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Sample records for 192ir brachytherapy source

  1. In vivo dosimetry thermoluminescence dosimeters during brachytherapy with a 370 GBq {sup 192}Ir source

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    Cuepers, S.; Piessens, M.; Verbeke, L.; Roelstraete, A. [Onze-Lieve-Vrouw Hospitaal, Aalst (Belgium). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology

    1995-12-01

    When using LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters in brachytherapy, we have to take into account the properties of a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir source (energy spectrum ranging form 9 to 885 keV, steep dose gradient in the vicinity of the source) and these of the dosimeters themselves (supralinearity, reproducibility, size). All these characteristics combine into a set of correction factors which have been determined during in phantom measurements. These results have then been used to measure the dose delivered to organs at risk (e.g. rectum, bladder, etc.) during high dose rate brachytherapy with a 370 GBq {sup 192}Ir source for patients with gynaecological tumors.

  2. Patient effective dose from endovascular brachytherapy with 192Ir sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perma, L; Bianchi, C; Nicolini, G; Novario, R; Tanzi, F; Conte, L

    2002-01-01

    The growing use of endovascular brachytherapy has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies in several fields, but few studies on patient dose have been found in the literature. Moreover, these studies were carried out on the basis of Monte Carlo simulation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effective dose to the patient undergoing endovascular brachytherapy treatment with 112Ir sources, by means of experimental measurements. Two standard treatments were taken into account: an endovascular brachytherapy of the coronary artery corresponding to the activity x time product of 184 GBq.min and an endovascular brachytherapy of the renal artery (898 GBq.min). Experimental assessment was accomplished by thermoluminescence dosemeters positioned in more than 300 measurement points in a properly adapted Rqndo phantom. A method has been developed to estimate the mean organ doses for all tissues and organs concerned in order to calculate the effective dose associated with intravascular brachytherapy. The normalised organ doses resulting from cronary treatment were 2.4 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for lung, 0.9 x 10(-2) mSv.GBSq(-1).min(-1) for oesophagus and 0.48 x 10(-2) mS.GBq(-1).min(-1) for bone marrow. During brachytherapy of the renal artery, the corresponding normalised doses were 4.2 x 10(-2) mS.GBq(-1).min(-1) for colon, 7.8 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for stomach and 1.7 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for liver. Coronary treatment iJnvlled an efl'fective dose of (0.046 mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1), whereas the treatment of the renal artery resulted in an effective dose of 0.15 mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1); there were many similarities with data from former studies. Based on these results it can be concluded that the dose level of patients exposed during brachytherapy treatment is low.

  3. Source geometry factors for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, D. R.; Sander, T.; Nutbrown, R. F.

    2015-03-01

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated 192Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR 192Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, ksg, is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR 192Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR 192Ir Flexisource ksg was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  4. Comparison of the hypothetical 57Co brachytherapy source with the 192Ir source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Rostami, Atefeh; Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Khademi, Sara; Knaup, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study The 57Co radioisotope has recently been proposed as a hypothetical brachytherapy source due to its high specific activity, appropriate half-life (272 days) and medium energy photons (114.17 keV on average). In this study, Task Group No. 43 dosimetric parameters were calculated and reported for a hypothetical 57Co source. Material and methods A hypothetical 57Co source was simulated in MCNPX, consisting of an active cylinder with 3.5 mm length and 0.6 mm radius encapsulated in a stainless steel capsule. Three photon energies were utilized (136 keV [10.68%], 122 keV [85.60%], 14 keV [9.16%]) for the 57Co source. Air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function, anisotropy function, and isodose curves for the source were calculated and compared to the corresponding data for a 192Ir source. Results The results are presented as tables and figures. Air kerma strength per 1 mCi activity for the 57Co source was 0.46 cGyh–1 cm 2 mCi–1. The dose rate constant for the 57Co source was determined to be 1.215 cGyh–1U–1. The radial dose function for the 57Co source has an increasing trend due to multiple scattering of low energy photons. The anisotropy function for the 57Co source at various distances from the source is more isotropic than the 192Ir source. Conclusions The 57Co source has advantages over 192Ir due to its lower energy photons, longer half-life, higher dose rate constant and more isotropic anisotropic function. However, the 192Ir source has a higher initial air kerma strength and more uniform radial dose function. These properties make 57Co a suitable source for use in brachytherapy applications. PMID:27688731

  5. Verification of high dose rate 192Ir source position during brachytherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system for in vivo tracking of 1 Ci 192Ir source during brachytherapy treatment has been built using high resistivity silicon pad detectors as image sensors and knife-edge lead pinholes as collimators. The sensors consist of 256 pads arranged in 32 x8 grid with pad size 1.4x1.4mm2 and 1 mm thickness. The sensors have two metal layers, enabling connection of readout electronics (VATAGP31 chips) at the edge of the detector. With source self-images obtained from a dual-pinhole system, location of the source can be reconstructed in three dimensions in real time, allowing on-line detection of deviations from planned treatment. The system was tested with 1 Ci 192Ir clinical source in air and plexi-glass phantom. The movements of the source could be tracked in a field of view of approximately 20x20x20cm3 with absolute precision of about 5 mm. Positions of the source, relative to the first measured source position, could be mapped with precision of around 3 mm.

  6. Monte Carlo angular dose distribution of the microselectron HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polar dose profiles around the Nucletron MicroSelectron high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy source were calculated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N Particle) version 4A. The geometry modeled consisted of an identical simulation of the construction of the MicroSelectron HDR source located at the centre of a spherical water phantom of 100cm radius. Doses were calculated using a spherical coordinate system at 5 degree intervals (measured relative to the cable) at radii of 0.25, 0.5,1.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 7.0cm. These polar doses were compared to equivalent profiles from the Nucletron PLATO Brachytherapy Planning System (BPS) version 13.X. At 3.0, 5.0 and 7.0cm radii, the Monte Carlo and BPS profiles are generally within 3%. The near field polar dose profiles however, are in significant disagreement. At 1.0cm radius, the discrepancy can exceed 5%. At 0.5cm this figure rises to 15%, and even 60% at 0.25cm radius

  7. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. - Author-Highlights: • The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. • FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. • The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. • The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus

  8. Estimation of distance error by fuzzy set theory required for strength determination of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Datta, D; Sharma, S D; Chourasiya, G; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2014-04-01

    Verification of the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of institutional quality assurance program. Either reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) or air-kerma strength (AKS) is the recommended quantity to specify the strength of gamma-emitting brachytherapy sources. The use of Farmer-type cylindrical ionization chamber of sensitive volume 0.6 cm(3) is one of the recommended methods for measuring RAKR of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. While using the cylindrical chamber method, it is required to determine the positioning error of the ionization chamber with respect to the source which is called the distance error. An attempt has been made to apply the fuzzy set theory to estimate the subjective uncertainty associated with the distance error. A simplified approach of applying this fuzzy set theory has been proposed in the quantification of uncertainty associated with the distance error. In order to express the uncertainty in the framework of fuzzy sets, the uncertainty index was estimated and was found to be within 2.5%, which further indicates that the possibility of error in measuring such distance may be of this order. It is observed that the relative distance li estimated by analytical method and fuzzy set theoretic approach are consistent with each other. The crisp values of li estimated using analytical method lie within the bounds computed using fuzzy set theory. This indicates that li values estimated using analytical methods are within 2.5% uncertainty. This value of uncertainty in distance measurement should be incorporated in the uncertainty budget, while estimating the expanded uncertainty in HDR (192)Ir source strength measurement.

  9. Investigation of Dosimetric Parameters of $^{192}$Ir MicroSelectron v2 HDR Brachytherapy Source Using EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code

    CERN Document Server

    Naeem, Hamza; Zheng, Huaqing; Cao, Ruifen; Pei, Xi; Hu, Liqin; Wu, Yican

    2016-01-01

    The $^{192}$Ir sources are widely used for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatments. The aim of this study is to simulate $^{192}$Ir MicroSelectron v2 HDR brachytherapy source and calculate the air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function established in the updated AAPM Task Group 43 protocol. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code package is used to calculate these dosimetric parameters, including dose contribution from secondary electron source and also contribution of bremsstrahlung photons to air kerma strength. The Air kerma strength, dose rate constant and radial dose function while anisotropy functions for the distance greater than 0.5 cm away from the source center are in good agreement with previous published studies. Obtained value from MC simulation for air kerma strength is $9.762\\times 10^{-8} \\textrm{UBq}^{-1}$and dose rate constant is $1.108\\pm 0.13\\%\\textrm{cGyh}^{-1} \\textrm{U}^{-1}$.

  10. Determination of the chemical yield on the Fricke dosimetry for {sup 192}Ir sources used in brachytherapy; Determinacao do rendimento quimico na dosimetria Fricke para fontes de {sup 192}Ir usadas em braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, M.G.; Albuquerque, M.A.G.; Almeida, C.E. de, E-mail: marianogd08@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (LCR/UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Salata, C. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rosado, P.H. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    With the aim of developing a primary standard for the absorbed dose to water, for the {sup 192}Ir sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy, this work focuses on the determination of the chemical yield, G(Fe{sup +3}), using Fricke dosimetry, for the energy of those sources . The G(Fe{sup +3}) were determined the for three qualities of x-ray beams (150, 250 and 300 kV ) and for {sup 60}Co energy. The G(Fe{sup +3}) value for the average energy of {sup 192}Ir was obtained by linear fit, the found value was 1,555 ± 0,015 μmol/J. (author)

  11. Determination of factors through Monte Carlo method for Fricke dosimetry from {sup 192}Ir sources for brachytherapy; Determinacao por Monte Carlo de fatores para dosimetria Fricke de fontes de {sup 192}Ir para braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Mariano Gazineu; Salata, Camila; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo, E-mail: marianogd08@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ/LCR), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas

    2014-07-01

    The Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas develops a methodology for the determination of the absorbed dose to water by Fricke chemical dosimetry method for brachytherapy sources of {sup 192}Ir high dose rate and have compared their results with the laboratory of the National Research Council Canada. This paper describes the determination of the correction factors by Monte Carlo method, with the Penelope code. Values for all factors are presented, with a maximum difference of 0.22% for their determination by an alternative way. (author)

  12. Comparative dosimetry of GammaMed Plus high-dose rate 192 Ir brachytherapy source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The comparative dosimetry of GammaMed (GM Plus high-dose rate brachytherapy source was performed by an experiment using 0.1-cc thimble ionization chamber and simulation-based study using EGSnrc code. In-water dose measurements were performed with 0.1-cc chamber to derive the radial dose function (r = 0.8 to 20.0 cm and anisotropy function (r = 5.0 cm with polar angle from 10° to 170°. The nonuniformity correction factor for 0.1-cc chamber was applied for in-water measurements at shorter distances from the source. The EGSnrc code was used to derive the dose rate constant (L, radial dose function g L (r and anisotropy function F(r, q of GM Plus source. The dosimetric data derived using EGSnrc code in our study were in very good agreement relative to published data for GM Plus source. The radial dose function up to 12 cm derived from measured dose using 0.1-cc chamber was in agreement within ±3% of data derived by the simulation study.

  13. A simplified analytical approach to estimate the parameters required for strength determination of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources using a Farmer-type ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measuring the strength of high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of a quality assurance program. Owing to their ready availability in radiotherapy departments, the Farmer-type ionization chambers are also used to determine the strength of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources. The use of a Farmer-type ionization chamber requires the estimation of the scatter correction factor along with positioning error (c) and the constant of proportionality (f) to determine the strength of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources. A simplified approach based on a least squares method was developed for estimating the values of f and Ms. The seven distance method was followed to record the ionization chamber readings for parameterization of f and Ms. Analytically calculated values of Ms were used to determine the room scatter correction factor (Ksc). The Monte Carlo simulations were also carried out to calculate f and Ksc to verify the magnitude of the parameters determined by the proposed analytical approach. The value of f determined using the simplified analytical approach was found to be in excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo simulated value (within 0.7%). Analytically derived values of Ksc were also found to be in good agreement with the Monte Carlo calculated values (within 1.47%). Being far simpler than the presently available methods of evaluating f, the proposed analytical approach can be adopted for routine use by clinical medical physicists to estimate f by hand calculations. - Highlights: ► RAKR measurement of a brachytherapy source by 7 distance method requires the evaluation of ‘f’. ► A simplified analytical approach based on least square method to evaluate ‘f’ and ‘Ms’ was developed. ► Parameter ‘f’ calculated by proposed analytical approach was verified using the Monte Carlo method. ► Proposed analytical approach can be adopted for routine use to estimate ‘f’.

