WorldWideScience

Sample records for 1953-2003 orau follow-up

  1. Review of 1953-2003 ORAU Follow-Up Studies on Science Education Programs: Impacts on Participants' Education and Careers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities

    2006-06-01

    Through sponsorship of science education programs for undergraduates and graduates, such as research participation programs and fellowships, the Department of Energy (DOE) encouraged the development of adequate numbers of qualified science and engineering (S&E) personnel to meet its current and future research and development (R&D) needs. This retrospective study summarizes impacts of selected programs on these participants. The summary data are from follow-up studies conducted from 1953 through 2003 by Oak Ridge Associated Universities and its predecessor, the Oak Ridge Institute for Nuclear Studies (ORINS).

  2. CONTRACT FOLLOW UP TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    SPL is organizing Training Sessions on the Contract Follow Up application. CFU is a Web based tool, developped and supported by the Administrative Information Services. It allows the creation of Divisional Requests and the follow up of their processing, from the Market Survey to the Invitation to Tender or Price Enquiry, approval by the Finance Committee, up to the actual signature of a Contract, acccording to the CERN Purchasing procedures. It includes a document management component. It also provides link with other AIS applications such as BHT and EDH. The course is primarily intended for DPOs, Contract Technical responsibles in the division and their assistants, but is beneficial to anybody involved in the follow up of such Purchasing Procedures. This course is free of charge, but application is necessary. The details of the course may be found at http://training.web.cern.ch/Training/ENSTEC/P2001/Bureautique/cfu4_f.htm General information of CFU may be found at http://ais.cern.ch/apps/cfu/ The dates of t...

  3. O ensino de graduação na Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo ao longo dos seus 50 anos (1953-2003 La educación de pre-grado en la Escuela de Enfermería de Ribeirão Preto de la Universidad de São Paulo a lo largo de sus 50 años (1953-2003 Undergraduate education at the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing throughout the 50 years of its history (1953-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Clapis

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem por objetivo descrever a trajetória do ensino de graduação desenvolvido na Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo (EERP-USP, ao longo dos seus 50 anos (1953-2003, trazendo subsídios para reflexões acerca do contexto histórico-social, das diretrizes curriculares atuais e desafios político-pedagógicos para a formação do enfermeiro.En este estudio, el objetivo es describir la trayectoria de la educación de pre-grado desarrollada en la Escuela de Enfermería de Ribeirão Preto de la Universidad de São Paulo a lo largo de sus 50 años (1953-2003, trayendo aportes para reflexionar a cerca del contexto histórico y social, de las directrices curriculares actuales y los desafíos políticos y pedagógicos para la formación del enfermero.This study aims to describe the course of undergraduate education developed at the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing throughout the 50 years of its history (1953-2003, offering tools for reflection about the historical and social context, about current curricular guidelines and political and pedagogical challenges with a view to nursing formation.

  4. Hyper Cold Systems follow up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berges, Jean Claude; Beltrando, Gerard; Cacault, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The follow up of intense precipitation system is a key information for climate studies. Whereas some rainfall measurement series cover more than one century they cannot retrieve these phenomena in their spatial and temporal continuity. The geostationary satellite data offer a good trade-off between the length of data series and the retrieval accuracy. However a difficulty arise from ambiguous interpretation of the lone infrared signal in nephanalysis. Hence the tropopause temperature is used as a proxy to characterize extreme precipitation event. That does not mean that the more intense rain-rate will be always collocated with the coldest temperature but that most of these intense events is produced by systems whose a part is colder than tropopause. Computations have been carried out on 38 months of MSG and Meteosat/IODC. System follow up is achieved by a simple 3D connexity algorithm, the time being considered as the third dimension. This algorithm produce three dimension clusters from where the main system parameters can be easily extracted. Thus the systems can be classified trajectory characteristic (duration, speed ans size variation). A drawback of this simple threshold method relies is some over-segmentation. In most of case the bias is minor as unconnected clusters are small and short-lived. However an aggregating algorithm have been developed to retrieve the most complex system trajectories. To assess the efficiency of this method three regional studies are displayed: the North African Maghreb, the West African Sahel and the Indian Ocean. On Maghreb, the location of system initialization shows a dramatic difference between the eastern and western parts. Whereas in Tunisia a significant part of these systems are generated on sea and most have no clear relation with relief, the Morocco is mainly characterized with land initiated system with a strong orographic effect on system triggering. Another difference relies on the low level wind shear impact which

  5. O ensino de graduação na Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo ao longo dos seus 50 anos (1953-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Clapis

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem por objetivo descrever a trajetória do ensino de graduação desenvolvido na Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo (EERP-USP, ao longo dos seus 50 anos (1953-2003, trazendo subsídios para reflexões acerca do contexto histórico-social, das diretrizes curriculares atuais e desafios político-pedagógicos para a formação do enfermeiro.

  6. The Kepler follow-up observation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gautier...[], T.N.; Batalha, N.M.; Borucki, W. J.;

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was launched on March 6, 2009 to perform a photometric survey of more than 100,000 dwarf stars to search for terrestrial-size planets with the transit technique. Follow-up observations of planetary candidates identified by detection of transit-like events are needed both...... that have been selected for follow-up. A preliminary estimate indicates that between 24% and 62% of planetary candidates selected for follow-up will turn out to be true planets....

  7. Follow-up utterances in QA dialogue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schooten, van Boris; Akker, op den Rieks

    2006-01-01

    The processing of user follow-up utterances by a QA system is a topic which is still in its infant stages, but enjoys growing interest in the QA community. In this paper, we discuss the broader issues related to handling follow-up utterances in a real-life "information kiosk" setting. With help of a

  8. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: a.morrison-saunders@murdoch.edu.au [Murdoch University (Australia); North-West University (South Africa); Pope, Jenny, E-mail: jenny@integral-sustainability.net [North-West University (South Africa); Integral Sustainability (Australia); Curtin University (Australia); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [North-West University (South Africa); University of East Anglia (United Kingdom); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [North-West University (South Africa)

    2014-02-15

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently.

  9. Follow-up interviews after eclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersgaard, Alice Beathe; Herbst, Andreas; Johansen, Marianne;

    2008-01-01

    hundred and twenty-three women (59%) were followed up with a structured telephone interview, 6-24 months (median 11) after their eclamptic fit. Results: At the time of follow-up, 63 women (51%) had at least one persistent symptom; 2 patients had severe neurological sequels (hemiparesis and dysarthria), 11...

  10. Follow-up in Childhood Functional Constipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modin, Line; Walsted, Anne-Mette; Rittig, Charlotte Siggaard;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Guidelines recommend close follow-up during treatment of childhood functional constipation. Only sparse evidence exists on how follow-up is best implemented. Our aim was to evaluate if follow-up by phone or self-management through web-based information improved treatment outcomes....... METHODS: In this randomized, controlled trial, conducted in secondary care, 235 children, aged 2-16 years, who fulfilled the Rome III criteria of childhood constipation, were assigned to one of three follow-up regimens: (I) control group (no scheduled contact), (II) phone group (2 scheduled phone contacts......: Improved self-management behavior caused by access to self-motivated web-based information induced faster short-term recovery during treatment of functional constipation. Patient empowerment rather than health care promoted follow-up might be a step towards more effective treatment for childhood...

  11. Robotic Follow-Up for Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matthew C.; Adams, Byron; Allan, Mark; Altobelli, Martha; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Cohen, Tamar; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Garber, Joshua; Palmer, Elizabeth; Heggy, Essam; Jurgens, Frank; Kennedy, Tim; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Lundy, Mike; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Wheeler, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    We are studying how "robotic follow-up" can improve future planetary exploration. Robotic follow-up, which we define as augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity, is a field exploration technique designed to increase human productivity and science return. To better understand the benefits, requirements, limitations and risks associated with this technique, we are conducting analog field tests with human and robot teams at the Haughton Crater impact structure on Devon Island, Canada. In this paper, we discuss the motivation for robotic follow-up, describe the scientific context and system design for our work, and present results and lessons learned from field testing.

  12. Audit Follow-up Tracking System (AFTS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Audit Follow-up Tracking System (AFTS) is used to track, monitor, and report on audits and open recommendations of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM)...

  13. The Kepler Follow-up Observation Program

    CERN Document Server

    Gautier, Thomas N; Borucki, William J; Cochran, William D; Dunham, Edward W; Howell, Steve B; Koch, David G; Latham, David W; Marcy, Geo? W; Buchhave, Lars A; Ciardi, David R; Endl, Michael; Furesz, Gabor; Isaacson, Howard; MacQueen, Phillip; Mandushev, Georgi; Walkowicz, Lucianne

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was launched on March 6, 2009 to perform a photometric survey of more than 100,000 dwarf stars to search for terrestrial-size planets with the transit technique. Follow-up observations of planetary candidates identified by detection of transit-like events are needed both for identification of astrophysical phenomena that mimic planetary transits and for characterization of the true planets and planetary systems found by Kepler. We have developed techniques and protocols for detection of false planetary transits and are currently conducting observations on 177 Kepler targets that have been selected for follow-up. A preliminary estimate indicates that between 24% and 62% of planetary candidates selected for follow-up will turn out to be true planets.

  14. The Community Follow-up Project (CFUP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherina, M S; Azhar, M Z; Mohd Yunus, A; Azlan Hamzah, S A

    2005-08-01

    The Community Follow-up Project (CFUP) is a project where medical students choose a hospital in-ward patient during their clinical ward-based attachments and follow-up this patient's progress after discharge from the hospital. The students do a series of home visits and also accompany their patients for some of their follow-ups at the hospital, government clinics, general practitioners' clinics and even to the palliative care or social welfare centres. The students assess the physical, psychological and social impact of the illness on the patient, family and community. By following their patients from the time their patients were in the hospital and back to their homes and community, the students are able to understand in depth the problems faced by patients, the importance of communication skills in educating patients on their illness and the importance of good communication between primary, secondary and tertiary care.

  15. Follow-up of erlotinib related uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Indu; Ali, Kashif; Usman-Saeed, Muniba; Saeed, Muhammad Usman

    2012-01-01

    The authors report the follow-up of a 68-year-old lady with bilateral anterior uveitis secondary to erlotinib. Erlotinib was started and stopped after symptoms and signs suggestive of severe bilateral anterior uveitis were noted. The patient developed signs of a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, 12 days after stopping the erlotinib, and recovered without major problems. The patient also reported intermittent low-grade fever since starting erlotinib which resolved after stopping this drug. No further symptoms of uveitis were noted up to 6 month follow-up. The patient reported improved well being, resolution of ocular symptoms and intermittent low-grade fever at last follow-up (6 months after stopping erlotinib). PMID:22892235

  16. Giant Cholesteatoma : Recommendations for Follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geven, Leontien I.; Mulder, Jef J. S.; Graamans, Kees

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the management of five patients who presented with giant recurrent or residual cholesteatoma after periods of 2 to 50 years. Their case histories are highly diverse, but all provide evidence of the need for long-term follow-up.

  17. Follow-Up Treatment and Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn › Stages › In Treatment Follow-Up Treatment and Rehabilitation Originally published on November 10, 2009 Most recently ... will need to be monitored when treatment stops. Rehabilitation Therapist Either the tumor itself or the effects ...

  18. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Tim; Greenstreet, Sarah; Gomez, Edward; Christensen, Eric J.; Larson, Stephen M.

    2016-10-01

    The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is using the telescopes of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) and a web-based target selection, scheduling and data reduction system to confirm NEO candidates and characterize radar-targeted known NEOs. Starting in July 2014, the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network has observed over 3,500 targets and reported more than 16,000 astrometric and photometric measurements to the Minor Planet Center (MPC).The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network's main aims are to perform confirming follow-up of the large number of NEO candidates and to perform characterization measurements of radar targets to obtain light curves and rotation rates. The NEO candidates come from the NEO surveys such as Catalina, PanSTARRS, ATLAS, NEOWISE and others. In particular, we are targeting objects in the Southern Hemisphere, where the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is the largest resource for NEO observations.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to a site at Ali Observatory, Tibet is planned for 2017-2018.We have developed web-based software called NEOexchange which automatically downloads and aggregates NEO candidates from the Minor Planet Center's NEO Confirmation Page, the Arecibo and Goldstone radar target lists and the NASA ARM list. NEOexchange allows the planning and scheduling of observations on the LCOGT Telescope Network and the tracking of the resulting blocks and generated data. We have recently extended the NEOexchange software to include automated data reduction to re-compute the astrometric solution, determine the photometric zeropoint and find moving objects and present these results to the user via

  19. A FOLLOW UP STUDY OF HYSTERIA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, N.N.; Mangalwedhe, K.; Bedi, Harminder; Murthy, R. Srinivas

    1982-01-01

    SUMMARY The present study undertook to examine the outcome of a group of cases who were diagnosed as hysteria, six or more years ago in a general hospital psychiatric unit and correlate various clinical factors with good or bad outcome. Of the 81 cases selected for the study, 57 (67%) could be located and followed up after a gap of 6-8 years. Majority of the cases (74%) had either no symptoms or symptoms less than before at the time of the follow up. In only 3 cases, there was evidence of an underlying organic illness which seemed to have been missed at the initial assessment. A new sub-classification of hysteria with glossary of terms used for this study is presented for future research work. PMID:21965899

  20. Radiologic findings and follow-up evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Cheol Hyun; Kim, Hyung Hwan; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young [Soonchunhyang University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    In esophageal perforation, fistulous tracts commonly occur between the esophagus and mediastinal or pleural spaces, but rarely between the esophagus and bronchi. The clinical manifestations and radiologic findings of esophageal perforation are nonspecfic, and diagnosis is the often delayed; esophagography is the standard technique for evaluation of its location and degree. CT is useful in demonstrating the extraluminal manifestations of esophageal perforation and for follow-up after medical treatment, and may depict the various manifestations of perforation, according to the causes.

  1. Prompt GRB optical follow-up experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H-S; Williams, G; Ables, E; Band, D; Barthelmy, S; Bionta, R; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Hartmann, D; Hurley, K; Kippen, M; Nemiroff, R; Pereira, W; Porrata, R

    2000-11-13

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are brief, randomly located, releases of gamma-ray energy from unknown celestial sources that occur almost daily. The study of GRBs has undergone a revolution in the past three years due to an international effort of follow-up observations of coordinates provided by Beppo/SAX and IPN GRB. These follow-up observations have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances and interact with surrounding material as described by the fireball model. However, prompt optical counterparts have only been seen in one case and are therefore very rare or much dimmer than the sensitivity of the current instruments. Unlike later time afterglows, prompt optical measurements would provide information on the GRB progenitor. LOTIS is the very first automated and dedicated telescope system that actively utilizes the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) and it attempts to measure simultaneous optical light curve associated with GRBs. After 3 years of running, LOTIS has responded to 75 GRB triggers. The lack of any optical signal in any of the LOTIS images places numerical limits on the surrounding matter density, and other physical parameters in the environment of the GRB progenitor. This paper presents LOTIS results and describes other prompt GRB follow-up experiments including the Super-LOTIS at Kitt Peak in Arizona.

  2. Disk Detective Follow-Up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc

    As new data on exoplanets and young stellar associations arrive, we will want to know: which of these planetary systems and young stars have circumstellar disks? The vast allsky database of 747 million infrared sources from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission can supply answers. WISE is a discovery tool intended to find targets for JWST, sensitive enough to detect circumstellar disks as far away as 3000 light years. The vast WISE archive already serves us as a roadmap to guide exoplanet searches, provide information on disk properties as new planets are discovered, and teach us about the many hotly debated connections between disks and exoplanets. However, because of the challenges of utilizing the WISE data, this resource remains underutilized as a tool for disk and planet hunters. Attempts to use WISE to find disks around Kepler planet hosts were nearly scuttled by confusion noise. Moreover, since most of the stars with WISE infrared excesses were too red for Hipparcos photometry, most of the disks sensed by WISE remain obscure, orbiting stars unlisted in the usual star databases. To remedy the confusion noise problem, we have begun a massive project to scour the WISE data archive for new circumstellar disks. The Disk Detective project (Kuchner et al. 2016) engages layperson volunteers to examine images from WISE, NASA's Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and optical surveys to search for new circumstellar disk candidates via the citizen science website DiskDetective.org. Fueled by the efforts of > 28,000 citizen scientists, Disk Detective is the largest survey for debris disks with WISE. It has already uncovered 4000 disk candidates worthy of follow-up. However, most host stars of the new Disk Detective disk candidates have no known spectral type or distance, especially those with red colors: K and M stars and Young Stellar Objects. Others require further observations to check for false positives. The Disk Detective project is supported by

  3. Spectroscopic follow up of Kepler planet candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latham..[], D. W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from...... spectroscopic orbits. The most precious resource for this work is HIRES on Keck I, to be joined by HARPS-North on the William Herschel Telescope when that new spectrometer comes on line in two years. Because a large fraction of the planet candidates are in fact stellar systems involving eclipsing stars...... and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using...

  4. Therapeutic abortion follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, A J; Davison, L A; Hanson, K H; Loos, S A; Mikkelsen, C M

    1971-05-15

    To determine the long-range psychological effects of therapeutic abortion, 50 women (aged from 13-44 years), who were granted abortions between 1967 and 1968 Because of possible impairment of mental and/or physical health, were analyzed by use of demographic questionnaires, psychological tests, and interviews. Testing revealed that 44 women had psychiatric problems at time of abortion. 43 patients were followed for 3-6 months. The follow-up interviews revealed that 29 patients reacted positively after abortion, 10 reported no significant change and 4 reacted negatively. 37 would definitely repeat the abortion. Women under 21 years of age felt substantially more ambivalent and guilty than older patients. A study of 36 paired pre- and post-abortion profiles showed that 15 initially abnormal tests had become normal. There was a significant increase in contraceptive use among the patients after the abortion, but 4 again became pregnant and 8 were apparently without consistent contraception. It is concluded that the abortions were therapeutic, but physicians are encouraged to be aware of psychological problems in abortion cases. Strong psychological and contraceptive counselling should be exercised.

  5. Leisure of Opiate Addicts at Posttreatment Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D. Dwayne; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Comparisons of self-reported leisure showed an overall shift toward more positive, socially accepted leisure activities at follow-up. More free time was spent with family and friends who did not use drugs. Positive leisure at follow-up was related to favorable outcomes on drug use, criminality, and productive activities. (Author)

  6. Shelf acetabuloplasty for Perthes' disease: 12-year follow-up.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, I.C.M. van der; Kooijman, H.M.; Spruit, M.; Anderson, P.G.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de

    2001-01-01

    The goal of all therapies for Perthes' disease is to achieve an optimal shape of the acetabulum and an optimal coverage of the femoral head. Thirty patients who were included in this follow-up study (mean follow-up 12 years) underwent a shelf acetabuloplasty for Catterall group III or IV. The mean I

  7. The value of gynecologic cancer follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Henrik; Jensen, Mette B.; Kilsmark, Jannie

    2010-01-01

    . The conception of follow-up among physicians, patients, and their relatives therefore needs revision. Follow-up after treatment should have a clearly defined and evidence-based purpose. Based on the existing literature, this purpose should presently focus on other end points rather than early detection...

  8. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Follow-up. 1022.17 Section 1022.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in...

  9. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt...

  10. The Effects of Drug Education at Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Joel M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Presents a one-year follow-up of a drug education course for 500 junior high school students. Analyses of variance and covariance were performed on class-level data collected at follow-up. None of the short-term effects of the course sustained. (JAC)

  11. Post-Discharge Follow-Up Visits and Hospital Utilization

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Analysis reported in Post-Discharge Follow-Up Visits and Hospital Utilization by Medicare Patients, 2007-2010, published in Volume 4, Issue 2 of Medicare and...

  12. A CLINICAL AND FOLLOW UP STUDY OF ATYPICAL PSYCHOSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurmeet; Sachdev, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    SUMMARY Twenty-two cases who fulfilled the criteria of having atypical manifestation at any stage of illness and had minimum follow up of three years were studied in detail. Their family history and follow up was analysed. The findings of the present study suggest that the cases showing admixture of schizophrenic and affective symptoms are probably a variant of affective disorders although a possibility of their being a third independent psychosis cannot be ruled out. PMID:22065727

  13. Paradoxes of follow-up - health professionals' views on follow-up after surgical treatment in gynecological cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Lotte; Wittrup, Inge; Petersen, Lone Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    : A qualitative approach was undertaken with semi-structured focus group interviews. Three focus group interviews were conducted at neutral ground. One group with onco-gynecologists, one group with specialist nurses, and one mixed group. The main themes of the interviewguide were: Existing follow-up program, life...... and appraisal from the patients. A disadvantage was the inadequate use of the nurses' main competencies. Some dilemmas were described by the nurses as well as doctors: First, both groups were aware of the existing evidence that attendance of follow-up programs may not improve survival and yet, health...... that the existing follow-up regime contains several dilemmas. According to the health professionals, future follow-up must be more individualized, and a shift in focus is needed from relapse to quality of life after cancer....

  14. [Telemedicine in pacemaker therapy and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchert, A

    2009-12-01

    Present-day remote systems for cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) provide, in contrast to previous solutions, a broad range of data about the patient and the implanted device ("remote control"). Telemedicine includes remote monitoring as well as remote follow-up: Remote monitoring is the continual interrogation of the device to detect patient- or device-related adverse events earlier than with standard follow-up visits. Remote follow-up aims to replace scheduled and unscheduled face-to-face follow-up visits due to the interrogation of the automatic pacemaker functions. Currently available remote systems, such as Home Monitoring, CareLink, Merlin.net, and Latitude, have in common that they interrogate the device, send these data to a server, and provide the data to the physician on a secured web site. Automatic wireless interrogation of the device is the preferred solution; however, the devices must have been equipped with a micro-antenna, which is usually restricted to more recent pacemaker models. Knowledge about remote control in pacemaker patients is limited, because most remote applications were evaluated in ICD and CRT patients. While the most frequently reported clinical event in pacemaker patients is atrial fibrillation, the impact in routine clinical follow-up still has to be evaluated in detail. Device-related adverse events are rare. Large, long-term, randomized trials are comparing remote and conventional approaches with the aim of demonstrating the benefits of telemedicine in this patient group.

  15. Follow-up care of children suffered from burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Константин Александрович Афоничев

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes of III-VI AB degree burns in children,regardless of the nature of treatment in the acute andrecovery period, are the development of scar contractures and deformities of the joints. However, thecorrect organization of follow-up care and rehabilitation treatment can significantly reduce the severity and facilitates the full recovery of the affected segment. Based on the analysis of their own material, the author defines the early stage of rehabilitation in these patients before full maturation of scar tissue or before the formation of functionally significant joint contractures, and later period, when there are indications for surgical rehabilitation. In the early period, follow-up care is recommended in 1 month after discharge and then on a quarterly basis, and with the appearance of deformities - at least once in 2 months. At the2nd stage of rehabilitation, older children and children of secondary school age are subject to follow-up care at least 1 time per year of primary school age - atleast once in 6 months, preschool children - every3 months. The proposed assessment of scar tissuehelps to determine the terms of follow-up care. Usingthis scheme of follow-up care and appropriate treatment allowed the author to obtain excellent and goodresults in 87-90 % of cases at the stages of rehabilitaion.

  16. Cohort follow-up: the 21st century procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Debra E; Hughes, Therese; Aldrich, Timothy E; Silver, Kenneth Z; Brion, Gall M

    2009-01-01

    The basic logic of designing an occupational cohort study has changed little since William R. Gaffey outlined the issues of follow-up, measurement of exposure, and analysis of data. However, many new avenues of tracking workers for epidemiological studies have been developed since Gaffey wrote his paper in 1973. Many disease registries also perform follow-up of subjects for vital status determination, so the procedures used with this process are common to the two applications. This article speaks to cohort construction for this occupational research as well as describes the 2007 methods for vital status follow-up. Rises in concern about work-related disease risks and the scientific resources for performing these studies coincided with the computer revolution. Government and private sources of data on vital status have changed in several ways over the 35 years since Gaffey's seminal paper. Some systems make the process of follow-up more rapid and productive, and some barriers have been imposed as societal concerns for privacy have risen. We describe the process of linking 5 sources of data to compile a roster of 6,820 workers employed at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant from 1953 to 2003. The record linkage processes achieved a final death cohort of 1672 deaths--the ascertainment of these deaths (by time period) was 1379 (1979-2003) and 293 (1953-1978); follow-up then was 100% for this cohort.

  17. Acromegalic patients lost to follow-up: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuki, Leandro; Marques, Nelma Verônica; Nuez, Maria José Braga La; Leal, Vera Lucia Gomes; Chinen, Renata N; Gadelha, Mônica R

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 50 % of all acromegalic patients will require lifelong medical treatment to normalize mortality rates and reduce morbidity. Thus, adherence to therapy is essential to achieve treatment goals. To date, no study has evaluated the frequency and reasons for loss to follow-up in the acromegalic population. The current study aimed at evaluating the frequency of acromegalic patient loss to follow-up in three reference centers and the reasons responsible for their low compliance with treatment. All of the files for the acromegalic patients in the three centers were reviewed. Those patients, who had not followed up with the hospital for more than a year, were contacted via phone and/or mail and invited to participate. Patients who agreed to participate were interviewed, and blood samples were collected. A total of 239 files were reviewed; from these 42 patients (17.6 %) were identified who were lost to follow-up. It was possible to contact 27 of these patients, 10 of whom did not attend the appointments for more than one time and 17 of whom agreed to participate in the study. Fifteen of these 17 patients had active disease (88.2 %), and all of the patients restarted treatment in the original centers. The main reason for loss to follow-up was an absence of symptoms. High-quality follow-up is important in acromegaly to successfully achieve the aims of the treatment. An active search for patients may allow the resumption of treatment in a significant proportion of these cases, contributing to reduced morbidity and mortality in this patient population.

  18. Barrett's esophagus. Diagnosis, follow-up and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremholm, Lasse; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Eriksen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Barrett's Esophagus (BE) is a premalignant condition in the esophagus. Esophageal adenocarcinomas have the fastest increase of incidence of all solid tumors in the western world. BE is defined as areas with macroscopic visible columnar epithelium and intestinal metaplasia oral of the anatomical...... and it is not recommended outside controlled studies. Treatment of high grade dysplasia and carcinoma in situ is handled in departments treating esophageal cancer. Follow-up with endoscopy and biopsy can be offered. Follow-up endoscopy with biopsy can only be recommended after thorough information to the patients...

  19. Exercise-Induced Ventricular Fibrillation: Seven Years Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökmen Gemici

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a 7-year follow-up of a 55-year-old male who experienced ventricular fibrillation during the recovery period of exercise testing and refused implantation of an ICD. Normal left ventricular systolic function was found on echocardiographic examination, and coronary angiography revealed only a side branch disease with a vessel diameter of less than 2 millimeters. The patient was discharged on metoprolol and ASA in addition to his previous treatment with lisinopril and simvastatin. Outpatient cardiac evaluation by repeated 24-hour ECG monitorizations (Holter revealed normal findings. On follow up visits every six months for the past seven years, the patient was found to be asymptomatic.

  20. Urological outcome after myelomeningocele: 20 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Biering-Sorensen, Fin; Cortes, Dina

    2011-01-01

    %) compared to those with normal function of both kidneys (24%). In total, 48% of the 52 myelomeningocele individuals were continent at follow-up. Continence surgery was performed in eight patients, nine used anticholinergica, three had regular botulinum toxin detrusor injections, and 27 used clean......Study Type - Therapy (case series)¿Level of Evidence 4 OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the urological outcome in a long-term follow-up of individuals with myelomeningocele and relate the findings obtained to urodynamic variables in childhood. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Individuals with myelomeningocele born...

  1. Danish offshore wind. Key environmental issues - a follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    This follow-up to the Danish environmental monitoring programme on large-scale offshore wind power builds on the result of the former programme of 2006 and focuses on updated knowledge on harbour porpoises, water birds and fish communities, and on the cumulative effects of wind farms. The scientific quality of the projects in this follow-up has been assessed by experts from the International Advisory Panel of Experts on Marine Ecology (IAPEME), who have commented on the results in an independent evaluation which is reproduced in this publication. (LN)

  2. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy - two years follow-up by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausegger, K.A.; Ebner, F.; Flueckiger, F.; Justich, E. (Graz Univ. (Austria). Radiologische Klinik); Millner, M.M. (Graz Univ. (Austria). Paediatrische Klinik)

    1991-04-01

    A case of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy (MEM) followed-up by MRI for 2 1/2 y is presented. MRI showed gross, diffusely distributed white matter lesions in both hemispheres predominantly in frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital locations a marked ventriculomegaly indicative of cerebral atrophy. Except a slight increase of the cerebral atrophy there were no changes in the follow-up examinations. There are no specific MRI findings in MEM, the diagnosis is established by the synopsis of MRI, laboratory data and muscle biopsy. (orig.).

  3. A Follow-up Study of Secretarial Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Bleil, David F.

    To determine how effectively the Secretarial Studies Department's program was meeting the needs of its students, a follow-up study was conducted of former Montgomery Community College Secretarial Studies students. The survey sought to determine, in particular, if the students had secured employment that was related to their course work at the…

  4. Transient Alert Follow-up Planned for CCAT

    CERN Document Server

    Jenness, Tim

    2014-01-01

    CCAT is a sub-millimeter telescope to be built on Cerro Chajnantor in Chile near the ALMA site. The remote location means that all observing will be done by remote observers with the future goal of fully autonomous observing using a dynamic scheduler. The fully autonomous observing mode provides a natural means for accepting transient alert notifications for immediate follow up.

  5. Eight to ten years follow-up after carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen Rathenborg, Lisbet; Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T

    1990-01-01

    Follow-up information was obtained on 185 patients who consecutively underwent carotid endarterectomy eight to ten years previously. Doppler ultrasound examination was performed in 59 patients who were still alive and living within 100 miles of the hospital. Using lifetable analysis, the annual...

  6. Treatment, follow-up and microbiota in acute diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniels, L.

    2015-01-01

    Er bestaat veel controverse rondom diverticulitis. Er is tegenstrijdigheid omtrent de beste behandeling van de verschillende stadia. Voor acute ongecompliceerde diverticulitis is het onzeker of antibiotica nodig zijn. De waarde van routine follow-up colonoscopie wordt betwijfeld. Er bestaat onduidel

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Follow-up Assessment of Sciatica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L. A. M.; Nijeholt, Geert J. Lycklama A.; Van der Kallen, Bas F.; van den Hout, Wilbert B.; Jacobs, Wilco C. H.; Koes, Bart W.; Peul, Wilco C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently performed during follow-up in patients with known lumbar-disk herniation and persistent symptoms of sciatica. The association between findings on MRI and clinical outcome is controversial. METHODS We studied 283 patients in a randomized trial

  8. MRI of penile fracture: diagnosis and therapeutic follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uder, Michael; Gohl, Dietrich; Takahashi, Masahide; Kramann, Bernhard; Schneider, Guenther [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Derouet, Harry [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Defreyne, Luc [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University Hospital of Gent (Belgium)

    2002-01-01

    A rupture of corpus cavernosum (CC) is a rare injury of the erect penis. The present study describes the role of MRI for diagnosis and follow-up of this injury. Four patients with clinically suspected acute penile fractures underwent MRI. Imaging findings were confirmed at surgery. In three patients, follow-up MRI was also available at 1, 6 and 16 weeks after surgical repair. In all patients pre-contrast T1-weighted images (T1WI) clearly disclosed ruptures of CC, which depicted as discontinuity of low signal intensity of the tunica albuginea (TA). Concomitant subcutaneous haematoma were well visualised both on T1-weighted (T1WI) and T2-weighted images, whereas haematoma in CC were optimally demonstrated on contrast-enhanced T1WI. On follow-up MRI all fractures presented similar healing process. Shortly after the repair, the tunical suture showed an increase in signal intensity on pre-contrast T1WI and was strongly enhanced with the administration of contrast material. Then the tear site gradually recovered low signal intensity on all spin-echo sequences by 4 months after surgery. These serial findings may suggest the formation of vascularised granulation tissue during cicatrisation. Magnetic resonance imaging is of great value for the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with penile fracture. (orig.)

  9. A Follow-Up Study of Former Student Health Advocates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streng, Nancy J.

    2007-01-01

    Student health advocates (SHAs) are high school students who, under the supervision of the school nurse, provide health education and health promotion activities to other students via a peer education model. This 3-year follow-up study explored how the SHA experience influences career choice and attitudes of the participants. It also examined what…

  10. Follow-up photometry of iPTF16geu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.-H.

    2016-10-01

    We report follow-up photometry of the strongly lensed SNIa iPTF16geu (ATel #9603, #9626). We observed iPTF16geu on 2016/10/17 with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) + WFC at La Palma, under ~0.9" seeing condition.

  11. A Follow-Up Study of Dyslexic Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucci, Joan M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Over 500 men who attended an independent school for children with developmental dyslexia were followed up from one to 38 years after they left the school. Socioeconomic status and IQ were not predictive of adult outcome. Severity of reading problem upon entrance and academic and remedial progress while at school were predictive of adult…

  12. Immunological follow-up of hydatid cyst cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulut Vedat

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is caused by Echinococcus granulosus. In this study, we aimed to investigate the benefit of monitoring cases with hydatid cyst by means of immune components in patients in a long-term follow-up after surgery. Eighty-four preoperative and postoperative serum samples from 14 cases undergoing surgery for hydatid disease were evaluated in terms of immune parameters, such as total and specific IgE, IgG, IgM, IgA and complement. Total and specific IgE were determined by ELISA. Specific IgG levels were measured by indirect hemaglutination.Total IgG, IgM, IgA and complement (C3 and C4 were detected by nephelometry. Imaging studies were also carried out during the follow-up. In none of the patients hydatid cysts were detected during the follow-up. Total IgE levels in the sera of the patients decreased to normal six months after surgery. Although specific IgE against echinococcal antigens decreased one year after operation, levels were still significantly high. There were no changes in the levels of anti-Echinococcus IgG and total IgG in follow-up period. Additionally, other parameters, such as IgA, IgM, C3 and C4, were not affected.

  13. Challenges of loss to follow-up in tuberculosis research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Thomas N; Rose, Michala V; Kimaro, Godfather;

    2012-01-01

    In studies evaluating methods for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB), follow-up to verify the presence or absence of active TB is crucial and high dropout rates may significantly affect the validity of the results. In a study assessing the diagnostic performance of the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test...

  14. The Minnesota Couple Communication Program: A Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampler, Karen Smith; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

    1980-01-01

    The Minnesota Couple Communication Program had a positive effect on the couple's use of open-style communication and on perceived quality of the couple's relationship immediately after training. Only the positive changes in perceived quality of relationship persisted at the follow-up. (Author)

  15. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  16. Morning Star Cycle Two: Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, L. V.

    Semi-structured telephone interviews were used to gather follow-up data on students who completed the 1977-1979 Morning Star cycle two program, a community-based Native teacher education program at the Blue Quills Native Education Centre leading to a Bachelor of Education degree from the University of Alberta. Of the 24 students who completed…

  17. Nimh Treatment Study of ADHD Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of changes in medication use between 14 and 24 months follow-up on effectiveness (symptom ratings and growth (height and weight measures were analyzed, comparing 4 groups of patients, in the Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD (MTA reported by the MTA Cooperative Group.

  18. KLENOT Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, Milos; Ticha, Jana; Kocer, Michal; Tichy, Milos

    2015-08-01

    Near Earth Object (NEO) research is important not only as a great challenge for science but also as an important challenge for planetary defense. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind.The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of NEOs since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO distribution. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008.The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013.The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation.Both the system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used in the framework of the KLENOT Project are described here, including methods for selecting useful and important targets for NEO follow-up astrometry.The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. More than 8000 of minor planet and comet astrometric positions including NEA measurements were published from September 2013 to February 2015.The 1.06-m KLENOT telescope is still the largest telescope in continental Europe used exclusively for observations of asteroids and comets. Full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team. Considering our results and long-time experience obtained at the Klet Observatory, we have the large potential to

  19. The Safe Dates program: 1-year follow-up results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foshee, V A; Bauman, K E; Greene, W F; Koch, G G; Linder, G F; MacDougall, J E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An earlier report described desirable 1-month follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program on psychological, physical, and sexual dating violence. Mediators of the program-behavior relationship also were identified. The present report describes the 1-year follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program. METHODS: Fourteen schools were in the randomized experiment. Data were gathered by questionnaires in schools before program activities and 1 year after the program ended. RESULTS: The short-term behavioral effects had disappeared at 1 year, but effects on mediating variables such as dating violence norms, conflict management skills, and awareness of community services for dating violence were maintained. CONCLUSIONS: The findings are considered in the context of why program effects might have decayed and the possible role of boosters for effect maintenance. PMID:11029999

  20. EMCS Installation Follow-Up Study. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    were in progress at the time of this site visit. A post occupancy evaluation (POE) was performed on August 9 & 10. Copies of three documents related to...FOLLOW-UP INVESTIGATION SITE VISIT ATTACHMENTS I. Norfolk Naval Shipyard - Post Occupancy Evaluation Field 1 Notes 2. Norfolk Naval Shipyard - Additional... Post Occupancy Evaluation Comments 3. Norfolk Naval Shipyard - Post Occupancy Evaluation Station Comments 4. Langley Air Force Base - F-i. F-2 POST

  1. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  2. [Renal lithiasis. Biochemical changes in the follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivacow, Francisco R; del Valle, Elisa E; Zancheta, José R

    2006-01-01

    With the aim of assessing if biochemical changes occur in the follow up of patients with renal lithiasis, 237 patients were studied (115 women and 122 men, mean age 39 +/- 8 and 42 +/- 7 years, respectively) and controlled during 27.3 +/- 19.3 months. All of them had previously undergone metabolic evaluations at baseline and one or more than one control studies afterwards. Patients with a diagnosis of sponge kidney, renal tubular acidosis, primary hyperparathyroidism, anatomical malformations of the urinary tract, or urinary infections were not included. Two populations were identified: those who presented changes in the baseline diagnosis (139 patients, Group I) and those who presented no changes (98 patients, Group II). In these groups, no differences were observed in baseline metabolic diagnoses or in the follow-up period. Hypocitraturia was the additional diagnosis most frequently observed (43.1%), followed by Idiopatic hypercalciuria (20.8%) and abnormalities of uric acid (16.5%). In the group of 110 patients followed up for more than 3 years, 37 patients recurred (33%). Among the latter, 25 (23%) changed the baseline metabolic diagnosis vs. 12 (11%) that maintained the same diagnosis (p < 0.002). Changes in metabolic disorders were frequently observed in the follow up of patients with nephrolithiasis. These changes are not necessarily associated with the diet indicated or drug treatment. Hypocitraturia was the additional metabolic disorder most frequently found. In general, there is a higher recurrence rate in those patients who present changes in their biochemical parameters and undergo no treatment.

  3. A Follow-Up Study of 69 Discharged SARS Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩云; 庚慧; 冯维斌; 汤湘江; 欧爱华; 老膺荣; 许银姬; 林浩; 刘惠; 李咏文

    2003-01-01

    @@ Sixty-nine patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) discharged from Guangdong Provincial TCM Hospital were followed up from January to April 2003 during which the patients were asked to fill the questionnaire form and at the same time received blood routine examination, hepatic, renal,pulmonary and immune function tests, and spiral computerized tomography (CT) of the chest, color Bultrasonography of the heart with the collected data treated by descriptive analysis and deductive analysis.

  4. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Rodrigues de Almeida; Marcio Rodrigues de Almeida; Paula Vanessa Pedron Oltramari-Navarro; Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira Conti; Ricardo de Lima Navarro; Karen Regina Siqueira de Souza

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been re...

  5. Follow-up after treatment for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisler, Jeffrey; Chaput, Genevieve; Sussman, Jonathan; Ozokwelu, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To offer FPs a summary of evidence-based recommendations to guide their follow-up survivorship care of women treated for breast cancer. Quality of evidence A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE from 2000 to 2016 using the search words breast cancer, survivorship, follow-up care, aftercare, guidelines, and survivorship care plans, with a focus on review of recent guidelines published by national cancer organizations. Evidence ranges from level I to level III. Main message Survivorship care involves 4 main tasks: surveillance and screening, management of long-term effects, health promotion, and care coordination. Surveillance for recurrence involves only annual mammography, and screening for other cancers should be done according to population guidelines. Management of the long-term effects of cancer and its treatment addresses common issues of pain, fatigue, lymphedema, distress, and medication side effects, as well as longer-term concerns for cardiac and bone health. Health promotion emphasizes the benefits of active lifestyle change in cancer survivors, with an emphasis on physical activity. Survivorship care is enhanced by the involvement of various health professionals and services, and FPs play an important role in care coordination. Conclusion Family physicians are increasingly the main providers of follow-up care after breast cancer treatment. Breast cancer should be viewed as a chronic medical condition even in women who remain disease free, and patients benefit from the approach afforded other chronic conditions in primary care. PMID:27737976

  6. Paediatrician office follow-up of common minor fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelink, Eric; Boutis, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that minor paediatric fractures can be followed by primary care paediatricians (PCPs). OBJECTIVES: To determine PCP opinions, knowledge and perceived barriers to managing minor paediatric fractures in the office. METHODS: An online survey was sent between June and September 2013 to all paediatricians who subscribed to the American Academy of Pediatrics PROS-Net Listerv and to those who were registered with the Scott’s Canadian Medical Directory as paediatricians who treated children in a primary care capacity. The primary outcome was the proportion of PCPs who agreed with PCP follow-up of minor paediatric fractures. Secondary outcomes included PCP’s perceived barriers to office follow-up. RESULTS: A total of 1752 surveys were sent; 1235 were eligible and 459 (37.2%) responded to the survey. Overall, 296 (69.5% [95% CI 65.2% to 74.0%]) PCPs agreed that minor paediatric fractures could be followed in a PCP office. The most frequently reported barriers were lack of materials to replace immobilization (58.1%), PCP knowledge deficits (44.8%) and a perceived parental preference for an orthopedic surgeon (38.6%). Finally, 58.8% of respondents believed that further education was necessary if PCPs assumed responsibility for follow-up of midshaft clavicle fractures, while 66.5% and 77.1% (Pmanagement strategy, including a desire for more education on this topic. PMID:25382996

  7. Appraising the value of independent EIA follow-up verifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessels, Jan-Albert, E-mail: janalbert.wessels@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: A.Morrison-Saunders@murdoch.edu.au [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Environmental Assessment, School of Environmental Science, Murdoch University, Australia. (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Independent Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) follow-up verifiers such as monitoring agencies, checkers, supervisors and control officers are active on various construction sites across the world. There are, however, differing views on the value that these verifiers add and very limited learning in EIA has been drawn from independent verifiers. This paper aims to appraise how and to what extent independent EIA follow-up verifiers add value in major construction projects in the developing country context of South Africa. A framework for appraising the role of independent verifiers was established and four South African case studies were examined through a mixture of site visits, project document analysis, and interviews. Appraisal results were documented in the performance areas of: planning, doing, checking, acting, public participating and integration with other programs. The results indicate that independent verifiers add most value to major construction projects when involved with screening EIA requirements of new projects, allocation of financial and human resources, checking legal compliance, influencing implementation, reporting conformance results, community and stakeholder engagement, integration with self-responsibility programs such as environmental management systems (EMS), and controlling records. It was apparent that verifiers could be more creatively utilized in pre-construction preparation, providing feedback of knowledge into assessment of new projects, giving input to the planning and design phase of projects, and performance evaluation. The study confirms the benefits of proponent and regulator follow-up, specifically in having independent verifiers that disclose information, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, are adaptable and proactive, aid in the integration of EIA with other programs, and instill trust in EIA enforcement by conformance evaluation. Overall, the study provides insight on how to harness the learning opportunities

  8. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  9. Cervical disc prosthesis: 2-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero Pinto de Oliveira Bilhar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the medical records of patients who underwent surgery for placement of cervical disc prosthesis after two years of postoperative follow-up, showing the basic epidemiological data, the technical aspects and the incidence of complications.METHODS: Medical records of seven patients who underwent surgery for placement of cervical disc prosthesis were reviewed after two years of follow-up, at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo.RESULTS: The average age of patients participating in this study was 43.86 years. Six patients (85.7% had one level approached while one patient (14.3% had two levels addressed. The level C5-C6 has been approached in one patient (14.3% while the C6-C7 level was addressed in five patients (71.4%. One patient (14.3% had these two levels being addressed, C5-C6 and C6-C7. The mean operative time was 164.29±40 minutes. Three patients were hospitalized for 2 days and four for 3 days making an average of 2.57±0.535 days. Two patients (28.6% underwent a new surgical intervention due to loosening of the prosthesis. The mean follow-up was 28.14±5.178 months (23-35 months.CONCLUSIONS: Although cervical arthroplasty appears to be a safe procedure and present promising results in our study as well as in many other studies, it requires long-term studies.

  10. Colonic resection for colovesical fistula: 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, K. G; Anderson, J. H; Iskander, N; McKee, R. F; Finlay, I. G

    2002-07-01

    OBJECTIVES: The outcome of colovesical fistula management may be unsatisfactory; complications are reported in up to 45% of patients. Published studies are retrospective and tend to lack standardized management strategies and long-term follow-up. This cohort study assesses a policy of resection of colovesical fistulae in continuity with any distal colorectal stricture, and includes 5-year follow-up. METHOD: All patients undergoing surgery in our institution for colovesical fistula between February 1991 and April 1995 were entered into the study. The fistulae were resected in continuity with any distal bowel stricture, according to a standard single-stage operative protocol. Postoperative mortality and morbidity were recorded, and prospective review was undertaken at April 2000. RESULTS: Nineteen consecutive patients entered the study. The source of the fistula was diverticular disease (n = 14), colorectal cancer (n = 3), trauma (n = 1) or Crohn's (n = 1) disease. Thirteen patients had a colorectal stricture. One patient died due to ischaemic colitis within 30 days of surgery. Eleven other patients died of unrelated causes before April 2000, in whom there was no evidence of fistula recurrence before death at a median of 37 months after operation (range 2-95 months). At 5-year follow-up there was no evidence of fistula recurrence in the seven remaining patients. CONCLUSIONS: A policy of resection of the fistula and associated colorectal stricture with primary bowel anastomosis and bladder drainage, resulted in no recurrences and low morbidity. However comorbidity is important in this patient population, most of whom will die from unrelated causes within a few years.

  11. Education On Prehospital Pain Management: A Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott C. French

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most common reason patients seek medical attention is pain. However,there may be significant delays in initiating prehospital pain therapy. In a 2001 qualityimprovement (QI study, we demonstrated improvement in paramedic knowledge,perceptions, and management of pain. This follow-up study examines the impact of thisQI program, repeated educational intervention (EI, and effectiveness of a new painmanagement standard operating procedure.Methods: 176 paramedics from 10 urban and suburban fire departments and two privateambulance services participated in a 3-hour EI. A survey was performed prior to the EI andrepeated one month after the EI. We reviewed emergency medical services (EMS runs withpain complaints prior to the EI and one month after the EI. Follow-up results were comparedto our prior study. We performed data analysis using descriptive statistics and chi-square tests.Results: The authors reviewed 352 surveys and 438 EMS runs with pain complaints. Usingthe same survey questions, even before the EI, 2007 paramedics demonstrated significantimprovement in the knowledge (18.2%; 95% CI 8.9%, 27.9%, perceptions (9.2%; 95% CI6.5%, 11.9%, and management of pain (13.8%; 95% CI 11.3%, 16.2% compared to 2001.Following EI in 2007, there were no significant improvements in the baseline knowledge (0%;95% CI 5.3%, 5.3% but significant improvements in the perceptions of pain principles (6.4%;95% CI 3.9%, 9.0% and the management of pain (14.7%; 95% CI 11.4%, 18.0%.Conclusion: In this follow up study, paramedics’ baseline knowledge, perceptions, andmanagement of pain have all improved from 6 years ago. Following a repeat educationalintervention, paramedics further improved their field management of pain suggestingparamedics will still benefit from both initial and also ongoing continuing education on thetopic of pain management.

  12. Klenot Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-Up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichý, Miloš; Tichá, Jana; Kočer, Michal

    2016-01-01

    NEO research is a great challenge just now - for science, for exploration and for planetary defence. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of Near Earth Objects since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO population. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008. The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation (NG) were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013. The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation. Along with huge hardware changes we have decided for essential changes in software and the whole KLENOT work-flow. Using the current higher computing power available, enhancing and updating our databases and astrometry program, the core of our software package, will prove highly beneficial. Moreover, the UCAC4 as the more precise astrometric star catalog was implemented. The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. This step opens new possibilities for the KLENOT Project, the long-term European Contribution to Monitoring and Cataloging Near Earth Objects. KLENOT Project Goals are confirmatory observations of newly discovered fainter NEO candidates, early follow-up of newly discovered NEOs, long-arc follow-up astrometry of NEOs

  13. GRBs Optical follow-up observation at Lulin observatory, Taiwan

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, K Y; Ip, W H; Tamagawa, T; Onda, K; Makishima, K

    2005-01-01

    The Lulin GRB program, using the Lulin One-meter Telescope (LOT) in Taiwan started in July 2003. Its scientific aims are to discover optical counterparts of XRFs and short and long GRBs, then to quickly observe them in multiple bands. Thirteen follow-up observations were provided by LOT between July 2003 and Feb. 2005. One host galaxy was found at GRB 031203. Two optical afterglows were detected for GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. In addition, the optical observations of GRB 031203 and a discussion of the non-detection of the optical afterglow of GRB 031203 are also reported in this article.

  14. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this

  15. THE FOLLOW-UP STUDY IN α-KETOADIPIC ACIDURIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To follow up study on α-ketoadipic aciduria , which is a rare inborn error of metabolism of L-ly sine, hydroxy-L-lysine, and L-tryptophan. Methods The case with α-ketoadipic aciduria was investigated clinically and metabolites were detected by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques during a period of 15 years (9months~ 15years). Results The case had growth retardation at the onset but later grew normally. The urinary metabolites showed persisent abnormality compatible with α-ketoadipic aciduria. The concentrations of α-ketoadipate , α-aminoadipate and α-hy droxyadipate were 33mmol/mol creatinine, 92~266mmol/mol creatinine and 17~28mmol/mol creatinine , respectively. Glutarate also increased in their urine. Conclusion The study suggested the clinical course of a-ketoadipic aciduria is benign and the clinical manifestations are various. The follow-up study on this case with α-ketoadipic aciduria must be continued.

  16. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Renato Rodrigues de; Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues de; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; Souza, Karen Regina Siqueira de

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program), and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment.

  17. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Rodrigues de Almeida

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program, and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment.

  18. Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome: A 13-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Antonio Guerrero-González

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder presenting with poikiloderma and other clinical features, affecting the bones and eyes and, in type II RTS, presenting an increased risk for malignancy. With about 300 cases reported so far, we present a 13-year follow-up including clinical images, X-rays and genetic analysis. A 13-month-old female started with a facial rash with blisters on her cheeks and limbs at the age of 3 months along with congenital hypoplastic thumbs, frontal bossing and fine hair, eyebrows and eyelashes. The patient was lost to follow-up and returned 12 years later with palmoplantar hyperkeratotic lesions, short stature, disseminated poikiloderma and sparse scalp hair, with absence of eyelashes and eyebrows. Radiographic analysis showed radial ray defect, absence of the thumb and three wrist carpal bones, and reduced bone density. Gene sequencing for the RECQL4 helicase gene revealed a mutation on each allele. RTS is a rare disease, and in this patient we observed the evolution of her skin lesions and other clinical features, which were important for the classification of type II RTS. The next years will provide even more information on this rare disease.

  19. Improving pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Dana; Williams, Elizabeth; Margolis, Peter; Ruschman, Jennifer; Bick, Julianne; Saeed, Shehzad; Opipari, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Standardization of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) care through participation in the ImproveCareNow (ICN) Network has improved outcomes for pediatric patients with IBD, but under the current care model, our improvements have plateaued. Current ICN model care guidelines recommend health supervision visits every six months. We identified a gap in our practice's ability to ensure either a routine six month follow-up or a rapid follow-up after a disease flare, and a significant number of patients with active disease status during a six month period lacked timely reassessment after interventions or medication changes. Telemedicine provides an alternative method of care delivery to address these gaps, but has had limited use in patients with IBD. A multi-step approach to offer alternative follow-up care options via telemedicine was developed with potential impact on remission rates and quality of life. Short term goals of the pilot were to improve telemedicine access for patients with IBD were to 1) increase the percent of patients with active disease with a follow-up completed within two months of a visit from 40% to 70%, 2) increase the percent of patients with a visit scheduled within two months of their last sick visit from 20% to 70% (interim measure), 3) increase the number of eVisits from zero visits per month to two visits per month during pilot phase, 4) increase electronic communication with patients from zero messages per month to 200 messages per month, 5) no change in complications or adverse events (defined as an unplanned visit or ED (emergency department) encounter within 30 days of an eVisit. The expected outcomes of the e-visit model were to: maintain baseline care standards and health screening capabilities, improve access to care, and provide equivalent care delivery (no increase in the number of unplanned clinical encounters). Using the IHI model for improvement (Plan-Do-Study-Act) we have seen a progressive increase in the rate of patient signups

  20. Loss to follow up within an HIV cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Wood

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available BHIVA guidelines recommend that all ARV-naïve and stable on-treatment patients are monitored at least 6 monthly [1]. Studies have shown that loss to follow up (LFU not only worsens outcomes [2] but has increased potential for onward transmission. Case notes of 1275 HIV patients registered under our care up to January 2011 were examined for attendance within the previous 6 months. 788 (61% patients had not been seen within the previous 6 months. Reasons for non attendance were identified. These are outlined below: 76% of the 130 LFU whose demographics were further examined were of Black African ethnicity, 54% female, 51% of single marital status and 48% of patients had been taking ARVs at the time of LFU. Interestingly, 53% of patients were lost to follow up within 1 year of diagnosis. The LFU patients (88 that had a local GP and a registered current address were sent recall letters. A small number of patients reengaged with care as a result of this action, some having not attended for over 5 years. Partner notification led to a number of new diagnoses in these cases. Failure to respond led to subsequent letters inviting them to clinic and finally a letter to their GP informing them of non attendance. In September 2011, a new recall system using Lillie Electronic Patient Records (EPR was introduced to promptly recognise if a patient had not attended for care as planned. Prior to this, recall was a manual process carried out by the Health Advising Team. We conclude that within our cohort we had a particularly mobile group of patients; 455 (36% transferring care to another clinic within the UK, 54 (4% moving out of UK. 76% of the LFU group being of Black African ethnicity highlights the ongoing problem of retention of care in this group. Further exploration is needed to identify additional issues besides housing and immigration that lead to LFU. Furthermore, the disportionate number of patients (53% disengaging with services within 1 year of

  1. A New GRB follow-up Software at TUG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dindar, M.; Parmaksizoglu, M.; Helhel, S.; Esenoglu, H.; Kirbiyik, H.

    2016-12-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical photometric follow-up system at TUBITAK (Scientic and Technological Research Council of Turkey) National Observatory (TUG) has been planned. It uses the 0.6 m Telescope (T60) and can automatically respond to GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) alerts. The telescopes slew relatively fast, being able to point to a new target field within 30 s upon a request. Whenever available, the 1 m T100 and 2.5 m RTT150 telescopes will be used in the future. As an example in 2015, the GRB software system (will be server side) at T60-telescope responded to GRB alert and started the observation as early as 129 s after the GRB trigger autonomously.

  2. MANDIBULAR INCISOR EXTRACTION: A 5-YEAR FOLLOW-UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir BEYCAN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This case report presents the mandibular incisor extraction treatment of a patient with dental Class I malocclusion and lower crowding, in whom one mandibular incisor extraction was selected as the treatment of choice to improve the dental occlusion. A 19-year-old male patient’s chief complaint was the crowding of lower incisors. He had a straight profile with normal upper and lower lip projection. Upper and lower dental midlines were coincident with the facial midline. The patient had Class I molar and canine relationships on both sides. He had Class I skeletal relationship, low angle vertical pattern, and proclined upper and lower incisors. The treatment plan included the extraction of lower right central incisor to resolve the crowding. At the end of 16-month active fixed treatment, lower dental crowding was resolved. At the 5-year follow-up, the patient had a stable occlusion, with the results of the orthodontic treatment maintained.

  3. Vertebral sarcoidosis: long-term follow-up with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefere, M. [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Larbi, A.; Malghem, J.; Vande Berg, B.; Dallaudiere, B. [University Hospitals St Luc, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    Vertebral involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and its clinical and imaging features are non-specific. Indeed, because the lesions are hard to differentiate from metastatic disease based on imaging alone, a histological confirmation is advised. Fatty replacement is a well-known finding indicating stabilization and healing in both benign and malignant conditions. It can be used as an indicator of a favorable disease course and response to treatment. We report the case of a 43-year-old woman with multifocal vertebral sarcoidosis lesions and long-term follow-up showing progressive and gradual fatty involution on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during 4 years of steroid treatment with a final favorable outcome. (orig.)

