatively linear (r2=0.95, P<.01). Logistic models did not provide a better fit as evaluated by AIC. Perfusion, ventilation, and the air-filled fraction decreased 0.75 ± 0.03%, 0.71 ± 0.06%, and 0.49 ± 0.02%/Gy, respectively. Within high-dose regions, higher baseline perfusion SUV was associated with greater rate of loss. At 50 Gy and 60 Gy, the rate of loss was 1.35% (P=.07) and 1.73% (P=.05) per SUV, respectively. Of 8/20 patients with peritumoral reperfusion/reventilation during treatment, 7/8 did not sustain this effect after treatment. Conclusions: Radiation-induced regional lung functional deficits occur in a dose-dependent manner and can be estimated by simple linear models with 4D-V/Q PET/CT imaging. These

  15. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virador, Patrick R.G.

    2000-04-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  16. Study of the silicon photomultipliers and their applications in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) used in scintillation detectors and their applications in positron emission tomography (PET). The study of the SiPM is mainly focused on the application to the proposed EndoTOFPET-US detector, which is a multi-modality PET detector facilitating the development of new biomarkers for pancreas and prostate cancers. A Monte Carlo simulation tool is developed for the optimization of the detector's single channel design. In order to obtain a 200 ps system coincidence time resolution and maximize the detector sensitivity, the requirements for the crystal geometry, light yield and SiPM photon detection efficiency are specified based on the simulation study. In addition, the nonlinear response of the SiPM can be corrected by the simulation tool and the energy resolution of the detector is extracted. A series of measurements are established to characterize SiPMs in a fast and reliable way with high precision. The static characterization measures the value of different components in the derived electrical model of the SiPM, whereas the dynamic characterization extracts parameters that is crucial for the operation of the SiPM. Several SiPM samples are tested and their characteristics are compared. The developed setup and the precision of the measurement fulfill the requirements of the quality assurance test for the commissioning of the EndoTOFPET-US detector. The test foresees large quantities of SiPMs to be characterized. In addition, the developed measuring procedure has contributed to the study of X-ray induced surface damage of a SiPM from Hamamatsu. Characteristics of the device are measured before and after irradiating the SiPM with different X-ray doses, the results are compared and discussed. A comparative study of a digital and an analog SiPM in gamma spectroscopy with the inorganic scintillator is presented. The characteristics of a prototype digital SiPM that is developed for the EndoTOFPETUS detector is

  17. Development of a prototype Open-close positron emission tomography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Ogata, Yoshimune; Kato, Katsuhiko [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Nagoya (Japan); Hatazawa, Jun [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    We developed a prototype positron emission tomography (PET) system based on a new concept called Open-close PET, which has two modes: open and close-modes. In the open-mode, the detector ring is separated into two halved rings and subject is imaged with the open space and projection image is formed. In the close-mode, the detector ring is closed to be a regular circular ring, and the subject can be imaged without an open space, and so reconstructed images can be made without artifacts. The block detector of the Open-close PET system consists of two scintillator blocks that use two types of gadolinium orthosilicate (GSO) scintillators with different decay times, angled optical fiber-based image guides, and a flat panel photomultiplier tube. The GSO pixel size was 1.6 × 2.4 × 7 mm and 8 mm for fast (35 ns) and slow (60 ns) GSOs, respectively. These GSOs were arranged into an 11 × 15 matrix and optically coupled in the depth direction to form a depth-of-interaction detector. The angled optical fiber-based image guides were used to arrange the two scintillator blocks at 22.5° so that they can be arranged in a hexadecagonal shape with eight block detectors to simplify the reconstruction algorithm. The detector ring was divided into two halves to realize the open-mode and set on a mechanical stand with which the distance between the two parts can be manually changed. The spatial resolution in the close-mode was 2.4-mm FWHM, and the sensitivity was 1.7% at the center of the field-of-view. In both the close- and open-modes, we made sagittal (y-z plane) projection images between the two halved detector rings. We obtained reconstructed and projection images of {sup 18}F-NaF rat studies and proton-irradiated phantom images. These results indicate that our developed Open-close PET is useful for some applications such as proton therapy as well as other applications such as molecular imaging.

  18. Metabolism and quantification of [18F]DPA-714, a new TSPO positron emission tomography radioligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [18F]DPA-714 [N,N-diethyl-2-(2-(4-(2[18F]-fluoroethoxy)phenyl) 5,7-dimethyl-pyrazolo[1,5a]pyrimidin-3-yl)acetamide] is a new radioligand currently used for imaging the 18-kDa translocator protein in animal models of neuro-inflammation and recently in humans. The biodistribution by positron emission tomography (PET) in baboons and the in vitro and in vivo metabolism of [18F]DPA-714 were investigated in rats, baboons, and humans. Whole-body PET experiments showed a high uptake of radioactivity in the kidneys, heart, liver, and gallbladder. The liver was a major route of elimination of [18F]DPA-714, and urine was a route of excretion for radio-metabolites. In rat and baboon plasma, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) metabolic profiles showed three major radio-metabolites accounting for 85% and 89% of total radioactivity at 120 minutes after injection, respectively. Rat microsomal incubations and analyses by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) identified seven metabolites, characterized as O-de-ethyl, hydroxyl, and N-de-ethyl derivatives of nonradioactive DPA-714, two of them having the same retention times than those detected in rat and baboon plasma. The third plasma radio-metabolite was suggested to be a carboxylic acid compound that accounted for 15% of the rat brain radioactivity. O-de-ethylation led to a nonradioactive compound and [18F] fluoroacetic acid. Human CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 were shown to be involved in the oxidation of the radioligand. Finally an easy, rapid, and accurate method-indispensable for PET quantitative clinical studies - for quantifying [18F]DPA-714 by solid-phase extraction was developed. In vivo, an extensive metabolism of [18F]DPA-714 was observed in rats and baboons, identified as [18F]de-ethyl, [18F]hydroxyl, and [18F]carboxylic acid derivatives of [18F]DPA-714. The main route of excretion of the unchanged radioligand in baboons was hepatobiliary while that of radio-metabolites was the urinary system. (authors)

  19. Transfer of learning with an application to the physics of positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Bijaya

    2007-12-01

    A series of teaching activities using physical models was developed to present some portions of physics of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and investigate students' understanding and transfer of learning in physics to a medical technology. A teaching interview protocol consistent with a qualitative research methodology was developed and administered to the students enrolled in an algebra-based introductory level physics course. 16 students participated in individual interviews and another 21 students participated in the group sessions. The major objectives of the teaching interviews were to investigate students' transfer of physics learning from their prior experiences to the provided physical models, from one model to the other and from the models to the PET problems. The study adapted phenomenological research methodology in analyzing students' use of cognitive resources and cognitive strategies during knowledge construction and reconstruction. A resource based transfer model framed under the cognitive theory of learning and consistent with contemporary views of transfer was used to describe the transfer of physics learning. Results of the study indicated both appropriate and inappropriate use of the students' prior conceptual resources in novel contexts. Scaffolding and questioning were found to be effective in activating appropriate and suppressing the inappropriate resources. The physical models used as analogies were found useful in transferring physics learning to understand image construction in PET. Positive transfer was possible when the models were introduced in an appropriate sequence. The results of the study indicate the occurrence of three types of non-scaffolded transfer---spontaneous, semi spontaneous and non-spontaneous. The research found connections between sequencing of hints and phrasing of information in activating students' different conceptual resources. A qualitative investigation based on Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD

  20. Positron emission tomography imaging of CD105 expression during tumor angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hao [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yunan [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Third Military Medical University, Department of Ultrasound, Xinqiao Hospital, Chongqing (China); Zhang, Yin; Engle, Jonathan W.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Leigh, Bryan R. [TRACON Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Overexpression of CD105 (endoglin) correlates with poor prognosis in many solid tumor types. Tumor microvessel density (MVD) assessed by CD105 staining is the current gold standard for evaluating tumor angiogenesis in the clinic. The goal of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for imaging CD105 expression. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was conjugated to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and labeled with {sup 64}Cu. FACS analysis and microscopy studies were performed to compare the CD105 binding affinity of TRC105 and DOTA-TRC105. PET imaging, biodistribution, blocking, and ex vivo histology studies were performed on 4T1 murine breast tumor-bearing mice to evaluate the ability of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-TRC105 to target tumor angiogenesis. Another chimeric antibody, cetuximab, was used as an isotype-matched control. FACS analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity between TRC105 and DOTA-TRC105, which was further validated by fluorescence microscopy. {sup 64}Cu labeling was achieved with high yield and specific activity. Serial PET imaging revealed that the 4T1 tumor uptake of the tracer was 8.0 {+-} 0.5, 10.4 {+-} 2.8, and 9.7 {+-} 1.8%ID/g at 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection, respectively (n = 3), higher than most organs at late time points which provided excellent tumor contrast. Biodistribution data as measured by gamma counting were consistent with the PET findings. Blocking experiments, control studies with {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-cetuximab, as well as ex vivo histology all confirmed the in vivo target specificity of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-TRC105. This is the first successful PET imaging study of CD105 expression. Fast, prominent, persistent, and CD105-specific uptake of the tracer in the 4T1 tumor was observed. Further studies are warranted and currently underway. (orig.)