  14. A practical implementation of the 2010 IPEM high dose rate brachytherapy code of practice for the calibration of {sup 192}Ir sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awunor, O A; Lecomber, A R; Richmond, N; Walker, C, E-mail: Onuora.Awunor@stees.nhs.uk [Regional Medical Physics Department, James Cook University Hospital, Marton Road, Middlesbrough, TS4 3BW (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-21

    This paper details a practical method for deriving the reference air kerma rate calibration coefficient for Farmer NE2571 chambers using the UK Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) code of practice for the determination of the reference air kerma rate for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources based on the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) air kerma standard. The reference air kerma rate calibration coefficient was derived using pressure, temperature and source decay corrected ionization chamber response measurements over three successive {sup 192}Ir source clinical cycles. A secondary standard instrument (a Standard Imaging 1000 Plus well chamber) and four tertiary standard instruments (one additional Standard Imaging 1000 Plus well chamber and three Farmer NE2571 chambers housed in a perspex phantom) were used to provide traceability to the NPL primary standard and enable comparison of performance between the chambers. Conservative and optimized estimates on the expanded uncertainties (k = 2) associated with chamber response, ion recombination and reference air kerma rate calibration coefficient were determined. This was seen to be 2.3% and 0.4% respectively for chamber response, 0.2% and 0.08% respectively for ion recombination and 2.6% and 1.2% respectively for the calibration coefficient. No significant change in ion recombination with source decay was observed over the duration of clinical use of the respective {sup 192}Ir sources.

  15. Using LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs to estimate the absorbed dose to water in liquid water around an 192Ir brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The absorbed dose to water is the fundamental reference quantity for brachytherapy treatment planning systems and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) have been recognized as the most validated detectors for measurement of such a dosimetric descriptor. The detector response in a wide energy spectrum as that of an192Ir brachytherapy source as well as the specific measurement medium which surrounds the TLD need to be accounted for when estimating the absorbed dose. This paper develops a methodology based on highly sensitive LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs to directly estimate the absorbed dose to water in liquid water around a high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source. Methods: Different experimental designs in liquid water and air were constructed to study the response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs when irradiated in several standard photon beams of the LNE-LNHB (French national metrology laboratory for ionizing radiation). Measurement strategies and Monte Carlo techniques were developed to calibrate the LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors in the energy interval characteristic of that found when TLDs are immersed in water around an192Ir source. Finally, an experimental system was designed to irradiate TLDs at different angles between 1 and 11 cm away from an 192Ir source in liquid water. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to correct measured results to provide estimates of the absorbed dose to water in water around the 192Ir source. Results: The dose response dependence of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs with the linear energy transfer of secondary electrons followed the same variations as those of published results. The calibration strategy which used TLDs in air exposed to a standard N-250 ISO x-ray beam and TLDs in water irradiated with a standard137Cs beam provided an estimated mean uncertainty of 2.8% (k = 1) in the TLD calibration coefficient for irradiations by the 192Ir source in water. The 3D TLD measurements performed in liquid water were obtained with a maximum uncertainty of 11% (k = 1) found

  16. Characterization of TLD-100 in powders for dosimetric quality control of 192 Ir sources used in brachytherapy of high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Secondary Standard Dosimetric at the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) calibrated a lot of powdered TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) in terms of absorbed dose to water Dw for the energy of: 60Co, 137Cs, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Later on, it is carried out an interpolation of the calibration for the energy of the 192Ir. This calibration is part of a dosimetric quality control program, to solve the problems of traceability for the measurements carried out by the users of 192Ir sources employed in the treatments of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR) at the Mexican Republic. The calibrations of the radiation beams are made with the following protocols: IAEA TRS-398 for the 60Co for Dw, using a secondary standard ionization chamber PTW N30013 calibrated in Dw by the National Research Council (NRC, Canada). AAPM TG-43 for Dw in terms of the strength kerma Sk, calibrating this last one quantity for the 137Cs radioactive source, with a well chamber HDR 1000 PLUS traceable to the University of Wisconsin (US). AAPM TG-61 for X ray of 250 and 50 kVp for Dw start to Ka using field standard a Farmer chamber PTW 30001 traceable to K for the Central Laboratory of Electric Industries (CLEI, France). The calibration curves (CC) they built for the response of the powder TLD: RTLD vs Dw: For the energy of 60Co, 137Cs, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Fitting them with the least square method weighed by means of a polynomial of second grade that corrects the supra linearity of the response. iii. Each one of the curves was validated with a test by lack of fitting and for the Anderson Darling normality test, using the software MINITAB in both cases. iv. The sensibility factor (Fs) for each energy corresponds to the slope of the CC, v. The Fs for the two 192Ir sources used are interpolated: one for a Micro Selectron source and the other one a Vari Source source. Finally, a couple of capsules were sent to two hospitals that have the HDR Brachytherapy with sources of 192Ir and that

  17. A simplified analytical approach to estimate the parameters required for strength determination of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources using a Farmer-type ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D; Mayya, Y S

    2012-01-01

    Measuring the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of a quality assurance program. Owing to their ready availability in radiotherapy departments, the Farmer-type ionization chambers are also used to determine the strength of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. The use of a Farmer-type ionization chamber requires the estimation of the scatter correction factor along with positioning error (c) and the constant of proportionality (f) to determine the strength of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. A simplified approach based on a least squares method was developed for estimating the values of f and M(s). The seven distance method was followed to record the ionization chamber readings for parameterization of f and M(s). Analytically calculated values of M(s) were used to determine the room scatter correction factor (K(sc)). The Monte Carlo simulations were also carried out to calculate f and K(sc) to verify the magnitude of the parameters determined by the proposed analytical approach. The value of f determined using the simplified analytical approach was found to be in excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo simulated value (within 0.7%). Analytically derived values of K(sc) were also found to be in good agreement with the Monte Carlo calculated values (within 1.47%). Being far simpler than the presently available methods of evaluating f, the proposed analytical approach can be adopted for routine use by clinical medical physicists to estimate f by hand calculations.

  18. SU-E-T-102: Determination of Dose Distributions and Water-Equivalence of MAGIC-F Polymer Gel for 60Co and 192Ir Brachytherapy Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo, A; Nicolucci, P [University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f polymer gel for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir clinical brachytherapy sources, through dose distributions simulated with PENELOPE Monte Carlo code. Methods: The real geometry of {sup 60} (BEBIG, modelo Co0.A86) and {sup 192}192Ir (Varian, model GammaMed Plus) clinical brachytherapy sources were modelled on PENELOPE Monte Carlo simulation code. The most probable emission lines of photons were used for both sources: 17 emission lines for {sup 192}Ir and 12 lines for {sup 60}. The dose distributions were obtained in a cubic water or gel homogeneous phantom (30 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}), with the source positioned in the middle of the phantom. In all cases the number of simulation showers remained constant at 10{sup 9} particles. A specific material for gel was constructed in PENELOPE using weight fraction components of MAGIC-f: wH = 0,1062, wC = 0,0751, wN = 0,0139, wO = 0,8021, wS = 2,58×10{sup −6} e wCu = 5,08 × 10{sup −6}. The voxel size in the dose distributions was 0.6 mm. Dose distribution maps on the longitudinal and radial direction through the centre of the source were used to analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f. Results: For the {sup 60} source, the maximum diferences in relative doses obtained in the gel and water were 0,65% and 1,90%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. For {sup 192}Ir, the maximum difereces in relative doses were 0,30% and 1,05%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. The materials equivalence can also be verified through the effective atomic number and density of each material: Zef-MAGIC-f = 7,07 e .MAGIC-f = 1,060 g/cm{sup 3} and Zef-water = 7,22. Conclusion: The results showed that MAGIC-f is water equivalent, consequently being suitable to simulate soft tissue, for Cobalt and Iridium energies. Hence, gel can be used as a dosimeter in clinical applications. Further investigation to its use in a clinical protocol is needed.

  19. Dosimetric impact of an 192Ir brachytherapy source cable length modeled using a grid-based Boltzmann transport equation solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose distributions of an 192Ir source (model VS2000) in homogeneous water geometry calculated using a deterministic grid-based Boltzmann transport equation solver (GBBS) in the commercial treatment planning system (TPS) (BRACHYVISION-ACUROS v8.8). Methods: Using percent dose differences (%ΔD), the GBBS (BV-ACUROS) was compared to the (1) published TG-43 data, (2) MCNPX Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the 192Ir source centered in a 15 cm radius water sphere, and (3) TG-43 output from the TPS using vendor supplied (BV-TG43-vendor) and user extended (BV-TG43-extended) 2D anisotropy functions F(r,θ). BV-ACUROS assumes 1 mm of NiTi cable, while the TPS TG-43 algorithm uses data based on a 15 cm cable. MC models of various cable lengths were simulated. Results: The MC simulations resulted in >20% dose deviations along the cable for 1, 2, and 3 mm cable lengths relative to 15 cm. BV-ACUROS comparisons with BV-TG43-vendor and BV-TG43-extended yielded magnitude of differences, consistent with those seen in MC simulations. However, differences >20% extended further (θ≤10 deg.) when using the vendor supplied anisotropy function Fven(r,θ). These differences were also seen in comparisons of F(r,θ) derived from the TPS output. Conclusions: The results suggest that %ΔD near the cable region is larger than previously estimated. The spatial distribution of the dose deviation is highly dependent on the reference TG-43 data used to compare to GBBS. The differences observed, while important to realize, should not have an impact on clinical dosimetry in homogeneous water.

  20. A simplified analytical approach to estimate the parameters required for strength determination of HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources using a Farmer-type ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sudhir [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, CTCRS, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Srinivasan, P. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sharma, S.D., E-mail: sdsharma_barc@rediffmail.com [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, CTCRS, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Mayya, Y.S. [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, CTCRS, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2012-01-15

    Measuring the strength of high dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of a quality assurance program. Owing to their ready availability in radiotherapy departments, the Farmer-type ionization chambers are also used to determine the strength of HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources. The use of a Farmer-type ionization chamber requires the estimation of the scatter correction factor along with positioning error (c) and the constant of proportionality (f) to determine the strength of HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources. A simplified approach based on a least squares method was developed for estimating the values of f and M{sub s}. The seven distance method was followed to record the ionization chamber readings for parameterization of f and M{sub s}. Analytically calculated values of M{sub s} were used to determine the room scatter correction factor (K{sub sc}). The Monte Carlo simulations were also carried out to calculate f and K{sub sc} to verify the magnitude of the parameters determined by the proposed analytical approach. The value of f determined using the simplified analytical approach was found to be in excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo simulated value (within 0.7%). Analytically derived values of K{sub sc} were also found to be in good agreement with the Monte Carlo calculated values (within 1.47%). Being far simpler than the presently available methods of evaluating f, the proposed analytical approach can be adopted for routine use by clinical medical physicists to estimate f by hand calculations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAKR measurement of a brachytherapy source by 7 distance method requires the evaluation of 'f'. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simplified analytical approach based on least square method to evaluate 'f' and 'M{sub s}' was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parameter 'f' calculated by proposed analytical

  1. Determination of air kerma standard of high dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source; Determinacao da taxa de kerma no ar de referencia para {sup 192}Ir de alta taxa de dose para braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, E.J.; Alves, C.F.E.; Leite, S.P.; Magalhaes, L.A.G.; David, M.G.; Almeida, C.E. de, E-mail: cfealves@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Di Prinzio, R. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the methodology developed by the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas and presently in use for determining of the air kerma standard of {sup 192}Ir high dose rate sources to calibrate well-type chambers. Uncertainty analysis involving the measurements procedure are presented. (author)

  2. A generic high-dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: Facundo.Ballester@uv.es [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa [Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping SE-581 85, Sweden and Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-171 76 (Sweden); Granero, Domingo [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia E-46014 (Spain); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Mourtada, Firas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware 19713 (United States); Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares – IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 MikrasAsias, Athens 115 27 (Greece); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Siebert, Frank-André [Clinic of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel 24105 (Germany); Sloboda, Ron S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic {sup 192}Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra{sup ®} Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS{sup TM}]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201){sup 3} voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by