  4. Role of imaging in glaucoma diagnosis and follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vizzeri Gianmarco

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the review is to provide an update on the role of imaging devices in the diagnosis and follow-up of glaucoma with an emphasis on techniques for detecting glaucomatous progression and the newer spectral domain optical coherence tomography instruments. Imaging instruments provide objective quantitative measures of the optic disc and the retinal nerve fiber layer and are increasingly utilized in clinical practice. This review will summarize the recent enhancements in confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, scanning laser polarimetry, and optical coherence tomography with an emphasis on how to utilize these techniques to manage glaucoma patients and highlight the strengths and limitations of each technology. In addition, this review will briefly describe the sophisticated data analysis strategies that are now available to detect glaucomatous change overtime.

  5. Hydrotherapy after total knee arthroplasty. A follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaquinto, S; Ciotola, E; Dall'Armi, V; Margutti, F

    2010-01-01

    The study evaluated the subjective functional outcome following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in participants who underwent hydrotherapy (HT) six months after discharge from a rehabilitation unit. A total of 70 subjects, 12 of which were lost at follow-up, were randomly assigned to either a conventional gym treatment (N=30) or HT (N=28). A prospective design was performed. Participants were interviewed with Western-Ontario McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) at admission, at discharge and six months later. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were applied for statistical analysis. Both groups improved. The WOMAC subscales, namely pain, stiffness and function, were all positively affected. Statistical analysis indicates that scores on all subscales were significantly lower for the HT group. The benefits gained by the time of discharge were still found after six months. HT is recommended after TKA in a geriatric population.

  6. Home/community monitoring using telephonic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elisabeth Moy; French, Louis; Janos, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    Service members who have had a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a war theatre [Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)] may have associated injuries far different and/or more complex (i.e., polytrauma) than injuries obtained outside the theatre of operation. This article expands on what has been learned from monitoring patients injured during peacetime to the newly injured war veterans being monitored in the home setting via routine telephonic follow-up. As Tanielian et al. state TBI, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression may occur during and following deployment/s which then pose a significant health risk to these veterans. This is particularly important as veterans of these two conflicts may incur these "invisible wounds of war". Thus, safe and effective monitoring of these veterans by nurses/case managers in the home/community setting becomes important in the recovery process.

  7. The Danish Cerebral Palsy Follow-up Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle Mätzke; Nordbye-Nielsen, Kirsten; Møller-Madsen, Bjarne;

    2016-01-01

    -15 years and children with symptoms of CP aged 0-5 years. MAIN VARIABLES: In the follow-up program, the children are offered examinations throughout their childhood by orthopedic surgeons, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and pediatricians. Examinations of gross and fine motor function, manual...... ability, muscle tone, passive range of motion, use of orthotics, and assistive devices are performed once a year; radiographic examination of the hips is planned based on the child's age and gross motor function; and the diagnosis is performed once before the age of 5 years. Six indicators were developed...... based on scientific literature and consensus in the steering committee, and their calculation is based on the following four main variables: radiographic examination of the hip, gross motor function, manual ability, and diagnosis. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The 2014 annual report includes results of the quality...

  8. [Obesity surgery--useful knowledge in indication and follow up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiwiller, A; Sykora, M

    2009-10-07

    In the last years, obesity has become one of the main problems of health care systems in Western countries. Among morbid obese patients, four out of five will develop comorbidities doubling the mortality risk in women and increase the numbers in men at a threefold risk. According to evidence based guidelines, nowadays surgery is the best and most effective treatment resulting in excellent long-term weight loss, reduction of comorbidities while extending expectation of life. A sound indication is the most important step for successful surgery. In this paper we focus on Swiss regulations and some special indications which have to be taken into consideration. After bariatric surgery clinical follow up on a regular basis is also of great importance. Furthermore, we explain typical mechanical and nutritional complications after different types of surgery and give some recommendations.

  9. Spheroid degeneration of conjunctiva and cornea. Two years' follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, M

    1980-10-01

    Twenty-six subjects with spheroid degeneration were followed up after two years. The number of colourless conjunctival droplets was seen to have increased by on an average 46% (2 alpha = 0.05) and that of autofluorescent conjunctival droplets by 223% (2 alpha less than 0.01). Counting within the individual sites sites disclosed that some droplets will disappear (not less than 30 and 21% respectivelY), while recently formed will constitute at least 76 and 243%. The number of areas with band-shaped keratopathy was found to rise from 3 to 26 (P less than 0.001) out of 104 possibilities, (nasally and temporally of right and left eye). Vital staining (fluorescein, rose bengal, tetrazolium, alcian blue) showed the epithelium above the droplets to be intact, and the droplet-containing eyes were found not to be abnormally dry (break up time, tear production).

  10. Facilitation of DDD follow-up using the DDT mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, W; Nitschke, M; Gutschker, A; Worzewski, W

    1992-11-01

    To facilitate follow-up, modern dual chamber pacemakers provide a variety of diagnostic features like ECG interpretation channels and intracardiac electrograms. For evaluation of the sensing performance at rest and during exercise, for assessment of the presence of crosstalk, and for measurement of the retrograde conduction time, dual chamber triggered pacing, particularly the DDT mode, can be used alternatively or additionally in pacemakers equipped with this option. In contrast to ECG interpretation channels, ECG documentation is not required for evaluation of the sensing performance, because the triggered pulses serving as markers for sense events can also be seen on the monitor. Selection of the DDT mode not only as temporary but also as permanent program serves to facilitate pacemaker ECG interpretation for exercise tests and Holter recordings as well.

  11. Male sexual dysfunctions and multimedia immersion therapy (follow-up).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optale, Gabriele; Marin, Silvia; Pastore, Massimiliano; Nasta, Alberto; Pianon, Carlo

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficiency, after 1 year, of combined use of psychodynamic psychotherapy integrating virtual reality (VR) for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) and premature ejaculation (PE) in 160 heterosexual males who had neither any prior sexual therapy nor had made use (either before, during or after therapy) of any specific pharmaceuticals for the treatment of primary sexual dysfunction. All subjects had given their informed consent. After a clinical diagnosis in an andrologic center, 50 presumably psychological ED (average age 43.7 years), 60 mixed ED (53.9 years) and 50 primary PE (39 years) who suffered these problems over 6 months were undergoing a cycle of 12 sessions, over a 25-week period, of psychotherapy, integrating an audio CD and helmet with miniature television screens that projected specially designed CD-ROM program on the ontogenetic development of male sexual identity. The clinical follow up was done after 6 and 12 months after the cycle. After one year, the overall partial (two times out of three) and complete positive response rate for psychological ED was 75%, for mixed ED was 47% and for PE was 54%. We considered drop-out cases as only before the 7th session of the treatment cycle, the drop-outs after session 7 and the patients that did not show up for follow-up are counted as negative results. Two patients reported nausea and one, vertigo during the first 15-min virtual reality experience. Considering the particular way that full-immersion virtual reality involves the subject who experiences it, we hypothesized that this methodological approach could speed up the therapeutic process. The evidence that positive results persist over time allows us to hypothesize that certain changes in cerebral function can be possible and that these changes are correlated to favorable sexual performance in the male.

  12. The Iowa follow-up of chemically sensitive persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, D W; Okiishi, C; Schlosser, S

    2001-03-01

    Clinical symptoms and self-reported health status in persons reporting multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS) are presented from a 9-year follow-up study. Eighteen (69%) subjects from a sample of 26 persons originally interviewed in 1988 were followed up in 1997 and given structured interviews and self-report questionnaires. In terms of psychiatric diagnosis, 15 (83%) met DSM-IV criteria for a lifetime mood disorder, 10 (56%) for a lifetime anxiety disorder, and 10 (56%) for a lifetime somatoform disorder. Seven (39%) of subjects met criteria for a personality disorder using the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-IV. Self-report data from the Illness Behavior Questionnaire and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised show little change from 1988. The 10 most frequent complaints attributed to MCS were headache, memory loss, forgetfulness, sore throat, joint aches, trouble thinking, shortness of breath, back pain, muscle aches, and nausea. Global assessment showed that 2 (11%) had "remitted", 8 (45%) were "much" or "very much" improved, 6 (33%) were "improved", and 2 (11%) were "unchanged/worse". Mean scores on the SF-36 health survey showed that, compared to U.S. population means, subjects reported worse physical functioning, more bodily pain, worse general health, worse social functioning, and more emotional-role impairment; self-reported mental health was better than the U.S. population mean. All subjects maintained a belief that they had MCS; 16 (89%) acknowledged that the diagnosis was controversial. It is concluded that the subjects remain strongly committed to their diagnosis of MCS. Most have improved since their original interview, but many remain symptomatic and continue to report ongoing lifestyle changes.

  13. Submillimeter Follow-up of Wise-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Cutri, Roc; Evans, Neal J., II; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Lake, Sean; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam

    2013-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approximately 1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at zeta = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 micrometers, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 micrometers. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (zeta greater than 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 micrometers, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) solar luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  14. Clinical outcome and follow-up of prenatal hydronephrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Safaei Asl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydronephrosis is probably the most common congenital abnormality detected prenatally by ultrasonography This study was performed to determine the cause and outcome of prenatal hydronephrosis in our hospital. A total of 45 infants, with 57 prenatally hydronephrotic renal units, were enrolled into this study. For the purpose of this study, the degree of hydronephrosis was defined as mild, moderate or severe. Postnatal ultrasonography was performed as soon as possible in those with bilateral hyronephrosis and 3-7 days after birth in those with unilateral hydronephrosis. Voiding cystourethrogram was performed in 6-8 weeks time. In the absence of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR, Diethylenetriamene penta acetate scan was performed to exclude obstructive uropathy. There were 29 males and 16 females (male:female ratio 1.8:1, and unilateral and bilateral hydronephrosis were seen in 33 (73% and 12 (27% of the cases, res-pectively. Hydronephrosis was caused by ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO in 20 (44.5%, VUR in 10 (22.2%, ureterovesical junction obstruction in four (8.9 %, posteriorurethral valves in four (8.9 %, UPJO with VUR in two (4.4% and non-VUR non-obstructive in one (2.2%. During follow-up, 16 patients (35.5% required operative intervention while seven (15.5% improved spontaneously. Fetal hydronephrosis needs close follow-up during both ante-natal and postnatal periods. In this study, the most common cause for hydronephrosis were UPJO and VUR. Also seen in this study is the noteworthy point that mild fetal hydronephrosis is relatively benign and does not require surgical intervention in most cases and surgery should be performed only if there is renal function compromise. Prenatal consultation with a pediatric nephrologist and urologist is useful in decreasing parental anxiety and facilitating postnatal management.

  15. Multicenter follow-up study of ankle fracture surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hai-lin; WANG Gang; WANG Guang-lin; WU Xin-bao; LIU Li-min; LI Xuan; ZHANG Dian-ying; FU Zhong-guo; WANG Tian-bing; ZHANG Pei-xun; JIANG Bao-guo; SHEN Hui-liang

    2012-01-01

    Background Few data on ankle fractures in China from large multicenter epidemiological and clinical studies are available.The aim of this research was to evaluate the epidemiological features and surgical outcomes of ankle fractures by reviewing 235 patients who underwent ankle fracture surgery at five hospitals in China.Methods This study included patients who underwent ankle fracture surgery at five Chinese hospitals from January 2000 to July 2009.Age,gender,mechanism of injury,Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) fracture type,fracture pattern,length of hospital stay and treatment outcome were recorded.Statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS software.The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale,visual analogue scale (VAS),and arthritis scale were used to evaluate outcome.Results Of 235 patients with ankle fractures,105 were male with an average age of 37.8 years and 130 were female with an average age of 47.3 years.The average follow-up period was 55.7 months.There were significant differences in the ratios of patients in different age groups between males and females,and in mechanisms of injury among different age groups.There were also significant differences in the length of hospital stay among different fracture types and mechanisms of injury.In healed fractures,the average AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score was 95.5,with an excellence rate of 99.6%,the average VAS score was 0.17,and the average arthritis score was 0.18.Movement of the injured ankle was significantly different to that of the uninjured ankle.There were no significant differences between AO fracture types,fracture patterns or follow-up periods and AOFAS score,but there were some significant differences between these parameters and ankle joint movements,pain VAS score and arthritis score.Conclusions Ankle fractures occur most commonly in middle-aged and young males aged 20-39 years and in elderly females aged 50-69 years.The most common mechanisms of

  16. Long-term follow-up of thyroid nodule growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadbeck, B; Pruellage, J; Roggenbuck, U; Hirche, H; Janssen, O E; Mann, K; Hoermann, R

    2002-10-01

    Benign thyroid nodules are common in iodine deficient countries. Although many recent studies have addressed the molecular basis and short-term outcome of treatment in nodular thyroid disease, data on the long-term follow-up of thyroid nodule growth are widely lacking. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term behaviour of benign thyroid nodules growth. We followed 109 consecutive patients seen at yearly intervals in our Outpatient Clinic for at least 3 years (range 3-12 years, mean 4.9 +/- 2.6 years) presenting with 139 benign nodules in uni- or multinodular goiters. The size of the nodules and thyroid glands was analysed retrospectively. The study included a spectrum of benign thyroid nodules, 86 functioning and 53 non-functioning. 27 patients were treated with levothyroxine, 8 with iodide and 16 with a combination of both. 58 patients were not treated mainly because of thyroid functional autonomy. Patients with overt hyperthyroidism or suspected malignancy by fine-needle aspiration were excluded from the study. The nodules and glands were assessed by ultrasonography at yearly intervals and documented by photoprints. Relevant growth was defined as an increase in nodule volume of at least 30%. For statistical analyses, Cox Proportional Hazard Model and life-table analyses according to Kaplan-Meier were performed. Most thyroid nodules grew slowly but continuously during follow-up. After about 3 years, half of the nodules had increased their volume by at least 30%. Growth of the nodules was significantly faster than of the corresponding thyroid glands (p < 0.0001). Age and sex of the patients and size or function of the nodules at initial presentation were not significantly related to their growth. Suppression of TSH did not affect growth of the nodules irrespective of the source of thyroid hormones, endogenous or by administration of levothyroxine. In conclusion, benign thyroid nodules have a slow intrinsic growth potential, which is apparently

  17. Intensity of follow-up after pancreatic cancer resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Jason A; Merchant, Nipun B

    2014-03-01

    The prognosis of patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains dismal. Of the 15-20 % of patients who are candidates for potentially curative resection, 66-92 % will develop recurrent disease. Although guidelines for surveillance in the postoperative setting exist, they are not evidence based, and there is wide variability of strategies utilized. Current surveillance guidelines as suggested by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) include routine history and physical, measurement of serum cancer-associated antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) levels, and computed tomographic imaging at 3- to 6-month intervals for the first 2 years, and annually thereafter. However, the lack of prospective clinical data examining the efficacy of different surveillance strategies has led to a variability of the intensity of follow-up and a lack of consensus on its necessity and efficacy. Recent therapeutic advances may have the potential to significantly alter survival after recurrence, but a careful consideration of current surveillance strategies should be undertaken to optimize existing approaches in the face of high recurrence and low survival rates.

  18. A long-term follow-up of postpartum thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, S; Phillips, D I; Parkes, A B; Richards, C J; Harris, B; Fung, H; Darke, C; John, R; Hall, R; Lazarus, J H

    1990-05-01

    To investigate the long-term outcome of postpartum thyroiditis (PPT), 43 patients with PPT and 171 control women were evaluated 3.5 (range 2-4) years postpartum. Ten (23%) PPT patients were hypothyroid compared to none of the controls (P less than 0.001). Factors associated with the development of hypothyroidism were high antimicrosomal antibody titre measured at 16 weeks gestation (P less than 0.01), severity of hypothyroid phase of PPT, multiparity, and a previous history of spontaneous abortion. The presence of microsomal antibody but no PPT in one pregnancy did not prevent the occurrence of PPT in the next pregnancy in two patients and a further five patients had PPT in two successive pregnancies. There was no association between HLA haplotype, family history of thyroid disease, smoking or frequency of oral contraception, and the development of long-term hypothyroidism after PPT. It is concluded that permanent hypothyroidism is an important sequel to PPT and patients with PPT should be followed up appropriately.

  19. Banked cadaveric fascia lata: 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, S H M; Gregório, E P; Rodrigues, M A F; Grando, J P S; Moreira, H A; Fraga, F C

    2004-05-01

    Autologous fascial and synthetic materials have been widely used to repair the stress form of urinary incontinence (SUI) as well as pelvic floor prolapse. The safety and long-term durability of cadaveric fascia lata in orthopedic and ophthalmologic surgery have encouraged urogynecologists to use this material for a sling material. The rationale of placement of a sling from cadaveric fascia lata is based upon decreasing the complication rates caused by autologous and synthetic materials. However, the high costs of the commercially available tissues in Brazil have limited its use in public health. In our institution we developed a cadaveric fascia lata bank, harvesting the material according to the Brazilian Transplantation Legislation and storing it at -70 degrees C. The safety of the tissue is achieved by 25-kGy irradiation. Since 1999, 30 patients have undergone surgery using material from five donors in repairs for stress urinary incontinence and pelvic floor prolapse at a mean of 34 months' follow-up (ranging from 30 to 40 months), there was no evidence of rejection. Therefore, we have shown the safety of cadaveric fascia lata harvested and treated as described above in our group of patients.

  20. Follow-up Sonography after Sonoguided Renal Biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Soo; Park, Cheol Min; Cha, In Ho [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-15

    To assess ultrasonographic findings and clinical significance after renal biopsy. 174 cases of post-biopsy sonography were studied retrospectively. We classified post-biopsy hematoma on the basis of their size as small (thickness less than 1 cm, length less than 3cm), medium (thickness less than 1cm, length greater than 3 cm), large (thickness greater than 1 cm, length greater than 3 cm). We also compared bleeding parameters (prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time) and renal function in both cases which had hematoma or not. Total 33 hematomas were found (19%). Small hematoma was observed in 14 cases, medium hematoma in 16 cases, large hematoma in 3 cases. Severe complications requiring prompt therapy occurred in 1 case(0.6%). In 6 cases hematocrit fell by more than 4%, all of these hematomas were observed on US. Severe complications after sonoguided renal biopsy were rare. There was poor correlation between prebiopsybleeding parameter, renal function and post-biopsy hematomas. And sonography is considered as adequate method for follow up of post-biopsy hematoma

  1. Primary testicular plasmocytoma: A five year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Ghirelli Filho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The testicular plasmocytoma represents only 5% of the non-germinative cell testicular tumors, and accounts for only 2% of all plasma cell neoplasms. Approximately, 50 cases of testicular plasmocytoma have been reported in medical literature; however, only 9 of these are isolated tumors without previous history or progression to multiple myeloma. A 47-year-old patient, presenting progressive and painless growth of the right testicle in the last four years, underwent surgical treatment in another hospital two years ago, to correct a hydrocele in the same testicle with no improvement at all. Sonography showed a tumor with the following measurements for the right testicle: 84 × 59 × 80 mm. The tumor marker values were all normal. An abdominal computed tomography found no evidence of retroperitoneal lymph nodes invasion. The patient underwent a right radical orchiectomy. Pathologic analysis revealed a malignant neoplasia described as a plasmocytoma (solitary myeloma that produces immunoglobulin′s kappa light chain. After five years of follow-up, there were no signs of metastasis or local recurrence in the exams. Case report and review of literature have been presented here.

  2. COPD and microalbuminuria: a 12-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romundstad, Solfrid; Naustdal, Thor; Romundstad, Pål Richard; Sorger, Hanne; Langhammer, Arnulf

    2014-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), low lung function independent of diagnosis and markers of inflammation are all associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Microalbuminuria, reflecting endothelial dysfunction, could be a relevant inflammatory marker of potential systemic effects of COPD. We hypothesised that there was a positive association between microalbuminuria and mortality in individuals with COPD. We conducted a 12-year follow-up study of 3129 participants in the second survey of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), Norway. At baseline, albuminuria was analysed in three urine samples and spirometry was performed. Among the participants, 136 had COPD and microalbuminuria, defined as a urinary albumin/creatinine ratio between 2.5 and 30.0 mg·mmol(-1). The main outcome measures were hazard ratio of all-cause mortality according to microalbuminuria. Compared to those with COPD without microalbuminuria, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality in those with COPD and microalbuminuria was 1.54, 95% CI 1.16-2.04. This result was similar after excluding cardiovascular disease at baseline. Classifying COPD severity by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, there was a positive association trend with increasing severity stages. Microalbuminuria is associated with all-cause mortality in individuals with COPD and could be a relevant tool in identification of patients with poor prognosis.

  3. Congenital hypothyroidism: follow up of a case for 13 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir M Naik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/objectives: Congenital hypothyroidism is one of the most common preventable causes of mental retardation in children. The prognosis of infants detected by neonatal screening and started on treatment early is excellent, with intelligence quotients similar to sibling or classmate without the disease. Setting: Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, KVG Medical College, Sullia. 1Case report: A 15 year old boy came with history of head ache, generalized body ache and lack of concentration in school. He was a case of congenital hypothyroidism and was on irregular treatment for the last 13 years. Intervention: The patient was advised strictly to continue the oral l-thyroxine 100μg one hour before food and come for regular follow-up. Conclusion: Definite intellectual deterioration is seen if oral l-thyroxine is not started within 50 days of life and the deterioration is irreversible. So in India newborn screening programs should be implemented as a national program as it is very important to diagnose and treatcongenital hypothyroidism as soon as possible and to treat it effectively.

  4. Measles vaccine: a 27-year follow-up.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramsay, M E

    1994-04-01

    In 1964, the Medical Research Council undertook a trial of measles vaccine in over 36,000 United Kingdom children; 9577 of whom received live vaccine, 10,625 received inactivated followed by live vaccines, and 16,328 acted as unvaccinated controls. Participants in this study have been followed to determine the long term protection from measles vaccine and follow-up data were available on 4194, 4638 and 274 respectively. During the 5-year period 1986-90, the protective efficacy of live measles vaccine has remained high at 87%, but the 95% confidence interval was wide (-43 to 99%) due to the small numbers of cases. Between 1976 and 1990, however, the overall efficacy of the live vaccine was 92% (95% confidence interval 86 to 95%) and there was no evidence of a decline in efficacy (P = 0.13) over the 15-year period. This study suggests that the protection from live measles vaccine persists for up to 27 years after vaccination, and that no change in the current United Kingdom measles immunization policy should be made on the grounds of waning immunity.

  5. Electrochemical sensors in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Marques

    2015-12-01

    electrodes (SPCEs were used as the transducers. These SPCEs (working volume: ~40 μL are widely employed in the construction of electrochemical (biosensors because of several reasons: simplicity and low cost, versatility of design, small dimensions and possibility of incorporation in portable systems, as well as adequate electroanalytical characteristics. These SPCEs were modified with gold nanoparticles (nAu through the electrochemical deposition of ionic gold from a solution. The developed sensors were applied to the analysis of the selected biomarkers in spiked human serum samples.Besides these immunosensors, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP sensor was developed for the analysis of HER2-ECD. In this case a gold electrode was used as the transducer. The MIP was formed by surface imprinting and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and voltammetry were used for detection purposes.Results: For the immunoassays the following parameters were optimized: capture and detection antibody concentration, surface blocking, reaction mixtures and incubation times. The best limits of detection obtained were below the established cut-off values (25 U/mL and 15 ng/mL for CA15-3 and HER2-ECD, respectively. For the MIP sensor the most adequate polymer was chosen and the electropolymerization, template removal, and incubation conditions were optimized. The lowest HER2-ECD concentration that was analyzed was 50 µg/mL.Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that the developed sensors could be promising tools in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up. However, further studies should be conducted using patients' samples and the results of these assays should be validated with the established analysis procedures for these cancer biomarkers.-----------------------------------------Cite this article as:  Marques R, Pacheco J, Rama EC, Viswanathan S, Nouws H, Delerue-Matos C. Electrochemical sensors in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2015; 3(4:34012.[This

  6. [Delirium in elderly inpatients. An 18 month follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Fernando J; Benchimol, Javier; Giunta, Diego; Cafferata, Carlos; Freixas, Antonio; Vallone, Marcelo; Andresik, Diego; Pollan, Javier; Aprile, Ana; Lorenzo, Jimena; Waisman, Gabriel; Camera, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Delirium usually hardens care during hospitalization and increases morbidity during hospital stay and after discharge. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of delirium in elderly inpatients in a Buenos Aires hospital, its morbidity and mortality during hospital stay and the next 18 month follow-up. Patients aged 70 or older admitted to internal medicine unit between September 2005 and May 2006 were enrolled. Delirium was assessed with the Spanish version of Confusion Assessment Method. Demographic data, cause of admition and length of stay, destination after discharge and mortality were registered. A new evaluation was made 18 months after discharge. We evaluated 194 patients and 74 were excluded. Of the 120 included, 52 (43.3%) presented delirium. We found significant differences between patients with and without delirium in previous placement in nursing home (17.3% vs. 1.5%; p < 0.002), dementia (40.4% vs. 8.8%; p < 0.001), median activity of daily living (5 vs. 6; p < 0.001), length-of-stay (7 vs. 5; p = 0.04) and mortality rate (21.2% vs. 1.5%; p < 0.001). Evaluation 18 months later showed differences between patients with and without delirium in median of activity of daily living (1/6 vs. 5/6), patients living in nursing homes (27.5% vs. 7.9%), estimated survival 35.3% (CI 95%: 24-49%) at day 569 and 49% (CI 95%: 32.9-65.4%) at day 644. The difference between survival curves was statistically significant (p = 0.027). Delirium increases morbidity and mortality during hospital stay. Elderly with delirium are at risk of worsening disability and of becoming dependent after discharge and it is a risk factor for higher mortality during the following months after discharge.

  7. Cancer mortality among German aircrew: second follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeb, Hajo; Hammer, Gaël P; Langner, Ingo; Schafft, Thomas; Bennack, Sabrina; Blettner, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Aircrew members are exposed to cosmic radiation and other specific occupational factors. In a previous analysis of a large cohort of German aircrew, no increase in cancer mortality or dose-related effects was observed. In the present study, the follow-up of this cohort of 6,017 cockpit and 20,757 cabin crew members was extended by 6 years to 2003. Among male cockpit crew, the resulting all-cancer standardized mortality ratio (SMR) (n = 127) is 0.6 (95% CI 0.5-0.8), while for brain tumors it is 2.1 (95% CI 1.0-3.9). The cancer risk is significantly raised (RR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.1) among cockpit crew members employed 30 years or more compared to those employed less than 10 years. Among both female and male cabin crew, the all-cancer SMR and that for most individual cancers are close to 1. The SMR for breast cancer among female crew is 1.2 (95% CI 0.8-1.8). Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma among male cabin crew is increased (SMR 4.2; 95% CI 1.3-10.8). However, cancers associated with radiation exposure are not raised in the cohort. It is concluded that among cockpit crew cancer mortality is low, particularly for lung cancer. The positive trend of all cancer with duration of employment persists. The increased brain cancer SMR among cockpit crew requires replication in other cohorts. For cabin crew, cancer mortality is generally close to population rates. Cosmic radiation dose estimates will allow more detailed assessments, as will a pooling of updated aircrew studies currently in planning.

  8. Clinical follow up of uniparental disomy 16: First data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dworniczak, B.; Koppers, B.; Bogdanova, N. [Univ. of Muenster (Germany)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Following the introduction of the concept of uniparental disomy (UPD) in 1980 by Engel this segregational anomaly is reported in an ever increasing number of patients. So far, several groups of individuals with an increased risk for UPD have been identified including abnormal carriers of familial balanced translocations or centric fusions, carriers of mosaic trisomies, and fetuses after prenatal diagnosis of confined placental mosaicism. A major pathogenetic mechanism appears to be post-meiotic chromosome loss in trisomic conceptuses. UPD was repeatedly observed in the fetus after diagnosis of mosaic or non-mosaic trisomies in the placenta which are usually considered {open_quotes}lethal{close_quotes} (i.e. trisomies 15 and 16). In an ongoing study to determine the incidence and clinical consequences of UPD we investigated the parental origin of chromosomes in the disomic cell line after prenatal diagnosis of mosaicism for various trisomies (e.g. 2, 7, 14, 15, and 16). At present, two maternal disomies 16 and one maternal disomy 15 were identified. Severe intrauterine growth retardation was a common symptome which, however, was also present in some but not all mosaics with a biparental origin of the chromosomes in question. While prognosis is clear in some instances (i.e. UPD 15) counseling can be extremely difficult in others, when imprinting effects and homozygosity for unknown recessive traits present in a parent have to be considered. To assess the clinical significance, detailed follow-up studies of proven cases of uniparental disomies are essential. First data of two cases with UPD 16 are presented.

  9. PNH revisited: Clinical profile, laboratory diagnosis and follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is characterized by intravascular hemolysis, marrow failure, nocturnal hemoglobinuria and thrombophila. This acquired disease caused by a deficiency of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored proteins on the hematopoietic cells is uncommon in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Data of patients diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year were collected. Clinical data (age, gender, various presenting symptoms, treatment information and follow-up data were collected from medical records. Results of relevant diagnostic tests were documented i.e., urine analysis, Ham′s test, sucrose lysis test and sephacryl gel card test (GCT for CD55 and CD59. Results: A total of 5 patients were diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year. Presenting symptoms were hemolytic anemia (n=4 and bone marrow failure (n=1. A GCT detected CD59 deficiency in all erythrocytes in 4 patients and CD55 deficiency in 2 patients. A weak positive PNH test for CD59 was seen in 1 patient and a weak positive PNH test for CD55 was seen in 3 patients. All patients were negative by sucrose lysis test. Ham′s test was positive in two cases. Patients were treated with prednisolone and/or androgen and 1 patient with aplastic anemia was also given antithymocyte globulin. A total of 4 patients responded with a partial recovery of hematopoiesis and 1 patient showed no recovery. None of the patients received a bone marrow transplant. Conclusion: The study highlights the diagnostic methods and treatment protocols undertaken to evaluate the PNH clone in a developing country where advanced methods like flowcytometry immunophenotyping (FCMI and bone marrow transplants are not routinely available.

  10. Parenchymal neurocysticercosis: follow-up and staging by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, J.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France)]|[Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France); Visy, J.M. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Belin, C. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Gaston, A. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Goldlust, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Dumas, M. [Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France)

    1997-01-01

    We describe the evolution of parenchymal cerebral cysticerci on MRI, to assess signs of early cyst degeneration. We studied 15 lesions in four treated and one untreated patient. MRI was performed before therapy and repeated in the 1st month after each course of anticysticercus drugs, every 4 months during the 1st year and then annually; the follow-up period was 8-48 months. Lesions were classified according to changes in four features: cyst content and capsule signal, gadolinium enhancement and oedema signal. We were able to recognise each of the pathological phases; five MRI stages were identified. Stage 1 showed oedema and/or nodular gadolinium enhancement in the tissue invasion phase; stage 2 was cerebrospinal fluid-like signal within a cyst in the vesicular phase; stage 3 showed a thick capsule with an impure liquid content signal and surrounding oedema, in the cystic phase; stage 4 showed the disappearance of the cyst fluid content signal in the degenerative phase; stage 5 showed a calcified lesion in the residual phase. Stage 1 lesions disappeared after therapy; the other progressed from one stage to another. Stage 4 indicated the end of viability of the parasite and determined the point after which treatment was useless. On T2-weighted images changes in the cyst content differed according to the history of the lesion; nodular low intensity followed the natural degeneration of the parasite and a mixed fluid signal with punctate low signal seemed to represent the specific result of therapy. MRI staging can help in the evaluation of indications for treatment and facilitate clinical therapeutic trials. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Pattern of follow-up care and early relapse detection in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, S.M.E.; Vegt, de F.; Siesling, S.; Flobbe, K.; Aben, K.K.H.; Heiden-van der Loo, van der M.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Dijck, van J.A.A.M.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Routine breast cancer follow-up aims at detecting second primary breast cancers and loco regional recurrences preclinically. We studied breast cancer follow-up practice and mode of relapse detection during the first 5 years of follow-up to determine the efficiency of the follow-up schedule. The Neth

  12. Barriers to follow-up for pediatric cataract surgery in Maharashtra, India: How regular follow-up is important for good outcome. The Miraj Pediatric Cataract Study II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikshit Gogate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular follow up and amblyopia treatment are essential for good outcomes after pediatric cataract surgery. Aim: To study the regularity of follow-up after cataract surgery in children and to gauge the causes of poor compliance to follow up. Subjects: 262 children (393 cataracts who underwent cataract surgery in 2004-8. Materials and Methods: The children were identified and examined in their homes and a "barriers to follow-up" questionnaire completed. Demographic data collected, visual acuity estimated, and ocular examination performed. Statistical Analysis: SPSS version 19. Results: Of the 262 children, only 53 (20.6% had been regularly following up with any hospital, 209 (79.4% had not. A total of 150 (57.3% were boys and the average age was 13.23 years (Std Dev 5 yrs. Poor follow up was associated with the older age group ( P 1 line with regular follow-up. Conclusion: Regular follow-up is important and improves vision; eye care practitioners need to take special efforts to ensure better follow-up.

  13. The IRRS follow-up mission to the Nuclear Safety Council; La mision follow-up de la IRRS al Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurgi Ferrer, A. P.; Collet Campo, D.

    2011-07-01

    The IRRS follow-up mission to the Nuclear Safety Council. From January 25th to February 1st last the CSN headquarters hosted a follow-up to the IAEA Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission carried out in January 2008. The objective of this follow-up has been to check the extent to which the suggestions and recommendations made by the original IRRS mission have been adopted by the audited regulator and, as a result, to verify its degree of adherence to the strictest international standards. (Author)

  14. Patients highly value routine follow-up of skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Themstrup, Lotte; Jemec, Gregor E; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    : This study included an open sample of patients attending routine follow-up at the outpatient Departments of Plastic Surgery and Dermatology, Roskilde Hospital. A total of 218 follow-up patients diagnosed with cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM), non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) or actinic keratosis (AK......INTRODUCTION: Skin cancer follow-up is a substantial burden to outpatient clinics. Few studies have investigated patients' views on skin cancer follow-up and cutaneous melanoma. The objective was to investigate patients' perceived benefits and the impact of follow-up. MATERIAL AND METHODS......) completed a structured interview. RESULTS: A total of 97% patients found follow-up useful. Continuity and consistency were important. One third of patients felt some degree of pre follow-up anxiety. The number of anxious MM patients was significantly greater than that of NMSC patients. No significant...

  15. Postoperative Follow-up After Bariatric Surgery: Effect on Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniolas, Konstantinos; Kasten, Kevin R; Celio, Adam; Burruss, Matthew B; Pories, Walter J

    2016-04-01

    While adherence to long-term follow-up after bariatric surgery is a mandate for center of excellence certification, the effect of attrition on weight loss is not well understood. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of postoperative follow-up on 12-month weight loss using the Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database (BOLD) dataset. Patients with complete follow-up (3, 6, and 12 months) were compared to patients who had one or more prior missed visits. There were 51,081 patients with 12-month follow-up data available. After controlling for baseline characteristics, complete follow-up was independently associated with excess weight loss ≥50%, and total weight loss ≥30%. Adherence to postoperative follow-up is independently associated with improved 12-month weight loss after bariatric surgery. Bariatric programs should strive to achieve complete follow-up for all patients.

  16. Follow-up skeletal surveys for nonaccidental trauma: can a more limited survey be performed?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan, Susan R. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Nixon, G.W.; Prince, Jeffrey S. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Campbell, Kristine A.; Hansen, Karen [University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Studies have demonstrated the value of the follow-up skeletal survey in identifying additional fractures, clarifying indeterminate findings, and improving dating of skeletal injuries in victims of physical abuse. To determine whether a more limited follow-up survey could yield the same radiologic data as a full follow-up survey. The study cohort comprised 101 children who had follow-up surveys that met our inclusion criteria. Consensus readings of both original and follow-up surveys were performed by two pediatric radiologists. These results were compared to determine additional findings from the follow-up surveys. Limited skeletal survey protocols were evaluated to determine whether they would detect the same fractures seen with a complete osseous survey. In the 101 children 244 fractures were identified on the initial osseous survey. Follow-up surveys demonstrated new information in 38 children (37.6%). A 15-view limited follow-up survey identified all additional information seen on the complete follow-up survey. Our data demonstrate that a 15-view limited follow-up skeletal survey could be performed without missing clinically significant new fractures and still allow proper identification of confirmed fractures or normal findings. A limited survey would decrease radiation dose in children. (orig.)

  17. A decade of GRB follow-up by BOOTES in Spain (2003-2013)

    CERN Document Server

    Jelínek, Martin; Cunniffe, Ronan; Gorosabel, Javier; Vítek, Stanislav; Kubánek, Petr; Postigo, Antonio de Ugarte; Guziy, Sergey; Tello, Juan C; Páta, Petr; Sánchez-Ramírez, Rubén; Oates, Samantha; Jeong, Soomin; Štrobl, Jan; Castillo-Carrión, Sebastián; Sanguino, Tomás Mateo; Rabaza, Ovidio; Pérez-Ramírez, Dolores; Fernández-Muñoz, Rafael; Carretero, Benito A de la Morena; Hudec, René; Reglero, Víctor; Sabau-Graziati, Lola

    2016-01-01

    This article covers ten years of GRB follow-ups by the Spanish BOOTES stations: 71 follow-ups providing 23 detections. Follow-ups by BOOTES-1B from 2005 to 2008 were given in the previous article, and are here reviewed, updated, and include additional detection data points as the former article merely stated their existence. The all-sky cameras CASSANDRA have not yet detected any GRB optical afterglows, but limits are reported where available.

  18. Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B.P.; Abbott, T.D.; Abernathy, M.R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.X.; Adya, V.B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O.D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P.A.; Anderson, S.B.; Anderson, W.G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M.C.; Arceneaux, C.C.; Areeda, J.S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K.G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S.M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M.K.M.; Baker, P.T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.W.; Barayoga, J.C.; Barclay, S.E.; Barish, B.C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A.S.; Bell, C.J.; Berger, B.K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C.P.L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I.A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M.A.; Blackburn, J.K.; Blair, C.D.; Blair, D.G.; Blair, R.M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T.P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B.A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P.R.; Braginsky, V.B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J.E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A.F.; Brown, D.A.; Brown, D.D.; Brown, N.M.; Buchanan, C.C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H.J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R.L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J.C.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J.B.; Cannon, K.C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J.C.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.B.; Baiardi, L.C.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S.J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H.Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H.S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J.H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J.A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C.A.; Coughlin, M.W.; Coughlin, S.B.; Coulon, J.P.; Countryman, S.T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E.E.; Coward, D.M.; Cowart, M.J.; Coyne, D.C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J.D.E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S.G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S.L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N.S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.S.; Daw, E.J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M.C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K.L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T.P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R.W.P.; Driggers, J.C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.E.; Edo, T.B.; Edwards, M.C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S.S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R.C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M.M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E.C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R.P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T.T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V.V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.A.G.; Gair, J.R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J.A.; Giardina, K.D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, G.; Castro, J.M.G.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N.A.; Gorodetsky, M.L.; Gossan, S.E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P.B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A.C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G.M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M.K.; Gushwa, K.E.; Gustafson, E.K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.J.; Hall, B.R.; Hall, E.D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M.M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M.D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.M.; Harry, I.W.; Hart, M.J.; Hartman, M.T.; Haster, C.J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I.S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A.W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K.A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S.E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D.E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D.J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.A.; Howell, E.J.; Hu, Y.M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E.A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S.H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D.R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H.N.; Isac, J.M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B.R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.W.; Jones, D.I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R.J.G.; Ju, L.; H. K; Kalaghatgi, C.V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J.B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M.S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J.S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F.Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E.A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.M.; King, E.J.; King, P.J.; Kinzel, D.L.; Kissel, J.S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S.M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W.Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.B.; Kringel, V.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B.D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P.D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E.O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, H.K.; Lee, H.M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J.R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.M.; Li, T.G.F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T.B.; Lockerbie, N.A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A.L.; Lord, J.E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.D.; Luck, H.; Lundgren, A.P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D.M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G.L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A.S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I.W.; Martin, R.M.; Martynov, D.V.; Marx, J.N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T.J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D.E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S.C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D.J.; McWilliams, S.T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G.D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R.A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P.M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E.E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V.P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S.R.P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, C.J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S.R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C.M.; Mueller, C.L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A.W.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R.K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.T.; Nielsen, A.B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M.E.N.; Nuttall, L.K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G.H.; Oh, J.J.; Oh, S.H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D.J.; Ottens, R.S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B.J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.A.; Palamos, J.R.; Palashov, O.; Palliyaguru, N.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B.C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M.A.; Paris, H.R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B.L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I.M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L.R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G.A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F.J.; Rabeling, D.S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C.M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D.H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S.D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N.A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.G.; Roma, V.J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J.H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rudiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E.J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J.R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B.S.; Saulson, P.R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R.L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; R. Schilling$^; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.M.S.; Schonbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B.F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S.M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D.A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M.S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D.H.; Shoemaker, D.M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A.D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A.M.; Slagmolen, B.J.J.; Smith, J.R.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R.J.E.; Son, E.J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A.K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B.C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K.A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N.A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A.L.; Summerscales, T.Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P.J.; Swinkels, B.L.; Szczepanczyk, M.J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D.B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S.P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M.P.; Thomas, E.G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K.A.; Thorne, K.S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K.V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; C.V. Torres$^; Torrie, C.I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M.C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C.S.; Urban, A.L.; Usman, S.A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D.C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J.V.; van Veggel, A.A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D.J.; Vinet, J.Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W.D.; Vyatchanin, S.P.; Wade, A.R.; Wade, L.E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R.L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J.T.; White, D.J.; Whiting, B.F.; Williams, R.D.; Williamson, A.R.; Willis, J.L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C.C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C.C.; Yap, M.J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X.J.; Zucker, M.E.; Zuraw, S.E.; Zweizig, J.; Allison, J.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M.E.; Chatterjee, S.; Chippendale, A.P.; Edwards, P.G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, Ian; Hotan, A.; Indermuehle, B.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Murphy, T.; Popping, A.; Reynolds, J.; Sault, R.J.; Voronkov, M.A.; Whiting, M.T.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Cunniffe, R.; Jelinek, M.; Tello, J.C.; Oates, S.R.; Zhang, B.B.; Hu, Y.D.; Kubanek, P.; Guziy, S.; Castellon, A.; Garcia-Cerezo, A.; Munoz, V.F.; Perez, C.; Castillo-Carrion, S.; Castro, J.M.; Hudec, R.; Caballero-Garcia, M.D.; Pata, P.; Vitek, S.; Adame, J.A.; Konig, S.; Rendon, F.; de J. Mateo, T.; Fernandez-Munoz, R.; Yock, P.C.; Rattenbury, N.; Allen, W.H.; Querel, R.; Jeong, S.; Park, I.H.; Bai, J.; Cui, Ch.; Fan, Y.; Wang, Ch.; Hiriart, D.; Lee, W.H.; Claret, A.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R.; Pandey, S.B.; Mediavilla, T.; Sabau-Graziati, L.; Abbott, T.M.C.; Abdalla, F.B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Berger, E.; Bernstein, R.A.; Bertin, E.; Brout, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D.L.; Capozzi, D.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F.J.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P.S.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C.E.; D'Andrea, C.B.; da Costa, L.N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H.T.; Dietrich, J.P.; Doctor, Z.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M.R.; Eifler, T.F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A.E.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D.A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R.J.; Fong, W.F.; Fosalba, P.; Fox, D.B.; Frieman, J.; Fryer, C.L.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.W.; Goldstein, D.A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R.A.; Gutierrez, G.; Herner, K.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.J.; Johnson, M.D.; Johnson, M.W.G.; Karliner, I.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A.G.; Kind, M.C.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T.S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M.A.G.; Margutti, R.; Marriner, J.; Martini, P.; Matheson, T.; Melchior, P.; Metzger, B.D.; Miller, C.J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R.C.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A.A.; Quataert, E.; Roe, N.; Romer, A.K.; Roodman, A.; Rosell, A.C.; Rykoff, E.S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Scolnic, D.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, N.; Smith, R.C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stebbins, A.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M.E.C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R.C.; Tucker, D.L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A.R.; Wechsler, R.H.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.; Connaughton, V.; Burns, E.; Goldstein, A.; Briggs, M.S.; Zhang, B.B.; Hui, C.M.; Jenke, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Bhat, P.N.; Bissaldi, E.; Cleveland, W.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Giles, M.M.; Gibby, M.H.; Greiner, J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kippen, R.M.; McBreen, S.; Mailyan, B.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Roberts, O.; Sparke, L.; Stanbro, M.; Toelge, K.; Veres, P.; Yu, H.F.; Blackburn, L.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T.J.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cameron, R.A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P.A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L.R.; Costanza, F.; Cuoco, A.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S.W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Dominguez, A.; Drell, P.S.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E.C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G.A.; Green, D.; Grenier, I.A.; Grove, J.E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A.K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J.W.; Hill, A.B.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A.S.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M.N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M.N.; McEnery, J.E.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P.F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A.A.; Monzani, M.E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J.F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J.S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T.A.; Racusin, J.L.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Salvetti, D.; Saz Parkinson, P.M.; Sgro, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E.J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D.J.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J.B.; Thompson, D.J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D.F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venters, T.M.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K.S.; Wood, M.; Zhu, S.; Zimmer, S.; Brocato, E.; Cappellaro, E.; Covino, S.; Grado, A.; Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Amati, L.; Antonelli, L.A.; Capaccioli, M.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Getman, F.; Giuffrida, G.; Iannicola, G.; Limatola, L.; Lisi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Melandri, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Possenti, A.; Pulone, L.; Rossi, A.; Stamerra, A.; Stella, L.; Testa, V.; Tomasella, L.; Yang, S.; Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.; Brandt, S.; Courvoisier, T.J.L.; Ferrigno, C.; Hanlon, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Laurent, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Roques, J.P.; Savchenko, V.; Ubertini, P.; Kasliwal, M.M.; Singer, L.P.; Cao, Y.; Duggan, G.; Kulkarni, S.R.; Bhalerao, V.; Miller, A.A.; Barlow, T.; Bellm, E.; Manulis, I.; Rana, J.; Laher, R.; Masci, F.; Surace, J.; Rebbapragada, U.; Cook, D.; Van Sistine, A.; Sesar, B.; Perley, D.; Ferreti, R.; Prince, T.; Kendrick, R.; Horesh, A.; Hurley, K.; Golenetskii, S.V.; Aptekar, R.L.; Frederiks, D.D.; Svinkin, D.S.; Rau, A.; Zhang, X.; Smith, D.M.; Cline, T.; Krimm, H.; Abe, F.; Doi, M.; Fujisawa, K.; Kawabata, K.S.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Tanaka, M.; Ohta, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Yoshida, M.; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Ellman, N.; Rostami, S.; Bersier, D.F.; Bode, M.F.; Collins, C.A.; Copperwheat, C.M.; Darnley, M.J.; Galloway, D.K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mazzali, P.; Mundell, C.G.; Piascik, A.S.; Pollacco, Don; Steele, I.A.; Ulaczyk, K.; Broderick, J.W.; Fender, R.P.; Jonker, P.G.; Rowlinson, A.; Stappers, B.W.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tyurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Buckley, D.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelian, G.; Budnev, N.M.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Poleshuk, V.; Tlatov, A.; Yurkov, V.; Kawai, N.; Serino, M.; Negoro, H.; Nakahira, S.; Mihara, T.; Tomida, H.; Ueno, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Matsuoka, M.; Croft, S.; Feng, L.; Franzen, T.M.O.; Gaensler, B.M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D.L.; Morales, M.F.; Tingay, S.J.; Wayth, R.B.; Williams, A.; Smartt, S.J.; Chambers, K.C.; Smith, K.W.; Huber, M.E.; Young, D.R.; Wright, D.E.; Schultz, A.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Magnier, E.A.; Primak, N.; Rest, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Stubbs, C.W.; Tonry, J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; Olivares E., F.; Campbell, H.; Kotak, R.; Sollerman, J.; Smith, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Anderson, J.P.; Botticella, M.T.; Chen, T.W.; Valle, M.D.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kupfer, T.; Harmanen, J.; Galbany, L.; Le Guillou, L.; Lyman, J.D.; Maguire, K.; Mitra, A.; Nicholl, M.; Razza, A.; Terreran, G.; Valenti, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; Cwiek, A.; Cwiok, M.; Mankiewicz, L.; Opiela, R.; Zaremba, M.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Onken, C.A.; Scalzo, R.A.; Schmidt, B.P.; Wolf, C.; Yuan, F.; Evans, P.A.; Kennea, J.A.; Burrows, D.N.; Campana, S.; Cenko, S.B.; Giommi, P.; Marshall, F.E.; Nousek, J.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J.P.; Palmer, D.; Perri, M.; Racusin, J.; Siegel, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Klotz, A.; Turpin, D.; Laugier, R.; Beroiz, M.; Penuela, T.; Macri, L.M.; Oelkers, R.J.; Lambas, D.G.; Vrech, R.; Cabral, J.; Colazo, C.; Dominguez, M.; Sanchez, B.; Gurovich, S.; Lares, M.; Marshall, J.L.; DePoy, D.L.; Padilla, N.; Pereyra, N.A.; Benacquista, M.; Tanvir, N.R.; Wiersema, K.; Levan, A.J.; Steeghs, D.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Malesani, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Watson, D.; Irwin, M.; Fernandez, C.G.; McMahon, R.G.; Banerji, M.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Schulze, S.; de U. Postigo, A.; Thoene, C.C.; Cano, Z.; Rosswog, S.

    2016-01-01

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current electromagnetic follow-up program. We compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the electromagnetic follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  19. A Decade of GRB Follow-Up by BOOTES in Spain (2003–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Jelínek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article covers ten years of GRB follow-ups by the Spanish BOOTES stations: 71 follow-ups providing 23 detections. Follow-ups by BOOTES-1B from 2005 to 2008 were given in a previous article and are here reviewed and updated, and additional detection data points are included as the former article merely stated their existence. The all-sky cameras CASSANDRA have not yet detected any GRB optical afterglows, but limits are reported where available.

  20. Follow-up of abnormal or inadequate test results in the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Bettina Kjær

    2014-01-01

    -up recommendation. However problems with delayed follow-up may threaten the effectiveness of the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program, as 20% of women are delayed and dysplasia potentially can progress into cancer. Delayed follow-up is found in situations where women either consciously or unconsciously postpone...... follow-up, or because of organizational aspects of the screening program, where communication regarding test results can fail either in content or with delay.This study will evaluate two interventions designed to increase follow-up: 1) A letter with the test result and potential recommendation for follow...

  1. Patient satisfaction with nurse-led telephone follow-up after curative treatment for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirksen Carmen D

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current frequent follow-up after treatment for breast cancer does not meet its intended aims, but does depend on expensive and scarce specialized knowledge for routine history taking and physical examinations. The study described in this paper compared patient satisfaction with a reduced follow-up strategy, i.e. nurse-led telephone follow-up, to satisfaction with traditional hospital follow-up. Methods Patient satisfaction was assessed among patients (n = 299 who were participants of a randomized controlled trial investigating the cost-effectiveness of several follow-up strategies in the first year after treatment for breast cancer. Data on patient satisfaction were collected at baseline, three, six and 12 months after treatment, using the Dutch version of Ware's Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire III (PSQ III. In addition to general satisfaction, the PSQ III reports on satisfaction scores for technical competence, interpersonal aspects, and access of care. Regression analysis was used to predict satisfaction scores from whether or not nurse-led telephone follow-up was received. Results Nurse-led telephone follow-up had no statistically significant influence on general patient satisfaction (p = 0.379, satisfaction with technical competence (p = 0.249, and satisfaction with interpersonal aspects (p = 0.662. Regarding access of care, patient satisfaction scores were significantly higher for patients receiving telephone follow-up (p = 0.015. However, a mean difference at 12 months of 3.1 points was judged to be not clinically relevant. Conclusions No meaningful differences were found in satisfaction scores between nurse-led telephone and hospital follow-up in the first year after breast cancer treatment. With high satisfaction scores and the potential to substantially reduce clinic visits, nurse-led telephone follow-up may be an acceptable alternative to traditional hospital follow-up. Trial registration number ISRCTN 74071417.

  2. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Requiring Neurological Intensive Care Unit Follow-up: Review with Nine Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazlı Gamze Bülbül

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a rare but life-threatening clinical manifestation induced by neuroleptic medication. Although NMS is regarded as a psychiatric diagnosis, its treatment requires a systematic approach and thus intensive care follow-up. In this paper, we report nine cases with NMS followed up in our Neurology Intensive Care Unit over the last three years.

  3. Nurse-Led Telephone Follow-up: Improving Options for Women With Endometrial Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, A.; Lopes, A.; Das, N.; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Kent, E.; McCullough, Z.; Galaal, K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nurse-led follow-up (NLFU) has been identified as a suitable means of follow-up care in cancer patients, and its acceptability has already been demonstrated in other areas of cancer care. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of NLFU on quality of life and

  4. The clinical value and the cost-effectiveness of follow-up in endometrial cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjalma, W A A; van Dam, P A; Makar, A P; Cruickshank, D J

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present article was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of follow-up in endometrial cancer patients. A literature review was performed regarding the studies that addressed routine follow-up of endometrial cancer. For each published study, the costs of the follow-up program were calculated according to Belgium standards. A mean total of 13% relapsed. Symptomatology and clinical examination detected over 83% of the recurrences. The follow-up cost in euro after 5 and 10 years ranged between 127.68 and 2,028.78 and between 207.48 and 2,353.48, respectively. Based on the available data, there is little evidence of routine follow-up improving survival rates. Multiple protocols are used in practice without an evidence base. There is an urgent need for prospective randomized studies to evaluate the value of the current so-called 'standard medical practice of follow-up.' It is to be expected that the cost of follow-up could be reduced considerably, for instance, by tailoring to low- and high-risk groups, or by abandoning routine follow-up. Symptomatic patients, however, should be evaluated immediately. A reduction in the number of visits and examinations would mean an enormous reduction in costs. This economic benefit would be warmly welcomed in the times of increased health costs and decreased budgets.

  5. How Do Mode and Timing of Follow-up Surveys Affect Evaluation Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koundinya, Vikram; Klink, Jenna; Deming, Philip; Meyers, Andrew; Erb, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the analysis of evaluation methods used in a well-designed and comprehensive evaluation effort of a significant Extension program. The evaluation data collection methods were analyzed by questionnaire mode and timing of follow-up surveys. Response rates from the short- and long-term follow-ups and different questionnaire…

  6. Effect on Mail Survey Return Rates of Including Questionnaires With Follow-Up Letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrell, Charles M.; Lamb, Charles W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Two thousand questionnaires were mailed to respondents allocated among seven treatments. Controls received an initial mailing (questionnaire and cover letter) only. The remaining six treatments varied by number of follow-up mailings and whether another questionnaire copy was included. Results suggest more than one follow-up letter with a…

  7. A Research on Students' Needs for Follow-Up Curriculum of College English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jie; Liu, Hengying; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Increased universities and colleges offer the undergraduates with more follow-up courses with the further reform in college English education in China. An investigation on self-evaluation, difficulty, and willingness of undergraduates in learning English further was made in order to design more appropriate and adaptable follow-up courses. This…

  8. Long-term follow-up of surgical treatment for thumb duplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, M; Nicolai, JPA

    2005-01-01

    There are few long-term follow-up reports concerning the treatment of thumb duplication. We reviewed the treatment of 19 of 74 patients treated at our institution between 1956 and 2002. The average follow-up was 22 (range, 7 years to 35 years) years. Satisfactory function was achieved in 18 thumbs a

  9. Follow Up Study of Non College Bound Somerset County High School Graduates June 1990, New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Charles R.

    A follow-up study sought to determine what happened to the 1990 noncollege-bound graduates of all the high schools in Somerset County, New Jersey. Data were gathered through a mailed survey and telephone follow-up (approximately 45 percent response) of the 408 graduates of the 12 of 13 high schools providing names. Some of the findings from…

  10. PERMANENT CARDIAC PACING IN CHILDREN - MORBIDITY AND EFFICACY OF FOLLOW-UP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KERSTJENSFREDERIKSE, MWS; BINKBOELKENS, MTE; DEJONGSTE, MJL; VANDERHEIDE, JNH

    1991-01-01

    The data from 50 permanently paced children [mean standard deviation follow-up 5.3 +/- 3.7 years] were reviewed, with special attention being paid to the cause of complications and the efficacy of follow-up. The 5-year survival (SD) of the patients was 78 +/- 6%; mortality was mainly due to the unde

  11. Individual Risk Profiling For Breast Cancer Recurrence: Towards Tailored Follow-Up Schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraeima, J.; Vliegen, I.; Siesling, S.; Klaase, J.; IJzerman, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Current international guidelines for breast cancer follow-up are not specific to individual risk of local regional recurrences. Instead, for personalised follow-up it is required to have more precise estimates of local regional recurrence probability as a function of time. The objective o

  12. Clinical and radiological long-term follow-up after embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Anette D

    2005-01-01

    . Outcome parameters at follow-up were PaO(2) and patients' satisfaction. During follow-up, the patients had a clinical examination, measurement of arterial blood gases, chest X-ray, and contrast echocardiography performed and were asked to fill in a questionnaire exploring experience of the treatment...

