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Sample records for 1937-1987 lawrence berkeley

  1. Fifty Years of Progress, 1937-1987 [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL, LBNL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, T. F. (ed.)

    1987-01-01

    This booklet was prepared for the 50th anniversary of medical and biological research at the Donner Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. The intent is to present historical facts and to highlight important facets of fifty years of accomplishments in medical and biological sciences. A list of selected scientific publications from 1937 to 1960 is included to demonstrate the character and lasting importance of early pioneering work. The organizational concept is to show the research themes starting with the history, then discoveries of medically important radionuclides, then the use of accelerated charged particles in therapy, next human physiology studies then sequentially studies of biology from tissues to macromolecules; and finally studies of the genetic code.

  2. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  3. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  4. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory's environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program

  5. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  6. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via ''no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is ''no fault'' and is not an ''audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs

  7. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-07-01

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs.

  8. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs

  9. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory`s framework for an affirmative approach to increasing the representation of people of color and women in segments of our work force where they have been underrepresented and taking action to increase the employment of persons with disabilities and special disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The AAP describes the hierarchy of responsibility for Laboratory affirmative action, the mechanisms that exist for full Laboratory participation in the AAP, the policies and procedures governing recruitment at all levels, the Laboratory`s plan for monitoring, reporting, and evaluating affirmative action progress, and a description of special affirmative action programs and plans the Laboratory has used and will use in its efforts to increase the representation and retention of groups historically underrepresented in our work force.

  10. Former Fermilab boss to lead Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Particle physicist Michael Witherell - current vice-chancellor for research at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) - has been appointed the next director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL).

  11. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1981-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed.

  12. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed

  13. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O. (eds.)

    1990-08-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a multiprogram national laboratory managed by the University of California (UC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL's major role is to conduct basic and applied science research that is appropriate for an energy research laboratory. The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1989 are presented, and general trends are discussed. 17 refs., 12 figs., 23 tabs.

  14. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1987-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  15. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1995--2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the details of the mission and strategic plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during the fiscal years of 1995--2000. It presents summaries of current programs and potential changes; critical success factors such as human resources; management practices; budgetary allowances; and technical and administrative initiatives.

  16. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs

  17. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division

  18. Annual site environmental report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O. (eds.)

    1991-05-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1990 are presented, and general trends are discussed. The report is organized under the following topics: Environmental Program Overview; Environmental Permits; Environmental Assessments; Environmental Activities; Penetrating Radiation; Airborne Radionuclides; Waterborne Radionuclides; Public Doses Resulting from LBL Operations; Trends -- LBL Environmental Impact; Waterborne Pollutants; Airborne Pollutants; Groundwater Protection; and Quality Assurance. 20 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs.

  19. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

  20. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

    1996-07-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment

  2. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs

  3. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1989-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs.

  4. USING DOE-2.1 AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Building Energy Analysis Group.; Authors, Various

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this manual is to assist the DOE-2 user to run DOE-2 and its utility programs at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). It is organized to reflect the facts that every DOE-2 job run at LBL requires certain steps, and that there are options related to DOE-2 job runs available to any DOE-2 user. The standard steps for running a DOE-2 job are as follows: 1. Prepare a job deck 2. Process a job deck 3. Obtain standard output reports.

  5. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1997 Site Environmental Report Vol. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1997 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1997. This report is structured into three basic areas that cover a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and the results of the surveillance and monitoring activities, including air quality, surface water, groundwater, sanitary sewer, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuffs, radiation dose assessment, and quality assurance. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains the body of the report, a list of references, a list of acronyms and abbreviations, a glossary, Appendix A (NESHAPS annual report), and Appendix B (distribution list for volume I). Volume II contains Appendix C, the individual data results from monitoring programs. Each chapter in volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow

  6. Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

  7. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs.

  8. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES ampersand H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES ampersand H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES ampersand H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES ampersand H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs

  9. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, L.D. (ed.)

    1978-03-01

    The data obtained from the Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for the Calendar year 1977 are described and general trends are discussed. The general trend of decreasing radiation levels at our site boundary due to accelerator operation during past years has leveled off during 1977 and in some areas shows a slight but not statistically significant increase as predicted in last year's summary. There were changes in both ion beams as well as current which have resulted in shifts in maxima at the monitoring stations. The gamma levels are once again reported as zero. There is only one period of detectable gamma radiation due to accelerator operation. The annual dose equivalent are reported from the environmental monitoring stations since they have been established. Radiation levels at the Olympus Gate Station have shown a steady decline since 1959 when estimates were first made. The Olympus Gate Station is in direct view of the Bevatron and most directly influenced by that accelerator. Over the past several years the atmospheric sampling program has, with the exception of occasional known releases, yielded data which are within the range of normal background. The surface water program always yields results within the range of normal background. As no substantial changes in the quantities of radionuclides used are anticipated, no changes are expected in these observations.

  10. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation's scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory's ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy's strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory's scientific and support divisions.

  11. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Institutional Plan FY 1994--1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. For FY 1994-1999 the Institutional Plan reflects significant revisions based on the Laboratory`s strategic planning process. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff diversity and development program. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The new section on Information Resources reflects the importance of computing and communication resources to the Laboratory. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process.

  12. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, Joseph T.; Stroh, Suzanne C.; Maio, Linda R.; Olson, Karl R.; Grether, Donald F.; Clary, Mary M.; Smith, Brian M.; Stevens, David F.; Ross, Loren; Alper, Mark D.; Dairiki, Janis M.; Fong, Pauline L.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  13. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1987-1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    1986-12-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, provides national scientific leadership and supports technological innovation through its mission to: (1) Perform leading multidisciplinary research in general sciences and energy sciences; (2) Develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for use by qualified investigators; (3) Educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers; and (4) Foster productive relationships between LBL research programs and industry. The following areas of research excellence implement this mission and provide current focus for achieving DOE goals. GENERAL SCIENCES--(1) Accelerator and Fusion Research--accelerator design and operation, advanced accelerator technology development, accelerator and ion source research for heavy-ion fusion and magnetic fusion, and x-ray optics; (2) Nuclear Science--relativistic heavy-ion physics, medium- and low-energy nuclear physics, nuclear theory, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear chemistry, transuranium elements studies, nuclear data evaluation, and detector development; (3) Physics--experimental and theoretical particle physics, detector development, astrophysics, and applied mathematics. ENERGY SCIENCES--(1) Applied Science--building energy efficiency, solar for building systems, fossil energy conversion, energy storage, and atmospheric effects of combustion; (2) Biology and Medicine--molecular and cellular biology, diagnostic imaging, radiation biophysics, therapy and radiosurgery, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, lipoproteins, cardiovascular disease, and hemopoiesis research; (3) Center for Advanced Materials--catalysts, electronic materials, ceramic and metal interfaces, polymer research, instrumentation, and metallic alloys; (4) Chemical Biodynamics--molecular biology of nucleic acids and proteins, genetics of photosynthesis, and photochemistry; (5) Earth Sciences--continental lithosphere properties, structures and

  14. Hydrogeology and tritium transport in Chicken Creek Canyon,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Preston D.; Javandel, Iraj

    2007-10-31

    This study of the hydrogeology of Chicken Creek Canyon wasconducted by the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) at LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This canyon extends downhill fromBuilding 31 at LBNL to Centennial Road below. The leading edge of agroundwater tritium plume at LBNL is located at the top of the canyon.Tritium activities measured in this portion of the plume during thisstudy were approximately 3,000 picocuries/liter (pCi/L), which issignificantly less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinkingwaterof 20,000 pCi/L established by the Environmental ProtectionAgency.There are three main pathways for tritium migration beyond theLaboratory s boundary: air, surface water and groundwater flow. Thepurpose of this report is to evaluate the groundwater pathway.Hydrogeologic investigation commenced with review of historicalgeotechnical reports including 35 bore logs and 27 test pit/trench logsas well as existing ERP information from 9 bore logs. This was followedby field mapping of bedrock outcrops along Chicken Creek as well asbedrock exposures in road cuts on the north and east walls of the canyon.Water levels and tritium activities from 6 wells were also considered.Electrical-resistivity profiles and cone penetration test (CPT) data werecollected to investigate the extent of an interpreted alluvial sandencountered in one of the wells drilled in this area. Subsequent loggingof 7 additional borings indicated that this sand was actually anunusually well-sorted and typically deeply weathered sandstone of theOrinda Formation. Wells were installed in 6 of the new borings to allowwater level measurement and analysis of groundwater tritium activity. Aslug test and pumping tests were also performed in the wellfield.

  15. Berkeley Lab's Saul Perlmutter wins E.O. Lawrence Award; scientist's work on supernovae reveals accelerating Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Saul Perlmutter, from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Physics Division and leader of the Supernova Cosmology Project based there, has won the DOE's 2002 E.O. Lawrence Award in the physics category (2 pages).

  16. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs.

  17. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs

  18. Berkeley Lab's Saul Perlmutter wins E.O. Lawrence Award scientist's work on supernovae reveals accelerating universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Saul Perlmutter, a member of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Physics Division and leader of the international Supernova Cosmology Project based there, has won the Department of Energy's 2002 E.O. Lawrence Award in the physics category" (1/2 page).

  19. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2000-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartock, Mike (ed.); Hansen, Todd (ed.)

    1999-08-01

    The FY 2000-2004 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab, the Laboratory) mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. To advance the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to define the Integrated Laboratory System, the Berkeley Lab Institutional Plan reflects the strategic elements of our planning efforts. The Institutional Plan is a management report that supports the Department of Energy's mission and programs and is an element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and complements the performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions.

  20. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL's existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required

  1. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  2. Exploratory Research and Development Fund, FY 1990. Report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Exploratory R&D Fund FY 1990 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of an Exploratory R&D Fund (ERF) planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The research areas covered in this report are: Accelerator and fusion research; applied science; cell and molecular biology; chemical biodynamics; chemical sciences; earth sciences; engineering; information and computing sciences; materials sciences; nuclear science; physics and research medicine and radiation biophysics.

  3. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1992-07-02

    In connection with the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 67 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 35 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd.lbl.gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and most pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. This paper contains a list of the CD-ROMs available.

  4. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1992-07-02

    In connection with the Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL's computing network. At this time 67 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 35 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd.lbl.gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and most pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. This paper contains a list of the CD-ROMs available.

  5. Catalog of Research Abstracts, 1993: Partnership opportunities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The 1993 edition of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Catalog of Research Abstracts is a comprehensive listing of ongoing research projects in LBL`s ten research divisions. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a major multi-program national laboratory managed by the University of California for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL has more than 3000 employees, including over 1000 scientists and engineers. With an annual budget of approximately $250 million, LBL conducts a wide range of research activities, many that address the long-term needs of American industry and have the potential for a positive impact on US competitiveness. LBL actively seeks to share its expertise with the private sector to increase US competitiveness in world markets. LBL has transferable expertise in conservation and renewable energy, environmental remediation, materials sciences, computing sciences, and biotechnology, which includes fundamental genetic research and nuclear medicine. This catalog gives an excellent overview of LBL`s expertise, and is a good resource for those seeking partnerships with national laboratories. Such partnerships allow private enterprise access to the exceptional scientific and engineering capabilities of the federal laboratory systems. Such arrangements also leverage the research and development resources of the private partner. Most importantly, they are a means of accessing the cutting-edge technologies and innovations being discovered every day in our federal laboratories.

  6. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1993-01-16

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL's computing network. At this time 72 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 37 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd.lbl.gov''. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and many of these pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. In addition, printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), tel. (510) 642-6571, or the UC Documents Library, tel. (510) 642-2569, both located on the UC Berkeley Campus. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. LBL is grateful to UC DATA and the UC Documents Library for the use of their CD-ROM diskettes. Shared access to LBL facilities may be restricted in the future if costs become prohibitive. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user's application program(s). Due to the size of the files, this access method is preferred over File Transfer Protocol (FTP) access. Please contact Deane Merrill (dwmerrill lbl.gov) if you wish to make use of the data.

  7. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1993-03-12

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 89 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 45 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd.lbl.gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and many of these pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. In addition, printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), tel. (510) 642-6571, or the UC Documents Library, tel. (510) 642-2569, both located on the UC Berkeley Campus. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. LBL is grateful to UC DATA and the UC Documents Library for the use of their CD-ROM diskettes. Shared access to LBL facilities may be restricted in the future if costs become prohibitive. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user`s application program(s). Due to the size of the files, this access method is preferred over File Transfer Protocol (FTP) access.

  8. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1993-01-16

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socioeconomic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 72 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 37 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server ``cedrcd.lbl.gov``. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and many of these pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. In addition, printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), tel. (510) 642-6571, or the UC Documents Library, tel. (510) 642-2569, both located on the UC Berkeley Campus. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. LBL is grateful to UC DATA and the UC Documents Library for the use of their CD-ROM diskettes. Shared access to LBL facilities may be restricted in the future if costs become prohibitive. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user`s application program(s). Due to the size of the files, this access method is preferred over File Transfer Protocol (FTP) access. Please contact Deane Merrill (dwmerrill@lbl.gov) if you wish to make use of the data.

  9. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1996--2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The FY 1996--2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  10. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1992-10-01

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socio-economic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL`s computing network. At this time 70 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 36 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd. lbl. gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and most pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. Printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), or the UC Documents Library. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user`s application program(s).

  11. Public census data on CD-ROM at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1992-10-01

    The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) and Populations at Risk to Environmental Pollution (PAREP) projects, of the Information and Computing Sciences Division (ICSD) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are using public socio-economic and geographic data files which are available to CEDR and PAREP collaborators via LBL's computing network. At this time 70 CD-ROM diskettes (approximately 36 gigabytes) are on line via the Unix file server cedrcd. lbl. gov. Most of the files are from the US Bureau of the Census, and most pertain to the 1990 Census of Population and Housing. All the CD-ROM diskettes contain documentation in the form of ASCII text files. Printed documentation for most files is available for inspection at University of California Data and Technical Assistance (UC DATA), or the UC Documents Library. Many of the CD-ROM diskettes distributed by the Census Bureau contain software for PC compatible computers, for easily accessing the data. Shared access to the data is maintained through a collaboration among the CEDR and PAREP projects at LBL, and UC DATA, and the UC Documents Library. Via the Sun Network File System (NFS), these data can be exported to Internet computers for direct access by the user's application program(s).

  12. Heavy ion facilities and heavy ion research at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been heavily involved since 1956 in the construction and adaptation of particle accelerators for the acceleration of heavy ions. At the present time it has the most extensive group of accelerators with heavy-ion capability in the United States: The SuperHILAC, the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the Bevatron/Bevalac. An extensive heavy-ion program in nuclear and particle physics, in nuclear chemistry, and in the study of biological effects of heavy-ion irradiations has been supported in the past; and the Laboratory has a strong interest in expanding both its capabilities for heavy-ion acceleration and its participation in heavy-ion science. The first heavy-ion accelerator at LBL was the HILAC, which began operation in 1957. A vigorous program of research with ion beams of masses 4 through 40 began at that time and continued until the machine was shut down for modifications in February 1971. At that time, a grant of $3 M had been received from the AEC for a total reconstruction of the HILAC, to turn it into an upgraded accelerator, the SuperHILAC. This new machine is designed for the acceleration of all ions through uranium to an energy of 8.5 MeV/u. The SuperHILAC is equipped with two injectors. The lower energy injector, a 750-kV Cockcroft-Walton machine, was put into service in late 1972 for acceleration of ions up through {sup 40}Ar. By spring of 1973, operation of the SuperHILAC with this injector exceeded the performance of the original HILAC. The second injector, a 2.5-MV Dynamitron, was originally designed for the Omnitron project and built with $1 M of Omnitron R and D funds. Commissioning of this injector began in 1973 and proceeded to the point where nanoampere beams of krypton were available for a series of research studies in May and June. The first publishable new results with beams heavier than {sup 40}Ar were obtained at that time. Debugging and injector improvement projects will continue in FY 74.

  13. Analysis of background distributions of metals in the soil at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, David; Baskin, David; Brown, Dennis; Lund, Loren; Najita, Julie; Javandel, Iraj

    2009-03-15

    As part of its Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (CAP), the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Restoration Program conducted an evaluation of naturally occurring metals in soils at the facility. The purpose of the evaluation was to provide a basis for determining if soils at specific locations contained elevated concentrations of metals relative to ambient conditions. Ambient conditions (sometimes referred to as 'local background') are defined as concentrations of metals in the vicinity of a site, but which are unaffected by site-related activities (Cal-EPA 1997). Local background concentrations of 17 metals were initially estimated by LBNL using data from 498 soil samples collected from borings made during the construction of 71 groundwater monitoring wells (LBNL 1995). These concentration values were estimated using the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) guidance that was available at that time (USEPA 1989). Since that time, many more soil samples were collected and analyzed for metals by the Environmental Restoration Program. In addition, the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal-EPA) subsequently published a recommended approach for calculating background concentrations of metals at hazardous waste sites and permitted facilities (Cal-EPA 1997). This more recent approach differs from that recommended by the USEPA and used initially by LBNL (LBNL 2002). The purpose of the 2002 report was to apply the recommended Cal-EPA procedure to the expanded data set for metals that was available at LBNL. This revision to the 2002 report has been updated to include more rigorous tests of normality, revisions to the statistical methods used for some metals based on the results of the normality tests, and consideration of the depth-dependence of some sample results. As a result of these modifications, estimated background concentrations for some metals have been

  14. Environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document is an Environmental Assessment (EA) for a proposed project to modify 14,900 square feet of an existing building (Building 64) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to operate as a Genome Sequencing Facility. This EA addresses the potential environmental impacts from the proposed modifications to Building 64 and operation of the Genome Sequencing Facility. The proposed action is to modify Building 64 to provide space and equipment allowing LBL to demonstrate that the Directed DNA Sequencing Strategy can be scaled up from the current level of 750,000 base pairs per year to a facility that produces over 6,000,000 base pairs per year, while still retaining its efficiency.

  15. Environmental assessment for the recycling of slightly activated copper coil windings from the 184-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-02

    The proposed action is to recycle slightly activated copper that is currently stored in a warehouse leased by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to a scrap metal dealer. Subsequent reutilization of the copper would be unrestricted. This document addresses the potential environmental effects of recycling and reutilizing the activated copper. In addition, the potential environmental effects of possible future uses by the dealer are addressed. Direct environmental effects from the proposed action are assessed, such as air emissions from reprocessing the activated copper, as well as indirect beneficial effects, such as averting air emissions that would result from mining and smelting an equivalent quantity of copper ore. Evaluation of the human health impacts of the proposed action focuses on the pertinent issues of radiological doses and protection of workers and the public. Five alternatives to the proposed action are considered, and their associated potential impacts are addressed. The no-action alternative is the continued storage of the activated copper at the LBL warehouse. Two recycling alternatives are considered: recycling the activated copper at the Scientific Ecology Group (SEG) facility for re-use at a DOE facility and selling or giving the activated copper to a foreign government. In addition, two disposal alternatives evaluate the impacts attributable to disposing of the activated copper either at a local sanitary landfill or at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Site. The proposed project and alternatives include no new construction or development of new industry.

  16. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.

    1994-12-01

    This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects.

  17. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects

  18. Design, fabrication, and calibration of curved integral coils for measuring transfer function, uniformity, and effective length of LBL ALS [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Advanced Light Source] Booster Dipole Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A matched pair of curved integral coils has been designed, fabricated and calibrated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for measuring Advanced Light Source (ALS) Booster Dipole Magnets. Distinctive fabrication and calibration techniques are described. The use of multifilar magnet wire in fabrication integral search coils is described. Procedures used and results of AC and DC measurements of transfer function, effective length and uniformity of the prototype booster dipole magnet are presented in companion papers. 8 refs

  19. The Advanced Light Source: A new 1.5 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), presently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, will be the world's brightest synchrotron-radiation source of ultraviolet and soft x-ray photons when it opens its doors to users in April 1993. The ALS is a third-generation source that is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring, optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV, with long straight sections for insertion devices. Its naturally short pulses are ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will produce high-brightness beams from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; wigglers will produce high fluxes of harder x-rays to energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in a broad spectrum of scientific and technological areas. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. Undulator radiation can excite the K shell of elements up to silicon and the L shell of elements up to krypton, and wiggler radiation can excite the L shell of nearly every element. The ALS will operate as a national user facility; interested scientists are encouraged to contact the ALS Scientific Program Coordinator to explore their scientific and technological research interests

  20. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Health and Ecological Assessment Div.; Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1997-04-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

  1. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime

  2. Environmental research at Berkeley

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    The information concerning the Energy and Environment Programme at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is based on a talk given at CERN by A.M. Sessler, one of the initiators of the Programme. (Dr. Sessler has been appointed Director of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in succession to Prof. E. M. McMillan, from 1 November.) Many of the topics mentioned merit an extended story in themselves but the purpose of this article is simply to give a sketch of what is happening.

  3. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 11: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    President Clinton has directed an Interagency Working Group to initiate a comprehensive review of long-term options for the disposition of surplus plutonium. As part of this initiative, Secretary of Energy, Hazel O'Leary, has directed that a Department of Energy project be initiated to develop options and recommendations for the safe storage of these materials in the interim. A step in the process is a plutonium vulnerability assessment of facilities throughout the Department. The Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group was formed to produce the Project and Assessment Plans, to manage the assessments and to produce a final report for the Secretary by September 30, 1994. The plans established the approach and methodology for the assessment. The Project Plan specifies a Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to examine each of the twelve DOE sites with significant holdings of plutonium. The Assessment Plan describes the methodology that the Site Assessment Team (SAT) used to report on the plutonium holdings for each specific site.This report provides results of the assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

  4. Beyond the Soundtrack: Representing Music in Cinema, a cura di Daniel Goldmark, Lawrence Kramer e Richard Leppert, Berkeley, University of California Press, 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Finocchiaro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Beyond the Soundtrack: Representing Music in Cinema (edited by Daniel Goldmark, Lawrence Kramer and Richard Leppert, Berkeley, University of California Press, 2007, viii-324 pp. offers sixteen essays of various authors about film music. These papers were presented in 2004 in a study congress at the University of Minnesota. In introducing the book, the editors assert an assumption, today broadly accepted: indeed they affirm, that music has traditionally been regarded as a subordinate element in cinematographic text: film music literature still has a marginal position in the much larger field of film studies which focuses on image, narrative, film history. In this theoretical and historiographic context, the expression “Beyond the Soundtrack” is meant to be more than a title: it is the manifesto of a conceptual shift. We can summarize this change in reconsidering the importance of film music, in order to understand a movie not only as a visual, but also as a musical medium. The change of paradigm brings renewed questions and completely new issues. If we abandon the assumption, at this point obsolete, that film music has a mere functional role, it will be necessary to ask not how to conceptualize the use of music in film, but rather how the film conceptualizes music: how films imagine music, how films represent music as an artistic and social phenomenon, and how films position music as an integral parts of a fictional world. Such questions aim to consider film music not as an atmospheric expedient, but «as an agent, a force, and an object engaged in ongoing negotiations with image, narrative, and context», as the editors assert at the very beginning of their book.

  5. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, Appendix B, Part 11: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory site assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was founded in 1931 on the Berkeley campus of the University of California. The laboratory evolved from accelerator development and related nuclear physics programs to include energy production, atomic imaging, research medicine, and life sciences. The LBL research with actinide elements, including plutonium, focuses principally to develop methods to dispose of nuclear wastes. Also, LBL uses sources of plutonium to calibrate neutron detectors used at the laboratory. All radiological work at LBL is governed by Publication 3000. In accordance with the directive of Energy Secretary O'Leary open-quote Department of Energy Plutonium ES ampersand H Vulnerability Assessment: Project Plan,close-quote April 25, 19941. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico has conducted a site assessment of the SNL/NM site's plutonium environment, safety and health (ES ampersand H) vulnerabilities associated with plutonium and other transuranic material. The results are presented in this report

  6. Bishop Berkeley

    OpenAIRE

    Bindon, Francis (Irish artist, 1690-1765)

    2008-01-01

    'Berkeley was born at his family home, Dysart Castle, near Thomastown, County Kilkenny, Ireland, the eldest son of William Berkeley, a cadet of the noble family of Berkeley. He was educated at Kilkenny College and attended Trinity College, Dublin, completing a Master's degree in 1707. He remained at Trinity College after completion of his degree as a tutor and Greek lecturer.' (en.wikipedia.org)

  7. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California-Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States); Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States); Lesko, K. T. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  8. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects

  9. UC-Berkeley-area citizens decry waste transfer from lab.

    CERN Multimedia

    Nakasato, L

    2002-01-01

    Residents are working to stop the transfer of potentially hazardous and radioactive material from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The lab has begun to dismantle the Bevatron which has been shut down since 1993 and says eight trucks per day will move material offsite (1 page).

  10. The Berkeley TRIGA Mark III research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Research Reactor went critical on August 10, 1966, and achieved licensed operating power of 1000 kW shortly thereafter. Since then, the reactor has operated, by and large, trouble free on a one-shift basis. The major use of the reactor is in service irradiations, and many scientific programs are accommodated, both on and off campus. The principal off-campus user is the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley. The reactor is also an important instructional tool in the Nuclear Engineering Department reactor experiments laboratory course, and as a source of radioisotopes for two other laboratory courses given by the Department. Finally, the reactor is used in several research programs conducted within the Department, involving studies with neutron beams and in reactor kinetics

  11. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory research highlights for FY 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief, nontechnical reviews are presented of work in the following areas: solar energy projects, fusion research, silicon cell research, superconducting magnetometers, psi particles, positron--electron project (PEP), pulsar measurements, nuclear dynamics, element 106, computer control of accelerators, the Bevalac biomedical facility, blood--lipid analysis, and bungarotoxin and the brain. Financial data and personnel lists are given, along with citations to well over a thousand research papers

  12. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Ergonomics Committee FY 94 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    This report presents the Committee`s accomplishments for fiscal year 1994. Ergonomic issues are getting increased attention nationwide. This is a result of ergonomic hazards impacting the safety and health of employees, and companies ``bottom line`` via an increase in medical and workers` compensation costs. The Committee reviews injury and illness data, advises management of ergonomic trends at LBL, initiates corrective action to mitigate ergonomic hazards, and sponsors ergonomic awareness activities. Documented evidence supports the claim that implementing cost-effective ergonomic solutions are a good investment.

  13. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory/University of California lighting program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, S.

    1981-12-01

    The objective of the Lighting Program is to assist and work in concert with the lighting community (composed of manufacturers, designers, and users) to achieve a more efficient lighting economy. To implement its objectives, the Lighting Program has been divided into three major categories: technical engineering, buildings applications, and human impacts (impacts on health and vision). The technical program aims to undertake research and development projects that are both long-range and high-risk and which the lighting industry has little interest in pursuing on its own, but from which significant benefits could accrue to both the public and the industry. The building applications program studies the effects that introducing daylighting in commercial buildings has on lighting and cooling electrical energy requirements as well as on peak demand. This program also examines optimization strategies for integrating energy-efficient design, lighting hardware, daylighting, and overall building energy requirements. The impacts program examines relationships between the user and the physical lighting environment, in particular how new energy-efficient technologies relate to human productivity and health. These efforts are interdisciplinary, involving engineering, optometry, and medicine. The program facilities are described and the personnel in the program is identified.

  14. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1982-06-01

    Results for 1981 of the LBL Environmental Monitoring Program are given. Data include monitoring results for accelerator-produced radiation, airborne and waterborne radionuclides, and nonradioactive pollutants. Population doses resulting from LBL operations are given in terms of accelerator-produced and airborne radioactivities. Trends in the environmental impacts of LBL operations are discussed in terms of accelerator-produced, airborne, and waterborne radionuclides. (ERB)

  15. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1983-04-01

    In order to establish whether LBL research activities produces any impact on the population surrounding the Laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1982, as in the previous several years, doses attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG). The maximum perimeter dose equivalent was less than or equal to 24.0 mrem (the 1982 dose equivalent measured at the Building 88 monitoring station B-13A, about 5% of the RPG). The total population dose equivalent attributable to LBL operations during 1982 was less than or equal to 16 man-rem, about 0.002% of the RPG of 170 mrem/person to a suitable sample of the population.

  16. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1979-04-01

    Environmental monitoring data are reported for accelerator produced radiation; radionuclide measurements and release data from atmospheric and water sampling; population dose equivalent resulting from LBL operations; and non-radioactive pollutants. (HLW)

  17. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1980-06-01

    Monitoring data obtained for the calendar year 1979 are described, and general trends are discussed. The following areas are covered: accelerator produced radiation; radionuclide measurements and release (atmospheric, water, and sewer sampling); population dose equivalent resulting from LBL operations; and nonradioactive pollutants. Over the past several years the atmospheric sampling program has, with the exception of occasional known releases, yielded data which are within the range of normal background. The surface water program always yields results within the range of normal background. As no substantial changes in the quantities of radionuclides used are anticipated, no changes are expected in these observations.

  18. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory research highlights for FY 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    1978-01-01

    Brief, nontechnical reviews are presented of work in the following areas: solar energy projects, fusion research, silicon cell research, superconducting magnetometers, psi particles, positron--electron project (PEP), pulsar measurements, nuclear dynamics, element 106, computer control of accelerators, the Bevalac biomedical facility, blood--lipid analysis, and bungarotoxin and the brain. Financial data and personnel lists are given, along with citations to well over a thousand research papers. (RWR)

  19. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results for 1981 of the LBL Environmental Monitoring Program are given. Data include monitoring results for accelerator-produced radiation, airborne and waterborne radionuclides, and nonradioactive pollutants. Population doses resulting from LBL operations are given in terms of accelerator-produced and airborne radioactivities. Trends in the environmental impacts of LBL operations are discussed in terms of accelerator-produced, airborne, and waterborne radionuclides

  20. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to establish whether LBL research activities produces any impact on the population surrounding the Laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1982, as in the previous several years, doses attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG). The maximum perimeter dose equivalent was less than or equal to 24.0 mrem (the 1982 dose equivalent measured at the Building 88 monitoring station B-13A, about 5% of the RPG). The total population dose equivalent attributable to LBL operations during 1982 was less than or equal to 16 man-rem, about 0.002% of the RPG of 170 mrem/person to a suitable sample of the population

  1. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H[sub 2], and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO[sub 2], potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-[Tc] systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  2. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-{Tc} systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  3. El idealismo de Berkeley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sobrevilla

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available En esta conferencia se examina en qué consiste el idealismo de Berkeley. Para ello se sigue el mismo camino propuesto por G .J. Warnock: se indaga contra qué se opone Berkeley, el materialismo, y cómo lo entiende, y por qué está en contra del mismo. A continuación se reexamina el idealismo berkeleyano, y en la consideración final se juzgan sus virtudes y defectos: algunas de las críticas fundadas que se le han formulado y la visión de la ciencia que se desprende de los escritos de Berkeley. A este respecto se pone en conexión las ideas del autor con algunos planteamientos del último Husserl y con una interpretación de Popper sobre la sorprendente modernidad de algunas de las ideas berkeleyanas sobre la ciencia.

  4. Berkeley mini-collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Mini-Collider, a heavy-ion collider being planned to provide uranium-uranium collisions at T/sub cm/ less than or equal to 4 GeV/nucleon, is described. The central physics to be studied at these energies and our early ideas for a collider detector are presented

  5. The principle of phase stability and the accelerator program at Berkeley, 1945--1954

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of the Principle of Phase Stability by Vladimir Veksler and Edwin McMillian and the end of the war released a surge of accelerator activity at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (then The University of California Radiation Laboratory). Six accelerators incorporating the Principle of Phase Stability were built in the period 1945--1954

  6. Fermilab and Berkeley Lab Collaborate with Meyer Tool on Key Component for European Particle Accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Officials of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory announced yesterday the completion of a key component of the U.S. contribution to the Large Hadron Collider, a particle accelerator under construction at CERN, in Geneva, Switzerland

  7. 2009 SCDNR Berkeley County Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sanborn Map Company completed the original classification of the multiple return LiDAR of Berkeley County, South Carolina in 2009. In 2013, Dewberry was tasked with...

  8. Ernest Orlando Lawrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Luis W.

    1967-02-01

    In his relatively short life of 57 years, Ernest Orlando Lawrence accomplished more than one might believe possible in a life twice as long. The important ingredients of his success were native ingenuity and basic good judgement in science, great stamina, an enthusiastic and outgoing personality, and a sense of integrity that was overwhelming. Many articles on the life and accomplishments of Ernest Lawrence have been published, and George Herbert Childs has written a book-length biography. This biographical memoir, however, has not made use of any sources other than the author's memory of Ernest Lawrence and of things learned from him. A more balanced picture will emerge when Herbert Childs biography is published; this sketch simply shows how Ernest Lawrence looked to one of his many friends.

  9. 76 FR 37650 - Safety Zone; 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display Berkeley, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina... Berkeley Pier, Berkeley, CA in support of the 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display... used in the fireworks display. Background and Purpose The City of Berkeley Marina will sponsor the...

  10. 78 FR 29022 - Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA... enforce the safety zone for the Berkeley Marina Fourth of July Fireworks display in the Captain of the...'19'' W (NAD 83) for the Berkeley Marina Fourth of July Fireworks display listed in 33 CFR...

  11. Two amateur astronomers at Berkeley

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2012-01-01

    The book on Mechanics of the Physics at Berkeley, by C. Kittel, W.D. Knight and M.A. Ruderman, is proposing at the end of its first chapter some problems of simple astronomy within the solar system. The discussion begins with two amateur astronomers who set for themselves the goal of determining the diameter and mass of the Sun. Here we discuss the problems proposed by the book and some other matters on ancient and modern astronomical studies of the solar system.

  12. Lawrence Klein i Oslo

    OpenAIRE

    BJERKHOLT, Olav

    2014-01-01

    Lawrence R. Klein som i 1980 ble tildelt Sveriges Riksbanks pris i økonomisk vitenskap til minne om Alfred Nobel «for the creation of econometric models and the application to the analysis of economic fluctuations and economic policies,» døde 20. oktober 2013. Mer en noen annen var det Klein som etter annen verdenskrig skapte makroøkonometrisk modellutvikling som et eget fagfelt. Denne artikkelen redegjør for Kleins tidlige karriere og hans kontakt med Ragnar Frisch og Trygve H...

  13. Ernest Orlando Lawrence (1901-1958), Cyclotron and Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William T.

    2005-09-01

    On August 8, 2001, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory celebrated the centennial of the birth of its founder (and namesake), Ernest Orlando Lawrence. For the occasion, many speeches were given and old speeches were remembered. We recall the words of the late Luis Alvarez, a Nobel Laureate and one of the Lawrence's closest colleagues: ''Lawrence will always be remembered as the inventor of the cyclotron, but more importantly, he should be remembered as the inventor of the modern way of doing science''. J. L. Heilbron and R. W. Seidel, in the introduction of their book, ''Lawrence and His Laboratory'' stated, ''The motives and mechanisms that shaped the growth of the Laboratory helped to force deep changes in the scientific estate and in the wider society. In the entrepreneurship of its founder, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, these motives, mechanisms, and changes came together in a tight focus. He mobilized great and small philanthropists, state and local governments, corporations, and plutocrats, volunteers and virtuosos. The work they supported, from astrophysics and atomic bombs, from radiochemistry to nuclear medicine, shaped the way we observe, control, and manipulate our environment.'' Indeed, all over the civilized world, the ways we do science changed forever after Lawrence built his famed Radiation Laboratory. In this editorial, we epitomize his legacy of changing the way we do medicine, thereby affecting the health and well being of all humanity. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the invention of the cyclotron by Ernest Orlando Lawrence at the University of California at Berkeley. Lawrence conceived the idea of the cyclotron early in 1929 after reading an article by Rolf Wideroe on high-energy accelerators. In the spring of 1930 one of his students, Nels Edlefsen, constructed two crude models of a cyclotron. Later in the fall of the same year, another student, M. Stanley Livingston

  14. 77 FR 37604 - Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA... enforce the safety zone for the Berkeley Marina Fourth of July Fireworks display in the Captain of the... Marina Fourth of July Fireworks display in 33 CFR 165.1191. This safety zone will be in effect from...

  15. Berkeley High-Resolution Ball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criteria for a high-resolution γ-ray system are discussed. Desirable properties are high resolution, good response function, and moderate solid angle so as to achieve not only double- but triple-coincidences with good statistics. The Berkeley High-Resolution Ball involved the first use of bismuth germanate (BGO) for anti-Compton shield for Ge detectors. The resulting compact shield permitted rather close packing of 21 detectors around a target. In addition, a small central BGO ball gives the total γ-ray energy and multiplicity, as well as the angular pattern of the γ rays. The 21-detector array is nearly complete, and the central ball has been designed, but not yet constructed. First results taken with 9 detector modules are shown for the nucleus 156Er. The complex decay scheme indicates a transition from collective rotation (prolate shape) to single- particle states (possibly oblate) near spin 30 h, and has other interesting features

  16. Fermi, Heisenberg y Lawrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ynduráin, Francisco J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Not available

    Los azares de las onomásticas hacen coincidir en este año el centenario del nacimiento de tres de los más grandes físicos del siglo XX. Dos de ellos, Fermi y Heisenberg, dejaron una marca fundamental en la ciencia (ambos, pero sobre todo el segundo y, el primero, también en la tecnología. Lawrence, indudablemente de un nivel inferior al de los otros dos, estuvo sin embargo en el origen de uno de los desarrollos tecnológicos que han sido básicos para la exploración del universo subnuclear en la segunda mitad del siglo que ha terminado hace poco, el de los aceleradores de partículas.

  17. Obituary: Lawrence Hugh Aller, 1913-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaler, James B.

    2003-12-01

    The announcement still lies in my inbox: ``Lawrence Aller died last Sunday." On 16 March 2003, one of the world's fine astronomers passed away at the age of 89, leaving behind a legacy that will ripple as long as there are students of the celestial science, one that incorporated observation, theory, education, care, decency, and kindness. Lawrence was born in the humblest of conditions in Tacoma, Washington, on 24 September 1913. His mother, Lella (Belle) Allen, was a homemaker and his father Leslie Aller, was an occassional printer and gold prospector who thought that the use of the mind was a waste of time. With fierce persistence and dedication, Lawrence pulled off a feat that would probably not be possible now: getting into college without having finished high school, the result of being dragged to work in his father's primitive gold mining camp. His interest, sparked by leaflets from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific and by Russell, Dugan, and Stewart's venerable textbook, led him to a correspondence, and finally a meeting, with Donald Menzel of Harvard, who persuaded the admissions director of the University of California at Berkeley to admit him in 1932. From there, Lawrence went on to graduate school at Harvard and the Harvard Society of Fellows, where he studied with Menzel and developed his interest in stellar and nebular astronomy. After working in the War effort, he made his professorial debut at Indiana University, where he stayed until 1948 before leaving for the University of Michigan. Residing there for the next 14 years, he established his research reputation and helped develop the Michigan graduate program. In 1962, the opportunity arose to return to California, to UCLA, where he again was instrumental in founding a PhD program. There he stayed, through his retirement in 1984, doing research right up to the end. Eight other schools received him as visiting professor. Lawrence knew that to make inroads into astronomy, he needed to apply

  18. Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory - Fundamental and applied research on lean premixed combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernest Orland Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is the oldest of America's national laboratories and has been a leader in science and engineering technology for more than 65 years, serving as a powerful resource to meet Us national needs. As a multi-program Department of Energy laboratory, Berkeley Lab is dedicated to performing leading edge research in the biological, physical, materials, chemical, energy, environmental and computing sciences. Ernest Orlando Lawrence, the Lab's founder and the first of its nine Nobel prize winners, invented the cyclotron, which led to a Golden Age of particle physics and revolutionary discoveries about the nature of the universe. To this day, the Lab remains a world center for accelerator and detector innovation and design. The Lab is the birthplace of nuclear medicine and the cradle of invention for medical imaging. In the field of heart disease, Lab researchers were the first to isolate lipoproteins and the first to determine that the ratio of high density to low density lipoproteins is a strong indicator of heart disease risk. The demise of the dinosaurs--the revelation that they had been killed off by a massive comet or asteroid that had slammed into the Earth--was a theory developed here. The invention of the chemical laser, the unlocking of the secrets of photosynthesis--this is a short preview of the legacy of this Laboratory

  19. Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory - Fundamental and applied research on lean premixed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Robert K.

    1999-07-07

    Ernest Orland Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is the oldest of America's national laboratories and has been a leader in science and engineering technology for more than 65 years, serving as a powerful resource to meet Us national needs. As a multi-program Department of Energy laboratory, Berkeley Lab is dedicated to performing leading edge research in the biological, physical, materials, chemical, energy, environmental and computing sciences. Ernest Orlando Lawrence, the Lab's founder and the first of its nine Nobel prize winners, invented the cyclotron, which led to a Golden Age of particle physics and revolutionary discoveries about the nature of the universe. To this day, the Lab remains a world center for accelerator and detector innovation and design. The Lab is the birthplace of nuclear medicine and the cradle of invention for medical imaging. In the field of heart disease, Lab researchers were the first to isolate lipoproteins and the first to determine that the ratio of high density to low density lipoproteins is a strong indicator of heart disease risk. The demise of the dinosaurs--the revelation that they had been killed off by a massive comet or asteroid that had slammed into the Earth--was a theory developed here. The invention of the chemical laser, the unlocking of the secrets of photosynthesis--this is a short preview of the legacy of this Laboratory.

  20. The anticentre old open clusters Berkeley 27, Berkeley 34, and Berkeley 36: new additions to the BOCCE project

    CERN Document Server

    Donati, P; Cignoni, M; Cocozza, G; Tosi, M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the investigation of the evolutionary status of three open clusters: Berkeley 27, Berkeley 34, and Berkeley 36, all located in the Galactic anti-centre direction. All of them were observed with SUSI2@NTT using the Bessel B, V, and I filters. The cluster parameters have been obtained using the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) method i.e. the direct comparison of the observational CMDs with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different evolutionary sets (Padova, FRANEC, and FST). This analysis shows that Berkeley 27 has an age between 1.5 and 1.7 Gyr, a reddening E(B-V) in the range 0.40 and 0.50, and a distance modulus (m-M)_0 between 13.1 and 13.3; Berkeley 34 is older with an age in the range 2.1 and 2.5 Gyr, E(B-V) between 0.57 and 0.64, and (m-M)_0 between 14.1 and 14.3; Berkeley 36, with an age between 7.0 and 7.5 Gyr, has a reddening E(B-V)~0.50 and a distance modulus (m-M)_0 between 13.1 and 13.2. For all the clusters our analysis suggests a sub-solar metallicity ...

  1. The Berkeley Digital Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, B.; Dreger, D.; Neuhauser, D.; Karavas, W.; Hellweg, M.; Uhrhammer, R.; Lombard, P.; Friday, J.; Lellinger, R.; Gardner, J.; McKenzie, M. R.; Bresloff, C.

    2007-05-01

    Since it began monitoring earthquakes in northern California 120 years ago, the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) has been striving to produce the highest quality and most complete seismic data possible in the most modern way. This goal has influenced choices in instrumentation, installation and telemetry, as well as the investment in expertise and manpower. Since the transition to broadband (BB) instrumentation in the mid- 1980s and to a fully digitally telemetered network in the early 1990s, we have continued these efforts. Each of our 25 BB installations includes three component BB seismometers (STS-1s or STS-2) and digital accelerometers to capture the full range of ground motion from distant teleseisms to large, nearby earthquakes (almost 250 dB). The ground motion is recorded on-site by 24 bit dataloggers. Additional environmental parameters, such as temperature and pressure, are also monitored continuously. Many stations record also C-GPS data that is transmitted continuously to the BSL via shared real-time telemetry. The BDSN's first stations were installed in abandoned mines. In the last 15 years, we developed installations using buried shipping containers to reduce environmental noise and provide security and easy access to the equipment. Data are transmitted in real-time at several sampling rates to one or more processing centers, using frame relay, radio, microwave, and/or satellite. Each site has 7-30 days of onsite data storage to guard against data loss during telemetry outages. Each station is supplied with backup batteries to provide power for 3 days. The BDSN real-time data acquisition, earthquake analysis and archiving computers are housed in a building built to "emergency grade" seismic standards, with air conditioning and power backed up by a UPS and a large generator. Data latency and power are monitored by automated processes that alert staff via pager and email. Data completeness and timing quality are automatically assessed on a daily

  2. Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility (formerly LOASIS) develops advanced accelerators and radiation sources. High gradient (1-100 GV/m) laser-plasma...

  3. Clinical results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. Since then, over 800 patients have received stereotactically-directed plateau-beam heavy-charged particle pituitary irradiation at this institution. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of these treatments. 11 refs.

  4. Annual Site Environmental Report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Calendar year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balgobin, D.A.; Javandel, I.; Pauer, R.O.; Schleimer, G.E.; Thorson, P.A. [eds.

    1993-05-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report summarizes LBL environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1992. The purpose of this Report is to present summary environmental information in order to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.``

  5. Protection and fault detection for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory neutral beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing of TFTR neutral beam (NB) sources has begun at the LBL Neutral Beam System Test Facility (NBSTF). Operation at 120 kV, 65 A, 0.5 sec should be achieved soon. Because NB sources spark down frequently during conditioning, the main accelerating (accel) power supply must be interrupted within a few microseconds to avoid degrading the voltage holding capability, or even the damaging, of the NB source. A variety of improper magnitudes and/or ratios of voltages, currents, and times can occur and must be recognized as fault conditions in order to initiate a prompt interruption of the accel power supply. This paper discusses in detail the key signals which must be monitored and the manner in which they are processed in fault detector circuitry for safe operation of LBL NB sources. The paper also reviews the more standard interlocks and protective features recommended for these sources

  6. SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Baseline review of three groundwater plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry; et al.

    2002-09-26

    During the closeout session, members of the technical assistance team conveyed to the site how impressed they were at the thoroughness of the site's investigation and attempts at remediation. Team members were uniformly pleased at the skilled detection work to identify sources, make quick remediation decisions, and change course when a strategy did not work well. The technical assistance team also noted that, to their knowledge, this is the only DOE site at which a world-class scientist has had primary responsibility for the environmental restoration activities. This has undoubtedly contributed to the successes observed and DOE should take careful note. The following overall recommendations were agreed upon: (1) The site has done a phenomenal job of characterization and identifying and removing source terms. (2) Technologies selected to date are appropriate and high impact, e.g. collection trenches are an effective remedial strategy for this complicated geology. The site should continue using technology that is adapted to the site's unique geology, such as the collection trenches. (3) The site should develop a better way to determine the basis of cleanup for all sites. (4) The sentinel well system should be evaluated and modified, if needed, to assure that the sentinel wells provide coverage to the current site boundary. Potential modifications could include installation, abandonment or relocation of wells based on the large amount of data collected since the original sentinel well system was designed. (5) Modeling to assist in remedial design and communication should continue. (6) The site should develop a plan to ensure institutional memory. (7) The most likely possibility for improving closure to 2006 is by removing the residual source of the Old Town plume and establishing the efficacy of remediation for the 51/64 plume.

  7. Annual Site Environmental Report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Calendar year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Annual Site Environmental Report summarizes LBL environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1992. The purpose of this Report is to present summary environmental information in order to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Program.''

  8. Nuclear science annual report, July 1, 1977-June 30, 1978. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, L.S.; Gough, R.A.; Nurmia, M.J. (eds.)