  3. Water equivalent phantom materials for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A.; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-12-01

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with 192Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading 192Ir brachytherapy source were Monte-Carlo simulated in EGSnrc. The degree of water equivalence of a phantom material was evaluated by comparing the radial dose-to-water profile in the phantom material with that in water. The phantom size was varied over a large range since it influences the dose contribution by scattered photons with energies diminished by single and multiple Compton scattering. Phantom axis distances up to 10 cm were considered as clinically relevant. Scattered photons with energies reaching down into the 25 keV region dominate the photon fluence at source distances exceeding 3.5 cm. The tested phantom materials showed significant differences in the degree of water equivalence. In phantoms with radii up to 10 cm, RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR phantoms show excellent water equivalence with dose deviations from a water phantom not exceeding 0.8%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene show deviations up to 2.6%. For larger phantom radii up to 30 cm, the deviations for RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR remain below 1.4%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene produce deviations up to 8.1%. PMMA plays a separate role, with deviations up to 4.3% for radii not exceeding 10 cm, but below 1% for radii up to 30 cm. As suggested by

  4. Water equivalent phantom materials for (192)Ir brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-12-21

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with (192)Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading (192)Ir brachytherapy source were Monte-Carlo simulated in EGSnrc. The degree of water equivalence of a phantom material was evaluated by comparing the radial dose-to-water profile in the phantom material with that in water. The phantom size was varied over a large range since it influences the dose contribution by scattered photons with energies diminished by single and multiple Compton scattering. Phantom axis distances up to 10 cm were considered as clinically relevant. Scattered photons with energies reaching down into the 25 keV region dominate the photon fluence at source distances exceeding 3.5 cm.The tested phantom materials showed significant differences in the degree of water equivalence. In phantoms with radii up to 10 cm, RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR phantoms show excellent water equivalence with dose deviations from a water phantom not exceeding 0.8%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene show deviations up to 2.6%. For larger phantom radii up to 30 cm, the deviations for RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR remain below 1.4%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene produce deviations up to 8.1%. PMMA plays a separate role, with deviations up to 4.3% for radii not exceeding 10 cm, but below 1% for radii up to 30 cm.As suggested

  5. The non-uniformity correction factor for the cylindrical ionization chambers in dosimetry of an HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majumdar Bishnu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to derive the non-uniformity correction factor for the two therapy ionization chambers for the dose measurement near the brachytherapy source. The two ionization chambers of 0.6 cc and 0.1 cc volume were used. The measurement in air was performed for distances between 0.8 cm and 20 cm from the source in specially designed measurement jig. The non-uniformity correction factors were derived from the measured values. The experimentally derived factors were compared with the theoretically calculated non-uniformity correction factors and a close agreement was found between these two studies. The experimentally derived non-uniformity correction factor supports the anisotropic theory.

  6. Comparison of organ doses for patients undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the breast with HDR {sup 192}Ir or electronic sources using Monte Carlo simulations in a heterogeneous human phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mille, Matthew M.; Xu, X. George; Rivard, Mark J. [Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation via interstitial balloon brachytherapy is a fast and effective treatment method for certain early stage breast cancers. The radiation can be delivered using a conventional high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir gamma-emitting source or a novel electronic brachytherapy (eBx) source which uses lower energy x rays that do not penetrate as far within the patient. A previous study [A. Dickler, M. C. Kirk, N. Seif, K. Griem, K. Dowlatshahi, D. Francescatti, and R. A. Abrams, ''A dosimetric comparison of MammoSite high-dose-rate brachytherapy and Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy,'' Brachytherapy 6, 164-168 (2007)] showed that the target dose is similar for HDR {sup 192}Ir and eBx. This study compares these sources based on the dose received by healthy organs and tissues away from the treatment site. Methods: A virtual patient with left breast cancer was represented by a whole-body, tissue-heterogeneous female voxel phantom. Monte Carlo methods were used to calculate the dose to healthy organs in a virtual patient undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the left breast with HDR {sup 192}Ir or eBx sources. The dose-volume histograms for a few organs which received large doses were also calculated. Additional simulations were performed with all tissues in the phantom defined as water to study the effect of tissue inhomogeneities. Results: For both HDR {sup 192}Ir and eBx, the largest mean organ doses were received by the ribs, thymus gland, left lung, heart, and sternum which were close to the brachytherapy source in the left breast. eBx yielded mean healthy organ doses that were more than a factor of {approx}1.4 smaller than for HDR {sup 192}Ir for all organs considered, except for the three closest ribs. Excluding these ribs, the average and median dose-reduction factors were {approx}28 and {approx}11, respectively. The volume distribution of doses in nearby soft tissue organs that were outside the PTV were also

  7. Dosimetry audits in Brazil for {sup 192}Ir high dose rate brachytherapy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, L.A.R. da; Paiva, E. de.; Goncalves, M.G.; Velasco, A.F.; Di Prinzio, R.; Dovales, A.C.M.; Freire, B.L.V.; Brito, R.R.A.; Giannoni, R.A.; Castelo, L.H.R. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marechal, M.H.H. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Instalacoes Radiativas (CORAD)

    2005-03-15

    In Brazil, among 200 radiotherapy centres, 30 have high dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy systems. In August 2001, the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) started a biennial audit program to those centres having HDR systems. This program consists of visiting each centre in order to investigate the radiation protection aspects of the centres and also to measure the intensity of the brachytherapy source, in terms of air kerma strength, with a well type chamber specially designed for HDR {sup 192} Ir sources. The audit dosimetry results are compared to measurements carried out by the local institution physicist and to the source intensity value provided by the manufacturer. Two methods have been used by the Brazilian physicists for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source dosimetry, namely the employment of a farmer type chamber calibrated according to the interpolation methodology and the use of a well type chamber to provide direct intercomparison. The larger difference obtained was 18.9% and it can be explained in terms of the lack of knowledge of the institution physicist about the interpolation methodology using the farmer type chamber. Another difference of 5.82% was found as being the lack of an updated calibration factor for the clinic well type chamber. On the basis of these results, CNEN is able to establish a maximum deviation value for the dosimetry of HDR system. Additionally, with this program the radiotherapy services have an opportunity to have their HDR {sup 192}Ir sources calibrated and to test the validity of the calibration factors for their own well type chambers, using their calibrated sources. (author)

  8. Calibration of well-type chambers in Brazil using {sup 192}Ir HDR sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Carlos Frederico Estrada; Pires, Evandro Jesus; David, Mariano Gazineu; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de, E-mail: cfealves@gmail.com, E-mail: evjpires@gmail.com, E-mail: marianogd08@gmail.com, E-mail: cea71@yahoo.com.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ/LCR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Di Prinzio, Renato, E-mail: rprinzio@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The results obtained by performing of a traceable calibration service for well-type reentrant ionization chamber for HDR 192Ir sources used in brachytherapy physical procedures at the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas from Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro -LCR/UERJ are described. (author)

  9. Dosimetric characterization of round HDR {sup 192}Ir AccuBoost applicators for breast brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Wazer, David E.; Bricault, Raymond J. Jr. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Advanced Radiation Therapy, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The AccuBoost brachytherapy system applies HDR {sup 192}Ir beams peripherally to the breast using collimating applicators. The purpose of this study was to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations of the HDR {sup 192}Ir source, to dosimetrically characterize the round applicators using established Monte Carlo simulation and radiation measurement techniques and to gather data for clinical use. Methods: Dosimetric measurements were performed in a polystyrene phantom, while simulations estimated dose in air, liquid water, polystyrene and ICRU 44 breast tissue. Dose distribution characterization of the 4-8 cm diameter collimators was performed using radiochromic EBT film and air ionization chambers. Results: The central axis dose falloff was steeper for the 4 cm diameter applicator in comparison to the 8 cm diameter applicator, with surface to 3 cm depth-dose ratios of 3.65 and 2.44, respectively. These ratios did not considerably change when varying the phantom composition from breast tissue to polystyrene, phantom thickness from 4 to 8 cm, or phantom radius from 8 to 15 cm. Dose distributions on the central axis were fitted to sixth-order polynomials for clinical use in a hand calculation spreadsheet (i.e., nomogram). Dose uniformity within the useful applicator apertures decreased as depth-dose increased. Conclusions: Monte Carlo benchmarking simulations of the HDR {sup 192}Ir source using the MCNP5 radiation transport code indicated agreement within 1% of the published results over the radial/angular region of interest. Changes in phantom size and radius did not cause noteworthy changes in the central axis depth-dose. Polynomial fit depth-dose curves provide a simple and accurate basis for a nomogram.

  10. Dosimetric characterization of round HDR 192Ir AccuBoost applicators for breast brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The AccuBoost brachytherapy system applies HDR 192Ir beams peripherally to the breast using collimating applicators. The purpose of this study was to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations of the HDR 192Ir source, to dosimetrically characterize the round applicators using established Monte Carlo simulation and radiation measurement techniques and to gather data for clinical use. Methods: Dosimetric measurements were performed in a polystyrene phantom, while simulations estimated dose in air, liquid water, polystyrene and ICRU 44 breast tissue. Dose distribution characterization of the 4-8 cm diameter collimators was performed using radiochromic EBT film and air ionization chambers. Results: The central axis dose falloff was steeper for the 4 cm diameter applicator in comparison to the 8 cm diameter applicator, with surface to 3 cm depth-dose ratios of 3.65 and 2.44, respectively. These ratios did not considerably change when varying the phantom composition from breast tissue to polystyrene, phantom thickness from 4 to 8 cm, or phantom radius from 8 to 15 cm. Dose distributions on the central axis were fitted to sixth-order polynomials for clinical use in a hand calculation spreadsheet (i.e., nomogram). Dose uniformity within the useful applicator apertures decreased as depth-dose increased. Conclusions: Monte Carlo benchmarking simulations of the HDR 192Ir source using the MCNP5 radiation transport code indicated agreement within 1% of the published results over the radial/angular region of interest. Changes in phantom size and radius did not cause noteworthy changes in the central axis depth-dose. Polynomial fit depth-dose curves provide a simple and accurate basis for a nomogram.

  11. Radiation levels in Cath Lab and occupational exposures during manual 192Ir intracoronary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracoronary brachytherapy is a new modality of radiation therapy and is being used to reduce the rate of restenosis after angioplasty. Clinical trials for evaluation of safety and efficacy of manually implanted 192Ir seed ribbons are underway at various cardiology centres in India. 192Ir emits high energy gamma rays (0.136 -1.06 MeV), which causes concern regarding safety of the personnel when these sources are manually used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (Cath Lab) for intracoronary irradiation. Radiation levels in Cath Lab and exposures to personnel have been measured at 6 different cardiology centres in the country during 8 different clinical trials using radiation survey meter, personnel monitoring badges and pocket dosimeters. Activities of 192Ir seed ribbons used in these clinical trials were in the range of 5.55 - 14.8 GBq. Measured radiation levels behind the mobile lead shields, at the top of lead shields, near the patient head, near the patient toes and at the main door of the Cath Lab were in the range of 2.6-20, 50-256, 385-450, 22-225 and 2-16 μSv/hr/3.7GBq, respectively. Measured effective doses to occupational workers were in range of 14-100 μSv/procedure/3.7GBq. Based on these measurements, user institutions have been advised to use lead glass mounted L-shaped mobile lead shields with proper orientation during clinical trials, avoid unwanted occupancy in the Cath Lab and around the patient during irradiation and use conveniently long forceps or tongs for implantation and removal of sources. (author)

  12. Determination of the Fricke G value for HDR {sup 192}Ir sources using ionometric measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, L.; Coelho, M.; Almeida, C.E. de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Gavazza, S. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy using {sup 192}Ir is widely accepted as an important treatment option, and it thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of absolute dose to water is currently not available. The dose to water conversion is calculated via the dose rate constant {Lambda} and several correction factors accounting for the scatter, attenuation, and anisotropy of the dose distribution, among other effects. Two potentially useful procedures have been reported, including one by Sarfehnia et al. [3,4], which used a water-based calorimeter with an uncertainty of 1.9% for k=1, and a second by Austerlitz et al. and de Almeida et al., which used Fricke dosimetry with estimated uncertainties of 3.9% for k=1 and 1.4% for k=1, respectively. Chemical dosimetry using a standard FeSO{sub 4} solution has shown potential to be a reliable standard of absorbed dose for the HDR {sup 192}Ir source. A major uncertainty is associated with the G values reported by Fregene, which had a numerical value of 1.1 %. However, that reference provided very little detail of the experimental procedures for the {sup 192}Ir source. The G value may be obtained by using a calorimeter or ionometric measurements. In the absence of calorimetric data, this paper makes an attempt to measure the G value for the HDR {sup 192}Ir sources using ionometric measurements and recommendations from dosimetry protocols. (author)

  13. Calibration of a {sup 19} {sup 2}Ir source for high dose brachytherapy using various techniques; Calibracion de una fuente de {sup 192} Ir para braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis mediante diversas tecnicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montilla Prieto, Tedicel C., E-mail: tcdicel@gmaiLcam [Instituto de Oncologia Dr. Miguel Perez Carreno, Barbula (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Departamento de Fisica y Dosimetria; Padron Rivero, Alvaro D., E-mail: alvarodpadronr@yahoo.com.ve [Universidad de Carabobo, Barbula (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud. Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas

    2013-10-01

    In this research we studied three experimental procedures for calibration of a source of {sup 192}Ir to high dose rate for clinical brachytherapy use, and thus were compared and analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of each. For this study we quantified the value of the current kerma rate reference in air by three procedures: source calibration using a well chamber, with an cylindrical ionization chamber in air, and a cylindrical ionization chamber on a phantom, and this magnitude was compared with the value provided by the manufacturer of the source and thereby obtaining the deviation corresponding . Thus, it was found that the deviation corresponding to the source calibration making use of a well chamber, remained within tolerance, while the cylindrical ionization chamber in air and on phantom exceeded the standards established in some documents. However, although both the measurement in air and in the phantom are the procedures for the final calibration source, these can be used to verify that the delivered dose are in tolerance.