  13. Patient preference regarding assessment of clinical follow-up after percutaneous coronary intervention: the PAPAYA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.; Birgelen, von C.; Lam, M.K.; Lowik, M.; Houwelingen, van G.; Stoel, M.; Louwerenburg, H.; Man, de F.H.; Hartmann, M.; Doggen, C.J.; Til, van J.A.; IJzerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To keep patients in long-term clinical follow-up programmes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), knowledge of the patient-preferred mode for follow-up assessment is crucial. We systematically assessed patient preference, and explored potential relationships with age and gender.Metho

  14. Patient preference regarding assessment of clinical follow-up after percutaneous coronary intervention: the PAPAYA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Marlies M.; Birgelen, von Clemens; Lam, Ming Kai; Löwik, Marije M.; Houwelingen, van K. Gert; Stoel, Martin G.; Louwerenburg, J. (Hans) W.; Man, de Frits H.A.F.; Hartmann, Marc; Doggen, Carine J.M.; Til, van Janine A.; IJzerman, Maarten J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To keep patients in long-term clinical follow-up programmes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), knowledge of the patient-preferred mode for follow-up assessment is crucial. We systematically assessed patient preference, and explored potential relationships with age and gender.Metho

  15. Routine follow-up after laryngeal cancer treatment : the assessment of pre-symptomatic recurrence detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritoe, Savitri Christine

    2007-01-01

    The principal goal of the follow-up program as formulated for patients with laryngeal carcinoma is the pre-symptomatic detection of local and regional recurrences. Different studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiviness of this follow-up protocol. The first study comprised 402 patients with s

  16. Effective follow-up consultations : the importance of patient-centered communication and shared decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Paul L. P.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.

    2013-01-01

    Paediatricians spend a considerable proportion of their time performing follow-up visits for children with chronic conditions, but they rarely receive specific training on how best to perform such consultations. The traditional method of running a follow-up consultation is based on the doctor's agen

  17. The RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Yang, Raymond K.; Pettit, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first follow-up assessment of the RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program. Parent participants (N = 168) reduced their anger, violence, and family conflict levels from posttest to follow-up, on average, at 2.5 months on 13 of 15 dependent variables. Current findings are consistent with a small, albeit growing body of…

  18. Cardiac abnormalities in a follow-up study on carriers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westrum, S. M. Schade; Hoogerwaard, E. M.; Dekker, L.; Standaar, T. S.; Bakker, E.; Ippel, P. F.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Majoor-Krakauer, D. F.; van Essen, A. J.; Leschot, N. J.; Wilde, A. A. M.; de Haan, R. J.; de Visser, M.; van der Kooi, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Cardiac involvement has been reported in carriers of dystrophin mutations giving rise to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). The progress of these abnormalities during long-term follow-up is unknown. We describe the long-term follow-up of dilated cardio

  19. Two-Year Follow-Up of Bibliotherapy and Individual Cognitive Therapy for Depressed Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Mark; Rohen, Noelle; Shackelford, Jodie A. M.; Hubbard, Karen L.; Parnell, Marsha B.; Scogin, Forrest; Coates, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the stability of treatment gains after receiving either cognitive bibliotherapy or individual cognitive psychotherapy for depression in older adults. A 2-year follow-up of 23 participants from Floyd, Scogin, McKendree-Smith, Floyd, and Rokke (2004) was conducted by comparing pre- and posttreatment scores with follow-up scores…

  20. Long-term follow-up after urethral injection with polyacrylamide hydrogel for female stress incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Lone; Lose, Gunnar; Møller-Bek, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Urethral injection therapy for treatment of stress urinary incontinence has been in use for years, but only a few long-term follow-up studies have been published. Twenty-five women, injected with polyacrylamide hydrogel 8 years earlier, were invited for follow-up. Twenty-four could be contacted; ...

  1. Oral squamous cell carcinoma and a clinically negative neck : the value of follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, Bart M; Merkx, Matthias A W; Krabbe, Paul F M; Marres, Henri A M; Van den Hoogen, Frank J A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC), regular follow-up comprises 5 years of prescheduled visits, irrespective of tumor stage/classification and/or treatment. We analyzed our standard treatment and follow-up protocol in patients with a preoperative clinically negative ne

  2. Oral squamous cell carcinoma and a clinically negative neck: the value of follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, B.M.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Marres, H.A.M.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC), regular follow-up comprises 5 years of prescheduled visits, irrespective of tumor stage/classification and/or treatment. We analyzed our standard treatment and follow-up protocol in patients with a preoperative clinically negative ne

  3. Follow-up care for breast cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra I

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ishveen Chopra,1 Avijeet Chopra2 1Department of Pharmacy Administration, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA Background: Appropriate follow-up care is important for improving health outcomes in breast cancer survivors (BCSs and requires determination of the optimum intensity of clinical examination and surveillance, assessment of models of follow-up care such as primary care-based follow-up, an understanding of the goals of follow-up care, and unique psychosocial aspects of care for these patients. The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies focusing on follow-up care in BCSs from the patient's and physician's perspective or from patterns of care and to integrate primary empirical evidence on the different aspects of follow-up care from these studies. Methods: A comprehensive literature review and evaluation was conducted for all relevant publications in English from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2013 using electronic databases. Studies were included in the final review if they focused on BCS’s preferences and perceptions, physician's perceptions, patterns of care, and effectiveness of follow-up care. Results: A total of 47 studies assessing the different aspects of follow-up care were included in the review, with a majority of studies (n=13 evaluating the pattern of follow-up care in BCSs, followed by studies focusing on BCS's perceptions (n=9 and preferences (n=9. Most of the studies reported variations in recommended frequency, duration, and intensity of follow-up care as well as frequency of mammogram screening. In addition, variations were noted in patient preferences for type of health care provider (specialist versus non-specialist. Further, BCSs perceived a lack of psychosocial support and information for management of side effects. Conclusion: The studies reviewed, conducted in a range of settings, reflect variations in

  4. Nurse-Led Follow-Up at Home vs. Conventional Medical Outpatient Clinic Follow-Up in Patients With Incurable Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer: A Randomized Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Uitdehaag (Madeleen); P.G. van Putten (Paul); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); E.M.L. Verschuur (Els); A. van der Gaast (Ate); C.J. Pek (Chulja); C.C.D. van der Rijt (Carin); R.A. de Man (Robert); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); C. Laheij (Claudia); P.D. Siersema (Peter); M.C.W. Spaander (Manon); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractContext: Upper gastrointestinal cancer is associated with a poor prognosis. The multidimensional problems of incurable patients require close monitoring and frequent support, which cannot sufficiently be provided during conventional one to two month follow-up visits to the outpatient cli

  5. Effects of nurse-led telephone follow-up for discharged patients treated with chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nurse-led telephone follow-up is effective in meeting information and psycho-social needs. We explored the potential effects of nurse-led telephone follow-up for patients treated with chemotherapy in China. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was employed in the research. 300 cases of cancer inpatients in a cancer hospital in Beijing during July-October 2012 were selected by convenience sampling. To compare the satisfaction and response regarding to chemotherapy adverse side effects, patients who discharged on Monday and Friday were provided with telephone follow-up. Patients who discharged on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday received routine care. Results: Via telephone follow-up, patient satisfaction relating to nursing care increased. Moreover, their response to chemotherapy adverse side effects showed a significant difference. Conclusion: Telephone follow-up by specialist nurses may be a feasible option. It was well received by patients, with no physical or psychological disadvantage.

  6. EA follow-up in the Ghanaian mining sector: Challenges and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appiah-Opoku, Seth, E-mail: sappiah@bama.ua.edu [Geography Department, University of Alabama, 230 Farrah Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Bryan, Hobson C. [Geography Department, University of Alabama, 330 Farrah Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Environmental assessment (EA) follow-up provides a means for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of environmental impact studies. It is integral to the success or failure of a project or program. In spite of its importance, very little attention is given to the need for follow-up programs in most jurisdictions in Africa. Using a case study in the Ghanaian mining sector, this paper explores the challenges and opportunities within the country's EA process for an effective follow-up program. The paper is based on informal interviews, content analysis of relevant publications, official EA documents, and internet searches. The authors suggest a standard EA follow-up program to be formalized as an integral part of Ghana's environmental assessment policy. They also propose a follow-up process that harnesses existing opportunities within the country's EA system. This approach can be replicated in other African countries.

  7. Recurrence after surgery due to cervical cancer - An evaluation of the follow-up program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Katrine; Petersen, Lone Kjeld; Blaakær, Jan

    Objective During the last 20 years the follow-up program after surgical treatment for cervical cancer has remained unchanged. Surprisingly, little is communicated in relation to the follow-up program even though it has a huge impact on the life of the women and their relatives for five years....... The focus for this study is to evaluate the follow-up program in fulfilling the purpose for early diagnosis of recurrence while reminding and concerning women, who we consider healthy after surgery, 10 times during five years. Already politicians are focusing on the subject due to the socioeconomic...... consequences, but there is a need for a foundation prior to an adjustment of the follow-up program. Methods Design: retrospective study of a cohort of women attending follow-up program after surgery due to cervical cancer. Material: From the patient register at the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics...

  8. Large regional differences in serological follow-up of Q fever patients in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriëlla Morroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the Dutch Q fever epidemic more than 4,000 Q fever cases were notified. This provided logistical challenges for the organisation of serological follow-up, which is considered mandatory for early detection of chronic infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the proportion of acute Q fever patients that received serological follow-up, and to identify regional differences in follow-up rates and contributing factors, such as knowledge of medical practitioners. METHODS: Serological datasets of Q fever patients diagnosed between 2007 and 2009 (N = 3,198 were obtained from three Laboratories of Medical Microbiology (LMM in the province of Noord-Brabant. One LMM offered an active follow-up service by approaching patients; the other two only tested on physician's request. The medical microbiologist in charge of each LMM was interviewed. In December 2011, 240 general practices and 112 medical specialists received questionnaires on their knowledge and practices regarding the serological follow-up of Q fever patients. RESULTS: Ninety-five percent (2,226/2,346 of the Q fever patients diagnosed at the LMM with a follow-up service received at least one serological follow-up within 15 months of diagnosis. For those diagnosed at a LMM without this service, this was 25% (218/852 (OR 54, 95% CI 43-67. Although 80% (162/203 of all medical practitioners with Q fever patients reported informing patients of the importance of serological follow-up, 33% (67/203 never requested it. CONCLUSIONS: Regional differences in follow-up are substantial and range from 25% to 95%. In areas with a low follow-up rate the proportion of missed chronic Q fever is potentially higher than in areas with a high follow-up rate. Medical practitioners lack knowledge regarding the need, timing and implementation of serological follow-up, which contributes to patients receiving incorrect or no follow-up. Therefore, this information should be incorporated in

  9. Adherence to follow-up CT scans in patients with small pulmonary nodules, a retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sofie Lock; Gerner Hansen, Niels-Christian

    2010-01-01

    Adherence to follow-up CT scans in patients with small pulmonary nodules, a retrospective study The Danish National guidelines have since 2008 suggested serial follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months for nodules between 5 and 10 mm and at 12 and 24 months for nodules less than 5 mm in accor...... is that management of the follow-up of small nodules did improve in 2008-2009, but adherence to the guidelines was still limited. We will now implement a prospective program for monitoring the adherence to the follow-up CTs.......Adherence to follow-up CT scans in patients with small pulmonary nodules, a retrospective study The Danish National guidelines have since 2008 suggested serial follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months for nodules between 5 and 10 mm and at 12 and 24 months for nodules less than 5 mm...... in the four year period 2006-2009. In 72 cases, 19 in 2006-2007 and 51 in 2008-2009, one or more small nodules, with diameter ≤ 10 mm, were detected on CT in patients with no known recent malignant disease. For these patients follow-up was suggested, either with CT or PET-CT. One of the 70 patients from 2008...

  10. Can follow-up examination of tuberculosis patients be simplified? A study in Chhattisgarh, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashish Kundu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Each follow-up during the course of tuberculosis treatment currently requires two sputum examinations. However, the incremental yield of the second sputum sample during follow-up of different types of tuberculosis patients has never been determined precisely. OBJECTIVES: To assess the incremental yield of the second sputum sample in the follow-up of tuberculosis patients under the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP in Chhattisgarh, India. METHODOLOGY: A record review of tuberculosis (TB patients registered in 2009 using a structured proforma from two sources, Tuberculosis and Laboratory Register, was undertaken in the six districts of Chhattisgarh, India. RESULTS: In smear positive cases, of 10,048 follow-up examinations, 45 (0.5% were found to be smear positive only on the second sputum when the result of the first sample was negative. In smear negative pulmonary and extra pulmonary TB patients, of 6,206 follow-up smear examinations, 11(0.2% were found to be smear positive. CONCLUSIONS: The incremental yield of a second smear examination was very low, indicating that examination of one sputum sample is enough during follow-up among TB patients. There is insufficient yield to support sputum smear microscopy for monitoring smear negative pulmonary TB and extra pulmonary TB patients. These results indicate that the follow-up smear microscopy can be substantially simplified with favourable resource implications.

  11. Adherence to Follow-Up Recommendations by Triathlon Competitors Receiving Event Medical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D. Joslin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We sought to investigate triathlete adherence to recommendations for follow-up for participants who received event medical care. Methods. Participants of the 2011 Ironman Syracuse 70.3 (Syracuse, NY who sought evaluation and care at the designated finish line medical tent were contacted by telephone approximately 3 months after the initial encounter to measure adherence with the recommendation to seek follow-up care after event. Results. Out of 750 race participants, 35 (4.6% athletes received event medical care. Of these 35, twenty-eight (28/35; 80% consented to participate in the study and 17 (61% were available on telephone follow-up. Of these 17 athletes, 11 (11/17; 65% of participants reported that they had not followed up with a medical professional since the race. Only 5 (5/17; 29% confirmed that they had seen a medical provider in some fashion since the race; of these, only 2 (2/17; 12% sought formal medical follow-up resulting from the recommendation whereas the remaining athletes merely saw their medical providers coincidentally or as part of routine care. Conclusion. Only 2 (2/17; 12% of athletes who received event medical care obtained postrace follow-up within a one-month time period following the race. Event medical care providers must be aware of potential nonadherence to follow-up recommendations.

  12. Adherence to Follow-Up Recommendations by Triathlon Competitors Receiving Event Medical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Jarem B.; Copeli, Nikoli

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. We sought to investigate triathlete adherence to recommendations for follow-up for participants who received event medical care. Methods. Participants of the 2011 Ironman Syracuse 70.3 (Syracuse, NY) who sought evaluation and care at the designated finish line medical tent were contacted by telephone approximately 3 months after the initial encounter to measure adherence with the recommendation to seek follow-up care after event. Results. Out of 750 race participants, 35 (4.6%) athletes received event medical care. Of these 35, twenty-eight (28/35; 80%) consented to participate in the study and 17 (61%) were available on telephone follow-up. Of these 17 athletes, 11 (11/17; 65%) of participants reported that they had not followed up with a medical professional since the race. Only 5 (5/17; 29%) confirmed that they had seen a medical provider in some fashion since the race; of these, only 2 (2/17; 12%) sought formal medical follow-up resulting from the recommendation whereas the remaining athletes merely saw their medical providers coincidentally or as part of routine care. Conclusion. Only 2 (2/17; 12%) of athletes who received event medical care obtained postrace follow-up within a one-month time period following the race. Event medical care providers must be aware of potential nonadherence to follow-up recommendations. PMID:28203462

  13. Long-term follow-up of echolalia and question answering.

    OpenAIRE

    Foxx, R M; Faw, G D

    1990-01-01

    A long-term follow-up of echolalia and correct question answering was conducted for 6 subjects from three previously published studies. The follow-up periods ranged from 26 to 57 months. In a training site follow-up, subjects were exposed to baseline/posttraining conditions in which the original trainer and/or a novel person(s) presented trained and untrained questions. Four subjects displayed echolalia below baseline levels, and another did so in some assessments. Overall, echolalia was lowe...

  14. Pi of the Sky involvement in LSC-Virgo electromagnetic follow-up project

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZadroŻny, Adam; Sokołowski, Marcin; Mankiewicz, Lech; Żarnecki, Aleksander Filip

    2016-09-01

    Pi of the Sky took part in LSC-Virgo's Electromagnetic (EM) Follow-up project during first science run of Advanced LIGO detectors between September 2015 and January 2016. More than 60 astronomical teams have signed Memorandum-of-Understanding with LSC-Virgo for EM Follow-up project. LSC-Virgo's EM Follow-up is aimed for searching electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave transient candidates. Observing an event both in EM and gravitational wave band might be a important step forward to multi-messenger astronomy. The aim of this paper is to show algorithms used by Pi of the Sky for analysing data taken during the science runs.

  15. Kyoto Conference Dinner Speech: Follow-up in the age of surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Groot, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Future big surveys are going to provide many targets of rare compact binary populations that will require photometric and spectroscopic follow-up to use them to answer questions on the formation and evolution of compact binaries, their space densities and the connection to other astrophysical phenomena such as Supernovae Type Ia and the populations of gravitational wave emitters. Now is the time to start preparing efficient follow-up strategies for upcoming static and synoptic surveys. The proposal is to develop a standard photometer that will facilitate a homogeneous multi-band follow-up strategy.

  16. Follow-up research of moose and other wild animals at Pernaja European Highway E18

    OpenAIRE

    Vare, Seija

    2001-01-01

    The follow up study at Pernaja has continued now for nearly three years. The follow up research has been started before the road was built, it continued during the construction period 1995 -1998. The amounts of animals and the traces of animals were examined. The semi -motorway was opened to traffic in the year 1998, and then started the follow - up research at under passages. At the road there were 11 under passages, which were built for local traffic, but they were suitable also for animals...

  17. Benefits of and barriers to SEA follow-up - Theory and practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gachechiladze-Bozhesku, M., E-mail: mayagachechiladze@gmail.com [Center for Environment and Security, Central European University, Nador ut. 9, Budapest 1051 (Hungary); Fischer, T.B., E-mail: fischer@liverpool.ac.uk [School of Environmental Sciences, 4imPiAct research team, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, 74 Bedford Street South, Liverpool L69 7ZQ (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-15

    If SEA is to facilitate 'strategic' changes, it needs to focus on shaping the ways in which strategic initiatives are implemented, not just formulated. This is why follow-up which refers to postdecisional activities of SEA and strategic initiatives is increasingly seen as crucial. However, to date follow-up has only received limited attention in the SEA literature, as well as in practical guidance. The key reasons for why post decision activities are often overlooked are the lack of understanding of its actual benefits and purportedly multiple problems with its accomplishment. This paper reports on the results of a comprehensive literature review and an international e-survey on the topic, as well as an in-depth analysis of six SEA follow-up cases from England and Canada. Practically encountered and perceived benefits of, and obstacles to SEA follow-up are identified and discussed.

  18. Postoperative follow-up studies in congenital dilatation of the common bile duct using hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirobe, Seiichi; Ishida, Haruo; Hayashi, Akira; Kamagata, Shoichiro; Fuchimoto, Yasufumi; Mizuno, Dai; Yano, Tsunehiro [Tokyo Metropolitan Kiyose Children`s Hospital (Japan); Ishii, Katsumi

    1995-03-01

    Follow-up studies in congenital dilatation of the common bile duct were done in 20 cases ranging 3 to 20 years after operation. Operative cholangiography had shown dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts in 15 patients (75%), of these, 7 patients had cystic dilatation. Five cases of these 7 patients showed prolonged stasis of the nuclide in the cystic dilated intrahepatic bile ducts by {sup 99m}Tc-PMT hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the follow-up studies even at 10 years after operation. But none of 20 cases had complication such as intrahepatic lithiasis, cholangitis, and liver dysfunction. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy could provide moderate anatomic and excellent functional information which were useful for these follow-up studies and careful follow-up should be done in the case of cystic dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. (author).

  19. Initial non-participation and loss to follow-up in a Danish youth cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winding, Trine Nøhr; Andersen, Johan H; Labriola, Merete;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Initial non-participation and loss to follow-up in the Danish youth cohort Vestliv could introduce selection bias of the measured risk estimates. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of initial non-participation and loss to follow-up on the validity of descriptive measures and selected...... better school abilities and came more often from homes with two adults, higher income or higher educational level. These differences increased at subsequent follow-ups. The effect of initial non-participation on the ORs was modest with most RORs being close to one. Loss to follow-up led to larger...... variations in the RORs ranging from 0.77 to 1.62 although for most estimates, the bias was minor. None of the measured RORs were statistically different from one indicating no significant bias. CONCLUSIONS: Although certain characteristics were related to those who initially chose to participate...

  20. Ultrasonographic features of vascular closure devices: initial and 6-month follow-up results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Jung Choo

    2014-10-01

    Initial ultrasonographic evaluation reflected the unique structure of each VCD, with most of them being easily distinguishable. Follow-up ultrasonography revealed various changes in the affected vessels.

  1. Parental education on asthma severity in the emergency department and primary care follow-up rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kelli W; Word, Carolyn; Streck, Maria R; Titus, M Olivia

    2013-07-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic condition affecting children and a common chief complaint in emergency departments (EDs). We aimed to improve parents' understanding of their child's asthma severity on accessing our pediatric ED for an acute asthma exacerbation. A retrospective chart review was conducted to determine outpatient follow-up rates from our ED in 2010-2011. In an attempt to educate parents at ED discharge about their child's asthma severity at presentation, we included a visual severity scale on their discharge instructions. Postdischarge telephone interviews were completed to determine postintervention follow-up rates. Asthma follow-up rates at 1 week improved from 20.8% to 50% after intervention. This difference was statistically significant after controlling for age and clinical asthma score with logistic regression (P education about a child's initial asthma severity is a simple intervention that significantly improved follow-up rates for children seen in the ED for asthma exacerbation.

  2. The importance of complete follow-up for results after femoro-infrapopliteal vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L P; Nielsen, O M; Schroeder, T V

    1996-01-01

    postoperatively and 100% follow-up was obtained. After completion of the trial we calculated the patency and survival rates using life-table methods and compared the results based on the vascular registry with those achieved in the clinical trial. RESULTS: Comparing the results from the two databases revealed...... to follow-up according to the vascular registry database and the fact that these patients turned out to have a significantly increased rate of graft thrombosis, limb amputation and death, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Life-table statistics may inadvertently become unreliable if a large proportion of patients...... is lost to follow-up, since failure to examine the patient for any reason may be related to the patients health. In addition to the number of patients at risk, it is suggested, that life-table plots should be supplemented with information on the number of patients lost to follow-up....

  3. Long-term adherence to follow-up after treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barken, Sidsel Svennekjær; Lynge, Elsebeth; Søgaard-Andersen, Erik;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure adherence to annual follow-up among women treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. DESIGN: Prospective, population-based, register study. SETTING: Denmark, 1996-2007. POPULATION: All women treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with conization. METHODS: Treate...

  4. The value of gynecologic cancer follow-up: evidence-based ignorance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Henrik; Jensen, Mette B; Kilsmark, Jannie;

    2010-01-01

    To explore the extent of evidence-based data and cost-utility of follow-up after primary treatment of endometrial and ovarian cancer, addressing perspectives of technology, organization, economics, and patients....

  5. Medication overuse headache: a critical review of end points in recent follow-up studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Knut; Jensen, Rigmor; Bøe, Magne Geir

    2010-01-01

    a minimum of one predefined end point. In total, nine studies were identified. The 1,589 MOH patients (22% men) had an overall mean frequency of 25.3 headache days/month at baseline. Headache days/month at the end of follow-up was reported in six studies (mean 13.8 days/month). The decrease was more...... in headache index at the end of follow-up were reported in only one and two of nine studies, respectively. The present review demonstrated a lack of uniform end points used in recently published follow-up studies. Guidelines for presenting follow-up data on MOH are needed and we propose end points...

  6. Final results of a long-term, clinical follow-up in fatty liver patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Larsen, Sanne; Becker, Ulrik; Franzmann, Maria-Benedicte

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is increasing focus on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The aim of the present study was to conduct a long-term clinical follow-up of patients with biopsy-confirmed fatty liver without inflammation or significant fibrosis (pure fatty liver), to analyse for potential risk....... All admissions, discharge diagnoses and causes of death during follow-up were collected. All surviving patients were invited to a clinical follow-up. RESULTS: The follow-up period was 20.4 and 21.0 years, respectively, for the NAFLD and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) groups. Two NAFLD patients...... of death. Patients with AFLD died primarily from cirrhosis and other alcohol-related disorders, whereas in patients with NAFLD the main causes of death were cardiovascular disease and cancer. CONCLUSIONS: For patients with pure non-alcoholic fatty liver, survival was good and independent...

  7. Assessing factors for loss to follow-up of HIV infected patients in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Pernille Bejer; Engell-Sørensen, Thomas; Jespersen, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    to face or by phone by a field assistant and patients were asked why they had not shown up for the scheduled appointment. Patients were included by date of HIV testing and risk factors for LTFU were assessed using Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Among 561 patients (69.5 % HIV-1, 18.0 % HIV-2......Purpose: The objective of this study was to ascertain vital status of patients considered lost to follow-up at an HIV clinic in Guinea-Bissau, and describe reasons for loss to follow-up (LTFU). Methods: This study was a cross-sectional sample of a prospective cohort, carried out between May 15......, 2013, and January 31, 2014. Patients lost to follow-up, who lived within the area of the Bandim Health Project, a demographic surveillance site (DSS), were eligible for inclusion. Active follow-up was attempted by telephone and tracing by a field assistant. Semi-structured interviews were done face...

  8. Echocardiographic Follow-up of Robotic Mitral Valve Repair for Mitral Regurgitation due to Degenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Robotic MV repair for MR due to degenerative disease is associated with a low rate of recurrent MR, and a significant improvement in MR grade, LAD, and LVEDD, but a significant decrease in LVEF at echocardiographic follow-up.

  9. Nurse-led telephone follow-up after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szöts, Kirsten; Konradsen, Hanne; Solgaard, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To generate information on how telephone follow-up consultations, structured by nursing status according to the VIPS-model, functioned after total knee arthroplasty. The objectives were to unfold the content of the telephone follow-ups according to the structure for nursing...... status and to explore the patients' views of the telephone follow-ups. BACKGROUND: The length of stay in hospital following total knee arthroplasty has fallen markedly, and patients now have to be responsible for their recovery from a very early stage. After discharge, patients may experience a variety...... Telephone follow-up was valued by total knee arthroplasties patients as representing a holistic approach and providing adequate information, counselling and support after discharge to home. Three categories were identified with regard to the patients' views: 'A means for reflection and provision of adequate...

  10. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  11. Irreversible Electroporation of Malignant Hepatic Tumors--Alterations in Venous Structures at Subacute Follow-Up and Evolution at Mid-Term Follow-Up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Dollinger

    Full Text Available To evaluate risk factors associated with alterations in venous structures adjacent to an ablation zone after percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE of hepatic malignancies at subacute follow-up (1 to 3 days after IRE and to describe evolution of these alterations at mid-term follow-up.43 patients (men/women, 32/11; mean age, 60.3 years were identified in whom venous structures were located within a perimeter of 1.0 cm of the ablation zone at subacute follow-up after IRE of 84 hepatic lesions (primary/secondary hepatic tumors, 31/53. These vessels were retrospectively evaluated by means of pre-interventional and post-interventional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography or both. Any vascular changes in flow, patency, and diameter were documented. Correlations between vascular change (yes/no and characteristics of patients, lesions, and ablation procedures were assessed by generalized linear models.191 venous structures were located within a perimeter of 1.0 cm of the ablation zone: 55 (29% were encased by the ablation zone, 78 (41% abutted the ablation zone, and 58 (30% were located between 0.1 and 1.0 cm from the border of the ablation zone. At subacute follow-up, vascular changes were found in 19 of the 191 vessels (9.9%, with partial portal vein thrombosis in 2, complete portal vein thrombosis in 3, and lumen narrowing in 14 of 19. At follow-up of patients with subacute vessel alterations (mean, 5.7 months; range, 0 to 14 months thrombosis had resolved in 2 of 5 cases; vessel narrowing had completely resolved in 8 of 14 cases, and partly resolved in 1 of 14 cases. The encasement of a vessel by ablation zone (OR = 6.36, p<0.001, ablation zone being adjacent to a portal vein (OR = 8.94, p<0.001, and the usage of more than 3 IRE probes (OR = 3.60, p = 0.035 were independently associated with post-IRE vessel alterations.Venous structures located in close proximity to an IRE ablation zone remain largely

  12. The Experience of Melanoma Follow-Up Care: An Online Survey of Patients in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Janine Mitchell; Peta Callaghan; Jackie Street; Susan Neuhaus; Taryn Bessen

    2014-01-01

    Investigating patients’ reports on the quality and consistency of melanoma follow-up care in Australia would assist in evaluating if this care is effective and meeting patients’ needs. The objective of this study was to obtain and explore the patients’ account of the technical and interpersonal aspects of melanoma follow-up care received. An online survey was conducted to acquire details of patients’ experience. Participants were patients treated in Australia for primary melanoma. Qualitative...

  13. What Happens Next? Follow-Up from the Children's Toddler School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akshoomoff, Natacha; Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Corsello, Christina; Mahrer, Nicole E.

    2010-01-01

    This study was a follow-up of a group of 29 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders at age 2 who attended an inclusive toddler program until age 3. Children ranged in age from 4 to 12 years at the time of the parent survey and follow-up testing. The majority of children were placed in a special education (noninclusive) preschool class,…

  14. Six-Year Experience of a Nurse-Led Colorectal Cancer Follow-Up Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. To review the experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in a tertiary referral colorectal cancer centre. Methodology. Data from the nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in our unit was prospectively maintained in a colorectal cancer database. Data was analysed from January 1, 2006 until the December 31, 2011. Results. 1125 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and referred to our unit as a tertiary centre for specialised colorectal can...

  15. Sleep complaints in adolescent depression: one year naturalistic follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Anna S. Urrila; Karlsson, Linnea; Kiviruusu, Olli; Pankakoski, Maiju; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Strandholm, Thea; Marttunen, Mauri; ,

    2014-01-01

    Background Sleep complaints are highly prevalent in adolescents suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The aims of this study were to describe the longitudinal course of sleep complaints, and to assess the association between sleep complaints and clinical outcome in a sample of adolescents with MDD during naturalistic follow-up. Methods A sample of adolescent outpatients (n = 166; age 13–19 years, 17.5% boys) diagnosed with MDD was followed-up during one year in naturalistic settings...

  16. Outcome of knee injuries in general practice: 1-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Background Knee injuries may lead to pain and to functional limitations in the activities of daily living. Patients with knee injuries are frequently seen in general practice; however, the outcome and management in these patients is not known. Aim To assess the outcome and management of knee injuries at 12 months' follow-up in general practice. Design of study A prospective observational cohort study with a 1-year follow-up. Setting. Primary health care. Method Adult patients consulting their...

  17. Planning for Long-Term Follow-Up: Strategies Learned from Longitudinal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Karl G; Woodward, Danielle; Woelfel, Tiffany; Hawkins, J David; Green, Sara

    2016-10-01

    Preventive interventions are often designed and tested with the immediate program period in mind, and little thought that the intervention sample might be followed up for years or even decades beyond the initial trial. However, depending on the type of intervention and the nature of the outcomes, long-term follow-up may well be appropriate. The advantages of long-term follow-up of preventive interventions are discussed and include the capacity to examine program effects across multiple later life outcomes, the ability to examine the etiological processes involved in the development of the outcomes of interest, and the ability to provide more concrete estimates of the relative benefits and costs of an intervention. In addition, researchers have identified potential methodological risks of long-term follow-up such as inflation of type 1 error through post hoc selection of outcomes, selection bias, and problems stemming from attrition over time. The present paper presents a set of seven recommendations for the design or evaluation of studies for potential long-term follow-up organized under four areas: Intervention Logic Model, Developmental Theory and Measurement Issues; Design for Retention; Dealing with Missing Data; and Unique Considerations for Intervention Studies. These recommendations include conceptual considerations in the design of a study, pragmatic concerns in the design and implementation of the data collection for long-term follow-up, as well as criteria to be considered for the evaluation of an existing intervention for potential for long-term follow-up. Concrete examples from existing intervention studies that have been followed up over the long term are provided.

  18. Course of adolescent headache: 4-year annual face-to-face follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Karlı, Necdet; Bican, Aylin; Zarifoğlu, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the course of the diagnosis and characteristics of headache in 12- to 17-year-old adolescents during a follow-up period of 4 years. Headache prevalence and characteristics, and even the type of headache show important changes during adolescence. The course of adolescent headache might reveal important insight into the pathophysiology of headache. Subjects who received a single headache diagnosis were invited to participate in a follow-up study con...

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation of Renal Tumors: Four-Year Follow-Up Results in 47 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Dong; Yoon, Seong Guk; Sung, Gyung Tak [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the intermediate results of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of small renal masses (SRMs). Percutaneous or laparoscopic RFA was performed on 48 renal tumors in 47 patients. The follow-up studies included a physical examination, chest radiography, creatinine level, and contrast-enhanced CT or MRI. To confirm the pathologic criteria of complete ablation, 35 patients underwent a follow-up biopsy. Recurrence was defined as contrast enhancement on imaging studies after 3 months, lesion growth at subsequent imaging, or viable cancer cells on follow-up biopsy. Technical success was achieved in 43 (89.6%) of 48 renal tumors. The mean tumor size was 2.3 cm and the mean follow-up period was 49.6 months. Repeated RFA was necessary in 5 tumors due to incomplete ablation. The overall complication rate was 35.8%, of which 96.2% were mild complications. Serum creatinine levels at 12 months after RFA did not differ from those before RFA (1.28 vs. 1.36 mg/dL). Four patients were found to have recurrence at various follow-up intervals, and distant metastasis was not found in any cases. RFA appears to be a useful treatment for selected patients with SRMs. Our 4-year follow-up results disclose an excellent therapeutic outcome with RFA, while achieving effective local tumor control.

  20. Cohort profile of the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study at final follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamakoshi, Akiko; Ozasa, Kotaro; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Koji; Sakata, Kiyomi; Mori, Mitsuru; Kikuchi, Shogo; Iso, Hiroyasu; Sakauchi, Fumio; Motohashi, Yutaka; Tsuji, Ichiro; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Mikami, Haruo; Kurosawa, Michiko; Hoshiyama, Yoshiharu; Tanabe, Naohito; Tamakoshi, Koji; Wakai, Kenji; Tokudome, Shinkan; Hashimoto, Shuji; Wada, Yasuhiko; Kawamura, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Miki, Tsuneharu; Date, Chigusa; Kurozawa, Yoichi; Yoshimura, Takesumi; Shibata, Akira; Okamoto, Naoyuki; Shio, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk (JACC Study) was established in the late 1980s to evaluate the risk impact of lifestyle factors and levels of serum components on human health. During the 20-year follow-up period, the results of the study have been published in almost 200 original articles in peer-reviewed English-language journals. However, continued follow-up of the study subjects became difficult because of the retirements of principal researchers, city mergers throughout Japan in the year 2000, and reduced funding. Thus, we decided to terminate the JACC Study follow-up at the end of 2009. As a final point of interest, we reviewed the population registry information of survivors. A total of 207 (0.19%) subjects were ineligible, leaving 110 585 eligible participants (46 395 men and 64 190 women). Moreover, errors in coding date of birth and sex were found in 356 (0.32%) and 59 (0.05%) cases, respectively, during routine follow-up and final review. Although such errors were unexpected, their impact is believed to be negligible because of the small numbers relative to the large total study population. Here, we describe the final cohort profile at the end of the JACC Study along with selected characteristics of the participants and their status at the final follow-up. Although follow-up of the JACC Study participants is finished, we will continue to analyze and publish study results.

  1. Four years follow-up of 101 children with melamine-related urinary stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Wen, Jian Guo; Wen, Jian Jun; Su, Zhi Qiang; Zhu, Wen; Huang, Chen Xu; Yu, Si Long; Guo, Zhan

    2013-06-01

    The melamine-contaminated milk powder incidence occurred in China in 2008. Many studies have been published regarding the epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of melamine-related urinary stones. The objective of this study is to follow-up the effects of melamine-contaminated milk powder consumption on kidney and body growth in children with melamine-related urinary stones 4 years ago. One hundred and one children with melamine-related urinary stones were followed up by urinalysis, renal function tests and urinary ultrasonography. The data of body weight and height, clinical signs and complications were collected. Eighty normal children without the history of consuming melamine-contaminated milk powder were collected as controls. Eighty-one children with melamine-related urinary stones were successfully followed up. Of 45 cases with melamine-related urinary stones treated conservatively after discharge, 34 disappeared completely, 6 dissolved partially, 1 increased in size and 4 did not change at 4 years follow-up. The percentages of under-height and under-weight infants were significantly higher in melamine-related urinary stones group compared to the controls, respectively (p urinary stones on kidney and bladder was found at 4 years follow-up. However, whether or not melamine-related urinary stones had effect on body growth needs follow-up in future.

  2. Reimbursement for Living Kidney Donor Follow-Up Care: How Often Does Donor Insurance Pay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kher, Ajay; Rodrigue, James; Ajaimy, Maria; Wasilewski, Marcy; Ladin, Keren; Mandelbrot, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, many transplantation centers do not follow former living kidney donors on a long-term basis. Several potential barriers have been identified to provide this follow-up of former living kidney donors, including concerns that donor insurance will not reimburse transplantation centers or primary care physicians for this care. Here, we report the rates at which different insurance companies reimbursed our transplantation center for follow-up visits of living donors. Methods We collected data on all yearly follow-up visits of living donors billed from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2010, representing 82 different donors. Concurrent visits of their recipients were available for 47 recipients and were used as a control group. Results We find that most bills for follow-up visits of living kidney donors were paid by insurance companies, at a rate similar to the reimbursement for recipient follow-up care. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, for former donors with insurance, inadequate reimbursement should not be a barrier in providing follow-up care. PMID:23060280

  3. Preparing for LSST with the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstreet, Sarah; Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward

    2016-10-01

    The Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) provides an ideal platform for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network is using the LCOGT telescope network in addition to a web-based system developed to perform prioritized target selection, scheduling, and data reduction to confirm NEO candidates and characterize radar-targeted known NEOs.In order to determine how to maximize our NEO follow-up efforts, we must first define our goals for the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network. This means answering the following questions. Should we follow-up all objects brighter than some magnitude limit? Should we only focus on the brightest objects or push to the limits of our capabilities by observing the faintest objects we think we can see and risk not finding the objects in our data? Do we (and how do we) prioritize objects somewhere in the middle of our observable magnitude range? If we want to push to faint objects, how do we minimize the amount of data in which the signal-to-noise ratio is too low to see the object? And how do we find a balance between performing follow-up and characterization observations?To help answer these questions, we have developed a LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network simulator that allows us to test our prioritization algorithms for target selection, confirm signal-to-noise predictions, and determine ideal block lengths and exposure times for observing NEO candidates. We will present our results from the simulator and progress on our NEO follow-up efforts.In the era of LSST, developing/utilizing infrastructure, such as the LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network and our web-based platform for selecting, scheduling, and reducing NEO observations, capable of handling the large number of detections expected to be produced on a daily basis by LSST will be critical to follow-up efforts. We hope our

  4. Options for early breast cancer follow-up in primary and secondary care - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taggart Frances

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both incidence of breast cancer and survival have increased in recent years and there is a need to review follow up strategies. This study aims to assess the evidence for benefits of follow-up in different settings for women who have had treatment for early breast cancer. Method A systematic review to identify key criteria for follow up and then address research questions. Key criteria were: 1 Risk of second breast cancer over time - incidence compared to general population. 2 Incidence and method of detection of local recurrence and second ipsi and contra-lateral breast cancer. 3 Level 1–4 evidence of the benefits of hospital or alternative setting follow-up for survival and well-being. Data sources to identify criteria were MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, PSYCHINFO, ZETOC, Health Management Information Consortium, Science Direct. For the systematic review to address research questions searches were performed using MEDLINE (2011. Studies included were population studies using cancer registry data for incidence of new cancers, cohort studies with long term follow up for recurrence and detection of new primaries and RCTs not restricted to special populations for trials of alternative follow up and lifestyle interventions. Results Women who have had breast cancer have an increased risk of a second primary breast cancer for at least 20 years compared to the general population. Mammographically detected local recurrences or those detected by women themselves gave better survival than those detected by clinical examination. Follow up in alternative settings to the specialist clinic is acceptable to women but trials are underpowered for survival. Conclusions Long term support, surveillance mammography and fast access to medical treatment at point of need may be better than hospital based surveillance limited to five years but further large, randomised controlled trials are needed.

  5. The meaning of follow-up in intensive care: patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storli, Sissel L; Lind, Ranveig

    2009-03-01

    The growing understanding of correlations between experiences and memories from a period of intensive care treatment and complaints of mental character has led to the development of various patient follow-up offers. Little, however, is known about what follow-up may mean to patients. The aim of this study was to explore the meaning of patients' lived experience of being followed-up in a programme consisting of patient diaries, post-intensive care unit (ICU) conversations and visits back to the ICU. Field notes were made from encounters with patients (n = 10) during follow-up. Then they were interviewed twice, at about 6 months (n = 8) and at about 18 months (n = 6) after discharge from hospital. The first interview focused on the patients' experience during intensive care and on their reflections on the experience. The second interview had a particular focus on the meaning for each individual of the sources for understanding that they had been offered. The data was analysed by using a hermeneutic-phenomenological approach. The study corroborated earlier research that found that patients seek to understand experiences they have undergone. They search for meaning in experiences and memories. It is realized that the diary as text and photos, in addition to conveying care and love, is important to induce postexperience reflections. It provided guideposts that follow-up conversations could pursue in the patient's quest for meaning. The conversation also provided an opening for, and could in itself be essential to, the patient's willingness to talk about experiences. It allowed the nurse to accompany the patient in his quest for meaning. The return visit appeared to be significant in the patient's quest for meaning. It was via 'feeling' the room that 'things' fell into place. The study is important in elucidating aspects that are beneficial in the patient's follow-up and which lay the basis for further development of existing and new follow-up offers.

  6. Value of early follow-up CT in paediatric tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronikou, Savvas [University of Cape Town, Department of Radiology, Cape Town (South Africa); Wieselthaler, Nicky; Smith, Bruce; Douis, Hassan [Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Fieggen, A. Graham; Toorn, Ronald van; Wilmshurst, Jo [Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurosciences, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2005-11-01

    The value of CT in the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in children is well reported. Follow-up CT scanning for these patients is, however, not well described and, in particular, the value of early follow-up CT has not been addressed for children with TBM. To assess the value of early follow-up CT in children with TBM in identifying diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutically relevant features of TBM. A retrospective 4-year review of CT scans performed within 1 week and 1 month of initial CT in children with proven (CSF culture-positive) and probable TBM (CSF profile-positive but culture-negative) and comparison with initial CT for the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic CT features of TBM. The CT scans of 50 children were included (19 ''definite'' TBM; 31 ''probable'' TBM). Of these, 30 had CT scans performed within 1 week of the initial CT. On initial CT, 44 patients had basal enhancement. Only 24 patients had contrast medium-enhanced follow-up scans. Important findings include: 8 of 29 patients (who were not shunted) developed new hydrocephalus. New infarcts developed in 24 patients; 45% of those who did not have infarction initially developed new infarcts. Three of the six patients who did not show basal enhancement on initial scans developed this on the follow-up scans, while in seven patients with pre-existing basal enhancement this became more pronounced. Two patients developed hyperdensity in the cisterns on non-contrast medium scans. Eight patients developed a diagnostic triad of features. Three patients developed CT features of TBM where there was none on the initial scans. Early follow-up CT is useful in making a diagnosis of TBM by demonstrating features that were not present initially and by demonstrating more sensitive, obvious or additional features of TBM. In addition, follow-up CT is valuable as a prognostic indicator as it demonstrates additional infarcts which may have developed or become more

  7. Six-Year Experience of a Nurse-Led Colorectal Cancer Follow-Up Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Al Chalabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives. To review the experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in a tertiary referral colorectal cancer centre. Methodology. Data from the nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in our unit was prospectively maintained in a colorectal cancer database. Data was analysed from January 1, 2006 until the December 31, 2011. Results. 1125 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and referred to our unit as a tertiary centre for specialised colorectal cancer. Nine hundred and four patients had surgical resection of their colorectal cancer. Four hundred and seven patients were referred to the nurse-led colorectal cancer clinic for surveillance. The mean age of the patient cohort was 67 years (range 32–88 and 56% of patients were male. One hundred and seventeen patients were discharged to their general practitioner having been disease free after 5 years of followup. Fifty-four patients were diagnosed with either local or distant recurrence. Conclusion. A nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic is running according to strict follow-up protocols. This type of clinic significantly reduces the number of routine follow-up patients that have to be seen by the colorectal surgical consultant.

  8. Congenital arterioportal fistulas: radiological treatment and color Doppler US follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplisky, Dario; Tincani, Eliana Uruena; Lipsich, Jose; Sierre, Sergio [Department of Interventional Radiology, Pichincha 1890, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-11-15

    Congenital intrahepatic arterioportal fistulas (APFs) are a rare cause of portal hypertension in children. Doppler US is a useful diagnostic imaging modality. Transarterial embolization is a minimally invasive and effective therapy allowing occlusion of the fistula and restoration of liver hemodynamics. To describe the clinical and radiologic findings, percutaneous treatment and role of D-US in the postembolization follow-up of children with APF. Between 2002 and 2011, four children with APF were treated. Initial diagnosis and follow-up was performed with D-US and confirmed by arteriography, followed by endovascular embolization in all patients. D-US demonstrated abnormal arterioportal communications in all patients. Six endovascular procedures were performed in these four children. In two children, no residual fistula was seen on D-US after the first procedure and symptoms resolved. In the other two children, D-US demonstrated residual flow through the fistula, with resolution of pathological D-US findings and symptoms after the second endovascular procedure. All four children were successfully treated and asymptomatic at the end of follow-up. The mean follow-up was 24 months. Interventional radiology has a key role in the treatment of congenital APF. D-US is a noninvasive and effective tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  9. Long-Term Ultrasound Follow-Up of Thyroid Colloid Cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wook Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to assess the interval changes of thyroid colloid cysts (TCCs by performing long-term ultrasound (US follow-up examinations. Methods. From 2007 to 2008, 437 patients underwent a lobectomy for the treatment of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma. Among them, 268 patients underwent 4 or more postoperative US follow-ups after surgery. This study investigated the prevalence and interval changes of TCCs ≥3 mm by using US follow-ups. Results. Among 268 patients, 35 (13.1% had TCCs ≥3 mm by a preoperative thyroid US, and 6 (2.2% had newly detected TCCs at a US follow-up. Through long-term US follow-up, the interval changes for TCCs were classified as follows: no interval change (n=8, gradual increase (n=8, gradual decrease (n=5, positive fluctuation (n=3, negative fluctuation (n=6, disappearance (n=5, and new detection (n=6. None of the TCC cases had a TCC that was ≥10 mm at its largest diameter, and no patient complained of any relevant symptoms pertaining to the TCCs. Conclusions. In this study, TCCs demonstrated various interval changes, but no abrupt increase was found or acute onset of symptoms occurred.

  10. Six-year experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Chalabi, Hasan; O'Riordan, James M; Richardson, Alex; Flannery, Delia; O'Connor, Katrina; Stuart, Charlotte; Larkin, John; McCormick, Paul; Mehigan, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. To review the experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in a tertiary referral colorectal cancer centre. Methodology. Data from the nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in our unit was prospectively maintained in a colorectal cancer database. Data was analysed from January 1, 2006 until the December 31, 2011. Results. 1125 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and referred to our unit as a tertiary centre for specialised colorectal cancer. Nine hundred and four patients had surgical resection of their colorectal cancer. Four hundred and seven patients were referred to the nurse-led colorectal cancer clinic for surveillance. The mean age of the patient cohort was 67 years (range 32-88) and 56% of patients were male. One hundred and seventeen patients were discharged to their general practitioner having been disease free after 5 years of followup. Fifty-four patients were diagnosed with either local or distant recurrence. Conclusion. A nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic is running according to strict follow-up protocols. This type of clinic significantly reduces the number of routine follow-up patients that have to be seen by the colorectal surgical consultant.

  11. International clinical guideline for the management of classical galactosemia: diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welling, Lindsey; Bernstein, Laurie E; Berry, Gerard T; Burlina, Alberto B; Eyskens, François; Gautschi, Matthias; Grünewald, Stephanie; Gubbels, Cynthia S; Knerr, Ina; Labrune, Philippe; van der Lee, Johanna H; MacDonald, Anita; Murphy, Elaine; Portnoi, Pat A; Õunap, Katrin; Potter, Nancy L; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; Spencer, Jessica B; Timmers, Inge; Treacy, Eileen P; Van Calcar, Sandra C; Waisbren, Susan E; Bosch, Annet M

    2017-03-01

    Classical galactosemia (CG) is an inborn error of galactose metabolism. Evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and follow-up of CG are currently lacking, and treatment and follow-up have been demonstrated to vary worldwide. To provide patients around the world the same state-of-the-art in care, members of The Galactosemia Network (GalNet) developed an evidence-based and internationally applicable guideline for the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of CG. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. A systematic review of the literature was performed, after key questions were formulated during an initial GalNet meeting. The first author and one of the working group experts conducted data-extraction. All experts were involved in data-extraction. Quality of the body of evidence was evaluated and recommendations were formulated. Whenever possible recommendations were evidence-based, if not they were based on expert opinion. Consensus was reached by multiple conference calls, consensus rounds via e-mail and a final consensus meeting. Recommendations addressing diagnosis, dietary treatment, biochemical monitoring, and follow-up of clinical complications were formulated. For all recommendations but one, full consensus was reached. A 93 % consensus was reached on the recommendation addressing age at start of bone density screening. During the development of this guideline, gaps of knowledge were identified in most fields of interest, foremost in the fields of treatment and follow-up.

  12. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Revascularized Immature Necrotic Tooth Evaluated by CBCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. L. She

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study reports the successful treatment of an immature upper premolar with periapical pathosis and sinus tract using revascularization technique. Clinical and radiographic examination demonstrated the recovery of vitality, continued root development, and periapical healing at the 7-month follow-up. In addition, severe calcification of the canal was noted at the 36-month follow-up. At the 66-month follow-up, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT revealed complete periapical healing, apical closure, increase in root length and thickness of dentin, and severe calcification of the root canal. Even though the nature of tissue within the root canal is unknown, revascularization appears to give good clinical and radiographic success. This case report highlights that severe calcification of the canal is one of the long-term outcomes of revascularized root canals.

  13. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Revascularized Immature Necrotic Tooth Evaluated by CBCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, C. M. L.; Cheung, G. S. P.; Zhang, C. F.

    2016-01-01

    This case study reports the successful treatment of an immature upper premolar with periapical pathosis and sinus tract using revascularization technique. Clinical and radiographic examination demonstrated the recovery of vitality, continued root development, and periapical healing at the 7-month follow-up. In addition, severe calcification of the canal was noted at the 36-month follow-up. At the 66-month follow-up, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) revealed complete periapical healing, apical closure, increase in root length and thickness of dentin, and severe calcification of the root canal. Even though the nature of tissue within the root canal is unknown, revascularization appears to give good clinical and radiographic success. This case report highlights that severe calcification of the canal is one of the long-term outcomes of revascularized root canals. PMID:26949550

  14. [Neurodevelopmental follow-up of premature children in Lausanne and Geneva].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickle Graz, M; Cevey-Macherel, M; Forcada-Guex, M; Truttmann, A; Ha-Vinh Leuchter, R; Sizonenko, S; Huppi, P S; Borradori Tolsa, C

    2011-02-23

    Preterm children born before 32 weeks of gestation represent 1% of the annual births in Switzerland, and are the most at risk of neurodevelopmental disabilities. A neurological surveillance is thus implemented in the neonatal units, and multidisciplinary neurodevelopmental follow-up is offered to all our preterm patients. The follow-up clinics of the University hospitals in Lausanne and Geneva follow the Swiss guidelines for follow-up. An extended history and neurological examination is taken at each appointment, and a standardized test of development is performed. These examinations, which take place between the ages of 3 months and 9 years old, allow the early identification and treatment of developmental disorders frequent in this population, such as motor, cognitive or behavioral disorders, as well as the monitoring of the quality of neonatal care.

  15. Optimal Control of the Lost to Follow Up in a Tuberculosis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Emvudu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problem of optimal control for the transmission dynamics of tuberculosis (TB. A TB model that considers the existence of a new class (mainly in the African context is considered: the lost to follow up individuals. Based on the model formulated and studied in the work of Plaire Tchinda Mouofo, (2009, the TB control is formulated and solved as an optimal control theory problem using the Pontryagin's maximum principle (Pontryagin et al., 1992. This control strategy indicates how the control of the lost to follow up class can considerably influence the basic reproduction ratio so as to reduce the number of lost to follow up. Numerical results show the performance of the optimization strategy.

  16. Association between subjective memory complaints and nursing home placement: a four-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Siersma, Volkert; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2009-01-01

    nursing home placements were observed. Subjective memory complaints were associated with an adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) of 2.59 for nursing home placement. Other statistical significant covariates were MMSE depression......OBJECTIVE: In order to evaluate whether elderly persons with subjective memory complaints may be regarded as a group of potentially vulnerable patients who need close follow-up, we investigated the risk of nursing home placement during a 4-year follow-up period. METHODS: Prospective cohort survey...... with 4-year follow-up in general practice. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the influence of risk factors on nursing home placement. RESULTS: A total 758 non-nursing home residents aged 65 years and older consulted the General Practitioners in October and November 2002 of whom 50...

  17. Role of human papillomavirus testing and cytology in follow-up after conization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosvig, Camilla F; Huusom, Lene D; Deltour, Isabelle;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adequate follow-up of women who have undergone conization for high-grade cervical lesions is crucial in cervical cancer screening programs. We evaluated the performance of testing for high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types, cytology alone, and combined testing in predicting cervical...... after conization is more sensitive than ASCUS+ cytology for identifying women at risk for relapse of CIN2+ within 2 years. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether HPV testing could be a stand-alone test in follow up after conization....... detection of high-risk HPV. The women were passively followed until 2 years after first follow-up visit by linkage to the nationwide Pathology Data Bank. RESULTS: At first visit after conization (median time, 3.4 months), 20.4% were HPV-positive and 17.2% had atypical squamous intraepithelial lesions...

  18. A new era of sub-millimeter GRB afterglow follow-ups with the Greenland Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Yuji; Asada, Keiichi; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Makoto; Ho, Paul T P

    2015-01-01

    A planned rapid submillimeter (submm) Gamma Ray Burst (GRBs) follow-up observations conducted using the Greenland Telescope (GLT) is presented. The GLT is a 12-m submm telescope to be located at the top of the Greenland ice sheet, where the high-altitude and dry weather porvides excellent conditions for observations at submm wavelengths. With its combination of wavelength window and rapid responding system, the GLT will explore new insights on GRBs. Summarizing the current achievements of submm GRB follow-ups, we identify the following three scientific goals regarding GRBs: (1) systematic detection of bright submm emissions originating from reverse shock (RS) in the early afterglow phase, (2) characterization of forward shock and RS emissions by capturing their peak flux and frequencies and performing continuous monitoring, and (3) detections of GRBs as a result of the explosion of first-generation stars result of GRBs at a high redshift through systematic rapid follow ups. The light curves and spectra calcul...

  19. Slow-growing labyrinthine masses: contribution of MRI to diagnosis, follow-up and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deux, J.F.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.; Tubiana, J.M. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Paris (France). Service de Radiology; Ouayoun, M.; Meyer, B. [Service d`ORL, Hopital Saint-Antoine, 184 rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine, F-75012 Paris (France); Tran Ba Huy, P. [Service d`ORL, Hopital Lariboisiere, 2 rue Ambroise Pare, F-75010 Paris (France); Sterkers, J.M.

    1998-10-01

    We report the use of MRI in the diagnosis, follow-up and therapeutic management of three cases of intralabyrinthine Schwannoma. The diagnosis was based on the history and initial and follow-up MRI findings. The main feature suggesting the diagnosis was a nodular intralabyrinthine mass of low signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and high or isointense signal on T1-weighted images (relative to cerebrospinal fluid), which showed contrast enhancement. Follow-up imaging showed growth of the tumour in one patient. One patient underwent surgery for severe tinnitus. To detect these lesions, MRI should be focussed on the inner ear, using thin-section T2-weighted and T1-weighted images before and after contrast medium. MRI allowed informed surgical planning. (orig.) (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 21 refs.

  20. Hepatic pseudoaneurysm after traumatic liver injury; is CT follow-up warranted?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerballe, Lene; Helgstrand, Frederik; Axelsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hepatic pseudoaneurysm (HPA) is a rare complication after liver trauma, yet it is potentially fatal, as it can lead to sudden severe haemorrhage. The risk of developing posttraumatic HPA is one of the arguments for performing follow-up CT of patients with liver injuries. The aim...... no treatment failures. There was no correlation between the severity of the liver injury and development of HPA. 5 out of 7 patients were asymptomatic and would have been discharged without treatment if the protocol did not include a default follow-up CT. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, this study shows that HPA...... is not correlated to the severity of liver injury and it develops in 4% of patients after traumatic liver injury. In order to avoid potentially life-threatening haemorrhage from a post trauma hepatic pseudoaneurysm, it seems appropriate to do follow-up CT as part of the conservative management of blunt...