    1978-01-01

    Activities for the period July 1, 1977, through June 30, 1978, are reported in the following areas: experimental research (nuclear structure; nuclear reactions and scattering; relativistic heavy ions - projectile and target fragmentation, central collisions; the Table of Isotopes Project, atomic physics, and magnetic monopoles), theory of nuclear collisions (microscopic, macroscopic, relativistic), and apparatus (accelerator operations and development, nuclear instrumentation). Also included are thesis abstracts, publications lists, and an author index. Individual abstracts were prepared for 33 of the reports in this volume. (RWR)

  9. Heavy particle clinical radiotherapy trial at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Progress report, July 1975-July 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The primary objectives of the clinical radiotherapy program are: to evaluate the potential of improved dose localization particularly as exemplified by helium ion irradiation; and to evaluate the combined potential of improved dose localization and increased biologic effect available with heavier ions such as carbon, neon, and argon. It was possible to make modifications rapidly to provide for large field, fractionated, Bragg peak irradiation at the 184-inch cyclotron with the helium ion beam. This allowed the opportunity to gain experience with charged particle irradiation treatment techniques, patient immobilization techniques, treatment planning and dosimetry studies including the utilization of CT scanning for tumor localization and charged particle dose distributions as well as beginning studies in compensating for tissue inhomogeneities in the beam path. These treatment techniques have been directly transferable to the Bevalac facility where a similar patient positioner has been installed for human irradiation with heavier particles. For the studies both with helium and now with heavier particles, patients with multiple skin and subcutaneous metastatic nodules for evaluation of skin RBE data and patients with locally advanced and/or unresectable tumors unlikely to be effectively treated by any conventional modality were sought. In order to facilitate intercomparison with megavoltage irradiation techniques, a conventional dose fractionation scheme has been adopted. A few exceptions to this dose specification scheme have been patients in which pulmonary, subcutaneous or skin nodules have been irradiated with larger fraction sizes ranging up to 400 rads per fraction in order to obtain clinical RBE studies in 8 to 10 fractions of heavy particles.

  10. Heavy particle clinical radiotherapy trial at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Progress report, July 1975-July 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objectives of the clinical radiotherapy program are: to evaluate the potential of improved dose localization particularly as exemplified by helium ion irradiation; and to evaluate the combined potential of improved dose localization and increased biologic effect available with heavier ions such as carbon, neon, and argon. It was possible to make modifications rapidly to provide for large field, fractionated, Bragg peak irradiation at the 184-inch cyclotron with the helium ion beam. This allowed the opportunity to gain experience with charged particle irradiation treatment techniques, patient immobilization techniques, treatment planning and dosimetry studies including the utilization of CT scanning for tumor localization and charged particle dose distributions as well as beginning studies in compensating for tissue inhomogeneities in the beam path. These treatment techniques have been directly transferable to the Bevalac facility where a similar patient positioner has been installed for human irradiation with heavier particles. For the studies both with helium and now with heavier particles, patients with multiple skin and subcutaneous metastatic nodules for evaluation of skin RBE data and patients with locally advanced and/or unresectable tumors unlikely to be effectively treated by any conventional modality were sought. In order to facilitate intercomparison with megavoltage irradiation techniques, a conventional dose fractionation scheme has been adopted. A few exceptions to this dose specification scheme have been patients in which pulmonary, subcutaneous or skin nodules have been irradiated with larger fraction sizes ranging up to 400 rads per fraction in order to obtain clinical RBE studies in 8 to 10 fractions of heavy particles

  11. Annual Site Environmental Report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauer, R.O.; Schleimer, G.E.; Javendel, I. [eds.

    1992-05-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes LBL environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1991. The purpose of this Report is to present summary environmental data in order to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts.

  12. Effects of undulators on the ALS: The early work on the LBL [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we describe the early work carried out at LBL on the consequences of installing insertion devices (wigglers and undulators) on the beam dynamics of the ALS. This included analytical and tracking studies, and led to an insight to the reasons behind the predicted reduction in dynamic aperture. For completeness, a description of the unperturbed storage ring characteristics are also given. 3 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Analysis and stabilization of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s multiphase mixed waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, B.A.

    1995-05-19

    Five drums of mixed waste were accepted from LBL during FY 1994; they contain inorganic acids and compounds, as well as organic reagents and radioactive materials. This document defines the work plan for stabilization and characterization of the waste in three of these 5 drums.

  14. Introduction: Lawrence Kohlberg as Mentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Dwight

    1988-01-01

    Recognizes Lawrence Kohlberg as the foremost contributor to moral education during the twentieth century. Analyzes the mentor-student relationship and discusses Kohlberg's mentor relationship with his students. (KO)

  15. Lawrence Kohlberg: A Personal Tribute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Ralph

    1988-01-01

    Author reflects on his association with psychologist Lawrence Kohlberg and his collaboration with Kohlberg in a project funded by the Danforth Foundation for research and development in moral education. (Author/NB)

  16. THE YOUNG OPEN CLUSTER BERKELEY 55

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Marco, Amparo, E-mail: ignacio.negueruela@ua.es, E-mail: amparo.marco@ua.es [Departamento de Fisica, Ingenieria de Sistemas y Teoria de la Senal, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    We present UBV photometry of the highly reddened and poorly studied open cluster Berkeley 55, revealing an important population of B-type stars and several evolved stars of high luminosity. Intermediate-resolution far-red spectra of several candidate members confirm the presence of one F-type supergiant and six late supergiants or bright giants. The brightest blue stars are mid-B giants. Spectroscopic and photometric analyses indicate an age 50 {+-} 10 Myr. The cluster is located at a distance d Almost-Equal-To 4 kpc, consistent with other tracers of the Perseus Arm in this direction. Berkeley 55 is thus a moderately young open cluster with a sizable population of candidate red (super)giant members, which can provide valuable information about the evolution of intermediate-mass stars.

  17. Political-social reactor problems at Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For better than ten years there was little public notice of the TRIGA reactor at UC-Berkeley. Then: a) A non-student persuaded the Student and Senate to pass a resolution to request Campus Administration to stop operation of the reactor and remove it from campus. b) Presence of the reactor became a campaign-issue in a City Mayoral election. c) Two local residents reported adverse physical reactions before, during, and after a routine tour of the reactor facility. d) The Berkeley City Council began a study of problems associated with radioactive material within the city. e) Friends Of The Earth formally petitioned the NRC to terminate the reactor's license. Campus personnel have expended many man-hours and many pounds of paper in responding to these happenings. Some of the details are of interest, and may be of use to other reactor facilities. (author)

  18. C. Judson King of UC Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prausnitz, John

    2005-06-01

    In the middle of the UC Berkeley campus, next to the Main Library, South Hall is the last surviving building from the original campus, founded about 135 years ago. A tiny tree-shaded appendix to this venerated classical building houses Berkeley's Center for Studies in Higher Education, directed by C. Judson King, former Provost and Senior Vice President--Academic Affairs of the ten-campus University of California and long-time Professor of Chemical Engineering at Berkeley. Jud came to Berkeley in 1963 as assistant professor of chemical engineering, following receipt of a doctor's degree from MIT and a subsequent short appointment as director of the MIT chemical engineering practice school station at what was then Esso (now Exxon) in New Jersey. His undergraduate degree is from Yale. Starting with his MIT doctoral dissertation on gas absorption, Jud has devoted much of his professional career to separation processes. His teaching and research activities have been primarily concerned with separation of mixtures with emphasis on liquid-liquid extraction and drying. As a consultant to Procter and Gamble, he contributed to the technology of making instant coffee. His life-long activities in hiking and camping stimulated Jud's interest in the manufacture of freeze-dried foods (e.g. turkey meat) to minimize the weight of his hiking back-pack. Jud is internationally known not only for his many research publications but even more, for his acclaimed textbook ''Separation Processses'' (McGraw-Hill, second edition 1980) that is used in standard chemical engineering courses in the US and abroad.

  19. D.H. Lawrence and modern destructiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, D

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses twentieth century societal destructiveness as reflected in four key prose works by D.H. Lawrence--the novels Sons and Lovers, Women in Love, Lady Chatterley's Lover and the early travel book Twilight in Italy. Sons and Lovers, which projects the young Lawrence persona's struggle between life and death, partly accounts for a deepening sensitivity to life and death in modern society in Lawrence's subsequent works. It is seen that Lawrence's writings depict the perilous trends today towards the mechanization of our fundamental being, and the resultant life-threatening qualities of sensationalism and reduction of the individual inner life. PMID:7008281

  20. Three new bricks in the wall: Berkeley 23, Berkeley 31, and King 8

    CERN Document Server

    Cignoni, Michele; Bragaglia, Angela; Tosi, Monica

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive census of Galactic open cluster properties places unique constraints on the Galactic disc structure and evolution. In this framework we investigate the evolutionary status of three poorly-studied open clusters, Berkeley 31, Berkeley 23 and King 8, all located in the Galactic anti-centre direction. To this aim, we make use of deep LBT observations, reaching more than 6 mag below the main sequence Turn- Off. To determine the cluster parameters, namely age, metallicity, distance, reddening and binary fraction, we compare the observational colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different evolutionary sets (Padova, FRANEC and FST) and metallicities. We find that Berkeley 31 is relatively old, with an age between 2.3 and 2.9 Gyr, and rather high above the Galactic plane, at about 700 pc. Berkeley 23 and King 8 are younger, with best fitting ages in the range 1.1-1.3 Gyr and 0.8-1.3 Gyr, respectively. The position above the Galactic plane is about 500- 600 pc...

  1. Careers in Data Science: A Berkeley Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koy, K.

    2015-12-01

    Last year, I took on an amazing opportunity to serve as the Executive Director of the new Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS). After a 15-year career working with geospatial data to advance our understanding of the environment, I have been presented with a unique opportunity through BIDS to work with talented researchers from a wide variety of backgrounds. Founded in 2013, BIDS is a central hub of research and education at UC Berkeley designed to facilitate and nurture data-intensive science. We are building a community centered on a cohort of talented data science fellows and senior fellows who are representative of the world-class researchers from across our campus and are leading the data science revolution within their disciplines. Our initiatives are designed to bring together broad constituents of the data science community, including domain experts from the life, social, and physical sciences and methodological experts from computer science, statistics, and applied mathematics. While many of these individuals rarely cross professional paths, BIDS actively seeks new and creative ways to engage and foster collaboration across these different research fields. In this presentation, I will share my own story, along with some insights into how BIDS is supporting the careers of data scientists, including graduate students, postdocs, faculty, and research staff. I will also describe how these individuals we are helping support are working to address a number of data science-related challenges in scientific research.

  2. An interview with Peter Lawrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Catarina

    2016-01-15

    Peter Lawrence, FRS, is a fly geneticist based at the Department of Zoology at the University of Cambridge. During his illustrious career he has carried out pioneering work on pattern formation and polarity, and his contributions have been recognised by many honours, including the Prince of Asturias prize with Gines Morata and election to the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. He is also an outspoken critic of the current scientific system and particularly how it affects young scientists. We recently had the opportunity to chat with Peter, and we asked him about the influence of his mentor Sir V. B. Wigglesworth, writing his first grant at age 65 and his time as an editor of Development. PMID:26786208

  3. LAWRENCE RISK-BASED AIR SCREENING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pediatric asthma rate in the city of Lawrence is the highest in the state of Massachusetts. This project will evaluate whether the cumulative risks due to the air pollution in Lawrence is contributing to the high asthma rates and other respiratory problems. The project will...

  4. The Berkeley gas-filled separator

    CERN Document Server

    Ninov, V; McGrath, C A

    1998-01-01

    The BGS is being constructed at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL in Berkeley. The magnetic configuration of the BGS will allow a large angular acceptance and good suppression of primary beam particles. BGS operates as a mass spectrometer with a A/ Delta A approximately =200 and as a gas filled separator at pressures between 0.1-50 hPa. The reaction products recoiling off a thin target will be collected with efficiencies from 10-80at the focal plane. A Monte Carlo simulation program of the ion transport through the gas-filled magnets in combination of 3-dimensional TOSCA field maps has been developed and reproduces closely the experimental behavior of BGS. (9 refs).

  5. Junior High Schools of Berkeley, California. Bulletin, 1923, No. 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, James T.; Clark, W. B.; Glessner, H. H.; Hennessey, D. L.

    1923-01-01

    This bulletin demonstrates that Berkeley, California's educational problem is and has been that of meeting the varied needs of a population such as may be found in any typical American city. The varied population needs, together with the rapid growth, have brought many difficult problems to Berkeley, just has they have to other cities. Based on…

  6. Berkeley UPC编译技术分析%Analysis of the Berkeley UPC Compile Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文延华; 黄传信; 漆锋滨

    2004-01-01

    UPC是一种可以在多种体系结构的并行系统上进行移植的基于全局地址空间(GAS)访问的并行编程语言.本文主要介绍了Berkeley UPC编译器的结构特点,分析了它对文本的支持程度和对并行的实现效率.

  7. Radioactive ion beam development in Berkeley

    CERN Document Server

    Wutte, D C; Leitner, M A; Xie, Z Q

    1999-01-01

    Two radioactive ion beam projects are under development at the 88" Cyclotron, BEARS (Berkeley Experiment with accelerated radioactive species) and the 14O experiment. The projects are initially focused on the production of 11C and 14O, but it is planned to expand the program to 17F, 18F, 13N and 76Kr. For the BEARS project, the radioactivity is produced in form of either CO2 or N2O in a small medical 10 MeV proton cyclotron. The activity is then transported through a 300 m long He-jet line to the 88" cyclotron building, injected into the AECR-U ion source and accelerated through the 88" cyclotron to energies between 1 to 30 MeV/ nucleon. The 14O experiment is a new experiment at the 88" cyclotron to measure the energy-shape of the beta decay spectrum. For this purpose, a target transfer line and a radioactive ion beam test stand has been constructed. The radioactivity is produced in form of CO in a hot carbon target with a 20 MeV 3He from the 88" Cyclotron. The activity diffuses through an 8m long stainless s...

  8. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Jackson State University, Ana G. Mendez Educational Foundation Consortium: Progress report, October 1985-September 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    Seventeen student papers are included, treating various topics in computer languages and software, physics, combustion and atmosphere, and biology. All are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  9. Spatial data on energy, environmental, socioeconomic, health and demographic themes at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: 1978 inventory. [SEEDIS system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhart, B.R.; Merrill, D.W. (eds.)

    1979-04-01

    Spatial data files covering energy, environmental, socio-economic, health, and demographic themes are described. Descriptions provide data dates, abstracts, geographic coverage, documentation, original data source, availability limitations, and contact person. A current version of this document is maintained as part of the Socio-Economic-Environmental-Demographic Information System (SEEDIS) within the Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Department, and is available for on-line retrieval using the Virginia Sventek, (415) 486-5216 or (FTS) 451-5216 for further information.

  10. Opportunities for high aspect ratio micro-electro-magnetic-mechanical systems (HAR-MEMMS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, S. [ed.

    1993-10-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: Opportunities for HAR-MEMMS at LBL; Industrial Needs and Opportunities; Deep Etch X-ray Lithography; MEMS Activities at BSAC; DNA Amplification with Microfabricated Reaction Chamber; Electrochemistry Research at LBL; MEMS Activities at LLNL; Space Microsensors and Microinstruments; The Advanced Light Source; Institute for Micromaching; IBM MEMS Interests; and Technology Transfer Opportunities at LBL.

  11. Opportunities for high aspect ratio micro-electro-magnetic-mechanical systems (HAR-MEMMS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: Opportunities for HAR-MEMMS at LBL; Industrial Needs and Opportunities; Deep Etch X-ray Lithography; MEMS Activities at BSAC; DNA Amplification with Microfabricated Reaction Chamber; Electrochemistry Research at LBL; MEMS Activities at LLNL; Space Microsensors and Microinstruments; The Advanced Light Source; Institute for Micromaching; IBM MEMS Interests; and Technology Transfer Opportunities at LBL

  12. Injection system design for the LBL [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The injection system for the LBL 1 to 2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source is designed to provide an electron beam of 400 mA at 1.5 GeV to the storage ring in a filling time of less than 5 minutes. An alternate mode of operation requires that 7.6 mA be delivered to one, or a few rf bunches in the storage ring. To accomplish these tasks, a high intensity electron gun, a 50 MeV electron linac, and a 1.5 GeV booster synchrotron are used. The performance requirements of the injector complex are summarized. The electron gun and subharmonic buncher, linac design, and linac to booster and booster to storage ring transport are discussed as well as the booster synchrotron

  13. Symposium commemorating the 25th anniversary of elements 99 and 100. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab. , January 23, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaborg, G.T.; Webb, C. (eds.)

    1979-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for five of the contributions to this symposium. The four remaining ones have already been cited in ERA and may be located by reference as the entry CONF-780134-- in the Report Number Index. (RWR)

  14. Obituary: Fred Lawrence Whipple, 1906-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans, Donald Keith

    2004-12-01

    Fred Whipple, one of the founding fathers of planetary science, died on August 30, 2004 just two months shy of his 98th birthday. The breadth of Fred's published research from 1927 through 2000 is quite extraordinary. Although his collected works were published in two massive volumes in 1972, shortly before his retirement, Fred's research contributions continued for another three decades - and another volume is planned. Fred Lawrence Whipple was born on November 5, 1906 on a farm in Red Oak Iowa. His parents were Harry Lawrence and Celestia (MacFarl) Whipple. At the age of fifteen, the Whipple family moved to California where Fred studied mathematics at Occidental College and the University of California at Los Angeles. As a graduate student at the University of California at Berkeley in 1930, he was one of the first to compute an orbit for the newly discovered planet Pluto. Upon receiving his PhD in 1931, he joined the staff of the Harvard College Observatory. He was Chairman of the Harvard Department of Astronomy (1949 - 1956), Director or the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (1955 - 1973), Phillips Professor of Astronomy (1968 - 1977) and Emeritus Phillips Professor of astronomy (1977 - 2004). In 1928 he married Dorothy Woods and their son, Earle Raymond, survives him. The marriage ended in divorce in 1935. Eleven years later, he married Babette F. Samelson and she too survives him, as do their two daughters Laura and (Dorothy) Sandra. Shortly after arriving at Harvard in the early 1930's, Fred developed a photographic tracking network to determine meteor trajectories from simultaneous observations from two or more stations. The photographic trails, chopped by a rotating shutter, allowed their orbits in space to be determined accurately. With the strong involvement of Richard McCrosky and others, he concluded in the early 1960's that most of these meteors were on comet-like orbits and less than 1% of the naked eye, sporadic meteors could be traced to an

  15. The Earth Sciences at St. Lawrence University?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romey, William D.

    1983-01-01

    The elimination of traditional courses in favor of student-originated, self-graded projects in the Department of Geology and Geography at St. Lawrence University in Canton (New York) proved too radical for the entire faculty. The program eventually became two-tracked, offering students both traditional and student-generated learning situations.…

  16. Struggle for the Soul: John Lawrence Childs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallones, Jared

    2010-01-01

    John Lawrence Childs was born in Eau Claire, Wisconsin on January 11, 1889, the second child of John Nelson Childs and Helen Janette (Nettie) Smith. In childhood Childs absorbed the values of industry, democracy, and a traditional, but socially conscious, religion. Childs was a Methodist and an intensely private person not given to talking about…

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bertoldo, N. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blake, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buscheck, W. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Byrne, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerruti, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bish, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Grayson, A. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacQueen, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Montemayor, W. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ottaway, H. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Paterson, L. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Revelli, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosene, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swanson, K. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Terrill, A. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wegrecki, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, K. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woollett, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-29

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2014 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL’s environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites—the Livermore Site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL’s Environmental Functional Area. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,” and DOE Order 458.1, “Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.”

  18. Marine geology of the St. Lawrence Estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St-Onge, Guillaume [Canada Research Chair in Marine Geology, Institut des sciences de la mer de Rimouski (ISMER) and GEOTOP Research Center, 310 allee des Ursulines, Rimouski, Quebec, G5L 3A1 (Canada); Duchesne, Mathieu J [Geological Survey of Canada, Quebec Division, 490 de la Couronne, Quebec City, Quebec, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Lajeunesse, Patrick, E-mail: guillaume_st-onge@uqar.qc.ca [Departement de geographie and Centre d' etudes nordiques, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    The St. Lawrence Estuary, Eastern Canada, contains a very thick (>450 m) Quaternary sedimentary sequence. The results from recently conducted geophysical surveys in conjunction with piston coring indicate that these sediments were deposited under very high sedimentation rates, sometimes as high as {approx}30 m/ka during the last deglaciation. Results also reveal evidence of large submarine landslides during the Holocene, changes in sedimentation rates and the significant role of submarine canyons and channels to transfer sediments from the coast to the deeper marine environment. Finally, this paper highlights the presence of more than 1900 pockmarks on the seafloor of the St. Lawrence Estuary and discusses their possible origins: active hydrocarbon seeps in the Laurentian Channel and biogenic gas seepage on the northwestern shoulder of the Laurentian Channel.

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Summer Employment Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, A J

    2002-08-06

    This document will serve as a summary of my work activities as a summer employee for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The intent of this document is to provide an overview of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, to explain the role of the department that I am working for, and to discuss my specific assigned tasks and their impact on the NIF project as a whole.

  20. Environmental report 1997, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the environmental program activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for 1997. This report accurately summarizes the results of environmental monitoring, compliance, impacts assessment, and the restoration program at LLNL. It features individual chapters on monitoring of air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation. It also contains chapters on site overview, environmental program information, radiological dose assessment, and quality assurance

  1. Environmental report 1996, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the environmental program activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for 1996. This report accurately summarizes the results of environmental monitoring, compliance, impacts assessment, and the restoration program at LLNL. It features individual chapters on monitoring of air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation. It also contains chapters on site overview, environmental program information, radiological dose assessment, and quality assurance

  2. Pass-Fail Grading at Berkeley: Facts and Opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslow, Sidney

    The facts and opinions regarding pass/no pass grading at Berkeley discussed in this report are based on three sources of information. These sources include a survey of faculty conducted in the spring quarter 1970, a survey of undergraduate students in the winter quarter 1971, and the records routinely generated in the Registrar's Office for the…

  3. Integration Defended: Berkeley Unified's Strategy to Maintain School Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Lisa; Frankenberg, Erica

    2009-01-01

    In June 2007, the Supreme Court limited the tools that school districts could use to voluntarily integrate schools. In the aftermath of the decision, educators around the country have sought models of successful plans that would also be legal. One such model may be Berkeley Unified School District's (BUSD) plan. Earlier this year, the California…

  4. Nuclear Medicine at Berkeley Lab: From Pioneering Beginnings to Today (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Thomas Budinger, head of Berkeley Lab's Center for Functional Imaging, discusses Berkeley Lab's rich history pioneering the field of nuclear medicine, from radioisotopes to medical imaging.

  5. Calibration of the Berkeley EUV Airglow Rocket Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Daniel M.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Siegmund, Oswald

    1989-01-01

    The Berkeley Extreme-ultraviolet Airglow Rocket Spectrometer (BEARS), a multiinstrument sounding rocket payload, made comprehensive measurements of the earth's dayglow. The primary instruments consisted of two near-normal Rowland mount spectrometers: one channel to measure several atomic oxygen features at high spectral resolution (about 1.5 A) in the band passes 980-1040 and 1300-1360 A, and the other to measure EUV dayglow and the solar EUV simultaneously in a much broader bandpass (250-1150 A) at moderate resolution (about 10 A). The payload also included a hydrogen Lyman-alpha photometer to monitor the solar irradiance and goecoronal emissions. The instrument was calibrated at the EUV calibration facility at the University of California at Berkeley, and was subsequently launched successfully on September 30, 1988 aboard a four-stage experimental sounding rocket, Black Brant XII flight 12.041 WT. The calibration procedure and resulting data are presented.

  6. Pressure safety program Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borzileri, C.; Traini, M.

    1992-10-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a Research and Development facility. Programs include research in: nuclear weapons, energy, environmental, biomedical, and other DOE funded programs. LLNL is managed by the University of California for the Department of Energy. Many research and development programs require the use of pressurized fluid systems. In the early 1960`s, courses were developed to train personnel to safely work with pressurized systems. These courses served as a foundation for the Pressure Safety Program. The Pressure Safety Program is administered by the Pressure Safety Manager through the Hazards Control Department, and responsibilities include: (1) Pressure Safety course development and training, (2) Equipment documentation, tracking and inspections/retests, (3) Formal and informal review of pressure systems. The program uses accepted codes and standards and closely follows the DOE Pressure Safety Guidelines Manual. This manual was developed for DOE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DOE Pressure Safety Guidelines Manual defines five (5) basic elements which constitute this Pressure Safety Program. These elements are: (1) A Pressure Safety Manual, (2) A Safety Committee, (3) Personnel who are trained and qualified, (4) Documentation and accountability for each pressure vessel or system, (5) Control of the selection and the use of high pressure hardware.

  7. "Blood" in D.H. Lawrence and O. Wilde

    OpenAIRE

    中山, 本文; Motofumi, NAKAYAMA

    2015-01-01

    Lawrence and Wilde found something special in "blood." Lawrence had a firm belief in "blood" symbolizing primitive "daemonic" energy. Lawrence's blood operates as energy to encourage one to transcend individuality and acquire "a greater life." With profound insight, he asserts that an invisible world of "blood-consciousness" underlies the visible world. Wilde too stresses "blood" as seen in "The Nightingale and the Rose," "The Happy Prince." or "The Selfish Giant." The "blood," which is insep...

  8. Autogrammid, oma aja märk / Mike Lawrence

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lawrence, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Autogrammide kogumisest, nende ehtsusest, sportlastele kuulunud esemete kollektsioneerimisest. Lisatud: Kollektsionääride maiuspalu. Autor Mike Lawrence on oksjonifirma Bonhams/Brooks konsultant, ajakirjanik

  9. Adaptive Optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavel, D T

    2003-03-10

    Adaptive optics enables high resolution imaging through the atmospheric by correcting for the turbulent air's aberrations to the light waves passing through it. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for a number of years has been at the forefront of applying adaptive optics technology to astronomy on the world's largest astronomical telescopes, in particular at the Keck 10-meter telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The technology includes the development of high-speed electrically driven deformable mirrors, high-speed low-noise CCD sensors, and real-time wavefront reconstruction and control hardware. Adaptive optics finds applications in many other areas where light beams pass through aberrating media and must be corrected to maintain diffraction-limited performance. We describe systems and results in astronomy, medicine (vision science), and horizontal path imaging, all active programs in our group.

  10. Geologic map of Saint Lawrence Island, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, William W.; Wilson, Frederic H.; Taylor, Theresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Saint Lawrence Island is located in the northern Bering Sea, 190 km southwest of the tip of the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, and 75 km southeast of the Chukotsk Peninsula, Russia (see index map, map sheet). It lies on a broad, shallow-water continental shelf that extends from western Alaska to northeastern Russia. The island is situated on a northwest-trending structural uplift exposing rocks as old as Paleozoic above sea level. The submerged shelf between the Seward Peninsula and Saint Lawrence Island is covered mainly with Cenozoic deposits (Dundo and Egiazarov, 1982). Northeast of the island, the shelf is underlain by a large structural depression, the Norton Basin, which contains as much as 6.5 km of Cenozoic strata (Grim and McManus, 1970; Fisher and others, 1982). Sparse test-well data indicate that the Cenozoic strata are underlain by Paleozoic and Proterozoic rocks, similar to those exposed on the Seward Peninsula (Turner and others, 1983). Saint Lawrence Island is 160 km long in an east-west direction and from 15 km to 55 km wide in a north-south direction. The east end of the island consists largely of a wave-cut platform, which has been elevated as much as 30 m above sea level. Isolated upland areas composed largely of granitic plutons rise as much as 550 m above the wave-cut platform. The central part of the island is dominated by the Kookooligit Mountains, a large Quaternary shield volcano that extends over an area of 850 km2 and rises to an elevation of 630 m. The west end of the island is composed of the Poovoot Range, a group of barren, rubble-covered hills as high as 450 m that extend from Boxer Bay on the southwest coast to Taphook Mountain on the north coast. The Poovoot Range is flanked on the southeast by the Putgut Plateau, a nearly flat, lake-dotted plain that stands 30?60 m above sea level. The west end of the island is marked by uplands underlain by the Sevuokuk pluton (unit Kg), a long narrow granite body that extends from Gambell on the

  11. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Collier, M

    2002-01-01

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle.

  12. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle

  13. Stability of the Zagreb Carnegie-Mellon-Berkeley model

    CERN Document Server

    Osmanović, H; Švarc, A; Hadžimehmedović, M; Stahov, J

    2011-01-01

    In ref. [1] we have used the Zagreb realization of Carnegie-Melon-Berkeley coupled-channel, unitary model as a tool for extracting pole positions from the world collection of partial wave data, with the aim of eliminating model dependence in pole-search procedures. In order that the method is sensible, we in this paper discuss the stability of the method with respect to the strong variation of different model ingredients. We show that the Zagreb CMB procedure is very stable with strong variation of the model assumptions, and that it can reliably predict the pole positions of the fitted partial wave amplitudes.

  14. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, Michael

    2002-12-17

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle.

  15. Lipoprotein subclasses in genetic studies: The Berkeley Data Set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, R.M.; Williams, P.T.; Blanche, P.J.; Cavanaugh, A.; Holl, L.G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Austin, M.A. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Epidemiology

    1992-10-01

    Data from the Berkeley Data Set was used to investigate familial correlations of HDL-subclasses. Analysis of the sibling intraclass correlation coefficient by HDL particle diameter showed that sibling HDL levels were significantly correlated for HDL{sub 2b}, HDL{sub 3a} and HDL{sub 3b} subclasses. The percentage of the offsprings` variance explained by their two parents. Our finding that parents and offspring-have the highest correlation for HDL{sub 2b} is consistent with published reports that show higher heritability estimates for HDL{sub 2} compared with HDL{sub 3}{minus} cholesterol.

  16. Mechanical design and fabrication of the VHF-gun, the Berkeley normal-conducting continuous-wave high-brightness electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R. P.; Ghiorso, W.; Staples, J.; Huang, T. M.; Sannibale, F.; Kramasz, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    A high repetition rate, MHz-class, high-brightness electron source is a key element in future high-repetition-rate x-ray free electron laser-based light sources. The VHF-gun, a novel low frequency radio-frequency gun, is the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) response to that need. The gun design is based on a normal conducting, single cell cavity resonating at 186 MHz in the VHF band and capable of continuous wave operation while still delivering the high accelerating fields at the cathode required for the high brightness performance. The VHF-gun was fabricated and successfully commissioned in the framework of the Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment, an injector built at LBNL to demonstrate the capability of the gun to deliver the required beam quality. The basis for the selection of the VHF-gun technology, novel design features, and fabrication techniques are described.

  17. Berkeley extreme-ultraviolet airglow rocket spectrometer: BEARS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D M; Chakrabarti, S

    1992-09-20

    We describe the Berkeley extreme-UV airglow rocket spectrometer, which is a payload designed to test several thermospheric remote-sensing concepts by measuring the terrestrial O I far-UV and extreme-UV dayglow and the solar extreme-UV spectrum simultaneously. The instrument consisted of two near-normal Rowland mount spectrometers and a Lyman-alpha photometer. The dayglow spectrometer covered two spectral regions from 980 to 1040 A and from 1300 to 1360 A with 1.5-A resolution. The solar spectrometer had a bandpass of 250-1150 A with an ~ 10-A resolution. All three spectra were accumulated by using a icrochannel-plate-intensified, two-dimensional imaging detector with three separate wedge-and strip anode readouts. The hydrogen Lyman-alpha photometer was included to monitor the solar Lyman-alpha irradiance and geocoronal Lyman-alpha emissions. The instrument was designed, fabricated, and calibrated at the University of California, Berkeley and was successfully launched on 30 September 1988 aboard the first test flight of a four-stage sounding rocket, Black Brant XII. PMID:20733778

  18. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bertoldo, N. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blake, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerruti, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dibley, V. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doman, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fish, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Grayson, A. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heidecker, K. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kumamoto, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacQueen, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Montemayor, W. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ottaway, H. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Paterson, L. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Revelli, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosene, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Terrill, A. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wegrecki, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, K. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woollett, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Veseliza, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a premier research laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As a national security laboratory, LLNL is responsible for ensuring that the nation’s nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable. The Laboratory also meets other pressing national security needs, including countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and strengthening homeland security, and conducting major research in atmospheric, earth, and energy sciences; bioscience and biotechnology; and engineering, basic science, and advanced technology. The Laboratory is managed and operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), and serves as a scientific resource to the U.S. government and a partner to industry and academia. LLNL operations have the potential to release a variety of constituents into the environment via atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater pathways. Some of the constituents, such as particles from diesel engines, are common at many types of facilities while others, such as radionuclides, are unique to research facilities like LLNL. All releases are highly regulated and carefully monitored. LLNL strives to maintain a safe, secure and efficient operational environment for its employees and neighboring communities. Experts in environment, safety and health (ES&H) support all Laboratory activities. LLNL’s radiological control program ensures that radiological exposures and releases are reduced to as low as reasonably achievable to protect the health and safety of its employees, contractors, the public, and the environment. LLNL is committed to enhancing its environmental stewardship and managing the impacts its operations may have on the environment through a formal Environmental Management System. The Laboratory encourages the public to participate in matters related to the Laboratory’s environmental impact on the

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H E; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S J; Coty, J D; Dibley, V R; Doman, J L; Grayson, A R; MacQueen, D H; Wegrecki, A M; Armstrong, D H; Brigdon, S L; Heidecker, K R; Hollister, R K; Khan, H N; Lee, G S; Nelson, J C; Paterson, L E; Salvo, V J; Schwartz, W W; Terusaki, S H; Wilson, K R; Woods, J M; Yimbo, P O; Gallegos, G M; Terrill, A A; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Blake, R G; Woollett, J S; Kumamoto, G

    2011-09-14

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites - the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.llnl.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2010: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff

  20. Seismic Protection of Laboratory Contents: The UC Berkeley Science Building Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Comerio, Mary C.

    2003-01-01

    The research described in this report is a part of the Disaster Resistant University (DRU) initiative funded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the University of California, Berkeley. The first phase of the Disaster Resistant University initiative produced a study of potential earthquake losses at UC Berkeley together with an analysis of the economic impacts. In that report, Comerio (2000) found that despite the extraordinary building retrofit program, the UC Berkeley cam...

  1. Vircator studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high power, pulsed microwave generator is in operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The microwave source uses a Virtual Cathode Oscillator (VIRCATOR) which is driven by a 500 kV, 11 ohm electron beam diode. In a VIRCATOR, an electron beam, having a current well above the space charge limiting current, is injected into a drift tube. A virtual cathode forms due to the electron space charge and electrons are reflected back towards the diode. This action couples electron energy into microwave energy. At present, the authors have obtained a microwave output of 600 MW in the range of 5.5 GHz to 15 GHz (an efficiency of 2.5%) and 300 MW between 6.75 and 7.25 GHz. Microwave diagnostics include a calorimeter for power measurements and D field probes for frequency measurements. Diagnostics are calibrated using a low power CW microwave source. In order to further understand basic VIRCATOR operation, tests are being done to determine the effects of beam emittance, beam voltage and anode material on the microwave frequency spectrum and power output

  2. Early History of Heavy Isotope Research at Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn T. Seaborg

    1976-06-01

    I have had the idea for some time that it would be interesting and worthwhile to put together an account of the early work on heavy isotopes at Berkeley. Of a special interest is the discovery of plutonium (atomic number 94) and the isotope U{sup 233}, and the demonstration of their fission with slow neutrons. This work served as a prelude to the subsequent Plutonium Project (Metallurgical Project) centered at the University of Chicago, in connection with which I have also had the idea of putting together a history of the work of my chemistry group. I have decided that it would be an interesting challenge to write this account on a day-to-day basis in a style that would be consistent with the entries having been written at the end of each day. The aim would be to make this history as accurate as possible by going back to the original records and using them with meticulous care.

  3. BVI photometry of the very old open cluster Berkeley 17

    CERN Document Server

    Bragaglia, A; Marconi, G; Tosi, M; Andreuzzi, Gloria; Bragaglia, Angela; Marconi, Gianni; Tosi, Monica

    2006-01-01

    We have obtained BVI CCD imaging of Berkeley 17, an anticentre open cluster that competes with NGC 6791 as the oldest known open cluster. Using the synthetic colour magnitude diagrams (CMD) technique with three sets of evolutionary tracks we have determined that its age is 8.5 - 9.0 Gyr, it distance modulus is (m-M)_0 = 12.2, with a reddening of E(B-V) = 0.62 - 0.60. Differential reddening, if present, is at the 5 % level. All these values have been obtained using models with metallicity about half of solar (Z=0.008 or Z=0.01 depending on the stellar evolution tracks), which allows us to reproduce the features of the cluster CMD better than other metallicities. Finally, from the analysis of a nearby comparison field we think to have intercepted a portion of the disrupting Canis Major dwarf galaxy.

  4. Berkeley Program Offers New Option for Financing Residential PV Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2008-07-06

    Readily accessible credit has often been cited as a necessary ingredient to open up the market for residential photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though financing does not reduce the high up-front cost of PV, by spreading that cost over some portion of the system's life, financing can certainly make PV systems more affordable. As a result, a number of states have, in the past, set up special residential loan programs targeting the installation of renewable energy systems and/or energy-efficiency improvements and often featuring low interest rates, longer terms and no-hassle application requirements. Historically, these loan programs have had mixed success (particularly for PV), for a variety of reasons, including a historical lack of homeowner interest in PV, a lack of program awareness, a reduced appeal in a low-interest-rate environment, and a tendency for early PV adopters to be wealthy and not in need of financing. Some of these barriers have begun to fade. Most notably, homeowner interest in PV has grown in some states, particularly those that offer solar rebates. The passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), however, introduced one additional roadblock to the success of low-interest PV loan programs: a residential solar investment tax credit (ITC), subject to the Federal government's 'anti-double-dipping' rules. Specifically, the residential solar ITC--equal to 30% of the system's tax basis, capped at $2000--will be reduced or offset if the system also benefits from what is known as 'subsidized energy financing', which is likely to include most government-sponsored low-interest loan programs. Within this context, it has been interesting to note the recent flurry of announcements from a number of U.S cities concerning a new type of PV financing program. Led by the city of Berkeley, Calif., these cities propose to offer their residents the ability to finance the installation of a PV system using increased property tax

  5. Chemical analysis of sediments from the St. Lawrence River

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides the results of a preliminary study of sediment contaminant levels in the St. Lawrence River. Sediment was sampled at 1 6 different locations...

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

    2008-04-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's many outstanding accomplishments in 2007 are a tribute to a dedicated staff, which is shaping the Laboratory's future as we go through a period of transition and transformation. The achievements highlighted in this annual report illustrate our focus on the important problems that affect our nation's security and global stability, our application of breakthrough science and technology to tackle those problems, and our commitment to safe, secure, and efficient operations. In May 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), a new public-private partnership, the contract to manage and operate the Laboratory starting in October. Since its inception in 1952, the Laboratory had been managed by the University of California (UC) for the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and predecessor organizations. UC is one of the parent organizations that make up LLNS, and UC's presence in the new management entity will help us carry forward our strong tradition of multidisciplinary science and technology. 'Team science' applied to big problems was pioneered by the Laboratory's co-founder and namesake, Ernest O. Lawrence, and has been our hallmark ever since. Transition began fully a year before DOE's announcement. More than 1,600 activities had to be carried out to transition the Laboratory from management by a not-for-profit to a private entity. People, property, and procedures as well as contracts, formal agreements, and liabilities had to be transferred to LLNS. The pre-transition and transition teams did a superb job, and I thank them for their hard work. Transformation is an ongoing process at Livermore. We continually reinvent ourselves as we seek breakthroughs that impact emerging national needs. An example is our development in the late 1990s of a portable instrument that could rapidly detect DNA signatures, research that

  7. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

    2008-04-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's many outstanding accomplishments in 2007 are a tribute to a dedicated staff, which is shaping the Laboratory's future as we go through a period of transition and transformation. The achievements highlighted in this annual report illustrate our focus on the important problems that affect our nation's security and global stability, our application of breakthrough science and technology to tackle those problems, and our commitment to safe, secure, and efficient operations. In May 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), a new public-private partnership, the contract to manage and operate the Laboratory starting in October. Since its inception in 1952, the Laboratory had been managed by the University of California (UC) for the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and predecessor organizations. UC is one of the parent organizations that make up LLNS, and UC's presence in the new management entity will help us carry forward our strong tradition of multidisciplinary science and technology. 'Team science' applied to big problems was pioneered by the Laboratory's co-founder and namesake, Ernest O. Lawrence, and has been our hallmark ever since. Transition began fully a year before DOE's announcement. More than 1,600 activities had to be carried out to transition the Laboratory from management by a not-for-profit to a private entity. People, property, and procedures as well as contracts, formal agreements, and liabilities had to be transferred to LLNS. The pre-transition and transition teams did a superb job, and I thank them for their hard work. Transformation is an ongoing process at Livermore. We continually reinvent ourselves as we seek breakthroughs that impact emerging national needs. An example is our development in the late 1990s of a portable instrument that could rapidly detect DNA signatures, research that

  8. On The Attitude Of D.H. Lawrence Towards Feminism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾晓哲

    2013-01-01

    D.H. Lawrence, an assumed advocator of Women’s Liberation Movement, has impressively created, out of his evalua-tion of the male and the female, harmonious relationships between man and woman. But influenced by the conventional ando-centric culture, D.H. Lawrence 's consciousness of male superiority is actually all the way working in his writings;leading him to the creation of alienated women characters that can only find their happiness in female obedience and concession.

  9. Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions

  10. Hazards analysis for the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory x-ray absorption experiments to be performed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the oxidation state(s) of neptunium (Np) in mouse skeleton and in soft tissue by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). If Np is present in sufficient concentration, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) data will be obtained in order to further identify the Np species present. These data will be crucial in understanding the metabolic pathway of Np in mammals which will help in the design of reagents which can eliminate Np from mammals in the event of accidental exposure. It is proposed to run these experiments at the Standard Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). This laboratory is a DOE national user facility located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The {sup 237}Np nucleus decays by the emission of an alpha particle and this particle emission is the principal hazard in handling Np samples. This hazard is mitigated by physical containment of the sample which stops the alpha particles within the containment. The total amount of Np material that will be shipped to and be at SSRL at any one time will be less than 1 gram. This limit on the amount of Np will ensure that SLAC remains a low hazard, non-nuclear facility. The Np samples will be solids or Np ions in aqueous solution. The Np samples will be shipped to SSRL/SLAC OHP. SLAC OHP will inventory the samples and swipe the containers holding the triply contained samples, and then bring them to the SSRL Actinide trailer located outside building 131. The QA counting records from the samples, as measured at LBNL, will be provided to SSRL and SLAC OHP prior to the arrival of the samples at SLAC OHP. In addition, strict monitoring of the storage and experimental areas will be performed in accordance with SLAC/OHP radiation protection procedures to ensure against the release of contamination.

  11. Study of the macrozooplankton within the samples taken at the Mobile site from November 1977 through November 1978. A data report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, J.; Gunter, G.

    1981-11-01

    This report brings together the results of a re-examination of zooplankton samples from the Mobile OTEC site (29/sup 0/N-88/sup 0/W) in the northern Gulf of Mexico for macrozooplankton larger than 15 mm.

  12. Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajemian, R.C. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions.

  13. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

    2007-05-24

    For the Laboratory and staff, 2006 was a year of outstanding achievements. As our many accomplishments in this annual report illustrate, the Laboratory's focus on important problems that affect our nation's security and our researchers breakthroughs in science and technology have led to major successes. As a national laboratory that is part of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Livermore is a key contributor to the Stockpile Stewardship Program for maintaining the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The program has been highly successful, and our annual report features some of the Laboratory's significant stockpile stewardship accomplishments in 2006. A notable example is a long-term study with Los Alamos National Laboratory, which found that weapon pit performance will not sharply degrade from the aging effects on plutonium. The conclusion was based on a wide range of nonnuclear experiments, detailed simulations, theoretical advances, and thorough analyses of the results of past nuclear tests. The study was a superb scientific effort. The continuing success of stockpile stewardship enabled NNSA in 2006 to lay out Complex 2030, a vision for a transformed nuclear weapons complex that is more responsive, cost efficient, and highly secure. One of the ways our Laboratory will help lead this transformation is through the design and development of reliable replacement warheads (RRWs). Compared to current designs, these warheads would have enhanced performance margins and security features and would be less costly to manufacture and maintain in a smaller, modernized production complex. In early 2007, NNSA selected Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories-California to develop ''RRW-1'' for the U.S. Navy. Design efforts for the RRW, the plutonium aging work, and many other stockpile stewardship accomplishments rely on computer

  14. Status of the UC-Berkeley SETI Efforts

    CERN Document Server

    Korpela, Eric J; Bankay, Robert; Cobb, Jeff; Howard, Andrew; Lebofsky, Matt; Siemion, Andrew P V; von Korff, Joshua; Werthimer, Dan

    2011-01-01

    We summarize radio and optical SETI programs based at the University of California, Berkeley. The SEVENDIP optical pulse search looks for ns time scale pulses at visible wavelengths using an automated 30 inch telescope. The ongoing SERENDIP V.v sky survey searches for radio signals at the 300 meter Arecibo Observatory. The currently installed configuration supports 128 million channels over a 200 MHz bandwidth with ~1.6 Hz spectral resolution. SETI@home uses the desktop computers of volunteers to analyze over 160 TB of data at taken at Arecibo looking for two types of continuous wave signals and two types of pulsed signals. A version to be released this summer adds autocorrelation analysis to look for complex wave forms that have been repeated (and overlayed) after a short delay. SETI@home will soon be processing data of Kepler exoplanet systems collected at the GBT. The Astropulse project is the first SETI search for $\\mu$s time scale dispersed pulses in the radio spectrum. We recently reobserved 114 sky loc...

  15. Berkeley lab checkpoint/restart (BLCR) for Linux clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Paul H.; Duell, Jason C.

    2006-09-01

    This article describes the motivation, design and implementation of Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a system-level checkpoint/restart implementation for Linux clusters that targets the space of typical High Performance Computing applications, including MPI. Application-level solutions, including both checkpointing and fault-tolerant algorithms, are recognized as more time and space efficient than system-level checkpoints, which cannot make use of any application-specific knowledge. However, system-level checkpointing allows for preemption, making it suitable for responding to ''fault precursors'' (for instance, elevated error rates from ECC memory or network CRCs, or elevated temperature from sensors). Preemption can also increase the efficiency of batch scheduling; for instance reducing idle cycles (by allowing for shutdown without any queue draining period or reallocation of resources to eliminate idle nodes when better fitting jobs are queued), and reducing the average queued time (by limiting large jobs to running during off-peak hours, without the need to limit the length of such jobs). Each of these potential uses makes BLCR a valuable tool for efficient resource management in Linux clusters.

  16. A study of the old galactic star cluster Berkeley 32

    CERN Document Server

    Richtler, T; Richtler, Tom; Sagar, Ram

    2001-01-01

    We present new CCD photometry of the distant old open star cluster Berkeley 32 in Johnson V and Cousins I passbands. A total of about 3200 stars have been observed in a field of 13X13 arcmin**2. The colour-magnitude diagram in V, (V-I) has been generated down to V = 22 mag. A broad but well defined main sequence is clearly visible. Some blue stragglers, a well developed subgiant branch and a Red Clump are also seen. By fitting isochrones to this CMD as well as to other CMDs available in the literature, and using the Red Clump location, the reddening, distance and age of the star cluster have been determined. The cluster has a distance of 3.3 kpc, its radius is about 2.4 pc; the reddening E(B-V) is 0.08 mag and the age is 6.3 Gyr. By comparison with theoretical isochrones, a metallicity of [Fe/H]= -0.2 dex has been estimated. We find a much flatter mass function than what has been found for young clusters. If the mass function is a power law dN/dm = const.*m**alpha, then we get alpha = -0.5+-0.3 in the mass ra...