  1. Ventilation/Perfusion Positron Emission Tomography—Based Assessment of Radiation Injury to Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siva, Shankar, E-mail: shankar.siva@petermac.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Hardcastle, Nicholas [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Bressel, Mathias [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Callahan, Jason [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); MacManus, Michael P.; Shaw, Mark; Plumridge, Nikki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Steinfort, Daniel [Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Department of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Ball, David L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Hofman, Michael S. [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate {sup 68}Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) as a novel imaging modality for assessment of perfusion, ventilation, and lung density changes in the context of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In a prospective clinical trial, 20 patients underwent 4-dimensional (4D)-V/Q PET/CT before, midway through, and 3 months after definitive lung RT. Eligible patients were prescribed 60 Gy in 30 fractions with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Functional images were registered to the RT planning 4D-CT, and isodose volumes were averaged into 10-Gy bins. Within each dose bin, relative loss in standardized uptake value (SUV) was recorded for ventilation and perfusion, and loss in air-filled fraction was recorded to assess RT-induced lung fibrosis. A dose-effect relationship was described using both linear and 2-parameter logistic fit models, and goodness of fit was assessed with Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Results: A total of 179 imaging datasets were available for analysis (1 scan was unrecoverable). An almost perfectly linear negative dose-response relationship was observed for perfusion and air-filled fraction (r{sup 2}=0.99, P<.01), with ventilation strongly negatively linear (r{sup 2}=0.95, P<.01). Logistic models did not provide a better fit as evaluated by AIC. Perfusion, ventilation, and the air-filled fraction decreased 0.75 ± 0.03%, 0.71 ± 0.06%, and 0.49 ± 0.02%/Gy, respectively. Within high-dose regions, higher baseline perfusion SUV was associated with greater rate of loss. At 50 Gy and 60 Gy, the rate of loss was 1.35% (P=.07) and 1.73% (P=.05) per SUV, respectively. Of 8/20 patients with peritumoral reperfusion/reventilation during treatment, 7/8 did not sustain this effect after treatment. Conclusions: Radiation-induced regional lung functional deficits occur in a dose-dependent manner and can be estimated by simple linear models with 4D-V/Q PET

  2. Multitracer study with positron emission tomography in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engler, Henry [Uppsala University PET Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, SE 751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Neurology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Lundberg, Per Olov [Department of Neurology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Ekbom, Karl [Department of Neurology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Nennesmo, Inger [Department of Pathology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Nilsson, Anna; Bergstroem, Mats; Hartvig, Per; Laangstroem, Bengt [Uppsala University PET Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, SE 751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Tsukada, Hideo [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.Central Research Lab, Hamakita City (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    During the period February 1997 to April 2000, 15 patients with clinical symptoms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) were referred to Uppsala University PET Centre. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed to detect characteristic signs of the disease, e.g. neuronal death and/or astrocytosis in the brain. The examinations were performed in one session starting with oxygen-15 labelled water scan to measure regional cerebral blood flow, followed by imaging with the monoamine oxidase B inhibitor N-[{sup 11}C-methyl]-L-deuterodeprenyl (DED) to assess astrocytosis in the brain and finally imaging with fluorine-18 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to assess regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMR{sub glu}). Nine of the patients fulfilled the clinical criteria of probable CJD. In eight of them, FDG and DED imaging revealed, in comparison with normal controls, a typical pattern characterized by a pronounced regional decrease (<2SD) in glucose brain metabolism, indicative of neuronal dysfunction; this was accompanied by a similar increase (>2SD) in DED binding, indicating astrocytosis. These changes were most pronounced in the cerebellum and the frontal, occipital and parietal cortices, whereas the pons, the thalamus and the putamen were less affected and the temporal cortex appeared unaffected. The cerebral blood flow showed a pattern similar to that observed with FDG. In the ninth patient, analysis with DED was not possible. The diagnosis of definite CJD according to international consensus criteria was confirmed in six of these patients. In one patient with probable CJD, protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres) could not be demonstrated. In two patients with probable CJD, autopsy was not allowed. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, performed in four and seven of these nine patients respectively, showed unspecific, mainly atrophic changes. In six other patients, the PET examinations gave a different pattern. In three of them, high rCMR{sub glu} was

  3. Positron emission tomography in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGonigal A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aileen McGonigal,1–3 Marie Arthuis,3 Jean-Arthur Micoulaud-Franchi,4,5 Fabrice Bartolomei,1–3 Eric Guedj6–8 1Institut de Neurosciences des Systèmes, INSERM UMR 1106, Marseille, France; 2Aix Marseille University, Faculty of Medicine, Marseille, France; 3Clinical Neurophysiology Department, Timone Hospital, Marseille, France; 4Department of Functional Investigation of the Nervous System, Sleep Clinic, Bordeaux University Hospital, Bordeaux, France; 5USR CNRS 3413, University of Bordeaux, France; 6Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine Department, Timone Hospital, Marseille, France; 7Aix-Marseille University, CERIMED, Marseille, France; 8Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, UMR7289, INT, Marseille, FranceWe have read with interest the recent review entitled “Uncovering the etiology of conversion disorder: insights from functional neuroimaging” by Maryam Ejareh dar and Richard AA Kanaan,1 published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment. Our paper on resting state brain metabolism measured by positron emission tomography (PET was included and discussed.2 We were most surprised to see that the authors of the review seem to have misunderstood the findings of our study, which concerned patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES. The authors state that the 16 patients included in our study “were later found to have PNES with comorbid epilepsy”. This is incorrect, since our study included only patients with PNES in whom comorbid epilepsy was excluded. This crucial point is indeed detailed in the Methods section of our article and clearly stated in the abstract: “in all patients, the diagnosis was subsequently confirmed to be PNES with no coexisting epilepsy.” It is thus on the basis of incorrect understanding of our results that Drs Ejareh dar and Kanaan discuss the possible significance of hypometabolism in the anterior cingulate region described in our paper, and erroneously suggest that interpretation of PET findings is

  4. Depressed cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with chronic renal failure. A positron emission tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to elucidate brain oxygen metabolism in uremic patients, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction (rOEF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO2) were measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in both 10 hemodialysis patients (HD: male [m]/female [f]=2/8, age of 49±3 [SEM] years old, HD duration of 113±26 months) and 13 pre-dialysis renal failure patients (CRF: m/f=10/3, age of 61±2 years old, serum creatinine (SCr) of 6.3±1.0 mg/dl). Data were compared with 20 non-uremic subjects (Control: m/f=7/13, age of 62±2 years old, SCr of 0.9±0.1 mg/dl). They had no neurological abnormalities, congestive heart failure, history of cerebrovascular accident, diabetes mellitus, or symptomatic brain lesion on magnetic resonance imaging. The age of HD was significantly younger than the other groups (p2 in both HD (1.82±0.10 ml/min/100 g) and CRF (1.95±0.09) showed significantly lower values as compared to Control (2.23±0.05) (p<0.01, respectively). Hemispheric rCBF in HD (35.6±2.1 ml/100 g/min) and in CRF (36.1±2.1) were not different from that in Control (31.8±1.4). Hemispheric rOEF in CRF (45.7±1.6%) was significantly higher than that in Control (40.5±1.2%) (p<0.02), but that in HD (43.7±1.9%) did not increase significantly. These tendencies were similar in all regions of interest, especially in the cerebral cortices, but not in the cerebellum. All PET parameters in the frontal cortices tended to show the lowest value in renal failure patients. For all HD patients, rCBF in both the frontal cortex and the white matter correlated inversely with HD duration (frontal cortex: r=-0.649, p<0.05; white matter: r=-0.706, p<0.02). Based on these data, it is concluded that brain oxygen metabolism is depressed in renal failure patients on or before hemodialysis treatment. The cause for the depressed brain oxygen metabolism is considered to be due either to the dysregulation of cerebral circulation or to lower brain cell activity. (author)

  5. Are restrictions to behaviour of patients required following fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic studies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical use of positron emission tomography (PET) is expanding rapidly in most European countries. It is likely therefore that patients receiving the tracer fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) will be discharged to come into contact with family members, members of the public and ward staff. There are few direct measurements on which to base any recommendations with regard to radiation protection, and so we have measured the dose rates from patients undergoing clinical PET examinations in our centre. Seventy-five patients who underwent whole-body and brain 18FDG PET examinations were studied. Dose rates were measured at 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 m from the mid thorax on leaving the department. The median administered activity was 323 MBq with a 95th percentile value of 360 MBq. The median dose rates measured at the four distances were 90.0, 35.0, 14.0 and 5.0 μSv h-1 (the median dose rates per unit administered activity at 2 h post injection were 0.31, 0.11, 0.04 and 0.02 μSv h-1 MBq-1). The corresponding 95th percentile values were 174.0, 69.0, 29.0 and 7.5 μSv h-1 (0.43, 0.2, 0.08 and 0.03 μSv h-1 MBq-1). A number of social situations were modelled and an annual dose limit of 1 mSv was used to determine whether restrictive behavioural advice was required. In the case of nursing staff on wards a value of 6 mSv was regarded as the annual limit, which translates to a daily limit of approximately 24 μSv. There is no need for restrictive advice for patients travelling by public or private transport when they leave the department 2 h after the administration of 18FDG. Similarly, there is no need for restrictive advice with regard to their contact with partners, work colleagues or children of any age, although it should be stressed that children should not accompany the patient to the scanning department. The only possible area of concern is in an oncology ward, where patients may be regularly referred for PET investigations and other high activity radionuclide

  6. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  7. Metastatic superscan in prostate carcinoma on gallium-68-prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Tripathi, Madhavi; Kumar, Rajeev; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    We describe the imaging features of a metastatic superscan on gallium-68 Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys-(Ahx)-[Ga-68(HBED-CC)], abbreviated as gallium-68-prostate-specific membrane antigen (68Ga-PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. 68Ga-PSMA is novel radiotracer undergoing evaluation for PET/CT imaging of prostate carcinoma. This patient had a superscan of metastases on conventional bone scintigraphy and was referred for 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT to evaluate the feasibility of 177Lu-PSMA therapy. PMID:27095868

  8. A Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound Guided Biopsy and Positron Emission Tomography with Integrated Computed Tomography in Lung Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stine Schmidt; Vilmann, P; Krasnik, K;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Exact staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is important to improve selection of resectable and curable patients for surgery. Positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT) and endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle...... aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) are new and promising methods, but indications in lung cancer staging are controversial. Only few studies have compared the 2 methods. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the diagnostic values of PET/CT and EUS-FNA for diagnosing advanced lung cancer in patients, who...

  9. A comparison of endoscopic ultrasound guided biopsy and positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography in lung cancer staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S S; Vilmann, P; Krasnik, K;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Exact staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is important to improve selection of resectable and curable patients for surgery. Positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT) and endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle...... aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) are new and promising methods, but indications in lung cancer staging are controversial. Only few studies have compared the 2 methods. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the diagnostic values of PET/CT and EUS-FNA for diagnosing advanced lung cancer in patients, who...

  10. Possibilities of positron emission tomography in the diagnosis of primary and recurrent ovarian cancer: a review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Ashrafyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is a current radionuclide imaging technique that can supplement a diagnostic process with information on physiological and metabolic disorders in the foci of injury and specify the characteristics of a tumor process. The paper analyzes publications on the use of PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in different clinical situations in the presence of ovarian cancer for both the identification of early-stage disease, the differential diagnosis of ovarian masses and the timely detection of recurrences, follow-up during and after combination treatment. The authors’ opinions that the technique is restricted, which yields false-positive and false-negative results, are given.