  1. Reactive attachment disorder in maltreated twins follow-up: from 18 months to 8 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Sherryl Scott; Boris, Neil W; Fuselier, Sarah-Hinshaw; Page, Timothy; Koren-Karie, Nina; Miron, Devi

    2006-03-01

    The best means for the diagnosis and treatment of reactive attachment disorder of infancy and early childhood have not been established. Though some longitudinal data on institutionalized children is available, reports of maltreated young children who are followed over time and assessed with measures of attachment are lacking. This paper presents the clinical course of a set of maltreated fraternal twins who were assessed and treated from 19 months to 30 months of age and then seen in follow-up at 3 and 8 years of age. A summary of the early assessment and course is provided and findings from follow-up assessments of the cognitive, behavioral, and interpersonal functioning of each child is analysed. Follow-up measures, chosen to capture social-cognitive processing of these children from an attachment perspective, are highlighted. Finally, findings from the case are discussed from nosological and theoretical perspectives.

  2. [Testicular cancer: a model to optimize the radiological follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebler, V; Pauchard, B; Schmidt, S; Valerio, M; De Bari, B; Berthold, D

    2015-05-20

    Despite being rare cancers, testicular seminoma and non-seminoma play an important role in oncology: they represent a model on how to optimize radiological follow-up, aiming at a lowest possible radiation exposure and secondary cancer risk. Males diagnosed with testicular cancer undergo frequently prolonged follow-up with CT-scans with potential toxic side effects, in particular secondary cancers. To reduce the risks linked to ionizing radiation, precise follow-up protocols have been developed. The number of recommended CT-scanners has been significantly reduced over the last 10 years. The CT scanners have evolved technically and new acquisition protocols have the potential to reduce the radiation exposure further.

  3. Reasons for women’s non-participation in follow-up screening after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgaard Nielsen, Jane; Olesen, Christinna Rebecca; Kristiansen, Tine Mechlenborg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Women whose pregnancy was complicated by gestational diabetes have a 7-fold higher risk of developing diabetes, primarily type 2. Early detection can prevent or delay the onset of late complications, for which follow-up screening is important. This study investigated the extent...... of participation in follow-up screening and the possible consequences of nonattendance in the Region of North Jutland, Denmark. METHOD: In Danish national registers covering the years 1994-2011 we identified 2171 birthing women whose pregnancy was complicated by first-time gestational diabetes. Control visits...... to general practitioners and biochemical departments after giving birth were charted. Following national guidelines we defined four intervals for assessment of participation in follow-up screening. Diagnosis of diabetes or treatment with glucose-lowering agents after giving birth were also identified...

  4. Associations between follow-up screening after gestational diabetes and early detection of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Christinna Rebecca; Hyldgaard Nielsen, Jane; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Women whose pregnancy was complicated by gestational diabetes have a 7-fold higher risk of developing diabetes, primarily type 2. Early detection can prevent or delay the onset of late complications, for which follow-up screening is important. This study investigated the extent...... of participation in follow-up screening and the possible consequences of nonattendance in the Region of North Jutland, Denmark. METHOD: In Danish national registers covering the years 1994-2011 we identified 2171 birthing women whose pregnancy was complicated by first-time gestational diabetes. Control visits...... to general practitioners and biochemical departments after giving birth were charted. Following national guidelines we defined four intervals for assessment of participation in follow-up screening. Diagnosis of diabetes or treatment with glucose-lowering agents after giving birth were also identified...

  5. Proposed follow up programme after curative resection for lower third oesophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyes LH

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma has risen throughout the Western world over the last three decades. The prognosis remains poor as many patients are elderly and present with advanced disease. Those patients who are suitable for resection remain at high risk of disease recurrence. It is important that cancer patients take part in a follow up protocol to detect disease recurrence, offer psychological support, manage nutritional disorders and facilitate audit of surgical outcomes. Despite the recognition that regular postoperative follow up plays a key role in ongoing care of cancer patients, there is little consensus on the nature of the process. This paper reviews the published literature to determine the optimal timing and type of patient follow up for those after curative oesophageal resection.

  6. Effect of Language Barriers on Follow-up Appointments After an Emergency Department Visit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, Joshua; Baker, David W

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether patients who encountered language barriers during an emergency department visit were less likely to be referred for a follow-up appointment and less likely to complete a recommended appointment. DESIGN Cohort study. SETTING Public hospital emergency department. PARTICIPANTS English- and Spanish-speaking patients (N =714) presenting with nonemergent medical problems. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Patients were interviewed to determine sociodemographic information, health status, whether an interpreter was used, and whether an interpreter should have been used. The dependent variables were referral for a follow-up appointment after the emergency department visit and appointment compliance, as determined by chart review and the hospital information system. The proportion of patients who received a follow-up appointment was 83% for those without language barriers, 75% for those who communicated through an interpreter, and 76% for those who said an interpreter should have been used but was not (P =.05). In multivariate analysis, the adjusted odds ratio for not receiving a follow-up appointment was 1.92 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11 to 3.33) for patients who had an interpreter and 1.79 (95% CI, 1.00 to 3.23) for patients who said an interpreter should have been used (compared with patients without language barriers). Appointment compliance rates were similar for patients who communicated through an interpreter, those who said an interpreter should have been used but was not, and those without language barriers (60%, 54%, and 64%, respectively; P =.78). CONCLUSIONS Language barriers may decrease the likelihood that a patient is given a follow-up appointment after an emergency department visit. However, patients who experienced language barriers were equally likely to comply with follow-up appointments. PMID:10760001

  7. Obese patients lose weight independently of nutritional follow-up after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Helena Tess

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: to examine the association between preoperative body weight, adherence to postsurgical nutritional follow-up, length of postoperative period, and weight loss during the first 18 months among adults who have undergone bariatric surgery. Methods: a retrospective cohort study was conducted on 241 consecutive patients who underwent open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP from January 2006 to December 2008, in a teaching hospital in São Paulo (Brazil. Data were collected through hospital records review and the variables analyzed included sex, age, immediate preoperative weight, adherence to postsurgical nutritional visits and length of postoperative period. Proportional body weight reductions during the 18-month follow-up period were examined using generalized estimating equations. Results: 81% (n=195 of participants were female, with overall mean age of 44.4 ± 11.6 years, mean preoperative weight of 123.1± 21.2 kg and mean preoperative body mass index of 47.2± 6.2 kg/m2. The overall adherence to postoperative follow- up schedule was 51% (95%CI: 44.5-57.5%. Preoperative body weight and adherence were not associated with proportional weight reduction (Wald’s test p > 0.18. Weight loss leveled off at the end of the 18-month follow-up period for both compliant and non-compliant patients (Wald’s test p = 0.00. Conclusions: our study showed that weight loss occurred steadily over the first 18 months after RYGBP, leveling off at around 40% weight reduction. It was associated with neither presurgical weight, nor nutritional follow-up and it may be primarily dependent on the surgical body alterations themselves. This finding may have implications for intervention strategies aimed at motivating patients to comply with early postsurgical and life-long follow-up.

  8. Reappraisal of Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy for follow up in children with vesicoureteral reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Eriko; Morita, Koichi; Katoh, Chietsugu; Nakada, Kunihiro; Nonomura, Katsuya; Kakizaki, Hidehiro; Koyanagi, Tomohiko; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine; Itoh, Kazuo

    1999-12-01

    We reviewed Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy in children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in order to assess whether repeated Tc-99m DMSA scans are necessary for the follow up of these patients. Ninety-seven children who were followed up for more than one year (1-7.4 years, average 2.8 years) after the first DMSA scan were included in the study. Fifty-one patients had been diagnosed as primary VUR and 46 as secondary VUR. Age at the first examination ranged from 0 to 14 years (average 5.1 years). Planar images were taken 2 hours after injection. The % renal uptake per injected dose (% RU) was calculated from posterior images. Kidneys in 11 patients (11.3%) changed morphologically during the follow up. Of these, new photon deficient areas (PD) were detected in only 4 patients (4.1%). All of these 4 patients had neurogenic bladder and were managed with self-catheterization. Of the remaining 7 patients, cortical thinning progressed in 5 patients (5.2%) and PDs resolved in 3 patients (3.1%). In one of these 7 patients, PD resolved in one kidney and cortical thinning progressed in the contralateral kidney. Of 97 patients reviewed, % RU decreased more than 20% during the follow up in 6 patients (6.2%). All were diagnosed as secondary VUR due to neurogenic bladder. % RU decreased only in the contracted kidneys at the initial scan. Two of them underwent renal transplantation because of severe renal failure. In conclusion, new PD rarely developed and % RU decreased in only a few patients during the follow up of children with VUR. Repeated Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy therefore seems to have little benefit in the follow up of children with VUR. It should be performed in selected patients with high risk of urinary tract infection or renal failure. (author)

  9. Association of black race with follow-up of an abnormal prostate-specific antigen test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Barbara J; Mavandadi, Shahrzad; Weiner, Mark G

    2011-02-01

    Delayed evaluation after a clearly abnormal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) result may contribute to more advanced prostate cancer at diagnosis in black men. In 46 primary care practices over a period of 4.5 years, we studied men aged more than 50 years without known prostate cancer who had a PSA of at least 10.0 ng/mL for the first time. PSA follow-up included: a urology appointment, a new prostate diagnosis, or repeat PSA test. Cox proportional hazards models assessed time to follow-up, adjusting for demographic, clinical, and health care factors with censoring at a time that represents excessive delay (200 days). Among all 724 study men (27% black), delay until PSA follow-up averaged 115.2 days (+/- 79.7 d) and the unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) for follow-up was shorter for black men than nonblack men (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.00-1.51). However, black men were more likely to have had prior urology care and had higher index PSA levels than other men; both factors were associated with shorter follow-up. After adjustment, delay did not differ for black vs nonblack race (HR, 1.05; 95% Cl, 0.78-1.43) but men aged at least 75 years had a longer delay than men aged 74 years or less (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59-0.89). Despite black men having greater risk of advanced prostate disease at diagnosis and better linkage to urologic care, follow-up was delayed, on average, by more than 3 months and did not differ by race. These results reveal a potentially important, remediable factor to improve prostate cancer prevention and care for black men.

  10. Clinical features and follow-up of Chinese patients with symptomatic hypogammaglobulinemia in infancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Ji-hong; ZHU Jian-xing; ZHU Xiao-dong; CHEN Tong-xin

    2009-01-01

    hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy;follow-upBackground Hypogammaglobulinemia is common in infant humoral immunodeficiencies and has complicated causes and outcomes.We aimed to determine the clinical manifestations,immunological changes and outcomes of Shanghai infants with hypogammaglobulinemia.Methods Patients under 2 years old,having one or more warning signs of primary immunodeficiency disorders,serum immunoglobulin levels below the lower limit of reference range per age,and with normal numbers for lymphocyte subsets,were analyzed and followed up for 2 to 3 years.Results A total of 91 children (male-to-female ratio:2.25:1) participated in the study.Initial clinical presentation was recurrent upper respiratory tract infection (46%),invasive infection (3%),atopic disease (32%).IgA reduction (77%) was prevalent;34% patients had more than one isotype reduced.During follow-up,51 of 62 patients (82.25%) had immunoglobulins normalized at the age between 12-48 months; these were diagnosed as transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy (THI).Long-term follow-up may reveal a diagnosis for the remaining 11 infants with persistent lower immunoglobulin levels,who did not have antibody titers measured.Earlier onset was correlated with higher rates of normalization.More patients were diagnosed with isolated hypogammaglobulinemia in 2006 compared with the previous 4 years (2002-2005).Conclusions The awareness of immunodeficiency among pediatricians has been greatly improved.Recurrent otitis media was not a major infection in our patients.THI is a relatively common condition associated with infant hypogammaglobulinemia.In the absence of specific antibody titers,the diagnosis of THI can be confirmed retrospectively with lg levels normalized in follow-up visits.Therefore,long-term follow-up and frequent re-evaluation of these patients are necessary to distinguish them from true primary immunodeficiency.

  11. MRI of cerebral rheumatoid pachymeningitis: report of two cases with follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cellerini, M.; Gabbrielli, S. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Clinical Pathophysiology; Maddali Bongi, S.; Cammelli, D. [Section of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Univ. of Florence (Italy)

    2001-02-01

    We report the clinical and neuroradiological features of cerebral rheumatoid pachymeningitis with 1 year follow-up in two patients. MRI of the head enabled noninvasive diagnosis of both the meningeal abnormality and its complications, consisting of hypertensive hydrocephalus and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis, respectively. Dural sinus thrombosis, very uncommon in rheumatoid arthritis, was confirmed by phase-contrast MRA. Worsening of the pachymeningitis at follow-up was observed in both patients despite regression or stability of the clinical picture and long-term therapy. (orig.)

  12. [Poor results in 183 threaded acetabular cups at a mean 7 years follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecestre, P; Poilbout, P; Dambreville, A; Vial, D

    1995-12-01

    We reviewed 183 threaded rings at a mean 7 years follow-up. Poor résults are frequent: 34 % had been revised and 50 % have radiographic migration, essentially with proximal migration of the cup. Generally, we reoperated with other cememtless implants. The type of threaded cup does not matter (spheric or conic). Only the duration of follow up seems significant. We think that biomecanical strains, rather than physiology, explain these numerous migrations. We have therefore abandoned threaded cups in favour of porous-coated impacted cups.

  13. Stereotactic irradiation of angiomas: scintigraphic follow-up. Irradiation stereotaxique des angiomes: suivi scintigraphique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebtahi, R.; Meder, J.F.; Kerviler, E. de; Piketty, M.L.; Berenger, N.; Habert, M.O.; Missir, O.; Merienne, L.; Askienazy, S. (Hopital Sainte-Anne, 75 - Paris (France))

    1992-01-01

    Irradiation increases the rate of thrombolie obliteration of the angioma. The long latency before the onset of thrombo-obliteration means that there is a considerable delay in treatment. Cerebral angiography is considered the gold standard in he follow-up of angiomas in this study, HM scintigraphy was positive in all cases when cerebral angiography showed no radiological improvement, negative when complete obliteration of the angioma occurred, but negative in 5 cases with incomplete obliteration. This preliminary study shows the place of HM scintigraphy in the follow-up of angioma irradiation, in which it revealed the incomplete effect of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  14. Conservative surgical management of in situ subungual melanoma: long-term follow-up*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda-Juárez, Mariana Catalina De; Martínez-Velasco, María Abril; Fonte-Ávalos, Verónica; Toussaint-Caire, Sonia; Domínguez-Cherit, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Subungual melanoma represents 20% of all melanomas in Hispanic population. Here, we report the outcome of 15 patients with in situ subungual melanoma treated with resection of the nail unit with a 5-mm margin without amputation, followed up for 55.93 ± 43.08 months. The most common complications included inclusion cysts and nail spicules. We found no evidence of local or distant recurrences at the last visit of our follow up. Functional outcome was good, with only one patient reporting persistent mild pain. These results support functional, non-amputative surgical management of in situ subungual melanomas. PMID:28099619

  15. White mineral trioxide aggregate pulpotomies: Two case reports with long-term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Tunc Emine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the partial pulpotomy treatment of complicated crown fractures of two cases by using white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA with long-term follow-up. In the cases presented here, to injured incisor teeth were open apices and the pulp exposure site was large, so it was decided to perform vital pulpotomy with WMTA. Long-term follow-up examinations revealed that the treatment preserved pulpal vitality with continued root development and apex formation. WMTA may be considered as an alternative option for the treatment of traumatized immature permanent teeth.

  16. Psychosocial Follow-Up in Survivorship as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, E Anne; Phillips, Farya; Schwartz, Lisa A; Rosenberg, Abby R; Jones, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) have a high risk of medical late effects following cancer therapy. Psychosocial late effects are less often recognized. Many CCS do not receive long-term follow-up (LTFU) care, and those who do are rarely screened for psychosocial late effects. An interdisciplinary team conducted a systematic review of qualitative and quantitative studies to assess social, educational, vocational, psychological, and behavioral outcomes along with factors related to receipt of LTFU care. We propose that psychosocial screening be considered a standard of care in long-term follow-up care and that education be provided to promote the use LTFU care starting early in the treatment trajectory.

  17. [Peculiarities of social adaptation in adolescents with schizoid personality disorder: a follow-up study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, D Iu

    2007-01-01

    A sample of 63 adolescents with schizoid personality disorder, aged 15-17 years, 58 males and 5 females, was followed up for a period of 3-8 years and re-examined at the age of 20-25. The patients were examined in a psychoneurologic out-patient center due to social maladaptation. The follow-up study revealed the improvement of social adaptation with an extremely low percent (5%) of schizophrenia manifestations. A number of clinical factors significant for the future social functioning of schizoid adolescents was found. A strategy of psychocorrection and sociotherapeutic care for the patients is worked out.

  18. Long-term follow up of renal anastomosing hemangioma mimicking renal angiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Isabel; Pichler, Renate; Schäfer, Georg; Zelger, Bernhard; Zelger, Bettina; Aigner, Friedrich; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang

    2014-08-01

    Anastomosing hemangioma of the kidney is a very rare neoplasm, currently 19 cases have been reported in the literature. First described in 2009, histopathologically anastomosing hemangioma is similar to aggressive angiosarcoma. No long-term follow-up data of anastomosing hemangioma have been described yet. Here, we present the case of a healthy 56-year-old man diagnosed in 2002 with a 7 × 5-cm anastomosing hemangioma mimicking an aggressive renal angiosarcoma. The patient underwent nephrectomy and has been followed up disease free for 13 years.

  19. Immigrant women living with HIV in Spain: a qualitative approach to encourage medical follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Guionnet, Anne; Navaza, Bárbara; Pizarro de la Fuente, Belén; Jesús Pérez-Elías, María; Dronda, Fernando; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Pérez-Molina, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immigrant women living with HIV generally have worse adherence to medical treatment and follow-up when compared to native women and immigrant or native men. The general aim of this study was to improve healthcare services for HIV-positive women and to better understand why some of them discontinue treatment. The specific objectives were: (1) to explore the barriers and facilitators to medical follow-up among women and (2) to use the findings to create a guide for healthcare profess...

  20. Neurocognitive development in first episode psychosis 5 years follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barder, Helene Eidsmo; Sundet, Kjetil; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are documented in first-episode psychosis (FEP), but the continuing course is not fully understood. The present study examines the longitudinal development of neurocognitive function in a five year follow-up of FEP-patients, focusing on the relation to illness severity, as meas......Cognitive deficits are documented in first-episode psychosis (FEP), but the continuing course is not fully understood. The present study examines the longitudinal development of neurocognitive function in a five year follow-up of FEP-patients, focusing on the relation to illness severity...

  1. Planck early results. IX. XMM-Newton follow-up for validation of Planck cluster candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.

    2011-01-01

    We present the XMM-Newton follow-up for confirmation of Planck cluster candidates. Twenty-five candidates have been observed to date using snapshot (∼10 ks) exposures, ten as part of a pilot programme to sample a low range of signal-to-noise ratios (4 ... of variable quality). The new clusters span the redshift range 0.09 ≲ z ≲ 0.54, with a median redshift of z ∼ 0.37. A first determination is made of their X-ray properties including the characteristic size, which is used to improve the estimate of the SZ Compton parameter, Y 500. The follow-up validation...

  2. Schnitzler's syndrome: 3-year radiological follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, A. [Hopital Bichat, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Feydy, A. [Hopital Bichat, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Hopital Cochin, Service de Radiologie B, Paris (France); Belmatoug, N.; Fantin, B. [Hopital Beaujon, Department of Internal Medicine, Clichy (France)

    2007-02-15

    Schnitzler's syndrome comprises urticaria, monoclonal gammapathy, inflammatory signs (fever, enlarged lymph nodes, hyperleukocytosis), and bone lesions. We report the imaging findings and follow-up of a new case with extensive osteosclerosis of the iliac bone, associated with inflammatory signal changes on MRI and foci of increased uptake on bone scintigraphy. When a diagnosis of Schnitzler's syndrome is established, treatment should be towards symptoms only; a long follow-up is warranted, as a delayed evolution towards a lymphoproliferative syndrome is possible. (orig.)

  3. Clinical treatment of a ruptured temporomandibular joint disc: morphological changes at 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Lucas; Porto, Felipe; Agarwal, Sachin; Grossman, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis is a disease that affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This case report chronicles the diagnosis and treatment of a patient for whom this pathological condition was accompanied by a rupture of the articular disc. The patient presented with loud sounds in the left TMJ and an irregular mandibular occlusal plane due to condylar intrusion in the glenoid fossa on the ipsilateral side. A noninvasive treatment was selected. A 4-month follow-up revealed remission of the articular sounds, and tissue regeneration was noted. These improvements remained visible at 5-year follow-up.

  4. Dynamic hyperinflation after metronome-paced hyperventilation in COPD--a 2 year follow-up.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannink, J.D.C.; Lahaije, A.; Bischoff, E.W.M.A.; Helvoort, H.A.C. van; Dekhuijzen, R.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Heijdra, Y.F.

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the decline in FEV(1), the behavior of dynamic hyperinflation (DH) over time is unknown in patients with COPD. Metronome-paced hyperventilation (MPH) is a simple applicable surrogate for exercise to detect DH. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate changes in MPH-induced DH during two years follow-up

  5. MRI follow-up of conservatively treated meniscal knee lesions in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.G. Oei (Edwin); I.M. Koster (Ingrid); J.H.J. Hensen; S.S. Boks (Simone); H.P.A. Wagemakers (Harry); B.W. Koes (Bart); D. Vroegindeweij (Dammis); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To evaluate meniscal status change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, prognostic factors and association with clinical outcome in patients with conservatively treated knee injury. Methods: We analysed 403 meniscal horns in 101 conservatively treated patients (59 male; mean age 40

  6. MRI follow-up of conservatively treated meniscal knee lesions in general practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, Edwin H.G.; Hunink, M.G.M. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Program for the Assessment of Radiological Technology (ART Program), Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Koster, Ingrid M. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hensen, Jan-Hein J.; Vroegindeweij, Dammis [Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boks, Simone S. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Diaconessenhuis Meppel, Department of Radiology, Meppel (Netherlands); Wagemakers, Harry P.A.; Koes, Bart W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M.A. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate meniscal status change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, prognostic factors and association with clinical outcome in patients with conservatively treated knee injury. We analysed 403 meniscal horns in 101 conservatively treated patients (59 male; mean age 40 years) in general practice who underwent initial knee MRI within 5 weeks of trauma. We performed ordinal logistic regression analysis to analyse prognostic factors for meniscal change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, and we assessed the association with clinical outcome. On follow-up MRI 49 meniscal horns had deteriorated and 18 had improved. Age (odds ratio [OR] 1.3/decade), body weight (OR 1.2/10 kg), total anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture on initial MRI (OR 2.4), location in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (OR 3.0) and an initial meniscal lesion (OR 0.3) were statistically significant predictors of meniscal MRI appearance change after 1 year, which was not associated with clinical outcome. In conservatively treated patients, meniscal deterioration on follow-up MRI 1 year after trauma is predicted by higher age and body weight, initial total ACL rupture, and location in the medial posterior horn. Change in MRI appearance is not associated with clinical outcome. (orig.)

  7. Risk of cervical cancer after completed post-treatment follow-up of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Helmerhorst, Theo; Habbema, Dik;

    2012-01-01

    To compare the risk of cervical cancer in women with histologically confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia who returned to routine screening after having completed post-treatment follow-up with consecutive normal smear test results with women with a normal primary smear test result....

  8. Discontinuation of long-term benzodiazepine use : 10-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gier, N. A. H.; Gorgels, W. J. M. J.; Lucassen, P. L. B. J.; Voshaar, R. Oude; Mulder, J.; Zitman, F.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Several interventions aiming at discontinuation of long-term benzodiazepine use have been proven effective in the short term. However, data on the persistence of discontinuation are lacking. Objectives. To assess 10-year follow-up status in patients who succeeded in stopping benzodiazepi

  9. ATLANTIC DIP: simplifying the follow-up of women with previous gestational diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Noctor, E

    2013-11-01

    Previous gestational diabetes (GDM) is associated with a significant lifetime risk of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we assessed the performance of HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) measurements against that of 75 g oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) for the follow-up screening of women with previous GDM.

  10. Long-Term Follow-Up of Microvascular Decompression for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oesman, Chenur; Mooij, Jan Jakob A.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate the follow-up characteristics of patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and to evaluate the factors affecting long-term outcome of microvascular decompression (MVD) in TN. Between 1983 and 2003, 156 patients with TN treated with MVD by 4 neurosurgeons at University

  11. Treatment of generalized social phobia : Results at long-term follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholing, A; Emmelkamp, PMG

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the long-term follow-up effectiveness-of (cognitive-)behavioural group and individual treatments for generalized social phobia. Patients were reassessed 18 months after they had finished one of the following treatment packages: (1) exposure in vivo; (2) cognitive therapy foll

  12. A Follow-Up Study of Behavior Problems Associated with Child Sexual Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowitz, Howard; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) was completed by parents of 93 prepubertal children evaluated for sexual abuse and 80 nonabused children. Sexually abused children had significantly more behavior problems, including depression, aggression, sleep and somatic complaints, hyperactivity, and sexual problems. At four-month follow-up, children with…

  13. Six years of following up a glomus jugulare tumor - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanka Štenc Bradvica

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This case report followed up a patient for six years after she had been successfully treated by embolization and gamma knife surgery, while a complete surgical resection was contraindicated because of the high risk of possible mortality outcome. A development of internal hydrocephalus in a subacute postoperative period as a probable postoperative complication related to gamma knife surgery was noted.

  14. Nocturnal enuresis and minor neurological dysfunction at 12 years : a follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunsing, R J; Hadders-Algra, M; Touwen, B C; Huisjes, H J

    1991-01-01

    On follow-up at 12 years to assess the relationship between minor neurological dysfunction (MND) and primary nocturnal enuresis (NE), the frequency of NE was found to be significantly higher in children with MND (N = 167) than in those who were neurologically normal (N = 174). There was no relations

  15. NOCTURNAL ENURESIS AND MINOR NEUROLOGICAL DYSFUNCTION AT 12 YEARS - A FOLLOW-UP-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunsing, R J; Hadders-Algra, M; Touwen, B C; Huisjes, H J

    1991-01-01

    On follow-up at 12 years to assess the relationship between minor neurological dysfunction (MND) and primary nocturnal enuresis (NE), the frequency of NE was found to be significantly higher in children with MND (N = 167) than in those who were neurologically normal (N = 174). There was no relations

  16. Apparent diffusion coefficient parametric response mapping MRI for follow-up of glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ra Gyoung [Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seo-gu, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho Sung; Hong, Gil Sun; Kim, Sang Joon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Songpa-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yoon [Bundang Jesaeng Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    To determine the diagnostic superiority of parametric response mapping of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCPR) for predicting glioblastoma treatment response, compared to single time point measurement. Fifty post-treatment glioblastoma patients were enrolled. ADCPR was calculated from serial apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps acquired before and at the time of first detection of an enlarged contrast-enhancing lesion on voxel-by-voxel basis. The percentage-decrease in ADCPR and tenth percentile histogram cutoff value of ADC (ADC10) were compared at subsequent 3-month and 1-year follow-ups. The percentage-decrease in ADCPR was significantly higher in the progression group (mean = 33.2-38.3 %) than in the stable-response group (mean = 9.7 %) at 3 months follow-up (corrected p < 0.001 for both readers). ADCPR significantly improved area under the receiver operating characteristic curve from 0.67 to 0.88 (corrected p = 0.037) and from 0.70 to 0.92 (corrected p = 0.020) for both readers, respectively, compared to ADC10 at 3-month follow-up, but did not significantly improve at 1-year follow-up. The inter-reader agreement was higher for ADCPR than ADC10 (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.93 versus 0.86). Voxel-based ADCPR appears to be a superior imaging biomarker than ADC, particularly for predicting early tumour progression in patients with glioblastoma. (orig.)

  17. Large regional differences in serological follow-up of q Fever patients in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morroy, G.; Wielders, C.C.; Kruisbergen, M.J.; Hoek, W. van der; Marcelis, J.H.; Wegdam-Blans, M.C.; Wijkmans, C.J.; Schneeberger, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During the Dutch Q fever epidemic more than 4,000 Q fever cases were notified. This provided logistical challenges for the organisation of serological follow-up, which is considered mandatory for early detection of chronic infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the proportio

  18. Exploring "Successful" Outcomes of Entrepreneurship Education: A Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Laura; Kapasi, Isla; Whittam, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    During 2005-2006 entrepreneurship students in several UK universities completed a survey about their background and career intentions. This paper reports, eight years on, on a follow-up study with ten of these participants, with the aim of exploring the students' intentions and subsequent actions since graduating. Using a qualitative methodology,…

  19. Effect of a weight loss program in obese adolescents: a long-term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilonka Rohm

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Obesity during adolescence is an increasing health problem in industrial countries. The comorbidities associated with obesity include important metabolic diseases. Methods: To analyze the effect of a weight-loss program, we recruited 12 obese, male adolescents before entering this program. We determined body weight measures at baseline, 6-week and 36-month follow-up. Also, the long-term changes of blood pressure, HbAlc, and CRP were evaluated. Twenty healthy age-matched adolescents served as controls. Results: Within the intervention group ((body mass index [BMI, kg/m²] > 95th percentile for age and sex, age 13-17 years the BMI and BMI-standard deviation score [SDS] were significantly reduced in the 6-week follow-up after completing the weight loss program. However, the significant weight-reduction effect was not persistent until the 36-month follow-up. Conclusion: The 6-week weight-loss program had beneficial short-term effects on body weight, BMI, and BMI-SDS in obese adolescents, but these effects could not be maintained until the 36-month follow-up.

  20. Predictive value of clinical evaluation in the follow-up of children with a brain tumor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, N. de; Hew, J.M.; Fock, J.M.; Kamps, W.A.; Graaf, S.S.N. de

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During follow-up of children with a brain tumor, traditionally surveillance-imaging studies are done in addition to clinical evaluations. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of clinical evaluations by a multidisciplinary team for the detection of recurrent tumor. PROCEDUR

  1. Predictive value of clinical evaluation in the follow-up of children with a brain tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hew, JM; Fock, JM; Kamps, WA

    2002-01-01

    Background. During follow-up of children with a brain tumor, traditionally surveillance-imaging studies are done in addition to clinical evaluations, The purpose of this study was to determine the role of clinical evaluations by a multidisciplinary team for the detection of recurrent tumor. Procedur

  2. The Experience of Melanoma Follow-Up Care: An Online Survey of Patients in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigating patients’ reports on the quality and consistency of melanoma follow-up care in Australia would assist in evaluating if this care is effective and meeting patients’ needs. The objective of this study was to obtain and explore the patients’ account of the technical and interpersonal aspects of melanoma follow-up care received. An online survey was conducted to acquire details of patients’ experience. Participants were patients treated in Australia for primary melanoma. Qualitative and quantitative data about patient perceptions of the nature and quality of their follow-up care were collected, including provision of melanoma specific information, psychosocial support, and imaging tests received. Inconsistencies were reported in the provision and quality of care received. Patient satisfaction was generally low and provision of reassurance from health professionals was construed as an essential element of quality of care. “Gaps” in follow-up care for melanoma patients were identified, particularly provision of adequate psychosocial support and patient education. Focus on strategies for greater consistency in the provision of support, information, and investigations received, may generate a cost dividend which could be reinvested in preventive and supportive care and benefit patient well-being.

  3. MRI follow-up of abdominal aortic aneurysms after endovascular repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, S.A.P.

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysm size changes form the basis of the follow-up after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, because aneurysm growth increases rupture risk. Aneurysm growth can be caused by endoleak (leakage of blood in the aneurysm sac). Therefore, accurate endoleak detection is important in growing

  4. Curiosity and Exploratory Behavior in Disadvantaged Children: A Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuchin, Patricia P.

    In a follow-up study of curiosity and exploratory behavior, subjects were 18 disadvantaged inner-city black children who had been observed at age four in their first year of a Head Start program, and who were now finishing first grade. Data were obtained from teachers, observations in the classrooms, and an individual session with each child. Each…

  5. Sources of Validity Evidence for Educational and Psychological Tests: A Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizek, Gregory J.; Bowen, Daniel; Church, Keri

    2010-01-01

    This study followed up on previous work that examined the incidence of reporting evidence based on test consequences in "Mental Measurements Yearbook". In the present study, additional possible outlets for what has been called "consequential validity" evidence were investigated, including all articles published in the past 10 years in several…

  6. Children of Mothers at Psychosocial Risk Growing Up: A Follow up at the Age of 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsby, Marie; Svedin, Carl Goran; Sydsjo, Gunilla

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to make a 16-year follow-up of children of psychosocial risk mothers as concerns emotional/behavioural problems, self-esteem, life events, and academic grades. Forty-three teenagers (index group) and 61 reference teenagers were personally interviewed and asked to answer the Youth Self-report (YSR), the Self-image…

  7. Self-Assessment Processes: The Importance of Follow-up for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, Juan Jose

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on self-assessment processes and to identify the difficulties, benefits and success factors of the European Foundation for Quality Management self-assessment model, analysing the importance of follow-up. Design/methodology/approach: First, the paper carries out a literature review on…

  8. Measuring Outcomes: A Follow-Up of Minnesota Private Career School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Richard W.; Smith, Edward J.

    In Phase I of a study, all students (n=4,488) enrolled in schools in the Minnesota Association of Private Postsecondary Schools (MAPPS) completed a quality assessment instrument to evaluate their school. In Phase II, a sample of 2,000 students who completed the initial assessment were followed up to measure completion, placement, and student…

  9. Liverpool Telescope follow-up of candidate electromagnetic counterparts during the first run of Advanced LIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copperwheat, C. M.; Steele, I. A.; Piascik, A. S.; Bersier, D.; Bode, M. F.; Collins, C. A.; Darnley, M. J.; Galloway, D. K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Lamb, G. P.; Levan, A. J.; Mazzali, P. A.; Mundell, C. G.; Pian, E.; Pollacco, D.; Steeghs, D.; Tanvir, N. R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2016-11-01

    The first direct detection of gravitational waves was made in 2015 September with the Advanced LIGO detectors. By prior arrangement, a worldwide collaboration of electromagnetic follow-up observers were notified of candidate gravitational wave events during the first science run, and many facilities were engaged in the search for counterparts. Three alerts were issued to the electromagnetic collaboration over the course of the first science run, which lasted from 2015 September to 2016 January. Two of these alerts were associated with the gravitational wave events since named GW150914 and GW151226. In this paper we provide an overview of the Liverpool Telescope contribution to the follow-up campaign over this period. Given the hundreds of square degree uncertainty in the sky position of any gravitational wave event, efficient searching for candidate counterparts required survey telescopes with large (˜degrees) fields of view. The role of the Liverpool Telescope was to provide follow-up classification spectroscopy of any candidates. We followed candidates associated with all three alerts, observing 1, 9 and 17 candidates respectively. We classify the majority of the transients we observed as supernovae. No counterparts were identified, which is in line with expectations given that the events were classified as black hole-black hole mergers. However these searches laid the foundation for similar follow-up campaigns in future gravitational wave detector science runs, in which the detection of neutron star merger events with observable electromagnetic counterparts is much more likely.

  10. LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP OF 46 PATIENTS WITH ANTI-(U1)SNRNP ANTIBODIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENHOOGEN, F.H.J.; SPRONK, P.E.; Boerbooms, A.M.T.; Bootsma, H.; DEROOIJ, D.J.R.A.; Kallenberg, Cees; VANDEPUTTE, L.B.A.

    1994-01-01

    The records of 46 patients with anti-(U1)snRNP antibodies and a minimal period of follow-up after first clinical presentation of at least 5 yr were examined with emphasis on symptoms contributing to established criteria of SLE, systemic sclerosis (SSc), RA or dermato- or polymyositis (DM/PM). At fir

  11. Recommendations for assessment, monitoring and follow-up of patients with haemophilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Moerloose, P.; Fischer, K.; Lambert, T.; Windyga, J.; Batorova, A.; Lavigne-Lissalde, G.; Rocino, A.; Astermark, J.; Hermans, C.

    2012-01-01

    . Over the last few decades, clinical follow-up of patients with haemophilia has become more complex as a result of the introduction of new treatment strategies, the presence of comorbidities related to haemophilia or ageing, as well as the emergence of new tools to evaluate the medical and social c

  12. Follow-up of combined intervention for patients with both renal and cerebral artery stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Xiao-xi; SUN Yu-heng

    2006-01-01

    @@ Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is a frequently overlooked clinical entity that can cause uncontrolled hypertension and lead to a progressive deterioration of renal function.1 We observed 20 patients with RAS complicated with cerebral artery stenosis (CAS), who underwent cerebral and renal artery angiography and combined intervening treatment. Clinical follow-up was performed for more than 3 years.

  13. Maximal aneurysm diameter follow-up is inadequate after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, JJ; Blankensteijn, JD; Mali, WPTM; Eikelboom, BC

    2000-01-01

    Background: follow-up after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EAR) generally consists of serial diameter measurements. A size change after EAR, however, is the consequence of alterations of the excluded aneurysm sac volume. Objective: to assess the agreement between diameter measurement

  14. Fifteen-Year Follow-Up of Thyroid Status in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasher, V.; Ninan, S.; Haque, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The natural history of thyroid function in adults with Down syndrome is relatively unknown with limited long-term follow-up data. Method: This study investigated annual thyroid function tests in 200 adults with Down syndrome over a 15-year period. Results: For healthy adults with Down syndrome there is a gradual increase in thyroxine…

  15. Long-term follow-up of cancer patients treated with gene therapy medicinal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Maria Cristina

    2012-06-01

    European Union requirements are discussed for the long-term follow-up of advanced therapy medicinal products, as well as how they can be applied to cancer patients treated with gene therapy medicinal products in the context of clinical trials, as described in a specific guideline issued by Gene Therapy Working Party at the European Medicine Agency.

  16. 12-Month Follow-Up of Fluoxetine and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Crosby, Ross D.; Wilson, G. Terence; Masheb, Robin M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The longer term efficacy of medication treatments for binge-eating disorder (BED) remains unknown. This study examined the longer term effects of fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) either with fluoxetine (CBT + fluoxetine) or with placebo (CBT + placebo) for BED through 12-month follow-up after completing treatments.…

  17. Radiofrequency ablation of chondroblastoma: procedure technique, clinical and MR imaging follow up of four cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie-Large, M.; Evans, N.; Davies, A.M.; James, S.L.J. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study is to describe the procedure technique, clinical and imaging outcomes of patients treated with radiofrequency ablation for chondroblastoma. Four patients (female/male, 3:1; mean age, 13 years; age range; 9-16 years) underwent the procedure. All had pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and symptomatic, biopsy-proven chondroblastomas (two proximal femur, two proximal tibia). The lesion size ranged from 1.5 to 2.5 cm in maximal dimension (mean size, 1.8 cm). Bone access was gained with a Bonopty biopsy needle system (mean number of radiofrequency needle placements, 5; mean ablation time, 31 min). Clinical and MRI follow-up was available in all cases (mean, 12.25 months; range, 5-18 months). All patients reported resolution of symptoms at 2-6 weeks post ablation. At their most recent clinical follow-up, three patients remained completely asymptomatic with full return to normal activities and one patient had minor local discomfort (different pain pattern) that was not limiting activity. All four patients' follow-up MRI studies demonstrated resolution of the oedema pattern around the lesion and temporal evolution of the internal signal characteristics with fatty replacement. Radiofrequency ablation for chondroblastoma provides an alternative to surgical curettage, and we have demonstrated both a clinical improvement in symptoms and the follow-up MRI appearances. (orig.)

  18. Long-term follow-up of indolent mastocytosis in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kors, JW; VanDoormaal, JJ; Breukelman, H; Vader, PCV; DeMonchy, JGR

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the natural course of indolent mastocytosis in adults. Design. A retrospective long-term follow-up study. Setting. The Department of Endocrinology of a University Hospital. Patients. Sixteen adult patients with a diagnosis of indolent mastocytosis and sufficient biochemical da

  19. {sup 3}He-MRI in follow-up of lung transplant recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gast, Klaus Kurt; Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian; Biedermann, Alexander; Knitz, Frank; Eberle, Balthasar; Schmiedeskamp, Joerg; Heussel, Claus-Peter; Mayer, Eckhard; Schreiber, Wolfgang Guenter; Thelen, Manfred; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131, Mainz (Germany)

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible contribution of {sup 3}He-MRI to detect obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) in the follow-up of lung transplant recipients. Nine single- and double-lung transplanted patients were studied by an initial and a follow-up {sup 3}He-MRI study. Images were evaluated subjectively by estimation of ventilation defect area and quantitatively by individually adapted threshold segmentation and subsequent calculation of ventilated lung volume. Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) was diagnosed using pulmonary function tests. At {sup 3}He-MRI, OB was suspected if ventilated lung volume had decreased by 10% or more at the follow-up MRI study compared with the initial study. General accordance between pulmonary function testing and {sup 3}He-MRI was good, although subjective evaluation of {sup 3}He-MRI underestimated improvement in ventilation as obtained by pulmonary function tests. The {sup 3}He-MRI indicated OB in 6 cases. According to pulmonary function tests, BOS was diagnosed in 5 cases. All diagnoses of BOS were also detected by {sup 3}He-MRI. In 2 of these 5 cases, {sup 3}He-MRI indicated OB earlier than pulmonary function tests. The results support the hypothesis that {sup 3}He-MRI may be sensitive for early detection of OB and emphasize the need for larger prospective follow-up studies. (orig.)

  20. Premarital Cohabitation vs. Traditional Courtship and Subsequent Marital Adjustment: A Replication and Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roy E. L.; DeMeo, Peter W.

    1987-01-01

    Replicated earlier study of couples in first year of marriage. Conducted follow-up study of couples in fourth year of marriage who had participated in original or replication studies. Concludes that premarital relationships of the couples, whether cohabitation or traditional courtship, does not appear to have had long-term effect on marital…

  1. Subjective quality of life in first-episode psychosis. A ten year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardsjord, Erlend Strand; Romm, Kristin Lie; Friis, Svein;

    2016-01-01

    patients with a first episode psychotic disorder was included from 1997 through 2000. At 10year follow-up 186 patients participated. QoL was measured by the Lehman's Quality of Life Interview. Linear mixed model analyses were performed to investigate longitudinal effects of baseline psychiatric symptoms...

  2. A Comparison of Community College Responders and Nonresponders to the VEDS Student Follow-Up Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carifio, James; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of respondents and nonrespondents to the Vocational Education Data System's follow-up survey of Massachusetts community college graduates was designed to measure response bias. The survey investigated employment patterns, wages, and degree of job relatedness. Results suggest original data was biased, if at all, toward underestimation, not…

  3. Smith-Petersen Vitallium mould arthroplasty: a 62-year follow-up.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baker, J F

    2011-09-01

    A variety of materials were used for early hip prostheses. The introduction of Vitallium by Smith-Petersen represented a further advance in this surgical field. We present the longest known follow-up of a Smith-Petersen Vitallium mould arthroplasty.

  4. Importance of post-treatment follow-up to secure sufficient eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roug, Stine; Madsen, Lone Galmstrup

    2012-01-01

    To optimize the care for Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, we wanted to evaluate the completeness of follow-up after H. pylori eradication therapy in a single Danish endoscopy unit. Furthermore, the eradication rates and possible clinical characteristics associated with failure...

  5. Long-term Follow-up with AlloDerm in Breast Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Baxter, MD, FACS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Little is known about the long-term fate of acellular dermal matrices in breast implant surgery. A 12-year follow-up case with tissue analysis of AlloDerm in revision breast reconstruction reveals retention of graft volume and integration with an organized collagen structure, minimal capsule formation, and little or no indication of inflammation.

  6. Research Update: Two-Year Follow-up Report for the Wilderness Therapy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Berman, Jennifer; Berman, Dene S.

    1994-01-01

    Follow-up surveys of 23 adolescent participants in the Wilderness Therapy Program examined self-efficacy, behavioral symptoms, and locus of control at 4 months, 1 year, and 2 years after the program. Results suggest a regression to pretest levels at 4 months, with a return to the original posttest change levels at 1 and 2 years. (Author/SV)

  7. Reasons for women's non-participation in follow-up screening after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jane Hyldgaard; Olesen, Christinna Rebecca; Kristiansen, Tine Mechlenborg;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Due to the increased risk of type 2 diabetes, follow-up screening after birth is recommended to women with previous gestational diabetes. Low participation in such screening has been shown to delay detection of diabetes with potentially serious consequences for the women's future health...

  8. Socioeconomic position and participation in baseline and follow-up visits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Anne M; Jørgensen, Torben; Hansen, Bodil Helbech;

    2012-01-01

    of IHD were invited to follow-up visits after 1, 3, and 5 years.Methods:Data on five socioeconomic factors were retrieved from nationwide registers. For each socioeconomic factor we estimated the relative risks and relative index of inequality of participation at the baseline visit and among high...

  9. Mortality in parents after death of a child in Denmark: A nationwide follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiong; Precht, Dorthe Hansen; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the effect of parental bereavement on physical health. We investigated whether the death of a child increased mortality in parents. METHODS: We undertook a follow-up study based on national registers. From 1980 to 1996, we enrolled 21062 parents in Denmark who ha...

  10. Premature thelarche: a follow up study of 40 girls. Natural history and endocrine findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquino, A M; Tebaldi, L; Cioschi, L; Cives, C; Finocchi, G; Maciocci, M; Mancuso, G; Boscherini, B

    1985-01-01

    Follow up of 40 girls with premature thelarche showed that where this disorder occurred before age 2 years it usually regressed completely, thus representing a transient and isolated phenomenon. Premature thelarche after age 2 years persisted more frequently, however, and represented the first sign of sexual development, generally leading to simple early puberty. PMID:4091585

  11. Loneliness, Social Networks, and Mortality: 18 Years of Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iecovich, Esther; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Stessman, Jochanan

    2011-01-01

    We examined the influence of changes in loneliness and social support networks upon mortality during 18 years of follow-up among an elderly cohort and determined the gender-specific nature of this relationship. The study is based on data collected from the Jerusalem Longitudinal Study (1990-2008), which has followed a representative sample of 605…

  12. Follow-up of a Case of Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy Over an 8-year Period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shizhou Huang; Lezheng Wu; Feng Wen; Guangwei Luo; Futian Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To show the follow-up of a case of vitelliform mac-ular dystrophy with morphological and visual functional tests over an 8-year period. Methods:.Retrospective review of medical records..The mor-phological examination included color photography,.fluores-cein angiography, and ocular coherence tomography (OCT). The visual functional tests included visual acuity, electro-ocu-logram (EOG) and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). The patient was observed for 8 years, from 2003 to 2011. Results:.During the follow-up,.the improvement of sensory retinal detachment and reduction of yellow-white deposit were observed with color photography and fluorescein angiography. OCT revealed a decrease in sensory retinal detachment and subretinal hyper-reflective deposits; both of these morphologi-cal changes were correspondent. Visual acuity was maintained throughout the follow-up..The Arden ratio of EOG was de-creased. The amplitudes of mfERG were decreased but slightly increased during the follow-up. Conclusion:.The retinal morphological changes and visual function slightly improved in this case of vitelliform macu-lopathy. The prognosis is good. (Eye Science 2014; 29:165-169)

  13. Teacher Education Program Evaluation and Follow-Up Studies: A Collection of Current Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, Shirley M., Ed.; Hall, Gene E., Ed.

    Presented is a collection of papers which describe follow-up studies designed to evaluate the effectiveness of some teacher education programs at six colleges and universities. Institutions represented are Western Kentucky University, Weber State College, University of Oregon, The Ohio State University, Tennessee Technological University, and the…

  14. Characteristics and follow-up of postmarketing studies of conditionally authorized medicines in the EU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekman, Jarno; Klamer, Thea T.; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K.; Leufkens, Hubert G M; De Bruin, Marie L.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to provide an insight into the characteristics and follow-up of postmarketing studies of medicines that were conditionally authorized in the European Union (EU). Methods: We compiled a list of all postmarketing studies attached as specific obligations to the lic

  15. A medical follow-up of 137 Cs Goiania radiation accident: un update (1990-1992)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao-Mello, Carlos Eduardo; Oliveira, Alexandre Rodrigues de [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Farina, Rosana [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil SA, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    The aim of this paper is to describe the main aftereffects of the 137 Cs accident in the last two years, giving emphasis on clinical, hematological, radiological and psychological aspects. A medical follow-up protocol was established by CNEN and the Leide das Neves Ferreira Foundation of the State of Goias, in order to prospectively follow more than 150 victims. (author). 6 refs.

  16. Early rheumatoid arthritis, personality and psychological status : A follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, B; Sanderman, R; Suurmeijer, T; Doeglas, D; Van Sonderen, E; Van Rijswijk, M; Van Leeuwen, M; Van den Heuvel, W

    1998-01-01

    This article presents results from a follow-up study in the Netherlands among 292 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The main focus of this paper is on (changes in) personality characteristics, coping strategies and psychological status between the first and second wave (T1 and T2). On p

  17. The oral rehabilitation and 5 years follow up of a patient with prepubertal periodontitis- one case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelal Seyfioglu Polat

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Ethiologic, pathogenetic and host factors definition and classifications ofperiodontal diseases are done in many studies till nowadays. To regard these studiesprepubertal periodontitis is defined as early onset periodontitis.In our study it is aimed to present the treatment results of of apatient who isdiagnosed with prepubertal periodontitis, treated and followed up for five years.

  18. Mortality in myasthenia gravis: A nationwide population-based follow-up study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Julie S; Danielsen, Ditte H; Somnier, Finn E;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In previous studies of myasthenia gravis (MG), increased mortality has been reported. The aim of this study was to estimate mortality in patients with acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive (AChR-Ab-seropositive) MG in a nationwide population-based, long-term follow-up study...

  19. Predictors of changes in sick leave in workers with asthma: a follow-up study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, C.R.L.; Vercoulen, J.H.M.M.; Gulden, J.W.J. van der; Orbon, K.H.; Rooijackers, J.; Weel, C. van; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this prospective study was to investigate predictors of 1-year changes in sick leave in workers with asthma. METHODS: The initial cohort consisted of 111 workers with asthma. One-hundred and one participants completed the follow-up after 1 year. Self-reported sick leave over th

  20. Transition Follow-Up System Development for Youth with Disabilities: Stakeholders' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youn-Young

    2014-01-01

    In this study I examined in depth the perspectives of stakeholders in Manitoba on the development and implementation of a transition follow-up system (TFS) for youth with disabilities. I conducted focus groups and individual interviews with a total of 76 stakeholders and obtained qualitative data. The stakeholders who participated in this study…

  1. Pulmonary nodule follow-up : be careful with volumetry between contrast enhanced and unenhanced CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohamed Hoesein, Firdaus A; Bülbül, Metin; de Jong, Pim A

    2016-01-01

    Incident pulmonary nodules are a frequent finding on chest computed tomography (CT) of the lungs requiring follow-up. This case illustrates the importance of taking differences in CT scanning techniques (contrast versus non-contrast enhanced) into account. Comparing nodule size on unenhanced follow-

  2. Cessation of smoking after first-ever stroke: a follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Søren; Sindrup, Søren Hein; Alslev, Torben;

    2002-01-01

    and at follow-up were included in the present study. Among 198 patients (38.7%) who were current smokers on admission, 43 patients (21.7%) gave up smoking within 6 months of suffering a stroke. Sex, functional status, and sociodemographic characteristics were independently associated with persistent smoking...

  3. [Colonoscopy in the long-term follow-up of surgical anastomoses of the large intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, F P; Ferrari, A; Roatta, L; Presti, F; Boido, C

    1976-10-15

    On the bases of personal experience the importance of endoscopic examination of the colon in the follow-up of patients who have been subjected to resection of the large intestine is emphasized. Fibercoloscopy permits direct observation of "high" surgical anastomoses, which are inaccessible for examination with rigid rectosigmoidoscope, and thus opens the way to precise diagnosis and a correct therapeutic approach.

  4. Dr. Leary's Concord Prison Experiment: a 34-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doblin, R

    1998-01-01

    This study is a long-term follow-up to the Concord Prison Experiment, one of the best-known studies in the psychedelic psychotherapy literature. The Concord Prison Experiment was conducted from 1961 to 1963 by a team of researchers at Harvard University under the direction of Timothy Leary. The original study involved the administration of psilocybin-assisted group psychotherapy to 32 prisoners in an effort to reduce recidivism rates. This follow-up study involved a search through the state and federal criminal justice system records of 21 of the original 32 subjects, as well as personal interviews with two of the subjects and three of the researchers: Timothy Leary, Ralph Metzner and Gunther Weil. The results of the follow-up study indicate that published claims of a treatment effect were erroneous. This follow-up study supports the emphasis in the original reports on the necessity of embedding psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy with inmates within a comprehensive treatment plan that includes post-release, nondrug group support programs. Despite substantial efforts by the experimental team to provide post-release support, these services were not made sufficiently available to the subjects in this study. Whether a new program of psilocybin-assisted group psychotherapy and post-release programs would significantly reduce recidivism rates is an empirical question that deserves to be addressed within the context of a new experiment.

  5. CT-follow-up-studies in neurocysticercosis during praziquantel-therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, A.; Aulich, A.; Hammer, B.

    1987-05-01

    Praziquanteltherapy has produced a much better prognosis in neurocysticercosis since 1980. The computertomographic findings and follow-up study in 4 patients with neurocysticercosis before and after praziquanteltherapy are described. The special difficulties of differential diagnosis and further diagnostic procedures are discussed in cases in which calcifications are absent and only solitary foci can be found.

  6. Predictors of ADHD Persistence in Girls at 5-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, Eric; Byrne, Deirdre; Fried, Ronna; Monuteaux, Michael; Faraone, Stephen V.; Biederman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to examine the age-dependent remission from ADHD in girls transitioning through childhood into adolescence and early adulthood. Method: We conducted a 5-year prospective follow-up study of 123 girls with ADHD and 106 non-ADHD control girls aged between 6 and 17 years at ascertainment. ADHD was considered…

  7. Loss to follow up did not bias associations between early life factors and adult depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Kriegbaum, Margit; Christensen, Ulla;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examines the consequences of nonresponse in a follow-up survey for the associations of early life factors with adult depression. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A cohort of 11,532 Danish men born in 1953 had nearly complete follow up for outcomes retrieved from the Danish Psychiat...... of this nonresponse on the estimated ORs was small, and all ROR were nonsignificant. CONCLUSION: Although early life characteristics were related to response in a follow-up survey, the ORs for the exposure-risk associations were not biased by nonresponse....... characteristics and four measures of depression were described by odd ratios (OR), estimated by logistic regression. For the register-based measures the effect of nonresponse was described by a relative OR(OR(responders)/OR(entire cohort)=ROR). RESULTS: Nonresponse at 50 years of age was related to having...... a single mother at birth, low educational attainment at age 18, and low cognitive function at ages 12 and 18. Hospitalizations for depression and having claimed a prescription for an antidepressive drug were also most frequent among men who did not respond in the follow up. However, the effect...

  8. Behavioural treatment of trichotillomania : two-year follow-up results : predictors of treatment outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, G.P.J.; Minnen, A. van; Hoogduin, C.A.L.; Klaassen, B.N.W.; Hendriks, G.J.; Tanis-Jacobs, J.

    2006-01-01

    Post-treatment evaluation studies of behaviour therapy (BT) for trichotillomania (TTM) have shown that BT is successful in reducing symptoms in this impulse-control disorder. The present study was aimed at investigating gain maintenance at long-term follow-up. TTM-related symptoms and other symptom

  9. Sierra Leone's Former Child Soldiers: A Follow-Up Study of Psychosocial Adjustment and Community Reintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Theresa Stichick; Borisova, Ivelina Ivanova; Williams, Timothy Philip; Brennan, Robert T.; Whitfield, Theodore H.; de la Soudiere, Marie; Williamson, John; Gilman, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    This is the first prospective study to investigate psychosocial adjustment in male and female former child soldiers (ages 10-18; n = 156, 12% female). The study began in Sierra Leone in 2002 and was designed to examine both risk and protective factors in psychosocial adjustment. Over the 2-year period of follow-up, youth who had wounded or killed…

  10. Emetic and Electric Shock Alcohol Aversion Therapy: Six- and Twelve-Month Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Dale S.; Baker, Timothy B.

    1981-01-01

    Follow-up data are presented for 6- and 12-months on male alcoholics (N=20) who received either a multifaceted inpatient alcoholism treatment program alone (controls) or emetic or shock aversion therapy in addition to that program. Both emetic and control subjects compiled more days of abstinence than shock subjects. (Author)

  11. Pemphigus with characteristics of dermatitis herpetiformis. A long-term follow-up of five patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, A; Feuerman, E J

    1986-11-01

    Five patients had a form of pemphigus which in its early stages resembled dermatitis herpetiform, although the immunofluorescent findings were typical of pemphigus. Potassium iodide tests, performed for the first time in such patients, showed positive results in two patients. Follow-ups ranging from 5 to 14 years have shown a benign course with low to absent dosages of steroids.