  17. Berkeley lab checkpoint/restart (BLCR) for Linux clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the motivation, design and implementation of Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a system-level checkpoint/restart implementation for Linux clusters that targets the space of typical High Performance Computing applications, including MPI. Application-level solutions, including both checkpointing and fault-tolerant algorithms, are recognized as more time and space efficient than system-level checkpoints, which cannot make use of any application-specific knowledge. However, system-level checkpointing allows for preemption, making it suitable for responding to ''fault precursors'' (for instance, elevated error rates from ECC memory or network CRCs, or elevated temperature from sensors). Preemption can also increase the efficiency of batch scheduling; for instance reducing idle cycles (by allowing for shutdown without any queue draining period or reallocation of resources to eliminate idle nodes when better fitting jobs are queued), and reducing the average queued time (by limiting large jobs to running during off-peak hours, without the need to limit the length of such jobs). Each of these potential uses makes BLCR a valuable tool for efficient resource management in Linux clusters

  18. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

    2007-05-24

    For the Laboratory and staff, 2006 was a year of outstanding achievements. As our many accomplishments in this annual report illustrate, the Laboratory's focus on important problems that affect our nation's security and our researchers breakthroughs in science and technology have led to major successes. As a national laboratory that is part of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Livermore is a key contributor to the Stockpile Stewardship Program for maintaining the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The program has been highly successful, and our annual report features some of the Laboratory's significant stockpile stewardship accomplishments in 2006. A notable example is a long-term study with Los Alamos National Laboratory, which found that weapon pit performance will not sharply degrade from the aging effects on plutonium. The conclusion was based on a wide range of nonnuclear experiments, detailed simulations, theoretical advances, and thorough analyses of the results of past nuclear tests. The study was a superb scientific effort. The continuing success of stockpile stewardship enabled NNSA in 2006 to lay out Complex 2030, a vision for a transformed nuclear weapons complex that is more responsive, cost efficient, and highly secure. One of the ways our Laboratory will help lead this transformation is through the design and development of reliable replacement warheads (RRWs). Compared to current designs, these warheads would have enhanced performance margins and security features and would be less costly to manufacture and maintain in a smaller, modernized production complex. In early 2007, NNSA selected Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories-California to develop ''RRW-1'' for the U.S. Navy. Design efforts for the RRW, the plutonium aging work, and many other stockpile stewardship accomplishments rely on computer

  19. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. 1979 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on monitoring activities is reported in two sections for EDB/ERA/INIS. The first section covers all information reported except Appendix D, which gives details of sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring used at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. A separate abstract was prepared for Appendix D

  20. Crystal clear the autobiographies of Sir Lawrence and Lady Bragg

    CERN Document Server

    Thomson, Patience

    2015-01-01

    The main body of this book contains the hitherto unpublished autobiographies of both William Lawrence Bragg, an innovative scientist who won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1915, and his wife, Alice, a Mayor of Cambridge and National Chairman of Marriage Guidance. Their autobiographies give unusual insights into the lives and times of two distinguished people and the real personalities behind their public appearance.

  1. D.H.Lawrence's Views On European Industrial Civilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯建明

    2001-01-01

    In Women in Love (1921)the reader can easily perceive the author's abhorrence to European industrial civilization T Lawrence, the inescapable fate of this sort of social deveolpment is destruction And he takes it for granted that"Rananim"--the Lawrencian utopia, is a social outlet for human salvation.

  2. Waste management study: Process development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-12-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the present Toxic Waste Control Operations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, evaluates the technologies most applicable to the treatment of toxic and hazardous wastes and presents conceptual designs of processes for the installation of a new decontamination and waste treatment facility (DWTF) for future treatment of these wastes.

  3. Waste management study: Process development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the present Toxic Waste Control Operations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, evaluates the technologies most applicable to the treatment of toxic and hazardous wastes and presents conceptual designs of processes for the installation of a new decontamination and waste treatment facility (DWTF) for future treatment of these wastes

  4. Spending Time and Money: Memories of Life in St. Lawrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jane; Cooper, Mabel; Ferris, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    Mabel Cooper and Gloria Ferris spent their early adult life in St. Lawrence's Hospital in Caterham. This was in the late 1950s to early 1970s. This is their memories of how they spent their time. It includes the work they did and leisure. They also write about the tokens that were used in the hospital instead of money.

  5. Jacob Lawrence's "The Migration Series": Art as Narrative History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laney, James D.

    2007-01-01

    Because art is a reflection of cultural heritage, a natural affinity exists between art and social studies. In Jacob Lawrence's "The Migration Series," art serves as narrative history, with visual images telling the story of the Great Migration, a movement of African American people from the South to the North around World War I. Social studies…

  6. From "Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education" by F. Clark Power, Ann Higgins, and Lawrence Kohlberg, with Judy Codding (1989)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schools: Studies in Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article is an excerpt from "Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education." It refers several times to Kohlberg's "six stages of moral development." Stages 3 and 4 belong to the second level of moral development, which Kohlberg calls "conventional." At stage 3, one becomes aware of conventions as one sees what is right in terms of living up…

  7. Seismic and bathymetric imaging of gas seepage in the St. Lawrence estuary : a window to the St. Lawrence Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchesne, M.J. [Natural Resources Canada, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada, Quebec Division

    2006-07-01

    The Geological Survey of Canada has gathered multichannel and single channel high-resolution seismic data in the St. Lawrence Estuary since 2003 in order to acquire more information about the nature and geology of the St. Lawrence Platform beneath the St. Lawrence Estuary. Seismic data gathered from Tadoussac to Pointe-des-Monts provided images of 42 different sedimentary sequences within the Grenville basement, the St. Lawrence Platform and the Appalachians tectonic wedge. A very-high-resolution bathymetric picture of the seafloor was generated using multibeam data. The study revealed that, in contrast to surrounding geological domains, the topography of the upper part of the St. Lawrence platform is smooth. The topographic expression of the platform appears to be derived from glacial episodes, and from the structural and lithological characteristics of the platform rocks. Differential glacial erosion scoured softer rocks leaving a positive relief over harder rocks. The datasets revealed seismic and bathymetric anomalies related to gas or fluid seepage such as chimneys, bright spots, amplitude blanking, and morphological evidences of pockmarks. Seismic anomalies are typically found along the northern side of the studied area while pockmarks are found downstream of the Bic Islands, on both northern and southern parts of the surveyed area. Pockmarks on the seafloor occur as linearly distributed, isolated or nested circles in areas where the sedimentary column is less than 200 metres thick. Seismic anomalies are not related to the thickness of the sedimentary column. Relationships between the upper part of the platform, seismic anomalies and pockmarks were observed. The seismic data strongly suggests that gas emanates from source rocks or breached reservoirs located within the Ordovician platform. Gas may sometimes escape on the seafloor as it migrates through glacially-eroded porous rock layers.

  8. Astronomy applications of adaptive optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Brian J.; Gavel, Donald T.

    2003-06-01

    Astronomical applications of adaptive optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a history that extends from 1984. The program started with the Lick Observatory Adaptive Optics system and has progressed through the years to lever-larger telescopes: Keck, and now the proposed CELT (California Extremely Large Telescope) 30m telescope. LLNL AO continues to be at the forefront of AO development and science.

  9. Astronomy Applications of Adaptive Optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T

    2003-04-23

    Astronomical applications of adaptive optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a history that extends from 1984. The program started with the Lick Observatory Adaptive Optics system and has progressed through the years to lever-larger telescopes: Keck, and now the proposed CELT (California Extremely Large Telescope) 30m telescope. LLNL AO continues to be at the forefront of AO development and science.

  10. Berkeley e o papel das hipóteses na filosofia natural Berkeley and the role of hypothesis in natural philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Seno Chibeni

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A questão do estatuto epistemológico das hipóteses que postulam entes e mecanismos inobserváveis tornou-se proeminente com o advento da ciência moderna, no século XVII. Uma das razões para isso é que, por um lado, as novas teorias científicas passaram a empregá-las amplamente na explicação dos fenômenos naturais, enquanto que, por outro lado, a epistemologia empirista, geralmente adotada desde então para a análise da ciência, parecia proscrever seu uso. Neste artigo analisam-se as soluções propostas por George Berkeley para essa tensão. Mostra-se que nos Princípios do conhecimento humano ele introduz uma nova noção de explicação científica, segundo a qual a ciência poderia prescindir de hipóteses sobre inobserváveis, quaisquer que sejam. Depois, para acomodar epistemologicamente a mecânica newtoniana, ele propõe, no De motu, a interpretação instrumentalista das hipóteses sobre forças, que são centrais nessa teoria, considerada por ele "a melhor chave para a ciência natural". Finalmente, em sua obra tardia, Siris, Berkeley envolve-se, de forma aparentemente realista, na discussão e defesa de uma série de hipóteses sobre fluidos inobserváveis. Examina-se brevemente, no final do artigo, a possibilidade de conciliar essa posição com os princípios fundamentais da epistemologia e metafísica de Berkeley.The issue of the epistemological status of hypotheses postulating unobservable entities became prominent with the advent of modern science, in the 17th century. The basic reason is that such entities were widely employed by the new scientific theories in the explanation and prediction of natural phenomena, whereas empiricist epistemology, which at that time became very popular among philosophers and scientists, formed a clearly inhospitable background for unobservable elements in general. This paper examines the stands adopted, and the proposals made on this topic by George Berkeley, one of the most important

  11. A community of scientists: cultivating scientific identity among undergraduates within the Berkeley Compass Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves, Ana V.; Berkeley Compass Project

    2015-01-01

    The Berkeley Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at UC Berkeley. Our goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students from populations typically underrepresented in the physical sciences. For students who enter as freshmen, the core Compass experience consists of a summer program and several seminar courses. These programs are designed to foster a diverse, collaborative student community in which students engage in authentic research practices and regular self-reflection. Compass encourages undergraduates to develop an identity as a scientist from the beginning of their university experience.

  12. The Indirect Perception of Distance: Interpretive Complexities in Berkeley's Theory of Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Braund

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of whether perception is direct or if it depends on additional, cognitive contributions made by the perceiving subject, is posed with particular force in an Essay towards a New Theory of Vision (NTV. It is evident from the recurrent treatment it receives therein that Berkeley considers it to be one of the central issues concerning perception. Fittingly, the NTV devotes the most attention to it. In this essay, I deal exclusively with Berkeley's treatment of the problem of indirect distance perception, as it is presented in the context of that work.

  13. 77 FR 75448 - Welded Tube-Berkeley Including On-Site Leased Workers From Snelling, Aerotek and Express...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration Welded Tube--Berkeley Including On-Site Leased Workers From Snelling... Worker Adjustment Assistance on October 10, 2012, applicable to workers of Welded Tube--Berkeley... Register on October 29, 2012 (77 FR 65583). At the request of South Carolina State, the Department...

  14. Searching the "Nuclear Science Abstracts" Data Base by Use of the Berkeley Mass Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, J. Joanne; Smith, Gloria L.

    1972-01-01

    Advantages of the Berkeley Mass Storage System (MSS) for information retrieval other than its size are: high serial-read rate, archival data storage; and random-access capability. By use of this device, the search cost in an SDI system based on the Nuclear Science Abstracts" data base was reduced by 20 percent. (6 references) (Author/NH)

  15. The Berkeley Puppet Interview: A Screening Instrument for Measuring Psychopathology in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Lisanne L.; van Daal, Carlijn; van der Maten, Marloes; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Janssens, Jan M. A. M.; Otten, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Background: While child self-reports of psychopathology are increasingly accepted, little standardized instruments are utilized for these practices. The Berkeley Puppet Interview (BPI) is an age-appropriate instrument for self-reports of problem behavior by young children. Objective: Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the BPI will be…

  16. Berkeley Foundation for Opportunities in Information Technology: A Decade of Broadening Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutchfield, Orpheus S. L.; Harrison, Christopher D.; Haas, Guy; Garcia, Daniel D.; Humphreys, Sheila M.; Lewis, Colleen M.; Khooshabeh, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Berkeley Foundation for Opportunities in Information Technology is a decade-old endeavor to expose pre-college young women and underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities to the fields of computer science and engineering, and prepare them for rigorous, university-level study. We have served more than 150 students, and graduated more than 65…

  17. Follow the Money: Engineering at Stanford and UC Berkeley during the Rise of Silicon Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of the engineering schools at UC Berkeley and Stanford during the 1940s and 1950s shows that having an excellent academic program is necessary but not sufficient to make a university entrepreneurial (an engine of economic development). Key factors that made Stanford more entrepreneurial than Cal during this period were superior…

  18. Information Access for a Digital Library: Cheshire II and the Berkeley Environmental Digital Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Ray R.; Carson, Chad

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the characteristics of the Cheshire II system that is being used to implement full-text and fielded searching of bibliographic information for the University of California Berkeley Digital Library Initiative. Examines its performance when applied to a collection of large full-text documents in the TREC Interactive Retrieval Track and its…

  19. Fatty acids in recent sediments in the St. Lawrence estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodier, L.; Khalil, M. F.

    1982-11-01

    Surface sediments along the Rimouski section in the St. Lawrence estuary were sampled at the surface and at 10 cm depth. Fatty acids were extracted and analysed. Saturated and unsaturated fatty acid contents at the two depths vary with the nature of the sediments. The clay sediments rich in organic matter contain more fatty acids than the corresponding sand or gravel. Unsaturated fatty acids were more abundant in the surface sediments. Some iso- and anteiso-odd carbon fatty acids were detected in the sediments; these acids could indicate a microbial activity. Correlation is made with the fatty acid contents of the water column together with the surface microlayer of the estuarine water.

  20. Optical Design Capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, J K

    2002-12-30

    Optical design capabilities continue to play the same strong role at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that they have played in the past. From defense applications to the solid-state laser programs to the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS), members of the optical design group played critical roles in producing effective system designs and are actively continuing this tradition. This talk will explain the role optical design plays at LLNL, outline current capabilities and summarize a few activities in which the optical design team has been recently participating.

  1. Technical Safety Appraisal of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    This report documents the results of the Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) (including the Site 300 area), Livermore, California, conducted from February 26 to April 5, 1990. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of Environment, Safety and Health (ES H) Programs at LLNL. LLNL is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE), and is a multi-program, mission-oriented institution engaged in fundamental and applied research programs that require a multidisciplinary approach. 1 fig.

  2. Cyclist safety on bicycle boulevards and parallel arterial routes in Berkeley, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minikel, Eric

    2012-03-01

    This study compares the safety of bicyclists riding on bicycle boulevards to those riding on parallel arterial routes in Berkeley, California. Literature on the impact of motor vehicle traffic characteristics on cyclist safety shows that high motor vehicle speeds and volumes and the presence of heavy vehicles are all detrimental to cyclist safety. This suggests that cyclists may be safer on side streets than on busy arterials. Bicycle boulevards-traffic-calmed side streets signed and improved for cyclist use-purport to offer cyclists a safer alternative to riding on arterials. Police-reported bicycle collision data and manually collected cyclist count data from bicycle boulevards and parallel arterial routes in Berkeley, California from 2003 to 2010 are used to test the hypothesis that Berkeley's bicycle boulevards have lower cyclist collision rates and a lower proportion of bicycle collisions resulting in severe injury. While no significant difference is found in the proportion of collisions that are severe, results show that collision rates on Berkeley's bicycle boulevards are two to eight times lower than those on parallel, adjacent arterial routes. The difference in collision rate is highly statistically significant, unlikely to be caused by any bias in the collision and count data, and cannot be easily explained away by self-selection or safety in numbers. Though the used dataset is limited and the study design is correlational, this study provides some evidence that Berkeley's bicycle boulevards are safer for cyclists than its parallel arterial routes. The results may be suggestive that, more generally, properly implemented bicycle boulevards can provide cyclists with a safer alternative to riding on arterials. PMID:22269506

  3. Integrated EPA Science for Decision-Making: Lawrence, MA Water Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powerpoint presentation on the Lawrence MA Making a Visible Difference in Communities project’s comprehensive water quality strategy, demonstrating a systems approach applying integrated EPA science

  4. Leibniz's Infinitesimals: Their Fictionality, Their Modern Implementations, And Their Foes From Berkeley To Russell And Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Mikhail G; 10.1007/s10670-012-9370-y

    2012-01-01

    Many historians of the calculus deny significant continuity between infinitesimal calculus of the 17th century and 20th century developments such as Robinson's theory. Robinson's hyperreals, while providing a consistent theory of infinitesimals, require the resources of modern logic; thus many commentators are comfortable denying a historical continuity. A notable exception is Robinson himself, whose identification with the Leibnizian tradition inspired Lakatos, Laugwitz, and others to consider the history of the infinitesimal in a more favorable light. Inspite of his Leibnizian sympathies, Robinson regards Berkeley's criticisms of the infinitesimal calculus as aptly demonstrating the inconsistency of reasoning with historical infinitesimal magnitudes. We argue that Robinson, among others, overestimates the force of Berkeley's criticisms, by underestimating the mathematical and philosophical resources available to Leibniz. Leibniz's infinitesimals are fictions, not logical fictions, as Ishiguro proposed, but ...

  5. A Community of Scientists and Educators: The Compass Project at UC Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Nathaniel; Schwab, Josiah

    2016-01-01

    The Berkeley Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. Its goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students from populations underrepresented in the physical sciences. For undergraduate students, the core Compass experience consists of a summer program and several seminar courses. These programs are designed to foster a diverse, collaborative student community in which students engage in authentic research practices and regular self-reflection. Graduate students, together with upper-level undergraduates, design and run all Compass programs. Compass strives to incorporate best practices from the science education literature. Experiences in Compass leave participants poised to be successful students researchers, teachers, and mentors.

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory environmental report for 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1990. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent surface water, groundwater, vegetation, and foodstuff were made at both the Livermore site and at Site 300 nearly. LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment was evaluated. Aside from an August 13 observation of silver concentrations slightly above guidelines for discharges to the sanitary sewer, all the monitoring data demonstrated LLNL compliance with environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. In addition, the monitoring data demonstrated that the environmental impacts of LLNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public to or to the environment. 114 refs., 46 figs., 79 tabs

  7. The Computation Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, L

    2006-09-07

    The Computation Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has four major areas of work: (1) Programmatic Support -- Programs are areas which receive funding to develop solutions to problems or advance basic science in their areas (Stockpile Stewardship, Homeland Security, the Human Genome project). Computer scientists are 'matrixed' to these programs to provide computer science support. (2) Livermore Computer Center (LCC) -- Development, support and advanced planning for the large, massively parallel computers, networks and storage facilities used throughout the laboratory. (3) Research -- Computer scientists research advanced solutions for programmatic work and for external contracts and research new HPC hardware solutions. (4) Infrastructure -- Support for thousands of desktop computers and numerous LANs, labwide unclassified networks, computer security, computer-use policy.

  8. Environmental restoration at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground water beneath Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) near Livermore California, contains 19 compounds in concentrations exceeding regulatory standards. These include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), dissolved fuel hydrocarbons, free product gasoline, cadmium, chromium, lead, and tritium. VOCs are the most widespread hazardous materials in the ground water, covering an area of about 1.4 square miles. The other compounds occur sporadically around the site. The LLNL site was added to the National Priorities (Superfund) List in 1987. This paper describes the technology developed at LLNL to remediate soil and ground water contamination. Included in this paper are methods in which site characterization has been aided by using a drilling technique developed at LLNL to evaluate the vertical distribution of VOCs in multiple water-bearing zones in single borehole. The paper also describes the development and implementation of a comprehensive three-step program to investigate and evaluate potential sources of hazardous materials in soil and ground water

  9. Panofsky Agonisters: 1950 Loyalty Oath at Berkeley; Pief navigates the crisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, John David

    2008-08-14

    In 1949-1951 the University of California was traumatized and seriously damaged by a Loyalty Oath controversy. Wolfgang K. H. Panofsky, a young and promising physics professor and researcher at Lawrence's Radiation Laboratory, was caught up in the turmoil.

  10. The design and implementation of Berkeley Lab's linuxcheckpoint/restart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duell, Jason

    2005-04-30

    This paper describes Berkeley Linux Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), a linux kernel module that allows system-level checkpoints on a variety of Linux systems. BLCR can be used either as a stand alone system for checkpointing applications on a single machine, or as a component by a scheduling system or parallel communication library for checkpointing and restoring parallel jobs running on multiple machines. Integration with Message Passing Interface (MPI) and other parallel systems is described.

  11. Status of the Berkeley small cyclotron AMS [accelerator mass spectrometry] project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small, low-energy cyclotron has been designed and built at Berkeley for direct detection dating of 14C. The system combines the use of a negative ion source to reject 14N with the high resolution of a cyclotron to reject other background ions. In order to allow the dating of old and small samples, the present system incorporates a high-current external ion source and injection beamline. The system is expected to be operational by mid-1987

  12. La critique du réalisme leibnizien dans le De Motu de Berkeley.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Peterschmitt

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available L’objet de Berkeley dans le De Motu est de marquer l’autonomie de la mécanique (ou dynamique et de la métaphysique, en montrant que le concept de force tel qu’on l’utilise en mécanique ne peut servir à déterminer ce qu’il en est de la nature des choses. Pour établir cette distinction entre ces deux domaines du savoir, Berkeley à la fois s’appuie sur et critique la notion leibnizienne de force : Leibniz assure la réalité de la force dérivative (concept mécanique en la fondant sur la forme substantielle des corps, ou force primitive (concept métaphysique, qui permet d’attribuer aux corps une efficace causale. En récusant la forme substantielle comme inconcevable, Berkeley ruine alors le réalisme leibnizien, en vertu du lien posé par Leibniz lui-même entre sa métaphysique et sa dynamique. Mais du coup, cela permet à Berkeley d’instaurer un nouveau rôle à la métaphysique face à la mécanique : non plus un rôle fondateur comme celui que lui assigne Leibniz, mais un rôle critique, celui d’une instance qui dit les conditions sous lesquelles l’usage des concept est valide en science.

  13. Strategic Plan for Loss Reduction and Risk Management: University of California, Berkeley

    OpenAIRE

    Office of the Vice Provost, University of California, Berkeley; Disaster-Resistant University Steering Committee, University of California, Berkeley

    2000-01-01

    In the nearly three years since Chancellor Berdahl announced the creation of the Seismic Action plan for Facilities Enhancement and Renewal (SAFER), the UC Berkeley campus has intensified its attention to seismic safety issues. SAFER Program initiatives have changed the organizational structure, altered the landscape, and increased our understanding of the complex operational needs of the campus. This Strategic Risk Management Plan grows out of the SAFER Program, and advances its twin goals o...

  14. Gilbert Newton Lewis: his influence on physical-organic chemists at Berkeley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is presented of the historical contributions of Gilbert N. Lewis to science and a discussion of the influence of Lewis on the research of the members of the physical-organic staff at Berkeley, including Melvin Calvin, during the twenties, thirties and forties. Some specific examples are discussed. Also, the effect of Lewis, his science and administrative concepts in the creation of excellence in a department of chemistry are reviewed

  15. Gilbert Newton Lewis: his influence on physical-organic chemists at Berkeley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, M.

    1982-03-01

    A review is presented of the historical contributions of Gilbert N. Lewis to science and a discussion of the influence of Lewis on the research of the members of the physical-organic staff at Berkeley, including Melvin Calvin, during the twenties, thirties and forties. Some specific examples are discussed. Also, the effect of Lewis, his science and administrative concepts in the creation of excellence in a department of chemistry are reviewed.

  16. An Introduction to the 2001 Issue of the Berkeley Planning Journa

    OpenAIRE

    Dowall, David

    2001-01-01

    Planners have always been deeply interested in and concerned about the effects of technology on human settlements. There is a rich and var­ ied literature on technics and civilization, to borrow from Mumford's brilliant account ( 193 4). Whether looking at machines, autos, comput­ ers or the Internet, this literature provides a rich treasure-trove of social and historical analysis. This issue of the Berkeley Planningjournal makes a contribution to this topic by examining the effects of techno...

  17. Progress Report on the Berkeley/Anglo-Australian Observatory High-redshift Supernova Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, G.; Perlmutter, S.; Pennypacker, C.; Marvin, H.; Muller, R. A.; Couch, W.; Boyle, B.

    1990-11-01

    There are two main efforts related to supernovae in progress at Berkeley. The first is an automated supernova search for nearby supernovae, which was already discussed by Carl Pennypacker at this conference. The second is a search for distant supernovae, in the z = 0.3 to 0.5 region, aimed at measuring {Omega}. It is the latter that I want to discuss in this paper.

  18. The little-studied cluster Berkeley 90. II. The foreground ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Apellániz, J Maíz; Sota, A; Simón-Díaz, S

    2015-01-01

    Context: Nearly one century after their discovery, the carrier(s) of Diffuse Interstellar Bands is/are still unknown and there are few sightlines studied in detail for a large number of DIBs. Aims: We want to study the ISM sightlines towards LS III +46 11 and LS III +46 12, two early-O-type stellar systems, and LS III +46 11 B, a mid-B-type star. The three targets are located in the stellar cluster Berkeley 90 and have a high extinction. Methods: We use the multi-epoch high-S/N optical spectra presented in paper I (Ma\\'iz Apell\\'aniz et al. 2015), the extinction results derived there, and additional spectra. Results: We have measured equivalent widths, velocities, and FWHMs for a large number of absorption lines in the rich ISM spectrum in front of Berkeley 90. The absorbing ISM has at least two clouds at different velocities, one with a lower column density (thinner) in the K I lines located away from Berkeley 90 and another one with a higher column density (thicker) associated with the cluster. The first cl...

  19. Late Quaternary vegetation and glacial history in the St. Lawrence Lowlands, Canada

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lasalle, Pierre

    1966-01-01

    This paper presents data of various kinds concerning the Quaternary geology of the St. Lawrence Lowlands: pollen diagrams, C14 dates, and diatom floras. These data show that the highest parts of the St. Lawrence Lowlands were already deglaciated more than 12,000 years ago, as appears from the existe

  20. Estonia's defence dollars spent wisely? / Tony Lawrence, Kaarel Kaas ; interv. Joel Alas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lawrence, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise Kaitseuuringute Keskuse teadurid Tony Lawrence ja Kaarel Kaas kommenteerivad Eestis Suurbritannia kaitseatasheena töötanud kolonelleitnant Glen Granti kriitikat kaitsejõudude efektiivsuse osas, Eesti kaitsepoliitikat, küberrünnakut Eestile, kahe Eesti rahukaitseväelase surma missioonil Afganistanis ning üldsuse suhtumist Eesti osalemisele rahvusvahelistel missioonidel. Lisa: Tony Lawrence; Kaarel Kaas

  1. Lawrence Kohlberg, una obra en permanente construcción Lawrence Kohlberg, a Work in Permanent Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Yánez-Canal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Este artículo, resultado de investigación documental del grupo Estudios sobre el Desarrollo Sociomoral, presenta un análisis sobre la historia y la evolución intelectual de Lawrece Kohlberg, pionero de la Psicología del Desarrollo Moral. Específicamente, el análisis de su obra gira alrededor de tres tópicos: la filosofía moral, la psicología del desarrollo y la pedagogía.Abstract This paper, documental research outcome of the ''Estudios sobre el Desarrollo Sociomoral'' research group, presents an analysis of the history and intellectual evolution of Lawrence Kohlberg, pioneer of Moral Development Psychology. Specifically, the analysis of his work revolves around three issues: moral Philosophy, developmental Psychology and Pedagogy.

  2. Hayward Fault rate constraints at Berkeley: Evaluation of the 335-meter Strawberry Creek offset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. L.

    2007-12-01

    At UC Berkeley the active channel of Strawberry Creek is offset 335 meters by the Hayward fault and two abandoned channels of Strawberry Creek are laterally offset 580 and 730 meters. These relationships record the displacement of the northern Hayward fault at Berkeley over a period of tens of millennia. The Strawberry Creek site has a similar geometry to the central San Andreas fault's Wallace Creek site, which arguably provides the best geological evidence of "millennial" fault kinematics in California (Sieh and Jahns, 1984). Slip rate determinations are an essential component of overall hazard evaluation for the Hayward fault, and this site is ripe to disclose a long-term form of this parameter, to contrast with geodetic and other geological rate evidence. Large offsets at the site may lower uncertainty in the rate equation relative to younger sites, as the affect of stream abandonment age, generally the greatest source of rate uncertainty, is greatly reduced. This is helpful here because it more-than-offsets uncertainties resulting from piercing projections to the fault. Strawberry Creek and its ancestral channels suggest west-side-up vertical deformation across the Hayward fault at this location. The development of the vertical deformation parameter will complement ongoing geodetic measurements, particularly InSAR, and motivate testing of other geological constraints. Up-to-the-west motion across the Hayward fault at Berkeley has important implications for the partitioning of strain and kinematics of the northern Hayward fault, and may explain anomalous up-on-the-west landforms elsewhere along the fault. For example, geological features of the western Berkeley Hills are consistent with rapid and recent uplift to the west of the fault. On the basis of a preliminary analysis of the offset channels of Strawberry Creek, up-to-the-west uplift is about 0.5mm/yr across the Hayward fault at Berkeley. If this is in fact the long-term rate, the 150 m height of the Hills

  3. Costs, Culture, and Complexity: An Analysis of Technology Enhancements in a Large Lecture Course at UC Berkeley

    OpenAIRE

    Harley, Diane; Henke, Jonathan; Lawrence, Shannon; McMartin, Flora; Maher, Michael; Gawlik, Marytza; Muller, Parisa

    2003-01-01

    As colleges and universities nationwide anticipate enrolling more than two million new students over the next decade, UC Berkeley is exploring options for serving more students, more cost effectively, in large lecture courses. This research project analyzes economic and pedagogical questions related to the use of on-line lecture and laboratory material in a large introductory chemistry course at UC Berkeley. We undertook a quasi-experimental two-year study to determine if the utilization of o...

  4. 78 FR 40260 - International Joint Commission: Public Comment on a Proposal for Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... International Joint Commission: Public Comment on a Proposal for Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River Regulation... the water levels and flows in Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River that will continue to contribute... health of Lake Ontario and the upper St. Lawrence River. Since 1960, the IJC has managed the flow...

  5. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), conducted December 1 through 19, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with LLNL. The Survey covers all environmental media all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at LLNL, and interviews with site personnel. A Sampling and Analysis Plan was developed to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during performance of on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LLNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LLNL Survey. 70 refs., 58 figs., 52 tabs.,

  6. Status of VibroIR at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael W.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2004-04-01

    Current efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the area of vibrothermography (VibroIR or SonicIR) are presented. The primary goals of the efforts of the NDE group at LLNL have been to demonstrate the applicability of vibrothermography to new areas, to examine the degree to which VibroIR may replace existing NDE inspection procedures, and to conduct research on the underlying processes and optimal parameters in its implementation. We report three new applications of VibroIR, in the areas of brazed tube joint inspection, evaluationtion of thick multilayer carbon/carbon composites as used in the NASA Shuttle, and the inspection of soft composite materials. The goal of the brazed joint inspection process is ultimately the replacement of a current dye penetrant inspection procedure. Therefore a direct comparison between VibroIR and dye penetrant inspection is made. Preliminary results of the analysis of a leading edge panel from a NASA Shuttle is also reported as an example of the application of VibroIR to thick composites. Finally, a comparison betweeen the effectiveness of VibroIR versus a spectrum of other NDE techniques (ultrasonic imaging, radiographic tomography) for the imaging of known ceramic defects is briefly discussed.

  7. Reuse of waste cutting sand at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, S., LLNL

    1998-02-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined the waste stream from a water jet cutting operation, to evaluate the possible reuse of waste garnet sand. The sand is a cutting agent used to shape a variety of materials, including metals. Nearly 70,000 pounds of waste sand is generated annually by the cutting operation. The Environmental Protection Department evaluated two potential reuses for the spent garnet sand: backfill in utility trenches; and as a concrete constituent. In both applications, garnet waste would replace the sand formerly purchases by LLNL for these purposes. Findings supported the reuse of waste garnet sand in concrete, but disqualified its proposed application as trench backfill. Waste sand stabilized in ac concrete matrix appeared to present no metals-leaching hazard; however, unconsolidated sand in trenches could potentially leach metals in concentrations high enough to threaten ground water quality. A technical report submitted to the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board was reviewed and accepted by that body. Reuse of waste garnet cutting sand as a constituent in concrete poured to form walkways and patios at LLNL was approved.

  8. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Nuclear Test Effects and Geologic Data Bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, N.W.

    1976-11-01

    Data on the geology of the USERDA Nevada Test Site have been collected for the purpose of evaluating the possibility of release of radioactivity at proposed underground nuclear test sites. These data, including both the rock physical properties and the geologic structure and stratigraphy of a large number of drill-hole sites, are stored in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Earth Sciences Division Nuclear Test Effects and Geologic Data Bank. Retrieval programs can quickly provide a geological and geophysical comparison of a particular site with other sites where radioactivity was successfully contained. The data can be automatically sorted, compared, and averaged, and information listed according to site location, drill-hole construction, rock units, depth to key horizons and to the water table, and distance to faults. These programs also make possible ordered listings of geophysical properties (interval bulk density, overburden density, interval velocity, velocity to the surface, grain density, water content, carbonate content, porosity, and saturation of the rocks). The characteristics and capabilities of the data bank are discussed.

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Working Reference Material Production Pla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Amy; Thronas, Denise; Marshall, Robert

    1998-11-04

    This Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Working Reference Material Production Plan was written for LLNL by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to address key elements of producing seven Pu-diatomaceous earth NDA Working Reference Materials (WRMS). These WRMS contain low burnup Pu ranging in mass from 0.1 grams to 68 grams. The composite Pu mass of the seven WRMS was designed to approximate the maximum TRU allowable loading of 200 grams Pu. This document serves two purposes: first, it defines all the operations required to meet the LLNL Statement of Work quality objectives, and second, it provides a record of the production and certification of the WRMS. Guidance provided in ASTM Standard Guide C1128-89 was used to ensure that this Plan addressed all the required elements for producing and certifying Working Reference Materials. The Production Plan was written to provide a general description of the processes, steps, files, quality control, and certification measures that were taken to produce the WRMS. The Plan identifies the files where detailed procedures, data, quality control, and certification documentation and forms are retained. The Production Plan is organized into three parts: a) an initial section describing the preparation and characterization of the Pu02 and diatomaceous earth materials, b) middle sections describing the loading, encapsulation, and measurement on the encapsulated WRMS, and c) final sections describing the calculations of the Pu, Am, and alpha activity for the WRMS and the uncertainties associated with these quantities.

  10. 2020 Foresight Forging the Future of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) of 2020 will look much different from the LLNL of today and vastly different from how it looked twenty years ago. We, the members of the Long-Range Strategy Project, envision a Laboratory not defined by one program--nuclear weapons research--but by several core programs related to or synergistic with LLNL's national security mission. We expect the Laboratory to be fully engaged with sponsors and the local community and closely partnering with other research and development (R&D) organizations and academia. Unclassified work will be a vital part of the Laboratory of 2020 and will visibly demonstrate LLNL's international science and technology strengths. We firmly believe that there will be a critical and continuing role for the Laboratory. As a dynamic and versatile multipurpose laboratory with a national security focus, LLNL will be applying its capabilities in science and technology to meet the needs of the nation in the 21st century. With strategic investments in science, outstanding technical capabilities, and effective relationships, the Laboratory will, we believe, continue to play a key role in securing the nation's future.

  11. Earthquake safety program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within three minutes on the morning of January 24, 1980, an earthquake and three aftershocks, with Richter magnitudes of 5.8, 5.1, 4.0, and 4.2, respectively, struck the Livermore Valley. Two days later, a Richter magnitude 5.4 earthquake occurred, which had its epicenter about 4 miles northwest of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Although no one at the Lab was seriously injured, these earthquakes caused considerable damage and disruption. Masonry and concrete structures cracked and broke, trailers shifted and fell off their pedestals, office ceilings and overhead lighting fell, and bookcases overturned. The Laboratory was suddenly immersed in a site-wide program of repairing earthquake-damaged facilities, and protecting our many employees and the surrounding community from future earthquakes. Over the past five years, LLNL has spent approximately $10 million on its earthquake restoration effort for repairs and upgrades. The discussion in this paper centers upon the earthquake damage that occurred, the clean-up and restoration efforts, the seismic review of LLNL facilities, our site-specific seismic design criteria, computer-floor upgrades, ceiling-system upgrades, unique building seismic upgrades, geologic and seismologic studies, and seismic instrumentation. 10 references

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory environmental report for 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, J.M.; Surano, K.A.; Lamson, K.C.; Balke, B.K.; Steenhoven, J.C.; Schwoegler, D.R. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1990. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent surface water, groundwater, vegetation, and foodstuff were made at both the Livermore site and at Site 300 nearly. LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment was evaluated. Aside from an August 13 observation of silver concentrations slightly above guidelines for discharges to the sanitary sewer, all the monitoring data demonstrated LLNL compliance with environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. In addition, the monitoring data demonstrated that the environmental impacts of LLNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public to or to the environment. 114 refs., 46 figs., 79 tabs.

  13. THE CONTRIBUTION MADE BY T.E. LAWRENCE TO THE THEORY OF REVOLUTIONARY WARFARE

    OpenAIRE

    G.K.B. Barron

    2012-01-01

    Lawrence was basically an academic thrown into the hurly-burly of leading an Arab revolt against Turkish domination. It could be said that the war in the Middle East was a sideshow of the First World War and Lawrence's part was a ' ... sideshow to the sideshow'l) Why then has Lawrence been remembered when greater military men have been forgotten? The romanticism of his exploits are surely the reason, and yet the fact that he is the first modern theorist and possibly the "father" of modern rev...

  14. THE CONTRIBUTION MADE BY T.E. LAWRENCE TO THE THEORY OF REVOLUTIONARY WARFARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.K.B. Barron

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Lawrence was basically an academic thrown into the hurly-burly of leading an Arab revolt against Turkish domination. It could be said that the war in the Middle East was a sideshow of the First World War and Lawrence's part was a ' ... sideshow to the sideshow'l Why then has Lawrence been remembered when greater military men have been forgotten? The romanticism of his exploits are surely the reason, and yet the fact that he is the first modern theorist and possibly the "father" of modern revolutionary warfare, tends to be forgotten.

  15. High energy nucleus--nucleus studies at the Berkeley Bevalac. [Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1976-09-01

    A survey of high-energy nucleus--nucleus experiments performed at the Berkeley Bevalac Facility is presented. Experimental results are divided into the general areas of peripheral and central collisions. Results on projectile and target fragmentation, total cross-section measurements, pion and photon production, and charged-particle multiplicities are stressed. Recently, there have been theoretical predictions concerning the possibility of observing new phenomena such as shock waves, pion condensates, or collapsed nuclear matter. Existing data relevant to some of these speculations are discussed. A brief discussion of future developments with high-energy nuclear beams is also presented. 27 figures, 1 table.

  16. Status of the belugas of the St Lawrence estuary, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael CS Kingsley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A population of belugas (Delphinapterus leucas inhabiting the estuary of the St Lawrence river in Quebec, Canada, was depleted by unregulated hunting, not closed until 1979. Surveys in 1977 showed only a few hundred in the population. Surveys since then have produced increasing estimates of population indices. An estimate of the population, fully corrected for diving animals, was 1,238 (SE 119 in September 1997. The population was estimated to have increased from 1988 through 1997 by 31.4 belugas/yr (SE 13.1. Observations of population age structure, as well as data on age at death obtained from beach-cast carcasses, do not indicate serious problems at the population level, although there are indications that mortality of the oldest animals may be elevated. Few animals appear to live much over 30 years. From examination of beach-cast carcasses, it appears that most deaths are due to old age and disease; hunting is illegal, ship strikes and entrapments in fishing gear are rare, ice entrapments and predation are unknown. Among beach-cast carcasses recovered and necropsied, about 23% of the adults have malignant cancers, while most of the juveniles have pneumonia; other pathological conditions are diverse. No factors are known to be limiting numbers of this population. Habitat quality factors, including persistent contaminants, boat traffic and harassment, may affect the population’s rate of increase, but these effects have not been quantitatively evaluated. Comprehensive legislation exists with powers to protect the population and the environment of which it is a component, but application and enforcement of the laws is not without problems.

  17. Exploring Viral Genomics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilpatrick, K; Hiddessen, A

    2007-08-22

    This summer I had the privilege of working at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under the Nonproliferation, Homeland and International Security Directorate in the Chemical and Biological Countermeasures Division. I worked exclusively on the Viral Identification and Characterization Initiative (VICI) project focusing on the development of multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. The goal of VICI is to combine several disciplines such as molecular biology, microfluidics, and bioinformatics in order to detect viruses and identify them in order to effectively and quickly counter infectious disease, natural or engineered. The difficulty in such a countermeasure is that little is known about viral diversity due to the ever changing nature of these organisms. In response, VICI is developing a new microfluidic bioanalytical platform to detect known and unknown viruses by analyzing every virus in a sample by isolating them into picoliter sized droplets on a microchip and individually analyzing them. The sample will be injected into a channel of oil to form droplets that will contain viral nucleic acids that will be amplified using PCR. The multiplexed PCR assay will produce a series of amplicons for a particular virus genome that provides an identifying signature. A device will then detect whether or not DNA is present in the droplet and will sort the empty droplets from the rest. From this point, the amplified DNA is released from the droplets and analyzed using capillary gel electrophoresis in order to read out the series of amplicons and thereby determine the identity of each virus. The following figure depicts the microfluidic process. For the abovementioned microfluidic process to work, a method for detecting amplification of target viral nucleic acids that does not interfere with the multiplexed biochemical reaction is required for downstream sorting and analysis. In this report, the successful development of a multiplexed PCR assay using SYBR Green I

  18. Laser materials processing applications at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High power and high radiance laser technologies developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) such as copper-vapor lasers, solid-state slab lasers, dye lasers, harmonic wavelength conversion of these lasers, and fiber optic delivery systems show great promise for material processing tasks. Evaluation of models suggests significant potential for tenfold increases in welding, cutting, and drilling performance, as well as capability for applications in emerging technologies such as micromachining, surface treatment, and stereolithography. Copper and dye laser systems are currently being developed at LLNL for uranium enrichment production facilities. The goals of this program are to develop low-cost, reliable and maintainable industrial laser systems. Chains of copper lasers currently operate at more than 1.5 kW output and achieve mean time between failures of more than 1,000 hours. The beam quality of copper vapor lasers is approximately three times the diffraction limit. Dye lasers have near diffraction limited beam quality at greater than 1.0 kW. Diode laser pumped, Nd:YAG slab lasers are also being developed at LLNL. Current designs achieve powers of greater than 1.0 kW and projected beam quality is in the two to five times diffraction limited range. Results from cutting and drilling studies in titanium and stainless steel alloys show that cuts and holes with extremely fine features can be made with dye and copper-vapor lasers. High radiance beams produce low distortion and small heat-affected zones. The authors have accomplished very high aspect ratio holes in drilling tests (> 60: 1) and features with micron scale (5-50 μm) sizes. Other, traditionally more difficult, materials such as copper, aluminum and ceramics will soon be studied in detail

  19. Polygons Representing Sensitivity of Ground Water to Contamination in Lawrence County, SD

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes 956 polygons labeled with a sensitivity-unit code that represents the sensitivity of ground water to contamination in Lawrence County, SD....

  20. Searching for multiple stellar populations in the massive, old open cluster Berkeley 39

    CERN Document Server

    Bragaglia, A; Carretta, E; D'Orazi, V; Sneden, C; Lucatello, S

    2012-01-01

    The most massive star clusters include several generations of stars with a different chemical composition (mainly revealed by an Na-O anti-correlation) while low-mass star clusters appear to be chemically homogeneous. We are investigating the chemical composition of several clusters with masses of a few 10^4 Msun to establish the lower mass limit for the multiple stellar population phenomenon. Using FLAMES@VLT spectra we determine abundances of Fe, O, Na, and several other elements (alpha, Fe-peak, and neutron-capture elements) in the old open cluster Berkeley 39. This is a massive open cluster: M~10^4 Msun, approximately at the border between small globular clusters and large open clusters. Our sample size of about 30 stars is one of the largest studied for abundances in any open cluster to date, and will be useful to determine improved cluster parameters, such as age, distance, and reddening when coupled with precise, well-calibrated photometry. We find that Berkeley 39 is slightly metal-poor, =-0.20, in ag...

  1. NGC 1817, NGC 2141, and Berkeley 81: three BOCCE clusters of intermediate age

    CERN Document Server

    Donati, P; Bragaglia, A; Cignoni, M; Tosi, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the evolutionary status of three open clusters: NGC 1817, NGC 2141, and Berkeley 81. They are all of intermediate age, two are located in the Galactic anti-centre direction while the third one is located in the Galactic centre direction. All of them were observed with LBC@LBT using the Bessel B, V, and I filters. The cluster parameters have been obtained using the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) method, i.e. the direct comparison of the observational CMDs with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different evolutionary sets (Padova, FRANEC, and FST). This analysis shows that NGC 1817 has subsolar metallicity, age between 0.8 and 1.2 Gyr, reddening E(B-V) in the range 0.21 and 0.34, and distance modulus (m-M)_0 of about 10.9; NGC 2141 is older, with age in the range 1.25 and 1.9 Gyr, E(B-V) between 0.36 and 0.45, (m-M)_0 between 11.95 and 12.21, and subsolar metallicity; Berkeley~81 has metallicity about solar, with age between 0.75 and 1.0 Gyr, has reddening E(B-V)~0.90...

  2. The old anticentre open cluster Berkeley 32: membership and fundamental parameters

    CERN Document Server

    D'Orazi, V; Fabrizio, L D; Held, E V; Tosi, M

    2006-01-01

    We have obtained medium-low resolution spectroscopy and BVI CCD imaging of Berkeley 32, an old open cluster which lies in the anticentre direction. From the radial velocities of 48 stars in the cluster direction we found that 31 of them, in crucial evolutionary phases, are probable cluster members, with an average radial velocity of +106.7 (sigma = 8.5) km/s. From isochrone fitting to the colour magnitude diagrams of Berkeley 32 we have obtained an age of 6.3 Gyr, (m-M)0 = 12.48 and E(B-V) = 0.10. The best fit is obtained with Z=0.008. A consistent distance, (m-M)0 ~= 12.6 +/- 0.1, has been derived from the mean magnitude of red clump stars with confirmed membership; we may assume (m-M)0 ~= 12.55 +/- 0.1. The colour magnitude diagram of the nearby field observed to check for field stars contamination looks intriguingly similar to that of the Canis Major overdensity.

  3. Poetic element: A study of D. H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers

    OpenAIRE

    Ankita; Surender Singh

    2013-01-01

    No writer can remain unaffected by the social, cultural, political and intellectual environment of his age.Every writer depicts the characteristics of his age as he generally transcribes from life. Lawrence's life and workrepresent a revolt against the values and ideas of the nineteenth century. He appears to be a novelist of the abnormalsimply because normality has become something abnormal during present age. D. H. Lawrence was a prolificwriter. He has written poems, novels and short storie...

  4. DHS-STEM Internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, B

    2008-08-18

    This summer I had the fortunate opportunity through the DHS-STEM program to attend Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) to work with Tom Slezak on the bioinformatics team. The bioinformatics team, among other things, helps to develop TaqMan and microarray probes for the identification of pathogens. My main project at the laboratory was to test such probe identification capabilities against metagenomic (unsequenced) data from around the world. Using various sequence analysis tools (Vmatch and Blastall) and several we developed ourselves, about 120 metagenomic sequencing projects were compared against a collection of all completely sequenced genomes and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) current probe database. For the probes, the Blastall algorithms compared each individual metagenomic project using various parameters allowing for the natural ambiguities of in vitro hybridization (mismatches, deletions, insertions, hairpinning, etc.). A low level cutoff was used to eliminate poor sequence matches, and to leave a large variety of higher quality matches for future research into the hybridization of sequences with mutations and variations. Any hits with at least 80% base pair conservation over 80% of the length of the match. Because of the size of our whole genome database, we utilized the exact match algorithm of Vmatch to quickly search and compare genomes for exact matches with varying lower level limits on sequence length. I also provided preliminary feasibility analyses to support a potential industry-funded project to develop a multiplex assay on several genera and species. Each genus and species was evaluated based on the amount of sequenced genomes, amount of near neighbor sequenced genomes, presence of identifying genes--metabolistic or antibiotic resistant genes--and the availability of research on the identification of the specific genera or species. Utilizing the bioinformatic team's software, I was able to develop and

  5. Photometric study of W UMa type binaries in the old open cluster Berkeley 39

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kandulapati Sriram; Yellapragada Ravi Kiron; Pasagada Vivekananda Rao

    2009-01-01

    The study of W UMa binary systems gives a wealth of information about their nature as well as their parent bodies(if any).like clusters.In this paper,we present the Ⅰ passband photometric solutions of four W UMa binaries in the open cluster Berkeley 39 using the latest version of the W-D program.The result shows that two binary systems are W-subtype W UMa binary systems and the other two systems are H-subtype W UMa binary systems.No third body has been found in any of the four systems.we found a correlation between the period and mass-ratio as well as temperature and mass-ratio for the respective variables,which is similar to the relationship between mass ratio and total mass of the contact binaries as shown by van't Veer and Li et al.