  11. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism and increased brain capillary permeability following high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: a positron emission tomographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional glucose metabolic rate constants and blood-to-brain transport of rubidium were estimated using positron emission tomography in an adolescent patient with a brain tumor, before and after chemotherapy with intravenous high-dose methotrexate. Widespread depression of cerebral glucose metabolism was apparent 24 hours after drug administration, which may reflect reduced glucose phosphorylation, and the influx rate constant for 82Rb was increased, indicating a drug-induced alteration in blood-brain barrier function. Associated changes in neuropsychological performance, electroencephalogram, and plasma amino acid concentration were identified in the absence of evidence of systemic methotrexate toxicity, suggesting primary methotrexate neurotoxicity

  12. 99mTc bone scan and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in evaluation of disseminated langerhans cell histiocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare histiocytic disorder in which pathological langerhans cells accumulate in a variety of organs. Manifestations may include lung infiltrates, lymph node involvements, bone lesions, hepatic, hematopoietic and endocrine dysfunctions. In this case report we present fluorine-18 positron emission tomography (F-18 PET/CT) and bone scintigraphy findings of a 18-year-old male patient with disseminated LCH, mimicking multiple hypermetabolic metastatic lesions. Clinicians should be aware that LCH infiltrations can be seen as intense uptake and to differentiate infiltrations from other metastatic intense uptake with fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and bone scintigraphy, clinical and laboratory findings should be kept in mind. (author)

  13. Contrast-enhanced 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in immunoglobulin G4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease encompasses a wide variety of immune disorders previously thought be distinct. IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis is one such entity. Metabolic imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can be useful in the management of IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis. We here discuss the case of 63-year-old male with IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis and the role, 18F-FDG PET/CT played in his management

  14. The Role of 18F-FDG-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Staging Primary Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Niikura, Naoto T. Ueno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite Medicare approving the use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT in staging primary breast cancer, little evidence is available to support the use of 18F-FDG-PET/CT for the detection of distant metastases in the initial staging of breast cancer. In this review of the literature listed in MEDLINE, we examine whether 18F-FDG-PET/CT may play a role in the initial staging of breast cancer. We discuss studies comparing PET/CT with conventional imaging for diagnosing distant metastases and axillary and extra-axillary lymph node metastases.

  15. Positron Emission Mammography Imaging with Low Activity Fluorodeoxyglucose and Novel Utilization in Core-needle Biopsy Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhery, Sadia; Seiler, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM), a relatively novel breast imaging modality, provides certain advantages over magnetic resonance imaging, including the ability to image biopsy samples. However, the radiation activity associated with PEM has remained a concern in clinical practice. We present a case of an invasive ductal carcinoma that was adequately imaged with a much lower than the standard 185 to 370 MBq activity of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose. In addition, we demonstrate ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy sample imaging with PEM to assess adequacy of sampling, a strategy that has previously only been documented with vacuum-assisted biopsy samples. PMID:25709550

  16. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a case of non-ketotic hyperglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemichorea and generalized chorea are rare syndromes associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia. This disorder usually afflicts elderly females, and may herald the onset of new onset diabetes, usually type 2. There are conflicting reports of the underlying pathophysiology of this rare entity. Magnetic resonance imaging findings have been described in the past, and are characteristic. There are very few reports of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) findings of this unusual dyskinetic syndrome. This report describes the PET/CT features of this rare disease. Early detection and prompt correction of hyperglycemia may lead to complete or significant amelioration of symptoms

  17. Venous thrombosis of sarcoidosis as an unusual incidental finding on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcoidosis is defined as a multisystem granulomatous disorder of unknown cause. Venous thrombosis (VT) in the sarcoidosis is rare. The routine use of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) has resulted in clinicians detecting many incidental findings, which have proven to be clinically significant such as thrombosis. Here, we present a case with VT of sarcoidosis in the inferior vena cava and portal vein as an unusual incidental finding on 18F-FDG PET/CT

  18. Splenic and lymph nodal involvement in sarcoidosis mimicking lymphoma on fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease presenting with well-defined, bilateral, symmetric hilar and right paratracheal lymph node enlargement. Recently, fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) has been used to stage and detect occult site of active inflammation in sarcoidosis. F-18 FDG PET/CT has become a cornerstone imaging modality in the modern lymphoma management, which can present with generalized lymphadenopathy including mediastinal. We present a case series, which shows how sarcoidosis can be a “great mimic of lymphoma” on F-18 FDG PET/CT and how histopathology is essential in diagnosing sarcoidosis and ruling out lymphoma

  19. A liquid Xenon Positron Emission Tomograph for small animal imaging : first experimental results of a prototype cell

    CERN Document Server

    Gallin-Martel, M L; Grondin, Y; Rossetto, O; Collot, J; Grondin, D; Jan, S; Martin, Ph; Mayet, F; Petit, P; Vezzu, F

    2008-01-01

    A detector using liquid Xenon (LXe) in the scintillation mode is studied for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of small animals. Its specific design aims at taking full advantage of the Liquid Xenon scintillation properties. This paper reports on energy, time and spatial resolution capabilities of the first LXe prototype module equipped with a Position Sensitive Photo- Multiplier tube (PSPMT) operating in the VUV range (178 nm) and at 165 K. The experimental results show that such a LXe PET configuration might be a promising solution insensitive to any parallax effect.

  20. [Capabilities of positron emission tomography to study mecha-nisms of multiple sclerosis: own data and literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyarov, I D; Petrov, A M; Shkil'nyuk, G G; Kataeva, G V; Prakhova, L N

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the literature data and results of our own researchon the use of positron emission tomography (PET) with different radiotracersin multiple sclerosis (MS). Informationon the operating principles of PET and PET studies with different radiotracers are considered. The results of PET studiesin different typesof MS, including determinationof the localization of neuronal damagein the corticalgray matter, assessmentof microglial activation, study of the relationship between glucose metabolismin the brain and the severity of cognitive impairmentin MS, can providenew information about the pathogenesis ofMS. PMID:27070358

  1. Identification of transport processes in bioirrigated muddy sediments by [18F]fluoride PET (Positron Emission Tomography).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskosch, Andrea; Lewandowski, Jörg; Bergmann, Ralf; Wilke, Florian; Brenner, Winfried; Buchert, Ralph

    2010-06-01

    In aquatic environments transport processes across the sediment-water interface are intensified by bioirrigating macrozoobenthos. Transport processes caused by Chironomus plumosus larvae dwelling in U-tubes were investigated by dynamic small animal Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with [18F]fluoride. Significant tracer transport from the burrows into the sediment was detected; penetration was deeper at the outlet branch of the burrow than at the inlet branch. Hence, advection plays a significant role in exchange between water in the burrows and muddy sediment. PMID:20185319

  2. Identification of transport processes in bioirrigated muddy sediments by [18F]fluoride PET (Positron Emission Tomography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In aquatic environments transport processes across the sediment-water interface are intensified by bioirrigating macrozoobenthos. Transport processes caused by Chironomus plumosus larvae dwelling in U-tubes were investigated by dynamic small animal Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with [18F]fluoride. Significant tracer transport from the burrows into the sediment was detected; penetration was deeper at the outlet branch of the burrow than at the inlet branch. Hence, advection plays a significant role in exchange between water in the burrows and muddy sediment.

  3. Identification of transport processes in bioirrigated muddy sediments by [18F]fluoride PET (Positron Emission Tomography)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskosch, Andrea [Department of Ecohydrology, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 310, 12587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: roskosch@igb-berlin.de; Lewandowski, Joerg [Department of Ecohydrology, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 310, 12587 Berlin (Germany); Bergmann, Ralf [Radiopharmaceutical Biology Division, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzener Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Wilke, Florian [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Brenner, Winfried; Buchert, Ralph [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Present address: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Chariteplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    In aquatic environments transport processes across the sediment-water interface are intensified by bioirrigating macrozoobenthos. Transport processes caused by Chironomus plumosus larvae dwelling in U-tubes were investigated by dynamic small animal Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with [18F]fluoride. Significant tracer transport from the burrows into the sediment was detected; penetration was deeper at the outlet branch of the burrow than at the inlet branch. Hence, advection plays a significant role in exchange between water in the burrows and muddy sediment.

  4. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography and biomarkers for early treatment response evaluation in metastatic colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Bodil E.; Loft, Annika; Kjær, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment options for metastatic colon cancer (mCC) are widening. We prospectively evaluated serial 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and measurements of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), carcinoembryonic antigen......). Early metabolically stable or progressive disease was associated with shorter progression-free survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.2 [CI 1.3; 7.8]). Biomarker levels at early evaluation were associated with shorter OS (TIMP-1 per unit increase on a log-2-transformed ng/mL scale: HR = 2.6 [CI 1.4; 4.9]; u...

  5. Positron emission tomography assessment of effects of benzodiazepines on regional glucose metabolic rate in patients with anxiety disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with generalized anxiety disorder (n = 18) entered a 21-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled random assignment trial of clorazepate. Positron emission tomography with 18F-deoxyglucose was carried out before and after treatment. Decreases in glucose metabolic rate in visual cortex and relative increases in the basal ganglia and thalamus were found. A correlation between regional changes in metabolic rate and regional benzodiazepine receptor binding density from other human autopsy studies was observed; brain regions highest in receptor density showed the greatest decrease in rate

  6. Positron emission tomography assessment of effects of benzodiazepines on regional glucose metabolic rate in patients with anxiety disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Wu, J.; Haier, R.; Hazlett, E.; Ball, R.; Katz, M.; Sokolski, K.; Lagunas-Solar, M.; Langer, D.

    1987-06-22

    Patients with generalized anxiety disorder (n = 18) entered a 21-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled random assignment trial of clorazepate. Positron emission tomography with YF-deoxyglucose was carried out before and after treatment. Decreases in glucose metabolic rate in visual cortex and relative increases in the basal ganglia and thalamus were found. A correlation between regional changes in metabolic rate and regional benzodiazepine receptor binding density from other human autopsy studies was observed; brain regions highest in receptor density showed the greatest decrease in rate.