  14. A CT-based analytical dose calculation method for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This article presents an analytical dose calculation method for high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, taking into account the effects of inhomogeneities and reduced photon backscatter near the skin. The adequacy of the Task Group 43 (TG-43) two-dimensional formalism for treatment planning is also assessed. Methods: The proposed method uses material composition and density data derived from computed tomography images. The primary and scatter dose distributions for each dwell position are calculated first as if the patient is an infinite water phantom. This is done using either TG-43 or a database of Monte Carlo (MC) dose distributions. The latter can be used to account for the effects of shielding in water. Subsequently, corrections for photon attenuation, scatter, and spectral variations along medium- or low-Z inhomogeneities are made according to the radiological paths determined by ray tracing. The scatter dose is then scaled by a correction factor that depends on the distances between the point of interest, the body contour, and the source position. Dose calculations are done for phantoms with tissue and lead inserts, as well as patient plans for head-and-neck, esophagus, and MammoSite balloon breast brachytherapy treatments. Gamma indices are evaluated using a dose-difference criterion of 3% and a distance-to-agreement criterion of 2 mm. PTRANCT MC calculations are used as the reference dose distributions. Results: For the phantom with tissue and lead inserts, the percentages of the voxels of interest passing the gamma criteria (Pγ≥1) are 100% for the analytical calculation and 91% for TG-43. For the breast patient plan, TG-43 overestimates the target volume receiving the prescribed dose by 4% and the dose to the hottest 0.1 cm3 of the skin by 9%, whereas the analytical and MC results agree within 0.4%. Pγ≥1 are 100% and 48% for the analytical and TG-43 calculations, respectively. For the head-and-neck and esophagus patient plans, Pγ≥1 are ≥99

  15. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D Printed, gynecologic 192-Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, J Adam M; Mellis, Katherine; Sethi, Rajni; Siauw, Timmy; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Garg, Animesh; Goldberg, Ken; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available, biocompatible, sterilizable 3D printing material, and its suitability for customized, single-use gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy applicators that have the potential for accurate guiding of seeds through linear and curved internal channels. A custom radiochromic film dosimetry apparatus was 3D-printed in PC-ISO with a single catheter channel and a slit to hold a film segment. The apparatus was designed specifically to test geometry pertinent for use of this material in a clinical setting. A brachytherapy dose plan was computed to deliver a cylindrical dose distribution to the film. The dose plan used an 192Ir source and was normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the channel. The material was evaluated by comparing the film exposure to an identical test done in water. The Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions were computed from a CT scan of the apparatus and compared to the HU distribution of water and the HU distribution of a commercial GYN cylinder applicator. The dose depth curve of PC-ISO as measured by the radiochromic film was within 1% of water between 1 cm and 6 cm from the channel. The mean HU was -10 for PC-ISO and -1 for water. As expected, the honeycombed structure of the PC-ISO 3D printing process created a moderate spread of HU values, but the mean was comparable to water. PC-ISO is sufficiently water-equivalent to be compatible with our HDR brachytherapy planning system and clinical workflow and, therefore, it is suitable for creating custom GYN brachytherapy applicators. Our current clinical practice includes the use of custom GYN applicators made of commercially available PC-ISO when doing so can improve the patient's treatment.  PMID:25679174

  16. Vascular brachytherapy with 90Sr/Y versus 192Ir: A health physics perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Currently there are two ongoing trials of catheter based radiation therapy in the United States, the BERT Trial (Emory University, Atlanta, GA) and the SCRIPPS Trial (Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA). The BERT method involved the use of a treatment system to manually deliver a source train consisting of 12, encapsulated 90Sr/Y seeds of 3 cm total active length. The total activity of the source train was approximately 3.7 GBq. The SCRIPPS trial involved the use of a hand delivered 192Ir (BEST Industries) source train of either 5 or 9 sources with 1 mm spacing between the sources. The average total activity of the source train was 3.6 GBq ± 1.08 GBq. It is the purpose of this study to compare the patient dose and staff exposures from the above source trains. A comparison with exposures from use of fluoroscopy in the catheterization laboratory will also be made. Materials and Methods: Measurements made with a GM meter at specified locations around the BERT patients during the insertion of the seeds were compared with published information from the SCRIPPS Trial. Monte Carlo modeled measurements of the equivalent dose in humans from insertion of the source trains were also compared for both methods. The above were contrasted with GM measurements from use of fluoroscopy in the catheterization laboratory. Results: Average exposure rates recorded at the patient's chest and groin from the BERT method were 4.9x10-4 and 1.29x10-4 C/kg·hr respectively. Average exposures to the operator from the BERT method and the SCRIPPS method were 8.6x10-6 and 1.03x10-3 C/kg respectively. A typical exposure rate for conventional cardiac fluoroscopy is 3.9x10-3 C/kg·hr. Monte Carlo modeled calculations of patient dose equivalent for the BERT method and the SCRIPPS method were 0.43 μSv and 6.41 mSv respectively. Conclusions: Vascular brachytherapy performed with 90Sr/Y sources resulted in staff exposures of at least a factor of 120 less and patient doses of a factor of nearly 15

  17. HDR-192Ir intraluminal brachytherapy in treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Chen; Xiao-Lin Wang; Zhi-Ping Yan; Jie-Min Cheng; Jian-Hua Wang; Gao-Quan Gong; Sheng Qian; Jian-Jun Luo; Qing-Xin Liu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and safety of intraluminal brachytherapy in treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice (MOJ) and to evaluate the clinical effect of intraluminal brachytherapy on stent patency and patient survival.METHODS: Thirty-four patients with MOJ were included in this study. Having biliary stent placed, all patients were classified into intraluminal brachytherapy group (group A,n = 14) and control group (group B, n = 20) according to their own choice. Intraluminal brachytherapy regimen included: HDR-192Ir was used in the therapy, fractional doses of 4-7 Gy were given every 3-6 d for 3-4 times, and standard points were established at 0.5-1.0 cm. Some patients of both groups received transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) after stent placement.RESULTS: In group A, the success rate of intraluminal brachytherapy was 98.0%, RTOG grade 1 acute radiation morbidity occurred in 3 patients, RTOG/EORTC grade 1 late radiation morbidity occurred in 1 patient. Mean stent patency of group A (12.6 mo) was significantly longer than that of group B (8.3 mo) (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in the mean survival (9.4 mo vs6.0 mo) between the two groups.CONCLUSION: HDR-192Ir intraluminal brachytherapy is a safe palliative therapy in treating MOJ, and it may prolong stent patency and has the potentiality of extending survival of patients with MOJ.

  18. A dosimetric comparison of 169Yb and 192Ir for HDR brachytherapy of the breast, accounting for the effect of finite patient dimensions and tissue inhomogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperopoulou, G; Papagiannis, P; Angelopoulos, A; Karaiskos, P; Georgiou, E; Baltas, D

    2006-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulation dosimetry is used to compare 169Yb to 192Ir for breast high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy applications using multiple catheter implants. Results for bare point sources show that while 169Yb delivers a greater dose rate per unit air kerma strength at the radial distance range of interest to brachytherapy in homogeneous water phantoms, it suffers a greater dose rate deficit in missing scatter conditions relative to 192Ir. As a result of these two opposing factors, in the scatter conditions defined by the presence of the lung and the finite patient dimensions in breast brachytherapy the dose distributions calculated in a patient equivalent mathematical phantom by Monte Carlo simulations for the same implant of either 169Yb or 1921r commercially available sources are found comparable. Dose volume histogram results support that 169Yb could be at least as effective as 192Ir delivering the same dose to the lung and slightly reduced dose to the breast skin. The current treatment planning systems' approach of employing dosimetry data precalculated in a homogeneous water phantom of given shape and dimensions, however, is shown to notably overestimate the delivered dose distribution for 169Yb. Especially at the skin and the lung, the treatment planning system dose overestimation is on the order of 15%-30%. These findings do not undermine the potential of 169Yb HDR sources for breast brachytherapy relative to the most commonly used 192Ir HDR sources. They imply, however, that there could be a need for the amendment of dose calculation algorithms employed in clinical treatment planning of particular brachytherapy applications, especially for intermediate photon energy sources such as 169Yb.

  19. HDR {sup 192}Ir source speed measurements using a high speed video camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Gabriel P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares—IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Viana, Rodrigo S. S.; Yoriyaz, Hélio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares—IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil); Podesta, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Rubo, Rodrigo A.; Sales, Camila P. de [Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo—HC/FMUSP, São Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil); Reniers, Brigitte [Department of Radiation Oncology - MAASTRO, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Research Group NuTeC, CMK, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Gebouw H, Diepenbeek B-3590 (Belgium); Verhaegen, Frank, E-mail: frank.verhaegen@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology - MAASTRO, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The dose delivered with a HDR {sup 192}Ir afterloader can be separated into a dwell component, and a transit component resulting from the source movement. The transit component is directly dependent on the source speed profile and it is the goal of this study to measure accurate source speed profiles. Methods: A high speed video camera was used to record the movement of a {sup 192}Ir source (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Stockholm, Sweden) for interdwell distances of 0.25–5 cm with dwell times of 0.1, 1, and 2 s. Transit dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the source movement. Results: The source stops at each dwell position oscillating around the desired position for a duration up to (0.026 ± 0.005) s. The source speed profile shows variations between 0 and 81 cm/s with average speed of ∼33 cm/s for most of the interdwell distances. The source stops for up to (0.005 ± 0.001) s at nonprogrammed positions in between two programmed dwell positions. The dwell time correction applied by the manufacturer compensates the transit dose between the dwell positions leading to a maximum overdose of 41 mGy for the considered cases and assuming an air-kerma strength of 48 000 U. The transit dose component is not uniformly distributed leading to over and underdoses, which is within 1.4% for commonly prescribed doses (3–10 Gy). Conclusions: The source maintains its speed even for the short interdwell distances. Dose variations due to the transit dose component are much lower than the prescribed treatment doses for brachytherapy, although transit dose component should be evaluated individually for clinical cases.