  6. Studies, Transport and Treatment Concept for Boilers from Berkeley NPP, England - 13599

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In November 2011 Studsvik was awarded a contract to transport five decommissioned boilers from the Berkeley Nuclear Licensed Site in the UK to the Studsvik Nuclear Site in Sweden for metal treatment and recycling. A key objective of the project was to remove the boilers from the site by 31 March 2012 and this was successfully achieved with all boilers off site by 22 March and delivered to Studsvik on 6 April. Four boilers have been processed and the fifth is planned for completion by end of December 2012.The project had many challenges including a very tight timescale and has been successfully delivered to cost and ahead of the baseline programme. This paper describes the project and the experience gained from treatment of the first four boilers. It is the first UK project to send large components overseas for recycling and provides new insight into the processing of Magnox gas-circuit components. (authors)

  7. Studies, Transport and Treatment Concept for Boilers from Berkeley NPP, England - 13599

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirendal, Bo [Studsvik Nuclear AB (Sweden); Saul, David; Robinson, Joe; Davidson, Gavin [Studsvik UK Ltd (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    In November 2011 Studsvik was awarded a contract to transport five decommissioned boilers from the Berkeley Nuclear Licensed Site in the UK to the Studsvik Nuclear Site in Sweden for metal treatment and recycling. A key objective of the project was to remove the boilers from the site by 31 March 2012 and this was successfully achieved with all boilers off site by 22 March and delivered to Studsvik on 6 April. Four boilers have been processed and the fifth is planned for completion by end of December 2012.The project had many challenges including a very tight timescale and has been successfully delivered to cost and ahead of the baseline programme. This paper describes the project and the experience gained from treatment of the first four boilers. It is the first UK project to send large components overseas for recycling and provides new insight into the processing of Magnox gas-circuit components. (authors)

  8. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coty, J

    2009-03-16

    This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site

  9. Assessing Information Literacy among Undergraduates: A Discussion of the Literature and the University of California-Berkeley Assessment Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Patricia Davitt

    2001-01-01

    Since 1994, the Teaching Library at the University of California-Berkeley has conducted an ongoing Survey of Information Literacy Competencies in selected academic departments to measure the "lower-order" information literacy skills of graduating seniors. The survey reveals that students think they know more about accessing information and…

  10. A Study of the Macrozooplankton within the Samples Taken at theMobile Site from November 1977 through November 1978:A Data Report of theLawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, John; Gunter, Gordon

    1981-11-01

    This report brings together the results of a re-examination of zooplankton samples from the Mobile OTEC site (29{sup o}N-88{sup o}W) in the northern Gulf of Mexico for macrozooplankton larger than 15 mm. Five cruises were made to the Mobile OTEC site aboard the R/V Virginia Key. Cruise dates were: 17-20 November 1977; 27 February-2 March 1978; 9-17 June 1978; 15-24 August 1978; and 21 October-3 November 1978.

  11. A chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1997 progress report and presentations at the annual meeting, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, December 3--4, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, B.; Doughty, C.; Geller, J. [and others

    1998-07-01

    Understanding subsurface flow and transport processes is critical for effective assessment, decision-making, and remediation activities for contaminated sites. However, for fluid flow and contaminant transport through fractured vadose zones, traditional hydrogeological approaches are often found to be inadequate. In this project, the authors examine flow and transport through a fractured vadose zone as a deterministic chaotic dynamical process, and develop a model of it in these terms. Initially, the authors examine separately the geometric model of fractured rock and the flow dynamics model needed to describe chaotic behavior. Ultimately they will put the geometry and flow dynamics together to develop a chaotic-dynamical model of flow and transport in a fractured vadose zone. They investigate water flow and contaminant transport on several scales, ranging from small-scale laboratory experiments in fracture replicas and fractured cores, to field experiments conducted in a single exposed fracture at a basalt outcrop, and finally to a ponded infiltration test using a pond of 7 by 8 m. In the field experiments, they measure the time-variation of water flux, moisture content, and hydraulic head at various locations, as well as the total inflow rate to the subsurface. Such variations reflect the changes in the geometry and physics of water flow that display chaotic behavior, which they try to reconstruct using the data obtained. In the analysis of experimental data, a chaotic model can be used to predict the long-term bounds on fluid flow and transport behavior, known as the attractor of the system, and to examine the limits of short-term predictability within these bounds. This approach is especially well suited to the need for short-term predictions to support remediation decisions and long-term bounding studies. View-graphs from ten presentations made at the annual meeting held December 3--4, 1997 are included in an appendix to this report.

  12. No Dancing Matter: The Language of Dance and Sublimation in D.H. Lawrence

    OpenAIRE

    Ragachewskaya, Marina

    2014-01-01

    What can I do but dance aloneDance to the sliding sea and the moon…?“Tarantella” (Works 95) The rhetorical question from Lawrence’s poem “Tarantella” is somewhat ominous, asserting as it does the strange isolation of the dancing persona or the voiced spirit of dance itself. The mystery of dance always seemed to fascinate Lawrence, whose attitude to it was somewhat ambiguous. For Lawrence, dance was an issue of psychic importance, one which he addressed throughout his work. The motif of dance ...

  13. Cenas de um casamento: o corpo erótico em D. H. Lawrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Conceição Monteiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In Lady Chatterley’s Lover, D. H. Lawrence had in mind to eliminate both the extremes of an apparent Victorian modesty and the decadence and the modern mechanization of his time, showing the necessity of a revolutionary change with reference to sexual attitudes. For Lawrence, sexuality does not simply belong to the physical body, but also to a complex of fantasies and symbolizations that determine identity.My reading of the novel analyses the body as agent and object of desire, desire that if on the one hand is sexual, on the other is a desire for knowledge.

  14. Mr. Lawrence tuleb Rabarockiks kokku! Peer Günt uues kuues. Pervert ja ämma unistus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Rockansamblist Mr. Lawrence, albumitest "Mr. Lawrence", "Swing", "Sitandspin". Soome hardrock'i ansamblist Peer Günt, albumist "Backseat". Etno-folkrockansamblist Dagö (kontsert 15. juunil Rabarockil), albumitest "Toiduklubi", "Hiired tuules", "Joonistatud mees". Info festivalist: www.rabarock.delfi.ee / www.rabarock.ee

  15. Genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity assessment of shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler using the Comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CK Miyaji

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The mushroom shiitake (Lentinula edodes (Berkeley Pegler is been widely consumed in many countries, including Brazil, because of its pleasant flavor and reports of its therapeutic properties, although there is little available information on the genotoxicity and/or antigenotoxicity of this mushroom. We used the Comet assay and HEp-2 cells to evaluate the in vitro genotoxic and antigenotoxic activity of aqueous extracts of shiitake prepared in three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL and three different temperatures (4, 22 and 60 °C, using methyl methanesulfonate (MMS as a positive control and untreated cells as a negative control. Two concentrations (1.0 and 1.5 mg/mL of extract prepared at 4 °C and all of the concentrations prepared at 22 ± 2 and 60 °C showed moderate genotoxic activity. To test the protective effect of the three concentrations of the extracts against the genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate, three protocols were used: pre-treatment, simultaneous-treatment and post-treatment. Treatments were repeated for all combinations of preparation temperature and concentration. Two extracts (22 ± 2 °C 1.0 mg/mL (simultaneous-treatment and 4 °C 0.5 mg/mL (post-treatment showed antigenotoxic activity.

  16. Berkeley Supernova Ia Program II: Initial Analysis of Spectra Obtained Near Maximum Brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2012-01-01

    In this second paper in a series we present measurements of spectral features of 432 low-redshift (z < 0.1) optical spectra of 261 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) within 20 d of maximum brightness. The data were obtained from 1989 through the end of 2008 as part of the Berkeley SN Ia Program (BSNIP) and are presented in BSNIP I (Silverman et al., submitted). We describe in detail our method of automated, robust spectral feature definition and measurement which expands upon similar previous studies. Using this procedure, we attempt to measure expansion velocities, pseudo-equivalent widths (pEW), spectral feature depths, and fluxes at the centre and endpoints of each of nine major spectral feature complexes. A sanity check of the consistency of our measurements is performed using our data (as well as a separate spectral dataset). We investigate how velocity and pEW evolve with time and how they correlate with each other. Various spectral classification schemes are employed and quantitative spectral differences a...

  17. Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of the UC-Berkeley Wave-Energy Extractor

    KAUST Repository

    Yeung, Ronald W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper evaluates the technical feasibility and performance characteristics of an ocean-wave energy to electrical energy conversion device that is based on a moving linear generator. The UC-Berkeley design consists of a cylindrical floater, acting as a rotor, which drives a stator consisting of two banks of wound coils. The performance of such a device in waves depends on the hydrodynamics of the floater, the motion of which is strongly coupled to the electromagnetic properties of the generator. Mathematical models are developed to reveal the critical hurdles that can affect the efficiency of the design. A working physical unit is also constructed. The linear generator is first tested in a dry environment to quantify its performance. The complete physical floater and generator system is then tested in a wave tank with a computer-controlled wavemaker. Measurements are compared with theoretical predictions to allow an assessment of the viability of the design and future directions for improvements. Copyright © 2010 by ASME.

  18. Design, Analysis, and Evaluation of the UC-Berkeley Wave-Energy Extractor

    KAUST Repository

    Yeung, Ronald W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the technical feasibility and performance characteristics of an ocean-wave energy to electrical energy conversion device that is based on a moving linear generator. The UC-Berkeley design consists of a cylindrical floater, acting as a rotor, which drives a stator consisting of two banks of wound coils. The performance of such a device in waves depends on the hydrodynamics of the floater, the motion of which is strongly coupled to the electromagnetic properties of the generator. Mathematical models are developed to reveal the critical hurdles that can affect the efficiency of the design. A working physical unit is also constructed. The linear generator is first tested in a dry environment to quantify its performance. The complete physical floater and generator system is then tested in a wave tank with a computer-controlled wavemaker. Measurements are compared with theoretical predictions to allow an assessment of the viability of the design and the future directions for improvements. © 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  19. Development of an accelerator-based BNCT facility at the Berkeley Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accelerator-based BNCT facility is under construction at the Berkeley Lab. An electrostatic-quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator is under development for the production of neutrons via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction at proton energies between 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. A novel type of power supply, an air-core coupled transformer power supply, is being built for the acceleration of beam currents exceeding 50 mA. A metallic lithium target has been developed for handling such high beam currents. Moderator, reflector and neutron beam delimiter have extensively been modeled and designs have been identified which produce epithermal neutron spectra sharply peaked between 10 and 20 keV. These. neutron beams are predicted to deliver significantly higher doses to deep seated brain tumors, up to 50% more near the midline of the brain than is possible with currently available reactor beams. The accelerator neutron source will be suitable for future installation at hospitals

  20. Processes governing the stable isotope composition of water in the St. Lawrence river system, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Eric; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Hélie, Jean-François; Myre, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Linkages between δ(18)O-δ(2)H and hydrological processes have been investigated from isotopic time series recorded in the St. Lawrence River basin. Three stations were monitored from 1997 to 2008. They include the Ottawa River, the St. Lawrence River main channel at Montreal and the fluvial estuary. All sites depict seasonal isotopic cycles characterized by heavy isotope depletions during the snowmelt period and heavy isotope enrichments throughout the ice-free period. The data define δ(2)H-δ(18)O regression lines falling below the meteoric water line. In the Ottawa River, calculations suggest that approximately 8 % of the total inflow to the basin is lost through evaporation. In the St. Lawrence River main channel, seasonal isotopic fluctuations most likely reflect hydrological processes occurring within the Great Lakes and mixing with tributaries located downstream. In the St. Lawrence River fluvial estuary, isotopic data allow partitioning streamflow components and suggest that the recorded seasonal variations mainly respond to mixing processes. PMID:26963148

  1. Electromechanical battery research and development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, R.F.; Baldwin, D.E.; Bender, D.A.; Fowler, T.K.

    1993-06-01

    The concepts undergirding a funded program to develop a modular electromechanical battery (EMB) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are described. Example parameters for EMBs for electric and hybrid-electric vehicles are given, and the importance of the high energy recovery efficiency of EMBs in increasing vehicle range in urban driving is shown.

  2. Remedial investigation and feasibility study for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 Pit 7 Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taffet, M.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Oberdorfer, J.A. (San Jose State Univ., CA (USA)); McIlvride, W.A. (Weiss Associates, Oakland, CA (USA))

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes the results and conclusions of the investigation of tritium and other compounds in ground water in the vicinity of landfills at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 Pit 7 Complex. 91 refs., 110 figs., 43 tabs.

  3. Moral Maturity and Autonomy: Appreciating the Significance of Lawrence Kolhberg's Just Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Graham P.

    2005-01-01

    Lawrence Kohlberg's Just Community program of moral education has conceptual significance to his theoretical work in the field of moral development. This argument contends that a perspective recognizing the Just Community as conceptually significant provides a more comprehensive picture of Kohlberg's work than do critical perspectives that limit…

  4. The Legacy of Lawrence Kohlberg: Implications for Counseling and Human Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Notes that, despite great contributions by Lawrence Kohlberg to understanding of moral development, counselors are only beginning to appreciate fully implications of his developmental psychology for practice of counseling and human development. Draws on collective body of Kohlberg's work to show how seven assumptions have direct relevance for…

  5. The Procedural Queer: Substantive Due Process, "Lawrence v. Texas," and Queer Rhetorical Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Peter Odell

    2012-01-01

    This essay discusses Justice Anthony M. Kennedy's choice to foreground arguments from due process rather than equal protection in the majority opinion in Lawrence v. Texas. Kennedy's choice can realize constitutional legal doctrine that is more consistent with radical queer politics than arguments from equal protection. Unlike some recent…

  6. Seasonal variability of denitrification efficiency in northern salt marshes: An example from the St. Lawrence Estuary

    OpenAIRE

    Poulin, Patrick; Pelletier, Emilien; Saint-Louis, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Seasonal variability of denitrification efficiency in northern salt marshes: An example from the St. Lawrence Estuary correspondence: Corresponding author. Tel.: 418 723 1986; fax: +418 724 1842. (Pelletier, Emilien) (Pelletier, Emilien) Institut des Sciences de la Mer de Rimouski (ISMER), Universite du Quebec a Rimouski - 310 allee des Ursulines--> , Rimouski (Quebec)--> , G5L 3A1--> - C...

  7. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory selects Intel Itanium 2 processors for world's most powerful Linux cluster

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Intel Corporation, system manufacturer California Digital and the University of California at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) today announced they are building one of the world's most powerful supercomputers. The supercomputer project, codenamed "Thunder," uses nearly 4,000 Intel® Itanium® 2 processors... is expected to be complete in January 2004" (1 page).

  8. Final Report Bald and Golden Eagle Territory Surveys for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratanduono, M. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-11-25

    Garcia and Associates (GANDA) was contracted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct surveys for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) at Site 300 and in the surrounding area out to 10-miles. The survey effort was intended to document the boundaries of eagle territories by careful observation of eagle behavior from selected viewing locations throughout the study area.

  9. Analytical capabilities and services of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's General Chemistry Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This comprehensive guide to the analytical capabilities of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's General Chemistry Division describes each analytical method in terms of its principle, field of application, and qualitative and quantitative uses. Also described are the state and quantity of sample required for analysis, processing time, available instrumentation, and responsible personnel

  10. Quarry Quest. A Field Trip Guide to the Indiana Limestone District, Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmaker, Sherman N.

    This guide provides information for planning a field trip to the Indiana Limestone District. This district, located in Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana, is responsible for material that has dominated the building-limestone market in the United States for nearly a century. A few of the many well-known buildings using Indiana limestone are the…

  11. Lawrence Augustus Oxley: The Beginnings of Social Work among Blacks in North Carolina Counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Details Lawrence Oxley's work as director of the Division of Work among Blacks from 1925 to 1934. Discusses racial attitudes and legal injustices toward Blacks. Oxley addressed social problems of Blacks such as unfair capital punishment, juvenile delinquency, and lack of social services. (KS)

  12. Component Structure, Reliability, and Stability of Lawrence's Self-Esteem Questionnaire (LAWSEQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Gordon; Dalto, Georgia; Loughrey, Dolores; Woods, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Lawrence's Self-Esteem Questionnaire (LAWSEQ) was administered to 120 Year 1 pupils in six schools in Belfast, Northern Ireland. A principal components analysis indicated that the scale items were unidimensional and that the reliability of the scores, as estimated by Cronbach's alpha, was satisfactory ([alpha] = 0.73). There were no differences…

  13. Differences and Similarities in Lawrence and Zhang Ailing’s Views on Female

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉一鸣

    2014-01-01

    D.H.Lawrence and Zhang Ailing both pay great attention to female in their novel writing. This thesis focus on the comparative study of their views on female. Through comparing their views, the author find the similarities and differences in them.

  14. William and Lawrence Bragg father and son the most extraordinary collaboration in science

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkin, John

    2008-01-01

    This joint biography is of William and Lawrence Bragg, who changed all of science in the 20th-century with the development of X-ray crystallography, and by mentoring the mid-century discovery of the structure of DNA. Their stories are vivid examples of science teaching and research in a colonial setting (Australia).

  15. Compte rendu de : Luc Peterschmitt, Berkeley et la chimie. Une philosophie pour la chimie au XVIIIe siècle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Pépin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ce livre, issu d’une thèse de doctorat sur Berkeley et les sciences, constitue la première étude systématique des rapports entre Berkeley et la chimie. C’est aussi une tentative originale pour examiner la cohérence et la pertinence d’un des derniers textes de Berkeley, la Siris, souvent considérée comme un ouvrage mineur, voire comme une erreur de vieillesse. Ces deux projets novateurs se croisent, puisque c’est par la philosophie de la chimie que Luc Peterschmitt cherche à montrer l’intérêt ...

  16. The Bio-accessibility of Synthetic Fe-Organo Complexes in Subsurface Soil with Elevated Temperature: a Proxy for the Vulnerability of Mineral Associated Carbon to Warming Rachel C. Porras, Peter S. Nico, and Margaret Torn Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, R. C.; Hicks Pries, C.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, subsurface soils (>30 cm) represent an important reservoir of soil organic carbon (SOC). However, the vulnerability of this deep SOC and, in particular mineral-associated SOC, to warming, and its potential to amplify the effects of climate change is highly uncertain. To gain insight into the bio-accessibility and temperature sensitivity of mineral-associated organic C, we conducted a series of incubations using soils collected from three depths (0-10, 50-60, and 80-90 cm) under coniferous forest. The soils are moderately acidic (mean pH=6.5) sandy, mixed, mesic Ultic Haploxeralfs. To understand how mechanisms controlling SOC bio-accessibilty or temperature sensitivity differ with depth and with the properties of Fe-organo complexes (i.e.,degree of crystallinity, amount of reactive surface area, or surface saturation), we used a 13C labeled glucose substrate to prepare synthetic Fe-organo complexes spanning a range of crystallinity and mineral surface saturation. The synthetic Fe-organo complexes were then added to soil from three depths. The soils containing the 13C labeled Fe-organo adduct were incubated at two temperatures (ambient and +4°C) and respired 13CO2 was measured and used to estimate flux rates. Differences in measured 13CO2 fluxes as a function of depth, surface loading, and mineral properties are discussed in terms of their implications for the temperature sensitivity of mineral protected organic carbon in subsurface soils.

  17. Control system for the 2nd generation Berkeley automounters (BAM2) at GM/CA-CAT macromolecular crystallography beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarov, O., E-mail: makarov@anl.gov [GM/CA-CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hilgart, M.; Ogata, C.; Pothineni, S. [GM/CA-CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cork, C. [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    GM/CA-CAT at Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is an NIH funded facility for crystallographic structure determination of biological macromolecules by X-ray diffraction. A second-generation Berkeley automounter is being integrated into the beamline control system at the 23BM experimental station. This new device replaces the previous all-pneumatic gripper motions with a combination of pneumatics and XYZ motorized linear stages. The latter adds a higher degree of flexibility to the robot including auto-alignment capability, accommodation of a larger capacity sample Dewar of arbitrary shape, and support for advanced operations such as crystal washing, while preserving the overall simplicity and efficiency of the Berkeley automounter design.

  18. Guidelines for generators to meet HWHF acceptance requirements for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes at Berkeley Lab. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R.

    1996-06-01

    This document provides performance standards that one, as a generator of hazardous chemical, radioactive, or mixed wastes at the Berkeley Lab, must meet to manage their waste to protect Berkeley Lab staff and the environment, comply with waste regulations and ensure the continued safe operation of the workplace, have the waste transferred to the correct Waste Handling Facility, and enable the Environment, Health and Safety (EH and S) Division to properly pick up, manage, and ultimately send the waste off site for recycling, treatment, or disposal. If one uses and generates any of these wastes, one must establish a Satellite Accumulation Area and follow the guidelines in the appropriate section of this document. Topics include minimization of wastes, characterization of the wastes, containers, segregation, labeling, empty containers, and spill cleanup and reporting.

  19. Transportation Periodicals And Newsletters Currently Received At The Institute Of Transportation Studies Library, University Of California At Berkeley

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, Paul A.

    2000-01-01

    This publication is intended to serve as a convenient reference to selected transportation periodicals and newsletters currently (2000) received by UC Berkeley's Harmer E. Davis Transportation Li-brary. This latest version of Transportation Periodicals and Newsletters represents a thourough revision of earlier editions (1989, 1993, and 1995) published under the same (or similar) title. The subject content of this listing reflects the subject strengths of the H.E. Davis Transportation Library:...

  20. A simple grid implementation with Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing using BLAST as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinthong, Watthanai; Muangruen, Panya; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Mairiang, Dumrong

    2016-01-01

    Development of high-throughput technologies, such as Next-generation sequencing, allows thousands of experiments to be performed simultaneously while reducing resource requirement. Consequently, a massive amount of experiment data is now rapidly generated. Nevertheless, the data are not readily usable or meaningful until they are further analysed and interpreted. Due to the size of the data, a high performance computer (HPC) is required for the analysis and interpretation. However, the HPC is expensive and difficult to access. Other means were developed to allow researchers to acquire the power of HPC without a need to purchase and maintain one such as cloud computing services and grid computing system. In this study, we implemented grid computing in a computer training center environment using Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) as a job distributor and data manager combining all desktop computers to virtualize the HPC. Fifty desktop computers were used for setting up a grid system during the off-hours. In order to test the performance of the grid system, we adapted the Basic Local Alignment Search Tools (BLAST) to the BOINC system. Sequencing results from Illumina platform were aligned to the human genome database by BLAST on the grid system. The result and processing time were compared to those from a single desktop computer and HPC. The estimated durations of BLAST analysis for 4 million sequence reads on a desktop PC, HPC and the grid system were 568, 24 and 5 days, respectively. Thus, the grid implementation of BLAST by BOINC is an efficient alternative to the HPC for sequence alignment. The grid implementation by BOINC also helped tap unused computing resources during the off-hours and could be easily modified for other available bioinformatics software.

  1. A simple grid implementation with Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing using BLAST as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinthong, Watthanai; Muangruen, Panya; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Mairiang, Dumrong

    2016-01-01

    Development of high-throughput technologies, such as Next-generation sequencing, allows thousands of experiments to be performed simultaneously while reducing resource requirement. Consequently, a massive amount of experiment data is now rapidly generated. Nevertheless, the data are not readily usable or meaningful until they are further analysed and interpreted. Due to the size of the data, a high performance computer (HPC) is required for the analysis and interpretation. However, the HPC is expensive and difficult to access. Other means were developed to allow researchers to acquire the power of HPC without a need to purchase and maintain one such as cloud computing services and grid computing system. In this study, we implemented grid computing in a computer training center environment using Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) as a job distributor and data manager combining all desktop computers to virtualize the HPC. Fifty desktop computers were used for setting up a grid system during the off-hours. In order to test the performance of the grid system, we adapted the Basic Local Alignment Search Tools (BLAST) to the BOINC system. Sequencing results from Illumina platform were aligned to the human genome database by BLAST on the grid system. The result and processing time were compared to those from a single desktop computer and HPC. The estimated durations of BLAST analysis for 4 million sequence reads on a desktop PC, HPC and the grid system were 568, 24 and 5 days, respectively. Thus, the grid implementation of BLAST by BOINC is an efficient alternative to the HPC for sequence alignment. The grid implementation by BOINC also helped tap unused computing resources during the off-hours and could be easily modified for other available bioinformatics software. PMID:27547555

  2. Brief History of Herpetology in the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley, with a List of Type Specimens of Recent Amphibians and Reptiles

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Robles, Javier A; Good, David A; Wake, David B

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the herpetological program of the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology (MVZ), University of California, Berkeley, is presented. The history of herpetological activities in the MVZ and more generally at Berkeley is summarized. Although the MVZ has existed since 1908, until 1945 there was no formal curator for the collection of amphibians and nonavian reptiles. Since that time Robert C. Stebbins, David B. Wake, Harry W. Greene, Javier A. Rodríguez-Robles (in an interim capacity), and Cra...

  3. A quiet revolution: the birth of the genetic counselor at Sarah Lawrence College, 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Alexandra Minna

    2009-02-01

    In 1969 Melissa Richter founded the first master's degree genetic counseling program in the country at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York. This article examines the myriad factors that contributed to the birth of the genetic counselor and situates this historical watershed in its social, cultural, academic, and medical context. This article highlights Richter's prescience and path-breaking vision, evaluates the Sarah Lawrence program during the years of her directorship (1969-1972), and explores how this early foundation subsequently shaped the field of genetic counseling. Close attention is paid to the ethical issues that concerned Richter and their ongoing relevance to genetic health professionals today. This article is based on historical research in archives, consultation of primary sources, and oral history interviews with genetic counselors, geneticists, and allied professionals. PMID:18985445

  4. Polychlorinated biphenyls in serum of the Siberian Yupik people from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, David O.; DeCaprio, Anthony P; O’Hehir, David; Akhtar, Farooq; Johnson, Glenn.; Scrudato, Ronald J.; Apatiki, Lucy; Kava, Jane; Gologergen, Jesse; Miller, Pamela K.; Eckstein, Lorraine

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. To determine serum levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in Siberian Yupik adults from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska, and to determine the relative contribution of atmospheric transport of PCBs and local contamination to body burdens. Study Design. Siberian Yupiks of various ages were recruited from three populations: residents of the village of Gambell, residents of the village of Savoonga who did not have family hunting camps near the Northeast Cape (NEC), a Formerly Used Def...

  5. Applied social science? academic contributions to the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry and their consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Murji, Karim

    2010-01-01

    A decade on from the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry, this article examines the contributions of social scientists to the enquiry on two key issues: the meaning of institutional racism and the police response to racial violence. These academic inputs are characterised as instrumental and reflexive forms of knowledge. While social science applied to social policy is most effective in instrumental mode, rather than reflexively, there are various factors – suchas the interpretation of evidence, media ...

  6. Shark Predation on Migrating Adult American Eels (Anguilla rostrata) in the Gulf of St. Lawrence

    OpenAIRE

    Mélanie Béguer-Pon; José Benchetrit; Martin Castonguay; Kim Aarestrup; Campana, Steven E.; Stokesbury, Michael J. W.; Dodson, Julian J.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to document the migratory pathways and the environmental conditions encountered by American eels during their oceanic migration to the Sargasso Sea, we tagged eight silver eels with miniature satellite pop-up tags during their migration from the St. Lawrence River in Québec, Canada. Surprisingly, of the seven tags that successfully transmitted archived data, six were ingested by warm-gutted predators, as observed by a sudden increase in water temperature. Gut temperatures were i...

  7. The value of assessments in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Waste Certification Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will discuss the value of assessments in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Waste Certification Programs by: introducing the organization and purpose of the LLNL Waste Certification Programs for transuranic, low-level, and hazardous waste; examining the differences in internal assessment/audit requirements for these programs; discussing the values and costs of assessments in a waste certification program; presenting practical recommendations to maximize the value of your assessment programs; and presenting improvements in LLNL's waste certification processes that resulted from assessments

  8. 2003 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  9. Target Selection and Deselection at the Berkeley StructuralGenomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-03-22

    At the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center (BSGC), our goalis to obtain a near-complete structural complement of proteins in theminimal organisms Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae, two closelyrelated pathogens. Current targets for structure determination have beenselected in six major stages, starting with those predicted to be mosttractable to high throughput study and likely to yield new structuralinformation. We report on the process used to select these proteins, aswell as our target deselection procedure. Target deselection reducesexperimental effort by eliminating targets similar to those recentlysolved by the structural biology community or other centers. We measurethe impact of the 69 structures solved at the BSGC as of July 2004 onstructure prediction coverage of the M. pneumoniae and M. genitaliumproteomes. The number of Mycoplasma proteins for which thefold couldfirst be reliably assigned based on structures solved at the BSGC (24 M.pneumoniae and 21 M. genitalium) is approximately 25 percent of the totalresulting from work at all structural genomics centers and the worldwidestructural biology community (94 M. pneumoniae and 86M. genitalium)during the same period. As the number of structures contributed by theBSGC during that period is less than 1 percent of the total worldwideoutput, the benefits of a focused target selection strategy are apparent.If the structures of all current targets were solved, the percentage ofM. pneumoniae proteins for which folds could be reliably assigned wouldincrease from approximately 57 percent (391 of 687) at present to around80 percent (550 of 687), and the percentage of the proteome that could beaccurately modeled would increase from around 37 percent (254 of 687) toabout 64 percent (438 of 687). In M. genitalium, the percentage of theproteome that could be structurally annotated based on structures of ourremaining targets would rise from 72 percent (348 of 486) to around 76percent (371 of 486), with the

  10. Validity and Reliability of Preschool, First and Second Grade Versions of Berkeley Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrbanoo Tajeri

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: The purpose of this study is to examine the factor structure, internal consistency, and construct validity of preschool, first and second grade versions of Berkeley Parenting self-efficacy scale. "nMethod:  The subjects were 317 mothers: (102 mothers of preschool children, 111 mothers of first grade children and 104 mothers of second grade children who were randomly selected from schools in Tehran. They completed Berkeley parenting self-efficacy and Rotter `s locus of control scales. Factor analysis using the principle component method was used to identify the factor structure of parenting self-efficacy scale. Cronbach`s alpha coefficient was used to identify the reliability of parenting self efficacy scale. "nResults: Results of this study indicated that the cronbach`s alpha coefficient was 0.84, 0.87, 0.64 for preschool, first grade and second grade versions respectively. Based on the scree test ,,factor analysis produced two factors of maternal strategy and child outcome, and it also produced the highest level of total variance explained by these 2 factors. The Parenting self-efficacy scale was negatively associated with measure of locus of control(r=-0.54 for the preschool version, -0.64 for the first grade version and -0.54 for the second grade version. "nConclusion: Due to relatively high reliability and validity of preschool, first and second grade versions of Berkeley Parenting Self-Efficacy scale, this scale could be used as a reliable and valid scale in other research areas

  11. Racism and cultural identity: the reflections of two Black trainee teachers' engagement with the Stephen Lawrence Symposium

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The Stephen Lawrence Symposium held in London in 2013 provided an opportunity for academics and educators to reflect on changes in education and wider society resulting from the legacy of Stephen Lawrence over the 20 years since his racist murder. A Black African trainee teacher and a Black Caribbean trainee teacher in post-16 teacher training at a large university in the North of England participated in a series of lunchtime discussion groups as part of their university-based training. This ...

  12. Results of a monitoring programme in the environs of Berkeley aimed at collecting Chernobyl data for foodchain model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a fallout measurement programme which was carried out in the environs of Berkeley Nuclear Laboratory in the United Kingdom following the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986 are presented in this report. The programme was aimed at establishing a time-dependent data base of concentrations of Chernobyl fallout radionuclides in selected agricultural products. Results were obtained for milk, grass, silage, soil and wheat over an eighteen month period from May 1986. It is intended to use the data to validate the CEGB's dynamic foodchain model, which is incorporated in the FOODWEB module of the NECTAR environmental code. (author)

  13. Berkeley Supernova Ia Program I: Observations, Data Reduction, and Spectroscopic Sample of 582 Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Foley, Ryan J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Barth, Aaron J.; Chornock, Ryan; Griffith, Christopher V.; Kong, Jason J.; Lee, Nicholas; Leonard, Douglas C.; Matheson, Thomas; Miller, Emily G.; Steele, Thea N.; Barris, Brian J.; Bloom, Joshua S.

    2012-01-01

    In this first paper in a series we present 1298 low-redshift (z\\leq0.2) optical spectra of 582 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed from 1989 through 2008 as part of the Berkeley SN Ia Program (BSNIP). 584 spectra of 199 SNe Ia have well-calibrated light curves with measured distance moduli, and many of the spectra have been corrected for host-galaxy contamination. Most of the data were obtained using the Kast double spectrograph mounted on the Shane 3 m telescope at Lick Observatory and have...

  14. Shark predation on migrating adult American eels (Anguilla rostrata in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Béguer-Pon

    Full Text Available In an attempt to document the migratory pathways and the environmental conditions encountered by American eels during their oceanic migration to the Sargasso Sea, we tagged eight silver eels with miniature satellite pop-up tags during their migration from the St. Lawrence River in Québec, Canada. Surprisingly, of the seven tags that successfully transmitted archived data, six were ingested by warm-gutted predators, as observed by a sudden increase in water temperature. Gut temperatures were in the range of 20 to 25°C-too cold for marine mammals but within the range of endothermic fish. In order to identify the eel predators, we compared their vertical migratory behavior with those of satellite-tagged porbeagle shark and bluefin tuna, the only endothermic fishes occurring non-marginally in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. We accurately distinguished between tuna and shark by using the behavioral criteria generated by comparing the diving behavior of these two species with those of our unknown predators. Depth profile characteristics of most eel predators more closely resembled those of sharks than those of tuna. During the first days following tagging, all eels remained in surface waters and did not exhibit diel vertical migrations. Three eels were eaten at this time. Two eels exhibited inverse diel vertical migrations (at surface during the day during several days prior to predation. Four eels were eaten during daytime, whereas the two night-predation events occurred at full moon. Although tagging itself may contribute to increasing the eel's susceptibility to predation, we discuss evidence suggesting that predation of silver-stage American eels by porbeagle sharks may represent a significant source of mortality inside the Gulf of St. Lawrence and raises the possibility that eels may represent a reliable, predictable food resource for porbeagle sharks.

  15. Shark predation on migrating adult American eels (Anguilla rostrata) in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béguer-Pon, Mélanie; Benchetrit, José; Castonguay, Martin; Aarestrup, Kim; Campana, Steven E; Stokesbury, Michael J W; Dodson, Julian J

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to document the migratory pathways and the environmental conditions encountered by American eels during their oceanic migration to the Sargasso Sea, we tagged eight silver eels with miniature satellite pop-up tags during their migration from the St. Lawrence River in Québec, Canada. Surprisingly, of the seven tags that successfully transmitted archived data, six were ingested by warm-gutted predators, as observed by a sudden increase in water temperature. Gut temperatures were in the range of 20 to 25°C-too cold for marine mammals but within the range of endothermic fish. In order to identify the eel predators, we compared their vertical migratory behavior with those of satellite-tagged porbeagle shark and bluefin tuna, the only endothermic fishes occurring non-marginally in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. We accurately distinguished between tuna and shark by using the behavioral criteria generated by comparing the diving behavior of these two species with those of our unknown predators. Depth profile characteristics of most eel predators more closely resembled those of sharks than those of tuna. During the first days following tagging, all eels remained in surface waters and did not exhibit diel vertical migrations. Three eels were eaten at this time. Two eels exhibited inverse diel vertical migrations (at surface during the day) during several days prior to predation. Four eels were eaten during daytime, whereas the two night-predation events occurred at full moon. Although tagging itself may contribute to increasing the eel's susceptibility to predation, we discuss evidence suggesting that predation of silver-stage American eels by porbeagle sharks may represent a significant source of mortality inside the Gulf of St. Lawrence and raises the possibility that eels may represent a reliable, predictable food resource for porbeagle sharks. PMID:23082131

  16. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Response to the Federal Communication Commission Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowls, F

    2000-08-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been conducting UWB research for the past few decades and submits a general comments section and a paragraph by paragraph response for consideration. In general, the proposed rules look very sound and encouraging for promoting use of the spectrum by both government and commercial users. General comments include recommending minimum frequency spreading specification, possibly clarifying the peak power limits and keeping the high frequency limit as high as possible. LLNL finds that minimum interference occurs by keeping wideband wide and narrowband narrow and keeping the middle ground clear.

  17. Groundwater quality in the Delaware and St. Lawrence River Basins, New York, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 10 production and domestic wells in the Delaware River Basin in New York and from 20 production and domestic wells in the St. Lawrence River Basin in New York from August through November 2010 to characterize groundwater quality in the basins. The samples were collected and processed by standard U.S. Geological Survey procedures and were analyzed for 147 physiochemical properties and constituents, including major ions, nutrients, trace elements, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), radionuclides, and indicator bacteria.

  18. Signal and Image Processing Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R S; Poyneer, L A; Kegelmeyer, L M; Carrano, C J; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

    2009-06-29

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a large, multidisciplinary institution that conducts fundamental and applied research in the physical sciences. Research programs at the Laboratory run the gamut from theoretical investigations, to modeling and simulation, to validation through experiment. Over the years, the Laboratory has developed a substantial research component in the areas of signal and image processing to support these activities. This paper surveys some of the current research in signal and image processing at the Laboratory. Of necessity, the paper does not delve deeply into any one research area, but an extensive citation list is provided for further study of the topics presented.

  19. Oceanography and Quaternary geology of the St. Lawrence Estuary and the Saguenay Fjord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vernal, Anne [GEOTOP, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, PO Box 8888, succursale ' centre ville' Montreal, QC, H3C 3P8 (Canada); St-Onge, Guillaume [GEOTOP and Institut des Sciences de la Mer (ISMER), Universite du Quebec a Rimouski, 310, Allee des Ursulines, Rimouski, QC, G5L 3A1 (Canada); Gilbert, Denis, E-mail: devernal.anne@uqam.ca [Institut Maurice-Lamontagne, Peches et Oceans Canada, 850 route de la Mer, CP 1000 Mont-Joli, QC, G5H 3Z4 (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    The St. Lawrence Estuary is an environment marked by important freshwater discharge and well stratified water masses, recording large seasonal contrast in surface waters from freezing conditions in winter to temperate conditions in summer due to a very strong seasonal cycle in overlying air temperature. High productivity takes place in the pelagic and benthic environments, where a recent trend toward bottom water hypoxia is observed. The area was profoundly marked by the Quaternary glaciations. Thick glaciomarine sequences dating from the last deglaciation are observed in the Estuary and along the shores, whereas a relatively thin layer (a few meters at most) of hemipelagic mud was deposited during the Holocene.

  20. Associated Western Universities summer participant program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Summer 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.

    1997-08-01

    The Associated Western Universities, Inc. (AWU) supports a student summer program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This program is structured so that honors undergraduate students may participate in the Laboratory`s research program under direct supervision of senior Laboratory scientists. Included in this report is a list of the AWU participants for the summer of 1997. All students are required to submit original reports of their summer activities in a format of their own choosing. These unaltered student reports constitute the major portion of this report.

  1. Evaluation of the contamination of marine algae (seaweed) from the St. Lawrence River and likely to be consumed by humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaneuf, D.; Cote, I.; Dumas, P.; Ferron, L.A.; LeBlanc, A. [CHUQ, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada). Centre de Toxicologie du Quebec

    1999-02-01

    The goal of the study was to assess the contamination of marine algae (seaweeds) growing in the St. Lawrence River estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence and to evaluate the risks to human health from the consumption of these algae. Algae were collected by hand at low tide. A total of 10 sites on the north and south shores of the St. Lawrence as well as in Baie des Chaleurs were sampled. The most frequently collected species of algae were Fucus vesiculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, Laminaria Longicruris, Palmaria palmata, Ulva lactuca, and Fucus distichus. Alga samples were analyzed for metals iodine, and organochlorines. A risk assessment was performed using risk factors. In general, concentrations in St. Lawrence algae were not very high. Consequently, health risks associated with these compounds in St. Lawrence algae were very low. Iodine concentration, on the other hand, could be of concern with regard to human health. Regular consumption of algae, especially of Laminaria sp., could result in levels of iodine sufficient to cause thyroid problems. For regular consumers, it would be preferable to choose species with low iodine concentrations, such as U. lactuca and P. palmata, in order to prevent potential problems. Furthermore, it would also be important to assess whether preparation for consumption or cooking affects the iodine content of algae. Algae consumption may also have beneficial health effects. Scientific literature has shown that it is a good source of fiber and vitamins, especially vitamin B{sub 12}.

  2. Surface and subsurface signatures of gas seepage in the St. Lawrence Estuary (Canada): Significance to hydrocarbon exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinet, Nicolas; Duchesne, Mathieu; Lavoie, Denis; Bolduc, Andree [Geological Survey of (Canada); Long, Bernard [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Eau-Terre-Environnement, 490, rue de la Couronne, Que. (Canada)

    2008-03-15

    The seabed of the St. Lawrence Estuary is characterized by many fluid releasing features. On multibeam bathymetric images these features correspond to crater-like depression (pockmarks) predominantly found on the northwestern shoulder of the {proportional_to}300 m deep Laurentian Channel, as well as on the channel floor. Aligned pockmarks, which define segments up to 12 km long, are frequent in the Laurentian Channel, whereas they are preferentially associated with submarine landslides on the northwestern shoulder of the channel. On high-resolution seismic profiles, pockmarks found in the Laurentian Channel are characterized by seismic chimneys that may be traced down to the autochthonous Paleozoic rocks (St. Lawrence platform), suggesting a thermogenic origin for the gas. On the northwest shoulder of the Laurentian Channel, the seismic signature of pockmarks does not extend downward to the reflector that corresponds to bedrock (St. Lawrence platform and/or Grenvillian province) suggesting, together with high sedimentation rate, a biogenic origin for the gas. These results are discussed in the light of the data collected in the onshore parts of the St. Lawrence platform and suggest the presence of a mature hydrocarbon source. The conclusions are supportive arguments for the hydrocarbon prospectivity of both the onshore and offshore segments of the Paleozoic autochthonous domain (St. Lawrence platform). (author)

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by Sandia/CA Fire Marshal, Martin Gresho. This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2004 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. On October 1, 2007, LLNL contracted with the Alameda County Fire Department to provide emergency response services. The level of service called for in that contract is the same level of service as was provided by the LLNL Fire Department prior to that date. This Compliance Assessment will evaluate fire department services beginning October 1, 2008 as provided by the Alameda County Fire Department.

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Potable Water System Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo, Ruben P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bellah, Wendy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-04

    The existing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 drinking water system operation schematic is shown in Figures 1 and 2 below. The sources of water are from two Site 300 wells (Well #18 and Well #20) and San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) Hetch-Hetchy water through the Thomas shaft pumping station. Currently, Well #20 with 300 gallons per minute (gpm) pump capacity is the primary source of well water used during the months of September through July, while Well #18 with 225 gpm pump capacity is the source of well water for the month of August. The well water is chlorinated using sodium hypochlorite to provide required residual chlorine throughout Site 300. Well water chlorination is covered in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Chlorination Plan (“the Chlorination Plan”; LLNL-TR-642903; current version dated August 2013). The third source of water is the SFPUC Hetch-Hetchy Water System through the Thomas shaft facility with a 150 gpm pump capacity. At the Thomas shaft station the pumped water is treated through SFPUC-owned and operated ultraviolet (UV) reactor disinfection units on its way to Site 300. The Thomas Shaft Hetch- Hetchy water line is connected to the Site 300 water system through the line common to Well pumps #18 and #20 at valve box #1.

  5. A preliminary assessment of individual doses in the environs of Berkeley, Gloucestershire, following the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary assessment has been made of the individual doses to critical group members of the public in the environs of Berkeley arising from fallout resulting from the Chernobyl accident. The assessment was based on measurements of airborne radionuclide concentrations, ground deposition and nuclide concentrations in rainwater, tapwater, grass, milk and green vegetables. The committed effective dose-equivalent was found to be as follows:- Adult - 200 μSv, 1 year old child - 500 μSv, the 10 year old child receiving a dose intermediate between these two values. The estimate accounts only for the nuclides measured and the specific exposure routes considered namely ingestion of milk and vegetables, inhalation and external exposure. However, it is believed that the inclusion of a range of other nuclides of potential significance, which may have been present but not measured, and potential intakes from additional routes is unlikely to increase the above estimates by more than a factor of 2. (author)

  6. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  7. A Tale of Three Campuses: Planning and Design in Response to the Cultural Heritages at Mills College, the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiene, Karen; Sabbatini, Robert

    2011-01-01

    How do forward-looking institutions with rich landscape and architectural heritages integrate contemporary programming and design? This article explores the evolution of the Mills College campus and compares it with two larger western universities: the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) and Leland Stanford, Jr., University (Stanford…

  8. Assessing Young Children's Views of Their Academic, Social, and Emotional Lives: An Evaluation of the Self-Perception Scales of the Berkeley Puppet Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measelle, Jeffrey R.; Ablow, Jennifer C.; Cowan, Philip A.; Cowan, Carolyn P.

    1998-01-01

    Examined psychometric properties of self-perception scales of the Berkeley Puppet Interview (BPI) with children at preschool, kindergarten, and first grade. Found that young children have a multidimensional self-concept that can be reliably measured. The BPI was sensitive to normative change and individual differences. Support for validity was…

  9. Federal Facility Compliance Act: Conceptual Site Treatment Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (the Act), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The Act requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the State or EPA for approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the Act and is being provided to California, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix 1.1 of this document. Please note that Appendix 1.1 appears as Appendix A, pages A-1 and A-2 in this document

  10. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Annual report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) for 1987. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements were made of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical pollutants in ambient air, soil, sewage effluents, surface water, groundwater, vegetation, foodstuff, and milk at both the Livermore site and nearby Site 300. Evaluations were made of LLNL's compliance with the applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological releases to the environment. The data indicates that the only releases in excess of applicable standards were four releases to the sanitary sewer. LLNL operations had no adverse impact on the environment during 1987. 65 refs., 24 figs

  11. Hazardous waste site assessment: Inactive landfill, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of an investigation of an inactive landfill (Pit 6) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300. The primary objectives were to: collect and review background information pertaining to past waste disposal practices and previous environmental characterization studies; conduct a geophysical survey of the landfill area to locate the buried wastes; conduct a hydrogeologic investigation to provide additional data on the rate and direction of groundwater flow, the extent of any groundwater contamination, and to investigate the connection, if any, of the shallow groundwater beneath the landfill with the local drinking water supply; conduct a risk assessment to identify the degree of threat posed by the landfill to the public health and environment; compile a preliminary list of feasible long-term remedial action alternatives for the landfill; and develop a list of recommendations for any interim measures necessary at the landfill should the long-term remedial action plan be needed

  12. Solid modeling research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: 1982-1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalibjian, J.R.

    1985-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has sponsored solid modeling research for the past four years to assess this new technology and to determine its potential benefits to the Nuclear Weapons Complex. We summarize here the results of five projects implemented during our effort. First, we have installed two solid modeler codes, TIPS-1 (Technical Information Processing System-1) and PADL-2 (Part and Assembly Description Language), on the Laboratory's CRAY-1 computers. Further, we have extended the geometric coverage and have enhanced the graphics capabilities of the TIPS-1 modeler. To enhance solid modeler performance on our OCTOPUS computer system, we have also developed a method to permit future use of the Laboratory's network video system to provide high-resolution, shaded images at users' locations. Finally, we have begun to implement code that will link solid-modeler data bases to finite-element meshing codes.

  13. Construction quality assurance closure report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, Pits 1 and 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the Final Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) report for the closure cover system of two mixed, low-level radioactive and hazardous waste landfills (pits) at Site 300. Site 300, operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is located in the Altamont Hills, approximately 15 miles southeast of Livermore, California. The purpose of this report is to document the CQA program established to assure that construction is completed in accordance with the design intent and the approved Closure and Post Closure Plans dated May 1989 and revised January 1990 (EPA ID Number: CA 2890090002). Inclusive within the Closure and Post Closure Plan were the CQA Plan and the Technical Specifications for the final cover system. This report contains a complete narrative with photographic documentation of the construction activities and progress, problems encountered and solutions utilized, and third party testing and monitoring results, thus establishing the verification of compliance with the Quality Assurance Plan for the project

  14. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Annual report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, R.C.; Brekke, D.D.