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals in positron emission tomography: Radioisotope productions and radiolabelling procedures at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Sachinidis, J.I.; Chan, J.G.; Cook, M. [Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Centre for Positron Emission Tomography

    1997-10-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a technique that utilizes positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals to map the physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology of the human body. Positron-emitting radioisotopes produced in a medical cyclotron are incorporated into compounds that are biologically active in the body. A scanner measures radioactivity emitted from a patient`s body and provides cross-sectional images of the distribution of these radiolabelled compounds in the body. It is the purpose of this paper to review the variety of PET radiopharmaceuticals currently produced at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre in Melbourne. Radioisotope production, radiolabelling of molecules and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals will be discussed. A few examples of their clinical applications will be shown as well. During the last five years we achieved a reliable routine production of various radiopharmaceuticals labelled with the four most important positron-emitters: oxygen-15 (t,{sub 1/2}=2min), nitrogen-13 (t{sub 1/2}= 10 min), carbon-11 (t{sub 1/2}=20 min) and fluorine-18 (t{sub 1/2}= 110 min). These radiopharmaceuticals include [{sup 15}O]oxygen, [{sup 15}O]carbon monoxide, [{sup 15}O]carbon dioxide, [{sup 15}O]water, [{sup 13}N]ammonia, [{sup 11}C]flumazenil, [{sup 11}C]SCH23390, [{sup 18}F]fluoromisonidazole and [{sup 18}F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG). In addition, since the half life of [{sup 18}F] is almost two hours, regional distribution can be done, and the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre is currently supplying [{sup 18}F]FDG in routine to other hospitals. Future new radiopharmaceuticals development include a [{sup 18}F]thymidine analog to measure cell proliferation and a [{sup 11}C]pyrroloisoquinoline to visualize serotonergic neuron abnormalities. (authors) 23 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Adequacy of compartmental model for positron emission tomography examinations; Adequacao de modelo compartimental para exames de tomografia por emissao de positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Joao Eduardo Maeda Moreira da; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Telecomunicacoes e Controle. Lab. de Engenharia Biomedica

    2011-12-15

    The objective of this work is the determination of the most adequate compartmental model for the study of physiological dynamics based on positron emission tomography exams. We propose the use of Akaike's information criterion for the optimal model selection, and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm with sensitivity equations for the task of estimating the characteristic parameters of the differential equations describing the models. We have considered three compartmental structures represented, respectively, by two compartments and two characteristic constants, three compartments and four characteristic constants and four compartments and six characteristics constants. The data considered in this work were synthesized taking into account key features of a real tomography exam, such as type and level of noise and morphology of the input function of the system. Applying the proposed methodology with three noise levels (low, medium and high), we obtained agreement of the best model with strong and considerable degrees (with Kappa indexes equal to 0.95, 0.93 and 0.63, respectively). It was observed that, with high noise level and more complex models (four compartments), the classification is deteriorated due to lack of data for the decision. Programs have been developed and a graphical interface that can be used in research, development, simulation and parameter identification of compartmental models, supporting analysis of clinical diagnostics and scientific practices. (author)

  9. Micro tomography prototype by positron emission. Spatial resolution and metabolic studies;Prototipo de microtomografo por emision de positrones. Resolucion espacial y estudios metabolicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alva S, H.; Murrieta, T.; Ruiz T, C.; Brandan, M. E.; Martinez D, A.; Rodriguez V, M., E-mail: halva@fisica.unam.m [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    During the past 4 years, the Medical Physics and Dosimetry Group at the Physics Institute, UNAM, has developed a positron emission tomography prototype for small-animal imaging (micro PET). The system is composed of pix elated, cerium-doped lutetium yttrium oxy orthosilicate scintillation crystal arrays coupled to position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. Detector electronic signals are processed by nuclear instrumentation modules and are digitized by a multichannel data acquisition board. The tomographic reconstruction is performed by filtered backprojection from a set of distortion- and nonuniformity- corrected projections taken at different angles. In this work, the reconstructed spatial resolution was evaluated from the line spread function with a mean value of 2.36 +- 0.44 mm. In addition, the first metabolic studies of 30 g, healthy mice, injected with {sup 1}8{sup F} labeled fluorodeoxyglucose and sodium fluoride are reported. They display normal glucose uptake and skeletal structure, respectively. The micro PET can be a useful tool for radiation detector physics research and its applications in nuclear medicine. (Author)

  10. Fabrication of polycrystalline scintillators for the positron emission tomography (PET); Herstellung polykristalliner Szintillatoren fuer die Positronen-Emissions-Tomographie (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Kamran Said

    2010-07-01

    Transparent ceramics are becoming more and more important for two new types of applications. On the one hand in cases where high mechanical and thermal demands in combination with optical properties are required, on the other hand where the optical properties of transparent materials like glass are not sufficient e.g. in positron-emission-tomography (PET) diagnostics. Most state of the art PET-scanners are using high-priced single crystals as scintillator material. The technological challenge is to replace single crystal by cost-efficient transparent ceramics. Producing transparent ceramics is ordered in synthesis of the powders and in manufacturing of these into transparent ceramics. The aim of this work was to synthesize single phase yttrium-alumina-and Luthetiumalumina-garnet (YAG, LuAG) powders partially doped with neodymium or praseodymium by four different synthesis routes (Pechini-synthesis, sol-gel-route, coprecipitation and solid state reactions). Additionally industrial LuAG and LuPO{sub 4} powders were characterized and manufactured. The powders were processed as submicron- and nanopowders. The compaction of nanopowder greenbodies sintered at high temperatures leads to a ''cross-over'' between both manufacturing route. Newly produced single-phase powders were homogenized with additions of sintering additives like tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and binders like polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Moulding the powders were carried out by uniaxial pressing, cold isostatic pressing and in individual cases also by slip casting. The achieved green densities were in a range of 25-42 %. Examination of calcination behaviour leads to a calcination temperature of 1000 C with 2 hours dwell time in air atmosphere. Only solid state reactions resulted into transparent YAG, YAG:Pr, LuAG, LuAG:Pr ceramics. Solid state reactions of nanopowders resulted in heterogeneously transparent samples. Ceramics made by powders of other synthetic routes gave nontransparent

  11. Positron emission tomography response criteria in solid tumours criteria for quantitative analysis of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography for treatment response assessment in metastasised solid tumours: All that glitters is not gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Annelieke E C A B; Vlenterie, Myrella; van Herpen, Carla M L; van Erp, Nielka P; van der Graaf, Winette T A; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Oyen, Wim J G

    2016-03-01

    For solid tumours, quantitative analysis of [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography potentially can have significant value in early response assessment and thereby discrimination between responders and non-responders at an early stage of treatment. Standardised strategies for this analysis have been proposed, and the positron emission tomography response criteria in solid tumours (PERCIST) criteria can be regarded as the current standard to perform quantitative analysis in a research setting, yet is not implemented in daily practice. However, several exceptions and limitations limit the feasibility of PERCIST criteria. In this article, we point out dilemmas that arise when applying proposed criteria like PERCIST on an expansive set of patients with metastasised solid tumours. Clinicians and scientists should be aware of these limitations to prevent that methodological issues impede successful introduction of research data into clinical practice. Therefore, to deliver on the high potential of quantitative imaging, consensus should be reached on a standardised, feasible and clinically useful analysis methodology. This methodology should be applicable in the majority of patients, tumour types and treatments. PMID:26808297

  12. New techniques for positron emission tomography in the study of human neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    This progress report describes accomplishments of four programs. The four programs are entitled (1) Faster,simpler processing of positron-computing precursors: New physicochemical approaches, (2) Novel solid phase reagents and methods to improve radiosynthesis and isotope production, (3) Quantitative evaluation of the extraction of information from PET images, and (4) Optimization of tracer kinetic methods for radioligand studies in PET.

  13. When to perform positron emission tomography/computed tomography or radionuclide bone scan in patients with recently diagnosed prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caldarella C

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Carmelo Caldarella,1 Giorgio Treglia,2 Alessandro Giordano,1 Luca Giovanella2 1Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT Centre, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland Abstract: Skeletal metastases are very common in prostate cancer and represent the main metastatic site in about 80% of prostate cancer patients, with a significant impact in patients' prognosis. Early detection of bone metastases is critical in the management of patients with recently diagnosed high-risk prostate cancer: radical treatment is recommended in case of localized disease; systemic therapy should be preferred in patients with distant secondary disease. Bone scintigraphy using radiolabeled bisphosphonates is of great importance in the management of these patients; however, its main drawback is its low overall accuracy, due to the nonspecific uptake in sites of increased bone turnover. Positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, such as fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose, choline-derived drugs (fluorine-18-fluorocholine and carbon-11-choline and sodium fluorine-18-fluoride, are increasingly used in clinical practice to detect metastatic spread, and particularly bone involvement, in patients with prostate cancer, to reinforce or substitute information provided by bone scan. Each radiopharmaceutical has a specific mechanism of uptake; therefore, diagnostic performances may differ from one radiopharmaceutical to another on the same lesions, as demonstrated in the literature, with variable sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy values in the same patients. Whether bone scintigraphy can be substituted by these new methods is a matter of debate. However, greater radiobiological burden, higher costs, and the necessity of an in-site cyclotron limit the use of these positron emission tomography methods as first-line investigations in patients with prostate cancer

  14. Quantitative measurement of human tissue hepatic blood volume by C{sup 15}O inhalation with positron-emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Hiroki; Masuyama, Mamoru; Koyama, Hiroshi; Oguro, Atsushi; Takahashi, Toshio [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine, First Dept. of Surgery, Kyoto (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    In order to estimate the tissue liver function, tissue hepatic blood volume was measured quantitatively and non-invasively using C{sup 15}0 inhalation in conjunction with positron-emission tomography. Fifty-eight patients with normal liver function, 14 patients with chronic hepatitis, 28 patients with hepatic cirrhosis, and 4 patients with obstructive jaundice were studied by positron-emission tomography scan after the single breath inhalation of 20 mCi of high specific activity {sup 1}25O-labeled carbon monoxide. The mean tissue hepatic blood volume was significantly grater in patients with normal livers in patients with chronic hepatitis or hepatic cirrhosis (mean: 20.5, 18.2, and 16.1 ml per 100 cm{sup 3}, respectively, p=8.6x10{sup -8}). Tissue hepatic blood volume (tHBV) correlated with the reaction of the mesenchymal system and protein synthesis, because there was a potent correlation between tHBV and hepatic fibrosis. In normal livers, we were able to demonstrate significant differences in tissue hepatic blood volume among liver segments. (au) 8 refs.