  20. HDR 192Ir source speed measurements using a high speed video camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The dose delivered with a HDR 192Ir afterloader can be separated into a dwell component, and a transit component resulting from the source movement. The transit component is directly dependent on the source speed profile and it is the goal of this study to measure accurate source speed profiles. Methods: A high speed video camera was used to record the movement of a 192Ir source (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Stockholm, Sweden) for interdwell distances of 0.25–5 cm with dwell times of 0.1, 1, and 2 s. Transit dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the source movement. Results: The source stops at each dwell position oscillating around the desired position for a duration up to (0.026 ± 0.005) s. The source speed profile shows variations between 0 and 81 cm/s with average speed of ∼33 cm/s for most of the interdwell distances. The source stops for up to (0.005 ± 0.001) s at nonprogrammed positions in between two programmed dwell positions. The dwell time correction applied by the manufacturer compensates the transit dose between the dwell positions leading to a maximum overdose of 41 mGy for the considered cases and assuming an air-kerma strength of 48 000 U. The transit dose component is not uniformly distributed leading to over and underdoses, which is within 1.4% for commonly prescribed doses (3–10 Gy). Conclusions: The source maintains its speed even for the short interdwell distances. Dose variations due to the transit dose component are much lower than the prescribed treatment doses for brachytherapy, although transit dose component should be evaluated individually for clinical cases

  1. Air kerma strength calibration of 0.6 cc Farmer chamber for 192Ir HDR source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the methods adopted by hospitals for the calibration of the HDR 192Ir source, in terms of Air Kerma Strength (AKS) is to use 0.6cc chamber at short source to chamber distances for measuring the air kerma rate at the chamber position and then compute the AKS using the appropriate correction factors. However, the 0.6 cc Farmer type chambers purchased by the users for the calibration of the HDR 192Ir source, are not generally provided with an HDR 192Ir calibration factor. With the result, many hospitals that have purchased the Farmer type chamber for the calibration of 192Ir HDR sources, use the 60Co calibration factor for this purpose. The use of 60Co calibration factor for the 192Ir HDR source would unnecessarily increase the uncertainty of the measured AKS. Again, because of the low chamber sensitivity, hospitals often use, source to chamber distances as small as a few cm for calibrating the 192Ir HDR source. In the absence of a rigid source-chamber positioning system, this can lead to several percent errors in AKS determination. Also, hospitals often don't take into account corrections for the room scatter or the fluence non-uniformity across the chamber, which further increase the uncertainty of the measured AKS

  2. Characterization of TLD-100 in powders for dosimetric quality control of {sup 192} Ir sources used in brachytherapy of high dose rate; Caracterizacion de TLD-100 en polvo para control de calidad dosimetrico de fuentes de Ir{sup 192} usadas en braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaiza C, S.P

    2007-07-01

    The Secondary Standard Dosimetric at the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) calibrated a lot of powdered TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) in terms of absorbed dose to water D{sub w} for the energy of: {sup 60}Co, {sup 137C}s, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Later on, it is carried out an interpolation of the calibration for the energy of the {sup 192}Ir. This calibration is part of a dosimetric quality control program, to solve the problems of traceability for the measurements carried out by the users of {sup 192}Ir sources employed in the treatments of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR) at the Mexican Republic. The calibrations of the radiation beams are made with the following protocols: IAEA TRS-398 for the {sup 60}Co for D{sub w}, using a secondary standard ionization chamber PTW N30013 calibrated in D{sub w} by the National Research Council (NRC, Canada). AAPM TG-43 for D{sub w} in terms of the strength kerma Sk, calibrating this last one quantity for the {sup 137}Cs radioactive source, with a well chamber HDR 1000 PLUS traceable to the University of Wisconsin (US). AAPM TG-61 for X ray of 250 and 50 kVp for D{sub w} start to Ka using field standard a Farmer chamber PTW 30001 traceable to K for the Central Laboratory of Electric Industries (CLEI, France). The calibration curves (CC) they built for the response of the powder TLD: R{sub TLD} vs D{sub w}: For the energy of {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Fitting them with the least square method weighed by means of a polynomial of second grade that corrects the supra linearity of the response. iii. Each one of the curves was validated with a test by lack of fitting and for the Anderson Darling normality test, using the software MINITAB in both cases. iv. The sensibility factor (F{sub s}) for each energy corresponds to the slope of the CC, v. The F{sub s} for the two {sup 192}Ir sources used are interpolated: one for a Micro Selectron source and the other one a Vari Source source. Finally, a couple of

  3. Correction factors for Farmer-type chambers for absorbed dose determination in 60Co and 192Ir brachytherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents experimentally determined correction factors for Farmer-type chambers for absorbed dose determination in 60Co and 192Ir brachytherapy dosimetry. The correction factors were determined from measurements made in a PMMA phantom and calculation of ratios of measured charges. The ratios were corrected for the different volumes of the ionization chambers, determined in external high-energy electron beams. The correction factors for the central electrode effect and the wall material dependency in 60Co brachytherapy dosimetry agree with those used in external 60Co beam dosimetry. In 192Ir dosimetry, the central aluminium electrode increases the response of an NE2571 chamber compared with that of a chamber with a central graphite electrode. The increase is 1.1 and 2.1% at 1.5 and 5.0 g cm-2 distance, respectively. Similar values are obtained with an NE2577 chamber. The wall correction factor in 192Ir dosimetry for a chamber with an A-150 wall has been determined to be 1.018, independent of the measurement distance. For a graphite walled chamber, the correction factor is 0.996 and 1.001 at 1.5 and 5.0 g cm-2 distance, respectively. The values of the wall correction factors are evaluated by a theory presented. If the chamber is used according to the 'large cavity' principle, the correction factor to account for the replacement of the phantom material by the ionization chamber was determined to be 0.982 for an NE2571 chamber when used with a Delrin cap, and 0.978 for an NE2581 when used with a polystyrene cap. The correction factors for the 'large cavity' principle are valid at both 60Co and 192Ir qualities. (author)

  4. Effects of Endovascular Brachytherapy with 192Ir Afterloading System on Expression of Type Ⅰ Collagen after Angioplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向定成; 杨传红; 候友贤; 龚志华; 易绍东; 邱建

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To investi-gate the effect and mechanism of endovascularbrachytherapy with 192Ir on expression of type Ⅰ collagen, metalloproteinases - 1 (MMP - 1) and the tissueinhibitor (TIMP- 1 ) after angioplasty. MethodsRestenotic model of domestic microswine was em-ployed and the iliac arteries were randomized to radi-ation group ( n = 12), which were treated with 20 ~ 25Gy of 192Ir, and non - radiation group ( n = 36) afterangioplasty. The target vessels were harvested in theend of 3 months and 6 months after angioplasty. Im-munohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were usedto detect proteins of type Ⅰ collagen, MMP-1 andTIMP- 1, and mRNA expression of type Ⅰ collagen.Results The protein and mRNA of type Ⅰ collagen,the ratios of TIMP-1/MMP-1 were significantlylower iu radiation group than in non- radiation group( P < 0.05 or 0.01 ). The peak of transcription of typeⅠ collagen mRNA was at 6 months and 3 months in non-radiation group and radiation group respectively.Conclusions Endovascular brachytherapy with192Ir might modify the metabolism of extracellular ma-trix after angioplasty by inhibiting the synthesis of typeⅠ collagen and the activities of MMP - 1 and TIMP - 1.

  5. The mean photon energy ĒF at the point of measurement determines the detector-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ,M in (192)Ir brachytherapy dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Poppe, Björn

    2016-09-01

    The application of various radiation detectors for brachytherapy dosimetry has motivated this study of the energy dependence of radiation quality correction factor kQ,M, the quotient of the detector responses under calibration conditions at a (60)Co unit and under the given non-reference conditions at the point of measurement, M, occurring in photon brachytherapy. The investigated detectors comprise TLD, radiochromic film, ESR, Si diode, plastic scintillator and diamond crystal detectors as well as ionization chambers of various sizes, whose measured response-energy relationships, taken from the literature, served as input data. Brachytherapy photon fields were Monte-Carlo simulated for an ideal isotropic (192)Ir point source, a model spherical (192)Ir source with steel encapsulation and a commercial HDR GammaMed Plus source. The radial source distance was varied within cylindrical water phantoms with outer radii ranging from 10 to 30cm and heights from 20 to 60cm. By application of this semiempirical method - originally developed for teletherapy dosimetry - it has been shown that factor kQ,M is closely correlated with a single variable, the fluence-weighted mean photon energy ĒF at the point of measurement. The radial profiles of ĒF obtained with either the commercial (192)Ir source or the two simplified source variants show little variation. The observed correlations between parameters kQ,M and ĒF are represented by fitting formulae for all investigated detectors, and further variation of the detector type is foreseen. The herewith established close correlation of radiation quality correction factor kQ,M with local mean photon energy ĒF can be regarded as a simple regularity, facilitating the practical application of correction factor kQ,M for in-phantom dosimetry around (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. ĒF values can be assessed by Monte Carlo simulation or measurement. A technique describing the local measurement of ĒF will be published separately. PMID

  6. Analysis of the Survival Rate with Cervical Cancer Using 137Cs and 192Ir Aftedoading Brachytherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuixioZhou; GuoxiongChen; DemeiMa; JianpingSun; LinMa

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze and compare the survival rate for stages Ⅱ and Ⅲ cervical cancer treated by external irradiation plus 137Cs or 192Ir. METHODS The patients with cervical cancer were treated by external irradiation plus 137Cs (group A, 427 patients) or plus 192Ir (group B, 156 patients). There were 170 stage Ⅱ cases and 413 stage Ⅲ cases. The number of cancer types were as follows: squamous cell carcinoma, 524; adenocarcinoma, 34; and adenosquamous cell carcinoma, 25. The two groups received the same external irradiation using 8 or 10 MV of X-ray. After the whole pelvis received 25-35 Gy, the focus was given a total of 45-55 Gy by four divided fields. Intracavitary irradiation was performed with one fraction of 6-7 Gy in reference dose at A point every week and a total dose of 40-60 Gy with 6-8 fractions for group A; every fraction of 5-6 Gy in reference dose of A point and total dose of 30-42 Gy with 5-7 fractions for group B.RESULTS The 5-year survival rate of stage Ⅱ and Ⅲ, and total were 82.9%, 62.2%, and 67.2% for group A respectively and 85.1%, 61.5% and 69.2% for group B respectively. There were significant differences between stage Ⅱ and Ⅲ in each group (P 0.05). The late complications of the therapy were rectitis and urocystitis and with an incidence rate of 7.3% and 6.3% for group A and 9.6% and 9.0% for group B (P> 0.05). CONCLUSION The long-term survival rate and complications of stages Ⅱ and Ⅲ cervical cancer are similar when treated with external irradiation plus 137Cs or plus 192Ir.

  7. The influence of different {sup 192}Ir sources geometries to the energy deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Paulo Eduardo; Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira, E-mail: lucio.neves@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (INFIS/UFU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Santos, William de Souza; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Belinato, Walmir [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, various simplifications of the HDR source Varian VariSource Classic model, in which {sup 192}Ir as a radionuclide is used, were compared. These simplifications were carried out by the simulation of Monte Carlo, using the MCNPX code. The different sources were compared through a distribution of energy deposition in a water phantom. Our results indicated that small simplifications will present no influence on the source response, and the removal of the entire capsule surrounding the radionuclide will present a difference of just 0.51% in the final response. (author)

  8. The influence of different 192Ir sources geometries to the energy deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, various simplifications of the HDR source Varian VariSource Classic model, in which 192Ir as a radionuclide is used, were compared. These simplifications were carried out by the simulation of Monte Carlo, using the MCNPX code. The different sources were compared through a distribution of energy deposition in a water phantom. Our results indicated that small simplifications will present no influence on the source response, and the removal of the entire capsule surrounding the radionuclide will present a difference of just 0.51% in the final response. (author)

  9. [Risk factors of late complications after interstitial 192Ir brachytherapy in cancers of the oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffert, D

    1997-01-01

    Brachytherapy has confirmed its prevailing role in conservative treatment of oral cavity carcinomas. To describe late toxicity in long-term surviving patients, comparisons with other series are necessary. Study of series of patients implanted for floor of the mouth or mobile tongue shows the need for more detailed data. Dental prophylaxy and lead protection of the mandibule, good indications and techniques of brachytherapy are necessary to avoid late complications. Some treatment factors have proved to be of good prognosis for late complications through multivariate analysis of large series treated with lr 192 wires, using the Paris system, eg, dose rate lower than 0.5 or 0.7 Gy/h, intersource spacing smaller than 1.2 or 1.5 cm, treated surface less than 12 cm2, lineic activity less than 1.5 mCi/cm, less than 1 cm diameter hyperdose, and use of mandibular lead protections. Tumor volume and location to the floor of mouth lead to higher risk of complications. Knowledge of treatment-related factors is important, with the development of new afterloading projectors allowing to control the dose rate and correct small inhomogeneities. High-dose rate exclusive brachytherapy is not recommended. More precise and reproducible classification should be used to report complications in series leading to publications in the future, thus allowing to compare results, reduce complication rates and improve the quality of life.