    1988-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) for 1987. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements were made of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical pollutants in ambient air, soil, sewage effluents, surface water, groundwater, vegetation, foodstuff, and milk at both the Livermore site and nearby Site 300. Evaluations were made of LLNL's compliance with the applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological releases to the environment. The data indicates that the only releases in excess of applicable standards were four releases to the sanitary sewer. LLNL operations had no adverse impact on the environment during 1987. 65 refs., 24 figs.

  15. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory low-level waste systems performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Systems Performance Assessment (PA) presents a systematic analysis of the potential risks posed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) waste management system. Potential risks to the public and environment are compared to established performance objectives as required by DOE Order 5820.2A. The report determines the associated maximum individual committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) to a member of the public from LLW and mixed waste. A maximum annual CEDE of 0.01 mrem could result from routine radioactive liquid effluents. A maximum annual CEDE of 0.003 mrem could result from routine radioactive gaseous effluents. No other pathways for radiation exposure of the public indicated detectable levels of exposure. The dose rate, monitoring, and waste acceptance performance objectives were found to be adequately addressed by the LLNL Program. 88 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs

  16. Safety analysis report for the Heavy-Element Facility (Building 251), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvam, D.J.

    1982-10-11

    A comprehensive safety analysis was performed on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Heavy Element Facility, Building 251. The purpose of the analysis was to evaluate the building and its operations in order to inform LLNL and the Department of Energy of the risks they assume at Building 251. This was done by examining all of the energy sources and matching them with the physical and administrative barriers that control, prevent, or mitigate their hazards. Risk was evaluated for each source under both normal and catastrophic circumstances such as fire, flood, high wind, lighting, earthquake, and criticality. No significant safety deficiencies were found; it is concluded that the operation of the facility presents no unacceptable risk.

  17. Shark predation on migrating adult american eels (Anguilla rostrata) in the Gulf of St. Lawrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Béguer-Pon, Mélanie; Benchetrit, José; Castonguay, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    to identify the eel predators, we compared their vertical migratory behavior with those of satellite-tagged porbeagle shark and bluefin tuna, the only endothermic fishes occurring non-marginally in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. We accurately distinguished between tuna and shark by using the behavioral criteria....... Surprisingly, of the seven tags that successfully transmitted archived data, six were ingested by warm-gutted predators, as observed by a sudden increase in water temperature. Gut temperatures were in the range of 20 to 25°C--too cold for marine mammals but within the range of endothermic fish. In order...... generated by comparing the diving behavior of these two species with those of our unknown predators. Depth profile characteristics of most eel predators more closely resembled those of sharks than those of tuna. During the first days following tagging, all eels remained in surface waters and did not exhibit...

  18. Computing environment for the ASSIST data warehouse at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuk, K.

    1995-11-01

    The current computing environment for the ASSIST data warehouse at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is that of a central server that is accessed by a terminal or terminal emulator. The initiative to move to a client/server environment is strong, backed by desktop machines becoming more and more powerful. The desktop machines can now take on parts of tasks once run entirely on the central server, making the whole environment computationally more efficient as a result. Services are tasks that are repeated throughout the environment such that it makes sense to share them; tasks such as email, user authentication and file transfer are services. The new client/;server environment needs to determine which services must be included in the environment for basic functionality. These services then unify the computing environment, not only for the forthcoming ASSIST+, but for Administrative Information Systems as a whole, joining various server platforms with heterogeneous desktop computing platforms.

  19. Waste minimization activities in the Materials Fabrication Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Materials Fabrication Division (MFD) is to provide fabrication services and technology in support of all programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). MFD involvement is called for when fabrication activity requires levels of expertise, technology, equipment, process development, hazardous processes, security, or scheduling that is typically not commercially available. Customers are encouraged to utilize private industry for fabrication activity requiring routine processing or for production applications. Our waste minimization (WM) program has been directed at source reduction and recycling in concert with the working definition of waste minimization used by EPA. The principal focus of WM activities has been on hazardous wastes as defined by RCRA, however, all pollutant emissions into air, water and land are being considered as part of the program. The incentives include: (1) economics, (2) regulatory conformance, (3) public image and (4) environmental concern. This report discusses the waste minimization program at LLNL

  20. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory data base for EMP external coupling-system relatability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The external coupling data base prepared by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for EMP assessment is described. The data may be used either by electromagnetic specialists or by engineers who may have only limited knowledge of the subject. Data generation by computer code and Transient Electromagnetics Range is described. The modular (generic system) form of the base is outlined, with examples. The worst-case philosophy adapted is explained. Validation data for the Range are given. Illustrative simulation test data on a real system are compared to canonical and representative model data. The close agreement validates the links between the real system/canonical model and real system/representative model. Validation from other test data establishes the wide scope of the base for EMP prediction/estimation. 9 figures, 1 table

  1. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: 1986 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, R.C.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Brekke, D.D.

    1987-04-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental monitoring program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for 1986. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical pollutants in ambient air, soil, surface water, groundwater, vegetation, milk, foodstuff, and sewage effluents were made at both the Livermore site and nearby Site 300. This report was prepared to meet the requirements of DOE Order 5484.1. Evaluations are made of LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological releases to the environment. The data indicate that no releases in excess of the applicable standards were made during 1986, and that LLNL operations had no adverse environmental impact.

  2. New 100 mm Gun Assembly Installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory High Explosives Applications Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandersall, K S; Lee, R A; Chiao, P I; Garcia, F; Travis, J O; Forbes, J W

    2003-10-28

    A new 100mm gun assembly was recently installed and tested at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories located in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). Thiot Ingenierie performed the design of the replacement barrel, based on improvements to the initial design. This design incorporated barrel and breech sections forged from CLARM series high-strength alloys obtained from Tecphy Corporation and machined by Manufacture de Forage. Part of the improvement of the design was implementing a laser alignment system for quick and accurate barrel alignment checks. This laser is also used to align the target assembly. This paper will detail the design changes incorporated into the installation, the testing process, and future direction of research for the new gun.

  3. Computer-aided mapping of stream channels beneath the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Super Fund Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sick, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site rests upon 300-400 feet of highly heterogeneous braided stream sediments which have been contaminated by a plume of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). The stream channels are filled with highly permeable coarse grained materials that provide quick avenues for contaminant transport. The plume of VOCs has migrated off site in the TFA area, making it the area of greatest concern. I mapped the paleo-stream channels in the TFA area using SLICE an LLNL Auto-CADD routine. SLICE constructed 2D cross sections and sub-horizontal views of chemical, geophysical, and lithologic data sets. I interpreted these 2D views as a braided stream environment, delineating the edges of stream channels. The interpretations were extracted from Auto-CADD and placed into Earth Vision`s 3D modeling and viewing routines. Several 3D correlations have been generated, but no model has yet been chosen as a best fit.

  4. High Energy, Short Pulse Fiber Injection Lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2008-09-10

    A short pulse fiber injection laser for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This system produces 100 {micro}J pulses with 5 nm of bandwidth centered at 1053 nm. The pulses are stretched to 2.5 ns and have been recompressed to sub-ps pulse widths. A key feature of the system is that the pre-pulse power contrast ratio exceeds 80 dB. The system can also precisely adjust the final recompressed pulse width and timing and has been designed for reliable, hands free operation. The key challenges in constructing this system were control of the signal to noise ratio, dispersion management and managing the impact of self phase modulation on the chirped pulse.

  5. Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Federal Facility Compliance Act: Conceptual Site Treatment Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (the Act), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The Act requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the State or EPA for approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the Act and is being provided to California, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix 1.1 of this document. Please note that Appendix 1.1 appears as Appendix A, pages A-1 and A-2 in this document.

  7. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: 1986 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the environmental monitoring program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for 1986. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical pollutants in ambient air, soil, surface water, groundwater, vegetation, milk, foodstuff, and sewage effluents were made at both the Livermore site and nearby Site 300. This report was prepared to meet the requirements of DOE Order 5484.1. Evaluations are made of LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological releases to the environment. The data indicate that no releases in excess of the applicable standards were made during 1986, and that LLNL operations had no adverse environmental impact

  8. Mesocarnivore Surveys on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, H O; Smith, D A; Cypher, B L; Kelly, P A; Woollett, J S

    2004-11-16

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), operated under cooperative agreement between the University of California and the U. S. Department of Energy, administers and operates an approximately 11 mi{sup 2} (28 km{sup 2}) test site in the remote hills at the northern end of the South Coast Ranges of Central California (Figure 1). Known as Site 300, this expanse of rolling hills and canyons supports a diverse array of grassland communities typical of lowland central California. The facility serves a variety of functions related to testing non-nuclear explosives, lasers, and weapons subsystems. The primary purpose of this project was to determine the presence of any mesocarnivores on Site 300 that use the property for foraging, denning, and other related activities. The surveys occurred from mid-September to mid-October, 2002.

  9. Contingency plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's hazardous-waste operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has the necessary equipment and trained personnel to respond to a large number of hazardous material spills and fires or other emergencies resulting from these spills including injured personnel. This response capability is further expanded by the agreements that LLNL has with a number of outside response agencies. The Hazards Control Department at LLNL functions as the central point for coordinating the response of the equipment and personnel. Emergencies involving hazardous waste are also coordinated through the Hazards Control Department, but the equipment and personnel in the Toxic Waste Control Group would be activated for large volume waste pumpouts. Descriptions of response equipment, hazardous waste locations communication systems, and procedures for personnel involved in the emergency are provided

  10. Assessment of Eligibility to National Register of Historic Places Building 431 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, M A; Ullrich, R A

    2003-05-07

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to demolish the original sections of Building 431 at its main site in Livermore, California. As this action will constitute an undertaking within the regulatory constraints of the National Historic Preservation Act, LLNL arranged for an assessment of the building's historic significance. This report provides a brief history of the magnetic fusion energy research activities housed in Building 431 and a historic assessment of the building. The final recommendation of the report is that, although Building 431 housed some significant breakthroughs in accelerator technology and magnetic mirror plasma confinement, it lacks integrity for the periods of significance of those developments. It is, therefore, not eligible to the National Register of Historic Places.

  11. Environmental management assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA. LLNL is operated by the University of California (UC) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Major programs at LLNL include research, development, and test activities associated with the nuclear design aspects of the nuclear weapons life cycle and related national security tasks; inertial confinement fusion; magnetic fusion energy; biomedical and environmental research; laser isotope separation; energy-related research; beam research physics; and support to a variety of Defense and other Federal agencies. During this assessment, activities and records were reviewed and interviews were conducted with personnel from management and operating contractor, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; DOE Oakland Operations Office; and DOE Headquarters Program Offices, including the Office of Defense Programs, Office of Environmental Management, the Office of Nuclear Energy, and the Office of Energy Research. The onsite portion was conducted in June 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit. The goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission using systematic and periodic evaluations of DOE's environmental programs within line organizations, and through use of supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The Environmental Management Assessment of LLNL revealed that LLNL's environmental program is exemplary within the DOE complex and that all levels of LLNL management and staff consistently exhibit a high level of commitment to achieve environmental excellence

  12. A geografia histórico-cultural da Escola de Berkeley: um precursor ao surgimento da História Ambiental The Berkeley School's cultural-historical Geography: a precursor to Environmental History's emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Mathewson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available No decorrer das últimas três décadas, a história ambiental se tornou um subcampo reconhecido com seus próprios clássicos, um grande número de monografias notáveis, um fluxo contínuo de artigos publicados e mais do que mil pesquisadores ativos em vários continentes, incluindo uma comunidade crescente na América Latina. Um olhar para além dos limites disciplinares da história mostra que há também outras tradições que se enquadram perfeitamente na temática. A geografia histórico-cultural da Escola de Berkeley sob a égide de Carl Sauer talvez seja uma dessas perspectivas alternativas conhecidas. Muitos estudos de Sauer, seus alunos e colaboradores podem ser considerados pesquisas em história ambiental; muitas delas se baseiam em matérias sobre a América Latina. Neste artigo, procuramos traçar o desenvolvimento dessa corrente alternativa para a história ambiental que se iniciou com a tese de doutoramento de Carl Sauer em 1915 e se consolidou nos anos 50, tendo sua continuidade no presente através dos trabalhos de diversos geógrafos.Over the past three decades environmental history has become a recognized subfield, with a cannon of classics, many dozens of distinguished monographs, a steady flow of published articles, and more than one thousand active practitioners on several continents, including a growing cohort in Latin America. If one looks beyond history's disciplinary bounds, one finds other traditions that equally fit perfectly into the array of environmental history. Perhaps the broadest and deepest current is represented by Carl Sauer's Berkeley School of cultural-historical geography. Much of the work of Sauer, his students, and his associates, can be considered environmental history. Moreover, much of it is based on Latin American materials. In this paper, we trace the development of an alternative current within environmental history - one that began with Carl Sauer's doctoral dissertation in 1915, became well

  13. 75 FR 1010 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Clark, Floyd, Lawrence, Orange...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board CSX Transportation, Inc.--Discontinuance of Service Exemption--in Clark, Floyd, Lawrence, Orange, and Washington Counties, IN On December 18, 2009, CSX Transportation, Inc. (CSXT) filed with the Board a petition under...

  14. Immune functions in the Fisher rat fed beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) blubber from the contaminated St. Lawrence estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapierre, P.; Guise, S. De [Univ. du Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. des Sciences Biologiques; Muir, D.C.G. [Freshwater Inst., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Norstrom, R. [Environment Canada, Hull, Quebec (Canada); Beland, P. [St. Lawrence National Inst. of Ecotoxicology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Fournier, M. [Univ. du Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. des Sciences Biologiques]|[INRS-Sante, Pointe-Claire, Quebec (Canada)]|[IML, Mont Joli, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans

    1999-02-01

    In order to assess the immunotoxic potential of food naturally contaminated with PCBs and other organohalogens, Fisher rats were fed a diet in which the lipids originated from the blubber of either a highly polluted St. Lawrence beluga or a relatively uncontaminated Arctic beluga. After a period of 2 months, different immune functions were evaluated, including lymphoblastic transformation, natural killer cell activity, plaque-forming cells, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and immunophenotyping. For all assays, rats fed at St. Lawrence beluga blubber diet or a mixture of Arctic and St. Lawrence beluga blubber diet were not different from control rats fed a diet containing Arctic beluga blubber. These results are inconsistent with the well-known immunosuppressive effects of organochlorines in numerous species and with the lesions suggestive of organochlorine-related immunosuppression that are observed in St. Lawrence belugas. The lack of observable immunotoxic effects in rats fed contaminated beluga blubber might be explained by antagonistic effects in the organohalogen mixture, by a response specific to the rat, by a strain-related lack of sensitivity to organochlorines, or by insufficient dose due to the shortness of the exposure period or the route of exposure.

  15. 75 FR 8428 - The Indiana Rail Road Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Martin and Lawrence Counties, IN; CSX...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... Mayor; Douglas England, City of New Albany Mayor; David Branneman, Lawrence County Tourism Commission... posted on the Board's Web site. This action will not significantly affect either the quality of the human environment or the conservation of energy resources. Dated: February 18, 2010. By the Board, Rachel...

  16. A practical MRI grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee: Association with Kellgren–Lawrence radiographic scores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To propose a reproducible and constant MR grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee joint that provides high interobserver and intraoberver agreement and that does not require complicated calculation procedures. Materials and methods: This retrospective study sample included 44 men and 65 women who underwent both MRI and plain radiography of the knee at our institution. All patients were older than 50 years of age (mean 57.7) and had clinically suspected osteoarthritis of the knee. The standard of 4 grades on the MR grade scale was based mainly on cartilage injury and additional findings. Kellgren–Lawrence grades were assessed for the same patient group. The relationship between the results was determined. Statistical analyses were performed including kappa statistics, categorical regression analysis and nonparametric correlation analysis. Results: The interobserver and intraoberver agreements between the two readers in the grading of osteoarthritis were found to be almost perfect. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements were slightly lower for the MR grading system than for the Kellgren–Lawrence grading scale. The correlation between the MR grade and Kellgren–Lawrence grade was very high and did not differ with patient age. The MR grades were highly correlated with the Kellgren–Lawrence grades and showed excellent interobserver and intraobserver agreements. Conclusion: This new MR grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee joint is reproducible and may be helpful for the grading of osteoarthritis of the knee without requiring reference to plain radiography

  17. A practical MRI grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee: Association with Kellgren–Lawrence radiographic scores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee-Jin, E-mail: parkhiji@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, #108 Pyung-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Baengnyeong-ro 156, Chuncheon-Si, Gangwon-Do Kangwon National University Hospital 200-722 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo, E-mail: samskim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Baengnyeong-ro 156, Chuncheon-Si, Gangwon-Do Kangwon National University Hospital 200-722 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So-Yeon, E-mail: parkhiji@kwandong.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, #108 Pyung-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Noh-Hyuck, E-mail: nhpark904@kwandong.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, 697-24 Hwajung-dong, Dukyang-ku, Koyang, Kyunggi 412-270 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji-Yeon, E-mail: zzzz3@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, 697-24 Hwajung-dong, Dukyang-ku, Koyang, Kyunggi 412-270 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoon-Jung, E-mail: yoonchoi99@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, #108 Pyung-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyun-Jun, E-mail: ostrich-13@hanmail.net [Department of Occupational Medicine, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, 194 Dongsan-Dong, Jung-ku, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To propose a reproducible and constant MR grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee joint that provides high interobserver and intraoberver agreement and that does not require complicated calculation procedures. Materials and methods: This retrospective study sample included 44 men and 65 women who underwent both MRI and plain radiography of the knee at our institution. All patients were older than 50 years of age (mean 57.7) and had clinically suspected osteoarthritis of the knee. The standard of 4 grades on the MR grade scale was based mainly on cartilage injury and additional findings. Kellgren–Lawrence grades were assessed for the same patient group. The relationship between the results was determined. Statistical analyses were performed including kappa statistics, categorical regression analysis and nonparametric correlation analysis. Results: The interobserver and intraoberver agreements between the two readers in the grading of osteoarthritis were found to be almost perfect. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements were slightly lower for the MR grading system than for the Kellgren–Lawrence grading scale. The correlation between the MR grade and Kellgren–Lawrence grade was very high and did not differ with patient age. The MR grades were highly correlated with the Kellgren–Lawrence grades and showed excellent interobserver and intraobserver agreements. Conclusion: This new MR grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee joint is reproducible and may be helpful for the grading of osteoarthritis of the knee without requiring reference to plain radiography.

  18. 46 CFR 401.405 - Basic rates and charges on the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... affecting § 401.405, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... Lake Ontario. 401.405 Section 401.405 Shipping COAST GUARD (GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE), DEPARTMENT OF... § 401.405 Basic rates and charges on the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. Except as provided...

  19. Lawrence Lessig, The architecture of access to scientific knowledge: just how badly we have messed this up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Pievatolo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available E’ una conferenza tenuta da Lawrence Lessig al Cern di Ginevra il 18 aprile di quest’anno. Il suo video è disponibile presso il Cern Document Server; a partire da qui si possono trovare i sottotitoli in inglese e in altre lingue, compresa quella italiana. Lessig esordisce proponendo due impressioni. La prima è un effetto chiamato [...

  20. Radiographic evaluation of posttraumatic osteoarthritis of the ankle : The Kellgren-Lawrence scale is reliable and correlates with clinical symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzer, N.; Salvo, D.; Marijnissen, A. C A; Vincken, K. L.; Ahmad, A. C.; Serra, E.; Hoffmeyer, P.; Stern, R.; Lübbeke, A.; Assal, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess reliability and construct validity of the Kellgren-Lawrence (K&L) scale in posttraumatic ankle osteoarthritis (OA); additionally evaluate the validity of including tibiotalar tilting in the scale. Method: One-hundred and fifty ankle radiographs (75 patients, unilateral malleolar

  1. Berkeley Supernova Ia Program I: Observations, Data Reduction, and Spectroscopic Sample of 582 Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Filippenko, Alexei V; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Barth, Aaron J; Chornock, Ryan; Griffith, Christopher V; Kong, Jason J; Lee, Nicholas; Leonard, Douglas C; Matheson, Thomas; Miller, Emily G; Steele, Thea N; Barris, Brian J; Bloom, Joshua S; Cobb, Bethany E; Coil, Alison L; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Gates, Elinor L; Ho, Luis C; Jha, Saurabh W; Kandrashoff, Michael T; Li, Weidong; Mandel, Kaisey S; Modjaz, Maryam; Moore, Matthew R; Mostardi, Robin E; Papenkova, Marina S; Park, Sung; Perley, Daniel A; Poznanski, Dovi; Reuter, Cassie A; Scala, James; Serduke, Franklin J D; Shields, Joseph C; Swift, Brandon J; Tonry, John L; Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wong, Diane S

    2012-01-01

    In this first paper in a series we present 1298 low-redshift (z < 0.2) optical spectra of 582 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed from 1989 through 2008 as part of the Berkeley SN Ia Program (BSNIP). 584 spectra of 199 SNe Ia have well-calibrated light curves with measured distance moduli, and many of the spectra have been corrected for host-galaxy contamination. Most of the data were obtained using the Kast double spectrograph mounted on the Shane 3 m telescope at Lick Observatory and have a typical wavelength range of 3300-10,400 Ang., roughly twice as wide as spectra from most previously published datasets. We present our observing and reduction procedures, and we describe the resulting SN Database (SNDB), which will be an online, public, searchable database containing all of our fully reduced spectra and companion photometry. In addition, we discuss our spectral classification scheme (using the SuperNova IDentification code, SNID; Blondin & Tonry 2007), utilizing our newly constructed set of SNID ...

  2. Final Report for the Arroyo Las Positas Maintenance Impact Study, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Hattem, M; Paterson, L

    2006-01-12

    In 2000, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Environmental Protection Department, in coordination with Plant Engineering (PE), began dredging sections of the Arroyo Las Positas (ALP) to alleviate concerns about flooding of sensitive facilities within the mainsite of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In order to reduce potential impacts on the federally threatened California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii), LLNL proposed to dredge sections of the ALP in a ''checkerboard pattern'', resulting in a mosaic of open water habitat and vegetated sections (Figure 1). The Arroyo Las Positas Management Plan (Plan) was coordinated with both state and federal agencies including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), California Department of Fish and Game (CDF&G), San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board (SFRWQCB), and the Army Corp of Engineers (ACOE). Water Discharge Requirements (WDRs) were issued for this project on December 30, 1999 (Order No. 99-086) by the SFRWQCB. Provision 19 of the WDRs outlined a five-year (2000 through 2004) Maintenance Impact Study (MIS) that LLNL began in coordination with dredging work that was conducted as part of the Arroyo Las Positas Management Plan. Provision 20 of these WDRs requires LLNL to submit a final report of the results of the Maintenance Impact Study for this project to the SFRWQCB. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the Maintenance Impact Study for Arroyo Las Positas and meet the requirements of Provision 20. A description of the annual monitoring included in this Maintenance Impact Study is included in the methods section of this report. Initially the Plan called for dredging the entire length of the Arroyo Las Positas (approximately 6,981 linear feet) over a 5-year period to minimize temporal impacts on the California red-legged frog. Dredging occurred in 2000 ({approx}1,300 ft.), 2001 ({approx}800 ft.), and 2002 ({approx}1,200 ft.), which

  3. DISCURSO E VERDADE: SEIS CONFERÊNCIAS DADAS POR MICHEL FOUCAULT, EM BERKELEY, ENTRE OUTUBRO E NOVEMBRO DE 1983, SOBRE A PARRHESIA - APRESENTAÇÃO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Os Editores da Prometeus

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho é a tradução, produzida pela equipe de tradutores daPrometeus, de O Discurso e a Verdade: a problematização da parrhesia, seisconferências de Michel Foucault proferidas em inglês na Universidade daCalifórnia, em Berkeley, entre outubro e novembro de 1983. A transcrição que nosserviu de base para a tradução foi editada em inglês em 1985 por Joseph Pearson ecompilada a partir das gravações das conferências, disponíveis para download no sítiodo Media Resources Center da Moffitt Library (UC Berkeley1. Essa transcrição foireeditada em 1999 por www.repb.net.

  4. An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Sandia National Laboratories/California, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 Experimental Test Site and Surrounding Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerial radiological surveys were conducted during February 10 to 17, 1998, over two areas near Livermore and Tracy, California. Three sites of interest were covered in the two survey areas. One survey area included 29.5 square kilometers (11.4 square miles)located on the eastern edge of Livermore, California, encompassing the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories/California. The other survey area included 62.1 square kilometers (24 square miles) located approximately 5 kilometers (3 miles) southwest of Tracy, California, encompassing the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 Experimental Test Site. These surveys were conducted by the U. S. Department of Energy's Remote Sensing Laboratory located in Las Vegas, Nevada, and maintained and operated by Bechtel Nevada

  5. Workplace investigation of increased diagnosis of malignant melanoma among employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, D.H. II; Patterson, H.W.; Hatch, F.; Discher, D.; Schneider, J.S.; Bennett, D.

    1994-08-01

    Based on rates for the surrounding communities, the diagnosis rate of malignant melanoma for employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 1972 to 1977 was three to four times higher than expected. In 1984 Austin and Reynolds concluded, as a result of a case-control study, that five occupational factors were {open_quotes}causally associated{close_quotes} with melanoma risk at LLNL. These factors were: (1) exposure to radioactive materials, (2) work at Site 300, (3) exposure to volatile photographic chemicals, (4) presence at the Pacific Test Site, and (5) chemist duties. Subsequent reviews of the Austin and Reynolds report concluded that the methods used were appropriate and correctly carried out. These reports did determine, however, that Austin and Reynolds` conclusion concerning a causal relationship between occupational factors and melanoma among employees was overstated. There is essentially no supporting evidence linking the occupational factors with melanoma from animal studies or human epidemiology. Our report summarizes the results of further investigation of potential occupational factors.

  6. Cost-benefit analysis for waste segregation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a cost-benefit analysis for the segregation of mixed, hazardous, and nonhazardous wastes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The cost-benefit analysis was conducted to determine if current waste segregation practices and additional candidates for waste segregation at LLNL might have the potential for significant waste source reduction and annual savings in treatment and disposal costs. In the following cost-benefit analysis, capital costs and recurring costs of waste segregation practices are compared to the economic benefits of savings in treatment and disposal costs. Indirect or overhead costs associated with these wastes are not available and have not been included. Not considered are additional benefits of waste segregation such as decreased potential for liability to LLNL for adverse environmental effects, improved worker safety, and enhanced LLNL image within the community because of environmental improvement. The economic evaluations in this report are presented on a Lab-wide basis. All hazardous wastes generated by a program are turned over to the Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) group, which is responsible for the storage, treatment, or disposal of these wastes and funded funded directly for this work

  7. Mixed waste study, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document addresses the generation and storage of mixed waste at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from 1984 to 1990. Additionally, an estimate of remaining storage capacity based on the current inventory of low-level mixed waste and an approximation of current generation rates is provided. Section 2 of this study presents a narrative description of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DOE) requirements as they apply to mixed waste in storage at LLNL's Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities. Based on information collected from the HWM non-TRU radioactive waste database, Section 3 presents a data consolidation -- by year of storage, location, LLNL generator, EPA code, and DHS code -- of the quantities of low-level mixed waste in storage. Related figures provide the distribution of mixed waste according to each of these variables. A historical review follows in Section 4. The trends in type and quantity of mixed waste managed by HWM during the past five years are delineated and graphically illustrated. Section 5 provides an estimate of remaining low-level mixed waste storage capacity at HWM. The estimate of remaining mixed waste storage capacity is based on operational storage capacity of HWM facilities and the volume of all waste currently in storage. An estimate of the time remaining to reach maximum storage capacity is based on waste generation rates inferred from the HWM database and recent HWM documents. 14 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs

  8. Delineation of Waters of the United States for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R E

    2006-09-25

    This report presents the results of a delineation of waters of the United States, including wetlands, for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, California. Jones & Stokes mapped vegetation at Site 300 in August, 2001, using Global Positioning System (GPS) data recorders to collect point locations and to record linear features and map unit polygons. We identified wetlands boundaries in the field on the basis of the plant community present. We returned to collect additional information on wetland soils on July 3, 2002. Forty-six wetlands were identified, with a total area of 3.482 hectares (8.605 acres). The wetlands include vernal pools, freshwater seeps, and seasonal ponds. Wetlands appearing to meet the criteria for federal jurisdictional total 1.776 hectares (4.388 acres). A delineation map is presented and a table is provided with information on the type, size, characteristic plant species of each wetland, and a preliminary jurisdictional assessment.

  9. Arroyo Mocho Boulder Removal Project: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hetch Hetchy Pump Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, L; Kato, T; Van Hattem, M

    2007-06-28

    The purpose of this biological assessment is to review the proposed Arroyo Mocho Boulder Removal Project in sufficient detail to determine to what extent the proposed action may affect any of the threatened, endangered, proposed, or sensitive species and designated or proposed critical habitats listed below. In addition, the following information is provided to comply with statutory requirements to use the best scientific and commercial information available when assessing the risks posed to listed and/or proposed species and designated and/or proposed critical habitat by proposed federal actions. This biological assessment is prepared in accordance with legal requirements set forth under regulations implementing Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act (50 CFR 402; 16 U.S.C 1536 (c)). It is our desire for the Arroyo Mocho Boulder Removal Project to receive incidental take coverage for listed species and critical habitat within the greater project area by means of amending the previous formal Section 7 consultation (1-1-04-F-0086) conducted a few hundred meters downstream by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in 2002. All conservation measures, terms and conditions, and reporting requirements from the previous Biological Opinion (1-1-04-F-0086) have been adopted for this Biological Assessment and/or amendment.

  10. Summary Report of Summer 2009 NGSI Human Capital Development Efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougan, A; Dreicer, M; Essner, J; Gaffney, A; Reed, J; Williams, R

    2009-11-16

    In 2009, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engaged in several activities to support NA-24's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). This report outlines LLNL's efforts to support Human Capital Development (HCD), one of five key components of NGSI managed by Dunbar Lockwood in the Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243). There were five main LLNL summer safeguards HCD efforts sponsored by NGSI: (1) A joint Monterey Institute of International Studies/Center for Nonproliferation Studies-LLNL International Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis Course; (2) A Summer Safeguards Policy Internship Program at LLNL; (3) A Training in Environmental Sample Analysis for IAEA Safeguards Internship; (4) Safeguards Technology Internships; and (5) A joint LLNL-INL Summer Safeguards Lecture Series. In this report, we provide an overview of these five initiatives, an analysis of lessons learned, an update on the NGSI FY09 post-doc, and an update on students who participated in previous NGSI-sponsored LLNL safeguards HCD efforts.

  11. National strategic challenges and the role of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Chrzanowski, P.L.; Werne, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    The end of the Cold War was a water-shed event in history--an event that calls for re-evaluation of the basic assumptions and priorities of US national security that have gone essentially unchallenged for nearly 50 years. Central to this re-evaluation are the changing needs for federal Science and Technology (S and T) investment to underpin national and economic security and the role of the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories in fulfilling those needs. The three nuclear weapons laboratories-Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL)-are major constituents of DOE`s national laboratory system. They helped win the Cold War, and will undoubtedly continue to support US security S and T requirements. This paper discusses of the role these three laboratories, and LLNL in particular, can play in supporting the nation`s S and T priorities. The paper also highlights some of the changes that are necessary for the laboratories to effectively support the national S and T and economic competitiveness agenda. These issues are important to DOE and laboratory managers responsible for the development of strategic direction and implementation plans.

  12. Assessment and cleanup of the Taxi Strip waste storage area at LLNL [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In September 1982 the Hazards Control Department of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began a final radiological survey of a former low-level radioactive waste storage area called the Taxi Strip so that the area could be released for construction of an office building. Collection of soil samples at the location of a proposed sewer line led to the discovery of an old disposal pit containing soil contaminated with low-level radioactive waste and organic solvents. The Taxi Strip area was excavated leading to the discovery of three additional small pits. The clean-up of Pit No. 1 is considered to be complete for radioactive contamination. The results from the chlorinated solvent analysis of the borehole samples and the limited number of samples analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry indicate that solvent clean-up at this pit is complete. This is being verified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of a few additional soil samples from the bottom sides and ends of the pit. As a precaution, samples are also being analyzed for metals to determine if further excavation is necessary. Clean-up of Pits No. 2 and No. 3 is considered to be complete for radioactive and solvent contamination. Results of analysis for metals will determine if excavation is complete. Excavation of Pit No. 4 which resulted from surface leakage of radioactive contamination from an evaporation tray is complete

  13. Design of ground water remediation control systems at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is operated for the Department of Energy by the University of California. In 1987, the LLNL Livermore site was placed on the National Priorities List based on the presence of volatile organic components (VOCs) in ground water. By late 1999, LLNL will have completed the build-up phase of its remediation program with plans calling for nine treatment facilities. At least three more facilities will be operating at Site 300, LLNL's high explosive test area. Control systems for all treatment facilities are required to be highly reliable, robust, and verifiable. The systems must also allow for adaptable process configurations to provide for occasional process changes due to component failures, well field management, and remediation experiments and special measurements. They must be designed to maximize the efficiency of maintenance support over their lifetime. The facility control systems are being integrated into the established Environmental Restoration Division networking and database systems. LLNL engineers have combined object oriented modeling and design methods, rigorous validation and verification procedures, human factors engineering, and application of standard instrumentation and software to produce systems that meet these requirements and that can be efficiently duplicated at all LLNL treatment facilities. Significant savings in implementation, testing, and maintenance costs are expected using the methods described

  14. Site safety plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations at site 300. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilmer, J.

    1997-08-01

    Various Department of Energy Orders incorporate by reference, health and safety regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). One of the OSHA regulations, 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, requires that site safety plans are written for activities such as those covered by work plans for Site 300 environmental investigations. Based upon available data, this Site Safety Plan (Plan) for environmental restoration has been prepared specifically for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, located approximately 15 miles east of Livermore, California. As additional facts, monitoring data, or analytical data on hazards are provided, this Plan may need to be modified. It is the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration Program and Division (ERD) Site Safety Officer (SSO), with the assistance of Hazards Control, to evaluate data which may impact health and safety during these activities and to modify the Plan as appropriate. This Plan is not `cast-in-concrete.` The SSO shall have the authority, with the concurrence of Hazards Control, to institute any change to maintain health and safety protection for workers at Site 300.

  15. Update of Earthquake Strong-Motion Instrumentation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Robert C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Following the January 1980 earthquake that was felt at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a network of strong-motion accelerographs was installed at LLNL. Prior to the 1980 earthquake, there were no accelerographs installed. The ground motion from the 1980 earthquake was estimated from USGS instruments around the Laboratory to be between 0.2 – 0.3 g horizontal peak ground acceleration. These instruments were located at the Veterans Hospital, 5 miles southwest of LLNL, and in San Ramon, about 12 miles west of LLNL. In 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) requested to know the status of our seismic instruments. We conducted a survey of our instrumentation systems and responded to DOE in a letter. During this survey, it was found that the recorders in Buildings 111 and 332 were not operational. The instruments on Nova had been removed, and only three of the 10 NIF instruments installed in 2005 were operational (two were damaged and five had been removed from operation at the request of the program). After the survey, it was clear that the site seismic instrumentation had degraded substantially and would benefit from an overhaul and more attention to ongoing maintenance. LLNL management decided to update the LLNL seismic instrumentation system. The updated system is documented in this report.

  16. Mitigation Monitoring Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory FY00 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcguff, R R

    2003-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has completed eight years of implementing the mitigation measures from the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) for the Continued Operation of LLNL and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Livermore. This eighth annual report documents LLNL's implementation of the mitigation measures during the fiscal year ending September 30, 2000 (FY00). It provides background information on the mitigation measures, describes activities undertaken during FY00, and documents changes in the monitoring program. Table 1 on page 12, provides a numerical listing of each mitigation measure, the department responsible for implementing it, and the location within this report where the status is discussed. The discussion of the mitigation measures is organized by the University of California (UC)'s three categories of approaches to implementation: project-specific, service-level and administrative. Table 2 on page 19, Table 6 on page 55, and Table 7 on page 63 provide a detailed discussion of each mitigation measure, including LLNL's implementation strategy and the status as of the end of the fiscal year. Table 3 on page 37, Table 4 on page 46, and Table 5 on page 47 list each construction project undertaken in FY00 and the mitigation measures implemented.

  17. Construction quality assurance for Pit 6 landfill closure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-30

    Golder Construction Services, Inc. (GCS), under contract to the Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), provided the construction quality assurance (CQA) observation and testing during the construction of the Site 300, Pit 6 landfill closure cover. The cap construction was performed as a CERCLA non-time-critical removal action from June 2 to August 29, 1997. the project site is located 18 miles east of Livermore on Tesla Road and approximately 10 miles southwest of Tracy on Corral Hollow Road in San Joaquin County, California. This report certifies that the LLNL, Site 300, Pit 6, Landfill Closure was constructed in accordance with the construction specifications and design drawings. This report documents construction activities and CQA monitoring and testing for construction of the Pit 6 Landfill Closure. Golder Associates, Inc. of Oakland, California was the design engineering firm responsible for preparation of the drawings and specifications. CQA services were provided by GCS, of Roseville, California, under supervision of a California registered civil Engineer.

  18. Cancer risks from soil emissions of volatile organic compounds at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibley, V. R., LLNL

    1998-02-01

    The emission isolation flux chamber (EIFC) methodology was applied to Superfund investigations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 to determine if on-site workers were exposed to VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface and what, if any, health risks could be attributed to the inhalation of the VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface. During July and August of 1996, twenty, eighteen, and twenty six VOC soil vapor flux samples were collected in the Building 830, 832, and 854 areas, respectively using EIFCS. The VOC concentrations in the vapor samples were used to calculate soil flux rates which were used as input into an air dispersion model to calculate ambient air exposure-point concentrations. The exposure-point concentrations were compared to EPA Region IX Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs). Buildings 830 and 832 exposure-point concentrations were less then the PRGs therefore no cancer risks were calculated. The cancer risks for Building 854 ranged from 1.6 x 10{sup -7} to 2.1 x 10{sup -6}. The resultant inhalation cancer risks were all within the acceptable range, implying that on-site workers were not exposed to VOC vapors volatilizing from the subsurface soil that could have significant cancer risks. Therefore remediation in these areas would not be necessary.

  19. Final Safety Analysis Document for Building 693 Chemical Waste Storage Building at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Analysis Document (SAD) for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Building 693, Chemical Waste Storage Building (desipated as Building 693 Container Storage Unit in the Laboratory's RCRA Part B permit application), provides the necessary information and analyses to conclude that Building 693 can be operated at low risk without unduly endangering the safety of the building operating personnel or adversely affecting the public or the environment. This Building 693 SAD consists of eight sections and supporting appendices. Section 1 presents a summary of the facility designs and operations and Section 2 summarizes the safety analysis method and results. Section 3 describes the site, the facility desip, operations and management structure. Sections 4 and 5 present the safety analysis and operational safety requirements (OSRs). Section 6 reviews Hazardous Waste Management's (HWM) Quality Assurance (QA) program. Section 7 lists the references and background material used in the preparation of this report Section 8 lists acronyms, abbreviations and symbols. Appendices contain supporting analyses, definitions, and descriptions that are referenced in the body of this report

  20. Screening Program Reduced Melanoma Mortality at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1984-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, MD, J S; II, PhD, D; MD, PhD, M

    2006-10-12

    Worldwide incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma has increased substantially, and no screening program has yet demonstrated reduction in mortality. We evaluated the education, self examination and targeted screening campaign at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from its beginning in July 1984 through 1996. The thickness and crude incidence of melanoma from the years before the campaign were compared to those obtained during the 13 years of screening. Melanoma mortality during the 13-year period was based on a National Death Index search. Expected yearly deaths from melanoma among LLNL employees were calculated by using California mortality data matched by age, sex, and race/ethnicity and adjusted to exclude deaths from melanoma diagnosed before the program began or before employment at LLNL. After the program began, crude incidence of melanoma thicker than 0.75 mm decreased from 18 to 4 cases per 100,000 person-years (p = 0.02), while melanoma less than 0.75mm remained stable and in situ melanoma increased substantially. No eligible melanoma deaths occurred among LLNL employees during the screening period compared with a calculated 3.39 expected deaths (p = 0.034). Education, self examination and selective screening for melanoma at LLNL significantly decreased incidence of melanoma thicker than 0.75 mm and reduced the melanoma-related mortality rate to zero. This significant decrease in mortality rate persisted for at least 3 yr after employees retired or otherwise left the laboratory.

  1. Building an internet-based workflow system - the case of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` Zephyr project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, C. W., LLNL

    1998-04-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` Zephyr System provides a showcase for the ways in which emerging technologies can help streamline procurement processes and improve the coordination between participants in engineering projects by allowing collaboration in ways that have not been possible before. The project also shows the success of a highly pragmatic approach that was initiated by the end user community, and that intentionally covered standard situations, rather than aiming at also automating the exceptions. By helping push purchasing responsibilities down to the end user, thereby greatly reducing the involvement of the purchasing department in operational activities, it was possible to streamline the process significantly resulting in time savings of up to 90%, major cost reductions, and improved quality. Left with less day-to- day purchasing operations, the purchasing department has more time for strategic tasks such as selecting and pre-qualifying new suppliers, negotiating blanket orders, or implementing new procurement systems. The case shows once more that the use of information technologies can result in major benefits when aligned with organizational adjustments.

  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation program: laser technology and demonstration facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing a large-scale process for photophysically enriching isotopes of several elements. The program now deploys plant prototypical hardware to demonstrate this enrichment process at full scale. The Laser Demonstration Facility, a fully integrated laser system has been constructed and when complete will produce more than 5000 W of tunable average power at a pulse repetition frequency >10 kHz. In AVLIS, an atomic vapor of mixed isotopes is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to photoionize only desired isotopes. The resulting electrically charged photoions are deflected in an electric field to collector (or extractor) plates where they condense as enriched products. The AVLIS laser system consists of a series of high-average-power dye lasers optically pumped by an array of copper lasers. The dye lasers are used to do the three-step photoionization process. These lasers are well suited for the AVLIS process for both technical and economic reasons. They provide the precise narrowband (<100-MHz), short-pulse (<100-nsec), high-average-power, high-repetition-frequency laser light required by the atomic spectroscopy and vapor flow properties. Equally important, the capital and operating costs of this laser system in its present state of development are consistent with a commercially viable process deployment

  3. Environmental assessment for the electric utility system distribution, replacements and upgrades at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Environmental Assessment evaluates the environmental effects resulting from the distribution of new electrical service, replacement of inadequate or aging equipment, and upgrade of the existing electrical utility system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The projects assessed herein do not impact cultural or historic resources, sensitive habitats or wetlands and are not a source of air emissions. The potential environmental effects that do result from the action are fugitive dust and noise from construction and the disposal of potentially contaminated soil removed from certain limited areas of the LLNL site as a result of trenching for underground transmission lines. The actions described in this assessment represent an improved safety and reliability to the existing utility system. Inherent in the increased reliability and upgrades is a net increase in electrical capacity, with future expansion reserve. As with any electrical device, the electrical utility system has associated electric and magnetic fields that present a potential source of personnel exposure. The potential is not increased, however, beyond that which already exists for the present electrical utility system

  4. A Comparison between Local and Global Spaceborne Chlorophyll Indices in the St. Lawrence Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A. Montes-Hugo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Spaceborne chlorophyll indices based on red fluorescence (wavelength = 680 nm and water leaving radiance (Lw in the visible spectrum (i.e., 400–700 nm were evaluated in the St Lawrence Estuary (SLE during September of 2011. Relationships between chlorophyll concentration (chl and fluorescence were constructed based on fluorescence line height (FLH measurements derived from a compact laser-based spectrofluorometer developed by ENEA (CASPER and using spectral bands corresponding to the satellite sensor MERIS (MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer. Chlorophyll concentration as estimated from CASPER (chlCASPER was relatively high NE of the MTZ (upper Estuary, and nearby areas influenced by fronts or freshwater plumes derived from secondary rivers (lower estuary. These findings agree with historical shipboard measurements. In general, global chl products calculated from Lw had large biases (up to 27-fold overestimation and 50-fold underestimation with respect to chlCASPER values. This was attributed to the smaller interference of detritus (mineral + organic non-living particulates and chromophoric dissolved organic matter on chlCASPER estimates. We encourage the use of spectrofluorometry for developing and validating remote sensing models of chl in SLE waters and other coastal environments characterized by relatively low to moderate (<10 g·m−3 concentrations of detritus.

  5. Special-Status Plant Species Surveys and Vegetation Mapping at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R E

    2006-10-03

    This report presents the results of Jones & Stokes special-status plant surveys and vegetation mapping for the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Special-status plant surveys were conducted at Site 300 in April to May 1997 and in March to April 2002. Eight special-status plants were identified at Site 300: large-flowered fiddleneck, big tarplant, diamond-petaled poppy, round-leaved filaree, gypsum-loving larkspur, California androsace, stinkbells, and hogwallow starfish. Maps identifying the locations of these species, a discussion of the occurrence of these species at Site 300, and a checklist of the flora of Site 300 are presented. A reconnaissance survey of the LLNL Livermore Site was conducted in June 2002. This survey concluded that no special-status plants occur at the Livermore Site. Vegetation mapping was conducted in 2001 at Site 300 to update a previous vegetation study done in 1986. The purpose of the vegetation mapping was to update and to delineate more precisely the boundaries between vegetation types and to map vegetation types that previously were not mapped. The vegetation map is presented with a discussion of the vegetation classification used.

  6. AN INTRODUCTION TO EXPLORING LAW, DISABILITY, AND THE CHALLENGE OF EQUALITY IN CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES: PAPERS FROM THE BERKELEY SYMPOSIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laverne Jacobs

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It brings me great pleasure to write this Introduction to Exploring Law, Disability, and the Challenge of Equality in Canada and the United States. This special collection of articles in the Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice [WYAJ] stems from a symposium of the same name held at the Berkeley Law School at the University of California on 5 December 2014. Writing this introduction allows me to bring together my identities as a law and disability scholar, the principal organizer and convener of the Berkeley Symposium, and editor-in-chief of the WYAJ. In these roles, I have had the opportunity to engage with this set of articles and their authors in a distinct way – from the early versions of these articles through to the final peer-reviewed publications. The Berkeley Symposium is the first conference, of which we are aware, to bring together scholars and experts from both Canada and the United States to present research and exchange ideas on equality issues affecting persons with disabilities in both countries.1 Each academic was invited to write about an equality issue of their choice that is of contemporary concern to persons with disabilities, and to focus on Canada, the United States,or both, at their  option. The result is a set of articles that is simultaneously introspective and comparative.

  7. Assessing potential impacts of climate change and variability on the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin: A binational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential impacts of climate change and variability on the Great Lakes environment are serious and complex. The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin is home to 42.5 million US and Canadian citizens and is the industrial and commercial heartland of both nations. The region is rich in human and natural resources, with diverse economic activities and substantial infrastructure which would be affected by major shifts in climate. For example, water level changes could affect wetland distribution and functioning; reductions in streamflow would alter assimilative capacities while warmer water temperatures would influence spring and fall turnover and incidence of anoxia. A binational program has been initiated to conduct interdisciplinary, integrated impact assessments for the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin. The goal of this program is to undertake interdisciplinary, integrated studies to improve the understanding of the complex interactions between climate, the environment, and socioeconomic systems in order to develop informed regional adaptation responses

  8. Polarimetry of comets 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, 74P/Smirnova-Chernykh, and 152P/Helin-Lawrence

    CERN Document Server

    Stinson, A; Tozzi, G P; Boehnhardt, H; Protopapa, S; Kolokolova, L; Muinonen, K; Jones, G H

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Polarimetric characteristics of comets at large heliocentric distances is a relatively unexplored area; we extend the idea by adding and analysing the data for three Jupiter family comets (JFCs). Methods. With the FORS2 instrument of the ESO VLT, we performed quasi-simultaneous photometry and polarimetry of three active JFCs 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, 74P/Smirnova-Chernykh, and 152P/Helin-Lawrence. Results. We obtained in total 23 polarimetric measurements at different epochs, covering a phase-angle range ~1 -16 degrees and heliocentric distances from 3 to 4.6 au. From our observations we obtained both colour and polarimetric maps to look for structures in the comae and tails of the comets. Conclusions. 74P/Smirnova-Chernykh and 152P/Helin-Lawrence exhibit enough activity at large heliocentric distances to be detectable in polarimetric measurements. Polarimetric and colour maps indicate no evidence of dust particle

  9. Out-of-band exposure characterization with the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA microfield exposure tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Simi A.; Nauleau, Patrick; Rekawa, Senajith; Gullikson, Eric; Kemp, Charles D.