  15. Methods and clinical applications of positron emission tomography in endocrinology. Methodologie et applications cliniques en endocrinologie de la tomographie a emission de positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landsheere, C. de; Lamotte, D. (Liege Univ. (BE))

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows to detect in coincidence photons issued from annihilation between positrons and electrons nearby situated. Tomographic detection (plane by plane) and tomographic reconstruction will lead to the quantitation of radioactive distribution per voxel, in the organ of interest. Recent tomographs can acquire simultaneously several transaxial slices, with a high sensitivity and a spatial resolution of 3-5 mm. Commonly used positron emitters have a short half-life: 2, 10, 20 and 110 min for {sup 15}0, {sup 13}N, {sup 11}C and {sup 18}F, respectively. The use of these isotopes requires on line production of radionuclides and synthesis of selected molecules. In endocrinology, PET allows among others to study noninvasively the receptor density of hormonodependent neoplasms such as breast, uterus, prostate tumors and prolactinomas. These last tumors represent a particular entity because of several combined characteristics: high turnover rate of amino acids, high density of dopaminergic receptors and response to bromocriptine (analogue of dopamine inhibiting the secretion of prolactine) in relation to the level of receptors. Because PET permits to evaluate the density of dopaminergic receptors and the metabolism of amino acids, theoretical response of the prolactinoma to bromocriptin can be predicted, the achieved therapeutic efficacy can be estimated and the long-term follow up of tumor growth can be assessed. This example illustrates the clinical value of PET in endocrinology.

  16. A case of skeletal tuberculosis and psoas abscess: disease activity evaluated using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psoas abscess complicating tuberculous spondylitis is a rare morbidity in extrapulmonary tuberculosis. There are no established guidelines for evaluating the clinical response of psoas abscess. Although several studies have shown that positron emission tomography-computed tomography with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose can play a potential role in diagnosing multifocal tuberculosis and monitoring the clinical response of pulmonary tuberculosis, to our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that positron emission tomography-computed tomography is useful for evaluating local inflammation and disease activity of a tuberculous psoas abscess. We report a case of multifocal bone and lymph node tuberculosis with concomitant lumbar psoas abscess in a 77-year-old man, along with a literature review. An initial positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan showed intense 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose accumulation in the sternum, ribs, vertebrae, and lymph nodes. The patient was successfully treated with antitubercular agents and computed tomography-guided drainage therapy. A follow-up positron emission tomography-computed tomography after abscess drainage and 9 months of antitubercular drug treatment revealed that the majority of lesions improved; however, protracted inflammation surrounding the psoas abscess was still observed. These results indicate that disease activity of psoas abscess can remain, even after successful drainage and antitubercular medication regime of appropriate duration. We have successfully followed up the extent of skeletal tuberculosis complicated with psoas abscess by positron emission tomography-computed tomography. In this patient, positron emission tomography-computed tomography is useful for evaluating the disease activity of tuberculous psoas abscess and for assessing the appropriate duration of antitubercular drug therapy in psoas abscess

  17. Mechanisms for the recovery of aphasia following stroke. A positron emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, E

    1998-07-01

    Language disorders following stroke are common and are a major source of distress and disability. Most patients show some recovery with time implying the potential for neuronal plasticity within the brain for recovery of language. The mechanisms underlying recovery are poorly understood, making strategies for speech therapy and further investigation of potential therapeutic agents difficult. These studies were designed to explore the cortical re-organisation which underlies at least some language recovery using positron emission tomography (PET). With the rapid developments in PET technology and advances in image data processing it is now well established that language tasks can be studied in terms of responses within brain regions, and interactions between regions. The results can be interpreted with reference to neuropsychological theory and models. Many language activation studies have been performed in the normal brain. Thestudies reported here concentrated on one behavioural task - the verbal fluency task - the strategy being to compare patterns of activation in normal subjects with those in recovered aphasic patients performing the same fluency task. In the first part of this thesis, a detailed PET study of a verb retrieval task was made using different control tasks in normal volunteers. The results show that this task engages a widespread network of regions, predominantly in the left hemisphere i.e. the dorsolateral temporal cortex, the inferolateral temporal cortex and inferior parietal cortex, an extensive area of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (LDLPFC), the anterior cingulate and the supplementary motor area (SMA). The experiments using different control tasks suggest that the dorsolateral temporal cortex is involved with auditory and lexical processing of the stimulus nouns and it is demonstrated that observation of an activation in this region is dependent on the particular control task used with the retrieval task. This explains discrepancies

  18. {sup 18}F-Fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography may differentiate glioblastoma multiforme from less malignant gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Kenji; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Terasaka, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Houkin, Kiyohiro [Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Neurosurgery, Sapporo (Japan); Hattori, Naoya [Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Magota, Keiichi [Hokkaido University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sapporo (Japan); Tanaka, Shinya [Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Cancer Pathology, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji [Hokkaido University, Central Institute of Isotope Science, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor and its prognosis is significantly poorer than those of less malignant gliomas. Pathologically, necrosis is one of the most important characteristics that differentiate GBM from lower grade gliomas; therefore, we hypothesized that {sup 18}F fluoromisonidazole (FMISO), a radiotracer for hypoxia imaging, accumulates in GBM but not in lower grade gliomas. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of FMISO positron emission tomography (PET) for the differential diagnosis of GBM from lower grade gliomas. This prospective study included 23 patients with pathologically confirmed gliomas. All of the patients underwent FMISO PET and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET within a week. FMISO images were acquired 4 h after intravenous administration of 400 MBq of FMISO. Tracer uptake in the tumor was visually assessed. Lesion to normal tissue ratios and FMISO uptake volume were calculated. Of the 23 glioma patients, 14 were diagnosed as having GBM (grade IV glioma in the 2007 WHO classification), and the others were diagnosed as having non-GBM (5 grade III and 4 grade II). In visual assessment, all GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor greater than that in the surrounding brain tissues, whereas all the non-GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor equal to that in the surrounding brain tissues (p {<=} 0.001). One GBM patient was excluded from FDG PET study because of hyperglycemia. All GBM patients and three of the nine (33%) non-GBM patients showed FDG uptake greater than or equal to that in the gray matter. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing GBM were 100 and 100% for FMISO, and 100 and 66% for FDG, respectively. The lesion to cerebellum ratio of FMISO uptake was higher in GBM patients (2.74 {+-} 0.60, range 1.71-3.81) than in non-GBM patients (1.22 {+-} 0.06, range 1.09-1.29, p {<=} 0.001) with no overlap between the groups. The lesion to gray matter ratio of FDG was also

  19. Depressed cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with chronic renal failure. A positron emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirakata, Hideki; Kanai, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Hiroshi; Fujii, Ken-ichiro; Hirakata, Eriko; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Deenitchna, S.S.; Fujishima, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Medical Sciences

    2001-07-01

    In order to elucidate brain oxygen metabolism in uremic patients, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction (rOEF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO{sub 2}) were measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in both 10 hemodialysis patients (HD: male [m]/female [f]=2/8, age of 49{+-}3 [SEM] years old, HD duration of 113{+-}26 months) and 13 pre-dialysis renal failure patients (CRF: m/f=10/3, age of 61{+-}2 years old, serum creatinine (SCr) of 6.3{+-}1.0 mg/dl). Data were compared with 20 non-uremic subjects (Control: m/f=7/13, age of 62{+-}2 years old, SCr of 0.9{+-}0.1 mg/dl). They had no neurological abnormalities, congestive heart failure, history of cerebrovascular accident, diabetes mellitus, or symptomatic brain lesion on magnetic resonance imaging. The age of HD was significantly younger than the other groups (p<0.02) and the hemoglobin (Hb) levels in both HD (10.5{+-}0.5 g/dl) and CRF (9.8{+-}0.9) were significantly lower than that in Control (13.3{+-}0.3) (p<0.02). In the hemisphere, rCMRO{sub 2} in both HD (1.82{+-}0.10 ml/min/100 g) and CRF (1.95{+-}0.09) showed significantly lower values as compared to Control (2.23{+-}0.05) (p<0.01, respectively). Hemispheric rCBF in HD (35.6{+-}2.1 ml/100 g/min) and in CRF (36.1{+-}2.1) were not different from that in Control (31.8{+-}1.4). Hemispheric rOEF in CRF (45.7{+-}1.6%) was significantly higher than that in Control (40.5{+-}1.2%) (p<0.02), but that in HD (43.7{+-}1.9%) did not increase significantly. These tendencies were similar in all regions of interest, especially in the cerebral cortices, but not in the cerebellum. All PET parameters in the frontal cortices tended to show the lowest value in renal failure patients. For all HD patients, rCBF in both the frontal cortex and the white matter correlated inversely with HD duration (frontal cortex: r=-0.649, p<0.05; white matter: r=-0.706, p<0.02). Based on these data, it is concluded that brain oxygen metabolism is depressed in renal failure

  20. Fast 3D-EM reconstruction using Planograms for stationary planar positron emission mammography camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, A; Guerra, A Del; Belcari, N; Moehrs, S; Panetta, D; Righi, S; Valentini, D

    2005-12-01

    At the University of Pisa we are building a PEM prototype, the YAP-PEM camera, consisting of two opposite 6 x 6 x 3 cm3 detector heads of 30 x 30 YAP:Ce finger crystals, 2 x 2 x 30 mm3 each. The camera will be equipped with breast compressors. The acquisition will be stationary. Compared with a whole body PET scanner, a planar Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) camera allows a better, easier and more flexible positioning around the breast in the vicinity of the tumor: this increases the sensitivity and solid angle coverage, and reduces cost. To avoid software rejection of data during the reconstruction, resulting in a reduced sensitivity, we adopted a 3D-EM reconstruction which uses all of the collected Lines Of Response (LORs). This skips the PSF distortion given by data rebinning procedures and/or Fourier methods. The traditional 3D-EM reconstruction requires several times the computation of the LOR-voxel correlation matrix, or probability matrix {p(ij)}; therefore is highly time-consuming. We use the sparse and symmetry properties of the matrix {p(ij)} to perform fast 3D-EM reconstruction. Geometrically, a 3D grid of cubic voxels (FOV) is crossed by several divergent 3D line sets (LORs). The symmetries occur when tracing different LORs produces the same p(ij) value. Parallel LORs of different sets cross the FOV in the same way, and the repetition of p(ij) values depends on the ratio between the tube and voxel sizes. By optimizing this ratio, the occurrence of symmetries is increased. We identify a nucleus of symmetry of LORs: for each set of symmetrical LORs we choose just one LOR to be put in the nucleus, while the others lie outside. All of the possible p(ij) values are obtainable by tracking only the LORs of this nucleus. The coordinates of the voxels of all of the other LORs are given by means of simple translation rules. Before making the reconstruction, we trace the LORs of the nucleus to find the intersecting voxels, whose p(ij) values are computed and