  10. Anisotropy measurement of {sup 192} Ir sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy; Medida da anisotropia de fontes de Ir-192 utilizadas em braquiterapia de altas taxa de dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henn, Keli Cristina; Khoury, Helen J.; Luz, Lidia Cristina P. da [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents the dose distribution around the Ir-192 source used in MicroSelectron-HDR remote after loader system. The measurements were made in air with the source stationary, positioned at the position 1, from the indexer of the microSelectron-HDR. Measurements were made using TLD and for radial distances of 3.0, 5.0 and 7.0 cm, for values of the angle from 0 deg c to 360 deg C in steps of 15 deg C. (author)

  11. Dose specification for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy in terms of dose-to-water-in-medium and dose-to-medium-in-medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy with 192Ir is usually based on the TG-43U1 protocol where all media are considered to be water. Several dose calculation algorithms have been developed that are capable of handling heterogeneities with two possibilities to report dose: dose-to-medium-in-medium (Dm,m) and dose-to-water-in-medium (Dw,m). The relation between Dm,m and Dw,m for 192Ir is the main goal of this study, in particular the dependence of Dw,m on the dose calculation approach using either large cavity theory (LCT) or small cavity theory (SCT). A head and neck case was selected due to the presence of media with a large range of atomic numbers relevant to tissues and mass densities such as air, soft tissues and bone interfaces. This case was simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code to score: Dm,m, Dw,m (LCT), mean photon energy and photon fluence. Dw,m (SCT) was derived from MC simulations using the ratio between the unrestricted collisional stopping power of the actual medium and water. Differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (SCT or LCT) can be negligible (<1%) for some tissues e.g. muscle and significant for other tissues with differences of up to 14% for bone. Using SCT or LCT approaches leads to differences between Dw,m (SCT) and Dw,m (LCT) up to 29% for bone and 36% for teeth. The mean photon energy distribution ranges from 222 keV up to 356 keV. However, results obtained using mean photon energies are not equivalent to the ones obtained using the full, local photon spectrum. This work concludes that it is essential that brachytherapy studies clearly report the dose quantity. It further shows that while differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (SCT) mainly depend on tissue type, differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (LCT) are, in addition, significantly dependent on the local photon energy fluence spectrum which varies with distance to implanted sources. (paper)

  12. Interstitial brachytherapy with 192-IR in treatment of recurrent malignant primary brain tumors. Braquiterapia intersticial con iridio-192 en el tratamiento de recidivas de tumores cerebrales tras cirugia y radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenes, R.; Martinez, R.; Victoria, C.; Nuez, L.; Clavo, B.; Sancedo, G. (Clinica Puerta de Hierro. Madrid (Spain))

    1994-01-01

    Seven patients with recurrent malignant primary brain tumors after surgery and radiation therapy were treated at the Clinica Puerta de Hierro (Madrid) by interstitial brachytherapy with 192-Ir sources. Implantations were performed using computerized tomography and dose prescription were determined following the Paris system rules for interstitial implants. The means dose deliberated was 50 to 65 Gy to the reference isodoses. At the last follow-up all patients except for one are alive and without evidence of progression of the disease. (Author) 35 refs.

  13. Stem signal suppression in fiber-coupled Al2O3:C dosimetry for 192Ir brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Andersen, Claus Erik; Edmund, J.M.;

    2011-01-01

    The stem signal, composed of fluorescence and Čerenkov light, becomes a significant source of uncertainty in fiber-coupled afterloaded brachytherapy dosimetry when the source dwells near the fiber cable but far from the detector. A stem suppression technique originally developed for scintillators...... was adapted for on-line in-vivo dosimetry using fiber-coupled carbon doped aluminum oxide (Al2O3:C). The technique involved a two-channel optical filtration of the radioluminescence (RL) emitted from a pre-irradiated Al2O3:C crystal with enhanced sensitivity. The system responded linearly in the absorbed dose...

  14. Proposal of a postal system for Ir-192 sources calibration used in high dose rate brachytherapy with LiF:Mn:Ti thermoluminescent dosemeters; Proposta de um sistema postal para a calibracao de fontes de {sup 192} Ir, utilizadas em braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose, com dosimetros termoluminescentes de LiF: Mn: Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, W.S.; Borges, J.C.; Almeida, C.E.V. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria. CNEN Caixa Postal 37750, 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    A proposal in order to improve the brachytherapy quality control and to allow postal intercomparison of Ir-192 sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy has been presented. The LiF: Mn: Ti (TLD 100) detector has been selected for such purpose. The experimental array and the TLDs irradiation and calibration techniques, at the treatment units, have been specified in the light of more recent methodology of Ir-192 calibration sources. (Author)

  15. Determination of transit dose profile for a {sup 192}Ir HDR source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, G. P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP, Sao Paulo 05508-000, Brazil and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Rubo, R. A.; Santos, G. R. dos [Hospital das Clinicas da Universidade de Sao Paulo - HC/FMUSP, Sao Paulo 05403-900 (Brazil); Minamisawa, R. A. [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Antunes, P. C. G.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP, Sao Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Several studies have reported methodologies to calculate and correct the transit dose component of the moving radiation source for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning systems. However, most of these works employ the average source speed, which varies significantly with the measurement technique used, and does not represent a realistic speed profile, therefore, providing an inaccurate dose determination. In this work, the authors quantified the transit dose component of a HDR unit based on the measurement of the instantaneous source speed to produce more accurate dose values. Methods: The Nucletron microSelectron-HDR Ir-192 source was characterized considering the Task Group 43 (TG-43U1) specifications. The transit dose component was considered through the calculation of the dose distribution using a Monte Carlo particle transport code, MCNP5, for each source position and correcting it by the source speed. The instantaneous source speed measurements were performed in a previous work using two optical fibers connected to a photomultiplier and an oscilloscope. Calculated doses were validated by comparing relative dose profiles with those obtained experimentally using radiochromic films. Results: TG-43U1 source parameters were calculated to validate the Monte Carlo simulations. These agreed with the literature, with differences below 1% for the majority of the points. Calculated dose profiles without transit dose were also validated by comparison with ONCENTRA{sup Registered-Sign} Brachy v. 3.3 dose values, yielding differences within 1.5%. Dose profiles obtained with MCNP5 corrected using the instantaneous source speed profile showed differences near dwell positions of up to 800% in comparison to values corrected using the average source speed, but they are in good agreement with the experimental data, showing a maximum discrepancy of approximately 3% of the maximum dose. Near a dwell position the transit dose is about 22% of the dwell dose delivered

  16. High dose rate 192Ir calibration: Indonesia experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indonesia with a population of more than 200 Million people which spread on about 5000 islands, up to now only has 23 radiotherapy centers and some not active anymore. As mention by Parkin et al that Cervix/Utery and breast cancer are the most estimated numbers of new cases of cancers in women for developing countries, stomach and lung cancers in men. Indonesia as a developing country is likely similar to other developing countries on numbers of new cases of cancers in women. But quite different in men, in Indonesia the most common cancers are nasopharynx and thyroid cancers. The use of lr-192 sources in high dose-rate (HDR) remotely afterloaded brachytherapy treatments have greatly increased in recent years and variety of such sources are commercially available. Nine radiotherapy centers in Indonesia installed Nucletron microSelectron HDR remote afterloader. Based on the data of CiptoMangunkusurno Hospital, Jakarta that the most common cancers are the cervix, breast, nasopharynx and thyroid cancers which of percentage are about 31%, 25 %, 13%, and 6 % respectively. It means that the use of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy has to be an effective tool in the treatments. Two methods have been studied and applied to calibrate HDR 192Ir brachytherapy in Indonesia, especially for Nucletron microSelectron HDR 192lr remote afterloader brachytherapy. Calibration of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source has been done by Cavity lonization Chamber and with Well Type lonization Chamber. First, 0.6 cc of NE Farmer type dosimeter that was calibrated to 60Co and 250 kV of x-rays in air kerma was used in this experiment. Position of measurement (detector and source) at the center of the room and about 1 meter from the floor. Eight variation of distances from 10 cm to 40 cms have been carried out measurement as recommended by IAEA-TECDOC-1079. Correction have been given for scatters, non-uniformity, and attenuation. To solve the problem of scatter correction factor was used Matlab programming. A

  17. SU-E-T-580: On the Significance of Model Based Dosimetry for Breast and Head and Neck 192Ir HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E; Pantelis, E; Papagiannis, P [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Major, T; Polgar, C [National Institute of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric and radiobiological differences between TG43-based and model-based dosimetry in the treatment planning of {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy for breast and head and neck cancer. Methods: Two cohorts of 57 Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) and 22 head and neck (H&N) patients with oral cavity carcinoma were studied. Dosimetry for the treatment plans was performed using the TG43 algorithm of the Oncentra Brachy v4.4 treatment planning system (TPS). Corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using MCNP6 with input files automatically prepared by the BrachyGuide software tool from DICOM RT plan data. TG43 and MC data were compared in terms of % dose differences, Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) and related indices of clinical interest for the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the Organs-At-Risk (OARs). A radiobiological analysis was also performed using the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD), mean survival fraction (S) and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) for the PTV, and the Normal Tissue Control Probability (N TCP) and the generalized EUD (gEUD) for the OARs. Significance testing of the observed differences performed using the Wilcoxon paired sample test. Results: Differences between TG43 and MC DVH indices, associated with the increased corresponding local % dose differences observed, were statistically significant. This is mainly attributed to their consistency however, since TG43 agrees closely with MC for the majority of DVH and radiobiological parameters in both patient cohorts. Differences varied considerably among patients only for the ipsilateral lung and ribs in the APBI cohort, with a strong correlation to target location. Conclusion: While the consistency and magnitude of differences in the majority of clinically relevant DVH indices imply that no change is needed in the treatment planning practice, individualized dosimetry improves accuracy and addresses instances of inter-patient variability observed. Research

  18. An innovative method for 192Ir HDR calibration by farmer chamber, V-film, and solid phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple, practical and economical technique was proposed to calibrate an 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source in terms of air kerma strength. This technique makes use of the 0.6 cm3 Farmer type ion chamber, radiographic film and polystyrene phantom. These tools are commonly used for dosimetry quality assurance of the clinical linear accelerator. In this study, the Exradin A19, PTW N30004 and TM30001 Farmer type ion chambers were used for the calibration of the 192Ir HDR source. To perform the calibration, a 25.4x30.5 cm2 radiographic film was taped on a piece of polystyrene plate, and a straight applicator probe of a HDR brachytherapy unit and the Farmer type ion chamber were affixed to the film envelope. The film was irradiated by the 192Ir source, followed by an exposure in the simulator X-ray beam. The film set with the film removed was then placed on a 5 cm thick polystyrene phantom for calibration measurement. Based on the electrometer reading from the Farmer type ion chamber irradiated by 192Ir and the measured source-to-chamber distance by means of the images on the developed film, we can calculate the air kerma strength of the 192Ir using the new technique. Our calibration results were compared to the data provided by the manufacturer and that of five different well type ion chambers, namely, Sun Nuclear cooperation (SNC) 1008, Nucletron SDS 077.091, SDS 077.094, PTW TN33004 and Standard Imaging (SI) HDR-1000 Plus. The differences were all within 1.6%. Relative to the '7-distance measurement technique' by Stump et al., 2002, our method is more efficient if our empirical formula was used. In summary, our method is simpler and cost-effective to calibrate an 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source for those hospitals without a calibration jig or a well type ion chamber.