  12. Measurements of Wide Tycho Double Stars in Orion - Follow Up Canis Minor and Columba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Ross; Knapp, Wilfried

    2016-10-01

    As follow up to our report "Visual Observation and Measurements of some Tycho Double Stars" we decided to have a look at some more wider TDS objects in other constellations but to replace the hapless visual observation task by counterchecking with existing Sky Survey images

  13. Intranasal LH-RH treatment of cryptorchidism. A clinical trial and 5 years follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Mauritzen, K; Skakkebaek, N E

    1987-01-01

    The effect of intranasal LH-RH on cryptorchidism was investigated in 45 prepubertal boys with 68 undescended testes. A daily dose of 1.2 mg LH-RH was given for 4 weeks. A total of 16 testes (24%) descended. Follow-up examination 5 years later showed that relapse had occurred in two cases. Fifty-t...

  14. Ulnar neuropathy at the elbow - Follow-up and prognostic factors determining outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, R; Wokke, JHJ; Schoemaker, MC; Lee, ML; Visser, LH

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the outcome in patients with ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE) treated surgically or conservatively, and the prognostic value of clinical, sonographic, and electrophysiologic features. Methods: After a median follow-up of 14 months, 69 of 84 patients initially included in a

  15. Quantitative muscle ultrasonography in the follow-up of juvenile dermatomyositis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habers, G.E.; Brussel, M. Van; Bhansing, K.J.; Hoppenreijs, E.P.A.H.; Janssen, A.J.; Royen-Kerkhof, A. Van; Pillen, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We explored the use of quantitative muscle ultrasonography (QMUS) for follow-up of juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). METHODS: Seven JDM patients were evaluated at diagnosis and 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months using the Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale (CMAS) and QMUS. Muscle thickness (MT)

  16. Pulmonary function and autoantibodies in a long-term follow-up of juvenile dermatomyositis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Pernille Raasthøj; Buchvald, Frederik Fouirnaies; Nielsen, Kim G

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Pulmonary disease is a rare complication in JDM, described in only a few studies. This long-term follow-up study aimed to (i) describe pulmonary involvement in a national cohort of JDM patients estimated by conventional spirometry, (ii) compare pulmonary impairment with overall JDM ou...

  17. QUANTITATIVE MUSCLE ULTRASONOGRAPHY IN THE FOLLOW-UP OF JUVENILE DERMATOMYOSITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habers, G. Esther A.; van Brussel, Marco; Bhansing, Kavish J.; Hoppenreijs, Esther P.; Janssen, Anjo J. W. M.; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Pillen, Sigrid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We explored the use of quantitative muscle ultrasonography (QMUS) for follow-up of juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Methods: Seven JDM patients were evaluated at diagnosis and 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months using the Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale (CMAS) and QMUS. Muscle thickness (MT)

  18. Long-term cardiac follow-up in survivors of a malignant bone tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, C. A. J.; Gietema, J. A.; van den Berg, M. P.; Bink-Boelkens, M. T. E.; Elzenga, N. J.; Haaksma, J.; Kamps, W. A.; Vonk, J. M.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Postma, A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Longitudinal studies of cardiac function in long-term childhood cancer survivors are scarce and frequently concern a median follow-up shorter than 13 years. Patients and methods: Cardiac assessment was performed in 22 doxorubicin-treated long-term survivors of a malignant bone tumour at

  19. A Four-Year Follow-Up Study of Underachieving College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valine, Warren J.

    1976-01-01

    A four-year follow-up study of underachieving college freshmen measured changes in the self-concept of those still in college and those who had dropped out. Significant differences generally favored college seniors. Findings also indicate that dropping out of college may be a positive experience. (Author)

  20. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1356 - Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Populations C Appendix C to Part 1356 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE... Follow-Up Populations 1. Using Finite Population Correction The Finite Population Correction (FPC) is applied when the sample is drawn from a population of one to 5,000 youth, because the sample is more...

  1. 77 FR 69896 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Follow-Up...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ...; Follow-Up Survey Information for Green Jobs and Health Care Impact Evaluation, American Recovery... Survey Information for Green Jobs and Health Care Impact Evaluation, American Recovery Reinvestment Act... Information for Green Jobs and Health ] Care Impact Evaluation, American Recovery Reinvestment Act Grants....

  2. Employer Follow-Up Survey: Employer Assessment of 1983-84 Forest Park Graduates. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapraun, E. Daniel; Nienkamp, Roger L.

    An employer follow-up study was conducted to gather information from the employers of 1983-84 graduates of St. Louis Community College at Forest Park regarding the preparation and performance of these graduates. A previous survey of the 1983-84 graduates had identified 221 of their employers, who were mailed a questionnaire asking for ratings of…

  3. Cervical involvement in SAPHO syndrome: imaging findings with a 10-year follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohme-Noun, C.; Krainik, A.; Menu, Y. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Beaujon, AP HP, Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Bichat-Beaujon, Paris (France); Feydy, A. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Beaujon, AP HP, Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Bichat-Beaujon, Paris (France); Department of Radiology, Hopital Beaujon, 100 avenue du General Leclerc, 92118, Clichy (France); Belmatoug, N.; Fantin, B. [Department of Internal Medicine, Hopital Beaujon, AP HP, Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Bichat-Beaujon, Paris (France)

    2003-02-01

    Osteoarticular manifestations of SAPHO syndrome include vertebral lesions, typically in the thoracic segment. Chronic inflammatory changes are well depicted by MRI. We report the imaging findings with a 10-year follow-up in a case of SAPHO syndrome with marked cervical lesions. (orig.)

  4. Is symptom-oriented follow-up still up to date?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhenke, Christoph; Moebus, Volker

    2013-10-01

    The main objective of following patients after the primary treatment of breast cancer is the detection of potentially curable events, particularly the detection of local recurrences and contralateral breast cancer. Additionally, medical counseling on therapies, psychosocial aspects, side effects of therapies, and lifestyle interventions is important to improve the quality of life. There is an ongoing discussion about whether early detection of asymptomatic metastasis could improve the course of disease. Today, the follow-up is still symptom-orientated. Intensified imaging and laboratory check-ups have not been beneficial for the patients' survival. A follow-up in the first 2-3 years is recommended every 3 months. Because of the decreasing incidence of recurrence from year 4, 6-monthly screening intervals are recommended. The screening should include a history, physical examination, and a consultation. Routine diagnostic imaging - except for mammography/ultrasound - is not indicated in asymptomatic patients. Innovative therapies for patients with metastatic breast cancer have been introduced. Therefore, measures of an intensified follow-up could change in the future as novel endocrine combination or targeted therapies in molecular subtypes could significantly improve the survival in early detected metastasis. In the future, more individualized follow-up programs are conceivable. However, this idea is so far not supported by the available data.

  5. Sex Differences in Stroke Survival: 10-Year Follow-up of the Copenhagen Stroke Study Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Nonboe; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2005-01-01

    the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (0-58); computed tomography determined stroke type. A risk factor profile was obtained for all including ischemic heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Date of death was obtained within a 10-year follow-up...

  6. Sex differences in stroke survival: 10-year follow-up of the Copenhagen stroke study cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Nonboe; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2005-01-01

    the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (0-58); computed tomography determined stroke type. A risk factor profile was obtained for all including ischemic heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Date of death was obtained within a 10-year follow-up...

  7. Effects of Stimulant Medication on Growth Rates across 3 Years in the MTA Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, James M.; Elliott, Glen R.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Wigal, Timothy; Arnold, L. Eugene; Vitiello, Benedetto; Hechtman, Lily; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Pelham, William E.; Abikoff, Howard B.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Wells, Karen C.; Hoza, Betsy; Jensen, Peter S.; Gibbons, Robert D.; Hur, Kwan; Stehli, Annamarie; Davies, Mark; March, John S.; Conners, C. Keith; Caron, Mark; Volkow, Nora D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hypothesis of stimulant medication effect on physical growth in the follow-up phase of the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children With ADHD. Method: Naturalistic subgroups were established based on patterns of treatment with stimulant medication at baseline, 14-, 24-, and 36-month assessments: not medicated (n = 65),…

  8. Panoramic imaging is not suitable for quantitative evaluation, classification, and follow up in unilateral condylar hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte, J.W.; Karssemakers, L.H.E.; Grootendorst, D.C.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Becking, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with suspected unilateral condylar hyperplasia are often screened radiologically with a panoramic radiograph, but this is not sufficient for routine diagnosis and follow up. We have therefore made a quantitative analysis and evaluation of panoramic radiographs in a large group of patients w

  9. Implant-based rehabilitation of a large mandibular odontogenic keratocyst with 7-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janardan B Garde

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic keratocyst is a unique cyst because of its locally aggressive behavior, high recurrence rate, and characteristic histological appearance. In this case report we present a 25-year-old male patient with a large odontogenic keratocyst and treatment with enucleation and chemical cauterization followed by dental implants with a 7-year follow-up.

  10. Psychopathy, Treatment Behavior, and Recidivism: An Extended Follow-Up of Seto and Barbaree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaree, Howard E.

    2005-01-01

    Seto and Barbaree reported the unexpected finding that adult male sex offenders who scored higher on psychopathy and exhibited better behavior in treatment were almost four times more likely to commit a new serious offence than other offenders once released. The present study reexamined this sample after a longer follow-up time using more complete…

  11. Evolution of Costs of Inflammatory Bowel Disease over Two Years of Follow-Up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, Mirthe E; Mangen, Marie-Josée J; Severs, Mirjam; van der Have, Mike; Dijkstra, Gerard; van Bodegraven, Ad A; Fidder, Herma H; de Jong, Dirk J; van der Woude, C Janneke; Romberg-Camps, Mariëlle J L; Clemens, Cees H M; Jansen, Jeroen M; van de Meeberg, Paul C; Mahmmod, Nofel; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; Bolwerk, Clemens; Vermeijden, J Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D; Leenders, Max; Oldenburg, Bas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With the increasing use of anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a shift of costs has been observed with medication costs replacing hospitalization and surgery as major cost driver. We aimed to explore the evolution of IBD-related costs over two years of follow-up. METHOD

  12. An Evaluation of an Innovative Drug Education Program: Follow-Up Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Joel M.; And Others

    This study provides a follow-up assessment of an innovative drug education program for seventh and eighth graders. Students learned Lasswell's framework for understanding human needs and motives, a systematic decision-making procedure, and information about the pharmacological, psychological, and social consequences of licit and illicit drug use.…

  13. Determining the rate of follow-up after hospital emergency department visits for dental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Beau Meyer,1,2 Eric Adkins,3,4 Nathan M Finnerty,4 Fonda G Robinson5 1Division of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 2Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 3The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Department, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, 5Clinic Administration and Patient Care, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Background: Emergency department (ED visits for dental reasons continue to impact EDs nationwide. This investigation determined the rate of follow-up in an emergency dental clinic (EDC after hospital ED visits for nontraumatic dental conditions. Methods: This prospective investigation reports the number of patients who presented to an ED for nontraumatic dental conditions and the rate of follow-up at an EDC. Upon ED discharge, patients were provided instructions to follow-up for low-cost care at the EDC. Telephone contact was attempted following failed referrals. Descriptive statistics were reported for comparing referral sources and demographic trends. Results: Two hundred and forty-seven referrals were made and 31% followed up for definitive treatment at the EDC. More referrals were made on weekends than on weekdays. Failed referrals were unreachable by telephone in 75% of cases. Tooth extraction was the most common treatment rendered in the EDC. Of the ED patients who accessed EDC care, 14% became comprehensive patients in the EDC's regular dental clinic. Conclusion: Less than one-third of ED referrals to the EDC followed up for definitive care when provided an opportunity to do so, and 75% of referrals were unreachable by telephone in the week following the ED dental visit. Keywords: emergencies, dental health services, health services accessibility, access to care, dental emergency treatment

  14. MR findings of neuro-Behcet's disease: initial and follow-up changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Beom; Chang, Ki Hyun; Kim, Hong Dae [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Moon Hee; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Joon Woo; Yu, In Kyu [College of Medicine and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Su Ok [Cheonju St. Mary' s Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Seok [Cheju Medical Center, Cheju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-08-01

    To evaluate the MR findings of neuro{sub B}ehcet's disease, and changes occurring during follow up. Brain MR imaging was performed in 19 patients in whom neuro-Behcet's disease had been clinically diagnosed. After treatment with corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents, 23 follow-up MR images were obtained in 12 patients, and a total of 42 MR images were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists. Of the 19 patients, 17 (89%) had parenchymal lesions, and the other two had dural venous sinus thrombosis. Among the 17 patients with parenchymal lesions, three showed leptomeningeal enhancement. A total of 72 parenchymal lesions were detected on initial MR images; 55 (76%) were patchy or nodular in shape and the lesion of the internal capsule appeared linear. Seventeen lesions (24%) in 12 patients were confluent. In order of frequency, the involved sites were the pons, midbrain, thalamus, basal ganglia, internal capsule, and frontal lobe. Thirteen lesions of 39 lesions detected on postcontrast images were enhanced, and a mass effect was seen in the area of 16 parenchymal lesions. Associated findings were microhemorrhage of the brain in two patients and spinal cord involvement in one. On short-term follow-up images obtained 1 week to 2 months after intensive treatment during the acute stage of the illness, the leptomeningeal enhancement seen in three patients had decreased and most parenchymal lesions showed improvement. Long-term follow-up images obtained 3 months to 3 years late showed that parenchymal lesions had relapsed in five patients, and brainstem atrophy had developed or progressed in five others. The most characteristic MR finding of neuro-Behcet's disease is multiple non-hemorrhagic lesions involving the brainstem. Leptomeningeal enhancement and dural venous sinus thrombosis may also be noted. On follow-up MR, the lesions may show either improvement or aggravation, and brainstem atrophy is not uncommon. (author)

  15. Four-year follow-up of endoscopic gastroplication for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthijs; P; Schwartz; J; Rieneke; C; Schreinemakers; André; J; P; M; Smout

    2013-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the long-term effect of Endocinch treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease(GERD).METHODS:After unblinding and crossover,50 patients(32 males,18 females; mean age 46 years) with pH-proven chronic GERD were recruited from an initial randomized,placebo-controlled,single-center study,and included in the present prospective open-label follow-up study.Initially,three gastroplications using the Endocinch device were placed under deep sedation in a standardized manner.Optional retreatment was offered in the first year with 1 or 2 extra gastroplications.At baseline,3 mo after(re) treatment and yearly proton pump inhibitor(PPI) use,GERD symptoms,quality of life(QoL) scores,adverse events and treatment failures(defined as:patients using > 50% of their baseline PPI dose or receiving alternative antireflux therapy) were assessed.Intention-to-treat analysis was performed.RESULTS:Median follow-up was 48 mo [interquartile range(IQR):38-52].Three patients were lost to follow-up.In 44% of patients retreatment was done after a median of 4 mo(IQR:3-8).No serious adverse events occurred.At the end of follow-up,symptom scores and4 out of 6 QoL subscales were improved(all P < 0.01compared to baseline).However,80% of patients required PPIs for their GERD symptoms.Ultimately,64% of patients were classified as treatment failures.In 60% a post-procedural endoscopy was carried out,of which in 16% reflux esophagitis was diagnosed.CONCLUSION:In the 4-year follow-up period,the subset of GERD patients that benefit from endoscopic gastroplication kept declining gradually,nearly half opted for retreatment and 80% required PPIs eventually.

  16. Neuro-Behcet's disease: initial and follow-up MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Sung; Choi, Sun Seob; Lee, Ha Jong; Ha, Dong Ho; Lee, Yong Il [Donga Medical Center, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate initial and follow-up MR imaging(MRI) findings of neuro-Behcet's disease. MRI of seven clinically diagnosed cases of neuro-Behcet's disease were retrospectively analysed in terms of involved site, pattern, signal intensity, contrast enhancement pattern and changes seen on follow-up. Using a 0.35T or 1.0T unit T2-and T1-weighted spin-echocontrast-enhanced images were obtained in six patients. Follow-up MRI after steroid therapy lastion between two weeks and 16 months was performed in six patients. Lesions involved the midbrain(6/7), pons(5/7), thalamus(4/7), medulla oblongata(3/7), tegmentum(3/7), internal capsule(3/7), middle cerebellar peduncle(2/7), dentate nucleus(1/7), basal ganglia(1/7) and temporal lobe(1/7). They were 1-3cm in size, and their shape was ill-defined and patchy. Inhomogeneous high and low signal-intensity was seen on T2-weighted and T1-weighted images, respectively. In two of six cases there was focal mild patchy enhancement. Euring follow-up lasting for between two weeks and 16 months after steroid therapy, the lesions decreased in extent(n=3D5) or disappeared(n=3D1), and in the brainstem, focal brain atrophy occurred in three cases. Although MRI findings of neuro-Behcet's disease are nonspecific, common involvement of the brainstem, tegmentum and internal capsule, as well as improvement on follow-up MRI, may be helpful diagnostic indicators of this condition.=20.

  17. Vestibular neuronitis in pilots: follow-up results and implications for flight safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupak, Avi; Nachum, Zohar; Stern, Yoram; Tal, Dror; Gil, Amnon; Gordon, Carlos R

    2003-02-01

    OBJECTIVES To report our experience over the past 12 years with the evaluation and follow-up of pilots with vestibular neuronitis and to discuss points relevant to flight safety and the resumption of flying duties. STUDY DESIGN A retrospective, consecutive case series.METHODS Eighteen military pilots with vestibular neuronitis were examined and followed up. A complete otoneurological workup was performed, including both physical examination and laboratory evaluation. The latter included electro-oculography (EOG) and a rotatory chair test using the smooth harmonic acceleration protocol. RESULTS The mean patient age was 35 +/- 6 years (range, 23 to 42 y), and the average follow-up period was 20.5 +/- 12.8 months (mean +/- standard deviation [SD]; (range, 11 to 48 mo). Electro-oculography caloric test on presentation documented significant unilateral hypofunction in all patients. Thirteen of the 18 patients (72%) had abnormal smooth harmonic acceleration test results. None of the pilots reported any symptoms on follow-up. However, five (28%) had positive otoneurological examination findings, and eight (44%) still had significant caloric lateralization (>25%). The average caloric hypofunction was reduced from 67.8% +/- 29.3% at onset to 40% +/- 16% (mean +/- SD, vestibular damage on follow-up. In 6 of these 11 cases (55%), the laboratory evaluation revealed vestibular deficits otherwise undiagnosed by the bedside test battery. CONCLUSIONS The vestibular system plays a central role in orientation awareness and is often challenged by flying conditions. The finding that approximately 60% of pilots who have had vestibular neuronitis continue to show signs of vestibular malfunction, despite apparent clinical recovery, emphasizes the need for a complete vestibular evaluation, including specific bedside testing and laboratory examinations, before flying duties can be resumed.

  18. Methods used for successful follow-up in a large scale national cohort study in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chokkanapitak Jaruwan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ensuring successful follow-up is essential when conducting a prospective cohort study. Most existing literature reviewing methods to ensure a high response rate is based on experience in developed nations. Findings We report our 4-year follow-up success for a national cohort study examining the health transition underway in Thailand. We began the cohort study in 2005 with a baseline postal questionnaire sent to all 200,000 Thais enrolled as distance learning students at Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University and residing all over Thailand; 87,134 or 44% of the students responded. Subsequently we used University and national media to inform cohort members of study progress. Also, we prepared a health book with study results and health advice which was distributed to all cohort members. After 4 years we repeated the survey and achieved a 71% response rate. In this paper we report the methods used to achieve this response The initial follow-up mail-out generated a response rate of about 48% reflecting the extensive preparatory work between baseline and follow-up. After 4 rounds of telephone contact (more than 100,000 phone calls and 4 related mail-out rounds progressively over 16 months an overall response rate was achieved of just over 71% (n = 60,774. The total cost was US$4.06/respondent - 19% for printing, 21% for postage, 14% for tape measures (included in mail-out, 18% for data processing 22% for prizes and 6% for telephone. Conclusions Many of the methods reported as effective for mail questionnaire and cohort response rates held true for Thailand. These included being associated with a university, incentivating cooperation, follow-up contact, providing a second copy of questionnaire where necessary, and assurance of confidentiality. Telephone contact with the cohort and the small prizes given to responders were particularly important in the Thai context as was Thai leadership of the research team.

  19. Long term follow-up of a randomised controlled trial of services for urinary symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Nicola J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the extent and priority of urinary symptoms there is little evidence available to inform service provision in relation to the long term effects of interventions. This study aims to determine the long term (6 year clinical effectiveness and costs of a new continence nurse led service compared to standard care for urinary symptoms. Methods A long term follow-up study of a 2-arm, non-blinded randomised controlled trial that recruited from a community based population between 1998-2000 in Leicestershire and Rutland UK was undertaken. 3746 men and women aged 40 years and over were followed up from the original trial. The continence nurse practitioner (CNP intervention comprised a continence service provided by specially trained nurses delivering evidence-based interventions using pre-determined care pathways. The standard care (SC arm comprised access to existing primary care including General Practitioner and continence advisory services in the area. Primary outcome: Improvement in one or more symptom. Secondary outcomes included: a Leicester Impact scale; b patient perception of problem; c number of symptoms alleviated and cost-effectiveness; all were recorded at long term follow-up (average 6 years post-randomisation. Results Overall at long-term follow-up (average 6 years significantly more individuals in the CNP group (72% had improved (i.e had fewer symptoms compared to those in the SC group (67% (difference of 5% 95% (CI = 0.6 to 9;p = 0.02. Conclusion The differences in outcome between the two randomised groups shown immediately post treatment had decreased by half in terms of symptom improvement at long term follow-up. Although the difference was statistically significant, the clinical significance may not be, although the direction of the difference favoured the new CNP service.

  20. One-Year Follow-Up of Patients Undergoing Transvenous Extraction of Pacemaker and Defibrillator Leads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Kempa

    Full Text Available The number of pacemaker and ICD implantations has increased substantially in the recent years. Therefore, complications are also observed in a greater number. In many cases, transvenous extraction of the previously implanted device (pacemaker or ICD is the only solution. One may find in the literature information about the efficacy and safety of that procedure, but data concerning the results of long-term follow up are still limited.The aim of the study was to assess the one-year mortality in the cohort of patients undergoing transvenous lead extraction procedures in our centre.Records of the patients undergoing transvenous lead removal in the Department of Cardiology and Electrotherapy of the Medical University of Gdańsk were analyzed. We collected detailed information about 192 patients that had undergone the procedure from January 2003 until June 2012. Data were collected from medical and surgical records. We analyzed concomitant diseases, indications, and possible complications. Long-term follow-up data were gathered in the follow-up ambulatory records and over-the-phone interviews with patients or families. In several cases, we consulted the database of the Polish National Health Fund.During the early post-operative period 5 patients died, although none of those deaths was associated with the procedure itself. No other major complications were observed. During one-year follow-up other 5 patients died, which gave the overall one-year survival rate of 92.7%. Heart failure, renal failure and an infective indication showed significant association with increased mortality.Results of transvenous lead extraction, a relatively safe procedure, should be assessed over time extending beyond the sole perioperative period. Some complications may be delayed in their nature, and may be observed only during the long-term follow up.

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm: Treatment options, image visualizations and follow-up procedures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Hua Sun

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a common vascular disease that affects elderly population.Open surgical repair is regarded as the gold standard technique for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm,however,endovaseular aneurysm repair has rapidly expanded since its first introduction in 1990s.As a less invasive technique,endovascular aneurysm repair has been confirmed to be an effective alternative to open surgical repair,especially in patients with co-morbid conditions.Computed tomography (CT) angiography is currently the preferred imaging modality for both preoperative planning and post-operative follow-up.2D CT images are complemented by a number of 3D reconstructions which enhance the diagnostic applications of CT angiography in both planning and follow-up of endovascular repair.CT has the disadvantage of high cummulative radiation dose,of particular concern in younger patients,since patients require regular imaging follow-ups after endovascular repair,thus,exposing patients to repeated radiation exposure for life.There is a trend to change from CT to ultrasound surveillance of endovascular aneurysm repair.Medical image visualizations demonstrate excellent morphological assessment of aneurysm and stent-grafts,but fail to provide hemodynamic changes caused by the complex stent-graft device that is implanted into the aorta.This article reviews the treatment options of abdominal aortic aneurysm,various image visualization tools,and follow-up procedures with use of different modalities including both imaging and computational fluid dynamics methods.Future directions to improve treatment outcomes in the follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair are outlined.

  2. Follow Up for Emergency Department Patients After Intravenous Contrast and Risk of Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getaw Worku Hassen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN, defined as an increase in serum creatinine (SCr greater than 25% or ≥0.5 mg/dL within 3 days of intravenous (IV contrast administration in the absence of an alternative cause, is the third most common cause of new acute renal failure in hospitalized patients. It is known to increase in-hospital mortality up to 27%. The purpose of this study was to investigate the rate of outpatient follow up and the occurrence of CIN in patients who presented to the emergency department (ED and were discharged home after computed tomography (CT of the abdomen and pelvis (AP with IV contrast. Methods: We conducted a single center retrospective review of charts for patients who required CT of AP with IV contrast and who were discharged home. Patients’ clinical data included the presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic kidney disease (CKD and congestive heart failure (CHF. Results: Five hundred and thirty six patients underwent CT of AP with IV contrast in 2011 and were discharged home. Diabetes mellitus was documented in 96 patients (18%. Hypertension was present in 141 patients (26.3%, and 82 patients (15.3% were on angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEI. Five patients (0.9% had documented CHF and all of them were taking furosemide. Seventy patients (13% had a baseline SCr >1.2 mg/dL. One hundred fifty patients (28% followed up in one of the clinics or the ED within one week after discharge, but only 40 patients (7.5% had laboratory workup. Out of 40 patients who followed up within 1 week after discharge, 9 patients (22.5% developed CIN. One hundred ninety patients (35.4% followed up in one of the clinics or the ED after 7 days and within 1 month after discharge, but only 71 patients (13.2% had laboratory workup completed. Out of 71 patients who followed up within 1 month, 11 patients (15% developed CIN. The overall incidence of CIN was 15.3% (17 out of 111 patients. Conclusion: There was a

  3. Changes in occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity: a follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahelma Eero

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity is known to have health benefits across population groups. However, less is known about changes over time in socioeconomic differences in leisure-time physical activity and the reasons for the changes. We hypothesised that class differences in leisure-time physical activity would widen over time due to declining physical activity among the lower occupational classes. We examined whether occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity change over time in a cohort of Finnish middle-aged women and men. We also examined whether a set of selected covariates could account for the observed changes. Methods The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study cohort mail surveys; the respondents were 40-60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki at baseline in 2000-2002 (n = 8960, response rate 67%. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to the baseline respondents in 2007 (n = 7332, response rate 83%. The outcome measure was leisure-time physical activity, including commuting, converted to metabolic equivalent tasks (MET. Socioeconomic position was measured by occupational class (professionals, semi-professionals, routine non-manual employees and manual workers. The covariates included baseline age, marital status, limiting long-lasting illness, common mental disorders, job strain, physical and mental health functioning, smoking, body mass index, and employment status at follow-up. Firstly the analyses focused on changes over time in age adjusted prevalence of leisure-time physical activity. Secondly, logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for covariates of changes in occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity. Results At baseline there were no occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity. Over the follow-up leisure-time physical activity increased among those in the higher classes and decreased among manual workers, suggesting the emergence of

  4. Echocardiographic Follow-up of Robotic Mitral Valve Repair for Mitral Regurgitation due to Degenerative Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Wang; Chang-Qing Gao; Yah-Song Shen; Gang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Background:Mitral valve (MV) repair can now be carried out through small incisions with the use of robotic assistance.Previous reports have demonstrated the excellent clinical result of robotic MV repair for degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR).However,there has been limited information regarding the echocardiographic follow-up of these patients.The present study was therefore to evaluate the echocardiographic follow-up outcomes after robotic MV repair in patients with MR due to degenerative disease of the MV.Methods:A retrospective analysis was undertaken using data from the echocardiographic database of our department.Between March 2007 and February 2015,84 patients with degenerative MR underwent robotic MV repair.The repair techniques included leaflet resection in 67 patients (79.8%),artificial chordae in 20 (23.8%),and ring annuloplasty in 79 (94.1%).Eighty-one (96.4%) of the 84 patients were eligible for echocardiographic follow-up assessment,and no patients were lost to follow-up.Results:At a median echocardiographic follow-up of 36.0 months (interquartile range 14.3-59.4 months),four patients (4.9%) developed recurrent mild MR,and no patients had more than mild MR.Mean MR grade,left atrial diameter (LAD),left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD),and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were significantly decreased when compared with preoperative values.Mean MR grade decreased from 3.96 ± 0.13 to 0.17 ± 0.49 (Z =-8.456,P < 0.001),LAD from 43.8 ± 5.9 to 35.5 ± 3.8 mm (t =15.131,P < 0.001),LVEDD from 51.0 ± 5.0 to 43.3 ± 2.2 mm (t =14.481,P < 0.001),and LVEF from 67.3 ± 7.0% to 63.9 ± 5.1% (t =4.585,P < 0.001).Conclusion:Robotic MV repair for MR due to degenerative disease is associated with a low rate of recurrent MR,and a significant improvement in MR grade,LAD,and LVEDD,but a significant decrease in LVEF at echocardiographic follow-up.

  5. High grade squamous intraepithelial lesion in inmates from Ohio: cervical screening and biopsy follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rofagha Soraya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical carcinoma remains the second leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide and sexual behavior is regarded as the main contributing factor. We studied cervical cytology screening with surgical biopsy follow-up in women prisoners and compared the findings to those in the general population. Methods We reviewed 1024 conventional cervical smears, 73 cervical biopsies and 2 loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP specimens referred to us from the Correctional Center in Columbus, Ohio during a 12-month period. The results were compared to 40,993 Pap smears from the general population for the same 12-month period. Results High grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HGSIL was diagnosed in 1.3% of the cervical smears from the inmate population versus 0.6% in the general population (p < 0.01. The unsatisfactory rate was 1.6% compared to 0.3% in the general population (p < 0.01. Among the study population, follow-up tissue diagnosis was obtained in 24.3% of the abnormal cytology results (ASCUS, LGSIL, and HGSIL. Of the HGSIL Pap smears, 61.5% had a subsequent tissue diagnosis. Thirty-nine biopsies (52% of the all inmate biopsies and LEEP showed CIN II/III (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia II/III. Eight of these thirty-nine follow-up biopsies diagnosed as CIN II/III had a previous cervical cytology diagnosis of ASCUS. The average age for HGSIL was 30.5 years (S.D. = 5.7 and for low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LGSIL was 27.2 years (S.D. = 6.1. Conclusion A significantly higher prevalence of HGSIL cervical cytology and unsatisfactory smears was encountered in female inmates, with tissue follow-up performed in less than two thirds of the patients with HGSIL. These results are in keeping with data available in the literature suggesting that the inmate population is high-risk and may be subject to less screening and tissue follow-up than the general population. Clinicians should proceed with urgency to improve

  6. Follow up of acute gonococcal urethritis in males treated with norfloxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chari KVR

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This subject was undertaken to confirm the efficacy of norfloxacin in acute gonorrhoea and to note the relapse if any during the follow up period of 3 months. 27 male patients suffering from acute gonorrhoea were treated with 800 mgs of norfloxacin as single oral dose. In all cases, gonococci disappeared from urethral smears by 8 hours, urethral discharge subsided by 72 hrs, urine on naked eye examination cleared in 4 days except in 1 case and burning micturition subsided by 7 days. Cure rate was 100% in the study. No relapse was found at the end of follow up of 3 months. No adverse reactions were observed to norfloxacin except headache in 2 cases. Norfloxacin was safe and effective in the treatment of acute gonorrhoea.

  7. Electromagnetic follow-up of gravitational wave candidates: perspectives in INAF

    CERN Document Server

    Piranomonte, S; Branchesi, M; Campana, S; Cappellaro, E; Covino, S; Grado, A; Palazzi, E; Nicastro, L; Pian, E; Stratta, G; Greco, G; Castellano, M; Giuffrida, G; Marinoni, S; Pulone, L; Antonelli, A; Bernardini, M G; D'avanzo, P; Melandri, A; Stella, L

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) emission associated with a gravitational wave (GW) signal is one of the main goal of future astronomy. Merger of neutron stars and/or black holes and core-collapse of massive stars are expected to cause rapid transient electromagnetic signals. The EM follow-up of GW signals will have to deal with large position uncertainties. The gravitational sky localization is expected to be tens to hundreds of square degrees. Wide-field cameras and rapid follow-up observations will be crucial to characterize the EM candidates for the first EM counterpart identification. We present some of the activities that we are currently carrying on to optimize the response of the INAF network of facilities to expected GW triggers. The INAF network will represent an efficient operational framework capable of fast reaction on large error box triggers and direct identification and characterization of the candidates.

  8. Localized Langerhans` cell histiocytosis of bone: treatment and follow-up in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libicher, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Heidelberg (Germany); Roeren, T. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Heidelberg (Germany); Troeger, J. [Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)

    1995-11-01

    We report a case of Langerhans` cell histiocytosis (LCH) involving the right scapula in a 4-year-old child. Because of progressive shoulder pain and immobility methylprednisolone was injected directly into the lesion under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Follow-up studies with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) revealed continuous ossification of the osteolytic lesion with healing after 6 months. Plain films and CT confirmed the healing process. We consider intralesional corticoid instillation a safe method when performed under CT guidance. For initial evaluation and follow-up, MRI and US yielded reliable results in comparison to plain films and CT, thus helping to reduce the radiation dosage in children. (orig.)

  9. The value of ultrasound in the follow-up of thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedbæk, Finn Noe; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    The value of ultrasound in the follow-up of thyroid cancer The commonly used tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) staging system is designed to predict death and not recurrence. Based on this, patients with thyroid cancer are grouped into risk categories at the time of initial treatment. However, recent...... guidelines proposed a novel staging system focusing on microscopic invasion into the perithyroidal tissues, neck lymph node involvement and 131I uptake outside the thyroid bed following treatment. This risk re-assessment improves the prediction of recurrent/persistent disease. The cornerstone in the follow......-up is measurement of plasma-thyroglobulin concentration and ultrasound of the neck focusing on the thyroid bed and classification of lymph nodes according to their location and high risk signs....

  10. Psychiatric severity and mortality in substance abusers. A 15 year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridell, Mats; Hesse, Morten

    2006-01-01

    abusers who become abstinent, mortality is often higher than in the general population. A consecutive sample of drug users admitted for detoxification was followed for 15 years. Face-to-face interviews were conducted at 5-year follow-up. At 15-year follow-up, 24% were dead. Cox proportional hazard...... and mortality. Psychiatric treatment, including psychotherapy, may be more life-saving for substance abusers than drug-abuse services.......Previous research has shown that most transitions into abstinence happens in the stages of the drug career quickly after the first treatment episode. Mortality is somewhat reduced for patients who become abstinent, but remains high for patients who remain addicted. However, even among substance...

  11. Updates to Advanced LIGO and Virgo's Low-Latency Electromagnetic Follow-Up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min-A.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Data from Advanced LIGO (and soon, Virgo) is promptly analyzed to enable electromagnetic follow-up observations by dozens of observing teams. In this talk I present three key changes made to this program for the second observing run, O2. These key changes cover (1) down-selecting from multiple gravitational wave triggers to the event candidate we follow-up on, provided these triggers all describe the same astrophysical event, (2) upgrading to 3-dimensional sky localization probability maps (skymaps) for compact binary coalescence events, and (3) providing additional information about event candidates that will be communicated via GCN notices/VOEvents to our observing partners. I will conclude by describing online low-latency pipelines. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the U.S. National Science Foundation through grant PHY-1404121.

  12. Nine-year follow-up of children with atopic dermatitis by general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misery, Laurent; Ansolabehere, Xavier; Grandfils, Nathalie; Georgescu, Victor; Taieb, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of associated comorbidity and the cost of treatments in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) followed up in primary care settings are poorly known. We carried out a retrospective cohort study on a longitudinal electronic medical records database of patients consulting a panel of general practitioners in France. All subjects with AD diagnosed during the first year of life were selected and matched with infants without the disease according to sex (1,163 vs. 1,163). Subjects were followed up for 9 years. Associated diseases, drug consumptions and available medical costs were detailed. Comparisons between subjects and controls were carried out. Subjects with AD had more comorbidities than others, especially in respiratory and ophthalmic system organs. The number of prescribed treatments in the field of skin diseases as well as overall medical costs (general practitioner consultations and prescribed drugs) were higher among atopic subjects, but differences were attenuated with age.

  13. Long-term follow-up study and long-term care of childhood cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Jin Park

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The number of long-term survivors is increasing in the western countries due to remarkable improvements in the treatment of childhood cancer. The long-term complications of childhood cancer survivors in these countries were brought to light by the childhood cancer survivor studies. In Korea, the 5-year survival rate of childhood cancer patients is approaching 70%; therefore, it is extremely important to undertake similar long-term follow-up studies and comprehensive long-term care for our population. On the basis of the experiences of childhood cancer survivorship care of the western countries and the current Korean status of childhood cancer survivors, long-term follow-up study and long-term care systems need to be established in Korea in the near future. This system might contribute to the improvement of the quality of life of childhood cancer survivors through effective intervention strategies.

  14. Fast response electromagnetic follow-ups from low latency GW triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, E J; Rowlinson, A; Gao, H; Zhang, B; Tingay, S J; Boer, M; Wen, L

    2016-01-01

    We investigate joint low-latency gravitational wave (GW) detection and prompt electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs). Assuming that BNS mergers are associated with short duration gamma ray bursts (SGRBs), we evaluate if rapid EM follow-ups can capture the prompt emission, early engine activity or reveal any potential by-products such as magnetars or fast radio bursts. To examine the expected performance of extreme low-latency search pipelines, we simulate a population of coalescing BNSs and use these to estimate the detectability and localisation efficiency at different times before merger. Using observational SGRB flux data corrected to the range of the advanced GW interferometric detectors, we determine what EM observations could be achieved from low-frequency radio up to high energy $\\gamma$-ray. We show that while challenging, breakthrough multi-messenger science is possible through low latency pipelines.

  15. Liverpool Telescope follow-up of candidate electromagnetic counterparts during the first run of Advanced LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    Copperwheat, C M; Piascik, A S; Bersier, D; Bode, M F; Collins, C A; Darnley, M J; Galloway, D K; Gomboc, A; Kobayashi, S; Lamb, G P; Levan, A J; Mazzali, P A; Mundell, C G; Pian, E; Pollacco, D; Steeghs, D; Tanvir, N R; Ulaczyk, K; Wiersema, K

    2016-01-01

    The first direct detection of gravitational waves was made in late 2015 with the Advanced LIGO detectors. By prior arrangement, a worldwide collaboration of electromagnetic follow-up observers were notified of candidate gravitational wave events during the first science run, and many facilities were engaged in the search for counterparts. No counterparts were identified, which is in line with expectations given that the events were classified as black hole - black hole mergers. However these searches laid the foundation for similar follow-up campaigns in future gravitational wave detector science runs, in which the detection of neutron star merger events with observable electromagnetic counterparts is much more likely. Three alerts were issued to the electromagnetic collaboration over the course of the first science run, which lasted from September 2015 to January 2016. Two of these alerts were associated with the gravitational wave events since named GW150914 and GW151226. In this paper we provide an overvie...

  16. The GSB III elbow prosthesis in rheumatoid arthritis: a 2- to 9-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Hjorth; Jacobsen, Steffen; Ratchke, Martin

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal design of an elbow prosthesis for badly damaged elbows is unkown. We evaluated 23 GSB III semi-constrained (sloppy-hinged) total elbow arthroplasties in 16 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: After a mean follow-up period of 5 (2-9) years...... and radiographic study. All patients had endstage rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the elbow joint. RESULTS: In 2 patients, humeral components were revised due to malorientation. 1 arthroplasty was revised due to aseptic loosening of the humeral component. There were 4 cases of intraoperative fracture which healed....../supination increased by 31 degrees (0-130). There were no cases of infection or ulnar nerve dysfunction. At the latest follow-up, the HSS elbow score was 84 (40-100) points. 11 of 20 elbows were rated as excellent, 4 elbows were rated as good, 2 elbows were rated as fair, and 3 elbows were rated as poor. 14 of 16...

  17. Maturogenesis of Two Maxillary Central Incisors: A Case Report with 10 Years of Follow Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Ghorbanzadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the treatment of two immature maxillary central incisors in a 7- year-old female patient. She suffered complicated crown fracture because of trauma, and the root formation was incomplete. White mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA was selected as the pulp-capping material after cervical pulpotomy to preserve the pulp tissue vitality and achieve maturogenesis. Follow-up evaluations showed successful treatment in terms of preservation of pulp vitality and demonstrated marked continuous physiological root devel- opment. During 10 years of follow-up, both teeth were clinically asymptomatic, and radio- graphic evaluations showed apparent root regeneration with apical root-end closure without pulp or periapical pathosis.

  18. Long-term follow-up in distal renal tubular acidosis with sensorineural deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R

    2000-11-01

    A 20-year-old man presented with failure to thrive and bilateral genu valgum. On the basis of growth failure, skeletal deformity, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis with alkaline urine and hypokalemia, nephrocalcinosis, and hearing loss, a diagnosis of distal renal tubular acidosis (DRTA) with sensorineural deafness was made. The genu valgum was treated by corrective osteotomy. Skeletal deformity was corrected and impaired growth improved after sustained therapy of metabolic acidosis with alkali supplementation. During an 8-year follow-up period the patient's glomerular filtration rate remained stable, the nephrocalcinosis did not progress, and his height increased 10 cm. Although nephrolithiasis led to atrophy of the right kidney, at last follow-up, when the patient was 44 years old, his creatinine clearance was 50 ml/min per 1.73 m2 body surface.

  19. Conceptualising patient empowerment in cancer follow-up by combining theory and qualitative data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna Thit; Eskildsen, Nanna Bjerg; Thomsen, Thora Grothe;

    2017-01-01

    and sensitive questionnaire for this population. Material and Methods: A theoretical model of PE was made, based on Zimmerman’s theory of psychological empowerment. Patients who were in follow-up after first line treatment for their cancer (n = 16) were interviewed about their experiences with follow......Background: Patient empowerment (PE) may be defined as the opportunity for patients to master issues important to their own health. The aim of this study was to conceptualise PE and how the concept manifests itself for cancer patients attending follow-up, in order to develop a relevant......-up. A deductive thematic analysis was conducted to contextualise the theory and find concrete manifestations of empowerment. Data were analysed to find situations that expressed empowerment or lack of empowerment. Then we analysed what abilities these situations called for and we further analysed how...

  20. Growth and development after oesophageal atresia surgery: Need for long-term multidisciplinary follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJsselstijn, Hanneke; Gischler, Saskia J; Toussaint, Leontien; Spoel, Marjolein; Zijp, Monique H M van der Cammen-van; Tibboel, Dick

    2016-06-01

    Survival rates in oesophageal atresia patients have reached over 90%. In long-term follow-up studies the focus has shifted from purely surgical or gastrointestinal evaluation to a multidisciplinary approach. We reviewed the literature on the long-term morbidity of these patients and discuss mainly issues of physical growth and neurodevelopment. We conclude that growth problems - both stunting and wasting - are frequently seen, but that sufficient longitudinal data are lacking. Therefore, it is unclear whether catch-up growth into adolescence and adulthood occurs. Data on determinants of growth retardation are also lacking in current literature. Studies on neurodevelopment beyond preschool age are scarce but oesophageal atresia patients seem at risk for academic problems and motor function delay. Many factors contribute to the susceptibility to growth and development problems and we propose a multidisciplinary follow-up schedule into adulthood future care which may help improve quality of life.

  1. [Evaluation of depressive symptoms and resilience in patients on pharmacotherapeutic follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, N C; Abrão, P H O; Fernandes, M R; Beijo, L A; Marques, L A M

    2017-03-07

    This study aimed to carry out the pharmacotherapeutic follow-up of patients with depression and to assess its impact on the resilience of the patients. Patients were followed-up for 8 months. The pharmacist evaluated depressive symptoms, resilience, and the need for pharmaceutical intervention. The measurement tools used were the Dader method, PHQ-9, and a resilience scale. Data were analysed using BioStat 5.0 software and the performing of the Wilcoxon and Pearson correlation tests. There was a reduction in the rate of depressive symptoms from 12.9 to 5.2 (P<.0001), and an increase in the resilience score from 112.4 to 149.0 (P<.0001). Pharmaceutical interventions were made to resolve the drug related problems in the form of oral communication between pharmacist-patient or pharmacist-patient-doctor. The pharmaceutical care was effective in decreasing depression and contributed to the increased resilience of patients.

  2. Cherenkov Telescope Array is Well Suited to Follow Up Gravitational Wave Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Bartos, Imre; Nieto, Daniel; Connaughton, Valerie; Humensky, Brian; Hurley, Kevin; Marka, Szabolcs; Meszaros, Peter; Mukherjee, Reshmi; O'Brien, Paul; Osborne, Julian P

    2014-01-01

    The first gravitational-wave (GW) observations will greatly benefit, or even depend on, the detection of coincident electromagnetic counterparts. These counterparts will similarly enhance the scientific impact of later detections. Electromagnetic follow-ups can be, nevertheless, challenging for GW event candidates with poorly reconstructed directions. Localization can be inefficient in several important scenarios: (i) in the early advanced detector era, only the two LIGO observatories will be operating; (ii) later, even with more observatories, the detectors' sensitivity will probably be non-uniform; (iii) the first events, as well as a significant fraction of later events, will likely occur near the detectors' horizon distance, where they are only marginally detectable, having low signal-to-noise ratios. In these scenarios, the precision of localization can be severely limited. Follow-up observations will need to cover hundreds to thousands of square degrees of the sky over a limited period of time, reducing...

  3. Long-term follow-up of the flexor carpi ulnaris transfer in spastic hemiplegic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thometz, J G; Tachdjian, M

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed on 25 patients with cerebral palsy who underwent transfer of the flexor carpi ulnaris to the radial wrist extendors. The mean age at the time of surgery was 8 years 1 month. The mean follow-up was 8 years 7 months. At follow-up, the mean active wrist dorsiflexion was 44.2 degrees, palmar flexion was 19.0 degrees, supination was 40.2 degrees, and pronation was 53.4 degrees. According to a modification of Green's evaluation system, there were six excellent, nine good, five fair, and five poor results. Two patients required further surgery to correct a supination, dorsiflexion contracture. We found the transfer to be quite effective in improving wrist dorsiflexion, although there was often a significant loss of active palmar flexion postoperatively. The patient therefore should have good digital extension (with the wrist extended passively above neutral) to be considered for the transfer.

  4. Diastematomyelia: A Surgical Case with Long-Term Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekki, Hirofumi; Kawano, Osamu; Shiba, Keiichiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-01-01

    Few reports have described the involvement of syringomyelia associated with diastematomyelia in the etiology of neurological deficits. We reported a case with syringomyelia associated with diastematomyelia. A female patient with diastematomyelia was followed up clinically over 14 years. At the age of 8, she developed clubfoot deformity with neurological deterioration. Motor function of the right peroneus demonstrated grade 2 in manual muscle tests. Continuous intracanial bony septum and double cords with independent double dura were observed at upper thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a tethering of the spinal cord and syringomyelia distal to the level of diastematomyelia. Extirpation of the osseum septum and duralplasty were performed surgically. She grew without neurological deterioration during 7 years postoperatively. A long-term followed up case with syringomyelia that was possibly secondary to the tethering of the spinal cord associated with diastematomyelia, and effective treatment with extirpation of the osseum septum and duralplasty was described. PMID:25705341

  5. Search for neutrinos from transient sources with the ANTARES telescope and optical follow-up observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dornic, D; Busto, J; Samarai, I Al; Basa, S; Gendre, B; Mazure, A; Klotz, Alain; ANTARES, Michel Boer on behalf the

    2009-01-01

    The ANTARES telescope has the opportunity to detect transient neutrino sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, flares of active nuclei... To enhance the sensitivity to these sources, we have developed a new detection method based on the optical follow-up of "golden" neutrino events such as neutrino doublets coincident in time and space or single neutrinos of very high energy. The ANTARES Collaboration has therefore implemented a very fast on-line reconstruction with a good angular resolution. These characteristics allow to trigger an optical telescope network; since February 2009. ANTARES is sending alert trigger one or two times per month to the two 25 cm robotic telescope of TAROT. This follow-up of such special events would not only give access to the nature of the sources but also improves the sensitivity for transient neutrino sources.

  6. Eight-year follow-up of a girl with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aycan, Zehra; Önder, Aşan; Çetinkaya, Semra

    2011-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is characterized by the triad of fibrous dysplasia (FD), cafe-au-lait spots and precocious puberty (PP). We report a 14-year-old girl with MAS who has been followed-up for 8 years. She was referred for multiple fractures and vaginal bleeding at age 5.9 years. She had peripheral PP, FD, and osteoporosis and was diagnosed as MAS. The patient was treated with aromatase inhibitors and bisphosphonates. She had no menses during aromatase inhibitor treatment. Her growth rate and bone maturation were in normal ranges while on treatment. She had one new fracture on the seventh year of follow- up in spite of bisphosphonate treatment.

  7. MRI in adult patients with aortic coarctation: diagnosis and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, B; Abbas, A; McParland, P; Fitzsimmons, S; Shambrook, J; Peebles, C; Brown, I; Harden, S

    2015-04-01

    Aortic coarctation is a disease that usually presents in infancy; however, a proportion of patients present for the first time in adulthood. These lesions generally require repair with either surgery or interventional techniques. The success of these techniques means that increasing numbers of patients are presenting for follow-up imaging in adulthood, whether their coarctation was initially repaired in infancy or as adults. Thus, the adult presenting to the radiologist for assessment of possible coarctation or follow-up of coarctation repair is not an uncommon scenario. In this review, we present details of the MRI protocols and MRI findings in these patients so that a confident and accurate assessment can be made.

  8. Regional sympathetic denervation after myocardial infarction: a follow-up study using [123I]MIBG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podio, V; Spinnler, M T; Spandonari, T; Moretti, C; Castellano, G; Bessone, M; Brusca, A

    1995-12-01

    Previous studies in dogs have shown that experimental infarction produces myocardial sympathetic denervation not only in the infarcted area, but also in a region apical to the infarction. In these dogs MIBG myocardial scintigraphy detected denervation but returned to normal in a few months at which time reinnervation was shown to have occurred. Myocardial sympathetic denervation was studied with MIBG scintigraphy in ten patients after their first acute transmural myocardial infarction; scans were repeated at 4 months, one year and 30 months to follow the time course of possible reinnervation. Except during the first 48 hours following the infarction, no therapy except for antiaggregants was administered to the patients; during this follow-up period no cardiac events were seen. One week after infarction, comparison of MIBG images with perfusion scans revealed that the denervated area was larger than the infarcted area; no difference in MIBG uptake by the infarcted myocardium was found during the 30 months follow-up.

  9. Treatment and follow-up of malignant struma ovarii: Regarding two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Oudoux

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Malignant struma ovarii (SO is a rare tumor, and as a consequence, treatments and follow-up procedures are not clearly established. Presented in this study are two cases of suspicious ovarian masses, resected and corresponding to malignant SO on histopathology. Similar to thyroid cancer, we proposed complementary radioiodine therapy (131I after total thyroidectomy (no malignancy was observed at this level in our two patients. Patients underwent treatment with 3.7 GBq 131I followed by post-therapy whole-body scintigraphy, which can detect residual disease or occult metastases. Thyroid remnant ablation increases the sensitivity and specificity of follow-up testing using serum thyroglobulin levels as a tumor marker. Our two patients remained disease-free for 3 and 5 years, respectively, after treatment.

  10. Spectroscopic follow-up of UV-excess objects selected from the UVEX survey

    CERN Document Server

    Verbeek, Kars; Scaringi, Simone; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Spikings, Ben; Østensen, Roy H; Drew, Janet; Steeghs, Danny; Casares, Jorge; Corral-Santana, Jesus M; Corradi, Romano; Deacon, Niall; Drake, Jeremy; Gansicke, Boris T; González-Solares, Eduardo; Greimel, Robert; Heber, Ulrich; Irwin, Mike; Knigge, Christian; Nelemans, Gijs

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of the first spectroscopic follow-up of 132 optically blue UV-excess sources selected from the UV-excess survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (UVEX). The UV-excess spectra are classified into different populations and grids of model spectra are fit to determine spectral types, temperatures, surface gravities and reddening. From this initial spectroscopic follow-up 95% of the UV-excess candidates turn out to be genuine UV-excess sources such as white dwarfs, white dwarf binaries, subdwarfs type O and B, emission line stars and QSOs. The remaining sources are classified as slightly reddened main-sequence stars with spectral types later than A0V. The fraction of DA white dwarfs is 47% with reddening smaller than E(B-V)17 and Galactic latitude smaller than |b|<4 compared to main-sequence stars, blue horizontal branch stars and subdwarfs.

  11. Role of thallium-201 total-body scintigraphy in follow-up of thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefnagel, C.A.; Delprat, C.C.; Marcuse, H.R.; de Vijlder, J.J.

    1986-12-01

    To evaluate the reliability of total-body scintigraphy using (/sup 201/Tl)chloride in postoperative follow-up of thyroid carcinoma, this procedure was performed in 326 patients after total thyroidectomy for thyroid carcinoma. The results were compared with those of 131I scintigraphy and thyroglobulin assays. /sup 201/Tl total-body scintigraphy was found to have the greatest sensitivity (94%), whereas /sup 131/I scintigraphy had the highest specificity (99%). It is shown that /sup 201/Tl total-body scintigraphy is a useful procedure in follow-up of thyroid cancer, however, the combination of parameters provides the greatest reliability. In medullary thyroid carcinoma, which is usually /sup 131/I negative, /sup 201/Tl total-body scintigraphy can be of great value for the localization of metastases which are indicated by elevated serum levels of calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen.

  12. Non-puerperal mastitis masking pre-existing breast malignancy: Importance of follow-up imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Jin Kyung; Woo, Jeong Joo; Lee, Seung A [Eulji General Hospital, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Mastitis is an inflammatory condition of the breast with common symptoms of pain, swelling, erythema, warmth, and fever. Diagnosis of mastitis is easily made on the basis of typical symptoms and ultrasonographic findings, such as diffusely increased echogenicity of the parenchyma and subcutaneous fat, or skin thickening. However, when it occurs in women middle-aged or older, associated malignancy should be considered. In our cases, we detected irregular hypoechoic malignant masses after the disappearance of inflammatory changes. Therefore, when non-puerperal women have inflammatory signs on their breast, follow-up imaging should be performed. In particular, in the case of persistent or growing palpability after the recovery of breast inflammation, percutaneous core biopsy and short-term follow-up with ultrasonography should be considered to exclude the associated malignancy.

  13. Developing COPD: a 25 year follow up study of the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkke, Anders; Lange, Peter; Scharling, H;

    2006-01-01

    population. METHODS: As part of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, 8045 men and women aged 30-60 years with normal lung function at baseline were followed for 25 years. Lung function measurements were collected and mortality from COPD during the 25 year observation period was analysed. RESULTS: The percentage......BACKGROUND: Smokers are more prone to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) than non-smokers, but this finding comes from studies spanning 10 years or less. The aim of this study was to determine the 25 year absolute risk of developing COPD in men and women from the general...... cessation, especially early in the follow up period, decreased the risk of developing COPD substantially compared with continuous smoking. During the follow up period there were 2912 deaths, 109 of which were from COPD. 92% of the COPD deaths occurred in subjects who were current smokers at the beginning...

  14. Post-gastrectomy patients need to be followed up for 20-30 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank I. Tovey; Michael Hobsley

    2000-01-01

    AIM To investigate the incidence andmanagement of nutritional deficiencies followinga gastrectomy.METHODS A gastrectomy population of 227patients in London was followed up for 30 years after operation to detect and treat nutritional deficiencies.RESULTS By the end of the first decade iron deficiency was the commonest problem. Vitamin B12 deficiency became more important in the second decade. During the third decade both reached equal prevalence, being found in some 90% of the female and 70% of the male residual population. Vitamin D deficiency was a lesser problem, reaching its climax in the second decade. Overall, all women fared worse than men.CONCLUSION The importance of long-term follow-up of gastrectomy patients for iron,Vitamin B12 and Vitamin D deficiencies is emphasised.

  15. Self-Determination Theory and Outpatient Follow-Up After Psychiatric Hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripada, Rebecca K; Bowersox, Nicholas W; Ganoczy, Dara; Valenstein, Marcia; Pfeiffer, Paul N

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether the constructs of self-determination theory-autonomy, competence, and relatedness-are associated with adherence to outpatient follow-up appointments after psychiatric hospitalization. 242 individuals discharged from inpatient psychiatric treatment within the Veterans Health Administration completed surveys assessing self-determination theory constructs as well as measures of depression and barriers to treatment. Medical records were used to count the number of mental health visits and no-shows in the 14 weeks following discharge. Logistic regression models assessed the association between survey items assessing theory constructs and attendance at mental healthcare visits. In multivariate models, none of the self-determination theory factors predicted outpatient follow-up attendance. The constructs of self-determination theory as measured by a single self-report survey may not reliably predict adherence to post-hospital care. Need factors such as depression may be more strongly predictive of treatment adherence.