  1. Mechanisms for the recovery of aphasia following stroke. A positron emission tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Language disorders following stroke are common and are a major source of distress and disability. Most patients show some recovery with time implying the potential for neuronal plasticity within the brain for recovery of language. The mechanisms underlying recovery are poorly understood, making strategies for speech therapy and further investigation of potential therapeutic agents difficult. These studies were designed to explore the cortical re-organisation which underlies at least some language recovery using positron emission tomography (PET). With the rapid developments in PET technology and advances in image data processing it is now well established that language tasks can be studied in terms of responses within brain regions, and interactions between regions. The results can be interpreted with reference to neuropsychological theory and models. Many language activation studies have been performed in the normal brain. The studies reported here concentrated on one behavioural task - the verbal fluency task - the strategy being to compare patterns of activation in normal subjects with those in recovered aphasic patients performing the same fluency task. In the first part of this thesis, a detailed PET study of a verb retrieval task was made using different control tasks in normal volunteers. The results show that this task engages a widespread network of regions, predominantly in the left hemisphere i.e. the dorsolateral temporal cortex, the inferolateral temporal cortex and inferior parietal cortex, an extensive area of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (LDLPFC), the anterior cingulate and the supplementary motor area (SMA). The experiments using different control tasks suggest that the dorsolateral temporal cortex is involved with auditory and lexical processing of the stimulus nouns and it is demonstrated that observation of an activation in this region is dependent on the particular control task used with the retrieval task. This explains discrepancies

  2. (/sup 11/C)clorgyline and (/sup 11/C)-L-deprenyl and their use in measuring functional monoamine oxidase activity in the brain using positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1986-04-17

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging the activity of the enzyme monoamine oxidase in the living body by using /sup 11/C-labeled enzyme inhibitors which bind irreversibly to an enzyme as a result of catalysis. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  3. Early detection of response to imatinib therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumor by using 18F-FDG-positron emission tomography and computed tomography imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Zincirkeser, Sabri; Sevinc, Alper; Kalender, M.Emin; Camci, Celalettin

    2007-01-01

    A 41-year old female with metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor was referred to 18F-FDG-positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) scan before and after one-month treatment with imatinib (Glivec®, Gleevec®, Novartis, Basel, Switzerland), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (400 mg/d). Metabolic response was evaluated before and after one month of therapy. The decrease of the maximum standardised uptake value (SUV) was 79% (from 9.8 to 2.1). Positron emission tomography demonstr...

  4. CA19-9 as a Potential Target for Radiolabeled Antibody-Based Positron Emission Tomography of Pancreas Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Girgis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sensitive and specific imaging of pancreas cancer are necessary for accurate diagnosis, staging, and treatment. The vast majority of pancreas cancers express the carbohydrate tumor antigen CA19-9. The goal of this study was to determine the potential to target CA19-9 with a radiolabeled anti-CA19-9 antibody for imaging pancreas cancer. Methods. CA19-9 was quantified using flow cytometry on human pancreas cancer cell lines. An intact murine anti-CA19-9 monoclonal antibody was labeled with a positron emitting radionuclide (Iodine-124 and injected into mice harboring antigen positive and negative xenografts. MicroPET/CT were performed at successive time intervals (72 hours, 96 hours, 120 hours after injection. Radioactivity was measured in blood and tumor to provide objective confirmation of the images. Results. Antigen expression by flow cytometry revealed approximately 1.3×106 CA19-9 antigens for the positive cell line and no expression in the negative cell line. Pancreas xenograft imaging with Iodine-124-labeled anti-CA19-9 mAb demonstrated an average tumor to blood ratio of 5 and positive to negative tumor ratio of 20. Conclusion. We show in vivo targeting of our antigen positive xenograft with a radiolabeled anti-CA19-9 antibody. These data demonstrate the potential to achieve anti-CA19-9 antibody based positron emission tomography of pancreas cancer.

  5. The fast method of Cu-porphyrin complex synthesis for potential use in positron emission tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Krzysztof; Pęgier, Maria; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2016-04-15

    Porphyrin based photosensitizers are useful agents for photodynamic therapy and fluorescence imaging of cancer. Additionally, porphyrins are excellent metal chelators, forming stable metalo-complexes and (64)Cu isotope can serve as a positron emitter (t1/2=12.7h). The other advantage of (64)Cu is its decay characteristics that facilitates the use of (64)Cu-porphyrin complex as a therapeutic agent. Thus, (64)Cu chelation with porphyrin photosensitizer may become a simple and versatile labeling strategy for clinical positron emission tomography. The present study reports a convenient method for the synthesis of Cu complex with tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (TCPP). The experimental conditions for labeling, such as the metal-to-ligand molar ratio, pH and time of reaction were optimized to achieve a high complexation efficiency in a short period of time as possible. In order to accelerate the metallation, the use of substitution reactions of cadmium or lead porphyrin and the presence of reducing agent, such as ascorbic acid, hydroxylamine and flavonoid - morin, were evaluated. The optimum conditions for the synthesis of the copper complex were borate buffer at pH9 with the addition of 10-fold molar excess, with respect to Cu(2+) ions and TCPP and ascorbic acid which resulted in reduction of the reaction time from 30 min to below 1 min.

  6. The fast method of Cu-porphyrin complex synthesis for potential use in positron emission tomography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Krzysztof; Pęgier, Maria; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2016-04-01

    Porphyrin based photosensitizers are useful agents for photodynamic therapy and fluorescence imaging of cancer. Additionally, porphyrins are excellent metal chelators, forming stable metalo-complexes and 64Cu isotope can serve as a positron emitter (t1/2 = 12.7 h). The other advantage of 64Cu is its decay characteristics that facilitates the use of 64Cu-porphyrin complex as a therapeutic agent. Thus, 64Cu chelation with porphyrin photosensitizer may become a simple and versatile labeling strategy for clinical positron emission tomography. The present study reports a convenient method for the synthesis of Cu complex with tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (TCPP). The experimental conditions for labeling, such as the metal-to-ligand molar ratio, pH and time of reaction were optimized to achieve a high complexation efficiency in a short period of time as possible. In order to accelerate the metallation, the use of substitution reactions of cadmium or lead porphyrin and the presence of reducing agent, such as ascorbic acid, hydroxylamine and flavonoid - morin, were evaluated. The optimum conditions for the synthesis of the copper complex were borate buffer at pH 9 with the addition of 10-fold molar excess, with respect to Cu2 + ions and TCPP and ascorbic acid which resulted in reduction of the reaction time from 30 min to below 1 min.

  7. Correlated positron-electron emission in heavy-ion collisions at the Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the experimental study of e+e--production in collisions of 238U with 181Ta and 232Th at energies from 5.85 MeV/u to 5.90 MeV/u. Presented are positron spectra, electron spectra, and e+e- sum spectra. The possible origin of sharp lines in the sum spectra at 620 keV, 748 keV, and 806 keV as resulting from the decay of a narrow resonance is discussed. (HSI)

  8. Diagnostic role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for follicular lymphoma with gastrointestinal involvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masaya Iwamuro; Hiroyuki Okada; Katsuyoshi Takata; Katsuji Shinagawa; Shigeatsu Fujiki; Junji Shiode; Atsushi Imagawa

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the capacity for 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)to evaluate patients with gastrointestinal lesions of follicular lymphoma.@@METHODS:This retrospective case series consisted of 41 patients with follicular lymphoma and gastrointestinal involvement who underwent 18F-FDG-PET and endoscopic evaluations at ten different institutions between November 1996 and October 2011.Data for endoscopic,radiological,and biological examinations performed were retrospectively reviewed from clinical records.A semi-quantitative analysis of 18F-FDG uptake was performed for each involved area by calculating the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax).Based on the positivity of 18F-FDG uptake in the gastrointestinal lesions analyzed,patients were subdivided into two groups.To identify potential predictive factors for 18F-FDG positivity,these two groups were compared with respect to gender,age at diagnosis of lymphoma,histopathological grade,pattern of follicular dendritic cells,mitotic rate,clinical stage,soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels detected by 18F-FDG-PET,lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels,hemoglobin levelsbone marrow involvement,detectability of gastrointestinal lesions by computed tomography (CT) scanningand follicular lymphoma international prognostic index (FLIPI) risk.@@RESULTS:Involvement of follicular lymphoma in the stomach,duodenum,jejunum,ileum,cecum,colon,and rectum was identified in 1,34,6,3,2,3,and 6patients,respectively.No patient had esophageal involvement.In total,19/41 (46.3%) patients exhibited true-positive 18F-FDG uptake in the lesions present in their gastrointestinal tract.In contrast,false-negative 18F-FDG uptake was detected in 24 patients (58.5%),while false-positive 18F-FDG uptake was detected in 5 patients (12.2%).In the former case,2/19 patients had both 18F-FDG-positive lesions and 18F-FDG-negative lesions in the gastrointestinal tract.In patients with 18F-FDG avidity,the SUVmax value of

  9. SensL B-Series and C-Series silicon photomultipliers for time-of-flight positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, K., E-mail: koneill@sensl.com; Jackson, C., E-mail: cjackson@sensl.com

    2015-07-01

    Silicon photomultipliers from SensL are designed for high performance, uniformity and low cost. They demonstrate peak photon detection efficiency of 41% at 420 nm, which is matched to the output spectrum of cerium doped lutetium orthosilicate. Coincidence resolving time of less than 220 ps is demonstrated. New process improvements have lead to the development of C-Series SiPM which reduces the dark noise by over an order of magnitude. In this paper we will show characterization test results which include photon detection efficiency, dark count rate, crosstalk probability, afterpulse probability and coincidence resolving time comparing B-Series to the newest pre-production C-Series. Additionally we will discuss the effect of silicon photomultiplier microcell size on coincidence resolving time allowing the optimal microcell size choice to be made for time of flight positron emission tomography systems.

  10. Positron emission tomography in at risk patients and in the progression of mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinne, Juha O; Någren, Kjell

    2010-01-01

    of such features will be increasingly important when treatments slowing down the progression of AD become available enabling early intervention. Brain imaging might be one possible predictor of conversion to AD. Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) has shown that either normal elderly people...... disorders. Dopamine transporter imaging to aid in the differential diagnosis between AD and dementia with Lewy bodies seems promising. Amyloid imaging is an example of "pathology specific" imaging that has great potential to enhance early detection of AD processes and to help in differential diagnosis....... In the future, multi-tracer imaging or development of agents enabling imaging of other protein aggregations in neurodegenerative diseases could further help in the early and differential diagnostics and evaluation of novel treatments....