    2009-02-23

    For the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), discharge or laser produced, pulsed plasma light sources are being considered. These sources are known to emit into a broad range of wavelengths that are collectively referred to as the out-of-band (OOB) radiation by lithographers. Multilayer EUV optics reflect OOB radiation emitted by the EUV sources onto the wafer plane resulting in unwanted background exposure of the resist (flare) and reduced image contrast. The reflectivity of multilayer optics at the target wavelength of 13.5 nm is comparable to that of their reflectivity in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) and UV regions from 100-350 nm. The aromatic molecular backbones of many of the resists used for EUV are equally absorptive at specific DUV wavelengths as well. In order to study the effect of these wavelengths on imaging performance in a real system, we are in the process of integrating a DUV source into the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA Microfield Exposure Tool (MET). The MET plays an active role in advanced research in resist and mask development for EUVL and as such, we will utilize this system to systematically evaluate the imaging impact of DUV wavelengths in a EUV system. In this paper, we present the optical design for the new DUV component and the simulation-based imaging results predicting the potential impact of OOB based on known resist, mask, and multilayer conditions. It should be noted that because the projection optics work equally well as imaging optics at DUV wavelengths, the OOB radiation cannot be treated simply as uniform background or DC flare.

  10. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): Quinquennial report, November 14-15, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tweed, J.

    1996-10-01

    This Quinquennial Review Report of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) branch of the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) provides an overview of IGPP-LLNL, its mission, and research highlights of current scientific activities. This report also presents an overview of the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), a summary of the UCRP Fiscal Year 1997 proposal process and the project selection list, a funding summary for 1993-1996, seminars presented, and scientific publications. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. A case-control study of malignant melanoma among Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory employees: A critical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reports on a reevaluation of data obtained in a previous report on occupational factors associated with the development of malignant melanomas at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The current report reduces the number of these factors from five to three based on a rigorous statistical analysis of the original data. Recommendations include restructuring the original questionnaire and trying to contact more individuals that worked with volatile photographic chemicals. 17 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs

  12. Boltzmann equation for fluctuation Cooper pairs in Lawrence-Doniach model. Possible out-of-plane negative differential conductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Mishonov, Todor M.; Maneva, Yana G.

    2006-01-01

    The differential conductivity for the out-of-plane transport in layered cuprates is calculated for Lawrence-Doniach model in the framework of time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) theory. The TDGL equation for the superconducting order parameter is solved in the presence of Langevin external noise, describing the birth of fluctuation Cooper pairs. The TDGL correlator of the superconducting order parameter is calculated in momentum representation and it is shown that the so defined number of p...

  13. Steady-state mass balance model for mercury in the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a local mass balance model for the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall, Ontario that describes the fate and transport of mercury in three forms, elemental, divalent, and methylated, in a five compartment environment (air, water, sediments, periphyton, and benthos). Our objective was to construct a steady-state mass balance model to determine the dominant sources and sinks of mercury in this environment. We compiled mercury concentrations, fluxes, and transformation rates from previous studies completed in this section of the river to develop the model. The inflow of mercury was the major source to this system, accounting for 0.42 mol month−1, or 95.5% of all mercury inputs, whereas outflow was 0.28 mol month−1, or 63.6% of all losses, and sediment deposition was 0.12 mol month−1, or 27.3% of all losses. Uncertainty estimates were greatest for advective fluxes in surface water, porewater, periphyton, and benthic invertebrates. -- Highlights: ► Inflow accounted for 95.5% of all mercury inputs to the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall. ► Major losses of mercury were by outflow (63%) and sedimentation (27%). ► Sediments account for over 94% of all mercury in the system. -- A steady-state mass balance model is presented for mercury species in the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall, Ontario

  14. Estimating the mercury exposure dose in a population of migratory bird hunters in the St. Lawrence River region, Quebec, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St. Lawrence River hunters (Quebec, Canada) are exposed to the pollutants, especially mercury, that contaminate birds and fish. However, the health risks of this have remained unclear because of a lack of information about the hunters' duck, geese, and sportfish consumption habits. A nutritional survey was set up to characterize waterfowl and sportfish consumption in St. Lawrence River duck hunters and to estimate their daily exposure to mercury. During the winter of 2000, 512 hunters selected from the Canadian Wildlife Service database completed a self-administered questionnaire. Daily exposure to contaminants was measured using data from the Canadian Wildlife Service (waterfowl) and available data on St. Lawrence River sportfish. The annual average consumption was 7.5 meals of ducks and geese and 8.7 meals of sportfish. The daily exposure to mercury related to waterfowl consumption was below the Canadian tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.47 μg/kg body wt/day for all participants. The daily mercury intake associated with fish consumption was greater than the TDI in 2 duck hunters. The daily exposure to mercury was higher than the TDI in 4 participants when both waterfowl and fish consumption were combined. Our results suggest that fish consumption (especially freshwater fish) represents the main source of exposure to pollutants in duck hunters

  15. Polarimetry of comets 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, 74P/Smirnova-Chernykh, and 152P/Helin-Lawrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, A.; Bagnulo, S.; Tozzi, G. P.; Boehnhardt, H.; Protopapa, S.; Kolokolova, L.; Muinonen, K.; Jones, G. H.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: Polarimetric characteristics of comets at large heliocentric distances is a relatively unexplored area; we extend the idea by adding and analysing the data for three Jupiter family comets (JFCs). Methods: With the FORS2 instrument of the ESO VLT, we performed quasi-simultaneous photometry and polarimetry of three active JFCs 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, 74P/Smirnova-Chernykh, and 152P/Helin-Lawrence. Results: We obtained in total 23 polarimetric measurements at different epochs, covering a phase-angle range ~1°-16° and heliocentric distances from 3 to 4.6 au. From our observations we obtained both colour and polarimetric maps to look for structures in the comae and tails of the comets. Conclusions: 74P/Smirnova-Chernykh and 152P/Helin-Lawrence exhibit enough activity at large heliocentric distances to be detectable in polarimetric measurements. Polarimetric and colour maps indicate no evidence of dust particle evolution in the coma. From near-infrared spectra we find no evidence of water ice in the coma of comet 152P/Helin-Lawrence. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under Programme IDs:089.C-0619 (PI = Tozzi), and 384.C-0115 (PI = Boehnhardt).

  16. Ground-Water Quality in the St. Lawrence River Basin, New York, 2005-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    The Federal Clean Water Act requires that States monitor and report on the quality of ground water and surface water. To satisfy part of these requirements, the U.S. Geological Survey and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation have developed a program in which ground-water quality is assessed in 2 to 3 of New York State's 14 major river basins each year. To characterize the quality of ground water in the St. Lawrence River Basin in northern New York, water samples were collected from 14 domestic and 11 production wells between August 2005 and January 2006. Eight of the wells were finished in sand and gravel and 17 wells were finished in bedrock. Ground-water samples were collected and processed using standard U.S. Geological Survey procedures and were analyzed for 229 constituents and physical properties, including inorganic constituents, nutrients, trace elements, radon-222, pesticides and pesticide degradates, volatile organic compounds, and bacteria. Sixty-six constituents were detected above laboratory reporting levels. Concentrations of most compounds at most sites were within drinking water standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and New York State Department of Health, but a few compounds exceeded drinking water standards at some sites. Water in the basin is generally hard to very hard (hardness equal to 121 mg/L as CaCO3 or greater); hardness and alkalinity were generally higher in the St. Lawrence Valley than in the Adirondack Mountains. The cation with the highest median concentration was calcium; the anion with the highest median concentration was bicarbonate. The concentration of chloride in one sample exceeded the 250 milligrams per liter U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Secondary Drinking Water Standard; the concentration of sulfate in one sample also exceeded the 250 milligrams per liter U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Secondary Drinking Water Standard. Nitrate was the predominant nutrient detected

  17. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1996 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryerson, F. J., Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

    1998-03-23

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is a Multicampus Research Unit of the University of California (UC). IGPP was founded in 1946 at UC Los Angeles with a charter to further research in the earth and planetary sciences and in related fields. The Institute now has branches at UC campuses in Los Angeles, San Diego, and Riverside, and at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. The University-wide IGPP has played an important role in establishing interdisciplinary research in the earth and planetary sciences. For example, IGPP was instrumental in founding the fields of physical oceanography and space physics, which at the time fell between the cracks of established university departments. Because of its multicampus orientation, IGPP has sponsored important interinstitutional consortia in the earth and planetary sciences. Each of the five branches has a somewhat different intellectual emphasis as a result of the interplay between strengths of campus departments and Laboratory programs. The IGPP branch at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was approved by the Regents of the University of California in 1982. IGPP-LLNL emphasizes research in seismology, geochemistry, cosmochemistry, and astrophysics. It provides a venue for studying the fundamental aspects of these fields, thereby complementing LLNL programs that pursue applications of these disciplines in national security and energy research. IGPP-LLNL is directed by Charles Alcock and was originally organized into three centers: Geosciences, stressing seismology; High-Pressure Physics, stressing experiments using the two-stage light-gas gun at LLNL; and Astrophysics, stressing theoretical and computational astrophysics. In 1994, the activities of the Center for High-Pressure Physics were merged with those of the Center for Geosciences. The Center for Geosciences, headed by Frederick Ryerson, focuses on research in geophysics and geochemistry. The Astrophysics Research

  18. Potential for saturated ground-water system contamination at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program of hydrogeologic investigation has been carried out to determine the likelihood of contaminant movement to the saturated zone from near the ground surface at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A companion survey of potential contaminant sources was also conducted at the LLNL. Water samples from selected LLNL wells were analyzed to test the water quality in the uppermost part of the saturated zone, which is from 14 to 48 m (45 to 158 ft) beneath the surface. Only nitrate and tritium were found in concentrations above natural background. In one well, the nitrate was slightly more concentrated than the drinking water limit. The nitrate source has not been found. The tritium in all ground-water samples from wells was found far less concentrated than the drinking water limit. The extent of infiltration of surface water was traced with environmental tritium. The thickness and stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone beneath the LLNL, and nearby area, was determined with specially constructed wells and boreholes. Well hydrograph analysis indicated where infiltration of surface water reached the saturated ground-water system. The investigation indicates that water infiltrating from the surface, through alluvial deposits, reaches the saturated zone along the course of Arroyo Seco, Arroyo Las Positas, and from the depression near the center of the site where seasonal water accumulates. Several potential contaminant sources were identified, and it is likely that contaminants could move from near the ground surface to the saturated zone beneath LLNL. Additional ground-water sampling and analysis will be performed and ongoing investigations will provide estimates of the speed with which potential contaminants can flow laterally in the saturated zone beneath LLNL. 34 references, 61 figures, 16 tables

  19. Progress in safety and environmental aspects of inertial fusion energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latkowski, J F; Reyes, S; Meier, W R

    2000-06-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is making significant progress in several areas related to the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of inertial fusion energy (IFE). A detailed accident analysis has been completed for the HYLIFE-II power plant design. Additional accident analyses are underway for both the HYLIFE-II and Sombrero designs. Other S and E work at LLNL has addressed the issue of the driver-chamber interface and its importance for both heavy-ion and laser-driven IFE. Radiation doses and fluences have been calculated for final focusing mirrors and magnets and shielding optimization is underway to extend the anticipated lifetimes for key components. Target designers/fabrication specialists have been provided with ranking information related to the S and E characteristics of candidate target materials (e.g., ability to recycle, accident consequences, and waste management). Ongoing work in this area will help guide research directions and the selection of target materials. Published and continuing work on fast ignition has demonstrated some of the potentially attractive S and E features of such designs. In addition to reducing total driver energies, fast ignition may ease target fabrication requirements, reduce radiation damage rates, and enable the practical use of advanced (e.g., tritium-lean) labels with significantly reduced neutron production rates, the possibility of self-breeding targets, and dramatically increased flexibility in blanket design. Domestic and international collaborations are key to success in the above areas. A brief summary of each area is given and plans for future work are outlined.

  20. Smoke Dispersion Simulations for Prescribed Burns at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, M M; Aluzzi, F J; Vogt, P J; Hall, C H; Neher, L A; Wilder, L A

    2002-04-04

    Each year, as part of its ongoing commitment to safe operating practices Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) conducts prescribed burns at its Site 300 complex. LLNL consistently adheres to stringent, self-imposed safety standards in all of its activities, and the annual prescribed burning at Site 300 is done to prevent an accumulation of vegetative fuels (primarily grasses) that could cause an unacceptable risk of wildfire ignition. The LLNL prescribed burn procedure (Burklin, 2001) calls for the sequential, controlled burning individual small land plots by the LLNL Fire Department. Essentially the same burning procedure is repeated on a yearly basis. The burns usually are conducted in May and June; however, on rare occasions the burning has been done as late in the year as July. To the best of our knowledge there has never been an environmental problem caused by the smoke from these prescribed burns. Indeed, the avoidance of undesirable environmental impacts is inherent in the very concept of prescription burning. In order to better understand, in a quantitative sense, the atmospheric dispersion of smoke from prescribed burns at Site 300, and to examine how smoke behavior might differ for different burn months and burn-plot terrain, the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at LLNL has simulated the smoke dispersion from eight prescribed burns. Four of these bums were conducted on two days in June 1999, and the other four bums were conducted on two days in July 2000. This report describes the atmospheric models, fuel data, and atmospheric data used in the case studies. It also describes the GIS-based analysis of the simulations, and summarizes the simulation results.

  1. Supplement analysis for Greenville Gate access to Kirschbaum Field at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Program proposes to provide additional access to the Kirschbaum Field construction laydown area. This additional access would alleviate traffic congestion at the East Gate entrance to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from Greenville Road during periods of heavy construction for the NIF. The new access would be located along the northeastern boundary of LLNL, about 305 m (1,000 ft) north of the East Gate entrance. The access road would extend from Greenville Road to the Kirschbaum Field construction laydown area and would traverse an existing storm water drainage channel. Two culverts, side by side, and a compacted road base would be installed across the channel. The security fence that runs parallel to Greenville Road would be modified to accommodate this new entrance and a vehicle gate would be installed at the entrance of Kirschbaum Field. The exiting shoulder along Greenville Road would be converted into a new turn lane for trucks entering the new gate. This analysis evaluates the impacts of constructing the Kirschbaum Field bridge and access gate at a different location than was analyzed in the NIF Project specific Analysis in the Final Programmatic environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SS and M PEIS) published in September 1996 (DOE/EIS-0236) and the Record of Decision published on December 19, 1996. Issues of concern addressed in this supplement analysis include potential impacts to wetlands downstream of the access bridge, potential impacts to the California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii) listed as threatened on the federal listing pursuant to the Endangered Species Act of 1974, and potential impacts on the 100-yr floodplain along the Arroyo Las Positas

  2. Environmental impact report addendum for the continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, R. F. [Roy F. Weston, Inc. (United States)

    1996-10-01

    An environmental impact statement/environmental impact report (ES/EIR) for the continued operation and management of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was prepared jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California (UC). The scope of the document included near-term (within 5-10 years) proposed projects. The UC Board of Regents, as state lead agency under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), certified and adopted the EIR by issuing a Notice of Determination on November 20, 1992. The DOE, as the lead federal agency under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), adopted a Record of Decision for the ES on January 27, 1993 (58 Federal Register [FR] 6268). The DOE proposed action was to continue operation of the facility, including near-term proposed projects. The specific project evaluated by UC was extension of the contract between UC and DOE for UC`s continued operation and management of LLNL (both sites) from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1997. The 1992 ES/EIR analyzed impacts through the year 2002. The 1992 ES/EIR comprehensively evaluated the potential environmental impacts of operation and management of LLNL within the near-term future. Activities evaluated included programmatic enhancements and modifications of facilities and programs at the LLNL Livermore site and at LLNL`s Experimental Test Site (Site 300) in support of research and development missions 2048 established for LLNL by Congress and the President. The evaluation also considered the impacts of infrastructure and building maintenance, minor modifications to buildings, general landscaping, road maintenance, and similar routine support activities.

  3. Environmental impact report addendum for the continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An environmental impact statement/environmental impact report (ES/EIR) for the continued operation and management of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was prepared jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California (UC). The scope of the document included near-term (within 5-10 years) proposed projects. The UC Board of Regents, as state lead agency under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), certified and adopted the EIR by issuing a Notice of Determination on November 20, 1992. The DOE, as the lead federal agency under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), adopted a Record of Decision for the ES on January 27, 1993 (58 Federal Register [FR] 6268). The DOE proposed action was to continue operation of the facility, including near-term proposed projects. The specific project evaluated by UC was extension of the contract between UC and DOE for UC's continued operation and management of LLNL (both sites) from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1997. The 1992 ES/EIR analyzed impacts through the year 2002. The 1992 ES/EIR comprehensively evaluated the potential environmental impacts of operation and management of LLNL within the near-term future. Activities evaluated included programmatic enhancements and modifications of facilities and programs at the LLNL Livermore site and at LLNL's Experimental Test Site (Site 300) in support of research and development missions 2048 established for LLNL by Congress and the President. The evaluation also considered the impacts of infrastructure and building maintenance, minor modifications to buildings, general landscaping, road maintenance, and similar routine support activities

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory offsite hazardous waste shipment data validation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters requested this report to verify that Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) properly categorized hazardous waste shipped offsite from 1984 to 1991. LLNL categorized the waste shipments by the new guidelines provided on the definition of radioactive waste. For this validation, waste that has had no radioactivity added by DOE operations is nonradioactive. Waste to which DOE operations has added or concentrated any radioactivity is radioactive. This report documents findings from the review of available LLNL hazardous waste shipment information and summarizes the data validation strategy. The report discusses administrative and radiological control procedures in place at LLNL during the data validation period. It also describes sampling and analysis and surface survey procedures used in determining radionuclide concentrations for offsite release of hazardous waste shipments. The evaluation team reviewed individual items on offsite hazardous waste shipments and classified them, using the DOE-HQ waste category definitions. LLNL relied primarily on generator knowledge to classify wastes. Very little radioanalytical information exists on hazardous wastes shipped from LLNL. Slightly greater than one-half of those hazardous waste items for which the documentation included radioanalytical data showed concentrations of radioactivity higher than the LLNL release criteria used from 1989 to 1991. Based on this small amount of available radioanalytical data, very little (less than one percent) of the hazardous waste generated at the LLNL main site can be shown to contain DOE added radioactivity. LLNL based the criteria on the limit of analytical sensitivity for gross alpha and gross beta measurements and the background levels of tritium. Findings in this report are based on information and documentation on the waste handling procedures in place before the start of the hazardous waste shipping moratorium in May 1991.

  5. Chemical health risk assessment for hazardous and mixed waste management units at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operates three Hazardous Waste Management Facilities with 24 associated waste management units for the treatment and storage of hazardous and mixed wastes. These wastes are generated by research programs and support operations. The storage and treatment units are presently operated under interim status in accordance with the requirements of the US Envirorunental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), a division of the California Envirorunental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA). As required by the California Hazardous Waste Control Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), LLNL ha s applied for a Part B permit to continue operating the storage and waste treatment facilities. As part of this permitting process, LLNL is required to conduct a health risk assessment (HRA) to examine the potential health impacts to the surrounding community from continued storage and treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes. analysis document presents the results of this risk assessment. An analysis of maximum credible chemical accidents is also included in Section 7.0. This HRA was prepared in accordance with procedures set forth by the California Air Pollution Control Officers Association (CAPCOA) ''Air Toxics Assessment Manual,'' CAPCOA guidelines for preparing risk assessments under the Air Toxic ''Hot Spots'' Act (AB 2588) and requirements of the US EPA. By following these procedures, this risk assessment presents a conservative analysis of a hypothetical Maximally Exposed Individual (MEI) using many worst-case assumptions that will not apply to an actual individual. As such, the risk estimates presented should be regarded as a worst-case estimate of any actual risk that may be present

  6. Supplement analysis for Greenville Gate access to Kirschbaum Field at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-05

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Program proposes to provide additional access to the Kirschbaum Field construction laydown area. This additional access would alleviate traffic congestion at the East Gate entrance to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from Greenville Road during periods of heavy construction for the NIF. The new access would be located along the northeastern boundary of LLNL, about 305 m (1,000 ft) north of the East Gate entrance. The access road would extend from Greenville Road to the Kirschbaum Field construction laydown area and would traverse an existing storm water drainage channel. Two culverts, side by side, and a compacted road base would be installed across the channel. The security fence that runs parallel to Greenville Road would be modified to accommodate this new entrance and a vehicle gate would be installed at the entrance of Kirschbaum Field. The exiting shoulder along Greenville Road would be converted into a new turn lane for trucks entering the new gate. This analysis evaluates the impacts of constructing the Kirschbaum Field bridge and access gate at a different location than was analyzed in the NIF Project specific Analysis in the Final Programmatic environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SS and M PEIS) published in September 1996 (DOE/EIS-0236) and the Record of Decision published on December 19, 1996. Issues of concern addressed in this supplement analysis include potential impacts to wetlands downstream of the access bridge, potential impacts to the California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii) listed as threatened on the federal listing pursuant to the Endangered Species Act of 1974, and potential impacts on the 100-yr floodplain along the Arroyo Las Positas.

  7. Berkeley Lighting Cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lask, Kathleen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gadgil, Ashok [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-10-24

    A lighting cone is a simple metal cone placed on the fuel bed of a stove during ignition to act as a chimney, increasing the draft through the fuel bed. Many stoves tend to be difficult to light due to poor draft through the fuel bed, so lighting cones are used in various parts of the world as an inexpensive accessory to help with ignition.

  8. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Workshop Characterization of Pathogenicity, Virulence and Host-Pathogen Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, A

    2006-08-30

    The threats of bio-terrorism and newly emerging infectious diseases pose serious challenges to the national security infrastructure. Rapid detection and diagnosis of infectious disease in human populations, as well as characterizing pathogen biology, are critical for reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with such threats. One of the key challenges in managing an infectious disease outbreak, whether through natural causes or acts of overt terrorism, is detection early enough to initiate effective countermeasures. Much recent attention has been directed towards the utility of biomarkers or molecular signatures that result from the interaction of the pathogen with the host for improving our ability to diagnose and mitigate the impact of a developing infection during the time window when effective countermeasures can be instituted. Host responses may provide early signals in blood even from localized infections. Multiple innate and adaptive immune molecules, in combination with other biochemical markers, may provide disease-specific information and new targets for countermeasures. The presence of pathogen specific markers and an understanding of the molecular capabilities and adaptations of the pathogen when it interacts with its host may likewise assist in early detection and provide opportunities for targeting countermeasures. An important question that needs to be addressed is whether these molecular-based approaches will prove useful for early diagnosis, complement current methods of direct agent detection, and aid development and use of countermeasures. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will host a workshop to explore the utility of host- and pathogen-based molecular diagnostics, prioritize key research issues, and determine the critical steps needed to transition host-pathogen research to tools that can be applied towards a more effective national bio-defense strategy. The workshop will bring together leading researchers/scientists in the

  10. Final Progress Report for the NASA Inductrack Model Rocket Launcher at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, L S; Post, R F; Martinez-Frias, J

    2001-06-27

    The Inductrack magnetic levitation system, developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was studied for its possible use for launching rockets. Under NASA sponsorship, a small model system was constructed at the Laboratory to pursue key technical aspects of this proposed application. The Inductrack is a passive magnetic levitation system employing special arrays of high-field permanent magnets (Halbach arrays) on the levitating cradle, moving above a ''track'' consisting of a close-packed array of shorted coils with which are interleaved with special drive coils. Halbach arrays produce a strong spatially periodic magnetic field on the front surface of the arrays, while canceling the field on their back surface. Relative motion between the Halbach arrays and the track coils induces currents in those coils. These currents levitate the cradle by interacting with the horizontal component of the magnetic field. Pulsed currents in the drive coils, synchronized with the motion of the carrier, interact with the vertical component of the magnetic field to provide acceleration forces. Motional stability, including resistance to both vertical and lateral aerodynamic forces, is provided by having Halbach arrays that interact with both the upper and the lower sides of the track coils. At present, a 7.8 meter track composed of drive and levitation coils has been built and the electronic drive circuitry performs as designed. A 9 kg cradle that carries the Halbach array of permanent magnets has been built. A mechanical launcher is nearly complete which will provide an initial cradle velocity of 9 m/s into the electronic drive section. We have found that the drag forces from the levitation coils were higher than in our original design. However, measurements of drag force at velocities less than 1 m/s are exactly as predicted by theory. Provided here are recommended design changes to improve the track's performance so that a final velocity of 40

  11. Impact of Recent Constraints on Intellectual Freedom on Science and Technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsworth, J

    2000-11-12

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was created in 1952 to meet the nation's need for an expanded nuclear weapons research and development (R&D) capability. LLNL quickly grew to become a full-fledged nuclear weapons design laboratory with a broad range of technical capabilities similar to those of our sister laboratory--Los Alamos--with which we shared mission responsibilities. By its very nature, nuclear weapons R&D requires some of the most advanced science and technology (S&T). Accordingly, there is an obvious need for careful attention to ensure that appropriate security measures exist to deal with the sensitive aspects of nuclear weapons development. The trade-off between advancing S&T at the Laboratory and the need for security is a complex issue that has always been with us, As Edward Teller noted in a recent commentary in a May, 1999 editorial in the New York Times: ''The reaction of President Harry Truman to the leaking of information is well known. He imposed no additional measures for security. Instead, we have clear knowledge that the disclosures by (Klaus) Fuchs caused Truman to call for accelerated work on all aspects of nuclear weapons. The right prescription for safety is not reaction to dangers that are arising, but rather action leading to more knowledge and, one hopes, toward positive interaction between nations.'' To explore the issue of intellectual freedom at a national security laboratory such as LLNL, one must understand the type of activities we pursue and how our research portfolio has evolved since the Laboratory was established. Our mission affects the workforce skills, capabilities, and security measures that the Laboratory requires. The national security needs of the US have evolved, along with the S&T community in which the Laboratory resides and to which it contributes. These factors give rise to a greater need for the Laboratory to interact with universities, industry, and other national

  12. Year-class formation of upper St. Lawrence River northern pike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B.M.; Farrell, J.M.; Underwood, H.B.; Smith, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Variables associated with year-class formation in upper St. Lawrence River northern pike Esox lucius were examined to explore population trends. A partial least-squares (PLS) regression model (PLS 1) was used to relate a year-class strength index (YCSI; 1974-1997) to explanatory variables associated with spawning and nursery areas (seasonal water level and temperature and their variability, number of ice days, and last day of ice presence). A second model (PLS 2) incorporated four additional ecological variables: potential predators (abundance of double-crested cormorants Phalacrocorax auritus and yellow perch Perca flavescens), female northern pike biomass (as a measure of stock-recruitment effects), and total phosphorus (productivity). Trends in adult northern pike catch revealed a decline (1981-2005), and year-class strength was positively related to catch per unit effort (CPUE; R2 = 0.58). The YCSI exceeded the 23-year mean in only 2 of the last 10 years. Cyclic patterns in the YCSI time series (along with strong year-classes every 4-6 years) were apparent, as was a dampening effect of amplitude beginning around 1990. The PLS 1 model explained over 50% of variation in both explanatory variables and the dependent variable, YCSI first-order moving-average residuals. Variables retained (N = 10; Wold's statistic ??? 0.8) included negative YCSI associations with high summer water levels, high variability in spring and fall water levels, and variability in fall water temperature. The YCSI exhibited positive associations with high spring, summer, and fall water temperature, variability in spring temperature, and high winter and spring water level. The PLS 2 model led to positive YCSI associations with phosphorus and yellow perch CPUE and a negative correlation with double-crested cormorant abundance. Environmental variables (water level and temperature) are hypothesized to regulate northern pike YCSI cycles, and dampening in YCSI magnitude may be related to a

  13. Hydrographic climatology in the Gulf of St. Lawrence: its recent trends and an estuarine regime of interannual variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovsky, Alexander; Yashayaev, Igor; Frank, Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Combining hydrographic data from the NOAA NODC World Ocean Database and the archive of the Bedford Institute of Oceanography we construct a hydrographic climatology of the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) and analyze interannual to multidecadal variability of its principal water masses. Our analysis is based on the assumption that buoyancy is a primary forcing mechanism defining thermohaline fields and driving circulation in GSL, which in turn dictates the selection of representative transects. We analyze ensembles of hydrographic conditions, parameters of seasonal cycle, seasonal-to-interannual anomalies and long-term trends in each distance-depth bin of several transects orthogonal or tangential to the principal pathways of buoyancy-driven flows in GSL. In the Cabot Strait, the surface layer exhibits freshening while the bottom layer (affected by the Atlantic water influx) becomes warmer and saltier. The latter tendency can be traced along the axis of the entire Laurentian Channel and becomes even stronger further inland (e.g., off Anticosti Isl.). This enhancement in two-layer estuarine exchange flow is likely related to the freshening effect of the melting ice further north advected into the Gulf, or to the stronger freshwater discharge mixing in the Gulf. Indeed, the near-surface coastal bin off Nova Scotia occupied by the coastal buoyancy current originating from the St. Lawrence estuary does not reveal similar freshening. Interannual variability of temperature and salinity also exhibits patterns of estuarine exchange: near-bottom temperature and salinity indicative of the return flow from the Atlantic into GSL correlate with the St. Lawrence River discharge. The coastal buoyancy current responds to variations in the freshwater discharge by its expansion offshore while the salinity variations near the coast do not show a significant relationship with the discharge. Accelerating departure of hydrographic anomalies from their record-mean trends is observed over the

  14. Study of the hydraulic regime of the St. Lawrence River between Montreal and the city of Quibec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, S.; Rassam, J.-C.; Lariviere, R. (Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, PQ (Canada)); Piotte, D.; Boivin, R.; Hausser, R. (Lasalle Hydraulic Lab., PQ (Canada))

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from a major hydraulic regime study of the St. Lawrence River carried out over a distance of 285 km between the Beauharnois and Carillon generating stations and Quebec City. The results focus mainly on the parameters that explain water level variations where the river is used most intensively for commercial shipping. Outflows from generating stations give rise to water level variations that could theoretically have an impact on the river. The upstream network, basically consisting of two lakes, was modelled using Hydro-Quebec's ARCHIP model. The downstream network simulations were performed in the transient flow regime with the Environment Canada hydrodynamic model 1D. Five main tributaries were incorporated into this model, and the downstream network was calibrated by adjusting the model's physical parameters to data observed during three 3-week periods. Using a series of numerical simulations, the factors that affect water levels were isolated and their particular contributions were estimated. In particular, the effects of the flows, local inflows, flow variations, and tide on the water levels along the St. Lawrence maritime channel were analyzed. It was shown that, although the water levels depend strongly on average discharge rates from Beauharnois and Carillon generating stations, they are less sensitive to discharge variations resulting from daily generating station operations. The effect of the tide is an important factor in the hydraulic behavior of the St. Lawrence River, even as high as Montreal, where the tide can explain water level variations of 30 cm at times during the year when the flow rate is low. 4 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Diet composition and fish consumption of double-crested Cormorants from three St. Lawrence River Colonies in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James H.; Farquhar, James F; Mazzocchi, Irene M; Bendig, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) were first observed nesting in the upper St. Lawrence River at Strachan Island in 1992. Cormorants now nest at a number of islands in the Thousand Islands section of the river. Griswold, McNair, and Strachan islands are among the largest colonies in the upper river. Until 2011, nest counts had remained relatively stable, ranging from 200 to 603 nests per colony. However, since 2011 the number of nests at McNair Island have exceeded 700 each year. Although the size of cormorant colonies in the upper St. Lawrence River is smaller than those in the eastern basin of Lake Ontario, the close proximity of islands in the upper river that have colonies may cause a cumulative fish consumption effect similar to a larger colony. Because of increasing numbers of Double-crested Cormorants in the upper St. Lawrence River and the possible effects on fish populations, studies were initiated in 1999 to quantify cormorant diet and fish consumption at the three largest colonies. From 1999 to 2012, these studies have shown that cormorants consumed about 128.6 million fish including 37.5 million yellow perch (Perca flavescens), 17.4 million rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris) and 1.0 million smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolemieu) (Johnson et al. 2012). During this same time period fish assessment studies near some of these islands have shown a major decrease in yellow perch populations (Klindt 2007). This occurrence is known as the halo effect and happens when piscivorous birds deplete local fish populations in areas immediately surrounding the colony (Ashmole 1963). This paper describes the diet and fish consumption of cormorants in the upper St.

  16. Goldin ja Katz meeste ning naiste palgalõhest / Claudia Goldin, Lawrence Katz ; toimetanud Steven D. Levitt, Stephen Dubner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Goldin, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Harvardi ülikooli tööturu uurimisele spetsialiseerunud majandusteadlased ning meeste ja naiste palgalõhe teema spetsialistid Claudia Goldin ja Lawrence Katz vastavad küsimustele, mis puudutavad võrdse haridusega meeste ja naiste tegelikku palgaerinevust, palgalõhet meeste ja naiste vahel siis, kui mitte arvestada tööaega, naiste suutlikkust pidada palgaläbirääkimisi ning tegevusalasi, kuhu peaksid mehed ja naised pürgima või mida vältima

  17. The Vulnerable Animals That Therefore We Are : (Non-)Human Animals in D.H. Lawrence's Women in Love

    OpenAIRE

    Trejling, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Central to animal studies is the question of words and how they are used in relation to wordless beings such as non-human animals. This issue is addressed by the writer D.H. Lawrence, and the focus of this thesis is the linguistic vulnerability of humans and non-humans in his novel Women in Love, a subject that will be explored with the help of the philosopher Jacques Derrida’s text The Animal That Therefore I Am. The argument is that Women in Love illustrates the human subjection to and cons...

  18. Jane Eyre de Michael Berkeley et de David Malouf : La transposition opératique d’un grand classique de la littérature anglaise Jane Eyre by Michael Berkeley and David Malouf: The Operatic Rewriting of a Great Classic English Novel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Héberlé

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses Michael Berkeley’s opera Jane Eyre. Premiered on June 30, 2000 by Music Theatre Wales at the Cheltenham International Festival of Music, this opera is based on the novel by Charlotte Brontë and the libretto is written by the Australian poet, novelist, playwright and librettist, David Malouf. It was risky and daring to try to adapt this famous and long novel for the stage. We will particularly focus on the similarities and differences between the novel and the opera as well as on the strategies used both by David Malouf and Michael Berkeley to adapt it. Through the analysis of the similarities we will see how Michael Berkeley set to music some of the great themes and elements of the novel: passion, a sense of entrapment, the “Gothic” atmosphere. On the other hand, the analysis of the discrepancies between the novel and the opera as they appear in both the libretto and the music will lead us to a modern apprehension of the characterization of madness as well as of the metafictional dimension of the rewriting of Jane Eyre by David Malouf and Michael Berkeley.  

  19. An advanced educational program for nuclear professionals with social scientific literacy. A collaborative initiative by UC Berkeley and Univ. of Tokyo on the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have collaborated for over three years in developing an advanced educational program to cultivate leading engineers who can productively interact with other stakeholders. The program is organized under a partnership between the Nuclear Engineering Department of University of California, Berkeley (UCBNE) and the Global COE Program 'Nuclear Education and Research Initiative' (GoNERI) of the University of Tokyo, and is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology), Japan. We conducted two 'summer schools' in 2009 and 2010 as trial cases of the educational program. This year, in response to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, we decided to make our third summer school a venue for preliminary, yet multi-dimensional learning from that event. This school was held in Berkeley, CA, in the first week of August, with 12 lecturers and 18 students from various fields and countries. In this paper, we will explain the concept, aim, and design of our program; do a preliminary assessment of its effectiveness; introduce a couple of intriguing discussions held by participants; and discuss the program's implications for the post-Fukushima nuclear context. (author)

  20. Department of Homeland Security Fellowship Internship Experience at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, J

    2006-08-30

    As a DHS intern at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), I was a member of the Agricultural Domestic Demonstration and Application Program (AgDDAP) under the mentorship of Benjamin Hindson. This group is focused on developing assays for the rapid detection of animal diseases that threaten agriculture in the United States. The introduction of a foreign animal disease to the US could potentially result in devastating economic losses. The 2001 Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) outbreak in the UK cost over 20 billion dollars and resulted in the death of over 6 million animals. FMD virus is considered to be one of greatest threats to agriculture due to its high infectivity, robustness, and broad species range. Thus, export of meat and animal products from FMD endemic countries is strictly regulated. Although the disease is rarely fatal in adult animals, morbidity is close to 100%. FMD also causes overall production (i.e. milk, mass) to decrease dramatically and can reduce it permanently. The rapid and accurate diagnosis of FMD and other foreign animal diseases is essential to prevent these diseases from spreading and becoming endemic to the country. Every hour delay in the detection of FMD is estimated to cost up to 3 million dollars. Diagnosis of FMD is often complicated by other diseases manifesting similar symptoms in the animal, such as vesicular stomatitis, bluetongue, etc. Typically, diagnosis cannot be made by clinical signs alone and samples must be sent away for testing. Depending on the test, such as in virus isolation, this can take several days. AgDDAP had previously developed a high-throughput multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the rule-out of Foot-and-Mouth Disease and six other look-alike diseases. This assay is intended for use in FMD surveillance, differential diagnosis in an outbreak scenario, and to establish an FMD-clean state after an outbreak. PCR based assays are favorable for multiple reasons. Viral nucleic acids can be

  1. The Aspiring Adept: Robert Boyle and His Alchemical Quest (Lawrence M. Principe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Jeffrey

    1999-10-01

    Robert Boyle is widely regarded as the Father of Modern Chemistry, who broke once and for all from the irrational, misguided alchemy that preceded him. One of the goals of this carefully researched and argued new book by Lawrence M. Principe, Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and the Institute for the History of Science, Medicine, and Technology at The Johns Hopkins University, is to refute the two errors in this characterization of Boyle and to understand his life, thought, and work in the intellectual and social context of his time. This book is not for the casual reader; it is a detailed scholarly treatise in the history of science, but it provides a fresh and interesting perspective on Boyle and on the development of chemistry in the 17th century. Boyle is usually characterized as a modern scientist and his most famous book, The Skeptical Chymist, as a critique of traditional alchemy. Principe demonstrates that this characterization is based on a selective and sometimes incorrect reading of Boyle's works. Like Newton, Boyle was deeply involved in traditional transmutational alchemy, reading the works of other alchemists, performing experiments, and even witnessing transmutations. Alchemy, however, was not a monolith and Boyle adhered to what Principe tentatively identifies as a uniquely English school of supernatural alchemy. According to Principe, The Skeptical Chymist was mainly a criticism of the Paracelsians interested in chemical medicine rather than a defense of what we would now regard as modern chemistry. To further support his characterization of Boyle and to better reveal Boyle's involvement in alchemyparticularly the transmutation of base metals to gold, termed chrysopoeiaPrincipe has reconstructed from some 20 fragments one of Boyle's alchemical manuscripts, his Dialogue on the Transmutation of Metals. The full text of this lost work is included as Appendix 1. Two other primary sources, Interview Accounts of Transmutations and

  2. Supplement analysis for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 2: Comment response document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), prepared a draft Supplement Analysis (SA) for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL-L), in accordance with DOE`s requirements for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 1021.314). It considers whether the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (1992 EIS/EIR) should be supplement3ed, whether a new environmental impact statement (EIS) should be prepared, or no further NEPA documentation is required. The SA examines the current project and program plans and proposals for LLNL and SNL-L, operations to identify new or modified projects or operations or new information for the period from 1998 to 2002 that was not considered in the 1992 EIS/EIR. When such changes, modifications, and information are identified, they are examined to determine whether they could be considered substantial or significant in reference to the 1992 proposed action and the 1993 Record of Decision (ROD). DOE released the draft SA to the public to obtain stakeholder comments and to consider those comments in the preparation of the final SA. DOE distributed copies of the draft SA to those who were known to have an interest in LLNL or SNL-L activities in addition to those who requested a copy. In response to comments received, DOE prepared this Comment Response Document.

  3. Assessing condition of macroinvertebrate communities and sediment toxicity in the St. Lawrence River at Massena Area-of-Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Brian T.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Smith, Alexander J; George, Scott D.; David, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    In 1972, the USA and Canada agreed to restore the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Great Lakes ecosystem under the first Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. In subsequent amendments, part of the St. Lawrence River at Massena, New York and segments of three tributaries, were designated as an Area of Concern (AOC) due to the effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), lead and copper contamination, and habitat degradation and resulting impairment to several beneficial uses. Because sediments have been largely remediated, the present study was initiated to evaluate the current status of the benthic macroinvertebrate (benthos) beneficial use impairment (BUI). Benthic macroinvertebrate communities and sediment toxicity tests using Chironomus dilutus were used to test the hypotheses that community condition and sediment toxicity at AOC sites were not significantly different from those of adjacent reference sites. Grain size was found to be the main driver of community composition and macroinvertebrate assemblages, and bioassessment metrics did not differ significantly between AOC and reference sites of the same sediment class. Median growth of C. dilutus and its survival in three of the four river systems did not differ significantly in sediments from AOC and reference sites. Comparable macroinvertebrate assemblages and general lack of toxicity across most AOC and reference sites suggest that the quality of sediments should not significantly impair benthic macroinvertebrate communities in most sites in the St. Lawrence River AOC.

  4. Preparedness activities regarding the protection of public health in case of a major oil or chemical spill on the St-Lawrence River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A project was initiated to protect the health of people living in the St-Lawrence basin from contaminants associated with an oil or chemical spill. Between 1980 and 1990, more than 240 chemical spills and 300 oil spills were recorded in the region which has prompted concerns regarding the possible contamination of drinking water sources. 45% of Quebec's population relies on the St-Lawrence River as a source of drinking water. Thus far, the project has identified the major chemical and oil products transported on the St-Lawrence River, and the main health risks associated with these products. Computerized dispersion models which can determine the migration of the contaminants in water, are available. Simulation exercises have been carried out to train personnel in the event of an actual spill. 1 ref

  5. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site Seismic Safety Program: Summary of Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savy, J B; Foxall, W

    2002-04-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site Seismic Safety Program was conceived in 1979 during the preparation of the site Draft Environmental Impact Statement. The impetus for the program came from the development of new methodologies and geologic data that affect assessments of geologic hazards at the LLNL site; it was designed to develop a new assessment of the seismic hazard to the LLNL site and LLNL employees. Secondarily, the program was also intended to provide the technical information needed to make ongoing decisions about design criteria for future construction at LLNL and about the adequacy of existing facilities. This assessment was intended to be of the highest technical quality and to make use of the most recent and accepted hazard assessment methodologies. The basic purposes and objectives of the current revision are similar to those of the previous studies. Although all the data and experience assembled in the previous studies were utilized to their fullest, the large quantity of new information and new methodologies led to the formation of a new team that includes LLNL staff and outside consultants from academia and private consulting firms. A peer-review panel composed of individuals from academia (A. Cornell, Stanford University), the Department of Energy (DOE; Jeff Kimball), and consulting (Kevin Coppersmith), provided review and guidance. This panel was involved from the beginning of the project in a ''participatory'' type of review. The Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC, a committee sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, DOE, and the Electric Power Research Institute) strongly recommends the use of participatory reviews, in which the reviewers follow the progress of a project from the beginning, rather than waiting until the end to provide comments (Budnitz et al., 1997). Following the requirements for probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) stipulated in the DOE standard DOE

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    performance criteria may not be the level of performance desired Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory or Sandia/CA. Performance at levels greater than those established by this document will provide a higher level of fire safety, fire protection, or loss control and is encouraged. In Section 7, Determination of Baseline Needs, a standard template was used to describe the process used that involves separating basic emergency response needs into nine separate services. Each service being evaluated contains a determination of minimum requirements, an analysis of the requirements, a statement of minimum performance, and finally a summary of the minimum performance. The requirement documents, listed in Section 5, are those laws, regulations, DOE Directives, contractual obligations, or LLNL policies that establish service levels. The determination of minimum requirements section explains the rationale or method used to determine the minimum requirements.

  7. Physics on your feet Berkeley graduate exam questions : or ninety minutes of shame but a PhD for the rest of your life!

    CERN Document Server

    Budker, Dmitry; Demas, Vasiliki

    2015-01-01

    Physics on Your Feet gives a collection of physics problems covering the broad range of topics in classical and modern physics that were, or could have been, asked at oral PhD exams at Berkeley. The questions are easy to formulate, but some of them can only be answered using an out-of-the-box approach. Detailed solutions are provided, from which the reader is guaranteed to learn a lot about the physicists' way of thinking. The book is also packed full of cartoons and dry humour to help take the edge off the stress and anxiety surrounding exams. This is a helpful guide to students preparing for their exams, as well as to University lecturers looking for good instructive problems. No exams are necessary to enjoy the book!

  8. Safety Basis Requirements for Nonnuclear Facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site-Specific Work Smart Standards Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beach, R; Brereton, S; Failor, R; Hildum, S; Spagnolo, S; Van Warmerdam, C

    2003-02-24

    This standard establishes requirements that, when coupled with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) methods and other Work Smart Standards for assuring worker safety, assure that the impacts of nonnuclear operations authorized in LLNL facilities are well understood and controlled in a manner that protects the health of workers, the public, and the environment. All LLNL facilities shall be classified based on potential for adverse impact of operations to the health of co-located (i.e., nearby) workers and the public in accordance with this standard, Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) 830, Subpart B, and Department of Energy Order (DOE O) 420.2A. This standard provides information on: Objectives; Applicability; Safety analysis requirements; Control selection and maintenance; Documentation requirements; Safety basis review, approval, and renewal; and Safety basis implementation.

  9. Summary of personal monitoring data for asbestos-related maintenance work at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) consists of 665 structures with approximately 6 million square feet of space. Many of the buildings date from the 1940's to 1980's and contain asbestos-containing materials (ACM). Maintenance and Operation activities, as well as full scale asbestos abatement and repair, has been conducted for many years. One result of all this activity is that a substantial database of personal monitoring data has been collected. This database is a collection of reported (Fed OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) information, including 8-hour Time Weighted Averages (TWA) and 30-minute Excursion Limit (EL) samples. Because this data represented a wide variety of asbestos removal techniques, materials and sampling strategies and industrial hygienists, a rigorous statistical comparison is of limited value. By summarizing the data by procedure category, procedures likely to result in significant exposures can be identified

  10. Investigating Sources of Toxicity in Stormwater: Algae Mortality in Runoff Upstream of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, C G; Folks, K; Mathews, S; Martinelli, R

    2003-10-06

    A source evaluation case study is presented for observations of algae toxicity in an intermittent stream passing through the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory near Livermore, California. A five-step procedure is discussed to determine the cause of water toxicity problems and to determine appropriate environmental management practices. Using this approach, an upstream electrical transfer station was identified as the probable source of herbicides causing the toxicity. In addition, an analytical solution for solute transport in overland flow was used to estimate the application level of 40 Kg/ha. Finally, this source investigation demonstrates that pesticides can impact stream water quality regardless of application within levels suggested on manufacturer labels. Environmental managers need to ensure that pesticides that could harm aquatic organisms (including algae) not be used within close proximity to streams or storm drainages and that application timing should be considered for environmental protection.