  16. Therapeutic follow-up in hospitalization: social inclusion, recovery of citizenship and respect for individuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Célia Fiorati

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in a psychiatric crisis hospitalization unit, with the aim of drawing up a proposal for implementing therapeutic follow-up as part of the therapeutic program at this unit. The concept of therapeutic follow-up was envisaged as an important resource to be included in psychosocial rehabilitation projects, with the following goals: linking users with extra-hospital services, avoiding re-hospitalization and achieving inclusion in social networks. The study consisted of an exploratory-descriptive case study with a qualitative approach to data. Participant observation and a field diary were the techniques used for gathering and recording data. The difficulties experienced were correlated with the spheres of social networks, family, institutional relationships and society. The results included heeding the patient's and the family's suffering and including users in social networks, extra-hospital services and community organizations.

  17. Association between subjective memory complaints and health care utilisation: a three-year follow up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Siersma, Volkert; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subjective memory complaints (SMC) are common among elderly patients and little is know about the association between SMC and health care utilisation. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate health care utilisation during a three-year follow-up among elderly patients consulting...... their general practitioner and reporting subjective memory complaints (SMC). METHODS: This study was conducted as a prospective cohort survey in general practice with three-year follow-up. Selected health care utilisation or costs relative to SMC adjusted for potential confounders were analyzed in a two...... aged 65 years and older consulted their GP in October and November 2002 and participated in the present study. The adjusted probability of nursing home placement was significantly increased in subjects with SMC relative to subjects without SMC (RR = 2.3). More generally, SMC was associated...

  18. Leveraging Ensemble Dynamical Properties to Prioritize Exoplanet Follow-Up Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    The number of transiting exoplanets now exceeds several thousand, enabling ensemble studies of the dynamical properties of exoplanetary systems. We require a mixture model of dynamical conditions (whether frozen in from formation or sculpted by planet-planet interactions) to recover Kepler's yield of transiting planets. Around M dwarfs, which will be predominate sites of exoplanet follow-up atmospheric study in the next decade, even a modest orbital eccentricity can sterilize a planet. I will describe efforts to link cheap observables, such as number of transiting planets and presence of transit timing variations, to eccentricity and mutual inclination in exoplanet systems. The addition of a second transiting planet, for example, halves the expected orbital eccentricity. For the vast majority of TESS targets, the light curve alone will furnish the sum total of data about the exoplanet. Extracting information about orbital properties from these light curves will help prioritize precious follow-up resources.

  19. Ultrasound follow up of testicular adrenal rest tumors with congenital adrenal hyperplasia: Report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Dong Won; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Nam, Kyung Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Dong-A University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    While testicular adrenal rest tumor is generally a rare intratesticular tumor, it is frequent in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The tumors are diagnosed and followed up by ultrasound examination because these tumors are non-palpable and symptomless in most cases and always benign. Ultrasound imaging features change depending on how congenital adrenal hyperplasia is controlled. We herein report three cases of testicular adrenal rest tumors with different usual and unusual imaging findings and follow-up imaging. Patient 1 was a 14-year-old boy who presented with poor compliance to medication. Patient 2 and 3 were a 10-year-old and 13-year-old boy who presented with precocious puberty and short stature, respectively. Ultrasound examinations demonstrated oval hypoechoic masses and irregular speculated hyperechoic masses in the testes and different serial imaging findings.

  20. The GSB III elbow prosthesis in rheumatoid arthritis: a 2- to 9-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Hjorth; Jacobsen, Steffen; Ratchke, Martin

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal design of an elbow prosthesis for badly damaged elbows is unkown. We evaluated 23 GSB III semi-constrained (sloppy-hinged) total elbow arthroplasties in 16 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: After a mean follow-up period of 5 (2-9) years...... patients were satisfied with the result and the 2 patients who were not satisfied had persistent pain. INTERPRETATION: Despite the inherent problems of cementing in small-calibre medullary cavities, the clinical outcome of the GSB III arthroplasty was encouraging for patients with-end stage RA. The rate......, we assessed quality of the cementing technique, signs of aseptic loosening, patient satisfaction, range of movement, and determined the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) elbow score. 3 patients had died before follow-up; thus, 20 replacements in 16 patients were available for clinical...

  1. One-year follow-Up in stroke patients discharged from rehabilitation hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolucci, S; Grasso, M G; Antonucci, G; Troisi, E; Morelli, D; Coiro, P; Bragoni, M

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate functional status at a 1-year follow-up in consecutive first-stroke patients after discharge from rehabilitation hospital and to identify reliable prognostic factors associated with changes in their abilities. Functional evaluation was made of consecutive patients 1 year after discharge to their own homes. Two multiple logistic regressions (forward stepwise) were performed using both improvement and worsening of the Barthel Index score between discharge and follow-up as dependent variables. Independent variables were medical, demographic and social factors. The final sample included 157 out of 172 patients. During the follow-up, 10 patients (5.81%) died because of a new cerebrovascular event, 1 patient died of myocardial infarction, 2 patients had new strokes and 2 fractured their paretic legs. Functionally, 43.3% of the patients maintained the level they achieved during inpatient rehabilitation treatment, 23.6% improved and the remaining 33.1% worsened. Patients with hemineglect and aged >/=65 years had a higher probability of functional worsening (odds ratio, OR = 3.77, 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.42- 10.0 and OR = 3.93, 95% CI = 1. 72-8.95, respectively). Postdischarge rehabilitation (performed for 46.5% of the final sample) was significantly and positively associated with functional improvement (OR = 7.23, 95% CI = 2.89-18. 05), and its absence with functional worsening (OR = 12.32, 95% CI = 4.47-37.01). In conclusion, in nearly half of the cases, functional status was still not stabilized at the time of discharge from the rehabilitation hospital. Postdischarge outpatient treatment was useful for preventing worsening of the functional ability achived during inpatient treatment and increased the possibility of further functional improvement. Age >/=65 years and hemineglect were predictors of functional worsening at follow-up.

  2. B-cell Lymphoma in retrieved femoral heads: a long term follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Kemenade Folkert J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A relatively high incidence of pathological conditions in retrieved femoral heads, including a group of patients having low grade B-cell lymphoma, has been described before. At short term follow up none of these patients with low-grade B-cell lymphoma showed evidence of systemic disease. However, the long term follow up of these patients is not known. Methods From November 1994 up to and including December 2005 we screened all femoral heads removed at the time of primary total hip replacement histopathologically and included them in the bone banking protocol according to the guidelines of the American Associations of Tissue Banks (AATB and the European Association of Musculo-Skeletal Transplantation (EAMST. We determined the percentage of B-cell lymphoma in all femoral heads and in the group that fulfilled all criteria of the bone banking protocol and report on the long-term follow-up. Results Of 852 femoral heads fourteen (1.6% were highly suspicious for low-grade B-cell lymphoma. Of these 852 femoral heads, 504 were eligible for bone transplantation according to the guidelines of the AATB and the EAMST. Six femoral heads of this group of 504 were highly suspicious for low-grade B-cell lymphoma (1.2%. At long term follow up two (0.2% of all patients developed systemic malignant disease and one of them needed medical treatment for her condition. Conclusion In routine histopathological screening we found variable numbers of low-grade B-cell lymphoma throughout the years, even in a group of femoral heads that were eligible for bone transplantation. Allogenic transmission of malignancy has not yet been reported on, but surviving viruses are proven to be transmissible. Therefore, we recommend the routine histopathological evaluation of all femoral heads removed at primary total hip arthroplasty as a tool for quality control, whether the femoral head is used for bone banking or not.

  3. Long-term follow-up and late complications following treatment of pediatric urologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Ardavan; Stock, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    Many pediatric urologic disorders have sequelae that may affect patients well into adulthood. Despite adequate treatment, many patients are at risk for progressive urologic deterioration years after surgical reconstruction. While many pediatric urologists follow their patients years after surgery, screening for late complications is a shared responsibility with primary care providers. This article discusses potential late complications and appropriate follow-up for patients who have a history of ureteral reimplantation, pyeloplasty, hypospadias repair, posterior urethral valve ablation, and intestinal interposition.

  4. RADICAL RETROPUBIC PROSTATECTOMY: THE FIRST RUSSIAN EXPERIENCE OF 15-YEAR FOLLOW-UP AFTER SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Veliev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of the maximum of more than 15 years of follow-up of Russia’s first large series of patients after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RPE were traced. The data of 1367 patients who had undergone RPE at the Clinic of Urology, S.P. Kirov Military Medical Academy, in 1997 to 2003 and at the Clinic of Urology, Russian Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, in 2001 to 2010 were retrospectively studied. After excluding 626 patients who had an incomplete set of preoperative/postoperative characteristics, a postoperative follow-up of < 6 months, neoadjuvant hormonal or radiation therapy, the trial included 741 patients. Their median age at surgery was 64 years (interquartile range (IQR: 59-68; median prostatespecific antigen (PSA, 8.7 ng/ml (IQR: 6.2-14; median follow-up, 65 months (IQR: 50-87; the maximum follow-up period, 189 months. Out of the 741 patients, 30.2, 28.3, and 41.5% were referred to as D’Amico classification low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Five-, 10-, and 15-year relapse-free survival rates were 80.3, 74.7, and 66.7%; 5-, 10-, and 15-year cancer-specific survival rates were 98.3, 95.9, and 85.7%; and 5-, 10-, and 15-year overall survival rates were 92.5, 81.4, and 64.3%, respectively. The significant predictors of biochemical recurrence were a preoperative PSA level of 10.1–20 ng/ml (p = 0.041, > 20 ng/ml (p = 0.003; pathological stage pT3b–4N0 (p = 0.006 and any stage pT N1 (p = 0.003. Further investigations are needed to identify groups of patients who will have the most benefit from surgery.

  5. RADICAL RETROPUBIC PROSTATECTOMY: THE FIRST RUSSIAN EXPERIENCE OF 15-YEAR FOLLOW-UP AFTER SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Veliev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the maximum of more than 15 years of follow-up of Russia’s first large series of patients after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RPE were traced. The data of 1367 patients who had undergone RPE at the Clinic of Urology, S.P. Kirov Military Medical Academy, in 1997 to 2003 and at the Clinic of Urology, Russian Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, in 2001 to 2010 were retrospectively studied. After excluding 626 patients who had an incomplete set of preoperative/postoperative characteristics, a postoperative follow-up of < 6 months, neoadjuvant hormonal or radiation therapy, the trial included 741 patients. Their median age at surgery was 64 years (interquartile range (IQR: 59-68; median prostatespecific antigen (PSA, 8.7 ng/ml (IQR: 6.2-14; median follow-up, 65 months (IQR: 50-87; the maximum follow-up period, 189 months. Out of the 741 patients, 30.2, 28.3, and 41.5% were referred to as D’Amico classification low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Five-, 10-, and 15-year relapse-free survival rates were 80.3, 74.7, and 66.7%; 5-, 10-, and 15-year cancer-specific survival rates were 98.3, 95.9, and 85.7%; and 5-, 10-, and 15-year overall survival rates were 92.5, 81.4, and 64.3%, respectively. The significant predictors of biochemical recurrence were a preoperative PSA level of 10.1–20 ng/ml (p = 0.041, > 20 ng/ml (p = 0.003; pathological stage pT3b–4N0 (p = 0.006 and any stage pT N1 (p = 0.003. Further investigations are needed to identify groups of patients who will have the most benefit from surgery.

  6. Mindfulness meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia: a naturalistic 12-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jason C; Shapiro, Shauna L; Manber, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    A unique intervention combining mindfulness meditation with cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has been shown to have acute benefits at posttreatment in an open label study. The aim of the present study was to examine the long-term effects of this integrated intervention on measures of sleep and sleep-related distress in an attempt to characterize the natural course of insomnia following this treatment and to identify predictors of poor long-term outcome. Analyses were conducted on 21 participants, who provided follow-up data at six and 12 months posttreatment. At each time point, participants completed one week of sleep and meditation diaries and questionnaires related to mindfulness, sleep, and sleep-related distress, including the Pre-Sleep Arousal Scale, the Glasgow Sleep Effort Scale, the Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills, and the Insomnia Episode Questionnaire. Analyses examining the pattern of change across time (baseline, end of treatment, six months, and 12 months) revealed that several sleep-related benefits were maintained during the 12-month follow-up period. Participants who reported at least one insomnia episode (>or=1 month) during the follow-up period had higher scores on the Pre-Sleep Arousal Scale (P insomnia episodes. Correlations between mindfulness skills and insomnia symptoms revealed significant negative correlations (P insomnia. These results suggest that most sleep-related benefits of an intervention combining CBT-I and mindfulness meditation were maintained during the 12-month follow-up period, with indications that higher presleep arousal and sleep effort at end of treatment constitute a risk for occurrence of insomnia during the 12 months following treatment.

  7. Selection, follow-up, and analysis in the Coke Oven Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockette, H E; Redmond, C K

    1985-05-01

    The current standard for exposure to coke oven emissions sets a permissible exposure of 150 micrograms benzene-soluble fraction of total particulate matter/m3. The major epidemiologic study that formed the basis for this standard including a review of the evidence of a dose-response relationship between exposure to coal tar pitch volatiles and lung cancer is reviewed. Particular attention was given to the selection of the cohort, follow-up procedures, and the evolution of the analysis.

  8. Benign multiple sclerosis? Clinical course, long term follow up, and assessment of prognostic factors

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To establish the characteristics of patients following a benign course of multiple sclerosis and evaluate the importance of potential prognostic factors. Also, an assessment of the value of the Kurtzke EDSS as a prognostic indicator has been undertaken in patients previously determined to have benign multiple sclerosis, after 10 years of follow up.
METHODS—A prevalence study in the Coleraine, Ballymena, Ballymoney, and Moyle districts of Northern Ireland used th...

  9. Mindfulness intervention for child abuse survivors: A 2.5-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Earley, MD; Chesney, MA; Frye, J.; Greene, PA; Berman, B; Kimbrough, E

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Objective: The present study reports on the long-term effects of a mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program for adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Method: Of the study participants, 73% returned to the clinic for a single-session follow-up assessment of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and mindfulness at 2.5 years. Results: Repeated measures mixed regression analyses revealed significant long-term improvements in depres...

  10. Ultrasonographic features of vascular closure devices: initial and 6-month follow-up results

    OpenAIRE

    Hye Jung Choo; Hae Woong Jeong; Jin Young Park; Sung-Chul Jin; Sung Tae Kim; Jung Hwa Seo; Sun Joo Lee; Young Mi Park

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:

    This study aimed to evaluate the ultrasonographic findings for various types of vascular closure devices (VCDs) immediately after the angiographic procedure and at 6-month follow-up.

    Methods:

    We included 18 VCDs including Angio-Seal (n=4), FemoSeal (n=8), ExoSeal (n=3), Perclose (n=...

  11. Clinical Coronary In-Stent Restenosis Follow-Up after Treatment and Analyses of Clinical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Campos Abreu Marino

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical in-stent restenosis (CISR is the main limitation of coronary angioplasty with stent implantation. Objective: Describe the clinical and angiographic characteristics of CISR and the outcomes over a minimum follow-up of 12 months after its diagnosis and treatment. Methods: We analyzed in 110 consecutive patients with CISR the clinical presentation, angiographic characteristics, treatment and combined primary outcomes (cardiovascular death, nonfatal acute myocardial infarction [AMI] and combined secondary (unstable angina with hospitalization, target vessel revascularization and target lesion revascularization during a minimal follow-up of one year. Results: Mean age was 61 ± 11 years (68.2% males. Clinical presentations included acute coronary syndrome (ACS in 62.7% and proliferative ISR in 34.5%. CISR was treated with implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES in 36.4%, Bare Metal Stent (BMS in 23.6%, myocardial revascularization surgery in 18.2%, balloon angioplasty in 15.5% and clinical treatment in 6.4%. During a median follow-up of 19.7 months, the primary outcome occurred in 18 patients, including 6 (5.5% deaths and 13 (11.8% AMI events. Twenty-four patients presented a secondary outcome. Predictors of the primary outcome were CISR with DES (HR = 4.36 [1.44–12.85]; p = 0.009 and clinical treatment for CISR (HR = 10.66 [2.53–44.87]; p = 0.001. Treatment of CISR with BMS (HR = 4.08 [1.75–9.48]; p = 0.001 and clinical therapy (HR = 6.29 [1.35–29.38]; p = 0.019 emerged as predictors of a secondary outcome. Conclusion: Patients with CISR present in most cases with ACS and with a high frequency of adverse events during a medium-term follow-up.

  12. Development of hypertension and uraemia after pyelonephritis in childhood: 27 year follow up.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--Determination of the long term incidence of uraemia, hypertension, and toxaemia in pregnancy associated with non-obstructive focal renal scarring after pyelonephritis in childhood 25-35 years earlier. DESIGN--27 Year follow up of patients with non-obstructive focal scarring identified from a retrospective review of intravenous urograms performed in childhood between 1951 and 1967. SETTING--Paediatric primary referral centre and urological clinic in tertiary referral centre. PATIENT...

  13. Radiographic follow-up study of Little Leaguer's shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanematsu, Yoshiji; Iwase, Takenobu [Tokushima National Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokushima (Japan); Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Sairyo, Koichi [University of Tokushima Graduate School, Department of Orthopedics, Institute of Health Bioscience, Tokushima (Japan); Kashiwaguchi, Shinji [Japan Community Health Care Organization, Tokyo Shinjuku Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokyo (Japan); Iwame, Toshiyuki [Tokushima Prefectural Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokushima (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Little Leaguer's shoulder is a syndrome involving the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate. Conservative treatment usually resolves the symptoms. However, there are no reports of a radiographic follow-up study of this disease. The purpose of this study was to show the radiographic healing process of Little Leaguer's shoulder. A total of 19 male baseball players diagnosed as having Little Leaguer's shoulder were retrospectively evaluated. The mean age at first presentation was 12.7 years. External rotation anteroposterior radiographs of the shoulder were taken. All patients were treated with rest from throwing, and no throwing was recommended until remodeling was confirmed. Follow-up radiographs were taken at 1-month intervals to assess healing. All patients were observed until healing was confirmed radiographically, after which they returned to baseball. The mean follow-up period was 8.5 months. In addition to radiography, patients were asked whether they had any symptoms and whether they had been able to return to baseball. At the first examination, radiographs showed a wider epiphyseal plate of the throwing side compared with the asymptomatic contralateral shoulder. Healing was observed in all cases. Healing occurred first along the medial side and was then extended laterally. The mean time required for healing was 4.7 months. All patients were able to return to playing baseball at their pre-injury level of play and were asymptomatic when examined at the final follow-up. The healing process of Little Leaguer's shoulder advanced from medial to lateral, and healing was achieved about 5 months after initial examination. (orig.)

  14. Operational follow-up of telecommunication equipment by sampling, using the SADE system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadin, H.; Gouret, G.; Heno, C.; Pichonnet, C.; Robert, Y.

    1982-09-01

    Contrary to an exhaustive follow-up which requires recall to judge the quality of materials, sampling permits knowledge of the rate of being out of order and the nature of the faults affecting the materials. Sampling using the system for analyzing defects during operation is considered as a means of determining the quality and reliability of telecommunication materials to be installed in hundereds of thousands of prototypes, such as subscriber terminals. Forms used for recording and reporting repairs are discussed.

  15. Development of de novo major involvement during follow-up in Behçet's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarico, Rosaria; Cantarini, Luca; d'Ascanio, Anna; Figus, Michele; Favati, Benedetta; Baldini, Chiara; Tani, Chiara; Neri, R; Bombardieri, Stefano; Mosca, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of de novo major involvement during follow-up in a cohort of patients with Behçet's syndrome (BS); the secondary aim was to analyse the epidemiological profile and the long-term outcome of those patients who developed new major involvement. Among our cohort of 120 BS patients, we evaluated all subjects who had no major organ involvement during the early years of their disease; specifically, at disease onset, the 52% of the cohort presented a prevalent mucocutaneous involvement. The primary outcomes were represented by the following: Hatemi et al. (Rheum Dis Clin North Am 39(2):245-61, 2013) the incidence of de novo major involvement during the follow-up and Hatemi et al. (Clin Exp Rheumatol 32(4 Suppl 84):S112-22, 2014) the use of immunosuppressive drugs during the follow-up. We have defined the development of de novo major involvement during the follow-up as the occurrence of severe ocular, vascular or CNS involvement after a latency period from the diagnosis of at least 3 years. Among 62 patients characterized by a mild onset of disease, we observed that after at least 3 years from the diagnosis, 21 BS patients (34%) still developed serious morbidities. Specifically, three patients developed ocular involvement, nine patients developed neurological involvement and nine patients presented vascular involvement. Comparing main epidemiological and clinical findings of the two groups, we observed that patients who developed de novo major involvement were more frequently males and younger; furthermore, 95% of these patients were characterized by a young onset of disease (p < 0.001). Being free of major organ complication in the first years of BS is not necessary a sign of a favourable outcome. Globally, the development of de novo major involvement during the coursfce of BS suggests that a tight control is strongly recommended during the course of the disease.

  16. Pterygium surgery by means of conjunctival autograft: long term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentín Huerva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To demonstrate the long term of follow-up of the recurrence rate after conjunctival autograft for pterygium surgery. METHODS: A total of 112 patients operated for pterygium with conjunctival autografts and with more than one year follow-up were registered. Patients were called for voluntary examinations of their respective ocular surface statuses. Completing the study was only possible in 44 cases. Seven had bilateral pterygium. (N=51 operated pterygium. RESULTS: The mean follow-up time was 49.06 months. In 29.45% of the cases, attachment was performed using non-absorbable sutures (nylon 10/0, while fibrin glue was used in 70.55% of the cases. Six cases of recurrence (11.76% were found. The recurrence rate between primary and recurrent pterygium, and between sutures and fibrin glue proved to be not statistically significant; p>0.05. There were no significant differences between women and men with respect to recurrence. The median of age in the recurrence group was 40 years old, in contrast to 55 in the non-recurrence group; p=0.01517. All of these recurrences were associated with patients of Hispanic origins (from Latin America; p=0.001506. CONCLUSIONS: After a long follow-up period after autograft pterygium surgery, there were no statistically significant differences in recurrence rates for the application of sutures as opposed to fibrin glue; similarly, there were no statistically significant differences between the use of autograft in primary and recurrent pterygium. The greatest risk factors for recurrence were young age and Hispanic ethnicity.

  17. Cytokines as a predictor of clinical response following hip arthroscopy: minimum 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Lauren M; Safran, Marc R; Maloney, William J; Goodman, Stuart B; Huddleston, James I; Bellino, Michael J; Scuderi, Gaetano J; Abrams, Geoffrey D

    2016-08-01

    Hip arthroscopy in patients with osteoarthritis has been shown to have suboptimal outcomes. Elevated cytokine concentrations in hip synovial fluid have previously been shown to be associated with cartilage pathology. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between hip synovial fluid cytokine concentration and clinical outcomes at a minimum of 2 years following hip arthroscopy. Seventeen patients without radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis had synovial fluid aspirated at time of portal establishment during hip arthroscopy. Analytes included fibronectin-aggrecan complex as well as a multiplex cytokine array. Patients completed the modified Harris Hip Score, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and the International Hip Outcomes Tool pre-operatively and at a minimum of 2 years following surgery. Pre and post-operative scores were compared with a paired t-test, and the association between cytokine values and clinical outcome scores was performed with Pearson's correlation coefficient with an alpha value of 0.05 set as significant. Sixteen of seventeen patients completed 2-year follow-up questionnaires (94%). There was a significant increase in pre-operative to post-operative score for each clinical outcome measure. No statistically significant correlation was seen between any of the intra-operative cytokine values and either the 2-year follow-up scores or the change from pre-operative to final follow-up outcome values. No statistically significant associations were seen between hip synovial fluid cytokine concentrations and 2-year follow-up clinical outcome assessment scores for those undergoing hip arthroscopy.

  18. Gangrene of the penis in a diabetic male with multiple amputations and follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Vijayan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old insulin dependent, diabetic male with severe atherosclerosis requiring multiple amputations in the extremities in the past, with normal renal function presented with gangrene of glans penis. He was initially treated with debridement but as the gangrene progressed, partial penile amputation was performed. He showed no further progress of the disease and had no voiding difficulties even after 4 years of follow up.

  19. Accuracy of Five Serologic Tests for the Follow up of Strongyloides stercoralis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Dora Buonfrate; Marco Sequi; Rojelio Mejia; Cimino, Ruben O.; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J.; Marco Albonico; Monica Degani; Stefano Tais; Andrea Angheben; Ana Requena-Mendez; José Muñoz; Thomas B Nutman; Zeno Bisoffi

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional faecal-based methods have poor sensitivity for the detection of S. stercoralis, therefore are inadequate for post-treatment evaluation of infected patients who should be carefully monitored to exclude the persistence of the infection. In a previous study, we demonstrated high accuracy of five serology tests for the screening and diagnosis of strongyloidiasis. Aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of the same five tests for the follow up of patients ...

  20. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures: 10-year follow-up of eight cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Roshan

    2009-01-01

    Eight children with pyridoxine-dependent seizures (PDS) were seen over a period of 10 years. Of those children, 6 are on regular follow-up. Four of the children were seen in one family. All the patients presented with refractory seizures, mainly neonatal status epilepticus. Though PDS is a rare condition, it must be considered in all cases with refractory seizures, particularly in children younger than 3 years. When confirming a diagnosis, oral pyridoxine is as effective as intravenous pyridoxine.

  1. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures: 10-year follow-up of eight cases

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Eight children with pyridoxine-dependent seizures (PDS) were seen over a period of 10 years. Of those children, 6 are on regular follow-up. Four of the children were seen in one family. All the patients presented with refractory seizures, mainly neonatal status epilepticus. Though PDS is a rare condition, it must be considered in all cases with refractory seizures, particularly in childrens younger than 3 years. When confirming a diagnosis, oral pyridoxine is as effective as intravenous pyrid...

  2. Long term follow-up of 43 pure dural arteriovenous fistulae (AVF) of the lateral sinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fermand, M.; Reizine, D.; Melki, J.P.; Riche, M.C.; Merland, J.J.

    1987-07-01

    Fourty-three patients with arterio-venous fistulae of the dura of the transverse sinus with a complaint of tinnitus are reviewed, with a follow-up of 12 months to 11 years. 34 patients were embolized, 2 treated surgically, and 7 were untreated. Embolization appears to have been beneficial. The benign nature of this abnormality must be emphasized, and serious psychological study of the patient must be made before deciding on therapy.

  3. Clinical Coronary In-Stent Restenosis Follow-Up after Treatment and Analyses of Clinical Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Barbara Campos Abreu; Nascimento, Guilherme Abreu; Rabelo, Walter; Marino, Marcos Antônio; Marino, Roberto Luiz; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz Pinho

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical in-stent restenosis (CISR) is the main limitation of coronary angioplasty with stent implantation. Objective Describe the clinical and angiographic characteristics of CISR and the outcomes over a minimum follow-up of 12 months after its diagnosis and treatment. Methods We analyzed in 110 consecutive patients with CISR the clinical presentation, angiographic characteristics, treatment and combined primary outcomes (cardiovascular death, nonfatal acute myocardial infarction [AMI]) and combined secondary (unstable angina with hospitalization, target vessel revascularization and target lesion revascularization) during a minimal follow-up of one year. Results Mean age was 61 ± 11 years (68.2% males). Clinical presentations included acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in 62.7% and proliferative ISR in 34.5%. CISR was treated with implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES) in 36.4%, Bare Metal Stent (BMS) in 23.6%, myocardial revascularization surgery in 18.2%, balloon angioplasty in 15.5% and clinical treatment in 6.4%. During a median follow-up of 19.7 months, the primary outcome occurred in 18 patients, including 6 (5.5%) deaths and 13 (11.8%) AMI events. Twenty-four patients presented a secondary outcome. Predictors of the primary outcome were CISR with DES (HR = 4.36 [1.44–12.85]; p = 0.009) and clinical treatment for CISR (HR = 10.66 [2.53–44.87]; p = 0.001). Treatment of CISR with BMS (HR = 4.08 [1.75–9.48]; p = 0.001) and clinical therapy (HR = 6.29 [1.35–29.38]; p = 0.019) emerged as predictors of a secondary outcome. Conclusion Patients with CISR present in most cases with ACS and with a high frequency of adverse events during a medium-term follow-up. PMID:25651344

  4. Percutaneous treatment of patients with heart diseases: selection, guidance and follow-up. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Contaldi Carla

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation, patent foramen ovale, interatrial septal defect, atrial fibrillation and perivalvular leak, are now amenable to percutaneous treatment. These percutaneous procedures require the use of Transthoracic (TTE, Transesophageal (TEE and/or Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE. This paper provides an overview of the different percutaneous interventions, trying to provide a systematic and comprehensive approach for selection, guidance and follow-up of patients undergoing these procedures, illustrating the key role of 2D echocardiography.

  5. Newly diagnosed incident dizziness of older patients: a follow-up study in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummers-Pradier Eva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dizziness is a common complaint of older patients in primary care, yet not much is known about the course of incident dizziness. The aim of the study was to follow-up symptoms, subjective impairments and needs of older patients (≥65 with incident dizziness and to determine predictors of chronic dizziness. Furthermore, we analysed general practitioners' (GPs' initial diagnoses, referrals and revised diagnoses after six months. Methods An observational study was performed in 21 primary care practices in Germany, including a four-week and six-month follow-up. A questionnaire comprising characteristic matters of dizziness and a series of validated instruments was completed by 66 participants during enrolment and follow-up (after 1 month and 6 months. After six months, chart reviews and face-to-face interviews were also performed with the GPs. Results Mean scores of dizziness handicap, depression and quality of life were not or only slightly affected, and did not deteriorate during follow-up; however, 24 patients (34.8% showed a moderate or severe dizziness handicap, and 43 (62.3% showed a certain disability in terms of quality of life at the time of enrolment. In multivariate analysis, n = 44 patients suffering from chronic dizziness (dependent variable, i.e. relapsing or persistent at six months initially had a greater dizziness handicap (OR 1.42, 95%CI 1.05-1.47 than patients with transient dizziness. GPs referred 47.8% of the patients to specialists who detected two additional cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. Conclusions New-onset dizziness relapsed or persisted in a considerable number of patients within six months. This was difficult to predict due to the patients' heterogeneous complaints and characteristics. Symptom persistence does not seem to be associated with deterioration of the psychological status in older primary care patients. Management strategies should routinely consider BPPV as

  6. Aortico-left ventricular tunnel in adulthood: twenty-two year follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Rose; Kafka, Henryk

    2009-05-01

    Aortico-left ventricular tunnel (ALVT) is a rare congenital cardiac defect that is usually managed by surgical or catheter intervention. This case documents the 22 year follow up of a 44 year old man who has been managed medically through a programme of close clinical and echocardiographic monitoring. This report illustrates that conservative management of Type I ALVT can be undertaken without adverse clinical consequences.

  7. The surgical management of urogenital tuberculosis our experience and long-term follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Punit Bansal; Neeru Bansal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Urogenital tuberculosis (TB) is common in developing countries. We present our experience of surgically managed cases of genitourinary TB (GUTB). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 60 cases GUTB who underwent surgery at our center from January 2003 to January 2010. Mode of presentation, organ involvement, investigation, surgical treatment and follow-up were studied. Results: There were 38 males and 22 females with a mean age of 32.5 years. The most common...

  8. Thin-Section CT Characteristics and Longitudinal CT Follow-up of Chemotherapy Induced Interstitial Pneumonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Na; Kim, Mi Young; Koo, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sung-Soo; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Lee, Jae Cheol; Song, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe the computed tomography (CT) features of chemotherapy-induced interstitial pneumonitis (CIIP) with longitudinal follow-up. The study was approved by the local ethics committee. One hundred consecutive patients with CIIP between May 2005 and March 2015 were retrospectively enrolled. The initial CT was reviewed by 2 independent chest radiologists and categorized into 1 of 4 CT patterns in accordance with the 2013 guidelines for idiopathic interstitial pneumonia: nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), organizing pneumonia (OP), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) mimicking desquamative interstitial pneumonitis, and diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). We assessed semiquantitative analysis on a 5% scale to assess the extent of parenchymal abnormalities (emphysema, reticulation, ground-glass opacity, consolidation, honeycombing cyst) and their distribution on initial (n = 100), subsequent (n = 87), and second follow-up CT (n = 48). Interval changes in extent on follow-up CT were compared using paired t test. The clinic-radiologic factors were compared between Group 1 (NSIP and OP patterns) and Group 2 (HP and DAD patterns) using χ2 and independent t tests. The most common pattern of CIIP on the initial CT was HP (51%), followed by NSIP (23%), OP (20%), and DAD (6%). Diffuse ground-glass opacity was the most common pulmonary abnormality. The predominant distribution was bilateral (99%) and symmetric (82%), with no craniocaudal (60%) or axial (79%) dominance. Subsequent and second follow-up CTs showed decreased extent of total pulmonary abnormalities (P CIIP, Group 2 CIIP was more likely to be caused by molecularly targeted drugs (P = 0.030), appeared earlier (P = 0.034), and underwent more complete resolution (P CIIP is appropriate and practical in interpreting radiological findings. PMID:26765442

  9. Does Diagnostic Classification of Early-Onset Psychosis Change over Follow-Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraguas, David; de Castro, Maria J.; Medina, Oscar; Parellada, Mara; Moreno, Dolores; Graell, Montserrat; Merchan-Naranjo, Jessica; Arango, Celso

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine the diagnostic stability and the functional outcome of patients with early-onset psychosis (EOP) over a 2-year follow-up period. Methods: A total of 24 patients (18 males (75%) and 6 females (25%), mean age [plus or minus] SD: 15.7 [plus or minus] 1.6 years) with a first episode of EOP formed the sample. Psychotic symptoms…

  10. Color Doppler Imaging in the Diagnosis and Follow-up of Carotid Cavernous Sinus Fistulas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    This report describes color doppler imaging (CDI) in theevaluation and follow-up of nine patients with carotid cavernous sinusfistulas.The orbits and carotid arteries were examined with CDI.In allcases,the diagnosis was confirmed by angiography.CDI clearlydemonstrated the dilated superior ophthalmic veins (SOVs) with retrogradeflow and low resistance arterial doppler waveform in all nine patients (10eyes).After the study of quantitative hemodynamics,we found that directcarotid cavernous sinus fistulas s...

  11. Evaluation of nurse-led follow up for patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Faithfull, S; Corner, J.; MEYER L.; Huddart, R; Dearnaley, D.

    2001-01-01

    This study reports results from a randomised controlled trial of nurse-led care and was designed to determine whether nurse-led follow up improved patients morbidity and satisfaction with care in men treated with radical radiotherapy for prostate and bladder cancer. The aim was to compare outcomes in terms of toxicity, symptoms experienced, quality of life, satisfaction with care and health care costs, between those receiving nurse-led care and a group receiving standard care. The study popul...

  12. Fifteen-year follow-up of quality of life in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter; R; van; Dijk; Susan; JJ; Logtenberg; Klaas; H; Groenier; Joost; C; Keers; Henk; JG; Bilo; Nanne; Kleefstra

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate metabolic control and health-related quality of life(HRQOL)in a type 1 diabetes mellitus(T1DM)population.METHODS:As part of a prospective cohort study,283T1DM patients treated with various insulin treatment modalities including multiple daily injections(MDI)and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion(CSII)were examined annually.HRQOL was measured using the SF-36 and EuroQol questionnaires.Data regarding HRQOL,glycaemic and metabolic control from baseline and follow-up measures in 2002 and 2010 were analysed.Linear mixed models were used to calculate estimated values and differences between the three moments in time and the three treatment modalities.RESULTS:Significant changes[meanΔ(95%CI)]in body mass index[2.4 kg/m2(1.0,3.8)],systolic blood pressure[-6.4 mmHg(-11.4,-1.3)]and EuroQol-VAS[-7.3(-11.4,-3.3)]were observed over time.In 2010,168 patients were lost to follow-up.Regarding mode of therapy,52 patients remained on MDI,28 remained on CSII,and 33 patients switched from MDI to CSII during follow-up.Among patients on MDI,HRQOL decreased significantly over time:mental component summary[-9.8(-16.3,-3.2)],physical component summary[-8.6(-15.3,-1.8)]and EuroQol-VAS[-8.1(-14.0,-2.3)],P<0.05 for all.For patients using CSII,the EuroQol-VAS decreased[-9.6(-17.5,-1.7)].None of the changes over time in HRQOL differed significantly with the changes over time within the other treatment groups.CONCLUSION:No differences with respect to metabolic and HRQOL parameters between the various insulin treatment modalities were observed after 15 years of follow-up in T1DM patients.

  13. Dynamic temporal change of cerebral microbleeds: long-term follow-up MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hoon Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral microbleeds (MBs are understood as an important radiologic marker of intracerebral hemorrhage. We sought to investigate the temporal changes of MBs and clinical factors associated with the changes using long-term follow-up MRI. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From October 2002 to July 2006, we prospectively enrolled patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack, and followed-up their brain MRIs with an interval >12 mo. We compared demographic factors, vascular risk factors, laboratory findings, and radiologic factors according to the presence or changes of MBs. A total of 224 patients successfully completed the follow-up examinations (mean, 27 months. Newly developed MBs were noted in 10 patients (6.8% among those without MBs at baseline (n = 148, and in those with MBs at baseline (n = 76, the MB count had decreased in 11 patients (14.5%, and increased in 41 patients (53.9%. The estimated annual rate of change of MB numbers was 0.80 lesions per year in all patients, a value which became greater in those patients who exhibited MBs at baseline (MBs≥5, 5.43 lesions per year. Strokes due to small vessel occlusion and intracerebral hemorrhage, as well as white matter lesions were independently associated with an increased MB count, whereas the highest quartile of low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol was associated with a decreased MB count. CONCLUSION: During the follow-up period, most of MBs showed dynamic temporal change. Symptomatic or asymptomatic small vessel diseases appear to act as risk factors while in contrast, a high level of LDL cholesterol may act as a protective factor against MB increase.

  14. A follow-up study of the fate of small asymptomatic deep venous thromboses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Lena M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postoperative asymptomatic deep venous thromboses (ADVT can give rise to posttthrombotic syndrome (PTS, but there are still many unresolved issues in this context. For example, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the fate of small ADVT following minor orthopedic surgery. This follow-up study evaluates postthrombotic changes and clinical manifestations of PTS in a group of patients with asymptomatic calf vein DVT after surgery for Achilles tendon rupture. Methods Forty-six consecutive patients with distal ADVT were contacted and enrolled in a follow-up consisting of a single visit at the hospital at a mean time of 5 years postoperatively, including clinical examination and scoring, ultrasonography and venous plethysmography. All patients had participated in DVT-screening with colour duplex ultrasound (CDU 3 and 6 weeks postoperatively and 80% of them were treated with anticoagulation. Results With CDU postthrombotic changes and deep venous reflux were detected at follow-up in more than 50% of the patients, more commonly in somewhat larger calf DVT:s initially affecting more than one vessel. However, only about 10% of the patients had significant venous reflux according to venous plethysmography. No patient had plethysmographic evidence of remaining outflow obstruction, but presence of postthrombotic changes shown with CDU negatively influenced venous outflow capacity measured with plethysmography. A clinical entity of PTS was rarely found and occurred only in two patients (4% and then classified by Villalta scoring as of mild degree with few clinical signs of disease. Distal ADVT:s detected in the early postoperative period (3 weeks showed DVT-progression in 75% of the limbs that were still immobilized and without anticoagulation. Conclusions Asymptomatic postoperative distal DVT:s following surgery for Achilles tendon rupture have a good prognosis and a favourable clinical outcome. In our material of 46 patients the

  15. Retrospective analysis of follow-up results in patients with skin lymphomas of low degree malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Tarasov V.V.

    2011-01-01

    Administration of specific chemotherapy (cytostatics) has great significance in the treatment of skin lymphomas of low degree malignancy. The research goal is to study follow-up results of cytostatic therapy of skin lymphomas. Retrospective observation of survival of patients with T-cell epidermothropic skin lymphomas using special therapy and without its use has been studied. Comparative analysis of survival rate in two groups of patients has been done. 40 patients received cytostatics and 3...

  16. Visual, Musculoskeletal, and Balance Complaints in AMD: A Follow-Up Study

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Zetterlund; Hans Olof Richter; Lars-Olov Lundqvist

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate whether patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) run a potentially higher risk of developing visual, musculoskeletal, and balance complaints than age-matched controls with normal vision. Methods. Visual assessments, self-rated visual function, self-rated visual, musculoskeletal, and balance complaints, and perceived general health were obtained in 37 AMD patients and 18 controls, at baseline and after an average of 3.8 years later. Results. At follow-up bot...

  17. [Importance of long-term follow-up of diabetes insipidus; from lymphocytic hypophysitis to germinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat Madramany, A; Gastaldo Simeón, E; Revert Ventura, A; Escobar Hoyos, L A; Riesgo Suárez, P

    2015-01-01

    A case is presented of a 10-year old boy who had a hypothalamic-pituitary axis disorder. He initially presented with diabetes insipidus that progressed to panhypopituitarism. A hidden hypothalamic lesion should be suspected in all these cases, and should be followed up. New lesions were found in the pituitary stem three years later. Although tumor markers were negative, there was an increase in size, and a biopsy was performed. The histopathology reported a Lymphocytic Hypophysitis. There were increases in the tumor markers during the follow-up, thus a second biopsy was performed, with the diagnosis of Germinoma. Lymphocytic Hypophysitis is an uncommon diagnosis in children. Few cases have been reported, and in some cases, they were later diagnosed with Germinoma. We believe this case highlights the importance of the follow-up of children with Central Diabetes Insipidus with a normal MRI, as well as not taking the diagnosis of Lymphocytic Hypophysitis/lymphocytic Infundibular neurohypophysitis as definitive, as it is a rare diagnosis at this age, and could mask a Germinoma, as recorded in some cases.

  18. Quality of life in post-stroke patients at one year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoany Mesa Barrera

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Foundation: Cerebrovascular diseases impact on quality of life. Factors associated to a greater impairment vary from one study to another. Objective: To describe the factors that affect Quality of life in stroke survivors at one year.Methods: It is a longitudinal descriptive study of a cohort of 110 stroke survivors with outpatient follow-up for one year after the initial evaluation. Quality of life was assessed using the Quality of Life Scale for Stroke.Results: Women predominated with 52.3%. The degree of neurological involvement was moderate to severe in more than two thirds of patients and at a year follow up, it improved (slight to moderate, with average score of 3.5 ± 3.8. More than one third presented high burden of depressive symptoms for an average score of 7.8 ± 3.6, which increased to 56% per year. Factors associated with the impairment of quality of life were: worse neurological status (OR: 2.63, CI: 1.48, 2.82, major depressive symptoms (OR: 1.94, CI: 1 17; 1.89 and older (OR: 1.14, CI: 1.04, 1.25. Conclusion: Quality of life was determined by the degree of neurological impairment, cognitive status, older age and the presence of depressive symptoms. The only factors associated with quality of life which were modified at a year of follow-up were the neurological involvement and the presence of depressive symptoms.

  19. Papillary Thyroid Cancer, Macrofollicular Variant: The Follow-Up and Analysis of Prognosis of 5 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varlık Erol

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The main aim of this study was to comparatively analyze the recurrence and prognosis of this rare variant with the literature by analyzing the follow-up data of 5 patients diagnosed with papillary cancer macrofollicular variant. Methods. The demographic data, radiological and pathological data, and prognostic data of 5 patients who underwent surgery for thyroid cancer and were diagnosed with papillary cancer macrofollicular variant pathologically were retrospectively analyzed. Results. The mean age of patients whose mean follow-up period was determined as 7.2 years was 41, and the male/female ratio was 4/1. All patients underwent total thyroidectomy. The pathology report of 2 patients (40% revealed macrofollicular variant of papillary microcancer, and 3 patients papillary cancer macrofollicular variant. Central dissection was performed in one patient (20% due to macroscopic pathologic lymph node and 4 metastatic lymph nodes were reported. Also, locoregional recurrence was present in 3 out of 5 patients (60%. Conclusions. Although an impression of earlier and increased risk of recurrence in papillary carcinoma with macrofollicular variant has been documented, more studies with extensive follow-up times and large populations are required.

  20. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: A Long Term Follow-up Shows Benefit with Risk Factor Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Khalighi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Only sparse data was available on long-term of Takotusbo Cardiomyopathy (TC. Previous studies suggested prognosis is not necessarily benign. We report the long-term follow-up of 12 TC patients actively managed with risk factor reduction. Retrospective analysis of all patients diagnosed with TC at our hospital between 1998 and 2010. We identified 12 patients with TC among 1651 cases of emergent left heart catheterization over 12 years. Mean follow-up time was 8.3 ± 3.6 years. All were female, 87% had hypertension, 25% had history of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD, 67% had hyperlipidemia, 44% had some preceding emotional trauma, and 44% had some physical/physiological stress. Previous studies have shown that over 50% of TC patients experience future cardiac events, and 10% have a recurrence of TC. Patients were prescribed therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLC and guideline directed medical therapy (GDMT for aggressive risk factor reduction. TLC included diet, exercise, and cardiac rehabilitation. GDMT often included aspirin, beta-blockers, ACE-inhibitors, and statins. Follow-up echocardiograms showed recovery and maintenance of the ejection fraction. There was no cardiac mortality and no recurrences of TC. Aggressive risk factor reduction with TLC and GDMT may be effective in improving the long term outcomes of patients with TC.

  1. A Comparison of four pulpotomy techniques in primary molars: a long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Deniz; Sari, Saziye; Cetinbaş, Tuğba

    2008-08-01

    The study evaluated the effects of formocresol (FC), ferric sulphate (FS), calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH](2)), and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as pulp dressing agents in pulpotomized primary molars. Sixteen children each with at least four primary molars requiring pulpotomy were selected. Eighty selected teeth were divided into four groups and treated with one of the pulpotomy agent. The children were recalled for clinical and radiographic examination every 6 months during 2 years of follow-up. Eleven children with 56 teeth arrived for clinical and radiographic follow-up evaluation at 24 months. The follow-up evaluations revealed that the success rate was 76.9% for FC, 73.3% for FS, 46.1% for Ca(OH)(2), and 66.6% for MTA. In conclusion, Ca(OH)(2)is less appropriate for primary teeth pulpotomies than the other pulpotomy agents. FC and FS appeared to be superior to the other agents. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups.

  2. Goddard Robotic Telescope - Optical Follow-up of GRBs and Coordinated Observations of AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Wallace, C. A.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Okajima, T.; Ukwatta, T. N.

    2010-01-01

    Since it is not possible to predict when a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) will occur or when Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) flaring activity starts, follow-up/monitoring ground telescopes must be located as uniformly as possible all over the world in order to collect data simultaneously with Fermi and Swift detections. However, there is a distinct gap in follow-up coverage of telescopes in the eastern U.S. region based on the operations of Swift. Motivated by this fact, we have constructed a 14" fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up Swift/Fermi GRBs and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) AGN. Our telescope system consists of off-the-shelf hardware. With the focal reducer, we are able to match the field of view of Swift narrow instruments (20' x 20'). We started scientific observations in mid-November 2008 and GRT has been fully remotely operated since August 2009. The 3(sigma) upper limit in a 30-second exposure in the R filter is approx.15.4 mag; however, we can reach to approx.18 mag in a 600-second exposures. Due to the weather condition at the telescope site. our observing efficiency is 30-40%, on average.

  3. Surgical treatment of gingival overgrowth with 10 years of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballini Andrea

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In some pathological conditions, gingivitis caused by plaque accumulation can be more severe, with the result of an overgrowth. Nevertheless, the overgrowth involves the gingival margin with extension to the inter-dental papilla. The lesion may involve the inter-proximal spaces, and become so extensive that the teeth are displaced and their crowns covered. Severe overgrowth may lead to impairment in aesthetic and masticatory functions, requiring surgical excision of the excessive tissue. Aim of this study is to describe an operative protocol for the surgical treatment of localized gingival overgrowth analyzing the surgical technique, times and follow-up. Methods A total of 20 patients were enrolled and underwent initial, non surgical, periodontal treatment and training sessions on home oral hygiene training. The treatment plan involved radical exeresis of the mass followed by positioning of an autograft of connective tissue and keratinized gingiva. Results During 10 years of follow-up, all the grafts appeared well vascularized, aesthetically satisfactory, and without relapse. Conclusions Periodontal examinations, surgical procedures, and dental hygiene with follow-up are an essential part of the treatment protocol. However, additional effort is needed from the patient. Hopefully, the final treatment result makes it all worthwhile.

  4. Asian-Specific total knee system: 5-14 year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosaka Kunihiro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knee size and body size differ in Asians compared with Caucasians. Nevertheless, many total knee arthroplasty (TKA prostheses used worldwide are made for Western Caucasian subjects. As a result, an Asian's knee might not fit these prostheses. We studied the Flexible Nichidai Knee (FNK system, a new model of TKA for Asian patients. The purpose of this report is to investigate the outcomes of this prosthesis retrospectively. Methods We investigated 1055 primary TKAs in 595 patients who underwent FNK for osteoarthritis (OA in Japan and were followed for > 5 years. The knee score and function score were used for clinical evaluation. We examined the range of motion (ROM preoperatively and at final follow-up and radiographic assessments. In addition, postoperative complications were investigated. A survivorship analysis was also conducted using two endpoints: revision for any reason and aseptic failure. Results 890 knees in 502 patients were available for study (follow-up rate of 96.0%. The mean follow-up term was 8.3 years (range, 5.0-14.1 years. The knee and function score significantly improved from 41.3 to 90.3 and from 39.1 to 76.2 points, respectively (p Conclusion The FNK prosthesis for Asians achieved excellent mid- to long-term survivorship and clinical results.

  5. Follow-up of high energy neutrinos detected by the ANTARES telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ANTARES telescope is well-suited to detect high energy neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky with a high duty cycle. Potential neutrino sources are gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae and flaring active galactic nuclei. To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a detection method based on follow-up observations from the neutrino direction has been developed. This program, denoted as TAToO, includes a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT, Zadko and MASTER and the Swift-XRT telescope, which are triggered when an “interesting” neutrino is detected by ANTARES. A follow-up of special events, such as neutrino doublets in time/space coincidence or a single neutrino having a very high energy or in the specific direction of a local galaxy, significantly improves the perspective for the detection of transient sources. The analysis of early and long term follow-up observations to search for fast and slowly varying transient sources, respectively, has been performed and the results covering optical and X-ray data are presented in this contribution.

  6. OSTA program: A French follow up intervention program for suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouaffak, Fayçal; Marchand, Arnaud; Castaigne, Emmanuelle; Arnoux, Armelle; Hardy, Patrick

    2015-12-30

    Attempted suicide is a strong risk factor for subsequent suicidal behavior. In recent years, a particular interest has been given to follow-up interventions as a potential effective strategy in preventing recurrent suicidal behavior. We developed a follow-up intervention program called OSTA (organization of a suitable monitoring for suicide attempters) aimed at addressing this issue and tested its effectiveness in a 1-year randomized controlled trial. Individuals who attempted suicide and were admitted to the emergency department (ED) of Bicêtre Hospital (n=320) were randomly allocated to receive either the OSTA program or a control treatment. On an intention to treat basis, the proportion of patients who reattempted suicide did not differ significantly between the interventional group (IG) 14.5% (22/152) and the control group (CG) 14% (21/150). There were also no significant differences, between the two arms, in the number of suicide attempts. Although no significant difference has been found between the OSTA program and the control treatment concerning the rate of suicide reattempts, we believe that further studies should be conducted to test the effectiveness of more standardized follow-up studies in suicide prevention.

  7. Follow-up study of Evolution-drum chipper; Evolution-energiapuuhakkurin kaeyttoeselvitys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahti, P. [Kotimaiset Energiat Ky, Kangashaekki (Finland); Vesisenaho, T. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Fuel Production

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this project was to test and further develop a new type of a drum chipper. It was assumed that this Evolution-chipper would be able to produce fuel chips without long splinters and would also be reliable and effective in chipping work at road-side landings. In this project the fuel chip quality and productivity of the chipper were found out. The follow-up study started in October 1995 and ended in the end of 1996. According to the follow-up study the mechanical availability of the chipper was 83 % during a period of one year. Because of the rather low level of fuel chip utilisation in Finland the work sites are located far from each other. Therefore the moving between working sites take as much as 1/5 of the total working hours. The chipper is easy to operate and the differences in the productivity between operators are modest. The chipping productivity varies mainly depending on the raw material. The average productivity was 45,8 m{sup 3} (loose) per gross effective hour during the follow-up period. The internal screening system of the chipper diminishes the amount of long splinters effectively. Other chipping parameters (such as rotating speed) affected the chip quality only a little. (orig.)

  8. Patient relationship management: an overview and study of a follow-up system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Räisänen, Teppo; Hummastenniemi, Niko

    2008-01-01

    Customer relationship management research is utilized to explain the need for a more patient-oriented support in patient care. This article presents a European study on how various hospital units of a single healthcare organization have utilized a patient relationship management system--in particular a patient treatment follow-up system--and how it affects patient care and the knowledge work performed by the medical staff. Eight physicians were interviewed at a university hospital on whether patient treatment was improved through a follow-up system that had been in use in the case organization for three years. The interviewees represented various hospital units, and all of them had used the system at their own unit. The results indicate that it is possible to improve patient care through more personalized treatment. The follow-up treatment system seems to be a tool to create and maintain better communication with the patients rather than just a technological solution. It may help better understand and analyze both individual patients and patient groups. For individual physicians it provides a way to reflect professional skills. The system was lacking in its support for one-to-one communication with patients. Nevertheless, the system is an example of patient relationship management which may help healthcare units to move towards a more patient-oriented care.

  9. Long-Term Follow-Up of Intravitreal Bevacizumab in Retinal Arterial Macroaneurysm: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shani Golan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To present the long-term effect of intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin® therapy in a patient suffering from retinal arterial macroaneurysm. Methods: Case report of a 72-year-old female diagnosed with retinal macroaneurysm in the superior temporal artery leading to macular edema. Functional and morphological data at baseline, 4 weeks, 2 months, and 13 months following treatment with two consecutive intravitreal bevacizumab injections are presented. Results: Best-corrected visual acuity improved from 20/160 at baseline to 20/20 at the3-months follow-up and remained stable through 13 months of follow-up. Central retinal thickness measured by optical coherence tomography decreased from 364 µm at baseline to 248 µm at the 13-months follow-up. No ocular or systemic side effects were detected. Conclusions: Intravitreal bevacizumab therapy may lead to resolution of macular edema associated with retinal macroaneurysm and consequently visual improvement. This treatment may promise a long-lasting effect but warrant further investigation in larger series.

  10. J-GEM Follow-Up Observations of The Gravitational Wave Source GW151226

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Michitoshi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Morokuma, Tomoki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Asakura, Yuichiro; Matsubayashi, Kazuya; Ohta, Kouji; Abe, Fumio; Chimasu, Sho; Furusawa, Hisanori; Itoh, Ryosuke; Itoh, Yoichi; Kanda, Yuka; Kawabata, Koji S; Kawabata, Miho; Koshida, Shintaro; Koshimoto, Naoki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Moritani, Yuki; Motohara, Kentaro; Murata, Katsuhiro L; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Nakata, Fumiaki; Nishioka, Tsubasa; Saito, Yoshihiko; Terai, Tsuyoshi; Tristram, Paul J; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Yasuda, Naoki; Doi, Mamoru; Fujisawa, Kenta; Kawachi, Akiko; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tamura, Yoichi; Uemura, Makoto; Yatsu, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of optical--infrared follow-up observations of the gravitational wave (GW) event GW151226 detected by the Advanced LIGO in the framework of J-GEM (Japanese collaboration for Gravitational wave ElectroMagnetic follow-up). We performed wide-field optical imaging surveys with Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC), Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC), and MOA-cam3. The KWFC survey started at 2.26 days after the GW event and covered 778 deg$^2$ centered at the high Galactic region of the skymap of GW151226. We started the HSC follow-up observations from 12 days after the event and covered an area of 63.5 deg$^2$ of the highest probability region of the northern sky with the limiting magnitudes of 24.6 and 23.8 for i band and z band, respectively. MOA-cam3 covered 145 deg$^2$ of the skymap with MOA-red filter 2.5 months after the GW alert. Total area covered by the wide-field surveys was 986.5 deg$^2$. The integrated detection probability of all the observed area was $\\sim$29%. We also performed galaxy-targeted o...