  11. Acute Calculous Cholecystitis Missed on Computed Tomography and Ultrasound but Diagnosed with Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Mari Aparici

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 69-year-old patient who underwent ascending aortic aneurysm repair with aortic valve replacement. On postsurgical day 12, he developed leukocytosis and low-grade fevers. The chest computed tomography (CT showed a periaortic hematoma which represents a postsurgical change from aortic aneurysm repair, and a small pericardial effusion. The abdominal ultrasound showed cholelithiasis without any sign of cholecystitis. Finally, a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-positron emission tomography (PET/CT examination was ordered to find the cause of fever of unknown origin, and it showed increased FDG uptake in the gallbladder wall, with no uptake in the lumen. FDG-PET/CT can diagnose acute cholecystitis in patients with nonspecific clinical symptoms and laboratory results.

  12. Acute Calculous Cholecystitis Missed on Computed Tomography and Ultrasound but Diagnosed with Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparici, Carina Mari; Win, Aung Zaw

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 69-year-old patient who underwent ascending aortic aneurysm repair with aortic valve replacement. On postsurgical day 12, he developed leukocytosis and low-grade fevers. The chest computed tomography (CT) showed a periaortic hematoma which represents a postsurgical change from aortic aneurysm repair, and a small pericardial effusion. The abdominal ultrasound showed cholelithiasis without any sign of cholecystitis. Finally, a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examination was ordered to find the cause of fever of unknown origin, and it showed increased FDG uptake in the gallbladder wall, with no uptake in the lumen. FDG-PET/CT can diagnose acute cholecystitis in patients with nonspecific clinical symptoms and laboratory results. PMID:27625897

  13. Design of brain imaging agents for positron emission tomography: do large bioconjugates provide an opportunity for in vivo brain imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirrmacher, Ralf; Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Reader, Andrew; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Schirrmacher, Esther; Wängler, Björn; Wängler, Carmen

    2013-09-01

    The development of brain imaging agents for positron emission tomography and other in vivo imaging modalities mostly relies on small compounds of low MW as a result of the restricted transport of larger molecules, such as peptides and proteins, across the blood-brain barrier. Besides passive transport, only a few active carrier mechanisms, such as glucose transporters and amino acid transporters, have so far been exploited to mediate the accumulation of imaging probes in the brain. An important question for the future is whether some of the abundant active carrier systems located at the blood-brain barrier can be used to shuttle potential, but non-crossing, imaging agents into the brain. What are the biological and chemical constrictions toward such bioconjugates and is it worthwhile to persue such a delivery strategy?

  14. Novel Radioligands for Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: An Update on Developments Since 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Schröder

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs are a class of intracellular enzymes that inactivate the secondary messenger molecules, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP. Thus, PDEs regulate the signaling cascades mediated by these cyclic nucleotides and affect fundamental intracellular processes. Pharmacological inhibition of PDE activity is a promising strategy for treatment of several diseases. However, the role of the different PDEs in related pathologies is not completely clarified yet. PDE-specific radioligands enable non-invasive visualization and quantification of these enzymes by positron emission tomography (PET in vivo and provide an important translational tool for elucidation of the relationship between altered expression of PDEs and pathophysiological effects as well as (pre-clinical evaluation of novel PDE inhibitors developed as therapeutics. Herein we present an overview of novel PDE radioligands for PET published since 2012.

  15. Bitemporal hypometabolism in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease measured by positron emission tomography with [18F]-2-fluorodeoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well established that Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is caused by a slow infectious agent similar to the scrapie prion. However, the pathogenesis of this infection is poorly understood. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on a 54-year-old man with autopsy confirmed CJD using [18F]-2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the Donner 280-crystal tomograph. Temporal lobe hypometabolism with hemispheric asymmetry was observed. These findings are similar to those previously obtained in PET-FDG studies of patients with clinically defined Alzheimer disease (AD). The similarities in the regional metabolic alterations between CJD and AD provide additional evidence for the possibility that AD may be caused by a slow infectious prion

  16. Optimization of [(11)C]raclopride positron emission tomographic rat studies: comparison of methods for image quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, Elia; Farré, Magí; Abasolo, Ibane; Millan, Olga; Llop, Jordi; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Ruiz, Alba; Pareto, Deborah

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this study was to compare different quantification approaches and reconstruction methods to estimate the binding potential in [11C]raclopride studies in rats. The final aim was to determine if the results obtained with short-acquisition scanning were comparable to the results obtained with long-acquistion (conventional) scanning. We analyzed two rat data sets: a baseline versus a pretreatment study (with cold raclopride) and a young versus an old animal group comparison. The study results support the contention that optimization of [11C]raclopride positron emission tomographic studies in rats by shortening the acquisition time is feasible. In addition, filtered backprojection is recommended as a reconstruction algorithm, although iterative methods may be more sensitive to detect within-group differences.

  17. Positron emission tomography (PET) study of the alterations in brain pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in methamphetamine sensitized animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hitoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Hospital

    2001-08-01

    I investigated the differences in brain pharmacokinetics of [{sup 11}C]methamphetamine ([{sup 11}C]MAP) in normal and MAP sensitized animals using positron emission tomography (PET). [{sup 11}C]MAP was synthesized by an automated on-line [{sup 11}C]methylation system. I newly produced MAP sensitized dog and monkey by repeated MAP treatment. The maximal level of accumulation of [{sup 11}C]MAP in the sensitized dog brain was 1.4 times higher than that in the control. This result suggests the changes in the pharmacokinetic profile of MAP in the brain affect the development or expression of MAP-induced behavioral sensitization. However, the overaccumulation of [{sup 11}C]MAP in the sensitized monkey brain was not observed due to the influence of anesthesia. (author)

  18. Are we ready for positron emission tomography/computed tomography-based target volume definition in lymphoma radiation therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, Kheng-Wei; Mikhaeel, N George

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has become indispensable for the clinical management of lymphomas. With consistent evidence that it is more accurate than anatomic imaging in the staging and response assessment of many lymphoma subtypes, its utility continues to increase. There have therefore been efforts to incorporate PET/CT data into radiation therapy decision making and in the planning process. Further, there have also been studies investigating target volume definition for radiation therapy using PET/CT data. This article will critically review the literature and ongoing studies on the above topics, examining the value and methods of adding PET/CT data to the radiation therapy treatment algorithm. We will also discuss the various challenges and the areas where more evidence is required.

  19. Imaging Spectrum and Pitfalls of 11C-Methionine Positron Emission Tomography in a Series of Patients with Intracranial Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Kubota, Kazoo

    2016-01-01

    11C-methionine (Met) positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most commonly used PET tracers for evaluating brain tumors. However, few reports have described tips and pitfalls of 11C-Met PET for general practitioners. Physiological 11C-Met uptake, anatomical variations, vascular disorders, non-tumorous lesions such as inflammation or dysplasia, benign brain tumors and patient condition during 11C-Met PET examination can potentially affect the image interpretation and cause false positives and negatives. These pitfalls in the interpretation of 11C-Met PET images are important for not only nuclear medicine physicians but also general radiologists. Familiarity with the spectrum and pitfalls of 11C-Met images could help prevent unfavorable clinical results caused by misdiagnoses. PMID:27134530

  20. Impact of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography staging in newly diagnosed classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, T. C.; Hutchings, M.; Juul Mylam, Karen;

    2014-01-01

    F-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a highly accurate staging method in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). We retrospectively compared the staging results obtained in two large cohorts of patients with cHL diagnosed before (n = 324) and after (n = 406......) the introduction of PET/CT staging in a retrospective study. In PET/CT staged patients, stage I disease was less frequent (16% vs. 27%, p <0.001) while stage IV disease was more frequent (17% vs. 10%, p = 0.02). Imaging-detected skeletal involvement was recognized more often in PET/CT staged patients...... (17% vs. 2%, p <0.001), and the presence of focal skeletal PET/CT lesions was associated with higher risk of progression (hazard ratio [HR] 1.96, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-3.36). The German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) risk classification (early, intermediate, advanced disease) predicted...

  1. The willingness to pay for positron emission tomography (PET). Evaluation of suspected lung cancer using contingent valuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, contingent valuation is used to estimate the willingness-to-pay (WTP) for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging by patients with suspected benign or malignant lung disease. Patients (n=87) undergoing thoracic computed tomography were surveyed for their WTP for PET for the evaluation of lung disease in lieu of further testing. Patients were provided background PET information and a two-page self-administered questionnaire. The survey queried basic demographic information, perceived risk of malignancy, and perceived life expectancy given a diagnosis of malignancy. Patients with increased perception of risk were willing to pay more than those with lower perceived risk. Patients who were self-payers for their health insurance indicated a lower WTP than those who did not pay any out-of-pocket insurance premiums. Individuals are willing to pay additional out-of-pocket costs for diagnostic imaging to reduce their perception of risk and improve their quality of life

  2. Study of brain uptake of etorphine, in vivo in the Baboon Papio-Papio, by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study in vivo opiate receptors in brain, etorphine, a morphine-like drug was labelled with 11C. Etorphine possesses an extremely high affinity for specific opiate binding sites. It passes easily through the blood-brain barrier. The brain pharmacokinetics of 11C-etorphine was studied in vivo in the Baboon Papio-Papio, by positron emission tomography. 11C-etorphine concentration reached its maximum two minutes after intravenous injection and then decreased rapidly. In some experiments, cyprenorphine, a morphine antagonist, was injected subsequently in order to study the displacement of the radioactive ligand from brain structures. Hepato-biliary and blood pharmacokinetics of 11C-etorphine were also studied

  3. Absolute cerebral blood flow and blood volume measured by magnetic resonance imaging bolus tracking: comparison with positron emission tomography values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Leif; Smith, D F; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter;

    1998-01-01

    The authors determined cerebral blood flow (CBF) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of contrast agent bolus passage and compared the results with those obtained by O-15 labeled water (H215O) and positron emission tomography (PET). Six pigs were examined by MRI and PET under normo......- and hypercapnic conditions. After dose normalization and introduction of an empirical constant phi Gd, absolute regional CBF was calculated from MRI. The spatial resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio of CBF measurements by MRI were better than by the H215O-PET protocol. Magnetic resonance imaging cerebral...... blood volume (CBV) estimates obtained using this normalization constant correlated well with values obtained by O-15 labeled carbonmonooxide (C15O) PET. However, PET CBV values were approximately 2.5 times larger than absolute MRI CBV values, supporting the hypothesized sensitivity of MRI to small...

  4. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computed Tomography (CT) in Suspected Recurrent Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Malene Grubbe; Gerke, Oke; Baun, Christina;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively investigate the diagnostic accuracy of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with dual-time-point imaging, contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT), and bone scintigraphy (BS) in patients with suspected breast cancer recurrence....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred women with suspected recurrence of breast cancer underwent 1-hour and 3-hour FDG-PET/CT, ceCT, and BS within approximately 10 days. The study was powered to estimate the precision of the individual imaging tests. Images were visually interpreted using a four......-point assessment scale, and readers were blinded to other test results. The reference standard was biopsy along with treatment decisions and clinical follow-up (median, 17 months). RESULTS: FDG-PET/CT resulted in no false negatives and fewer false positives than the other imaging techniques. Accuracy of results...