  11. Description of Gyrodactylus mediotorus n. sp. (Monogenea: Gyrodactylidae) infecting spottail shiner (Notropis hudsonius) from the St. Lawrence River, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stanley D; Marcogliese, David J; Forest, Jonathon J H; McLaughlin, J Daniel; Bentzen, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Gyrodactylus mediotorus n. sp. is described from the body, fins, and buccal cavity of the spottail shiner, Notropis hudsonius (Cyprinidae) from the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada. Gyrodactylus mediotorus n. sp. is the first species of Gyrodactylus Nordmann, 1832 described from N. hudsonius and is characterized by large hamuli, large medial process of the ventral bar, narrow linguiform ventral bar membrane, large anterolateral processes, and marginal hooks with long shafts and distinctly shaped sickle. The species that most resembles Gyrodactylus mediotorus n. sp. is Gyrodactylus protuberus Rogers and Wellborn, 1965 described from the stargazing shiner, Notropis uranoscopus Suttkus, 1959. The 2 species can be differentiated based on the larger hamuli (68.4 vs. 64) and ventral bar (38.4 vs. 24) of Gyrodactylus mediotorus n. sp. and the shape of the marginal hooks which for Gyrodactylus mediotorus n. sp. has a slightly larger toe and a point which is not as angled. The morphological description is supplemented with 436 sequenced base pairs of the 18S gene (including the V4 region) as well as 1,041 sequenced base pairs spanning the complete ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 regions. BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) searches failed to provide any close matches for either regions of DNA, with Gyrodactylus colemanensis infecting Salvelinus fontinalis being the most genetically similar for both the 18S (∼91%, JF836090) and ITS (∼84%, JF836142) rDNA regions. Gyrodactylus mediotorus n. sp. has been found infecting spottail shiners in the St. Lawrence River in low prevalence and intensities periodically over the last 15 yr. PMID:23883192

  12. Formation and Transportation of High-Salinity Water Produced in Polynyas South of the St.Lawrence Island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Hongli; ZHAO Jinping; SHI Jiuxin; JIAO Yutian

    2010-01-01

    The authors studied variations of temperature and salinity in seawater under sea ice using hydrologic data collected from polynyas south of the St.Lawrence Island during March of 2008 and 2009.The results indicate that the high-salinity water found during the cruises of 2008 and 2009 was due to the formation of polynyas.The salinity observed in 2008 was higher than that in 2009as a result of higher salt production in 2008.The spatial distributions of high-salinity cores differed between the two cruises.In March 2008,a southeastward flow was formed under the persistent northerly wind in the observation region,which transported the high-salinity water produced by the polynyas to the southeast.The similar flow,however,did not exist in March 2009 because the northerly wind over the study area was interrupted by a southerly wind.Accordingly,the polynyas and the high-salinity water produced by them existed for a short time.As a result,the high-salinity water in 2009 did not spread very far,and stayed within the polynyas.In addition,during the 2009 cruise,two stages of observations in the polynyas showed the core of high-salinity water was shifted to the southwest of the St.Lawrence Island.This result suggested that a southwestward flow might have existed in the area at the onset of the northerly wind,which was consistent with the alongshore and/or offshore flows caused by the northerly wind.

  13. Sulfonylurea herbicides in an agricultural catchment basin and its adjacent wetland in the St. Lawrence River basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lafontaine, Yves; Beauvais, Conrad; Cessna, Allan J; Gagnon, Pierre; Hudon, Christiane; Poissant, Laurier

    2014-05-01

    The use of sulfonylurea herbicides (SU) has increased greater than 100 times over the past 30 years in both Europe and North America. Applied at low rates, their presence, persistence and potential impacts on aquatic ecosystems remain poorly studied. During late-spring to early fall in 2009-2011, concentrations of 9 SU were assessed in two agricultural streams and their receiving wetland, an enlargement of the St. Lawrence River (Canada). Six SU in concentrations >LOQ (10 ng L(-1)) were detected in 10% or less of surface water samples. Rimsulfuron was detected each year, sulfosulfuron and nicosulfuron in two years and the others in one year only, suggesting that application of specific herbicides varied locally between years. Detection frequency and concentrations of SU were not significantly associated with total precipitation which occurred 1 to 5d before sampling. Concentrations and fate of SU differed among sites due to differences in stream dynamics and water quality characteristics. The persistence of SU in catchment basin streams reflected the dissipation effects associated with stream discharge. Maximum concentrations of some SU (223 and 148 ng L(-1)) were occasionally above the baseline level (100 ng L(-1)) for aquatic plant toxicity, implying potential toxic stress to flora in the streams. Substantially lower concentrations (max 55 ng L(-1)) of SU were noted at the downstream wetland site, likely as a result from dilution and mixing with St. Lawrence River water, and represent less toxicological risk to the wetland flora. Sporadic occurrence of SU at low concentrations in air and rain samples indicated that atmospheric deposition was not an important source of herbicides to the study area. PMID:24534695

  14. The Symbolic Approach and the Criticism to Industrialization——A Study on the Image of Train in Women in Love by D.H.Lawrence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱卓为

    2015-01-01

    The symbolic approach is one of the most important writing techniques that D.H.Lawrence specialized in.The criticism to industrialization is one of his main novel’s themes.This paper analyzed one of the typical symbols of industrialization from Women in Love-train and reveals Lawrence’s criticism to the industrial society.

  15. The elegant velvet glove: A textual and visual reading of the gothicised female form in Lawrence Durrell’s 'The Alexandria quartet'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D. Kreuiter

    2014-01-01

    My thesis analyses the gothicisation of the female form in ‘The Alexandria quartet’ written by the English novelist Lawrence Durrell. In this study I show how Durrell's concern with the themes of space-time-memory, ambiguity, multiple perspectives, metaphoric imagery, buried or not-so-buried acts of

  16. Hypoxia in the St. Lawrence Estuary: How a Coding Error Led to the Belief that “Physics Controls Spatial Patterns”

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourgault, D.; Cyr, F

    2015-01-01

    Two fundamental sign errors were found in a computer code used for studying the oxygenminimum zone (OMZ) and hypoxia in the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence. These errorsinvalidate the conclusions drawn from the model, and call into question a proposed mechanismfor generating OMZ that challenges cla

  17. Benthic fluxes of dissolved organic nitrogen in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary and implications for selective organic matter degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alkhatib

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON and carbon (DOC in sediment pore waters was determined at nine locations along the St. Lawrence Estuary and in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The study area is characterized by gradients in the sedimentary particulate organic matter (POM reactivity, bottom water oxygen concentrations, as well as benthic respiration rates. Based on pore water profiles we estimated the benthic diffusive fluxes of DON and DOC. Our results show that DON fluxed out of the sediments at significant rates (110 to 430 μmol m−2 d−1. DON fluxes were positively correlated with sedimentary POM reactivity and sediment oxygen exposure time (OET, suggesting direct links between POM quality, aerobic remineralization and the release of DON to the water column. DON fluxes were on the order of 30% to 64% of the total benthic inorganic fixed N loss due to denitrification, and often exceeded the diffusive nitrate fluxes into the sediments. Hence they represented a large fraction of the total benthic N exchange. This result is particularly important in light of the fact that DON fluxes are usually not accounted for in estuarine and coastal zone nutrient budgets. The ratio of the DON to nitrate flux increased from 0.6 in the Lower Estuary to 1.5 in the Gulf. In contrast to DON, DOC fluxes did not show any significant spatial variation along the Laurentian Channel (LC between the Estuary and the Gulf (2100 ± 100μmol m−2 d−1, suggesting that production and consumption of labile DOC components proceed at similar rates, irrespective of the overall benthic characteristics and the reactivity of POM. As a consequence, the molar C/N ratio of dissolved organic matter (DOM in pore water and the overlying bottom water varied significantly along the transect, with lowest C/N in the Lower Estuary (5–6 and highest C/N (> 10 in the Gulf. We observed large differences between the C/N of pore water DOM with respect to POM, and the degree of

  18. Historical Doses To The Public from Routine and Accidental Releases of Tritium - Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1953 - 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S; Raskob, W

    2007-08-15

    Throughout fifty-three years of operations, an estimated 29,300 TBq of tritium have been released to the atmosphere at the Livermore site of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; about 75% of this was released accidentally as gaseous tritium in 1965 and 1970. Routine emissions contributed slightly more than 3,700 TBq gaseous tritium and about 2,800 TBq tritiated water vapor to the total. Mean annual doses (with 95% confidence intervals) to the most exposed member of the public were calculated for all years using the same model and the same assumptions. Because time-dependent tritium models require detailed meteorological data that were unavailable for the large releases, ingestion/inhalation dose ratios were derived from experience with UFOTRI. Even with assumptions to assure that doses would not be underestimated, all doses from routine and accidental releases were below the level (3.6 mSv) at which adverse health effects have been documented, and most were below the current regulatory limit of 100 {micro}Sv per year from releases to the atmosphere.

  19. Preliminary report of the past and present uses, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreicer, M.

    1985-12-01

    This report contains the findings of a records search performed to survey the past and present use, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials and wastes at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site. This report provides a point of departure for further planning of environmental protection activities at the site. This report was conducted using the LLNL archives and library, documents from the US Navy, old LLNL Plant Engineering blueprint files, published articles and reports, Environmental Protection Program records, employee interviews, and available aerial photographs. Sections I and II of this report provide an introduction to the LLNL site and its environmental characteristics. Several tenants have occupied the site prior to the establishment of LLNL, currently operated by the University of California for the US Department of Energy. Section III of this report contains information on environmentally related operations of early site users, the US Navy and California Research and Development. Section IV of this report contains information on the handling of hazardous materials and wastes by LLNL programs. The information is presented in 12 sub-sections, one for each currently operating LLNL program. General site areas, i.e., garbage trenches, the traffic circle landfill, the taxi strip, and old ammunition bunkers are discussed in Section V. 12 refs., 23 figs., 27 tabs.

  20. Impact of the January-February 1980 earthquake sequence on various structures at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, R.C.; Nelson, T.A.; Coats, D.W.; Ng, D.S.; Weaver, H.J.

    1981-02-04

    On January 24, 1980, California's Livermore Valley was rocked by a moderate earthquake that caused some damage to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The earthquake, which measured 5.5 on the Richter scale and was centered about 20 km (12 mi) northwest of the Laboratory, produced estimated peak horizontal ground acceleration at LLNL of between 0.15 and 0.3 g. The earthquake was part of a sequence that included two sharp aftershocks (magnitudes 5.2 and 4.2) within 1.5 minutes of the initial event. A second earthquake (magnitude 5.8) struck on January 26, and several lesser earthquakes occurred during the next few weeks. This paper describes the damage impact of the January 24 earthquake, including: background information on LLNL, discussion of pre-earthquake seismic safety philosophy, and description of the impact of the January 24 earthquake, including a description of the seismic setting of the Laboratory, a discussion of the ground motion, and a summary of damage. This paper also describes a data gathering and reduction effort at LLNL in the aftermath of the January earthquakes.

  1. Preliminary archaeological survey of proposed gas well locations in Green Township (Scioto County) and Elizabeth Township (Lawrence County) Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, D.B.; Peebles, C.S.; Zielinski, R.E.

    1978-10-24

    The present archaeological survey and cultural resource assessment were conducted for the United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center in areas to be disturbed by gas well drilling and holding pond construction. The project area is the Pine Creek drainage system, which is a tributary of the Ohio River in Scioto and Lawrence Counties, Ohio. The literature search indicated that prehistoric archaeological sites do occur and have been documented in the Pine Creek drainage system. Presently, no archaeological sites have been reported in locations of direct impact. The literature search also indicated that historic features from the early iron industry period, ca. 1840 to 1870, are likely to occur throughout the project area. Field reconnaissance identified three prehistoric archaeological sites and one historic site in and adjacent to the proposed locations of disturbance. Two sites were determined to be of significant research value and may be nominated to the National Register of Historic Places. Consequently, recommendations were made to minimize the adverse effects of the proposed drilling project on these archaeological sites.

  2. A retrospective study of radon daughter concentrations in the workplace in the fluorspar mines of St. Lawrence, Newfoundland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorspar mining began in St. Lawrence, Newfoundland in the early thirties. In the early years the existing economic and social conditions resulted in poor health and safety practices in the mines. A high incidence of many types of pulmonary diseases, including lung cancer, among the miners was investigated by the Department of National Health and Welfare, and by 1960 radiation in the mines was recognized as the major cause. The original epidemiological study used radon daughter exposure estimates determined from a limited number of radon daughter measurements in one of the mines. Insufficient experience existed at that time to allow a proper technical assessment of the mines and to modify the estimated radon daughter concentrations accordingly. A review of the environmental conditions in the early years of mining and a revision of the estimates of radon daughter concentrations in those mines is presented. Environmental working conditions were determined based on a review of maps, inspectors' reports, Commission hearings, recollections of former workers and of the authors. Comparison to the conditions in the mines in later years, when radiation samples were taken more frequently allowed estimations of the probable radon daughter concentrations that would have existed in the mines earlier. Ranges of estimated average concentrations were made by mines for each year and wherever possible for broad types of job classes. Rather than attempting to propose single numbers for radon daughter concentrations, which in turn might have implied an accuracy that did not exist, ranges of average radon daughter concentrations were estimated

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory- Completing the Human Genome Project and Triggering Nearly $1 Trillion in U.S. Economic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Jeffrey S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-28

    The success of the Human Genome project is already nearing $1 Trillion dollars of U.S. economic activity. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was a co-leader in one of the biggest biological research effort in history, sequencing the Human Genome Project. This ambitious research effort set out to sequence the approximately 3 billion nucleotides in the human genome, an effort many thought was nearly impossible. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was discovered in 1869, and by 1943 came the discovery that DNA was a molecule that encodes the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of living organisms and many viruses. To make full use of the information, scientists needed to first sequence the billions of nucleotides to begin linking them to genetic traits and illnesses, and eventually more effective treatments. New medical discoveries and improved agriculture productivity were some of the expected benefits. While the potential benefits were vast, the timeline (over a decade) and cost ($3.8 Billion) exceeded what the private sector would normally attempt, especially when this would only be the first phase toward the path to new discoveries and market opportunities. The Department of Energy believed its best research laboratories could meet this Grand Challenge and soon convinced the National Institute of Health to formally propose the Human Genome project to the federal government. The U.S. government accepted the risk and challenge to potentially create new healthcare and food discoveries that could benefit the world and the U.S. Industry.

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

  5. Contaminant Uptake and Demography of the Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Hattem, M G; Santolo, G

    2005-02-23

    Concentrations of eleven potential environmental contaminants (metals) in the blood and retrice feathers of fledged-Hatch Year and adult loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus) were examined at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 and a control site, in San Joaquin and Contra Costa Counties, California. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine, through non-lethal means, if loggerhead shrikes are exposed to metals at Site 300 and whether specific demographic variables (i.e., clutch size, fledgling success, etc.) are affected. Loggerhead shrikes at Site 300 had higher blood concentrations of metals, especially birds on the west side of the site, when compared to control site birds. Metal concentrations in the feathers of control site birds tended to be higher than Site 300 shrikes. Blood concentrations of metals in loggerhead shrikes from both Site 300 and the control site were well below the Most Tolerant Dietary Level (MTDL) for domestic birds for all metals except selenium. Clutch size was similar to other populations but one deformed embryo was discovered in a failed egg. The results of this pilot study suggest further work is needed to understand possible synergistic effects related to other contaminants of concern found at Site 300 and overall population variability.

  6. Health assessment for Whitewood Creek, Lawrence and Mead Counties, South Dakota, Region 8. CERCLIS No. SD980717136. Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-03-15

    The Whitewood Creek Site is on the National Priorities List. The site, and 18-mile segment of Whitewood Creek, is located in Lawrence and Mead Counties, South Dakota. An estimated 10 billion kilograms of mill tailings are present on-site. Access to the area is unrestricted. Preliminary on-site sampling have identified arsenic (4-780 ppm in ground water, 8 ppm in surface water), cadmium (10 ppm in ground water, 102 ppm in surface water), chromium (19 ppm in ground water), cyanide (10 to 18 ppm in ground water, 2 ppm in surface water), selenium (79 ppm in ground water), lead (308 ppm in surface water). Preliminary off-site soil-sampling results identified arsenic (42 to 440 ppm), cadmium (9 ppm), and copper (412 ppm). Based on available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances. Direct contact and ingestion of contaminated ground water, surface water, soil and sediment are possible human exposure pathways. In addition, inhalation of contaminants entrained in air and ingestion of contaminants that bioaccumulate in the food chain are other potential sources for human exposure.

  7. Resumption of surrogate testing in the Engineering Demonstration System at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Engineering Demonstration System (EDS) is an existing equipment system within the Plutonium Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) designed to test the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) process for application to the Special Isotope Separation (SIS) program. The proposed action is to resume testing with members of the family of rare-earth metals in the EDS. The purpose of these tests is to train operators, verify operations procedures and obtain information on the engineering design, operational reliability, and separative performance capability of the integrated system hardware. The information to be provided by the EDS tests with the rare-earth metals is needed for engineering and operability evaluation of the prototype AVLIS separator hardware in an integrated system configuration. These evaluations are necessary to demonstrate the technology to the maximum extent possible, short of actual validation with plutonium. The EDS tests to be performed would use single and multiple separator units. Testing would be intermittent in nature, typically consisting of one to two tests per month, with durations ranging from approximately 10 to 200 h. 19 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Development of a Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring Network for Emergency Response at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertoldo, N; Hunter, S; Fertig, R; Laguna, G; MacQueen, D

    2004-03-08

    A real-time radiological sensor network for emergency response was developed and deployed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring (RTRAM) network is comprised of 16 Geiger-Mueller (GM) sensors positioned on the LLNL Livermore site perimeter to continuously monitor for a radiological condition resulting from a terrorist threat to site security and the health and safety of LLNL personnel. The RTRAM network sensor locations coincide with wind sector directions to provide thorough coverage of the one square mile site. These low-power sensors are supported by a central command center (CCC) and transmit measurement data back to the CCC computer through the LLNL telecommunications infrastructure. Alarm conditions are identified by comparing current data to predetermined threshold parameters and are validated by comparison with plausible dispersion modeling scenarios and prevailing meteorological conditions. Emergency response personnel are notified of alarm conditions by automatic radio and computer based notifications. A secure intranet provides emergency response personnel with current condition assessment data that enable them to direct field response efforts remotely. The RTRAM network has proven to be a reliable system since initial deployment in August 2001 and maintains stability during inclement weather conditions.

  9. Preliminary report of the past and present uses, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the findings of a records search performed to survey the past and present use, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials and wastes at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site. This report provides a point of departure for further planning of environmental protection activities at the site. This report was conducted using the LLNL archives and library, documents from the US Navy, old LLNL Plant Engineering blueprint files, published articles and reports, Environmental Protection Program records, employee interviews, and available aerial photographs. Sections I and II of this report provide an introduction to the LLNL site and its environmental characteristics. Several tenants have occupied the site prior to the establishment of LLNL, currently operated by the University of California for the US Department of Energy. Section III of this report contains information on environmentally related operations of early site users, the US Navy and California Research and Development. Section IV of this report contains information on the handling of hazardous materials and wastes by LLNL programs. The information is presented in 12 sub-sections, one for each currently operating LLNL program. General site areas, i.e., garbage trenches, the traffic circle landfill, the taxi strip, and old ammunition bunkers are discussed in Section V. 12 refs., 23 figs., 27 tabs

  10. Serving the Nation for Fifty Years: 1952 - 2002 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [LLNL], Fifty Years of Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    For 50 years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been making history and making a difference. The outstanding efforts by a dedicated work force have led to many remarkable accomplishments. Creative individuals and interdisciplinary teams at the Laboratory have sought breakthrough advances to strengthen national security and to help meet other enduring national needs. The Laboratory's rich history includes many interwoven stories -- from the first nuclear test failure to accomplishments meeting today's challenges. Many stories are tied to Livermore's national security mission, which has evolved to include ensuring the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons without conducting nuclear tests and preventing the proliferation and use of weapons of mass destruction. Throughout its history and in its wide range of research activities, Livermore has achieved breakthroughs in applied and basic science, remarkable feats of engineering, and extraordinary advances in experimental and computational capabilities. From the many stories to tell, one has been selected for each year of the Laboratory's history. Together, these stories give a sense of the Laboratory -- its lasting focus on important missions, dedication to scientific and technical excellence, and drive to made the world more secure and a better place to live.

  11. Radial velocities and metallicities from infrared Ca II triplet spectroscopy of open clusters II. Berkeley 23, King 1, NGC 559, NGC 6603 and NGC 7245

    CERN Document Server

    Carrera, R; Ospina, N; Balaguer-Nuñez, L; Jordi, C; Monteagudo, L

    2015-01-01

    Context: Open clusters are key to studying the formation and evolution of the Galactic disc. However, there is a deficiency of radial velocity and chemical abundance determinations for open clusters in the literature. Aims: We intend to increase the number of determinations of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for open clusters. Methods: We acquired medium-resolution spectra (R~8000) in the infrared region Ca II triplet lines (~8500 AA) for several stars in five open clusters with the long-slit IDS spectrograph on the 2.5~m Isaac Newton Telescope (Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, Spain). Radial velocities were obtained by cross-correlation fitting techniques. The relationships available in the literature between the strength of infrared Ca II lines and metallicity were also used to derive the metallicity for each cluster. Results: We obtain = 48.6+/-3.4, -58.4+/-6.8, 26.0+/-4.3 and -65.3+/-3.2 km s-1 for Berkeley 23, NGC 559, NGC 6603 and NGC 7245, respectively. We found [Fe/H] =-0.25+...

  12. The little-studied cluster Berkeley 90. I. LS III +46 11: a very massive O3.5 If* + O3.5 If* binary

    CERN Document Server

    Apellániz, J Maíz; Barbá, R H; Walborn, N R; Pellerin, A; Simón-Díaz, S; Sota, A; Marco, A; Alonso-Santiago, J; Bermudez, J Sanchez; Gamen, R C; Lorenzo, J

    2015-01-01

    Context: It appears that most (if not all) massive stars are born in multiple systems. At the same time, the most massive binaries are hard to find due to their low numbers throughout the Galaxy and the implied large distances and extinctions. AIMS: We want to study: [a] LS III +46 11, identified in this paper as a very massive binary; [b] another nearby massive system, LS III +46 12; and [c] the surrounding stellar cluster, Berkeley 90. Methods: Most of the data used in this paper are multi-epoch high-S/N optical spectra though we also use Lucky Imaging and archival photometry. The spectra are reduced with devoted pipelines and processed with our own software, such as a spectroscopic-orbit code, CHORIZOS, and MGB. Results: LS III +46 11 is identified as a new very-early-O-type spectroscopic binary [O3.5 If* + O3.5 If*] and LS III +46 12 as another early O-type system [O4.5 V((f))]. We measure a 97.2-day period for LS III +46 12 and derive minimum masses of 38.80$\\pm$0.83 M_Sol and 35.60$\\pm$0.77 M_Sol for it...

  13. Advancing Space Sciences through Undergraduate Research Experiences at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory - a novel approach to undergraduate internships for first generation community college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, C. L.; Davis, H. B.; Peticolas, L. M.; Paglierani, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley launched an NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program in the summer of 2015. The "Advancing Space Sciences through Undergraduate Research Experiences" (ASSURE) program recruited heavily from local community colleges and universities, and provided a multi-tiered mentorship program for students in the fields of space science and engineering. The program was focussed on providing a supportive environment for 2nd and 3rd year undergraduates, many of whom were first generation and underrepresented students. This model provides three levels of mentorship support for the participating interns: 1) the primary research advisor provides academic and professional support. 2) The program coordinator, who meets with the interns multiple times per week, provides personal support and helps the interns to assimilate into the highly competitive environment of the research laboratory. 3) Returning undergraduate interns provided peer support and guidance to the new cohort of students. The impacts of this program on the first generation students and the research mentors, as well as the lessons learned will be discussed.

  14. A telephone survey of eel fishermen regarding external lesions and mortalities of American eels (Anguilla rostrata) from Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River basin, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutil, L; Bélanger, D; Couillard, C M

    1997-07-01

    Signs of decreasing landings and recruitment have been observed during the last decade in American eels (Anguilla rostrata) from the St. Lawrence River basin, Canada. A study was undertaken to examine whether important manifestational diseases among commercial catches could be associated with these declines. During this survey, 56 fishermen from Lakes Ontario, Saint-François and Saint-Pierre, the Richelieu River, the Québec City area and the St. Lawrence Estuary were interviewed. Most fishermen from every area reported decreasing catches since the 1980s. Eel mortalities were reported from 1990 to 1992 in Lake Saint-François, Lake Saint-Pierre and the Québec City area, but in apparently lower magnitude than in the past decades. The lesions observed on dead eels in Lake Saint-François indicated that the cause of the mortalities might be associated with the upstream hydroelectric dam. Eels with 'scratches all over the body' were only observed in the St. Lawrence Estuary. Fishermen from almost every area reported that they had observed eels with 'crooked tail', 'humpback' and 'cut tail' in low frequency in 1992. The questionnaire data were validated by comparing some of the results of the questionnaire survey and a processing plant survey in 1992. The use of questionnaires for assessing fish diseases in commercial species is discussed. The results of this survey do not indicate that the health of the American eels from the St. Lawrence River basin is severely impaired. However, the magnitude of diseases and mortalities was probably underestimated. PMID:9234424

  15. 现代文明中的爱情悲剧%The Traglc Love in Modern Civilization·On lawrence's Sons and Lovers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾文雄

    2001-01-01

    Lawrence's Sons and Lover reflects the people in modern civilization are killed off their capacity and emotions to respond to the natural beauty and the loveliness in the human being. There are conflicts in pursuing :instinct, rationality and spirituality.Through the discussion on the hero's tragiclove stories, we can find only if hese conflicts can be solved,perfect humanity will be gained·

  16. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy quarter ending September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Steele, E.; Strait, R.S.

    1994-10-01

    This report presents the details of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and securities program. This program is focused on developing new technology, such as x- and gamma-ray spectrometry, for measurement of special nuclear materials. This program supports the Office of Safeguards and Securities in the following five areas; safeguards technology, safeguards and decision support, computer security, automated physical security, and automated visitor access control systems.

  17. Distributions of oxygen, carbon, and respiratory activity in the deep layer of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and their implications for the carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) is a semi-enclosed sea with an estuarine circulation forced by runoff from the St. Lawrence and Great Lakes drainage systems and balanced by a deep inflow of oceanic waters through the Laurentian Channel. Based on samples collected between July 1992 and June 1994 during Phase I of the CJGOFS program conducted in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, we present new data on the carbon and nutrient chemistry as well as respiratory activity in the deep waters. Organic carbon fluxes estimated from sediment trap data, deepwater respiratory activity, and benthic respiration measurements are consistent with those obtained from the changes in the dissolved oxygen concentration of the deep waters along the Laurentian Channel. These flux estimates suggest that approximately 10% of the local primary production reaches the deep layer (>200 m) and the sediments in the GSL. The vertical carbon budget is almost balanced in the eastern part of the gulf, but approximately half of the carbon produced in the surface layer of the northwestern gulf cannot be accounted for. The difference in hydrodynamic and biological conditions prevailing in both areas may explain our observations. (author). 71 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  18. Vertical distribution and diel migration of macrozooplankton in the St. Lawrence marine system (Canada) in relation with the cold intermediate layer thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Michel; Galbraith, Peter S.; Descroix, Aurélie

    2009-01-01

    Vertical distribution of various species and stages of macrozooplankton (euphausiacea, chaetognatha, cnidaria, mysidacea, amphipoda) were determined for different times of the day and related to the physical environment. Stratified sampling with the BIONESS was carried out during seven cruises in spring and fall 1998, 2000, and 2001, and fall 1999, in two different habitats in the St. Lawrence marine system: the lower St. Lawrence Estuary and the NW Gulf of St. Lawrence. Our results indicate that the various macrozooplankton species were distributed throughout the whole water column including the surface layer, the cold intermediate layer (CIL), and the deep layer at different times of day and night in both areas during all periods. Moreover, three types of migrational patterns were observed within this zooplanktonic community: (1) nocturnal ascent by the whole population, (2) segregation into two groups; one which performed nocturnal accent and another which remained in the deep, and (3) no detectable migration. We also observed that the diel vertical migration (DVM) amplitude in most of the macrozooplankton species varied as a function of physical factors, in particular the spatio-temporal variations of the CIL thermal properties, including the upper and the lower limits of the CIL and the depth of the CIL core temperature. Finally, the different DVM patterns coupled with estuarine circulation patterns and bottom topography could place animals in different flow regimes by night and by day and contribute to their retention (aggregation) and/or dispersion in different areas, time of the day, and seasons.

  19. (222)Rn activity in groundwater of the St. Lawrence Lowlands, Quebec, eastern Canada: relation with local geology and health hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinti, Daniele L; Retailleau, Sophie; Barnetche, Diogo; Moreira, Floriane; Moritz, Anja M; Larocque, Marie; Gélinas, Yves; Lefebvre, René; Hélie, Jean-François; Valadez, Arisai

    2014-10-01

    One hundred ninety-eight groundwater wells were sampled to measure the (222)Rn activity in the region between Montreal and Quebec City, eastern Canada. The aim of this study was to relate the spatial distribution of (222)Rn activity to the geology and the hydrogeology of the study area and to estimate the potential health risks associated with (222)Rn in the most populated area of the Province of Quebec. Most of the groundwater samples show low (222)Rn activities with a median value of 8.6 Bq/L. Ninety percent of samples show (222)Rn activity lower than 100 Bq/L, the exposure limit in groundwater recommended by the World Health Organization. A few higher (222)Rn activities (up to 310 Bq/L) have been measured in wells from the Appalachian Mountains and from the magmatic intrusion of Mont-Saint-Hilaire, known for its high level of indoor radon. The spatial distribution of (222)Rn activity seems to be related mainly to lithology differences between U-richer metasediments of the Appalachian Mountains and magmatic intrusions and the carbonaceous silty shales of the St. Lawrence Platform. Radon is slightly enriched in sodium-chlorine waters that evolved at contact with clay-rich formations. (226)Ra, the parent element of (222)Rn could be easily adsorbed on clays, creating a favorable environment for the production and release of (222)Rn into groundwater. The contribution of groundwater radon to indoor radon or by ingestion is minimal except for specific areas near Mont-Saint-Hilaire or in the Appalachian Mountains where this contribution could reach 45% of the total radioactive annual dose.

  20. 2001-2002 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300, Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W; Woollett, J

    2004-11-16

    Condor County Consulting on behalf of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has performed wet season surveys for listed branchiopods at Site 300, located in eastern Alameda County and western San Joaquin County. LLNL is collecting information for the preparation of an EIS covering ongoing explosives testing and related activities on Site 300. Related activities include maintenance of fire roads and annual control burns of approximately 607 hectares (1500 acres). Control burns typically take place on the northern portion of the site. Because natural branchiopod habitat is sparse on Site 300, it is not surprising that listed branchiopods were not observed during this 2001-2002 wet season survey. Although the site is large, a majority of it has topography and geology that precludes the formation of static seasonal pools. Even the relatively gentle topography of the northern half of the site contains few areas where water pools for more than two weeks. The rock outcrops found on the site did not provide suitable habitat for listed branchiopods. Most of the habitat available to branchiopods on the site is puddles that form in roadbeds and dry quickly. The one persistent pool on the site, the larger of the two modified vernal pools and the only one to fill this season, is occupied by two branchiopod species that require long-lived pools to reach maturity. In short, there is little habitat available on the site for branchiopods and most of the habitat present is generally too short-lived to support the branchiopod species that do occur at Site 300.

  1. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, S K; Pawloski, G A; Raschke, K

    2007-04-26

    This report describes evaluation of collapse evolution for selected LLNL underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The work is being done at the request of NSTec and supports the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Association Nevada Site Office Borehole Management Program (BMP). The primary objective of this program is to close (plug) weapons program legacy boreholes that are deemed no longer useful. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and crater formation are input into their safety decisions. The BMP is an on-going program to address hundreds of boreholes at the NTS. Each year NSTec establishes a list of holes to be addressed. They request the assistance of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory Containment Programs to provide information related to the evolution of collapse history and make statements on completeness of collapse as relates to surface crater stability. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program and the Chemical Sciences Division who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, and ground motion. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. The following unclassified summary

  2. Alternate airborne release fraction determination for hazardous waste management storage repository hazard categorization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities are used in the handling and processing of solid and liquid radioactive, hazardous, mixed, and medical wastes generated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Waste may be treated or stored in one of the HWM facility units prior to shipment off site for treatment or disposal. Planned facilities such as the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) and the Building 280 Container Storage Unit are expected to handle similar waste streams. A hazard classification was preformed in each facility safety analysis report (SAR) according to the DOE Standard 1027-92 'Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.' The general methodology practiced by HWM to determine alternate airborne release fractions (ARFs) in those SARs was based upon a beyond evaluation basis earthquake accident scenario characterized by the release of the largest amount of respirable, airborne radioactive material. The alternate ARF was calculated using a three-factor formula consisting of the fraction of failed waste containers, fraction of material released from failed waste containers,and the fraction of material entrained to the environment. Recently, in deliberation with DOE-Oakland representatives, HWM decided to modify this methodology. In place of the current detailed analysis, a more straightforward process was proposed based upon material form, credible accident environments, and empirical data. This paper will discuss the methodology and derivation of ARFs specific to HWM treatment and storage facilities that are alternative to those presented in DOE-STD-1027-92

  3. Office of Inspector General report on audit of renovation and new construction projects at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-05

    The Oakland Operations Office (Oakland) is responsible for acquiring facilities needed to satisfy mission needs and to do so at the least cost to the Department of Energy (Department). The objective of the audit was to determine if proposed renovation and new construction projects at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore) met mission needs while minimizing cost to the Government. In pursuing three projects, estimated to cost over $78 million, Livermore had not demonstrated that it had selected the best alternatives for meeting the Department`s needs while minimizing cost. Livermore was able to pursue these projects because Oakland did not ensure that the laboratory had performed cost and benefit analyses of all alternatives. Further, Oakland did not establish benchmarks to assess the reasonableness of the total costs of designing, constructing, and managing these projects. As a result, it was likely that the Department was spending more than necessary on renovation and new construction projects at Livermore. Although the projects met mission needs, it was recommended that the Manager, Oakland: (1) require Livermore to perform analyses of expected costs and benefits for alternatives; (2) evaluate the adequacy of Livermore`s cost and benefit analyses of alternatives; (3) establish benchmarks based on industry and other government agency cost data to assess the reasonableness of Livermore`s total design, construction, and project management costs; and (4) select the alternative that meets established needs at the least cost to the Government. Oakland agreed with the recommendations and will implement them starting with the Fiscal Year 1999 project submission and validation.

  4. Physical and underway data collected aboard the KNORR during cruise KN196-01 in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence and others from 2009-09-17 to 2009-10-02 (NODC Accession 0104280)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104280 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the KNORR during cruise KN196-01 in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence and others...

  5. BerkeleyGW: A massively parallel computer package for the calculation of the quasiparticle and optical properties of materials and nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslippe, Jack; Samsonidze, Georgy; Strubbe, David A.; Jain, Manish; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2012-06-01

    BerkeleyGW is a massively parallel computational package for electron excited-state properties that is based on the many-body perturbation theory employing the ab initio GW and GW plus Bethe-Salpeter equation methodology. It can be used in conjunction with many density-functional theory codes for ground-state properties, including PARATEC, PARSEC, Quantum ESPRESSO, SIESTA, and Octopus. The package can be used to compute the electronic and optical properties of a wide variety of material systems from bulk semiconductors and metals to nanostructured materials and molecules. The package scales to 10 000s of CPUs and can be used to study systems containing up to 100s of atoms. Program summaryProgram title: BerkeleyGW Catalogue identifier: AELG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELG_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Open source BSD License. See code for licensing details. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 576 540 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 110 608 809 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90, C, C++, Python, Perl, BASH Computer: Linux/UNIX workstations or clusters Operating system: Tested on a variety of Linux distributions in parallel and serial as well as AIX and Mac OSX RAM: (50-2000) MB per CPU (Highly dependent on system size) Classification: 7.2, 7.3, 16.2, 18 External routines: BLAS, LAPACK, FFTW, ScaLAPACK (optional), MPI (optional). All available under open-source licenses. Nature of problem: The excited state properties of materials involve the addition or subtraction of electrons as well as the optical excitations of electron-hole pairs. The excited particles interact strongly with other electrons in a material system. This interaction affects the electronic energies, wavefunctions and lifetimes. It is well known that ground-state theories, such as standard methods

  6. HYDROLOGY, Lawrence County, ARKANSAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a Flood Insurance...

  7. HYDRAULICS, LAWRENCE COUNTY, ARKANSAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  8. 76 FR 11199 - Application(s) for Duty-Free Entry of Scientific Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... location of aminergic receptors and transporter molecules in specific areas of the central nervous systems... California, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, M/ S 71R0259, Berkeley, CA...

  9. 1 September 2015 - CODEL Lucas, Members of the Committee on Science, Space and Technology, United States of America

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    visiting the ATLAS Visitors Centre and the ATLAS cavern with B. Heinemann, ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley and signing the CERN Guest Book with the Director-General R. Heuer.

  10. Análisis crítico de la educación moral según Lawrence Kohlberg Análise crítica da educação moral segundo Lawrence Kohlberg A Critical Analysis of Moral Education According to Lawrence Kohlberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Paz Elorrieta-Grimalt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Una de las cuestiones apasionantes para la investigación y la práctica educativa es la de saber si se puede o no educar al hombre para que actúe moralmente bien. La postura más defendida de la historia del pensamiento ético es la de que la moral podía y debía ser enseñada y aprendida. No obstante, aunque existe un acuerdo casi unánime acerca de la necesidad de educar moralmente a la actual y a la próxima generación, el consenso desaparece cuando se trata de definir cómo hacerlo y qué valores transmitir. El presente artículo plantea una revisión crítica de la teoría cognitivo-evolutiva de la educación moral propuesta por el psicólogo norteamericano Lawrence Kohlberg, en la que el desarrollo del juicio moral tiene un papel preponderante. Dicho objetivo se realiza a partir de la ética de las virtudes de Aristóteles y Tomás de Aquino, y de varios autores contemporáneos seguidores de la ética clásica. Para lograrlo se utiliza el método racional-deductivo. El trabajo concluye que más importante que la calidad del juicio moral de la persona, es su conducta real. Lo primordial es que logre la armónica integración de razón, voluntad, sentimientos y acción.Uma das questões apaixonantes para a pesquisa e a prática educativa é a de saber se pode ou não educar o homem para que aja moralmente bem. A postura mais defendida da história do pensamento ético é a de que a moral podia e devia ser ensinada e aprendida. Contudo, embora exista um acordo quase unânime sobre a necessidade de educar moralmente a atual e a próxima geração, o consenso desaparece quando se trata de definir como fazer isso e que valores transmitir. O presente artigo apresenta uma revisão crítica da teoria cognitivo-evolutiva da educação moral proposta pelo psicólogo norte-americano Lawrence Kohlberg, na qual o desenvolvimento do juízo moral tem um papel preponderante. Esse objetivo se realiza a partir da ética das virtudes de Aristóteles e Tom

  11. University of California at Berkeley

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The goal of this Center is to establish a forum for the multi-disciplinary approach to understand and reduce the environmental health risks of children. This Center...

  12. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Directing mesenchymal stem cells to bone to ... Accounts of Chemical Research 44, 666 (2011). ... and C. R. Bertozzi. Cell surface glycoproteomic analysis of prostate cancer-derived PC-3 cells. ...

  13. Biogeochemical factors influencing net mercury methylation in contaminated freshwater sediments from the St. Lawrence River in Cornwall, Ontario, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avramescu, Mary-Luyza; Yumvihoze, Emmanuel [Biology Department, University of Ottawa, 30 Marie Curie, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Hintelmann, Holger [Chemistry Department, Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, ON, K9J 7B8 (Canada); Ridal, Jeff [St. Lawrence River Institute of Environmental Sciences, 2 Belmont Street, Cornwall, ON, K6H 4Z1 (Canada); Fortin, Danielle, E-mail: dfortin@uottawa.ca [Earth Science Department, University of Ottawa, 140 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Lean, David R.S. [Biology Department, University of Ottawa, 30 Marie Curie, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2011-02-01

    The activity of various anaerobic microbes, including sulfate reducers (SRB), iron reducers (FeRP) and methanogens (MPA) has been linked to mercury methylation in aquatic systems, although the relative importance of each microbial group in the overall process is poorly understood in natural sediments. The present study focused on the biogeochemical factors (i.e. the relative importance of various groups of anaerobic microbes (FeRP, SRB, and MPA) that affect net monomethylmercury (MMHg) formation in contaminated sediments of the St. Lawrence River (SRL) near Cornwall (Zone 1), Ontario, Canada. Methylation and demethylation potentials were measured separately by using isotope-enriched mercury species ({sup 200}Hg{sup 2+} and MM{sup 199}Hg{sup +}) in sediment microcosms treated with specific microbial inhibitors. Sediments were sampled and incubated in the dark at room temperature in an anaerobic chamber for 96 h. The potential methylation rate constants (K{sub m}) and demethylation rates (K{sub d}) were found to differ significantly between microcosms. The MPA-inhibited microcosm had the highest potential methylation rate constant (0.016 d{sup -1}), whereas the two SRB-inhibited microcosms had comparable potential methylation rate constants (0.003 d{sup -1} and 0.002 d{sup -1}, respectively). The inhibition of methanogens stimulated net methylation by inhibiting demethylationand by stimulating methylation along with SRB activity. The inhibition of both methanogens and SRB was found to enhance the iron reduction rates but did not completely stop MMHg production. The strong positive correlation between K{sub m} and Sulfate Reduction Rates (SRR) and between K{sub d} and Methane Production Rates (MPR) supports the involvement of SRB in Hg methylation and MPA in MMHg demethylation in the sediments. In contrast, the strong negative correlation between K{sub d} and Iron Reduction Rates (FeRR) shows that the increase in FeRR corresponds to a decrease in demethylation

  14. Conflict Management in Participatory Approaches to Water Management: A Case Study of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Furber

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The International Joint Commission (IJC has been involved in a 14-year effort to formulate a new water regulation plan for the Lake Ontario St. Lawrence River (“LOSLR” area that balances the interests of a diverse group of stakeholders including shipping and navigation, hydropower, environment, recreational boating, municipal and domestic water supply, First Nations, and shoreline property owners. It has embraced the principles of collaborative and participatory management and, applying a Shared Visioning Planning (SVP approach, has worked closely with stakeholders throughout all stages of this process; however, conflicts between competing stakeholders have delayed and complicated this effort. The overarching aim of this paper is to consider the extent to which the SVP approach employed by the IJC was effective in managing conflict in the LOSLR context. Audio recordings and transcriptions of public and technical hearings held by the IJC in 2013 have been systematically analysed using stakeholder mapping and content analysis methods, to gain insight into the stakeholder universe interacting with the IJC on Plan 2014.  The principal conclusions of this paper are that (a the Shared Vision Planning approach employed by the IJC had some significant successes in terms of conflict management—particularly notable is the success that has been achieved with regards to integration of First Nation concerns; (b there is a distinct group of shoreline property owners, based in New York State, who remain opposed to Plan 2014—the IJC’s public outreach and participation efforts have not been successful in reconciling their position with that of other stakeholders due to the fact that this stakeholder group perceive that they can only lose out from any regulation change and are therefore unlikely to be motivated to engage productively in any planning dialogue; and (c a solution would require that the problem be reframed so that this stakeholder can see

  15. Community-based participatory research projects and policy engagement to protect environmental health on St Lawrence Island, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela K. Miller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives . This article synthesizes discussion of collaborative research results, interventions and policy engagement for St Lawrence Island (SLI, Alaska, during the years 2000–2012. Methods . As part of on-going community-based participatory research (CBPR studies on SLI, 5 discrete exposure-assessment projects were conducted: (a a biomonitoring study of human blood serum; (b–d 3 investigations of levels of contaminants in environmental media at an abandoned military site at Northeast Cape – using sediment cores and plants, semi-permeable membrane devices and blackfish, respectively; and (e a study of traditional foods. Results . Blood serum in residents of SLI showed elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs with higher levels among those exposed to the military site at Northeast Cape, an important traditional subsistence-use area. Environmental studies at the military site demonstrated that the site is a continuing source of PCBs to a major watershed, and that clean-up operations at the military site generated PCB-contaminated dust on plants in the region. Important traditional foods eaten by the people of SLI showed elevated concentrations of PCBs, which are primarily derived from the long-range transport of persistent pollutants that are transported by atmospheric and marine currents from more southerly latitudes to the north. Interventions . An important task for all CBPR projects is to conduct intervention strategies as needed in response to research results. Because of the findings of the CBPR projects on SLI, the CBPR team and the people of the Island are actively engaging in interventions to ensure cleanup of the formerly used military sites; reform chemicals policy on a national level; and eliminate persistent pollutants internationally. The goal is to make the Island and other northern/Arctic communities safe for themselves and future generations. Conclusions . As part of the CBPR projects conducted from 2000 to 2012

  16. Numerical simulation of the basin scale hydrogeological impacts of carbon sequestration in deep saline aquifers of the St. Lawrence Lowlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girou, O.; Lemieux, J. M.; Malo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Full-scale carbon capture and storage in deep saline aquifers implies injecting important quantities of carbon in order to significantly reduce greenhouse gases emissions. At the basin scale, impacts related to CO2 injection are pressure perturbation as well as brine migration into freshwater aquifers. In this study, potential impacts of an industrial-scale carbon capture and storage project in Bécancour (Quebec, Canada), in the St. Lawrence Lowlands basin, are discussed, as well as the role played by regional normal faults that divide the basin into multiple compartments. The basin is 300 km long and 90 km wide, formed by sub-horizontal Paleozoic formations on top of which the Utica and Lorraine shale formations represent the caprock of the potential CO2reservoir. These formations cover most of the basin, except in its eroded northwestern part, located between 10 to 40 km away from the potential injection sites. Three injection scenarios were considered, corresponding to greenhouse gases emissions from large emitters located; in Bécancour industrial park, in a larger area that allow affordable transport and in the entire basin without considering transport costs (1, 5, 10 Mt/yr). The numerical model FEFLOW was used to simulate CO2 injection into different compartments to evaluate pressure build up propagation and brine migration in order to define which compartments are best suited for long-term storage. The simulations considered an injection period of 100 years and post-injections period of 1000 years. Numerical simulations indicate that normal faults, which exhibit a low hydraulic conductivity, play a major role orienting pressure build-up and brine migration. Due to the presence of normal faults, no pressure build up occurred close to the surface. Similarly, preliminary mass transport simulations show very limited brine migration. These first results indicate that basin-scale impacts of carbon injection are low for the 3 injection scenarios, however, the

  17. Reservoir Characterization of Bridgeport and Cypress Sandstones in Lawrence Field Illinois to Improve Petroleum Recovery by Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Flood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyler, Beverly; Grube, John; Huff, Bryan; Webb, Nathan; Damico, James; Blakley, Curt; Madhavan, Vineeth; Johanek, Philip; Frailey, Scott

    2012-12-21

    Within the Illinois Basin, most of the oilfields are mature and have been extensively waterflooded with water cuts that range up to 99% in many of the larger fields. In order to maximize production of significant remaining mobile oil from these fields, new recovery techniques need to be researched and applied. The purpose of this project was to conduct reservoir characterization studies supporting Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Floods in two distinct sandstone reservoirs in Lawrence Field, Lawrence County, Illinois. A project using alkaline-surfactantpolymer (ASP) has been established in the century old Lawrence Field in southeastern Illinois where original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at over a billion barrels and 400 million barrels have been recovered leaving more than 600 million barrels as an EOR target. Radial core flood analysis using core from the field demonstrated recoveries greater than 20% of OOIP. While the lab results are likely optimistic to actual field performance, the ASP tests indicate that substantial reserves could be recovered even if the field results are 5 to 10% of OOIP. Reservoir characterization is a key factor in the success of any EOR application. Reservoirs within the Illinois Basin are frequently characterized as being highly compartmentalized resulting in multiple flow unit configurations. The research conducted on Lawrence Field focused on characteristics that define reservoir compartmentalization in order to delineate preferred target areas so that the chemical flood can be designed and implemented for the greatest recovery potential. Along with traditional facies mapping, core analyses and petrographic analyses, conceptual geological models were constructed and used to develop 3D geocellular models, a valuable tool for visualizing reservoir architecture and also a prerequisite for reservoir simulation modeling. Cores were described and potential permeability barriers were correlated using geophysical logs. Petrographic analyses

  18. Contaminant residues in snapping turtle (Chelydra s. serpentina) eggs from the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River basin (1999 to 2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashpole, S L; Bishop, C A; Brooks, R J

    2004-08-01

    To determine temporal and geographic variations of environmentally persistent pollutants, the concentrations of several contaminants were measured in snapping turtle eggs in 1999 and 2000. Contaminants included polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), non- ortho PCBs, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and furans, organochlorine pesticides, and total mercury. Egg collection sites within the St. Lawrence Area of Concern (AOC) and the Territory of Akwesasne included Turtle Creek, Snye Marsh, and Raquette River. Additional contaminated sites were Gray's Creek (within the St. Lawrence AOC boundary), Coote's Paradise (Hamilton Harbour AOC), and the Territory of Walpole Island (St. Clair AOC). Reference sites were Lake Sasajewun, Algonquin Provincial Park in central Ontario, and in close proximity to the St. Lawrence Area AOC, Hoasic Creek and Cooper Marsh. Eggs from clutches collected from Akwesasne contained the highest concentrations of contaminants. Mean total PCB concentrations for Akwesasne clutches ranged from 1,900 to 61,000 ng/g wet weight (w.w.), which was 360 to 3,100 times higher than the mean concentrations at the reference sites. The high levels of contaminants in eggs, from sites within Akwesasne, were consistent with trends reported in the past and reflect the influence of the proximity of heavy industry. Current contaminant concentrations in clutches from Coote's Paradise are comparable with those recorded in 1989 and 1990 but are 200 to 800 times lower than concentrations reported in 1984 and 1988. Eggs from Lake Sasajewun contained relatively low contaminant levels, which is consistent with atmospheric deposition. Our results support that snapping turtles are good indicators of temporal and geographic contaminant trends. PMID:15386150

  19. Uso del programa Berkeley Madonna para el desarrollo de modelos en la docencia en Ingeniería Química

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de la Menta Ballesteros Martín

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available La modelización es un procedimiento metodológico fundamental para resolver problemas en ingeniería. Consiste en representar el problema de una manera adecuada, de tal forma que se consiga una sustitución del sistema real por uno más adecuado que permita el tratamiento formal. Es por ello que su aprendizaje es de suma importancia en el estudio de la Ingeniería Química y se enmarca en las competencias contenidas en el módulo de tecnología específica, Química Industrial (Orden CIN/351/2009. En el presente trabajo, se propone el uso del programa informático Berkeley Madonna para el estudio de la modelización del crecimiento bacteriano sobre uno o varios sustratos en la asignatura Procesos Biotecnológicos del Grado en Biotecnología. Por su facilidad de manejo este programa se presenta como un método eficaz para el aprendizaje y práctica de problemas de modelización en la docencia de la Ingeniería Química en el entorno universitario. Mediante el uso del programa informático, los alumnos practicarán las actividades fundamentales relacionadas con el desarrollo de los modelos (descripción cualitativa, selección de hipótesis, proposición de ecuaciones diferenciales y algebraicas que rigen el sistema, análisis de los grados de libertad, resolución, verificación y reformulación. Asimismo, realizarán un análisis de sensibilidad de los modelos propuestos respecto a los parámetros de ajuste del modelo con el fin de determinar cuál tiene mayor influencia en el mismo. También discutirán la importancia del valor numérico de los parámetros y del error del modelo para un ajuste correcto. Finalmente, serán capaces de discernir el sentido físico de los parámetros de ajuste propuestos.