  19. Intercomparison of calibration procedures of high dose rate {sup 192} Ir sources in Brazil and a proposal of a new methodology; Intercomparacao de procedimientos de calibracao de fontes de {sup 192} Ir de alta taxa de dose no Brasil e proposta de uma nova metodologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marechal, M.H.; Almeida, C.E. de [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes IRD/CNEN. Caixa Postal 37750 CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to report the results of an intercomparison of the calibration procedures for {sup 192} Ir sources presently in use in Brazil and to proposal a calibration procedure to derive the N{sub k} for a Farmer type ionization chamber for {sup 192} Ir energy by interpolating from a {sup 60} Co gamma-rays and 250 kV x-rays calibration factors. the intercomparison results were all within {+-} 3.0 % except one case where 4.6 % was observed and latter identified as a problem with N-k value for X-rays. The method proposed by the present work make possible the improvement of the metrological coherence among the calibration laboratories and their users once the N{sub k} values could then provided by any of the members of SSDL network. (Author)

  20. Response of an implantable MOSFET dosimeter to 192Ir HDR radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerstrom, Jessica M; Micka, John A; DeWerd, Larry A

    2008-12-01

    New in vivo dosimetry methods would be useful for clinical HDR brachytherapy. An implantable MOSFET Dose Verification System designed by Sicel Technologies, Inc. was examined for use with 192Ir HDR applications. This investigation demonstrated that varying the dose rate from 22 to 84 cGy/min did not change detector response. The detectors exhibited a higher sensitivity to 192Ir energies than 60Co energies. A nonlinear accumulated dose effect was characterized by three third-order polynomials fit to data from detectors placed at three different distances from the source. The detectors were found to have minimal rotational angular dependence. A strong longitudinal angular dependence was found when the detector's copper coil and electronics assembly were aligned between the MOSFETs and incident radiation. This orientation showed a 16% decrease in response relative to other orientations tested. PMID:19175130

  1. Response of an implantable MOSFET dosimeter to {sup 192}Ir HDR radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagerstrom, Jessica M.; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    New in vivo dosimetry methods would be useful for clinical HDR brachytherapy. An implantable MOSFET Dose Verification System designed by Sicel Technologies, Inc. was examined for use with {sup 192}Ir HDR applications. This investigation demonstrated that varying the dose rate from 22 to 84 cGy/min did not change detector response. The detectors exhibited a higher sensitivity to {sup 192}Ir energies than {sup 60}Co energies. A nonlinear accumulated dose effect was characterized by three third-order polynomials fit to data from detectors placed at three different distances from the source. The detectors were found to have minimal rotational angular dependence. A strong longitudinal angular dependence was found when the detector's copper coil and electronics assembly were aligned between the MOSFETs and incident radiation. This orientation showed a 16% decrease in response relative to other orientations tested.

  2. Source geometry factors for HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, D R; Sander, T; Nutbrown, R F

    2015-03-21

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated (192)Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR (192)Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, k(sg), is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR (192)Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR (192)Ir Flexisource k(sg) was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  3. An innovative method for {sup 192}Ir HDR calibration by farmer chamber, V-film, and solid phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Liyun; Ding, Hueisch-Jy [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Ho, Sheng-Yow, E-mail: shengho@seed.net.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sinlau Christian Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-01

    A simple, practical and economical technique was proposed to calibrate an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source in terms of air kerma strength. This technique makes use of the 0.6 cm{sup 3} Farmer type ion chamber, radiographic film and polystyrene phantom. These tools are commonly used for dosimetry quality assurance of the clinical linear accelerator. In this study, the Exradin A19, PTW N30004 and TM30001 Farmer type ion chambers were used for the calibration of the {sup 192}Ir HDR source. To perform the calibration, a 25.4x30.5 cm{sup 2} radiographic film was taped on a piece of polystyrene plate, and a straight applicator probe of a HDR brachytherapy unit and the Farmer type ion chamber were affixed to the film envelope. The film was irradiated by the {sup 192}Ir source, followed by an exposure in the simulator X-ray beam. The film set with the film removed was then placed on a 5 cm thick polystyrene phantom for calibration measurement. Based on the electrometer reading from the Farmer type ion chamber irradiated by {sup 192}Ir and the measured source-to-chamber distance by means of the images on the developed film, we can calculate the air kerma strength of the {sup 192}Ir using the new technique. Our calibration results were compared to the data provided by the manufacturer and that of five different well type ion chambers, namely, Sun Nuclear cooperation (SNC) 1008, Nucletron SDS 077.091, SDS 077.094, PTW TN33004 and Standard Imaging (SI) HDR-1000 Plus. The differences were all within 1.6%. Relative to the '7-distance measurement technique' by Stump et al., 2002, our method is more efficient if our empirical formula was used. In summary, our method is simpler and cost-effective to calibrate an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source for those hospitals without a calibration jig or a well type ion chamber.

  4. The air-kerma rate constant of 192Ir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninković, M M; Raiĉevìć, J J

    1993-01-01

    The air-kerma rate constant gamma delta (and its precursors), as one of the basic radiation characteristics of 192Ir, was determined by many authors. Analysis of accessible data on this quantity led us to the conclusion that published data strongly disagree. That is the reason we calculated this quantity on the basis of our and many other authors' gamma-ray spectral data and the latest data for mass energy-transfer coefficients for air. In this way, a value was obtained for gamma delta of 30.0 +/- 0.9 a Gy m2 s-1 Bq-1 for an unshielded 192Ir source and 27.8 +/- 0.9 a Gy m2s -1Bq-1 for a standard packaged radioactive source taking into account attenuation of gamma rays in the platinum source wall. PMID:8416220

  5. A comparison of dosimetric parameters and dose distribution around CF -252 and IR-192 LDR Brachytherapy Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The purpose of this work is the evaluation and comparison of the dose rate distributions around a 252Cf Applicator Tube (AT) and 192Ir LDR sources. The dosimetric parameters were determined for both sources according to the updated AAPM TG-43U1 protocol. The calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle MCNP code, version 5C. To validate the results of this study, they were compared to experimental and analytical dosimetric data available in the literature for similar source configurations. After validation, the Monte Carlo computer code was applied to investigate the difference between dose rate distributions around the two brachytherapy sources, with the purpose of comparing their efficiency in treatment. The data so obtained also provide further information about spatial dose distributions and are important for detailed treatment planning with 252 Cf or 192Ir LDR sources for interstitial and intracavitary therapy

  6. Broad-beam transmission data for new brachytherapy sources, Tm-170 and Yb-169

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of the radionuclides 170Tm and 169Yb are highly interesting for their use as high dose-rate brachytherapy sources. The introduction of brachytherapy equipment containing these sources will lead to smaller required thicknesses of the materials used in radiation protection barriers compared with the use of conventional sources such as 192Ir and 137Cs. The purpose of this study is to determine the required thicknesses of protection material for the design of the protecting walls. Using the Monte Carlo method, transmission data were derived for broad-beam geometries through lead and concrete barriers, from which the first half value layer and tenth value layer are obtained. In addition, the dose reduction in a simulated patient was studied to determine whether transmission in the patient is a relevant factor in radiation protection calculations. (authors)

  7. Application of the Cavity theory in the calibration of the powder TLD-100 for energies of 60 Co, 137 Cs, 192 Ir and RX 50, 250 k Vp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A powder lot TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) in absorbed dose terms in water Dw for the following radiation sources: 60 Co, 137 Cs and RX 50 and 250 k Vp is calibrated; to continuation is made a lineal interpolation of the TLD response in function of the effective energy of the sources to calibrate a source of 192 Ir. The calibration of those fields in Dw are carried out with aid of the Bragg-Gray cavity theory, the one which finds implicit in the following protocols: IAEA-TRS 398 for the 60 Co and the AAPM TG61 for X Rays of 50 and 250 k Vp. Additionally the AAPM protocol TG43 to determine the Dw in function of the kerma intensity Sk in the case of the 137 Cs is used. The calibration curves for the response of the TLD-100 RTLD vs Dw, corresponding to each one of the sources already mentioned are constructed. The RTLD vs Dw by least heavy square by means of a second order polynomial that corrects the supralineality of the response is adjusted. The curves are validated by lack of LOF adjustment and by the Anderson Darling normality test. Later the factors of sensitivity (Fs) for the sources of 192 Ir: Micro Selectron and Vari Source are interpolated, used respectively in the A and B hospitals for treatments of brachytherapy of high dose rate (HDR), the expanded uncertainties associated to the Dw and Fs are also determined. Finally, an acrylic phantom and a couple of capsules are already sent to the hospitals mentioned, to verify a nominal Dw of 2 Gy, in a case an underestimate in 5.5% in the imparted Dw and in other an overestimation in a range of -1.5 to -8.0% was obtained. The obtained results in this work establish the bases for the development of a national dosimetric quality control program for brachytherapy of HDR with sources of 192 Ir. (Author)

  8. Determination of exit skin dose for 192Ir intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation with thermoluminescent dosimeters

    OpenAIRE

    Raffi, Julie A.; Stephen D. Davis; Hammer, Cliff G.; Micka, John A.; Kunugi, Keith A.; Musgrove, Jana E.; Winston, John W.; Ricci-Ott, Terresa J.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has become a popular treatment for early stage breast cancer in recent years due to its shortened course of treatment and simplified treatment planning compared to traditional external beam breast conservation therapy. However, the exit dose to the skin is a major concern and can be a limiting factor for these treatments. Most treatment planning systems (TPSs) currently used for high dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy overe...

  9. Determination of the tissue inhomogeneity correction in high dose rate Brachytherapy for Iridium-192 source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlanka Ravikumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brachytherapy treatment planning, the effects of tissue heterogeneities are commonly neglected due to lack of accurate, general and fast three-dimensional (3D dose-computational algorithms. In performing dose calculations, it is assumed that the tumor and surrounding tissues constitute a uniform, homogeneous medium equivalent to water. In the recent past, three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT based treatment planning for Brachytherapy applications has been popularly adopted. However, most of the current commercially available planning systems do not provide the heterogeneity corrections for Brachytherapy dosimetry. In the present study, we have measured and quantified the impact of inhomogeneity caused by different tissues with a 0.015 cc ion chamber. Measurements were carried out in wax phantom which was employed to measure the heterogeneity. Iridium-192 (192 Ir source from high dose rate (HDR Brachytherapy machine was used as the radiation source. The reduction of dose due to tissue inhomogeneity was measured as the ratio of dose measured with different types of inhomogeneity (bone, spleen, liver, muscle and lung to dose measured with homogeneous medium for different distances. It was observed that different tissues attenuate differently, with bone tissue showing maximum attenuation value and lung tissue resulting minimum value and rest of the tissues giving values lying in between those of bone and lung. It was also found that inhomogeneity at short distance is considerably more than that at larger distances.

  10. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between {sup 99m}Tc and HDR {sup 192}Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Lima, Carla Flavia de; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with {sup 99m}Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and methods: simulations of implants with {sup 99m}Tc-filled and HDR {sup 192}Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: the {sup 99m}Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1} and 0.190 cGyh{sup -1} at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1}, respectively, for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the {sup 99m}Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: temporary {sup 99m}Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. (author)

  11. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between 99mTc and HDR 192Ir*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with 99mTc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and Methods Simulations of implants with 99mTc-filled and HDR 192Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results The 99mTc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h-1.mCi-1 and 0.190 cGyh-1.mCi-1 at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh-1.mCi-1, respectively, for the HDR 192Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the 99mTc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR 192Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion Temporary 99mTc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR 192Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. PMID:27141131

  12. Experimental determination of the energy response of alanine pellets in the high dose rate 192Ir spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeken, B.; Cuypers, R.; Goossens, J.; Van den Weyngaert, D.; Verellen, D.

    2011-10-01

    An experimental determination of the energy correction factor for alanine/paraffin pellets in the 192Ir spectrum at varying distances from the source is presented. Alanine dosimeters were irradiated in water under full scatter conditions with a high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir source (Flexisource), using a dedicated holder. Up to six line sources (catheters) fit in a regular pattern at fixed radial distances from the holder axis, the alanine detector being placed at the centre of the holder. The HDR source was stepping every 0.5 cm within a trocar needle within ± 3.0 cm around the medial plane through the detector in order to achieve dose homogeneity within the detector volume. The energy correction factor of alanine/paraffin pellets in 192Ir relative to 60Co was experimentally determined as the inverse ratio of the dose to water measured in water around the 192Ir source to the dose to water calculated in water using the TG-43 formalism. The pellets were read out with a Bruker EMXmicro spectrometer (X-band). The amplitude of the central line in the alanine absorption spectrum from pellets irradiated within the 192Ir spectrum was directly compared with the amplitude from 60Co-irradiated pellets. The energy correction factors of Harwell pellets irradiated in the 192Ir spectrum are 1.029 ± 0.02, 1.027 ± 0.02 and 1.045 ± 0.02 at a mean weighted source-detector distance of 2.0, 2.9 and 5.3 cm, respectively. The experimentally obtained values for the energy response are 1.3% lower compared to the theoretical values for radial distances smaller than 3 cm.