  11. GRB follow-up observations in the East-Asian region

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Y; Ip, W H; Qiu, Y; Hu, J Y; Zhou, X; Tamagawa, T; Onda, K; Makishima, K; Zhou, Xn.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, we established a Japan-Taiwan-China collaboration for GRB study in the East-Asian region. This serves as a valuable addition to the world-wide optical and infrared follow-up network, because the East-Asia region would otherwise be blank. We have been carrying out imaging and spectroscopic follow-up observations at Lulin (Taiwan), Kiso (Japan), WIDGET (Japan) and Xinglong (China). From Xinglong and Kiso, we can locate candidates and obtain early time spectra for afterglows. While WIDGET provides early time observations before the burst, the high-time resolution for multi-band light curves can be obtained at Lulin. With the data from these sites, we can obtain detailed information about the light curve and redshift of GRBs, which are important to understand the mechanism of the afterglows. Up to March 2005, ten follow-up observations have been provided by this East-Asia cooperation. Two optical afterglows were detected, GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. The results of the two detected afterglows are reported ...

  12. The Bologna-Oxford total ankle replacement: a mid-term follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, A; Martinelli, N; Sartorelli, E; Malerba, F

    2012-06-01

    The Bologna-Oxford (BOX) total ankle replacement (TAR) was developed with the aim of achieving satisfactory pain-free movement of the ankle. To date, only one single multicentre study has reported its clinical results. The aim of this study was to conduct an independent review of its mid-term results. We retrospectively reviewed a total of 60 prospectively followed patients in whom 62 BOX TARs had been implanted between 2004 and 2008. We used the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score to assess the clinical results. Standardised radiographs taken at the time of final follow-up were analysed by two observers. The overall survival was 91.9% at a mean follow-up of 42.5 months (24 to 71). The mean AOFAS score had improved from 35.1 points (sd 16.6; 4 to 73) pre-operatively to 78.0 (sd 10.7; 57 to 100) at final follow-up (p total of 47 patients (78.3%) were very satisfied or satisfied with the outcome. Five patients required revision for functional limitation or continuing pain.

  13. Longitudinal follow-up of muscle echotexture in infants with congenital muscular torticollis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ching-Fang; Fu, Tieh-Cheng; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Lin, Yu-Ju; Hsu, Chih-Chin

    2017-02-01

    Unilateral fibrous contracture of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle is the major pathophysiology in infants with congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). Physical examination is not always sufficient to detect minimal muscle fibrosis in involved SCM muscles.A prospective study for SCM muscle fibrosis in CMT infants by quantifying echotexture and muscle thickness during the course of treatment is highlighted in the study.Convenience samples of 21 female and 29 male infants with CMT, who were 1 to 12 months old, underwent physiotherapy for at least 3 months and were followed for 4.7 ± 0.4 months. All infants had at least 2 clinical assessments and ultrasonographic examinations for bilateral SCM muscles during follow-up. The K value, derived from the difference in echo intensities between the involved and uninvolved SCM muscles on longitudinal sonograms, was used to represent the severity of muscle fibrosis. Bilateral SCM muscle thickness and ratio of involved to uninvolved muscle thickness (Ratio I/U) were obtained simultaneously. Clinical outcome was also recorded.No subjects underwent surgical intervention during follow-up. The K value decreased from 6.85 ± 0.58 to 1.30 ± 0.36 at the end of follow-up (P SCM muscle thickness.In conclusion, echotexture is an efficient indicator for reflecting a wide degree of muscle fibrosis in infants with CMT and is informative during the treatment course.

  14. Follow-up and characterization of the TESS exoplanets with SOPHIE, SPIRou, and JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzet, N.; Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X.; Boisse, I.; Hébrard, G.; Forveille, T.; Donati, J.-F.; Bouchy, F.; Moutou, C.; Doyon, R.; Artigau, E.; Albert, L.; Malo, L.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Santerne, A.; Author2, J.-P.; Author3, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA TESS mission will deliver hundreds of transiting exoplanet candidates orbiting bright stars. The spectrometers SOPHIE at OHP and SPIRou at CFHT will be ideal to obtain radial velocities of these candidates, confirm their nature, and derive the planets' masses. These measurements will be crucial to deliver the best targets for atmospheric characterization with JWST. Here, we calculate the required observing time with SOPHIE, SPIRou, and JWST for each of the TESS targets in order to prepare follow-up observations. To infer their potential for JWST, we restrict the calculations to the case of transmission spectroscopy with NIRISS. The radial velocity follow-up of the giant planets (R_p > 4 R_E) could be achieved with SOPHIE, with a median observing time of 3.47 hours per target, and a total observing time of 305 hours that includes the 80% most favorable cases. Several small planets (R_p R_E) could also be confirmed, but most of them would require an unrealistic time investment. On the other hand, SPIRou is ideally suited to the follow-up of the small planets, with a median observing time of 2.65 hours per target, and a median observing time of 4.70 hours for the terrestrial planets in the habitable zone (R_p R_E, S programs with SOPHIE and SPIRou before the first planet candidates are delivered by TESS.

  15. Skype clinics after intestinal transplantation - follow-up beyond post codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Undine A; Vrakas, Georgios; Holdaway, Lydia; O'Connor, Marion; Macedo, Rubens; Reddy, Srikanth; Friend, Peter J; Giele, Henk; Vaidya, Anil

    2016-07-01

    The follow-up after intestinal transplantation (ITX) is complex and limited to specialized centers. ITX recipients often travel all over the country to be seen in the outpatient clinic of specialized centers which is costly and time-consuming. Videoconferences through Skype have been implemented to eliminate travel time, costs, and to improve patient compliance without jeopardizing safety. Eighteen of 19 patients followed up after ITX or modified multivisceral transplantation (MMVTX) in conventional outpatient clinics in Oxford agreed to attend additional Skype clinics. All patients who were followed up through Skype clinics after ITX/MMVTX received a questionnaire to measure their satisfaction with methods and technical aspects of videoconferencing as well as time/mode of traveling, travel expenses/costs, waiting time in outpatient clinic and patients' satisfaction. Mean travel distance to Oxford was 236 ± 168 miles, mean travel time was 277 ± 175 min, and mean travel cost was 200 ± 56 Great Britain Pounds. A total of 56% had to take time off work and/or find child/family care for the time spent in travel. These patients reported a satisfaction score of 4.38 ± 0.77 of 5 points as opposed to 2.88 ± 0.90 for attending the conventional outpatient clinic. Skype clinics have been proven successful and feasible in highly specialized fields like ITX in eligible patients.

  16. Follow-up of high energy neutrinos detected by the ANTARES telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Aurore

    2016-04-01

    The ANTARES telescope is well-suited to detect high energy neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky with a high duty cycle. Potential neutrino sources are gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae and flaring active galactic nuclei. To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a detection method based on follow-up observations from the neutrino direction has been developed. This program, denoted as TAToO, includes a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT, Zadko and MASTER) and the Swift-XRT telescope, which are triggered when an "interesting" neutrino is detected by ANTARES. A follow-up of special events, such as neutrino doublets in time/space coincidence or a single neutrino having a very high energy or in the specific direction of a local galaxy, significantly improves the perspective for the detection of transient sources. The analysis of early and long term follow-up observations to search for fast and slowly varying transient sources, respectively, has been performed and the results covering optical and X-ray data are presented in this contribution.

  17. Swift follow-up observations of candidate gravitational-wave transient events

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, P A; Gehrels, N; Homan, J; Osborne, J P; Siegel, M; Beardmore, A; Handbauer, P; Gelbord, J; Kennea, J A; Smith, M; Zhu, Q; Abadie, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; ac, F Acernese; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; ac, A Allocca; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; ac, F Barone; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; ab, A Basti; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; ab, L Bonelli; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; ab, M Branchesi; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; ab, H J Bulten; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; ab, E Calloni; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; ab, E Coccia; Cohadon, P -F; ab, C N Colacino; ab, A Colla; Colombini, M; ab, A Conte; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; ab, R De Rosa; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; ab, A Di Lieto; Di Palma, I; ac, M Di Paolo Emilio; Di Virgilio, A; Diaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorsher, S; ab, M Drago; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eikenberry, S; Endroczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; ab, V Fafone; Fairhurst, S; Farr, B F; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; ab, I Ferrante; Ferrini, F; ab, F Fidecaro; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; ab, S Frasca; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; ab, L Gammaitoni; Garcia, J; ab, F Garufi; Gaspar, M E; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; ab, G M Guidi; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; d, P Jaranowski; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; ae, A Krolak; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Langley, A; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Roux, A Le; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Lhuillier, V; Li, J; Li, T G F; Lindquist, P E; Litvine, V; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Logue, J; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lundgren, A P; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; ac, F Marchesoni; Marion, F; Marka, S; Marka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; ab, F Martelli; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McDaniel, P; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Menendez, D F; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; ab, L Milano; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; ab, A Morgia; Mori, T; Morriss, S R; ab, S Mosca; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow--Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nash, T; ab, L Naticchioni; Necula, V; Nelson, J; ab, I Neri; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nishizawa, A; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Oldenberg, R G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Page, A; ac, L Palladino; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; ac, R Paoletti; Papa, M A; ab, M Parisi; Pasqualetti, A; ab, R Passaquieti; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; ab, G Persichetti; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; ab, F Piergiovanni; Pierro, V; Pihlaja, M; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; ab, R Poggiani; Pold, J; Postiglione, F; Poux, C; Prato, M; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; ab, G A Prodi; Prokhorov, L G; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; ab, D S Rabeling; Racz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Rankins, B; ab, P Rapagnani; Raymond, V; ab, V Re; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; ab, F Ricci; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Roberts, M; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, C; Rodruck, M; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, J D; ac, R Romano; Romie, J H; cf, D Rosinska; Rover, C; Rowan, S; Rudiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sankar, S; Sannibale, V; Santamaria, L; Santiago-Prieto, I; Santostasi, G; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R L; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G R; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Speirits, F C; ab, L Sperandio; Stefszky, M; Steinert, E; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S E; Stroeer, A S; ab, R Sturani; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sung, M; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szeifert, G; Tacca, M; Taffarello, L; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; ter Braack, A P M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Thuring, A; Titsler, C; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; ab, A Toncelli; ab, M Tonelli; ac, O Torre; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Tournefier, E; ab, F Travasso; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Vahlbruch, H; ab, G Vajente; ab, J F J van den Brand; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasuth, M; Vaulin, R; Vavoulidis, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; ab, F Vetrano; ab, A Vicere; Villar, A E; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Wan, Y; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; bd, K Yamamoto; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; e, A Zadrozny; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2012-01-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory. Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge". With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected...

  18. Follow-up study of people who misuse alcohol: reflections on methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Jan; Black, Heather; O'May, Fiona; Rees, Cheryl

    2016-11-18

    Background Considerable challenges exist for researchers attempting to monitor longitudinally the impact of any intervention on heavy drinkers, therefore they are often excluded from surveys. A particular challenge is the loss of validity through attrition. Aim To describe issues encountered when recruiting and re-contacting difficult to reach heavy drinkers participating in a longitudinal study; and propose strategies to inform the design of future studies to minimise the effects of confounding factors. Discussion Baseline recruitment exceeded targets, but attrition at first follow-up interview was considerable. Baseline alcohol consumption was not predictive of loss to follow-up. A variety of factors affected attrition including abstinence, severe intoxication at interview, deaths, selling of telephone, change of address and incarceration. Conclusion Longitudinal studies that use personal telephones or address details in following up heavy drinkers face considerable challenges to minimise attrition. An important mitigating factor is the use of flexible and experienced interviewers. Implications for practice The anticipated and reactive strategies documented in this paper provide important lessons for costing, designing and collecting data in future studies.

  19. Radiographic Follow-Up during Orthodontic Treatment for Early Diagnosis of Sequential Supernumerary Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Uhana Seifert Guimarães; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga

    2016-01-01

    Most supernumerary teeth are impacted and asymptomatic. Objective. The aim of this paper is to describe two cases of sequential development of supernumerary teeth in the mandibular premolar region, identified during orthodontic treatment. Reports. The first case describes the radiographic follow-up of a female patient that presented a supernumerary tooth at the age of 9 years and 10 months in the right mandibular premolar region, followed by a further supernumerary tooth in the left mandibular premolar region identified at the age of 11 years and 3 months. In the second case, the radiographic follow-up of a male patient demonstrated 3 supernumerary teeth in the premolar region at the age of 16 years. During orthognathic surgery planning at the age of 20 years and 5 months, a supplemental supernumerary tooth was found in the left mandibular region. Conclusion. Considering the late developing of supernumerary premolars, appropriate follow-up with panoramic radiographs of patients with previous experience of supernumerary teeth is essential for early diagnosis of supplemental premolars to prevent possible complications. PMID:27313911

  20. Paraquat induced lung injury: long-term follow-up of HRCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young; Im, Han Hyek [Soonchunhyang Univ., Chunan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-01

    To determine the long-term follow-up CT findings of paraquat-induced lung injury. Six patients who ingested paraquat underwent sequential follow-up CT scanning during a period of at least six months, and the results were analysed. Scans were obtained 1-6 (mean, 3.3) time during a 7-84 (mean, 25.7) months period, and the findings at 1-2 months, 3-12 months, 1-2 years, 2-3 years and more than above 7 years after poisoning were analyzed. We observed irregular-shaped areas of consolidation with traction bronchiectasis at 1-2 months (5/5), irregular-shaped consolidation and ground-glass opacity (5/5) at 3-12 months, and irregular-shaped consolidations/ground-glass opacity (4/5) and focal honeycombing (1/5) one year later. In the same patients, follow-up CT scans showed that some areas of focal consolidation could not be visualized and the radio-opacity of the lesions had decreased. The HRCT findings of paraquat-induced lung injury were irregular shaped areas of consolidation 1-2 months after ingestion, and irregular-shaped consolidation and ground-glass opacity or focal honeycombing 3-12 months later. At this thim slight improvement was observed.

  1. Mortality in an extended follow-up of British coal workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCalman; L; Miller; G, B.

    2009-02-01

    The Pneumoconiosis Field Research (PFR) programme was established in the 1950s, to evaluate effects of coal mining exposures on the health and mortality of British coal workers. Surveys of working miners were carried out at 5-yearly intervals, initially in 24 collieries but later concentrating on 10, collecting detailed work histories and health information for each recruit. Here we report on cause-specific mortality in a cohort of almost 18,000 men from 10 British collieries, followed up for periods up to 47 years, yielding over 516,000 life-years of follow-up. External analyses compared cause-specific death rates in the cohort to those of the population of the regions in which the collieries were situated, using Standardised Mortality Ratios (SMRs). The causes investigated included lung cancer, stomach cancer, non-malignant respiratory disorders and cardiovascular disorders. SMRs showed evidence of an initial healthy worker effect diminishing over time. Several causes, including non-malignant respiratory disease and lung cancer, showed a significant deficit of mortality at the start of the study period with an excess in the latter part of the follow-up period. In these results, effects of working conditions are likely to be confounded with smoking habits. Overall, we believe our results may be generalised to the British coal industry since nationalisation.

  2. Mortality in an extended follow-up of British coal workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacCalman, L.; Miller, B.G. [Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    The Pneumoconiosis Field Research (PFR) programme was established in the 1950s, to evaluate effects of coal mining exposures on the health and mortality of British coal workers. Surveys of working miners were carried out at 5-yearly intervals, initially in 24 collieries but later concentrating on 10, collecting detailed work histories and health information for each recruit. Here we report on cause-specific mortality in a cohort of almost 18,000 men from 10 British collieries, followed up for periods up to 47 years, yielding over 516,000 life-years of follow-up. External analyses compared cause-specific death rates in the cohort to those of the population of the regions in which the collieries were situated, using Standardised Mortality Ratios (SMRs). The causes investigated included lung cancer, stomach cancer, non-malignant respiratory disorders and cardiovascular disorders. SMRs showed evidence of an initial healthy worker effect diminishing over time. Several causes, including non-malignant respiratory disease and lung cancer, showed a significant deficit of mortality at the start of the study period with an excess in the latter part of the follow-up period. In these results, effects of working conditions are likely to be confounded with smoking habits. Overall, we believe our results may be generalised to the British coal industry since nationalisation. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Bone marrow edema syndrome of the foot: one year follow-up with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Canton, Guillermo; Casado, Oscar; Capelastegui, Ana; Astigarraga, Elena; Larena, Jose Alejandro; Merino, Amaya [OSATEK, Unidades de Resonancia Magnetica, Dr. Areilza 12-16, 48011, Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain)

    2003-05-01

    To describe the MR findings of bone marrow edema syndrome (BMES) of the foot and its evolution at 1 year follow-up.Design and patients Twenty-five of 32 patients with disabling foot and ankle pain unrelated to trauma diagnosed as BMES when MR imaging demonstrated a bone marrow edema pattern in one or more bones without any radiological or underlying clinical cause, were re-evaluated by MR imaging 1 year later. On the initial MR examinations an average of 4.7 individual bones were involved by bone marrow edema. Soft tissue edema was present in every patient and joint effusion in 10 patients. MR imaging at 1 year showed resolution of bone edema in 18 patients (72%), partial improvement in five (20%) and no improvement in two (8%). Six patients (24%) developed similar symptoms in the other foot during follow-up. Ten of 17 available plain radiographs showed some loss of radiodensity. Further bone marrow edema developed in bones of the same foot that were initially normal, or in uninvolved distant bone marrow areas in the same affected bone, in six of seven patients on follow-up MR imaging. The evolution of the MR findings of BMES of the foot is to complete resolution or partial improvement at 1 year in the majority of cases. Migration to the other foot occurs in up to a quarter of patients. (orig.)

  4. The surgical management of urogenital tuberculosis our experience and long-term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punit Bansal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Urogenital tuberculosis (TB is common in developing countries. We present our experience of surgically managed cases of genitourinary TB (GUTB. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 60 cases GUTB who underwent surgery at our center from January 2003 to January 2010. Mode of presentation, organ involvement, investigation, surgical treatment and follow-up were studied. Results: There were 38 males and 22 females with a mean age of 32.5 years. The most common symptom was irritative voiding symptoms. The most common organ involved was bladder in 33 cases, and next most common was kidney in 30 cases. Preoperative bacteriologic diagnosis was confirmed in only 19 cases. A total of 66 procedures were performed as some patients needed more than one procedure. These included 35 ablative procedures and 31 reconstructive procedures. All the patients were followed-up with renal function test (RFT at 3, 6 and 12 months. The intravenous urography and diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid scan were performed at 3 months when indicated. Then the patients were followed with RFT and ultrasonography 6 monthly for 3 years and then annual RFT. Conclusion: Many patients of urogenital TB present late with cicatrisation sequelae. Multidrug chemotherapy with judicious surgery as and when indicated is the ideal treatment. The results of reconstructive surgery are good and should be done when possible. Rigorous and long term follow-up is necessary in patients undergoing reconstructive surgery.

  5. Adolescent Kawasaki disease: usefulness of 64-slice CT coronary angiography for follow-up investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbone, Iacopo; Cannata, David; Algeri, Emanuela; Galea, Nicola; Napoli, Alessandro; Catalano, Carlo; Passariello, Roberto; Francone, Marco [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Radiological, Onchological and Anatomopathological Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome (Italy); De Zorzi, Andrea [Bambino Gesu Hospital, Cardiology Division, Rome (Italy); Bosco, Giovanna; D' Agostino, Rita [Sapienza University of Rome, Unit of Paediatric Cardiology, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome (Italy); Menezes, Leon [University College of London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis that mainly affects coronary arteries in children, and requires regular follow-up from the time of diagnosis. To evaluate the feasibility of 64-slice CT angiography (CTA) for follow-up of patients with KD using previously performed invasive catheter coronary angiography (CCA) as reference standard. The study group comprised 12 patients (age 17.6 {+-} 2.9 years, mean{+-}SD) with a diagnosis of KD and a previously performed CCA (interval, 32.6 {+-} 13.5 months) who underwent 64-slice cardiac CTA. The quality of the images for establishing the presence of coronary abnormalities was determined by two observers. The CTA findings were compared with those from the prior CCA. Adequate image quality was obtained in all patients. Mean effective dose for CTA was 6.56 {+-} 0.95 mSv. CTA allowed accurate identification, characterization and measurement of all coronary aneurysms (n = 32), stenoses (n = 3) and occlusions (n = 9) previously demonstrated by CCA. One patient with disease progression went on to have percutaneous coronary intervention. Coronary lesions were reliably evaluated by 64-slice CTA in the follow-up of compliant patients with KD, reducing the need for repeated diagnostic invasive CCA. Hence, in an adequately selected patient population, the role of CCA could be limited almost only to therapeutic procedures. (orig.)

  6. SWIFT FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF CANDIDATE GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENT EVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, P. A.; Osborne, J. P.; Beardmore, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Fridriksson, J. K.; Homan, J. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Gehrels, N. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Siegel, M.; Gelbord, J.; Kennea, J. A.; Smith, M.; Zhu, Q. [The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Handbauer, P. [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest, 1117 (Hungary); Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R. [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abbott, T. D. [California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, CA 92831 (United States); Abernathy, M. [SUPA, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Accadia, T. [Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-Le-Vieux (France); Acernese, F. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors (within less than 10 minutes) and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory (within 12 hr). Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a 'blind injection challenge'. With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime, multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  7. Effective follow-up consultations: the importance of patient-centered communication and shared decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Paul L P; Stiggelbout, Anne M

    2013-12-01

    Paediatricians spend a considerable proportion of their time performing follow-up visits for children with chronic conditions, but they rarely receive specific training on how best to perform such consultations. The traditional method of running a follow-up consultation is based on the doctor's agenda, and is problem-oriented. Patients and parents, however, prefer a patient-centered, and solution-focused approach. Although many physicians now recognize the importance of addressing the patient's perspective in a follow-up consultation, a number of barriers hamper its implementation in practice, including time constraints, lack of appropriate training, and a strong tradition of the biomedical, doctor-centered approach. Addressing the patient's perspective successfully can be achieved through shared decision making, clinicians and patients making decisions together based on the best clinical evidence. Research shows that shared decision making not only increases patient, parent, and physician satisfaction with the consultation, but also may improve health outcomes. Shared decision making involves building a physician-patient-parent partnership, agreeing on the problem at hand, laying out the available options with their benefits and risks, eliciting the patient's views and preferences on these options, and agreeing on a course of action. Shared decision making requires specific communication skills, which can be learned, and should be mastered through deliberate practice.

  8. West Foster Creek 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-02-01

    A follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the West Foster Creek (Smith acquisition) wildlife mitigation site in May 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance and maintain the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The West Foster Creek 2007 follow-up HEP survey generated 2,981.96 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for a 34% increase (+751.34 HUs) above baseline HU credit (the 1999 baseline HEP survey generated 2,230.62 habitat units or 1.13 HUs per acre). The 2007 follow-up HEP analysis yielded 1,380.26 sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) habitat units, 879.40 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) HUs, and 722.29 western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) habitat units. Mule deer and sharp-tailed grouse habitat units increased by 346.42 HUs and 470.62 HUs respectively over baseline (1999) survey results due largely to cessation of livestock grazing and subsequent passive restoration. In contrast, the western meadowlark generated slightly fewer habitat units in 2007 (-67.31) than in 1999, because of increased shrub cover, which lowers habitat suitability for that species.

  9. Swift Follow-up Observations of Candidate Gravitational-wave Transient Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, P. A.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Homan, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Siegel, M.; Beardmore, A.; Handbauer, P.; Gelbord, J.; Kennea, J. A.; Smith, M.; Zhu, Q.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eikenberry, S.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors (within less than 10 minutes) and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory (within 12 hr). Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge." With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime, multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  10. Swift Follow-Up Observations of Candidate Gravitational-Wave Transient Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, P. A.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Homan, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Siegel, M.; Beardmore, A.; Handbauer, P.; Gelbord, J.; Kennea, J. A.; Smith, M.; Zhu, Q.; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Blackburn, J. K.; Camp, J. B.; Kanner, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors (within less than 10 minutes) and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory (within 12 hr). Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge." With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime, multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  11. Goddard Robotic Telescope - Optical Follow-up of GRBs and Coordinated Observations of AGNs -

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, T; Donato, D; Gehrels, N; Okajima, T; Ukwatta, T N

    2010-01-01

    Since it is not possible to predict when a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) will occur or when Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) flaring activity starts, follow-up/monitoring ground telescopes must be located as uniformly as possible all over the world in order to collect data simultaneously with Fermi and Swift detections. However, there is a distinct gap in follow-up coverage of telescopes in the eastern U.S. region based on the operations of Swift. Motivated by this fact, we have constructed a 14" fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up Swift/Fermi GRBs and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) AGN. Our telescope system consists of off-the-shelf hardware. With the focal reducer, we are able to match the field of view of Swift narrow instruments (20' x 20'). We started scientific observations in mid-November 2008 and GRT has been...

  12. [Congenital toxoplasmosis: clinical manifestation, treatment and follow-up] [Article in Italian] • Il neonato con toxoplasmosi congenita: clinica, terapia e follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Bollani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplamosis is a parasitic zoonosis which occurs worldwide, but is prevalent in Europe, South America and Africa. When infection occurs for the first time during pregnancy, mother to child transmission of the parasite can cause congenital toxoplasmosis. Rate of congenital infection ranges from less than 0.1 to approximately 1 per 1,000 live births. The risk of transmission depends on the gestational age at the time of maternal infection. A diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis is usually considered in infants who present: hydrocephalus, chorioretinitis, and intracranial calcifications, but this triade is very rare. Approximately 85% of the infants with congenital toxoplasmosis are clinically normal at birth; however, sequelae of infection may become apparent only months or even years later. Chorioretinitis is the main complication of congenital toxoplasmosis, late onset retinal lesions and relapse can appear many years after birth, but the overall ocular prognosis is satisfactory when infection is identified and treated accordingly. Fortunately, serious neonatal forms and severe neurological impairment have become rare, but prompt treatment of children with convulsions, abnormal muscle tone, hydrocephalus, may improve the prognosis and result in almost normal outcome. For infants who have congenital toxoplasmosis, treatment soon after birth for 1 year with pyrimetamine, sulfadiazine and leukoverin led to remarkable resolution of serious, active disease. A long follow-up is necessary to assess the long-term outcome of children and young adults with congenital toxoplasmosis, that is favourable for the majority of cases. Epidemiological surveillance needs to be improved in order to determine the effectiveness of prevention programs.Articoli Selezionati del “3° Convegno Pediatrico del Medio Campidano” · Guspini · 25 Maggio 2013Guest Editor: Roberto Antonucci

  13. Tuberculosis screening and follow-up of asylum seekers in Norway: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garåsen Helge

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 80% of new tuberculosis cases in Norway occur among immigrants from high incidence countries. On arrival to the country all asylum seekers are screened with Mantoux test and chest x-ray aimed to identify cases of active tuberculosis and, in the case of latent tuberculosis, to offer follow-up or prophylactic treatment. We assessed a national programme for screening, treatment and follow-up of tuberculosis infection and disease in a cohort of asylum seekers. Methods Asylum seekers ≥ 18 years who arrived at the National Reception Centre from January 2005 to June 2006, were included as the total cohort. Those with a Mantoux test ≥ 6 mm or positive x-ray findings were included in a study group for follow-up. Data were collected from public health authorities in the municipality to where the asylum seekers had moved, and from hospital based internists in case they had been referred to specialist care. Individual subjects included in the study group were matched with the Norwegian National Tuberculosis Register which receive reports of everybody diagnosed with active tuberculosis, or who had started treatment for latent tuberculosis. Results The total cohort included 4643 adult asylum seekers and 97.5% had a valid Mantoux test. At least one inclusion criterion was fulfilled by 2237 persons. By end 2007 municipal public health authorities had assessed 758 (34% of them. Altogether 328 persons had been seen by an internist. Of 314 individuals with positive x-rays, 194 (62% had seen an internist, while 86 of 568 with Mantoux ≥ 15, but negative x-rays (16% were also seen by an internist. By December 31st 2006, 23 patients were diagnosed with tuberculosis (prevalence 1028/100 000 and another 11 were treated for latent infection. Conclusion The coverage of screening was satisfactory, but fewer subjects than could have been expected from the national guidelines were followed up in the community and referred to an internist. To

  14. Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation: Post Trial Follow-Up of Randomized Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tazeen H Jafar

    Full Text Available Evidence on long term effectiveness of public health strategies for lowering blood pressure (BP is scarce. In the Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation (COBRA Trial, a 2 x 2 factorial, cluster randomized controlled trial, the combined home health education (HHE and trained general practitioner (GP intervention delivered over 2 years was more effective than no intervention (usual care in lowering systolic BP among adults with hypertension in urban Pakistan. However, it was not clear whether the effect would be sustained after the cessation of intervention. We conducted 7 years follow-up inclusive of 5 years of post intervention period of COBRA trial participants to assess the effectiveness of the interventions on BP during extended follow-up.A total of 1341 individuals 40 years or older with hypertension (systolic BP 140 mm Hg or greater, diastolic BP 90 mm Hg or greater, or already receiving treatment were followed by trained research staff masked to randomization status. BP was measured thrice with a calibrated automated device (Omron HEM-737 IntelliSense in the sitting position after 5 minutes of rest. BP measurements were repeated after two weeks. Generalized estimating equations (GEE were used to analyze the primary outcome of change in systolic BP from baseline to 7- year follow-up. The multivariable model was adjusted for clustering, age at baseline, sex, baseline systolic and diastolic BP, and presence of diabetes.After 7 years of follow-up, systolic BP levels among those randomised to combined HHE plus trained GP intervention were significantly lower (2.1 [4.1-0.1] mm Hg compared to those randomised to usual care, (P = 0.04. Participants receiving the combined intervention compared to usual care had a greater reduction in LDL-cholesterol (2.7 [4.8 to 0.6] mg/dl.The benefit in systolic BP reduction observed in the original cohort assigned to the combined intervention was attenuated but still evident at 7- year follow-up. These

  15. Percutaneous closure of secundum type atrial septal defects:More than 5-year follow-up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roel; JR; Snijder; Maarten; J; Suttorp; Jurri?n; M; Ten; Berg; Martijn; C; Post

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate long-term efficacy of two different devices more than five years after percutaneous atrial septal defect(ASD) closure in adults.METHODS: All patients who underwent percutaneous closure of an ASD in the St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands, between February 1998 and December 2006 were included. Percutaneous closure took place under general anaesthesia and transesophageal echocardiographic moni toring. Transthoracic echocardiography(TTE) was performed 24 h post-procedure to visualize the device position and to look for residual shunting using color Doppler. All complications were registered. All patients were invited for an outpatient visit and contrast TTE more than 5-years after closure. Efficacy was based on the presence of a residual right-to-left shunt(RLS), graded as minimal, moderate or severe. The presence of a residual left-to-right shunt(LRS) was diagnosed using color Doppler, and was not graded. Descriptive statistics were used for patients’ characteristics. Univariate analysis was used to identify predictors for residual shunting.RESULTS: In total, 104 patients(mean age 45.5 ± 17.1 years) underwent percutaneous ASD closure using an Amplatzer device(ASO) in 76 patients and a Cardioseal/Starflex device(CS/SF) in 28 patients. The mean follow-up was 6.4 ± 3.4 years. Device migration occurred in 4 patients of whom two cases occurred during the index hospitalization(1 ASO, 1 CS/SF). The other 2 cases of device migration occurred during the first 6 mo of follow-up(2 CS/SF). The recurrent thrombo-embolic event rate was similar in both groups: 0.4% per follow-up year. More than 12 mo post-ASD closure and latest follow-up, new-onset supraventricular tachyarrhythmia’s occurred in 3.9% and 0% for the ASO and CS/SF group, respectively. The RLS rate at latest follow-up was 17.4%(minimal 10.9%, moderate 2.2%, severe 4.3%) and 45.5%(minimal 27.3%, moderate 18.2%, severe 0%) for the ASO- and CS/SF groups, respectively. There was no

  16. Long-term follow-up of patients with choroidal neovascularization due to angioid streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Serrano, Maria Guadalupe; Rodriguez-Reyes, Abelardo; Guerrero-Naranjo, Jose Luis; Salcedo-Villanueva, Guillermo; Fromow-Guerra, Jans; García-Aguirre, Gerardo; Morales-Canton, Virgilio; Velez-Montoya, Raul

    2017-01-01

    Background The following case series describes the long-term anatomical and functional outcome of a group of seven patients with choroidal neovascularization (CNV), secondary to angioid streaks (AS), who were treated with antiangiogenic drugs in a pro re nata (PRN) regimen. After the 4-year mark, visual acuity tends to return to pretreatment level. Treatment delays and lack of awareness and self-referral by the patients are believed to be the cause of the PRN regimen failure. Purpose To assess the long-term outcomes (>4 years) of patients with CNV due to AS treated with a PRN regimen of antiangiogenic. Methods This was a retrospective, case series, single-center study. We reviewed the electronic medical records from patients with CNV due to AS. From each record, we noted general demographic data and relevant medical history; clinical presentation, changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) over time, optical coherent tomography parameters, treatment and retreatment details, and systemic associations. Changes in BCVA and central macular thickness were assessed with a Wilcoxon two-sample test, with an alpha value of ≤0.05 for statistical significance. Results The mean follow-up time was 53.8±26.8 months. BCVA at baseline was: 1.001±0.62 logMAR; at the end of follow-up: 0.996±0.56 logMAR (P=0.9). Central macular thickness at baseline was: 360.85±173.82 μm; at the end of follow-up: 323.85±100.34 μm (P=0.6). Mean number of intravitreal angiogenic drugs: 6±4.16 injections (range 4–15). Mean time between injections was 3.8±2.7 months (range 1.9–5.8 months). Conclusion Despite initial anatomical and functional improvement, patients at the end of the follow-up had no visual improvement after a pro re nata regimen of antiangiogenic drugs. The amount of retreatments, number of recurrences, and time between intravitreal injections were similar to previous reports with shorter follow-up. PMID:28031699

  17. Early juvenile arthritis – results of two-year follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S O Salugina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study clinical and laboratory manifestations of different variants of juvenile arthritis (JA at the disease onset and during prospective two-year follow up. Material and methods. The study was performed as a part of Institute of Rheumatology early arthritis examination program RADIKAL. 130 pts with early JA (60,7% - girls with disease duration from 2 weeks to 6 months (mean 2,9±1,6 months aged 1,5- 16 years (mean 7,9±5,0 years were included. 13 (10% pts had systemic, 45 (34,6% – polyarticular and 72 (55,4% – olygoarticular variant of JA. General state, joint status, systemic and organ manifestation as well as immunological parameters (ANF, RF, disease activity, functional class (by Steinbrocker and CHAQ were assessed at baseline, and after 6, 12, 24 months of follow up. Results. Oligoarticular variant prevailed at onset and after 2 years (57,6%-55,6%. Systemic features were noted in reduced form as single manifestations. Morning stiffness was absent in half of children and lasted more than 1 hour in 16,4% of pts. After 2 years number of pts with morning stiffness significantly decreased and its duration diminished. Rheumatoid nodules appeared in 1 pt after 1 year. Uveitis developed in 7 children (5,3% and to the end of follow up it appeared in 2 more pts. Most of pts had minimal or moderate functional disability (FK 1,2 and CHAQ 0,1-1,5 during follow up. Disease activity at onset did not exceed 1 or 2 stage (80,2% and after 2 years the disease was not active in half of pts. To the end of follow up remission was achieved in 59% of pts, more often in those who received disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. In 23,2% of pts mostly in those with polyarthritis JA continued to recur independently on treatment. Conclusion. Timely administered complex therapy hampered disease progression, induced remission and improved quality of life in most children with JA. Pts with olygoarthritis had most favorable course of the disease. Pts

  18. Symptom prevalence and longitudinal follow-up in cancer outpatients receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Akemi; Morita, Tatsuya; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Kimura, Fukuko

    2009-05-01

    Palliative care for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy in the outpatient setting is important. The aims of this study were 1) to identify symptom prevalence and intensity in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and 2) to describe longitudinal follow-up data obtained from repeated assessment using the distress thermometer (DT). Questionnaires were distributed to consecutive cancer outpatients newly starting chemotherapy at the first appointment and at every hospital visit. The questionnaire included the severity of 11 symptoms (M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory [MDASI], Japanese version), the DT, and the need for help in four psychosocial areas (decision-making, economic problems, nutrition, and daily activities). In total, 4000 questionnaires were returned by 462 patients. The frequently identified problems were oral problems (21%), insomnia (19%), psychological distress (defined as a DT score of 6 or more; 15%), help with information and decision-making (14%), severe fatigue (8.2%), and severe appetite loss (6.3%). Cluster analysis identified four symptom clusters: 1) fatigue and somnolence; 2) pain, dyspnea, and numbness; 3) nausea, appetite loss, and constipation; and 4) psychological distress. Of 165 patients with a DT of score 6 or more, 115 patients (70%) demonstrated a DT score below 6 at a median of 17 days follow-up. In the remaining 50 patients who had a DT score of 6 or more at follow-up, 34 patients (68%) had one or more physical symptoms rated at 7 or more on an 11-point numeric rating scale. Compared with patients with a DT score below 6 at follow-up, patients with a DT score of 6 or more at follow-up had higher levels of all physical symptoms. Frequent symptoms experienced by cancer outpatients receiving chemotherapy may be categorized as: 1) psychosocial issues (insomnia, psychological distress, decision-making support); 2) nutrition-gastrointestinal issues (oral problems, appetite loss, nausea); 3) fatigue; and 4) pain, dyspnea, and numbness

  19. Lung Functions During Long Term Follow-Up After Pleural Empyema Treatment in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayhan Kırkpınar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Studies on lung functions at the long term follow-up of pleural empyema treatment in children are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long term pulmonary function test results in childhood empyema cases treated with antibiotic (AB or AB+tube thoracostomy (TT or AB+TT+fibrinolytics (FT. Materials and Method: In this study, 45 cases (1 to 13 years old treated for empyema were included. The age, gender, clinical characteristics, radiological findings and laboratory results at baseline and during the follow-up periods and the treatment modalities (AB or AB+TT or AB+TT+FT were evaluated. Pulmonary function tests were performed at the end of the follow-up periods. Results: The mean ages at baseline and at the end of follow-up period of 30.4±13.5 (6-54 months were 6.3±3.3 (1-13 years and 9.3±3.4 (4-17 years, respectively. Stages of the disease at admission was acute exudative (stage 1 in 14 (31.1% cases, fibrinopurulent (stage 2 in 19 (42.2% and chronic organizing (stage 3 in 12 (26.7%. Twenty one cases (46.7%were treated with AB, 8 (17.8% with AB+TT and 16 (35.5% with AB+TT+FT. Chest roentgenograms showed abnormal findings in 15 cases (33.3% at the 3rd month, in 3 cases (6.6% at the 6th month and none at the 12th month. Pulmonary function tests were available in 25 children. The mean follow-up period of these cases was 32.7±11.9 months after the empyema treatment. Three cases (12% with a shorter mean follow-up (8.3±3.3 months had minimal restrictive patterns. Six of 25 (24% cases having pulmonary function tests were classified as stage 1, 12 (48% as stage 2, and 7 (28% as stage 3 empyema at admission. Of 25 cases having pulmonary function tests, 12 (48% were treated with AB, 4 (16% with AB+TT and 9 (36% with AB+TT+FT. Mean VC, FVC, FEV1/FVC, FEV1, FEF25-75% and PEF values did not significantly differ according to stages and treatment modalities (p>0.05.Conclusion: It was seen that after the treatment of empyema

  20. The costs of reducing loss to follow-up in South African cervical cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhn Louise

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to quantify the resources used in reestablishing contact with women who missed their scheduled cervical cancer screening visits and to assess the success of this effort in reducing loss to follow-up in a developing country setting. Methods Women were enrolled in this Cape Town, South Africa-based screening study between 2000 and 2003, and all had scheduled follow-up visits in 2003. Community health worker (CHW time, vehicle use, maintenance, and depreciation were estimated from weekly logs and cost accounting systems. The percentage of women who attended their scheduled visit, those who attended after CHW contact(s, and those who never returned despite attempted contact(s were determined. The number of CHW visits per woman was also estimated. Results 3,711 visits were scheduled in 2003. Of these, 2,321 (62.5% occurred without CHW contact, 918 (24.8% occurred after contact(s, and 472 (12.7% did not occur despite contact(s. Loss to follow-up was reduced from 21% to 6%, 39% to 10%, and 50% to 24% for 6, 12, and 24-month visits. CHWs attempted 3,200 contacts in 530 trips. On average, 3 CHWs attempted to contact 6 participants over each 111 minute trip. The per-person cost (2003 Rand for these activities was 12.75, 24.92, and 40.50 for 6, 12, and 24-month visits. Conclusion CHW contact with women who missed scheduled visits increased their return rate. Cost-effectiveness analyses aimed at policy decisions about cervical cancer screening in developing countries should incorporate these findings.

  1. A software tool for advanced MRgFUS prostate therapy planning and follow up

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straaten, Dörte; Hoogenboom, Martijn; van Amerongen, Martinus J.; Weiler, Florian; Issawi, Jumana Al; Günther, Matthias; Fütterer, Jurgen; Jenne, Jürgen W.

    2017-03-01

    US guided HIFU/FUS ablation for the therapy of prostate cancer is a clinical established method, while MR guided HIFU/FUS applications for prostate recently started clinical evaluation. Even if MRI examination is an excellent diagnostic tool for prostate cancer, it is a time consuming procedure and not practicable within an MRgFUS therapy session. The aim of our ongoing work is to develop software to support therapy planning and post-therapy follow-up for MRgFUS on localized prostate cancer, based on multi-parametric MR protocols. The clinical workflow of diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of MR guided FUS on prostate cancer was deeply analyzed. Based on this, the image processing workflow was designed and all necessary components, e.g. GUI, viewer, registration tools etc. were defined and implemented. The software bases on MeVisLab with several implemented C++ modules for the image processing tasks. The developed software, called LTC (Local Therapy Control) will register and visualize automatically all images (T1w, T2w, DWI etc.) and ADC or perfusion maps gained from the diagnostic MRI session. This maximum of diagnostic information helps to segment all necessary ROIs, e.g. the tumor, for therapy planning. Final therapy planning will be performed based on these segmentation data in the following MRgFUS therapy session. In addition, the developed software should help to evaluate the therapy success, by synchronization and display of pre-therapeutic, therapy and follow-up image data including the therapy plan and thermal dose information. In this ongoing project, the first stand-alone prototype was completed and will be clinically evaluated.

  2. The 35 years followed up study of 72 patients with transient ischemic attacks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xinde; Gong Tao

    2000-01-01

    Objective Seventy-two TIA patients were followed up for 35 years. The recurrence of TIA, thc ocurrence of complete stroke and myocardial infarction, the fatality rate and the causes of death, the survival rate in every year and its 95% confidence interval, and limitation of neurovascular surgical indication were observed. Methods We followed up 72 patients with TIA for 35 years and analyzed those conditions mentioned above with the methods ofcochort study, life table and other medical epidemiological statistics. Results The recurrent rate of TIA was 27.9%, the occurrence rate of complete stroke 65.7%, that of myocardial infarction 8.4%. The fatality rate was 72.7%. The main cause of death was complete stroke, accounting for 59.6%. The first cause of death in non-elderly patients was cerebral hemorrhage and in the elderly patiems was cerebral infarction. There were two patients with fatal myocardial infarction, accounting for 2. 8% The survival rate of 29 years was 24.5% and its 95% confidence interval was 5.0-44.0%. The 19 cases had the indication of neurovascular surgical operation, accounting for 26.6%. Conclusion In the long term followed-up study the prognosis of patients with TIA was better than that of those witt cerebral infarction. About one thud of patients had the recurrence of TIA. The occurrence rate of complete stroke was obviously higher than that of myocardial infarction. Estimably, the effect on preventing the occurrence of complete stroke in patients with TIA by neurovascular surgical operation was limited

  3. Schizophrenia and quality of life: a one-year follow-up in four EU countries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article systematically monitors the quality of life (QOL) of patients with schizophrenia from seven different sites across four European countries: France, Ireland, Portugal and Spain. METHODS: A one-year prospective cohort study was carried out. Inclusion criteria for patients were: a clinical lifetime diagnosis of schizophrenia according to ICD-10 (F20) diagnostic criteria for research, age between 18 and 65 years and at least one contact with mental health services in 1993. Data concerning QOL were recorded in seven sites from four countries: France, Portugal, Ireland and Spain, and were obtained using the Baker and Intagliata scale. At baseline, 339 patients answered the QOL questionnaire. At one-year follow-up, Spain could not participate, so only 263 patients were contacted and 219 agreed to take part. QOL was compared across centres by areas and according to a global index. QOL was correlated with presence of clinical and social problems, needs for care and interventions provided during the one-year follow-up. RESULTS: We did not find any link between gender and QOL. There were some significant differences between centres concerning many items. What is more, these differences were relative: in Lisbon where the lowest level of satisfaction was recorded, people were satisfied with food but highly dissatisfied with finances, whereas in St Etienne, where the highest level of satisfaction was recorded, people were less satisfied with food when they were more satisfied with finances. The evolution in one year among those respondents who took part in the follow-up (excluding the subjects from Granada) showed different patterns depending on the items. CONCLUSION: The four countries have different resources and patients live in rather different conditions. However, the main differences as far as their QOL is concerned very much depend on extra-psychiatric variables, principally marital status and income.

  4. Follow-Up Visit Patterns in an Antiretroviral Therapy (ART programme in Zomba, Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Rachlis

    Full Text Available Identifying follow-up (FU visit patterns, and exploring which factors influence them are likely to be useful in determining which patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART may become Lost to Follow-Up (LTFU. Using an operation and implementation research approach, we sought 1 to describe the timing of FU visits amongst patients who have been on ART for shorter and longer periods of time; and 2 to determine the median time to late visits, and 3 to identify specific factors that may be associated with these patterns in Zomba, Malawi.Using routinely collected programme monitoring data from Zomba District, we performed descriptive analyses on all ART visits among patients who initiated ART between Jan. 1, 2007-June 30, 2010. Based on an expected FU date, each FU visit was classified as early (≥4 day before an expected FU date, on time (3 days before an expected FU date/up to 6 days after an expected FU date, or late (≥7 days after an expected FU date. In total, 7,815 patients with 76417 FU visits were included. Ninety-two percent of patients had ≥2 FU visits. At the majority of visits, patients were either on time or late. The median time to a first late visit among those with 2 or more visits was 216 days (IQR: 128-359. Various patient- and visit-level factors differed significantly across Early, On Time, and Late visit groups including ART adherence and frequency of, and type of side effects.The majority of patients do not demonstrate consistent FU visit patterns. Individuals were generally on ART for at least 6 months before experiencing their first late visit. Our findings have implications for the development of effective interventions that meet patient needs when they present early and can reduce patient losses to follow-up when they are late. In particular, time-varying visit characteristics need further research.

  5. Vertebral Augmentation with Nitinol Endoprosthesis: Clinical Experience in 40 Patients with 1-Year Follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo, E-mail: gc.anselmetti@fastwebnet.it [Villa Maria Hospital, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Manca, Antonio, E-mail: anto.manca@gmail.com [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Marcia, Stefano, E-mail: stemarcia@gmail.com [Institute of Radiology, University of Cagliari (Italy); Chiara, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.chiara@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Marini, Stefano, E-mail: stemarini@gmail.com [Institute of Radiology, University of Cagliari (Italy); Baroud, Gamal, E-mail: gamalbaroud@gmail.com [University of Sherbrooke, Departement de Genie Mecanique (Canada); Regge, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.regge@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy); Montemurro, Filippo, E-mail: filippo.montemurro@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Internal Medicine Unit (Italy)

    2013-05-08

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the clinical outcomes of patients treated by vertebral augmentation with nitinol endoprosthesis (VNE) to treat painful vertebral compression fractures.MethodsForty patients with one or more painful osteoporotic VCF, confirmed by MRI and accompanied by back-pain unresponsive to a minimum 2 months of conservative medical treatment, underwent VNE at 42 levels. Preoperative and postoperative pain measured with Visual Analog Scale (VAS), disability measured by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and vertebral height restoration (measured with 2-dimensional reconstruction CT) were compared at last follow-up (average follow-up 15 months). Cement extravasation, subsequent fractures, and implant migration were recorded.ResultsLong-term follow-up was obtained in 38 of 40 patients. Both VAS and ODI significantly improved from a median of 8.0 (range 5–10) and 66 % (range 44–88 %) to 0.5 (range 0–8) and 6 % (range 6–66 %), respectively, at 1 year (p < 0.0001). Vertebral height measurements comparing time points increased in a statistically significant manner (ANOVA, p < 0.001). Overall cement extravasation rate was 9.5 %. Discal and venous leakage rates were 7.1 and 0 % respectively. No symptomatic extravasations occurred. Five of 38 (13.1 %) patients experienced new spontaneous, osteoporotic fractures. No device change or migration was observed.ConclusionsVNE is a safe and effective procedure that is able to provide long-lasting pain relief and durable vertebral height gain with a low rate of new fractures and cement leakages.

  6. Treatment and follow-up of children with transient congenital hypothyroidism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ru-lai; ZHU Zhi-wei; ZHOU Xue-lian; ZHAO Zheng-yan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical therapy and prognosis in children with transient congenital hypothyroidism (CH).Methods: Fifty-seven children with CH diagnosed after neonatal screening were treated with low-dosage levothyroxine (L-T4).Follow-up evaluation included the determination of TT3, TT4 and TSH serum levels and the assessment of thyroid gland morphology, bone age, growth development and development quotients (DQ). A full check-up was performed at age 2, when the affected children first discontinued the L-T4 treatment for 1 month, and one year later. Development quotients were compared (16.25±3.87) μg/d. Mean duration of therapy was (28.09±9.56) months. No significant difference was found between study group and control group in the DQ test (average score (106.58± 14.40) vs (102.4±8.6), P>0.05) and 96.49% of the CH children achieved a test score above 85. Bone age, 99mTc scans and ultrasonographic findings were all normal, and evaluation of physical development was normal too, as were the serum levels of TT3, TT4 and TSH after one year of follow-up. Conclusion: A L-T4 dosage of and physical development at age 2. So it is possible for CH children to stop taking medicine if their laboratory findings and physical development are all normal after regular treatment and 2~3 years of follow-up.

  7. Residual intrahepatic stones after percutaneous biliary extraction : longterm follow up of complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Min; Shim, Hyung Jin; Lee, Hwa Yeon; Lim, Sang Jun; Park, Hyo Jin; Kim, Yang Soo; Choi, Young Hee [Chungang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Byung Kuck [National Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Young [Sung Ae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-01

    To evaluate and compare the radiologic and clinical follow-up of complications between a group in whom stone removal after percutaneous biliary extraction had been complete, and a group in whom this had been incomplete. Twenty-two patients in whom stone removal had been incomplete, and 20 from whom stones had been completely removed were evaluated with particular attention to complications such as cholangitis, liver abscess, biliary sepsis, and pain. Cholangitis was diagnosed on the basis of typical clinical symptoms such as pain, high fever, jaundice and leukocytosis. Pain without other cholangitic symptoms was excluded. Liver abscess was diagnosed by percutaneous aspiration of pus, and biliary sepsis by bacterial growth on blood culture, or laboratory findings such as increased fibrinogen products, decreased fibrinogen, and increased prothrombin time with cholangitic symptoms. 'Complete removal' means no residual stones on follow-up sonogram and cholangiogram performed within three to seven days after pecutaneous biliary extraction. Mean follow-up period was 26.5 months in the incomplete removal group and 34.2 months in the complete removal group. In twelve of 22 patients (54.5%) in the incomplete removal group, complications occurred, as follows:cholangitis, ten cases (45.5%);liver absces, one (4.5%);biliary sepsis, one (4.5%);and pain, seven(31.8%). In contrast, only two of twenty patients (10%) in the complete removal group suffered complications, all of which involved the recurrence of stones in the common duct, and cholangitis. Complete removal of intrahepatic stones significantly helps to reduce the incidence of possible complications. Even in the case of an impacted stone, aggressive interventional procedures, aimed at complete removal, should be considered. If nonsurgical procedures fail, early partial hepatectomy should be considered, particulary for the stones localized in the left intrahepatic duct.

  8. Frequency and long-term follow-up of trapped fourth ventricle following neonatal posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeraniec, I Jonathan; Ksendzovsky, Alexander; Ellis, Scott; Roberts, Sarah E; Jane, John A

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a common complication of premature neonates with small birth weight, which often leads to hydrocephalus and treatment with ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunting procedures. Trapped fourth ventricle (TFV) can be a devastating consequence of the subsequent occlusion of the cerebral aqueduct and foramina of Luschka and Magendie. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed 8 consecutive cases involving pediatric patients with TFV following VP shunting for IVH due to prematurity between 2003 and 2012. The patients ranged in gestational age from 23.0 to 32.0 weeks, with an average age at first shunting procedure of 6.1 weeks (range 3.1-12.7 weeks). Three patients were managed with surgery. Patients received long-term radiographic (mean 7.1 years; range 3.4-12.2 years) and clinical (mean 7.8 years; range 4.6-12.2 years) follow-up. RESULTS The frequency of TFV following VP shunting for neonatal posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus was found to be 15.4%. Three (37.5%) patients presented with symptoms of posterior fossa compression and were treated surgically. All of these patients showed signs of radiographic improvement with stable or improved clinical examinations during postoperative follow-up. Of the 5 patients treated conservatively, 80% experienced stable ventricular size and 1 patient experienced a slight increase (3 mm) on imaging. All of the nonsurgical patients showed stable to improved clinical examinations over the follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS The frequency of TFV among premature IVH patients is relatively high. Most patients with TFV are asymptomatic at presentation and can be managed without surgery. Symptomatic patients may be treated surgically for decompression of the fourth ventricle.

  9. Agenda Setting During Follow-Up Encounters in a University Primary Care Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Bellet, Sarah; Dubois, Julie; Vannotti, Marco; Zuercher, Marili; Faouzi, Mohamed; Devaud, Karen; Rodondi, Nicolas; Rodondi, Pierre-Yves

    2016-07-13

    At the beginning of the medical encounter, clinicians should elicit patients' agendas several times using open-ended questions. Little is known, however, about how many times physicians really solicit a patient's agenda during follow-up encounters. The objective was to analyze the number of agenda solicitations by physicians, of agendas initiated by physicians, and of patients' spontaneous agendas during the beginning and the entire encounter. We analyzed 68 videotaped follow-up encounters at a university primary care outpatient clinic. The number of different types of agenda setting was searched for and analyzed using negative binomial regression or logistic regression models. Physicians solicited agendas a mean ± SD of 0.8 ± 0.7 times/patient during the first 5 minutes and 1.7 ± 1.2 times/patient during the entire encounter. Physicians in 32.4% of encounters did not solicit the patient agenda, and there were never more than two physician's solicitations during the first 5 minutes. The mean number of physician's solicitations of the patients' agenda was 42% lower among female physicians during the first 5 minutes and 34% lower during the entire encounter. The number of agendas initiated by physicians was 1.2 ± 1.2/patient during the beginning and 3.2 ± 2.3/patient during the entire encounter. In 58.8% of the encounters, patients communicated their agendas spontaneously. There were twice as many patient spontaneous agendas (IRR = 2.12, p = .002) with female physicians than with males. This study showed that agenda solicitation with open-ended questions in follow-up encounters does not occur as often as recommended. There is thus a risk of missing new agendas or agendas that are important to the patient.

  10. Vascular permeability and iron deposition biomarkers in longitudinal follow-up of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Romuald; Fam, Maged D; Zeineddine, Hussein A; Tan, Huan; Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Shi, Changbin; Jesselson, Michael; Shenkar, Robert; Wu, Meijing; Cao, Ying; Hobson, Nicholas; Larsson, Henrik B W; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2016-08-05

    OBJECTIVE Vascular permeability and iron leakage are central features of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) pathogenesis. The authors aimed to correlate prospective clinical behavior of CCM lesions with longitudinal changes in biomarkers of dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative permeability (DCEQP) and quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) assessed by MRI. METHODS Forty-six patients with CCMs underwent 2 or more permeability and/or susceptibility studies in conjunction with baseline and follow-up imaging and clinical surveillance during a mean 12.05 months of follow-up (range 2.4-31.27 months). Based on clinical and imaging features, cases/lesions were classified as stable, unstable, or recovering. Associated and predictive changes in quantitative permeability and susceptibility were investigated. RESULTS Lesional mean permeability and QSM values were not significantly different in stable versus unstable lesions at baseline. Mean lesional permeability in unstable CCMs with lesional bleeding or growth increased significantly (+85.9% change; p = 0.005), while mean permeability in stable and recovering lesions did not significantly change. Mean lesional QSM values significantly increased in unstable lesions (+44.1% change; p = 0.01), decreased slightly with statistical significance in stable lesions (-3.2% change; p = 0.003), and did not significantly change in recovering lesions. Familial cases developing new lesions during the follow-up period showed a higher background brain permeability at baseline (p = 0.001), as well as higher regional permeability (p = 0.003) in the area that would later develop a new lesion as compared with the homologous contralateral brain region. CONCLUSIONS In vivo assessment of vascular permeability and iron deposition on MRI can serve as objective and quantifiable biomarkers of disease activity in CCMs. This may be applied in natural history studies and may help calibrate clinical trials. The 2 techniques are likely applicable in

  11. Osteoid osteoma treated with percutaneous radiofrequency ablation: MR imaging follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Hee [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 108 Pyung-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: min.h.lee@samsung.com; Ahn, Joong Mo; Chung, Hye Won; Lim, Hyo K.; Suh, Jae Gon; Kwag, Hyon Joo; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Kim, Byung Moon [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 108 Pyung-dong, Jongro-gu, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: We evaluated follow-up magnetic resonance (MR) images for osteoid osteoma treated with percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Materials and methods: Sixteen patients with osteoid osteoma treated with RFA underwent follow-up MR imaging. The protocol included T1, T2 and contrast-enhanced (CE) T1-weighted images with fat saturation at each visit immediately for 17 months after the treatment. MR images were jointly reviewed by two radiologists, regarding the appearance of treated areas, presence of complications, and the best sequence for visualization of signal intensity (SI) changes. The therapeutic response was evaluated to be a clinical success with the relief of pain. Results: The treated areas had a target-like appearance on MR images: a central ablated zone (Z1) surrounded by a band (Z2), and a peripheral area (Z3). Z1 was a non-enhancing, hypointense core on T1, T2WI. Z2 was a well-enhancing, hyperintense rim on T2WI. Z3 was less hyperintense and less enhanced than Z2. All nidi were within Z1. This appearance became evident from 1 week to 1 and 2 months. Following up after 2 months, Z2 showed progressive inward enhancement from the periphery, resulting in almost complete enhancement of Z1 and Z2 with a diminishing size. Z3 gradually showed a decrease in signal change and enhancement. No complications were found. CE-T1WI was the best for visualizing SI changes. The clinical success was achieved in all patients except for one patient with a recurrence at 17 months following treatment that had a second ablation. Conclusion: MR imaging demonstrated a characteristic appearance and subsequent changes of treated areas for osteoid osteoma following RFA.