  20. Cost-benefit analysis for waste compaction alternatives at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Addendum A to the Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Plan of May 31, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a cost-benefit analysis of the potential procurement and operation of various solid waste compactors or of the use of commercial compaction services, for compaction of solid transuranic (TRU), low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities. The cost-benefit analysis was conducted to determine if increased compaction capacity at HWM might afford the potential for significant waste volume reduction and annual savings in material, shipping, labor, and disposal costs

  1. Proceedings of a workshop on digital mapping techniques; methods for geologic map data capture, management, and publication - June 2 - 5, 1997, Lawrence, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, David R.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: From June 2-5, 1997, selected technical representatives of the USGS and State geological surveys participated in the 'AASG/USGS Digital Mapping Techniques' workshop in Lawrence, Kansas. The workshop was initiated by the AASG/USGS Data Capture Working Group, and was hosted by the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS). With a focus on methods for data capture and digital map production, the goal was to help move the state surveys and the USGS toward development of more cost-effective, flexible, and useful systems for digital mapping and GIS analysis.

  2. Determination of plutonium isotopic abundances by gamma-ray spectrometry. Interim report on the status of methods and techniques developed by the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an overview of methods and techniques developed by the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for determining plutonium isotopic abundances from gamma-ray spectra that have been measured with germanium detectors. The methodology of fitting the spectral features includes discussions of algorithms for gamma-ray and x-ray peak shape fitting and generation of response spectra profiles characteristic of specific isotopes. Applications of the techniques developed at government, commercial, and Japanese reprocessing plants are described. Current development of the methodology for the nondestructive analysis of samples containing nondescript solid materials is also presented

  3. Exploring the Potential Impact of Serious Games on Social Learning and Stakeholder Collaborations for Transboundary Watershed Management of the St. Lawrence River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wietske Medema

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The meaningful participation of stakeholders in decision-making is now widely recognized as a crucial element of effective water resource management, particularly with regards to adapting to climate and environmental change. Social learning is increasingly being cited as an important component of engagement if meaningful participation is to be achieved. The exact definition of social learning is still a matter under debate, but is taken to be a process in which individuals experience a change in understanding that is brought about by social interaction. Social learning has been identified as particularly important in transboundary contexts, where it is necessary to reframe problems from a local to a basin-wide perspective. In this study, social learning is explored in the context of transboundary water resource management in the St. Lawrence River Basin. The overarching goal of this paper is to explore the potential role of serious games to improve social learning in the St. Lawrence River. To achieve this end, a two-pronged approach is followed: (1 Assessing whether social learning is currently occurring and identifying what the barriers to social learning are through interviews with the region’s water resource managers; (2 Undertaking a literature review to understand the mechanisms through which serious games enhance social learning to understand which barriers serious games can break down. Interview questions were designed to explore the relevance of social learning in the St. Lawrence River basin context, and to identify the practices currently employed that impact on social learning. While examples of social learning that is occurring have been identified, preliminary results suggest that these examples are exceptions rather than the rule, and that on the whole, social learning is not occurring to its full potential. The literature review of serious games offers an assessment of such collaborative mechanisms in terms of design principles

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories Perspective on Code Development and High Performance Computing Resources in Support of the National HED/ICF Effort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clouse, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCoy, M. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marinak, M. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Verdon, C. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-07

    Through its Advanced Scientific Computing (ASC) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) code development efforts, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides a world leading numerical simulation capability for the National HED/ICF program in support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP). In addition the ASC effort provides high performance computing platform capabilities upon which these codes are run. LLNL remains committed to, and will work with, the national HED/ICF program community to help insure numerical simulation needs are met and to make those capabilities available, consistent with programmatic priorities and available resources.

  5. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF SOIL REMEDIATION ALTERNATIVES AT THE BUILDING 812 OPERABLE UNIT, LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Miles, D.; Abitz, R.

    2009-08-14

    The Department of Energy Livermore Site Office requested a technical review of remedial alternatives proposed for the Building 812 Operable Unit, Site 300 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team visited the site and reviewed the alternatives proposed for soil remediation in the draft RI/FS and made the following observations and recommendations. Based on the current information available for the site, the team did not identify a single technology that would be cost effective and/or ecologically sound to remediate DU contamination at Building 812 to current remedial goals. Soil washing is not a viable alternative and should not be considered at the site unless final remediation levels can be negotiated to significantly higher levels. This recommendation is based on the results of soil washing treatability studies at Fernald and Ashtabula that suggest that the technology would only be effective to address final remediation levels higher than 50 pCi/g. The technical review team identified four areas of technical uncertainty that should be resolved before the final selection of a preferred remedial strategy is made. Areas of significant technical uncertainty that should be addressed include: (1) Better delineation of the spatial distribution of surface contamination and the vertical distribution of subsurface contamination in the area of the firing table and associated alluvial deposits; (2) Chemical and physical characterization of residual depleted uranium (DU) at the site; (3) Determination of actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates to support risk modeling; and (4) More realistic estimation of cost for remedial alternatives, including soil washing, that were derived primarily from vendor estimates. Instead of conducting the planned soil washing treatability study, the team recommends that the site consider a new phased approach that combines additional characterization approaches and technologies to address the technical uncertainty in

  6. L’Enseignement supérieur aux États-Unis : l’exemple de Clark Kerr et de l’université ou « multiversité » de Berkeley en 1964

    OpenAIRE

    Frédéric Robert

    2009-01-01

    Higher education in the United States went through a real revolution in the 1960s. In 1964, UC Berkeley, run by President Clark Kerr, and defined as a “multiversity” by its fierce opponents, was a case in point. Indeed, at that time, the American higher educational system was really called into question by a growing number of students. What is Kerr’s own definition of the “multiversity”? To what extent was the “multiversity” or “knowledge industry” different from a traditional university? Was...

  7. Recent wave climate and expected future changes in the seasonally ice-infested waters of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruest, Benoit; Neumeier, Urs; Dumont, Dany; Bismuth, Eliott; Senneville, Simon; Caveen, James

    2016-01-01

    A new method is developed to evaluate the wave climate in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) with the consideration of wave attenuation by sea ice. Ice concentrations outputs from a regional oceanic model are used to attenuate, in post-processing, significant wave height ( H s ) time-series simulated with a parametric wave model for ice-free conditions. Reanalysis data is used to compute GSL wave climate for the 1981-2010 period with and without wave attenuation by sea ice. Outputs from two simulations from the Canadian Regional Climate Model are also used to evaluate how GSL wave climate should evolve during the twenty first century according to the SRES-A2 greenhouse gases emission scenario. Results show that sea ice has reduced extreme H s on the GSL by about 12 % on average over the 1981-2010 period but its impact on wave climate should become negligible by 2100 except in the St. Lawrence Estuary. Over the twenty first century, an increase of extreme H s on the GSL should be expected mostly because of the reduction of sea ice. On the other hand, little changes in the extreme wave climate should be expected as a response to changes in the wind regime over the GSL. For future coastal engineering applications, the GSL wave climate could be evaluated by supposing an ice-free sea to integrate the likely impact of future climate change.

  8. On the Psychological Narrative Technique of The Rainbow by Lawrence%论劳伦斯《虹》的心理叙事技巧

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春燕

    2015-01-01

    小说家 D.H.劳伦斯以对人类关系特别是男女之间的心理探索而著称。劳伦斯的小说《虹》不仅采用传统的全知叙事策略和多种聚焦模式表达人物的思想,而且灵活运用自由间接思维让读者直接进入人物的内心。劳伦斯使用这些技巧描述非可察觉的人物内心的无意识。通过分析劳伦斯使用的叙事技巧,可以充分解读厄休拉追求自我的无意识的生命冲动。%Novelist D.H.Lawrence is well known for his psychological exploration of human relationships,especially those between men and women.In The Rainbow,Lawrence not only adopts traditional omniscient narrative strategies and multiple focalizations to ex-press characters’thoughts,but also uses free indirect thought flexibly to demonstrate non -perceptible unconsciousness by putting readers directly into the mind of characters.

  9. Modeling wetland plant community response to assess water-level regulation scenarios in the Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon, Christiane; Wilcox, Douglas; Ingram, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The International Joint Commission has recently completed a five-year study (2000-2005) to review the operation of structures controlling the flows and levels of the Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River system. In addition to addressing the multitude of stakeholder interests, the regulation plan review also considers environmental sustainability and integrity of wetlands and various ecosystem components. The present paper outlines the general approach, scientific methodology and applied management considerations of studies quantifying the relationships between hydrology and wetland plant assemblages (% occurrence, surface area) in Lake Ontario and the Upper and Lower St. Lawrence River. Although similar study designs were used across the study region, different methodologies were required that were specifically adapted to suit the important regional differences between the lake and river systems, range in water-level variations, and confounding factors (geomorphic types, exposure, sediment characteristics, downstream gradient of water quality, origin of water masses in the Lower River). Performance indicators (metrics), such as total area of wetland in meadow marsh vegetation type, that link wetland response to water levels will be used to assess the effects of different regulation plans under current and future (climate change) water-supply scenarios.

  10. Eco-spirituality in Short Stories of D. H. Lawrence%劳伦斯短篇小说中的精神生态思想

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶敬霞

    2015-01-01

    As a modernist writer, D. H. Lawrence paid much attention to alienation of humanity. In his short stories, there are conflicts between natural instincts of human beings and mechanical civilization in modern times. The unchangeable theme of Lawrence’ s short stories is the scourge of mechanical civilization which twists humanity and the appeal to natural humanity. Ac-cording to Lawrence, only by returning to Nature and the original truth can men get rid of the nightmare of civilization and be away from destruction.%作为一个现代主义作家,劳伦斯十分关注现代文明对人性的异化,在其中短篇小说中生动地再现了人的自然本能与现代机械文明之间的冲突。劳伦斯小说中永恒不变的主题是对扭曲人性的机械文明的鞭挞和对自然人性回归的呼吁。他认为只有回归自然,恢复两性的本来面目,才能使人类摆脱文明的梦魇,远离机器的摧残。

  11. Reservoir Characterization of Bridgeport and Cypress Sandstones in Lawrence Field Illinois to Improve Petroleum Recovery by Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Flood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyler, Beverly; Grube, John; Huff, Bryan; Webb, Nathan; Damico, James; Blakley, Curt; Madhavan, Vineeth; Johanek, Philip; Frailey, Scott

    2012-12-21

    Within the Illinois Basin, most of the oilfields are mature and have been extensively waterflooded with water cuts that range up to 99% in many of the larger fields. In order to maximize production of significant remaining mobile oil from these fields, new recovery techniques need to be researched and applied. The purpose of this project was to conduct reservoir characterization studies supporting Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Floods in two distinct sandstone reservoirs in Lawrence Field, Lawrence County, Illinois. A project using alkaline-surfactantpolymer (ASP) has been established in the century old Lawrence Field in southeastern Illinois where original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at over a billion barrels and 400 million barrels have been recovered leaving more than 600 million barrels as an EOR target. Radial core flood analysis using core from the field demonstrated recoveries greater than 20% of OOIP. While the lab results are likely optimistic to actual field performance, the ASP tests indicate that substantial reserves could be recovered even if the field results are 5 to 10% of OOIP. Reservoir characterization is a key factor in the success of any EOR application. Reservoirs within the Illinois Basin are frequently characterized as being highly compartmentalized resulting in multiple flow unit configurations. The research conducted on Lawrence Field focused on characteristics that define reservoir compartmentalization in order to delineate preferred target areas so that the chemical flood can be designed and implemented for the greatest recovery potential. Along with traditional facies mapping, core analyses and petrographic analyses, conceptual geological models were constructed and used to develop 3D geocellular models, a valuable tool for visualizing reservoir architecture and also a prerequisite for reservoir simulation modeling. Cores were described and potential permeability barriers were correlated using geophysical logs. Petrographic analyses

  12. An inversion model based on salinity and remote sensing reflectance for estimating the phytoplankton absorption coefficient in the Saint Lawrence Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Hugo, Martin; Xie, Huxiang

    2015-10-01

    The inversion of individual inherent optical properties (IOPs) is very challenging in optically complex waters and within the violet spectral range (i.e., 380-450 nm) due to the strong light attenuation caused by chromophoric dissolved organic matter, nonalgal particulates, and phytoplankton. Here we present a technique to better discriminate light absorption contributions due to phytoplankton based on a hybrid model (QAA-hybrid) that combines regional Saint Lawrence System estimates of IOPs derived from a quasi-analytical algorithm (hereafter QAA-SLE) and empirical relationships between salinity and IOPs. Preliminary results in the Saint Lawrence System during May 2000 and April 2001 showed that QAA-hybrid estimates of phytoplankton absorption coefficient at 443 nm have a smaller bias with respect to in situ measurements (root-mean-square deviation, RMSD = 0.156) than those derived from QAA-SLE (RMSD = 0.341). These results were valid for surface waters (i.e., 0-5 m depth) of the lower estuary with a salinity and chlorophyll-a concentration range of 22-28 psu and 2.1-13.8 mg m-3, respectively.

  13. Logs of wells and boreholes drilled during hydrogeologic studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, January 1, 1991--September 1, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 is located in the Altamont Hills between Livermore and Tracy, about 18 road miles southeast of Livermore, California. The site is used as a test facility to support national defense research carried out by LLNL. This Addendum 2 to the Logs of Wells and Boreholes Drilled During Hydrogeologic Studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 presents hydrogeologic logs for monitor wells and boreholes drilled primarily between January 1, 1991 and September 1, 1992. Some logs drilled earlier and not incorporated in earlier volumes of this document are also included here. A small number of logs drilled before September 1, 1992, are not available at the time of closing the report for publication of this volume (Addendum 2), but will be included in subsequent documents. By September 1, 1992, a total of 495 monitor wells and 285 exploratory boreholes had been drilled at Site 300 since the beginning of hydrogeologic studies in 1982. The primary purpose of these logs is to document lithologic and hydrogeologic conditions together with well completion information. For this reason, not all chemical analytical data are presented. These logs report concentrations of only the most commonly encountered volatile organic compounds, trace metals, and radionuclides detected in ground water and soil samples collected during drilling

  14. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF SOIL REMEDIATION ALTERNATIVES AT THE BUILDING 812 OPERABLE UNIT, LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Miles, D.; Abitz, R.

    2009-08-14

    The Department of Energy Livermore Site Office requested a technical review of remedial alternatives proposed for the Building 812 Operable Unit, Site 300 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team visited the site and reviewed the alternatives proposed for soil remediation in the draft RI/FS and made the following observations and recommendations. Based on the current information available for the site, the team did not identify a single technology that would be cost effective and/or ecologically sound to remediate DU contamination at Building 812 to current remedial goals. Soil washing is not a viable alternative and should not be considered at the site unless final remediation levels can be negotiated to significantly higher levels. This recommendation is based on the results of soil washing treatability studies at Fernald and Ashtabula that suggest that the technology would only be effective to address final remediation levels higher than 50 pCi/g. The technical review team identified four areas of technical uncertainty that should be resolved before the final selection of a preferred remedial strategy is made. Areas of significant technical uncertainty that should be addressed include: (1) Better delineation of the spatial distribution of surface contamination and the vertical distribution of subsurface contamination in the area of the firing table and associated alluvial deposits; (2) Chemical and physical characterization of residual depleted uranium (DU) at the site; (3) Determination of actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates to support risk modeling; and (4) More realistic estimation of cost for remedial alternatives, including soil washing, that were derived primarily from vendor estimates. Instead of conducting the planned soil washing treatability study, the team recommends that the site consider a new phased approach that combines additional characterization approaches and technologies to address the technical uncertainty in

  15. 劳伦斯与郁达夫小说的性伦理思想%Sex Ethics Thought in the Fictions by Lawrence and Yu Dafu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋家国

    2009-01-01

    劳伦斯和郁达夫小说的性伦理思想主要体现为:反对理性、道德对人性的干预;主张回归人的自然本性;追求"灵"、"肉"相谐.他们从自己的性伦理标准出发,塑造了一系列具有或丑陋或理想的性关系的人物形象.这对于揭露批判资本主义工业文明对人性的扭曲、封建道德对生命本能的压抑,创建情欲相谐、灵肉统一的新型两性关系具有积极意义.由于劳伦斯在否定资产阶级道德的同时,也否定了任何道德的必要,因而他的性伦理是有缺陷的.郁达夫用充满人道精神的性伦理来反对传统的封建伦理,因而社会现实意义更大一些.%The major thoughts of the sex ethics embodied in Lawrence's and Yu da-fu's fiction are mainly the following points: opposition to the oppression of humanity by rationality and existing social morality, advocacy of the restoration of human nature, pursuit of the harmony between "spirit" and "flesh". They describe some character images (evil or ideal ) with sex relation according to their own sex ethics standards. It has active meaning in Lawrence's criticism of the distortion of humanity by industrialization and the opposition of life nature by feudalism morality, creation of a new sex relation in sexuality harmony and unity of "flesh"and "spirit". However, Lawrence's own sex ethics is also flawed, for he denies the necessity of any morality when he negates the bourgeois morality. While Yu da-fu oppresses traditional feudalism ethics by way of humanity spirit in his fictions, so it gets more realism.

  16. Significance of modified Lawrence's reconstuction procedures following total gastrectomy for gastric cancer%全胃切除改良Lawrence法消化道重建的意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹小明; 宋茂力; 聂刚; 李刚; 佟佰峰; 姜浩

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨胃癌全胃切除术改良Lawrence法消化道重建对患者营养吸收的影响.方法 对76例全胃切除患者,行改良Lawrence法消化道重建3个月和6个月的营养状况及消化道症状进行回顾性分析.结果 76例患者中48例患者于术后3个月行钡餐检查,钡剂排空时间为60~100 min,站立位与平卧位均未见钡剂反流入食管,无吻合口狭窄的征象.分别于术后3个月和6个月复查血红蛋白、总蛋白、体重、进食量,均达到或接近术前水平.结论 该术式使患者在术后短期内恢复正常饮食习惯,手术操作简便、安全,是全胃切除术后一种理想的消化道重建术式.%Objective To explore the influence of modified Lawrence's reconstuction procedures following total gastrectomy for gastric cancer to alimentation of patients. Methods Retrospective analysis of nutritional status and symptoms of digestive tract in 76 patiens of total gastrectomy for gastric cancer while 3 and 6 month after modified Lawrence's reconstuction procedure. Results Examination was given in 48 patients 3 month after operation. Emptying time of barium was 60-100 min, barium meal backflowing to esophagus was not observed in all patients when they were in erect or decubitus position, no sign of narrow of anastomotic stoma. The hemoglobin, total protein, body weight and food-intake of patients 3 or 6 months after operation was as same as them before operation. Conclusion The patients undergoing this reconstuction procedure will recover normal food habits soon after operation, Lawrence's reconstuction procedures is a satisfactory choice in patients of total gastrectomy for gastric cancer because of its safety and convenient.

  17. Continuous analysis of dissolved gaseous mercury and mercury volatilization in the upper St. Lawrence River: exploring temporal relationships and UV attenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, N J; Poissant, L; Canário, L; Ridal, J; Lean, D R S

    2007-08-01

    The formation and volatilization of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) is an important mechanism by which freshwaters may naturally reduce their mercury burden. Continuous analysis of surface water for diurnal trends in DGM concentration (ranging from 0 to 60.4 pg L(-1); n=613), mercury volatilization (ranging from 0.2 to 1.1 ng m(-2) h(-1); n=584), and a suite of physical and chemical measurements were performed during a 68 h period in the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall (Ontario, Canada) to examine the temporal relationships governing mercury volatilization. No lag-time was observed between net radiation and OGM concentrations (highest cross-correlation of 0.817), thus supporting previous research indicating faster photoreduction kinetics in rivers as compared to lakes. A significant lag-time (55-145 min; maximum correlation = 0.625) was observed between DGM formation and mercury volatilization, which is similar to surface water Eddy diffusion times of 42-132 min previously measured in the St. Lawrence River. A depth-integrated DGM model was developed using the diffuse integrated vertical attenuation coefficients for UVA and UVB (K(dI UVA) = 1.45 m(-1) K(dI UVB)= 3.20 m(-1)) Low attenuation of solar radiation was attributed to low concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (mean = 2.58 mg L(-1) and particulate organic carbon (mean = 0.58 mg L(-1) in the St. Lawrence River. The depth-integrated DGM model developed found that the top 0.3 m of the water column accounted for only 26% of the total depth-integrated DGM. A comparison with volatilization data indicated that a large portion (76% or 10.5 ng m(-2) of the maximum depth-integrated DGM (13.8 ng m(-2))is volatilized over a 24 h period. Therefore, at least 50% of all DGM volatilized was produced at depths below 0.3 m. These results highlight the importance of solar attenuation in regulating DGM formation with depth. The results also demonstrate both the fast formation of DGM in rivers and the importance of

  18. Safety Basis Requirements for Nonnuclear Facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site-Specific Work Smart Standard Revision 3 December 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beach, D; Brereton, S; Failor, R; Hildum, J; Ingram, C; Spagnolo, S; van Warmerdam, C

    2007-06-07

    This standard establishes requirements that, when coupled with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) methods and other Work Smart Standards for assuring worker safety, assure that the impacts of nonnuclear operations authorized in LLNL facilities are well understood and controlled in a manner that protects the health of workers, the public, and the environment. All LLNL facilities shall be classified based on potential for adverse impact of operations to the health of co-located (i.e., nearby) workers and the public in accordance with this standard, Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) 830, Subpart B, and Department of Energy Order (DOE O) 420.2A.

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory post-Loma Prieta earthquake initiative: Seismic analysis of an elevated portion of the Bay Bridge distribution system structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, D.; Goudreau, G.

    1990-06-01

    Because of the importance of earthquake safety for the citizens of California, and the potential devastating effects of future large earthquakes on the California economy, upper management at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) made a decision that LLNL should make available any unique laboratory resources to aid in post-earthquake studies. One area in which LLNL has attempted to help is in computer simulation of the performance of large scale transportation structures. The computer horsepower available at LLNL, coupled together with the in-house finite element software capabilities, results in a unique numerical simulation capability for large structures. The effort summarized in this report is one of a number of post-earthquake efforts at LLNL. The financial support for this project was provided by the LLNL Engineering Department. 9 refs., 26 figs.

  20. Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories Code-to-Code Comparison of Inter Lab Test Problem 1 for Asteroid Impact Hazard Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Robert P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Paul [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Howley, Kirsten [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ferguson, Jim Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gisler, Galen Ross [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Plesko, Catherine Suzanne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Managan, Rob [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Owen, Mike [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wasem, Joseph [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bruck-Syal, Megan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The NNSA Laboratories have entered into an interagency collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to explore strategies for prevention of Earth impacts by asteroids. Assessment of such strategies relies upon use of sophisticated multi-physics simulation codes. This document describes the task of verifying and cross-validating, between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), modeling capabilities and methods to be employed as part of the NNSA-NASA collaboration. The approach has been to develop a set of test problems and then to compare and contrast results obtained by use of a suite of codes, including MCNP, RAGE, Mercury, Ares, and Spheral. This document provides a short description of the codes, an overview of the idealized test problems, and discussion of the results for deflection by kinetic impactors and stand-off nuclear explosions.

  1. The Functions of Onomatopoeia in Modern English and Arabic Poetry: A Study in Selected Poems by Lawrence and al-Sayyab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham K. Al-Zubbaidi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Onomatopoeia has always been a functional poetic device which enjoys a high sound significance in the poetry of many languages. In modern English and Arabic poetry alike, it proves to be vital and useful at different levels: musical, thematic and at the level of meaning. Still, the cultural difference looms large over the ways it is employed by the poets of each. The present paper investigates the employment of onomatopoeia in the poetry of D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930 and Badr Shakir al-Sayyab (1926-1964 who are chosen due to the importance they enjoy in modern English and Arabic poetry and the richness of their poems in onomatopoeias.  The conclusions reached at are in a sense related to cultural differences which govern the use of onomatopoeia for specific aims rather than for others.

  2. Sandia`s network for Supercomputing `94: Linking the Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Sandia National Laboratories using switched multimegabit data service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahle, M.O.; Gossage, S.A.; Brenkosh, J.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Networking Integration Dept.

    1995-01-01

    Supercomputing `94, a high-performance computing and communications conference, was held November 14th through 18th, 1994 in Washington DC. For the past four years, Sandia National Laboratories has used this conference to showcase and focus its communications and networking endeavors. At the 1994 conference, Sandia built a Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS) network running at 44.736 megabits per second linking its private SMDS network between its facilities in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Livermore, California to the convention center in Washington, D.C. For the show, the network was also extended from Sandia, New Mexico to Los Alamos National Laboratory and from Sandia, California to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This paper documents and describes this network and how it was used at the conference.

  3. Production and isolation of homologs of flerovium and element 115 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New procedures have been developed to isolate no-carrier-added (NCA) radionuclides of the homologs and pseudo-homologs of flerovium (Hg, Sn) and element 115 (Sb), produced by 12-15 MeV proton irradiation of foil stacks with the tandem Van-de-Graaff accelerator at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) facility. The separation of 113Sn from natIn foil was performed with anion-exchange chromatography from hydrochloric and nitric acid matrices. A cation-exchange chromatography method based on hydrochloric and mixed hydrochloric/ hydroiodic acids was used to separate 124Sb from natSn foil. A procedure using Eichrom TEVA resin was developed to separate 197Hg from Au foil. These results demonstrate the suitability of using the CAMS facility to produce NCA radioisotopes for studies of transactinide homologs. (author)

  4. Jacob Lawrence’s Migration series: a pictorial memory of black America Les Migrations de Jacob Lawrence : souvenir pictural de l’Amérique noire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Elmaleh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Jacob Lawrence, artiste afro-américain décédé en juin 2000, a étudié la condition humaine et plus spécifiquement la condition des Afro-américains durant plus de six décennies. Ses mises en scène visuelles, sous forme de séries de peintures aux thématiques variées vont d’événements historiques comme la Grande Migration des Noirs dans les années 1920-1930 à l’étude de personnages héroïques, symboles mythiques de la lutte pour l’émancipation et l’égalité. Cet article tente de mettre en lumière l’importance d’une période pour les Noirs américains qui, pour se libérer des lourdes conséquences de l’esclavage essayèrent de construire une nouvelle identité noire en affirmant l’existence d’une culture noire. Je tenterai de déterminer la façon dont Lawrence s’est positionné dans cette perspective et sa représentation de l’histoire afro-américaine au travers principalement de The Migration of the Negro, série de tableaux peints sous un mode narratif qui raconte la fuite de centaines de milliers de noirs américains du Sud rural vers le Nord urbain industrialisé après la Première Guerre mondiale. J’explorerai les multiples facettes de sa vision de la Grande Migration en tant qu’historien et artiste.

  5. Cadrage, décadrage et recadrage dans Baa Baa Black Sheep : A Jungle Tale de David Malouf et Michael Berkeley Patrimonial Deconstruction and Reconstruction in David Malouf and Michael Berkeley’s Baa Baa Black Sheep : A Jungle Tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Héberlé

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses Michael Berkeley’s first opera, Baa Baa Black Sheep: A Jungle Tale. Premiered under the baton of Paul Daniel on July 3rd 1993 at the Cheltenham International Festival of Music, this opera is based on two texts by Rudyard Kipling: The Jungle Books (1894-1895 and “Baa, Baa, Black Sheep” from the short story collection Wee Willie Winkie and Other Stories, first published in 1888. The libretto was penned by the Australian poet, novelist, playwright and librettist, David Malouf. After a brief survey of some of the earliest transpositions of The Jungle Books, I analyse the way David Malouf deals with both texts. “Baa Baa Black Sheep” is used as the central element of his libretto, and episodes and characters from The Jungle Books are incorporated to draw parallelism between the main topics of the two texts. Both Malouf’s endeavour and Berkeley’s, through the music, aims at deconstructing the preposterous oldest transpositions of The Jungle Books and at focusing on the key elements of Kipling’s famous book, notably identity and hybridism, two important themes of colonial and postcolonial literature. The aim of David Malouf and Michael Berkeley is to address an adult audience and show that The Jungle Books are not only aimed at children as Disney’s or Baden Powell’s appropriations of the work could wrongly make us believe.Cet article porte sur Baa Baa Black Sheep: A Jungle Tale, le premier opéra de Michael Berkeley. Créé au Everyman Theatre de Cheltenham le 3 juillet 1993 sous la direction de Paul Daniel, cette œuvre est le fruit de la collaboration entre le compositeur britannique et l’écrivain australien David Malouf. Le livret de Malouf se fonde sur deux récits de Rudyard Kipling : la nouvelle autobiographique “Baa, Baa, Black Sheep” auquel l’opéra doit son nom et The Jungle Books. Après m’être intéressé aux premières transpositions musicales de The Jungle books, je montre comment

  6. Around the laboratories: Rutherford: Successful tests on bubble chamber target technique; Stanford (SLAC): New storage rings proposal; Berkeley: The HAPPE project to examine cosmic rays with superconducting magnets; The 60th birthday of Professor N.N. Bogolyubov; Argonne: Performance of the automatic film measuring system POLLY II

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    Around the laboratories: Rutherford: Successful tests on bubble chamber target technique; Stanford (SLAC): New storage rings proposal; Berkeley: The HAPPE project to examine cosmic rays with superconducting magnets; The 60th birthday of Professor N.N. Bogolyubov; Argonne: Performance of the automatic film measuring system POLLY II

  7. PCBs and organochlorine pesticides in blubber biopsies from free-ranging St. Lawrence River Estuary beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas), 1994-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measuring contaminants only in stranded whales may result in overestimation of organochlorines. - For the first time, organochlorine (OC) contaminants were measured in blubber biopsies from free-ranging St. Lawrence River Estuary beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas), to compare contaminant levels to those previously measured in dead stranded belugas. PCBs, DDTs, toxaphene and chlordane-related compounds were the major OC contaminants detected in 44 belugas biopsied in 1994-1998. ΣPCB (the sum of 104 congeners) ranged from 2080 to 128,000 ng/g lipid in males (n=34; minimum estimated ages 8-22 years), and from 148 to 44,100 ng/g lipid in females (n=10; minimum estimated ages 7-22 years). The concentrations of PCBs and OC pesticides in the blubber of these whales overlapped those observed in stranded belugas from an earlier study, and demonstrated comparable age and sex-related trends. However, lower proportions of mirex, HCB, DDTs, and many of the highly chlorinated PCBs occurred in the biopsy samples compared to results for blubber from stranded carcasses. Most major OC compounds were present at lower concentrations in the biopsies, but this does not appear to be solely related to age differences between the two groups, or to emaciation in the stranded whales. Nor does it appear to be associated with the use of superficial biopsies, and the possible stratification of lipids and OCs in the blubber layer. Nevertheless, given these possible confounding factors, and the uncertainty in age estimates for the biopsied whales, the results point to the need for careful interpretation of biopsy results when comparing with data taken from the full depth of the blubber mantle in stranded whales. Taken together, results from both biopsied whales and previously studied stranded belugas indicate that PCB and OC pesticide contamination of St. Lawrence beluga whales may occur across a broader range of levels than previously thought, at least for males which formed the largest

  8. MANAGEMENT PRE-START REVIEW FINAL REPORT FOR THE BIOSAFETY LEVEL 3 (BSL-3) FACILITY (B368) LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, R; O' brien, J; Owens, T; Salvo, V; Sassone, D; Tuholski, S J; Tsan, S

    2006-07-25

    A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Management Pre-Start Review (MPR) Team was formed to independently verify the operational readiness of Building 368 (B368) Biosafety Level III (BSL-3) Facility to conduct research with biological pathogens and toxins including those considered Select Agents. Review objectives and criteria were developed from the DOE/NNSA and LLNL requirements. These were provided in the Implementation Plan for the Biosafety Level III (BSL-3) Facility Management Pre-Start Review (BSL-3 MPR) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that was reviewed and approved by DOE/NNSA-LSO. The formal part of the LLNL MPR for the BSL-3 Facility was begun in August of 2005 but work on the MPR was stopped in October of 2005 due to the need for LLNL to reassess organizational and operational controls and respond to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention inquiries related to a shipping incident involving select agents. The MPR was restarted in mid-June of 2006. Preliminary facility tours and familiarization with project documents took place in June of 2005. The Independent Management Review Team consists of seven members led by a Team Leader with expertise in management, operations, and safety basis experience with biosafety laboratories. Other team members have expertise in electrical engineering, security, environmental/waste management/regulatory compliance, biosafety/industrial hygiene/medical, structural engineering, and mechanical engineering. The MPR Team reviewed various documents, including authorization basis, safety, emergency preparedness, and various operations, configuration, and management plans. They also reviewed building plans, equipment repair/maintenance documents, training records, and many standard operating procedures. The MPR resulted in three Pre-Start Findings, one Post-Start/Critical Finding, and four observations which are shown on Tables 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Based upon this review the Team feels that the B368

  9. Sit Down with Sabin: Margaret Torn: The Carbon Cycle Like You've Never Seen It (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Sabin; Torn, Margaret

    2011-07-06

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory soil scientist Margaret Torn appears July 6, 2011 on "Sit Down with Sabin," a weekly conversation in which former reporter Sabin Russell chats with Berkeley Lab staff about innovative science. Torn discusses how she travels the world to learn more about soil's huge role in the global carbon cycle. Brought to you by Berkeley Lab Public Affairs.

  10. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Pre-project Rare Plant and Wildlife Surveys For the Pit 7 Drainage Diversion and Groundwater Extraction and Treatment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, L; Woollett, J

    2007-07-17

    In January 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) released the final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Environmental Remediation at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 Pit 7 Complex. At the same time, the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) released the final Negative Declaration and Initial Study covering the Pit 7 remediation. No substantial adverse effect on wildlife species of concern was anticipated from the project. However, it was proposed that wildlife surveys should be conducted prior to construction because species locations and breeding areas could potentially change by the time construction activities began. Although no known populations of rare or endangered/threatened plant species were known to occur within the project impact area at the time these documents were released, rare plants listed by the California Native Plant Society had been observed in the vicinity. As such, both DOE and DTSC proposed that plant surveys would be undertaken at the appropriate time of year to determine if rare plants would be impacted by project construction. This document provides the results of wildlife and rare plant surveys taken prior to the start of construction at the Pit 7 Complex.

  11. Comparison of the Recently proposed Super Marx Generator Approach to Thermonuclear Ignition with the DT Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid Concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed Super Marx generator pure deuterium micro-detonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser DT fusion-fission hybrid concept (LiFE) [1]. In a Super Marx generator a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultra-high voltage Marx generator, from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium micro-explosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. A typical example of the LiFE concept is a fusion gain of 30, and a fission gain of 10, making up for a total gain of 300, with about 10 times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means a substantial release of fission products, as in fusion-less pure fission reactors. In the Super Marx approach for the ignition of a pure deuterium micro-detonation a gain of the same magnitude can in theory be reached [2]. If feasible, the Super Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of ther...

  12. Risk assessment of down-the-drain chemicals at large spatial scales: Model development and application to contaminants originating from urban areas in the Saint Lawrence River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Günther; Khan, Usman; Lehner, Bernhard; Nicell, Jim; Ariwi, Joseph

    2016-01-15

    Chemicals released into freshwater systems threaten ecological functioning and may put aquatic life and the health of humans at risk. We developed a new contaminant fate model (CFM) that follows simple, well-established methodologies and is unique in its cross-border, seamless hydrological and geospatial framework, including lake routing, a critical component in northern environments. We validated the model using the pharmaceutical Carbamazepine and predicted eco-toxicological risk for 15 pharmaceuticals in the Saint-Lawrence River Basin, Canada. The results indicated negligible to low environmental risk for the majority of tested chemicals, while two pharmaceuticals showed elevated risk in up to 13% of rivers affected by municipal effluents. As an integrated model, our CFM is designed for application at very large scales with the primary goal of detecting high risk zones. In regulatory frameworks, it can help screen existing or new chemicals entering the market regarding their potential impact on human and environmental health. Due to its high geospatial resolution, our CFM can also facilitate the prioritization of actions, such as identifying regions where reducing contamination sources or upgrading treatment plants is most pertinent to achieve targeted pollutant removal or to protect drinking water resources.

  13. Integrated spatial health assessment of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) populations from the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada) part A: physiological parameters and pathogen assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudo, Maeva; Bruneau, Audrey; Gendron, Andrée D; Brodeur, Philippe; Pilote, Martin; Marcogliese, David J; Gagnon, Christian; Houde, Magali

    2016-09-01

    A multi-disciplinary approach was used to evaluate the health of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) in the St. Lawrence River (Quebec, Canada), which is experiencing a severe population decline in the downstream portion of the river. Physiological parameters, liver alterations, trace metal concentrations, parasite prevalence and abundance, stable isotope composition, and the presence/absence of the viral hemorragic septicemia virus (VHSV) were evaluated in perch collected at six sites along the river: Lake St. François, Lake St. Louis (north and south), Beauregard Island, and Lake St. Pierre (north and south). Trace metal concentrations in surface water were higher in Lake St. Louis and downstream of a major urban wastewater treatment plant discharge, indicating that this effluent was a significant source of Cu, As, Ag, Zn, and Cd. Levels of Pb in surface water exceeded thresholds for the protection of aquatic life in Lake St. Louis and were negatively correlated with body condition index in this lake. In Lake St. Pierre, Cu, Ag, and Cd bioaccumulated significantly in perch liver and lower body condition index and greater liver damage were observed compared to upstream sites. Parasite analyses indicated a higher abundance of metacercariae of the trematodes Apophallus brevis and Diplostomum spp. in Lake St. Louis, and VHSV was not detected in the liver of yellow perch for all studied sites. Overall, results suggested that the global health of yellow perch from Lake St. Pierre is lower compared to upstream studied sites, which could contribute to the documented population collapse at this site.

  14. Type B accident investigation board report of the July 2, 1997 curium intake by shredder operator at Building 513 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On July 2, 1997 at approximately 6:00 A.M., two operators (Workers 1 and 2), wearing approved personal protective equipment (PPE), began a shredding operation of HEPA filters for volume reduction in Building 513 (B-513) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The waste requisitions indicated they were shredding filters containing ≤ 1 μCi of americium-241 (Am-241). A third operator (Worker 3) provided support to the shredder operators in the shredding area (hot area) from a room that was adjacent to the shredding area (cold area). At Approximately 8:00 A.M., a fourth operator (Worker 4) relieved Worker 2 in the shredding operation. Sometime between 8:30 A.M. and 9:00 A.M., Worker 3 left the cold area to make a phone call and set off a hand and foot counter in Building 514. Upon discovering the contamination, the shredding operation was stopped and surveys were conducted in the shredder area. Surveys conducted on the workers found significant levels of contamination on their PPE and the exterior of their respirator cartridges. An exit survey of Worker 1 was conducted at approximately 10:05 A.M., and found contamination on his PPE, as well as on the exterior and interior of his respirator. Contamination was also found on his face, chest, back of neck, hair, knees, and mustache. A nose blow indicated significant contamination, which was later determined to be curium-244

  15. An Interpretation of Life in The Rainbow by D·H·Lawrence%劳伦斯小说《虹》对人生意义的阐释

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱谷强

    2014-01-01

    劳伦斯的《虹》描写了布朗温家族三代人在婚姻与爱情、人生道路上的不同命运,凸显了作者对两性关系与人生意义之间的问题的独特思考。面对人类沦为工业文明的奴隶这一不良社会后果,劳伦斯认为只有和谐的性爱关系才是祛除弊病的新动力,他推崇直指本能的“血性意识”,并以之来阐释人生的理想之路。%The Rainbow depicts the purely instinctive marriage between Lydia and Tom,the endless conjugal battle between Anna and Will,and the separation of mind and body between Ursula and her lover.Through the representation of the superficial sexual relation-ship,the very truth is revealed that their road is getting wider and wider.Lawrence believes that harmony sexual relationship is the only new drive of getting rid of the problem,and he admires blood consciousness,which directly refers to the instinct.

  16. 劳伦斯凤凰涅槃式的女性解救%Lawrence's Saving of Women in Phoenix Nirvana Style

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梅

    2015-01-01

    Lawrence viewed death as a"rebirth" just like the nirvana of the phoenix. By this way he called for the return of human being's nature, he wanted to save the feminine as well. The right themes are contained in some of his short stories. Through analyzing some of his short stories such as Odour of Chrysanthemums and The Horse Dealer's Daughter, we can conclude that he was giving a guidance to women on how to fight for their rights.%英国作家劳伦斯的死亡观是希望通过凤凰涅槃式的"重生"来实现人之本性的自然回归,也是他为解救女性所作的殚精竭虑的思考. 他的短篇小说诸如《菊花的气味》、《马贩子的女儿》等都有着关于女性经历了凤凰涅槃而获得重生的主题. 他为女性争取权利所指明的过程是:先是觉醒,接着发出呼声,然后采取行动,最后争取男女平等的权利.

  17. Investigation into the response of the auditory and acoustic communications systems in the Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) of the St. Lawrence River Estuary to noise, using vocal classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheifele, Peter Martin

    2003-06-01

    Noise pollution has only recently become recognized as a potential danger to marine mammals in general, and to the Beluga Whale (Delphinapterus leucas) in particular. These small gregarious Odontocetes make extensive use of sound for social communication and pod cohesion. The St. Lawrence River Estuary is habitat to a small, critically endangered population of about 700 Beluga whales who congregate in four different sites in its upper estuary. The population is believed to be threatened by the stress of high-intensity, low frequency noise. One way to determine whether noise is having an effect on an animal's auditory ability might be to observe a natural and repeatable response of the auditory and vocal systems to varying noise levels. This can be accomplished by observing changes in animal vocalizations in response to auditory feedback. A response such as this observed in humans and some animals is known as the Lombard Vocal Response, which represents a reaction of the auditory system directly manifested by changes in vocalization level. In this research this population of Beluga Whales was tested to determine whether a vocalization-as-a-function-of-noise phenomenon existed by using Hidden Markhov "classified" vocalizations as targets for acoustical analyses. Correlation and regression analyses indicated that the phenomenon does exist and results of a human subjects experiment along with results from other animal species known to exhibit the response strongly implicate the Lombard Vocal Response in the Beluga.

  18. NEW GUN CAPABILITY WITH INTERCHANGABLE BARRELS TO INVESTIGATE LOW VELOCITY IMPACT REGIMES AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH EXPLOSIVES APPLICATIONS FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandersall, K S; Behn, A; Gresshoff, M; Jr., L F; Chiao, P I

    2009-09-16

    A new gas gun capability is being activated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories located in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). The single stage light gas (dry air, nitrogen, or helium) gun has interchangeable barrels ranging from 25.4 mm to 76.2 mm in diameter with 1.8 meters in length and is being fabricated by Physics Applications, Inc. Because it is being used for safety studies involving explosives, the gun is planned for operation inside a large enclosed firing tank, with typical velocities planned in the range of 10-300 m/s. Three applications planned for this gun include: low velocity impact of detonator or detonator/booster assemblies with various projectile shapes, the Steven Impact test that involves impact initiation of a cased explosive target, and the Taylor impact test using a cylindrical explosive sample impacted onto a rigid anvil for fracture studies of energetic materials. A highlight of the gun features, outline on work in progress for implementing this capability, and discussion of the planned areas of research will be included.

  19. Detection of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in round gobies in New York State (USA) waters of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groocock, G.H.; Getchell, R.G.; Wooster, G.A.; Britt, K.L.; Batts, W.N.; Winton, J.R.; Casey, R.N.; Casey, J.W.; Bowser, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    In May 2006 a large mortality of several thousand round gobies Neogobius melanostomus (Pallas, 1814) occurred in New York waters of the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. Necropsies of sampled fish from these areas showed pallor of the liver and gills, and hemorrhagic areas in many organs. Histopathologic examination of affected tissues revealed areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Inoculations of fathead minnow Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820) cell cultures with dilutions of tissue samples from the necropsied gobies produced a cytopathic effect within 5 d post-inoculation. Samples of cell culture supernatant were tested using RT-PCR and confirmed the presence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). Sequence analysis of the VHSV isolate resulted in its assignment to the type-IVb subgroup. The detection of VHSV in a relatively recent invasive fish species in the Great Lakes and the potential impact of VHSV on the ecology and economy of the area will require further investigation and careful management considerations. ?? Inter-Research 2007.

  20. Report on the Threatened Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle and its Elderberry Food Plant at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory--Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Ph.D., R A; Woollett, J

    2004-11-16

    This report describes the results of an entomological survey in 2002 to determine the presence of the federally-listed, threatened Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle or ''VELB'' (Desmocerus culifornicus dimorphus: Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) and its elderberry food plant (Sumbucus mexicana: Caprifoliaceae) on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Experimental Test Site, known as Site 300. In addition, an area located immediately southeast of Site 300, which is owned and managed by the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), but secured by LLNL, was also included in this survey. This report will refer to the survey areas as the LLNL-Site 300 and the CDFG site. The 2002 survey included mapping the locations of elderberry plants that were observed using a global positioning system (GPS) to obtain positional coordinates for every elderberry plant at Site 300. In addition, observations of VELB adults and signs of their infestation on elderberry plants were also mapped using GPS technology. LLNL requested information on the VELB and its elderberry food plants to update earlier information that had been collected in 1991 (Arnold 1991) as part of the 1992 EIS/EIR for continued operation of LLNL. No VELB adults were observed as part of this prior survey. The findings of the 2002 survey reported herein will be used by LLNL as it updates the expected 2004 Environmental Impact Statement for ongoing operations at LLNL, including Site 300.