  5. A case of plastron appendicitis mimicking malignant cecal tumor in flourodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, flourodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) has been used intensively in the field of oncology. However, an increase in FDG uptake has been observed both in malignant tissues, and inflammatory processes. Therefore false-positive results have appeared. We present a 70-year-old male patient who presented to the hospital with right lower quadrant pain. A right lower quadrant mass was observed with conventional methods, and PET/CT was performed which revealed a hypermetabolic mass in the right lower quadrant. The patient was referred to the surgery with a suspect malignant mass whose histopathological report indicated plastron appendicitis. Although FDG PET/CT is a reliable method in the evaluation of oncological cases, false-positivities should be taken into consideration in inflammatory processes

  6. Preclinical studies on [{sup 11}C]MPDX for mapping adenosine A{sub 1} receptors by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Kimura, Yuichi; Oda, Keiichi; Kawamura, Kazunori; Ishii, Kenji; Senda, Michio [Tokyo Metropolitan Inst. of Gerontology (Japan). Positron Medical Center; Nariai, Tadashi; Wakabayashi, Shinichi [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Shimada, Junichi [Kyowa Hakko Kogyo Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Pharmaceutical Research Inst.

    2002-09-01

    In previous in vivo studies with mice, rats and cats, we have demonstrated that [{sup 11}C]MPDX ([1-methyl-{sup 11}C]8-dicyclopropylmethyl-1-methyl-3-propylxanthine) is a potential radioligand for mapping adenosine A{sub 1} receptors of the brain by positron emission tomography (PET). In the present study, we performed a preclinical study. The radiation absorbed-dose by [{sup 11}C]MPDX in humans estimated from the tissue distribution in mice was low enough for clinical use, and the acute toxicity and mutagenicity of MPDX were not found. The monkey brain was clearly visualized by PET with [{sup 11}C]MPDX. We have concluded that [{sup 11}C]MPDX is suitable for mapping adenosine A{sub 1} receptors in the human brain by PET. (author)

  7. Bitemporal hypometabolism in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease measured by positron emission tomography with (/sup 18/F)-2-fluorodeoxyglucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedland, R.P.; Prusiner, S.B.; Jagust, W.J.; Budinger, T.F.; Davis, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    It is well established that Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is caused by a slow infectious agent similar to the scrapie prion. However, the pathogenesis of this infection is poorly understood. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on a 54-year-old man with autopsy confirmed CJD using (18F)-2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the Donner 280-crystal tomograph. Temporal lobe hypometabolism with hemispheric asymmetry was observed. These findings are similar to those previously obtained in PET-FDG studies of patients with clinically defined Alzheimer disease (AD). The similarities in the regional metabolic alterations between CJD and AD provide additional evidence for the possibility that AD may be caused by a slow infectious prion.

  8. Bioimpedance-based respiratory gating method for oncologic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with first clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivumäki, T.; Vauhkonen, M.; Teuho, J.; Teräs, M.; Hakulinen, M. A.

    2013-04-01

    Respiratory motion may cause significant image artefacts in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. This study introduces a new bioimpedance-based gating method for minimizing respiratory artefacts. The method was studied in 12 oncologic patients by evaluating the following three parameters: maximum metabolic activity of radiopharmaceutical accumulations, the size of these targets as well as their target-to-background ratio. The bioimpedance-gated images were compared with non-gated images and images that were gated with a reference method, chest wall motion monitoring by infrared camera. The bioimpedance method showed clear improvement as increased metabolic activity and decreased target volume compared to non-gated images and produced consistent results with the reference method. Thus, the method may have great potential in the future of respiratory gating in nuclear medicine imaging.

  9. The emerging role of whole-body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in patients with sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Taralli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this article is to examine the emerging role of whole-body positron emission tomography (PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG in patients with sarcoidosis.Materials and methodsWe reviewed the literature on the use of FDG-PET in patients with sarcoidosis to identify how this technique is being applied in clinical practice.Results and discussionOur review shows that: 1 sarcoidosis is commonly associated with increased FDG uptake. Therefore, positive findings should be interpreted with caution when FDG-PET is being used to distinguish benign from malignant abnormalities; 2 FDG-PET seems to be a very useful molecular imaging method for staging sarcoidosis, identification of occult sites of involvement, guiding biopsy procedures, and monitoring patients’ responses to treatment; and 3 in patients with sarcoidosis, the diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET is superior to that of 67Ga scintigraphy.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation and scatter corrections in three-dimensional brain positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Zaidi, H; Slosman, D O

    2003-01-01

    Reliable attenuation correction represents an essential component of the long chain of modules required for the reconstruction of artifact-free, quantitative brain positron emission tomography (PET) images. In this work we demonstrate the proof of principle of segmented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation and scatter corrections in 3D brain PET. We have developed a method for attenuation correction based on registered T1-weighted MRI, eliminating the need of an additional transmission (TX) scan. The MR images were realigned to preliminary reconstructions of PET data using an automatic algorithm and then segmented by means of a fuzzy clustering technique which identifies tissues of significantly different density and composition. The voxels belonging to different regions were classified into air, skull, brain tissue and nasal sinuses. These voxels were then assigned theoretical tissue-dependent attenuation coefficients as reported in the ICRU 44 report followed by Gaussian smoothing and additio...

  11. Bioimpedance-based respiratory gating method for oncologic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with first clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory motion may cause significant image artefacts in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. This study introduces a new bioimpedance-based gating method for minimizing respiratory artefacts. The method was studied in 12 oncologic patients by evaluating the following three parameters: maximum metabolic activity of radiopharmaceutical accumulations, the size of these targets as well as their target-to-background ratio. The bioimpedance-gated images were compared with non-gated images and images that were gated with a reference method, chest wall motion monitoring by infrared camera. The bioimpedance method showed clear improvement as increased metabolic activity and decreased target volume compared to non-gated images and produced consistent results with the reference method. Thus, the method may have great potential in the future of respiratory gating in nuclear medicine imaging.

  12. FDG-positron emission tomography/computed tomography and standardized uptake value in the primary diagnosis and staging of hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.T. Ruys; R.J. Bennink; H.L. van Westreenen; M.R. Engelbrecht; O.R. Busch; D.J. Gouma; T.M. van Gulik

    2011-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis and staging of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCCA) remain challenging despite recent advances in imaging. Little is known about the use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in HCCA. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the additional value of FDG-PET

  13. Redistribution of myocardial perfusion during permanent dual chamber pacing in symptomatic non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy : A quantitative positron emission tomography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posma, JL; Blanksma, PK; vanderWall, EE

    1996-01-01

    Dual chamber pacing causes significant symptomatic improvement in many patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The mechanism behind this beneficial response is not fully understood. Positron emission tomography showed a redistribution of myocardial flow during pacing in a patient with non-obstruc

  14. Reduction in coronary and peripheral vasomotor function in patients with HIV after initiation of antiretroviral therapy: a longitudinal study with positron emission tomography and flow-mediated dilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Ulrik Sloth; Wiinberg, Niels; Petersen, Claus Leth;

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the increased cardiovascular risk in patients with HIV on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are not known. Our aim was to study the endothelial function of the coronary arteries by cardiac perfusion positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with HIV initiating ART. In ad...... addition, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery was measured....

  15. Evaluation of 4-[18F]fluorobenzoyl-FALGEA-NH2 as a positron emission tomography tracer for epidermal growth factor receptor mutation variant III imaging in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denholt, Charlotte Lund; Binderup, Tina; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése;

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the radiosynthesis, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of the novel small peptide radioligand, 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoyl-Phe-Ala-Leu-Gly-Glu-Ala-NH(2,) ([(18)F]FBA-FALGEA-NH(2)) as a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for imaging of the cancer specific epidermal growth factor...

  16. Positron Emission Tomography-CT, CT, and MR Imaging Findings of Tumor-Mimicking Organized Hematoma in the Maxillary Sinus: Two Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Young; Lee, In Ho; Song, Chang Sun; Kim, Song Sun [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National Hospital, Chungnam University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Hee [Dept. of Pathology, Chungnam National Hospital, Chungnam University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Here in, we report two cases of organized hematoma in the maxillary sinus mimicking inverted papilloma. These cases presented as heterogeneously enhancing, expansible masses on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and also evidenced mild uneven hypermetabolism on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. Organized hematoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of inverted papilloma.

  17. Dynamic 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography of liver tumours without blood sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, S; Munk, O L; Schiøtt, K M;

    2000-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is a useful diagnostic tool for the detection of tumours. Using dynamic FDG PET, net metabolic clearance of FDG, K, can be calculated by Gjedde-Patlak analysis of the time course of the radioactivity concentrations in...

  18. Coexistence of atrial myxoma and lung cancer on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography: The impact of distinct fluorodeoxyglucose uptake pattern on differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The information regarding fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in benign and malignant cardiac tumors is limited in the literature and most of the currrently available data were derived from single case reports. Herein we reported coexistence of atrial myxoma and lung cancer on FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography with the aim of emphasizing the importance of distinct FDG uptake pattern on differential diagnosis

  19. Importance of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and endoscopic ultrasonography parameters in predicting survival following surgery for esophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omloo, J. M. T.; Sloof, G. W.; Boellaard, R.; Hoekstra, O. S.; Jager, P. L.; van Dullemen, H. M.; Fockens, P.; Plukker, J. T. M.; van Lanschot, J. J. B.

    2008-01-01

    Background and study aims: To assess the prognostic importance of standardized uptake value (SUV) for 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) at positron emission tomography (PET) and of EUS parameters, in esophageal cancer patients primarily treated by surgery. Patients and methods: Between October 2002 and A

  20. Positron Emission Tomography studies with [C-11]PBR28 in the Healthy Rodent Brain : Validating SUV as an Outcome Measure of Neuroinflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toth, Miklos; Doorduin, Janine; Haggkvist, Jenny; Varrone, Andrea; Amini, Nahid; Halldin, Christer; Gulyas, Balazs

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging of the 18 kD Translocator protein (TSPO) with positron emission tomography (PET) is of great value for studying neuroinflammation in rodents longitudinally. Quantification of the TSPO in rodents is, however, quite challenging. There is no suitable reference region and the use of pl