  12. Long-term use and follow-up of autologous and homologous cartilage graft in rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemali Khorasani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cartilage grafting is used in rhinoplasty and reconstructive surgeries. Autologous rib and nasal septum cartilage (auto graft is the preferred source of graft material in rhinoplasty, however, homologous cartilage (allograft has been extensively used to correct the nasal framework in nasal deformities. Autologous cartilage graft usage is restricted with complication of operation and limiting availability of tissue for extensive deformities. Alternatively, preserved costal cartilage allograft represents a readily available and easily contoured material. The current study was a formal systematic review of complications associated with autologous versus homologous cartilage grafting in rhinoplasty patients. Methods: In this cohort retrospective study, a total of 124 patients undergone primary or revision rhinoplasty using homologous or autologus grafts with postoperative follow-up ranging from 6 to 60 months were studied. The types of grafts and complications related to the grafts were evaluated. This included evaluation for warping, infection, resorption, mobility and fracture. Results: The total complications related to the cartilage grafts were 7 cases, which included 1 warped in auto graft group, three cases of graft displacement (two in allograft group and one in auto graft group and three fractures in allograft group. No infection and resorption was recorded. Complication rate (confidence interval 0.95 in autologous and homologous group were 1.25(0.4-3.88 and 2.08(0.78-5.55 in 1000 months follow up. There was no statistically significant difference between autologous and homologous group complications. Onset of complication in autologous and homologous group were 51.23(49.27-53.19 and 58.7(54.51-62.91 month respectively (P=0.81. Conclusion: The allograft cartilage has the advantage of avoiding donor-site scar. Moreover, it provides the same benefits as autologous costal cartilage with comparable complication rate. Therefore, it

  13. Three-Year Follow-up of Conservative Treatments of Shoulder Osteoarthritis in Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiong Jiong; Wu, Kailun; Guan, Huaqing; Zhang, Lei; Ji, Cheng; Yang, Huilin; Tang, Tiansi

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the mid-term results of nonsurgical treatment for shoulder osteoarthritis (OA), especially in a Chinese population. This study sought to determine the efficacy of nonsurgical management in older patients with shoulder OA. A total of 129 conservatively treated unilateral shoulder OA patients who were older than 65 years were evaluated prospectively at the initial office visit and then subsequently at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months later. During the 36-month follow-up period, all patients could receive conventional therapy, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication, corticosteroid injection, sodium hyaluronate, and education, at the discretion of treating physicians. Some patients received physiotherapy, rehabilitation training, and a shoulder strap to improve the range of motion and muscular strength training from a physical therapist. Parameters measured included comparative effectiveness of each therapeutic method, visual analog scale (VAS), Simple Shoulder Test (SST), and Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36) scores. At 3-year follow-up, most patients had a significant increase from their pretreatment values in pain, self-assessed shoulder function, mental health, and 5 of 8 SF-36 domains. The study showed a decline in SST and VAS at 6 and 12 months after an initial ascent at 3 months, and then it was rescued and continued at 3-year follow-up. Combined therapy could improve symptoms significantly. This study suggests that a conservative approach may be more appropriate and can produce satisfactory mid-term outcomes in selected cases. The findings of this study suggest that conservative treatments should be extended for longer than 12 months before the decision regarding shoulder arthroplasty is made. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e634-e641.].

  14. Chest HRCT signs predict deaths in long-term follow-up among asbestos exposed workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vehmas, Tapio, E-mail: tapio.vehmas@ttl.fi [Health and Work Ability, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FI-00250 Helsinki (Finland); Oksa, Panu, E-mail: panu.oksa@ttl.fi [Health and Work Ability, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Uimalankatu 1, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Much lung and pleural pathology is found in chest CT studies. • HRCT signs were screened and subsequent mortality followed up. • Several signs were related to all-cause and disease specific deaths. • The HRCT classification system used was able to predict mortality. • Secondary preventive strategies should be developed for patients with such signs. - Abstract: Objectives: To study associations between chest HRCT signs and subsequent deaths in long-term follow-up. Methods: Lung and pleural signs of 633 asbestos exposed workers (age 45–86, mean 65) screened with HRCT were recorded by using the International Classification of Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases (ICOERD) system, which contains detailed instructions for use and reference images. Subsequent mortality was checked from the national register. Cox regression adjusted for covariates (age, sex, BMI, asbestos exposure, pack-years) was used to explore the relations between HRCT signs and all-cause deaths, cardiovascular and benign respiratory deaths, and deaths from neoplasms – all according to the ICD-10 diagnostic system. Results: The follow-up totalled 5271.9 person-years (mean 8.3 y/person, range .04–10.3). 119 deaths were reported. Irregular/linear opacities, honeycombing, emphysema, large opacities, visceral pleural abnormalities and bronchial wall thickening were all significantly related to all-cause deaths. Most of these signs were associated also with deaths from neoplasms and benign respiratory disease. Deaths from cardiovascular disease were predicted by emphysema and visceral pleural abnormalities. Conclusions: Several HRCT signs predicted deaths. Careful attention should be paid on subjects with radiological signs predictive of deaths and new secondary preventive strategies developed. This calls for further focused studies among different populations.

  15. J-GEM follow-up observations of the gravitational wave source GW151226*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Michitoshi; Utsumi, Yousuke; Tominaga, Nozomu; Morokuma, Tomoki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Asakura, Yuichiro; Matsubayashi, Kazuya; Ohta, Kouji; Abe, Fumio; Chimasu, Sho; Furusawa, Hisanori; Itoh, Ryosuke; Itoh, Yoichi; Kanda, Yuka; Kawabata, Koji S.; Kawabata, Miho; Koshida, Shintaro; Koshimoto, Naoki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Moritani, Yuki; Motohara, Kentaro; Murata, Katsuhiro L.; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Nakata, Fumiaki; Nishioka, Tsubasa; Saito, Yoshihiko; Terai, Tsuyoshi; Tristram, Paul J.; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Yasuda, Naoki; Doi, Mamoru; Fujisawa, Kenta; Kawachi, Akiko; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tamura, Yoichi; Uemura, Makoto; Yatsu, Yoichi

    2017-02-01

    We report the results of optical-infrared follow-up observations of the gravitational wave (GW) event GW151226 detected by the Advanced LIGO in the framework of J-GEM (Japanese collaboration for Gravitational wave ElectroMagnetic follow-up). We performed wide-field optical imaging surveys with the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC), Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC), and MOA-cam3. The KWFC survey started at 2.26 d after the GW event and covered 778 deg2 centered at the high Galactic region of the skymap of GW151226. We started the HSC follow-up observations from ˜12 d after the event and covered an area of 63.5 deg2 of the highest probability region of the northern sky with limiting magnitudes of 24.6 and 23.8 for the i and z bands, respectively. MOA-cam3 covered 145 deg2 of the skymap with the MOA-red filter ˜2.5 mon after the GW alert. The total area covered by the wide-field surveys was 986.5 deg2. The integrated detection probability for the observed area was ˜29%. We also performed galaxy-targeted observations with six optical and near-infrared telescopes from 1.61 d after the event. A total of 238 nearby (≤100 Mpc) galaxies were observed with a typical I band limiting magnitude of ˜19.5. We detected 13 supernova candidates with the KWFC survey, and 60 extragalactic transients with the HSC survey. Two thirds of the HSC transients were likely supernovae and the remaining one third were possible active galactic nuclei. With our observational campaign, we found no transients that are likely to be associated with GW151226.

  16. Progression of remnant gastric cancer is associated with duration of follow-up following distal gastrectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhei Komatsu; Yoshiaki Kuriu; Masayoshi Nakanishi; Hitoshi Fujiwara; Toshiya Ochiai; Yukihito Kokuba; Eigo Otsuji; Daisuke Ichikawa; , Kazuma Okamoto; Daito Ikoma; Masahiro Tsujiura; Yukihisa Nishimura; Yasutoshi Murayama; Atsushi Shiozaki; Hisashi Ikoma

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To re-evaluate the recent clinicopathological features of remnant gastric cancer (RGC) and to develop desirable surveillance programs.METHOIDS:Between 1997 and 2008,1149 patients underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer at the Department of Digestive Surgery,Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine,Japan.Of these,33 patients underwent gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy for RGC.Regarding the initial gastric disease,there were 19 patients with benign disease and 14 patients with gastric cancer.The hospital records of these patients were reviewed retrospectively.RESULTS:Concerning the initial gastric disease,the RGC group following gastric cancer had a shorter interval [P < 0.05; gastric cancer vs benign disease:12 (2-22) vs 30 (4-51) years] and were more frequently reconstructed by Billroth- I procedure than those following benign lesions (P < 0.001).Regarding reconstruction,RGC following Billroth-Ⅱ reconstruction showed a longer interval between surgical procedures [P < 0.001; Billroth- 11 vs Billroth- Ⅰ:32 (5-51) vs 12 (2-36) years] and tumors were more frequently associated with benign disease (P < 0.001) than those following Billroth- I reconstruction.In tumor location of RGC,after Billroth- I reconstruction,RGC occurred more frequently near the suture line and remnant gastric wall.After Billroth- Ⅱ reconstruction,RGC occurred more frequently at the anastomotic site.The duration of followup was significantly associated with the stage of RGC (P < 0.05).Patients diagnosed with early stage RGC such as stage I -Ⅱ tended to have been followed up almost every second year.CONCLUSION:Meticulous follow-up examination and early detection of RGC might lead to a better prognosis.Based on the initial gastric disease and the procedure of reconstruction,an appropriate follow-up interval and programs might enable early detection of RGC.

  17. Longitudinal follow-up of muscle echotexture in infants with congenital muscular torticollis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ching-Fang; Fu, Tieh-Cheng; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Lin, Yu-Ju; Hsu, Chih-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Unilateral fibrous contracture of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle is the major pathophysiology in infants with congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). Physical examination is not always sufficient to detect minimal muscle fibrosis in involved SCM muscles. A prospective study for SCM muscle fibrosis in CMT infants by quantifying echotexture and muscle thickness during the course of treatment is highlighted in the study. Convenience samples of 21 female and 29 male infants with CMT, who were 1 to 12 months old, underwent physiotherapy for at least 3 months and were followed for 4.7 ± 0.4 months. All infants had at least 2 clinical assessments and ultrasonographic examinations for bilateral SCM muscles during follow-up. The K value, derived from the difference in echo intensities between the involved and uninvolved SCM muscles on longitudinal sonograms, was used to represent the severity of muscle fibrosis. Bilateral SCM muscle thickness and ratio of involved to uninvolved muscle thickness (Ratio I/U) were obtained simultaneously. Clinical outcome was also recorded. No subjects underwent surgical intervention during follow-up. The K value decreased from 6.85 ± 0.58 to 1.30 ± 0.36 at the end of follow-up (P treatment, which was possibly related to the increased uninvolved SCM muscle thickness. In conclusion, echotexture is an efficient indicator for reflecting a wide degree of muscle fibrosis in infants with CMT and is informative during the treatment course. PMID:28178161

  18. Maternal dioxin exposure and pregnancy outcomes over 30 years of follow-up in Seveso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesselink, Amelia; Warner, Marcella; Samuels, Steven; Parigi, Aliza; Brambilla, Paolo; Mocarelli, Paolo; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2014-02-01

    Animal evidence suggests an association between exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Epidemiologic studies report inconsistent results, but are limited by narrow range of exposure, small sample size, and lack of a biologic measure of highest lifetime exposure. On July 10, 1976, a chemical explosion in Seveso, Italy resulted in the highest known residential exposure to TCDD. In 1996, we initiated the Seveso Women's Health Study (SWHS), a retrospective cohort of TCDD exposure and reproductive health. Individual-level TCDD was measured in serum collected soon after the explosion. After 20years of follow-up, we found no association between maternal TCDD in 1976 serum or estimated at pregnancy and spontaneous abortion (SAB), fetal growth, or gestational length. Here, we present an updated analysis of TCDD exposure and adverse pregnancy outcomes from a subsequent follow-up of the SWHS cohort in 2008-2009. SWHS women had 1211 post-explosion pregnancies through the 2008-2009 follow-up. We found no association between TCDD estimated at pregnancy and SAB, fetal growth, or gestational length. However, we found a non-significant inverse association between maternal 1976 serum TCDD and birthweight (adjusted β=-22.8, 95% CI: -80.1, 34.6). The association was stronger among first post-explosion births, but remained non-significant (adjusted β=-47.7, 95% CI: -107.3, 11.9). SWHS is the first study to be able to consider two potentially relevant measures of TCDD exposure: highest lifetime dose and in utero. Our results, although non-significant, suggest that highest dose may be more relevant in epidemiologic studies of TCDD and pregnancy outcomes.

  19. Prehypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease in Chinese Population: Four-Year Follow-Up Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Xue

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a well established cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD. However, the effect of prehypertension on risk of CKD is controversial. The aim of this study is to determine whether prehypertension increases the risk of CKD events in the Chinese population. We enrolled 20,034 with prehypertension and 12,351 with ideal blood pressure in this prospective study. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 ml/min 1.73 m2. The new occurrences of CKD events were collected during follow-up. Cumulative survival and freedom for the occurrence of new CKD events was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier approach. Multivariate Cox Regression was used to analyze the effect of prehypertension on CKD. The median follow-up time was 47 (interquartile range 44-51 months. 601 new onset CKD events occurred during the follow-up period. The cumulative incidence of new CKD events was higher in the prehypertensive population than that in the ideal blood pressure population (2.10% vs 1.46%, P = 0.0001. Multivariate Cox Regression showed that relative risks (RRs for the new onset CKD events in the prehypertensive population were 1.69 (95% confidence intervals (CI: 1.41~2.04, P = 0.001 higher than those in the ideal blood pressure population. Similarly, the risks were 1.68 (95% CI: 1.33~2.13 P = 0.001 times higher in females and 2.14 (95% CI: 1.58~2.91 P = 0.001 times higher in males by adjustment for traditional CV risk factors. Our findings demonstrated prehypertension is an independent risk factor for the occurrence of new CKD events in the Chinese population.

  20. Granulomatous colitis: findings on double contrast barium enema and follow-up studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jong Gi; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Seung Hoon; Choo, Sung Wook; Kim, Seung Cheol; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    To evaluate the radiologic findings of granulomatous colitis on double contrast barium enema and changes on follow-up studies. Serial double contrast barium enema of six patients with granulomatous colitis confirmed by endoscopic biopsy were reviewed. We analyzed the radiologic findings and their follow-up changes, including aphthous ulcers, lymphoid hyperplasia, deep ulcers, cobble stone appearance, geographic ulcers, asymmetric involvement of ulcers, skip lesions, sinus tract, fistula formation, pseudosacculation, focal stricture, and small bowel involvement. Pretreatment double contrast barium enema findings were aphthous ulcers in five patients, deep ulcer in six, cobble stone appearance in five, longitudinal geographic ulcers in two, fistulas in one, pseudosacculations in two, focal stricture in one, and pseudopolyps in six. Also, anal ulcers were observed in two patients, asymmetric involvement of ulcers in three, skip lesions in four, and small bowel involvement in five in five patients proved to have inactive disease after treatment, aphthous ulcers and deep ulcers disappeared. Geographic ulcers of two patients and anal ulcer of one patients decreased in size or depth. Pseudosacculation in one patient disappeared. Pseudopolyps decreased in two patients, increased in one, and decreased after increase in two. One patient whose disease remained active after treatment showed maintenance or increase of ulcers or fistula. And their pseudosacculation or focal stricture unchanged and pseudopolyps decreased. The major radiologic findings of chronic granulomatous colitis on double contrast barium enema are aphthous ulcer, deep ulcer, cobble stone appearance, discontinuity of the lesion and coexistence of ulcers and pseudopolyps. And, double contrast barium enema is good follow-up modality because its findings correlate with clinical course of the granulomatous colitis after treatment.

  1. Surgical therapy and long-term follow-up of childhood hereditary pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, C R; Konzen, K M; Perrault, J

    1992-03-01

    Treatment and a 15-year follow-up survey of 42 patients with hereditary pancreatitis (HP) were compared with 28 patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis (RP) of childhood. There was no difference between the two groups except for pancreatic ductal dilatation and stones in patients with HP. Longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy (20) or resection and drainage procedures (7) were more commonly required in patients with HP than RP (55% v 14%). There was no surgical mortality. Postoperatively, immediate and complete relief of symptoms was obtained in 43% of patients with HP and 25% of patients with RP. In the remainder, recurrent attacks of pancreatitis abated over 2 years such that 81% of the surgical patients were in good or excellent health. Occasional symptoms persisted in 52% of HP patients and 25% of RP patients. Of the 20 patients with HP or RP undergoing longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy extending from the head to the tail, 75% were symptom-free on follow-up. However, 3 of 6 patients with poor results had also undergone this procedure. At long-term follow-up of patients who did not undergo operation, 75% of HP patients and 90% of RP patients reported excellent or good health despite the persistent symptoms in 68% and 42%, respectively. Surgery for childhood HP is dependent on the complications present. Longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy is beneficial for ductal dilatation and associated pseudocysts or pancreatic ascites. The performance of this procedure in the absence of consistent pancreatic duct dilatation will give poor results. Patients without ductal dilatation and the majority of patients with RP may eventually lead near normal lives without resorting to surgery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Schizophrenia and quality of life: a one-year follow-up in four EU countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacalmontie Elisabeth

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article systematically monitors the quality of life (QOL of patients with schizophrenia from seven different sites across four European countries: France, Ireland, Portugal and Spain. Methods A one-year prospective cohort study was carried out. Inclusion criteria for patients were: a clinical lifetime diagnosis of schizophrenia according to ICD-10 (F20 diagnostic criteria for research, age between 18 and 65 years and at least one contact with mental health services in 1993. Data concerning QOL were recorded in seven sites from four countries: France, Portugal, Ireland and Spain, and were obtained using the Baker and Intagliata scale. At baseline, 339 patients answered the QOL questionnaire. At one-year follow-up, Spain could not participate, so only 263 patients were contacted and 219 agreed to take part. QOL was compared across centres by areas and according to a global index. QOL was correlated with presence of clinical and social problems, needs for care and interventions provided during the one-year follow-up. Results We did not find any link between gender and QOL. There were some significant differences between centres concerning many items. What is more, these differences were relative: in Lisbon where the lowest level of satisfaction was recorded, people were satisfied with food but highly dissatisfied with finances, whereas in St Etienne, where the highest level of satisfaction was recorded, people were less satisfied with food when they were more satisfied with finances. The evolution in one year among those respondents who took part in the follow-up (excluding the subjects from Granada showed different patterns depending on the items. Conclusion The four countries have different resources and patients live in rather different conditions. However, the main differences as far as their QOL is concerned very much depend on extra-psychiatric variables, principally marital status and income.

  3. Influence of structured telephone follow-up on patient compliance with rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen MC

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mochuan Chen,1 Pihong Li,2 Feiou Lin3 1Department of Orthopaedics, 2Department of General Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital & Yuying Children’s Hospital, 3Orthodontic Department, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Introduction: To assess the effects of structured telephone follow-up on patient’s home-exercise compliance after total knee arthroplasty (TKA.Methods: A total of 202 elderly patients who received a unilateral TKA were enrolled in this study. The participants were randomized into two groups: the intervention group that received structured telephone follow-up after discharge and the control group that received routine health care. Pain, functional ability, quality of life, and depression survey scores were measured before and after TKA. The intergroup and intragroup differences were analyzed during the 12 months following discharge.Results: There were no significant differences in the sociodemographic characteristics of both groups. The mean home-exercise time and total days in the intervention group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Variable scores differed significantly between groups. Pain, functional ability, quality of life, and depression improved significantly after TKA in both groups, and the intervention group had greater improvement in mental health and active range of motion.Conclusion: Undergoing a TKA can significantly reduce the patient’s pain from osteoarthritis while improving the overall physical function and quality of life. Furthermore, a structured telephone follow-up can improve patient adherence to home exercise after TKA. Keywords: quality of life, pain, home exercises, patient-reported outcomes

  4. Diagnostic criteria and follow-up in neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivianne Calheiros Chaves Gomes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy (NEHI is a form of childhood interstitial lung disease characterized by tachypnea, retractions, crackles, and hypoxia. The aim of this study was to report and discuss the clinical, imaging, and histopathological findings in a series of NEHI cases at a tertiary pediatric hospital, with an emphasis on diagnostic criteria and clinical outcomes. METHODS: Between 2003 and 2011, 12 full-term infants were diagnosed with NEHI, based on clinical and tomographic findings. Those infants were followed for 1-91 months. Four infants were biopsied, and the histopathological specimens were stained with bombesin antibody. RESULTS: In this case series, symptoms appeared at birth in 6 infants and by 3 months of age in the remaining 6. In all of the cases, NEHI was associated with acute respiratory infection. The most common initial chest HRCT findings were ground-glass opacities that were in the middle lobe/lingula in 12 patients and in other medullary areas in 10. Air trapping was the second most common finding, being observed in 7 patients. Follow-up HRCT scans (performed in 10 patients revealed normal results in 1 patient and improvement in 9. The biopsy findings were nonspecific, and the staining was positive for bombesin in all samples. Confirmation of NEHI was primarily based on clinical and tomographic findings. Symptoms improved during the follow-up period (mean, 41 months. A clinical cure was achieved in 4 patients. CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of patients, the diagnosis of NEHI was made on the basis of the clinical and tomographic findings, independent of the lung biopsy results. Most of the patients showed clinical improvement and persistent tomographic changes during the follow-up period, regardless of the initial severity of the disease or type of treatment.

  5. Percutaneous laser disc decompression: Clinical experience at SCTIMST and long term follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Arun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low backache (LBA is now increasing in younger population due to misdirected spinal kinetics secondary to improper posture, heavy load lifting and motorbike driving. Hence minimally invasive procedures are increasingly sought after. Among these, PLDD is currently popular and in use. We present our long term follow-up in the use of Nd:YAG laser for PLDD. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of PLDD in treatment of contained herniation of lumbar discs & long term follow up results. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with contained lumbar disc herniation on MRI and who did not respond to 6 weeks conservative treatment were subjected to PLDD. L4-5 disc was treated in 31, L5-S1 in 12 and L1-2 and L3-4 in one each. Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm was used for the procedure. Total laser energy of 1500-2000 Joules was delivered at the disc space depending upon the size. Results: There was immediate pain relief in 32/40 (80%. According to MacNab criteria good to fair response was seen in 37/40 (92% and 3 patients (7.5% responded poorly to this treatment. On follow up which ranged from 1 to 7 years, 34/40 (85% had pain relief with no need for further treatment. Complications: Significant pain at local puncture site was experienced by 8 (20%, pain during lasing was experienced by one. One patient developed muscular spasm. Conclusion: Percutaneous laser disc decompression is a safe, relatively noninvasive and effective treatment modality for contained, nonsequestered, herniated lumbar disc disease in carefully selected patients.

  6. Elevated cancer mortality in a German cohort of bitumen workers: extended follow-up through 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Thomas; Schill, Walter; Ahrens, Wolfgang

    2009-09-01

    The mortality follow-up in a cohort of German asphalt workers covered an additional 6 years. Male workers (N = 7919) were classified into four exposure categories: (1) exposure to bitumen only, (2) to bitumen and coal tar, (3) neither to tar nor to bitumen, and (4) unknown exposure. Exposure-specific standardized mortality ratios (SMR) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on age- and calendar period-specific national mortality rates were calculated. To compare exposed and unexposed workers, relative risks were estimated by Poisson regression. By the end of 2004, 835 workers had died. The SMR for lung cancer was 1.77 (95% CI 1.46-2.16). Head and neck cancer showed an SMR of 2.36 (95% CI 1.78-3.07). Bladder cancer mortality was elevated threefold. Significantly elevated cancer-related SMRs were also found for all malignant tumors. In addition, elevated mortality rates of nonmalignant causes such as alcoholism, liver cirrhosis, and unnatural causes of deaths including accidents were observed. After stratification by exposure group, cancer mortality was elevated among bitumen-exposed and unexposed subjects. In the internal analysis, the association between lung cancer and bitumen exposure was weakened as compared with the previous follow-up (relative risk [RR] = 1.15; 95% CI 0.72-1.84). The follow-up demonstrated an excess of cancer in this cohort of asphalt workers. However, the observed mortality patterns were not clear. Although exposure to bitumen cannot be ruled out as being responsible for the observed results, a higher prevalence of alcohol and tobacco consumption may partially explain the observed risk increases. Exposure assessment in future studies should account for multiple occupational agents and nonoccupational factors to rule out that the observed differences in SMR are not due simply to random variation.

  7. Mid-Term Vascular Safety of Renal Denervation Assessed by Follow-up MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Axel, E-mail: axel.schmid@uk-erlangen.de; Schmieder, Raphael; Lell, Michael; Janka, Rolf [Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Veelken, Roland; Schmieder, Roland E. [Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension (Germany); Uder, Michael [Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Ott, Christian [Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Background/AimsRenal denervation (RDN) emerged as a treatment option for reducing blood pressure (BP) in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH). However, concerns have been raised regarding the incidence of late renal artery stenosis or thromboembolism after RDN. The goal of the current study was, therefore, to conduct a prospective clinical trial on the mid-term vascular integrity of the renal arteries and the perfusion of the renal parenchyma assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the follow-up after catheter-based RDN.MethodsIn our single-centre investigator initiated study, 51 patients with true TRH underwent catheter-based RDN using the Symplicity Flex{sup TM} catheter (Medtronic Inc., Palo Alto, CA). Follow-up MRI was performed at a median of 11 months (interquartile range 6–18 months) after RDN on a 1.5T MR unit. High-resolution MR angiography (MRA) and MRI results were compared to the baseline digital angiography of renal arteries obtained at time of RDN. In case of uncertainties (N = 2) catheter angiography was repeated.ResultsBoth office and 24-h ambulatory BP were significantly reduced 6 and 12 months after RDN. Renal function remained unchanged 6 and 12 months after RDN. In all patients, MRA excluded new or progression of pre-existing low grade renal artery stenosis as well as focal aneurysms at the sites of radiofrequency ablation. In none of the patients new segmental perfusion deficits in either kidney were detected on MRI.ConclusionsNo vascular or parenchymal complications after radiofrequency-based RDN were detected in 51 patients followed up by MRI.

  8. Australian Aboriginal Birth Cohort study: follow-up processes at 20 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davison Belinda

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1987, a prospective study of an Australian Aboriginal Birth Cohort was established focusing on the relationships of fetal and childhood growth with the risk of chronic adult disease. However as the study is being conducted in a highly marginalized population it is also an important resource for cross-sectional descriptive and analytical studies. The aim of this paper is to describe the processes of the third follow up which was conducted 20 years after recruitment at birth. Methods Progressive steps in a multiphase protocol were used for tracing, with modifications for the expected rural or urban location of the participants. Results Of the original 686 cohort participants recruited 68 were untraced and 27 were known to have died. Of the 591 available for examination 122 were not examined; 11 of these were refusals and the remainder were not seen for logistical reasons relating to inclement weather, mobility of participants and single participants living in very remote locations. Conclusion The high retention rate of this follow-up 20 years after birth recruitment is a testament to the development of successful multiphase protocols aimed at overcoming the challenges of tracing a cohort over a widespread remote area and also to the perseverance of the study personnel. We also interpret the high retention rate as a reflection of the good will of the wider Aboriginal community towards this study and that researchers interactions with the community were positive. The continued follow-up of this life course study now seems feasible and there are plans to trace and reexamine the cohort at age 25 years.

  9. Treatment of congenital Chagas' disease diagnosed and followed up by the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russomando, G; de Tomassone, M M; de Guillen, I; Acosta, N; Vera, N; Almiron, M; Candia, N; Calcena, M F; Figueredo, A

    1998-09-01

    In 1991 and 1992, a prenatal screening of Trypanosoma cruzi infection was carried out using ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence techniques. A total of 840 blood samples from pregnant women, obtained at the Maternity Ward of the Hospital de Clínicas, National University of Asunción (Asunción, Paraguay), and 1,022 samples from the Regional Hospital of the San Pedro Department of Paraguay were examined. It was observed that 7.7% and 10.5%, respectively, of the pregnant women were serologically positive for infection with T. cruzi. When blood samples obtained from newborns on the day of birth or, at the most, on the first few days afterwards were examined by direct microscopic observation, an incidence of congenital transmission of 3% was found. These results are consistent with those of neighboring countries. When a serologic follow-up was conducted on the newborns until six months of age, the incidence of congenital transmission reached 10%. The same incidence rate was obtained when the samples collected during the first days after birth were examined by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fifty-eight infants born to seropositive mothers were followed-up, two of which were positive by direct microscopic observation at birth, and four who were PCR-positive, but microscopy-negative at birth. None of the infants were positive for IgM at birth. The infected babies were treated with benznidazole and were followed-up by serology and PCR for four years. We conclude that the PCR has a clear advantage over conventional techniques for the early detection of congenital transmission of T. cruzi infection, and for monitoring infants undergoing chemotherapy.

  10. Interstitial lung disease in anti-synthetase syndrome: Initial and follow-up CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debray, Marie-Pierre, E-mail: marie-pierre.debray@bch.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital, Department of Radiology, 46, rue Henri Huchard, 75877 Paris Cedex 18 (France); Borie, Raphael, E-mail: raphael.borie@bch.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital, Department of Pneumology A and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, DHU Fire 46, rue Henri Huchard, 75877 Paris Cedex 18 (France); Inserm, U1152, Paris (France); Revel, Marie-Pierre, E-mail: marie-pierre.revel@htd.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Cochin Hospital, Department of Radiology, 27, Rue du Fg Saint Jacques, 75679 Paris Cedex 14 (France); Naccache, Jean-Marc, E-mail: jean-marc.naccache@tnn.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Avicenne Hospital, Department of Pneumology and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, Bobigny (France); AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Department of Pneumology and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Khalil, Antoine, E-mail: antoine.khalil@tnn.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Department of Radiology, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Toper, Cécile, E-mail: cecile.toper@gmail.com [AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Department of Pneumology and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Israel-Biet, Dominique, E-mail: dominique.israel-biet@egp.aphp.fr [Université Paris Descartes and AP-HP, Department of Pneumology, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, 20, rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris (France); and others

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To describe the initial and follow-up CT features of interstitial lung disease associated with anti-synthetase syndrome (AS-ILD). Materials and methods: Two independent thoracic radiologists retrospectively analysed thin-section CT images obtained at diagnosis of AS-ILD in 33 patients (17 positive for anti-Jo1, 13 for anti-PL12, and three for anti-PL7 antibodies). They evaluated the pattern, distribution and extent of the CT abnormalities. They also evaluated the change in findings during follow-up (median 27 months; range 13–167 months) in 26 patients. Results: At diagnosis, ground-glass opacities (100%), reticulations (87%) and traction bronchiectasis (76%) were the most common CT findings. Consolidations were present in 45% of patients. A non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), organizing pneumonia (OP) or mixed NSIP-OP CT pattern were observed in 15 out of 33 (45%), seven out of 33 (21%) and eight out of 33 (24%) patients, respectively, whereas the CT pattern was indeterminate in three patients. During follow-up, consolidations decreased or disappeared in 11 out of 12 patients (92%), among which seven within the first 6 months, but honeycombing progressed or appeared in ten out of 26 patients (38%) and overall disease extent increased in nine out of 26 patients (35%). Conclusion: CT features at diagnosis of AS-ILD mainly suggest NSIP and OP, isolated or in combination. Consolidations decrease or disappear in most cases but the disease may progress to fibrosis in more than one third of patients.

  11. Impact of follow-up consultations for ICU survivors on post-ICU syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J. F.; Thomsen, Thordis; Overgaard, D

    2015-01-01

    /unpublished trials. Randomized controlled trials investigating post-ICU consultations in adults with outcomes such as quality of life (QOL), anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), physical ability, cognitive function, and return to work were included. Two reviewers extracted data and assessed...... ratio 0.49, 95 % CI 0.26-0.95). There was no effect on other outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence indicates that follow-up consultations might reduce symptoms of PTSD at 3-6 months after ICU discharge in ICU survivors, but without affecting QOL and other outcomes investigated. This review highlights...

  12. Short-tem Post Renal Trasplant Follow-up at Madinah Al Munawarah

    OpenAIRE

    Bernieh Bassam; Nezamuddin Nabil; Sirwal Irshad; Wafa Adel; Abbade M; Nasser Baker; Al Razzaz Zakaria

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed the records of the renal transplant patients followed at our hospital to determine short-term outcome and complications. Sixty-five renal transplant patients, follow-up for two years were included in this study. Of these patients 40 (61.5%) were males, 33 (50.7%) were Saudis with mean age of 37.2 ± 11.7 years. Donors were living related (LRD) in 23 (35%), living non-related (LNRD) in 27 (42%) and cadaveric (CAD) in 15 (23%). Thirty-two tra...

  13. Treatment and follow-up of a locked posterior shoulder dislocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Klemt, Christof; Südkamp, Norbert P.

    2004-01-01

    Posterior shoulder dislocation appears to be a rare event and is a frequently overlooked problem in traumatology. Once the diagnosis is made, usually by clinical examination and use of conventional radiography, head damage should be evaluated by an arthro-CT of the shoulder. In case of severe...... humeral head damage and advanced age, arthroplasty of the shoulder seems to provide a reliable treatment method. Implantation of a new-generation prosthesis in a female patient and follow-up by assessment using the Constant-Murley score are described. © Urban & Vogel....

  14. The predictive value of microalbuminuria in IDDM. A five-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T; Nörgaard, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B;

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the predictive value of microalbuminuria and the annual increase of albumin excretion as risk factors for diabetic nephropathy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A 5-year follow-up of patients with microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion [UAE] = 30-299 mg/24 h) and matched...... patients with normoalbuminuria (UAE analysis of log-transformed UAE on time. This study was conducted at the outpatient clinic of the Steno Diabetes Center...... blood pressure, and a higher incidence of proliferative retinopathy compared with nonprogressors. Multiple regression analysis only identified mean HbAlc as an independent predictor of the rate of progression. Smoking was significantly more prevalent in patients with persistent albuminuria. CONCLUSIONS...

  15. Characteristic sonographic and follow up features of thyroid nodules according to children age groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Bo Da; Chang, Yun Woo; Hong, Seong Sook; Hwang, Ji Young; Lim, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Dong Hwan [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    We analyzed the spectrum and the significance of pediatric thyroid nodules depicted on sonography and evaluated the follow-up change according to the age group. We retrospectively reviewed the sonographic features of 82 nodules in 69 patients (6.6%) among 1282 children less than 13 years of age without a palpable lesion, from January 2006 to January 2013. Patients were divided into three age groups; infants, preschoolers, and schoolers. Thyroid nodules were evaluated according to their sonographic characteristics (simple cyst, colloid cyst, solid mass, or intrathyroid thymus) and the changes detected at follow-up (disappearance, decrease in size, no change or increase in size) were reported. There was a significant difference in the nodule patterns among the age groups (p < 0.001). The nodules in infants included a simple cyst (n = 12), a solid mass (n = 12), or an intra-thyroid thymus (n = 9). The preschoolers had a simple cyst (n = 11), a colloid cyst (n = 5), a solid mass (n = 3) or an intra-thyroid thymus (n = 5). However, the schoolers had a simple cyst (n = 2), a colloid cyst (n = 18), and a solid mass (n = 5), but there was no case of intra-thyroid thymus. Follow-up of 38 cases revealed significant differences among the age groups (p = 0.018). The nodules in infants showed findings such as disappearance of nodules (n = 9) and no change (n = 10) on follow-up sonography. In preschoolers, the nodules had disappeared (n = 2), decreased in size (n = 1), and showed no change (n = 11). However, the nodules in schoolers were found to be decreased in size (n = 1), show no change (n = 2), and increased in size (n = 2). The proven pathologic finding was benign in four patients. There were significant differences in the prevalence and the interval change of thyroid nodules among infants, preschoolers, and schoolers. A large series of intrathyroid thymus was seen in infants and preschoolers, and masses did not increase in size in these age groups. The frequency of a

  16. Crescendo response to rituximab in oral pemphigus vulgaris: a case with 7-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, D T; Benton, E C; Groves, R W; Setterfield, J F

    2016-07-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune blistering disease affecting the skin and mucous membranes. Rituximab, a CD20 chimeric monoclonal antibody, has efficacy in PV management. We report a case of severe oral PV that showed a progressive response to repeated courses of rituximab, culminating in a rapid response within 4 weeks following severe relapse 4 years after initial therapy. It demonstrates the progressively shorter time to achieve partial or complete remission following rituximab infusions, combined with minimal adjuvant therapy over a 7-year follow-up period.

  17. The GMRT Radio Halo Survey and low frequency follow-up

    CERN Document Server

    Venturi, T; Cassano, R; Brunetti, G; Dallacasa, D; Macario, G; Setti, G; Bardelli, S; Athreya, R

    2009-01-01

    The GMRT Radio Halo Survey, carried out at 610 MHz to investigate the statistical properties of cluster radio halos in a complete cluster sample selected in the redshift interval z=0.2-0.4, has significantly improved our understanding of the origin of cluster radio halos and relics. Here we briefly summarize the most relevant results of our investigation. A low frequency follow-up is in progress with the GMRT at 325 MHz and 240 MHz on the diffuse sources and candidated found at 610 MHz. We briefly report some preliminary results on these low frequency observations. Cluster radio halos with different radio spectral properties have been unexpectedly found.

  18. Extended heart failure clinic follow-up in low-risk patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Videbaek, Lars

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundOutpatient follow-up in specialized heart failure clinics (HFCs) is recommended by current guidelines and implemented in most European countries, but the optimal duration of HFC programmes has not been established. Nor is it known whether all or only high-risk patients, e.g. identified ......-up in a specialized HFC in a publicly funded universal access healthcare system. Heart failure patients on optimal medical therapy with mild or moderate symptoms are safely managed by their personal GP.Trial Registration: www.Centerwatch.com: 173491 (NorthStar)....

  19. Traumatic Habit causing Gingival Recession in a child: 3-Year Follow Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilis Alexandria

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this report was to present a successful treatment approach in an unusual gingival recession as a result of finger sucking traumatic habit associated with high labial frenum. Case Report: A 10-year-old girl presented moderate pain, recession in the mandibular right incisor and finger sucking habit. The performed treatment was: oral hygiene instruction, use of palatal appliance, psychological support and frenectomy. After three years follow up, significant increases in the width of keratinized gingival, root coverage and profits in clinical attachment levels were observed. Conclusion: This case report showed great results in recovery of the periodontal health in a child.

  20. Quality of life of elderly persons with cancer: a 3-month follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, Bente Appel; Østerlind, Kell; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm

    2006-01-01

    and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30, Katz ADL, Nowotny's Hope Scale, and the Interview Schedule for Social Interaction. Participation at baseline was 101 (74 women, 27 men), and after 3 months was 85(66 women, 19 men). Fatigue was the most reported symptom both at baseline and 3 months after. No significant changes......-month follow-up. From the perspective of QoL, nurses need to address more specifically the most vulnerable elderly cancer patients: those who are dependent in instrumental activities of daily living, those who perceive reduced economic ability, and those who need assistance to discover new strategies...

  1. Diffusion-weighted MR images and pineoblastoma. Diagnosis and follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Cruz Junior, L. Celso Hygino; Doring, Thomas M.; Domingues, Romeu C. [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: egasparetto@gmail.com; Araujo, Bertha; Dantas, Mario Alberto [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. of Radiology; Chimelli, Leila [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. of Pathology

    2008-07-01

    Pineoblastomas are uncommon pineal tumors, which demonstrate rapid growing and poor prognosis. We report the case of a 43-year-old man with an enhancing pineal region mass, which showed restriction of the diffusion on diffusion-weighted (DW) MR images. The surgical biopsy defined the diagnosis of pineoblastoma and the therapy was initiated with radiation and chemotherapy. Three months later, the follow-up MR imaging showed areas suggestive of necrosis and the DW images demonstrate no significant areas of restricted diffusion. The differential diagnosis of pineal region masses that could show restriction of diffusion is discussed. (author)

  2. Prevalent pain and pain level among torture survivors: a follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorthe Reff, Olsen; Montgomery, Edith; Carlsson, J;

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To estimate change over nine months and over two years, as concerns the prevalence and level of pain in the head, back and feet, among previously tortured refugees settled in Denmark, and to compare associations between torture methods and the prevalence of pain at baseline and at follow-up....... ten years after the torture took place, survivors of torture continue to suffer from pain associated with the type of torture they had been subjected to. This presents a considerable challenge to future evidence-based development of effective treatment programmes....

  3. Follow-up of infants with amniotic fluid trisomy 20 mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, D N; Barsel-Bowers, G; Zartler, A S

    1986-07-01

    The finding of trisomy 20 mosaicism in amniotic fluid is a cause of considerable anxiety for both physicians and parents. Although the significance of this finding is still not clear, some reassurance can be given to prospective parents, since the outcome has been normal in all reported pregnancies carried to term. Follow-up information on psychomotor development of these infants is needed in order to provide better genetic counseling to these families. We have followed three infants who have had normal growth and psychomotor development up to approximately 2 years.

  4. Quality of life of elderly persons with cancer: a 3-month follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, Bente Appel; Østerlind, Kell; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the quality of life (QoL) of newly diagnosed persons with cancer aged 65 years at baseline and 3 months after, in relation to age, contact with the healthcare system, activities of daily living, hope, social network and support using the European Organization for Research......-month follow-up. From the perspective of QoL, nurses need to address more specifically the most vulnerable elderly cancer patients: those who are dependent in instrumental activities of daily living, those who perceive reduced economic ability, and those who need assistance to discover new strategies...

  5. A four-year follow-up study in fibromyalgia. Relationship to chronic fatigue syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Bülow, P M; Prescott, E

    1993-01-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to examine to what extent fibromyalgia patients later on developed presumpted causative somatic diseases and to examine symptoms and muscle strength some years after the diagnosis of fibromyalgia was established. A secondary objective was to describe...... the overlap between fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. Only in two of 91 the muscle pain was found to be caused by another somatic disease during the median 4 year follow-up period. In one of the 83 attending subjects a somatic disease associated with muscle symptoms was established at the follow...

  6. Spinal cord compression in {beta}-thalassemia: follow-up after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Silvana Fahel da; Figueiredo, Maria Stella; Cancado, Rodolfo Delfini; Nakadakare, Fernando; Segreto, Roberto; Kerbauy, Jose [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    1998-12-01

    Spinal cord compression due to extramedullary hematopoiesis is a well-described bu rare syndrome encountered in several hematologic disorders, including {beta}-thalassemia. We report a case of a patient with intermediate {beta}-thalassemia and crural paraparesis due to spinal cord compression by a paravertebral extramedullary mass. She was successfully treated with low-dose radiotherapy and transfusions. After splenectomy, she was regularly followed up for over four years without transfusion or recurrence of spinal cord compression. Extramedullary hematopoiesis should be investigated in patients with hematologic disorders and spinal cord symptoms. The rapid recognition and treatment with radiotherapy can dramatically alleviate symptoms. (author)

  7. Scandinavian Clinical Practice Guidelines on the diagnosis, management and follow-up of anaphylaxis during anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroigaard, M; Garvey, L H; Gillberg, L;

    2007-01-01

    titration of adrenaline (epinephrine) and fluid therapy as first-line treatment. Recommendations for primary and secondary follow-up are given, bearing in mind that there are variations in geography and resources in the different countries. A list of National Centres from which anaesthesiologists can seek....... It is hoped that increased focus on the subject will lead to prompt diagnosis, rapid and correct treatment, and standardised management of patients with anaphylactic reactions during anaesthesia across Scandinavia. The recommendations are based on the best available evidence in the literature, which, owing...

  8. Radiological long-term follow-up of grafted xenogeneic bone in patients with bone tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Ozaki, Toshifumi; Inoue, Hajime; Sugihara, Shinsuke; Sumii, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    Radiological findings on the fate of grafted Kiel bone implants for the treatment of bone tumors were evaluated in 25 lesions. The mean follow-up period was 14.8 years, ranging from 5 to 21.8 years. We classified the radiological findings into 4 grades; Excellent (4 lesions), Good (14 lesions), Fair (2 lesions), and Poor (5 lesions). All cases of the Poor grade were polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. The younger the patient at the time of the operation, the more rapidly Kiel bone grafts tended to...

  9. Value of various radiological techniques for follow-up of Camurati-Engelmann disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, K.R.; Fritz, P.; Bihl, H.; Lenarz, T.; Weise, D.; Baldauf, G.

    1987-09-01

    Camurati-Engelmann disease is a rare progressive bone dysplasia; involvement of the skull base can lead to deafness, vestibular disturbances, facial paralysis and damage to the optic nerves. Treatment with corticosteroids, calcitonin and diphosphonates promises only very limited success. Conservative treatment of compression of the cranial nerves is almost ineffective, but the aim of surgical treatment is decompression of involved nerves. The differential diagnosis depends on radiological findings and clinical symptoms. Follow-up depends on radiographic examination and skeletal scintigraphy for showing the extent of the disease. CT may help in demonstrating compression of cranial nerves and define the indications for surgical decompression.

  10. Thyroid Nodules in an 11-Year DanThyr Follow-Up Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejbjerg, Anne; Bjergved, Lena; Pedersen, Inge Bulow

    2014-01-01

    Context: Limited longitudinal data are available on changes in the thyroid gland structure in a population and how this is influenced by iodine fortification (IF). Objective: Our objective was to clarify how IF influenced thyroid gland structure in 2 regions with different iodine intake at baseline...... was performed by the same sonographers using the same equipment, after controlling performances. Main Outcome Measure: Change in thyroid gland structure was evaluated. Results: The follow-up period saw an increased prevalence of multinodularity (9.8%-13.8%, P...

  11. Musculoskeletal disorders among construction workers: a one-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boschman Julitta S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs are an important cause of functional impairments and disability among construction workers. An improved understanding of MSDs in different construction occupations is likely to be of value for selecting preventive measures. This study aimed to survey the prevalence of symptoms of MSDs, the work-relatedness of the symptoms and the problems experienced during work among two construction occupations: bricklayers and supervisors. Methods We randomly selected 750 bricklayers and 750 supervisors resident in the Netherlands in December 2009. This sample was surveyed by means of a baseline questionnaire and a follow-up questionnaire one year later. The participants were asked about complaints of the musculoskeletal system during the last six months, the perceived work-relatedness of the symptoms, the problems that occurred during work and the occupational tasks that were perceived as causes or aggravating factors of the MSD. Results Baseline response rate was 37%, follow-up response was 80%. The prevalence of MSDs among 267 bricklayers and 232 supervisors was 67% and 57%, respectively. Complaints of the back, knee and shoulder/upper arm were the most prevalent among both occupations. Irrespective of the body region, most of the bricklayers and supervisors reported that their complaints were work-related. Complaints of the back and elbow were the most often reported among the bricklayers during work, whereas lower arm/wrist and upper leg complaints were the most often reported among the supervisors. In both occupations, a majority of the participants perceived several occupational physical tasks and activities as causes or aggravating factors for their MSD. Recurrent complaints at follow-up were reported by both bricklayers (47% of the complaints and supervisors (31% of the complaints. Participants in both occupations report that mainly back and knee complaints result in additional problems

  12. A follow-up study of heroin addicts (VEdeTTE2: study design and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lampis Fabio

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Italy, a large cohort study (VEdeTTE1 was conducted between 1998–2001 to evaluate the effectiveness of treatments in reducing mortality and increasing treatment retention among heroin addicts. The follow-up of this cohort (VEdeTTE2 was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of treatments on long-term outcomes, such as rehabilitation and social re-integration. The purpose of this paper is to describe the protocol of the VEdeTTE2 study, and to present the results of the pilot study carried out to assess the feasibility of the study and to improve study procedures. Methods The source population for the VEdeTTE2 study was the VEdeTTE1 cohort, from which a sample of 2,200 patients, traced two or more years after enrolment in the cohort, were asked to participate. An interview investigates drug use; overdose; family and social re-integration. Illegal activity are investigated separately in a questionnaire completed by the patient. Patients are also asked to provide a hair sample to test for heroin and cocaine use. Information on treatments and HIV, HBV and HCV morbidity are obtained from clinical records. A pilot phase was planned and carried out on 60 patients. Results The results of the pilot phase pointed out the validity of the procedures designed to limit attrition: the number of traced subjects was satisfactory (88%. Moreover, the pilot phase was very useful in identifying possible causes of delays and attrition, and flaws in the instruments. Improvements to the procedures and the instruments were subsequently implemented. Sensitivity of the biological test was quite good for heroin (78% but lower for cocaine (42.3%, highlighting the need to obtain a hair sample from all patients. Conclusion In drug addiction research, studies investigating health status and social re-integration of subjects at long-term follow-up are lacking. The VEdeTTE2 study aims to investigate these outcomes at long-term follow-up. Results of the

  13. Surgical outcome and clinical follow-up in patients with symptomatic myocardial bridging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiao-hong; WANG Shui-yun; XU Jian-ping; SONG Yun-hu; SUN Han-song; TANG Yue; DONG Chao; YANG Yue-jin; HU Sheng-shou

    2007-01-01

    Background Myocardial bridging with systolic compression of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) may be associated with myocardial ischaemia. The clinical outcome in patients with surgical treatment for symptomatic myocardial bridging remains undetermined. This study assessed the middle- and long-term results of surgical treatment for symptomatic myocardial bridging.Methods From 1997 to 2006, 37 463 patients received selective coronary angiography in the Fuwai Cardiovascular Hospital, Beijing, China. Of these, 484 patients had angiographic diagnosis of myocardial bridging. Of the 484 patients,35 underwent surgery for treatment of myocardial bridging with significant systolic arterial compression. Among the surgical treatment patients, 24 presented with other cardiac disorders, and the remaining 11 symptomatic patients with isolated myocardial bridging were included in the follow-up study.Results The angiographic prevalence of myocardial bridging was 1.3% in this study. The coronary angiographies of the 11 patients revealed myocardial bridging in the middle segment of LAD causing systolic compression ≥75% (ranging from 75% to 90%). The mean age of patients was 48.4 years. Surgical myotomy was performed in 3 patients and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in 8 patients. Eight patients were operated on with an off-pump approach and 3 with a cardiopulmonary bypass technique after median sternotomy. Conversion to on-pump CABG surgery was necessary in 1 patient because of perforation of the right ventricle. The left internal mammary artery was used in all patients with CABG.The acute clinical success rate was 100% with respect to the absence of myocardial infarction, death or other major in-hospital complications. All of the patients were followed up clinically. The median follow-up was 35.3 months (range: 6 to 120 months). Nine patients were free from symptoms and one of them continued taking beta blockers. The remaining 2 patients with myotomy had

  14. RECURRENT SPINAL HYDATIDOSIS - A CASE REPORT WITH 3 YEARS FOLLOW UP AND REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal hydatid cyst, constituting 1% - 2.5 % of the total cases of hydatid disease, is a rare form of hydatid disease. We present a case of pathologically confirmed primary intradural and extradural spinal hydatid cyst in an otherwise healthy patient causing spinal cord compression. The patient had atypical symptoms on presentation with sudden onset of paraplegia and hence, the diagnosis was not established pre-operatively. The patient underwent spinal decompression surgery resulting in complete recovery. However there was a recurrence at the 24 months follow-up for which she was treated in a similar fashion

  15. Professional Nurses' Perceptions of Skills Required for Performing Preterm Infants' Follow-up Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordewener, Debbie; Lubbe, Welma

    2017-02-14

    Improved perinatal and neonatal care enhances preterm infant survival rates, but the adverse outcomes remain high. Nurses play vitally important roles regarding the follow-up assessments, treatment, and care of preterm infants. This explorative, descriptive study aimed to describe nurses' perceptions of skills required to perform effective preterm infant assessments. Thirteen semistructured interviews were conducted. Identified themes included the role of the professional nurse, the importance of preterm infant assessments, lack of skills and knowledge to conduct quality assessments, formal and continuous development training needs, the absence of assessment tools and physical resources to perform standardized assessments of preterm infants, and the required support and referral systems.

  16. Automatic Tools for Diagnosis Support of Total Hip Replacement Follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SULTANA, A.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Total hip replacement is a common procedure in today orthopedics, with high rate of long-term success. Failure prevention is based on a regular follow-up aimed at checking the prosthesis fit and state by means of visual inspection of radiographic images. It is our purpose to provide automatic means for aiding medical personnel in this task. Therefore we have constructed tools for automatic identification of the component parts of the radiograph, followed by analysis of interactions between the bone and the prosthesis. The results form a set of parameters with obvious interest in medical diagnosis.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 8 Fermi GRB afterglows follow-up (Singer+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, L. P.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Perley, D. A.; Anderson, G. E.; Anupama, G. C.; Arcavi, I.; Bhalerao, V.; Bue, B. D.; Cao, Y.; Connaughton, V.; Corsi, A.; Cucchiara, A.; Fender, R. P.; Fox, D. B.; Gehrels, N.; Goldstein, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Horesh, A.; Hurley, K.; Johansson, J.; Kann, D. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Huang, K.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Masci, F.; Nugent, P.; Rau, A.; Rebbapragada, U. D.; Staley, T. D.; Svinkin, D.; Thone, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Urata, Y.; Weinstein, A.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we present the GBM-iPTF (intermediate Palomar Transient Factory) afterglows from the first 13 months of this project. Follow-up observations include R-band photometry from the P48, multicolor photometry from the P60, spectroscopy (acquired with the P200, Keck, Gemini, APO, Magellan, Very Large Telescope (VLT), and GTC), and radio observations with the Very Large Array (VLA), the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA), the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), and the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI). (3 data files).

  18. Gamma-Ray Burst Follow-up Observations with STACEE During 2003-2007

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvis, A; Carson, J E; Covault, C E; Driscoll, D D; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Hanna, D S; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Mukherjee, R; Müller, C; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope (ACT) that uses a large mirror array to achieve a relatively low energy threshold. For sources with Crab-like spectra, at high elevations, the detector response peaks near 100 GeV. Gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations have been a high priority for the STACEE collaboration since the inception of the experiment. We present the results of 20 GRB follow-up observations at times ranging from 3 minutes to 15 hours after the burst triggers. Where redshift measurements are available, we place constraints on the intrinsic high-energy spectra of the bursts.

  19. Follow-up review: recent progress in the development of super-resolution optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Katsumasa

    2016-08-01

    The advent of super-resolution microscopy brought a huge impact to various research fields ranging from the fundamental science to medical and industrial applications. The technological development is still ongoing with involving different scientific disciplines and often changing the standard of optical imaging. In this review, I would like to introduce the recent research progress in super-resolution microscopy as a follow-up for the featured issue in Microscopy (Vol. 64, No. 4, 2015) with discussions especially on the current trends and new directions in the technological development.

  20. Ten-digit replantation with seven years follow-up: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Haibo; Sui, Haiming; Wang, Chenlin; Wang, Zhumin; Yang, Qingmin; Wang, Buxing

    2010-07-01

    In this report, we present a case of successful replantation of 10-digit complete amputation and results of postoperative rehabilitation in 7 years follow-up. The rehabilitation program included psychotherapy, physical therapy, sensory re-education, and measurements. At the 7 years postoperatively, the static two-point discriminations of replanted digits ranged from 4 to 11 mm. Grasping powers ranged from 69 to 81 lb, and pinching powers ranged from 13 to 19 lb. The patient returned to the previous employment. Our experience has demonstrated that systemic postoperative rehabilitation and measurements could achieve satisfactory recovery of the sensory and motor functions of multiple-digit replantation.