  13. Comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K8 of high dose-rate Ir-192 brachytherapy standards for reference air kerma rate of the VSL and the BIPM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, J.T.; De Pooter, J.A.; Andersen, Claus E.;

    2014-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for reference air kerma rate for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy sources of the Dutch Metrology Institute (VSL), The Netherlands, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out at the VSL in November 2009. The comparison resu...

  14. SU-E-T-457: Design and Characterization of An Economical 192Ir Hemi-Brain Small Animal Irradiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grams, M; Wilson, Z; Sio, T; Beltran, C; Tryggestad, E; Gupta, S; Blackwell, C; McCollough, K; Sarkaria, J; Furutani, K [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To describe the design and dosimetric characterization of a simple and economical small animal irradiator. Methods: A high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source from a commercially available afterloader was used with a 1.3 centimeter thick tungsten collimator to provide sharp beam penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. The unit is equipped with continuous gas anesthesia to allow robust animal immobilization. Dosimetric characterization of the device was performed with Gafchromic film. The penumbra from the small animal irradiator was compared under similar collimating conditions to the penumbra from 6 MV photons, 6 MeV electrons, and 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator as well as 300 kVp photons from an orthovoltage unit and Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV protons. Results: The tungsten collimator provides a sharp penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation, and dose rates on the order of 200 cGy/minute were achieved. The sharpness of the penumbra attainable with this device compares favorably to those measured experimentally for 6 MV photons, and 6 and 20 MeV electron beams from a linear accelerator. Additionally, the penumbra was comparable to those measured for a 300 kVp orthovoltage beam and a Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV proton beam. Conclusions: The small animal irradiator described here can be built for under $1,000 and used in conjunction with any commercial brachytherapy afterloader to provide a convenient and cost-effective option for small animal irradiation experiments. The unit offers high dose rate delivery and sharp penumbra, which is ideal for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. With slight modifications to the design, irradiation of sites other than the brain could be accomplished easily. Due to its simplicity and low cost, the apparatus described is an attractive alternative for small animal irradiation experiments requiring a sharp penumbra.

  15. SU-E-T-457: Design and Characterization of An Economical 192Ir Hemi-Brain Small Animal Irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the design and dosimetric characterization of a simple and economical small animal irradiator. Methods: A high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source from a commercially available afterloader was used with a 1.3 centimeter thick tungsten collimator to provide sharp beam penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. The unit is equipped with continuous gas anesthesia to allow robust animal immobilization. Dosimetric characterization of the device was performed with Gafchromic film. The penumbra from the small animal irradiator was compared under similar collimating conditions to the penumbra from 6 MV photons, 6 MeV electrons, and 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator as well as 300 kVp photons from an orthovoltage unit and Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV protons. Results: The tungsten collimator provides a sharp penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation, and dose rates on the order of 200 cGy/minute were achieved. The sharpness of the penumbra attainable with this device compares favorably to those measured experimentally for 6 MV photons, and 6 and 20 MeV electron beams from a linear accelerator. Additionally, the penumbra was comparable to those measured for a 300 kVp orthovoltage beam and a Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV proton beam. Conclusions: The small animal irradiator described here can be built for under $1,000 and used in conjunction with any commercial brachytherapy afterloader to provide a convenient and cost-effective option for small animal irradiation experiments. The unit offers high dose rate delivery and sharp penumbra, which is ideal for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. With slight modifications to the design, irradiation of sites other than the brain could be accomplished easily. Due to its simplicity and low cost, the apparatus described is an attractive alternative for small animal irradiation experiments requiring a sharp penumbra

  16. RESULTS OF 192IR CONTACT RADIATION THERAPY FOR CERVIX UTERI CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Kravets

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of treatment for locally advanced cervix uteri cancer, by applying a 192Ir radioactive source for contact radiation. Three- and five-year overall and relapse-free survival rates have been obtained for stages: 82.5 and 82.5%; 78.4 and 78.4% for Stage IIb; 57 and 52.3%; 41.6 and 41.6 for IIIb; 53.3 and 47.3%; 42.4 and 37.7% for IVb, respectively.

  17. The wall correction factor for a spherical ionization chamber used in brachytherapy source calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piermattei, A [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Azario, L [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Fidanzio, A [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Viola, P [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Dell' Omo, C [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Iadanza, L [Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata-Rionero in Vulture, Pz (Italy); Fusco, V [Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata-Rionero in Vulture, Pz (Italy); Lagares, J I [Universidad de Sevilla, Facultad de Medicina, Dpto Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Sevilla (Spain); Capote, R [Universidad de Sevilla, Facultad de Medicina, Dpto Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Sevilla (Spain)

    2003-12-21

    The effect of wall chamber attenuation and scattering is one of the most important corrections that must be determined when the linear interpolation method between two calibration factors of an ionization chamber is used. For spherical ionization chambers the corresponding correction factors A{sub w} have to be determined by a non-linear trend of the response as a function of the wall thickness. The Monte Carlo and experimental data here reported show that the A{sub w} factors obtained for an Exradin A4 chamber, used in the brachytherapy source calibration, in terms of reference air kerma rate, are up to 1.2% greater than the values obtained by the linear extrapolation method for the studied beam qualities. Using the A{sub w} factors derived from Monte Carlo calculations, the accuracy of the calibration factor N{sub K,Ir} for the Exradin A4, obtained by the interpolation between two calibration factors, improves about 0.6%. The discrepancy between the new calculated factor and that obtained using the complete calibration curve of the ion-chamber and the {sup 192}Ir spectrum is only 0.1%.

  18. Calibration coefficient of reference brachytherapy ionization chamber using analytical and Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D

    2010-06-01

    A cylindrical graphite ionization chamber of sensitive volume 1002.4 cm(3) was designed and fabricated at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) for use as a reference dosimeter to measure the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. The air kerma calibration coefficient (N(K)) of this ionization chamber was estimated analytically using Burlin general cavity theory and by the Monte Carlo method. In the analytical method, calibration coefficients were calculated for each spectral line of an HDR (192)Ir source and the weighted mean was taken as N(K). In the Monte Carlo method, the geometry of the measurement setup and physics related input data of the HDR (192)Ir source and the surrounding material were simulated using the Monte Carlo N-particle code. The total photon energy fluence was used to arrive at the reference air kerma rate (RAKR) using mass energy absorption coefficients. The energy deposition rates were used to simulate the value of charge rate in the ionization chamber and N(K) was determined. The Monte Carlo calculated N(K) agreed within 1.77 % of that obtained using the analytical method. The experimentally determined RAKR of HDR (192)Ir sources, using this reference ionization chamber by applying the analytically estimated N(K), was found to be in agreement with the vendor quoted RAKR within 1.43%.

  19. Iridium-192 sources production for brachytherapy use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of cancer increases every year in Brazil and turns out to be one of the most important causes of mortality. Some of the patients are treated with brachytherapy, a form of lesion treatment which is based on the insertion of sources into tumors, in this particular case, activated iridium wires. During this process, the ionizing radiation efficiently destroys the malignant cells. These iridium wires have a nucleus made out of an iridium-platinum alloy 20-30/70-80 of 0,1 mm in diameter either coated by platinum or encased in a platinum tube. The technique consists in irradiating the wire in the reactor neutron flux in order to produce iridium-192. The linear activity goes from 1 mCi/cm to 4 mCi/cm and the basic characteristic, which is required, is the homogeneity of the activation along the wire. It should not present a dispersion exceeding 5% on a wire measuring 50 cm in length, 0.5 mm or 0.3 mm in diameter. Several experiments were carried out in order to define the activation parameters. Wires from different origins were analyzed. It was concluded that United States of America and France wires were found to be perfectly adequate for brachytherapy purposes and have therefore been sent to specialized hospitals and successfully applied to cancer patients. Considering that the major purpose of this work is to make this product more accessible in Brazil, at a cost reflecting the Brazilian reality, the IPEN is promoting the preparation of iridium-192 sources to be used in brachytherapy, on a national level. (author)

  20. OER and RBE for 125I and 192Ir at low dose rate on mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) for 125I and 192Ir as well as the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at low dose rates (40-80 cGy h-1) were determined for B16 melanoma cells in culture. The OER was found to be 2.1±0.03 for 125I and 2.7±0.04 for 192Ir. The RBE for 125I relative to 192Ir was determined as 1.8±0.03 under aerated conditions and as 2.4±0.03 under hypoxia. 18 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 table

  1. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for possession of sealed sources and... MATERIAL General Technical Requirements § 35.67 Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee in possession of any sealed source or brachytherapy source shall...

  2. Calibration procedure for thermoluminescent dosemeters in water absorbed doses for Iridium-192 high dose rate sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters are used in brachytherapy services quality assurance programs, with the aim of guaranteeing the correct radiation dose supplied to cancer patients, as well as with the purpose of evaluating new clinical procedures. This work describes a methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water for 192Ir high dose rate sources. The reference dose used is measured with an ionization chamber previously calibrated for 192Ir energy quality, applying the methodology proposed by Toelli. This methodology aims to standardizing the procedure, in a similar form to that used for external radiotherapy. The work evolves the adaptation of the TRS-277 Code of the International Atomic Energy Agency, for small and big cavities, through the introduction for non-uniform experimental factor, for the absorbed dose in the neighborhood of small brachytherapy sources. In order to simulate a water medium around the source during the experimental work, an acrylic phantom was used. It guarantees the reproducibility of the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeter's location in relation to the radiation source. The values obtained with the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeters, exposed to a 192Ir high dose rate source, were compared and correction factors for different source-detector distances were determined for the thermoluminescent dosimeters. A numeric function was generated relating the correction factors and the source-detector distance. These correction factors are in fact the thermoluminescent dosimeter calibration factors for the 192Ir source considered. As a possible application of this calibration methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters, a practical range of source-detector distances is proposed for quality control of 192Ir high dose rate sources. (author)

  3. [Brachytherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itami, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Brachytherapy do require a minimal expansion of CTV to obtain PTV and it is called as ultimate high precision radiation therapy. In high-dose rate brachytherapy, applicators will be placed around or into the tumor and CT or MRI will be performed with the applicators in situ. With such image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) 3-dimensional treatment planning becomes possible and DVH of the tumor and organs at risk can be obtained. It is now even possible to make forward planning satisfying dose constraints. Traditional subjective evaluation of brachytherapy can be improved to the objective one by IGBT. Brachytherapy of the prostate cancer, cervical cancer, and breast cancer with IGBT technique was described. PMID:25596048

  4. Reply to the comment on ‘Monte Carlo calculated microdosimetric spread for cell nucleus-sized targets exposed to brachytherapy 125I and 192Ir sources and 60Co cell irradiation’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, F.; Ahnesjö, A.

    2016-07-01

    A discrepancy between the Monte Carlo derived relative standard deviation σ z\\text{rel} (microdosimetric spread) and experimental data was reported by Villegas et al (2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 6149–62) suggesting wall effects as a plausible explanation. The comment by Lindborg et al (2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 8621–4) concludes that this is not a likely explanation. A thorough investigation of the Monte Carlo (MC) transport code used for track simulation revealed a critical bug. The corrected MC version yielded σ z\\text{rel} values that are now within experimental uncertainty. Other microdosimetric findings are hereby communicated.

  5. Comment on ‘Monte Carlo calculated microdosimetric spread for cell nucleus-sized targets exposed to brachytherapy 125I and 192Ir sources and 60Co cell irradiation’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindborg, Lennart; Lillhök, Jan; Grindborg, Jan-Erik

    2015-11-01

    The relative standard deviation, σr,D, of calculated multi-event distributions of specific energy for 60Co ϒ rays was reported by the authors F Villegas, N Tilly and A Ahnesjö (Phys. Med. Biol. 58 6149-62). The calculations were made with an upgraded version of the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. When the results were compared to results derived from experiments with the variance method and simulated tissue equivalent volumes in the micrometre range a difference of about 50% was found. Villegas et al suggest wall-effects as the likely explanation for the difference. In this comment we review some publications on wall-effects and conclude that wall-effects are not a likely explanation.

  6. Establishment of in vitro 192Ir γ-ray dose-response relationship for dose assessment by the lymphocyte dicentric assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Maria; Meronka, Katarzyna; Szewczak, Kamil

    2012-03-01

    In vitro dose-response relationships are used to describe the relation between dicentric chromosomes and radiation dose for human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The dicentric yield depends on both the dose and the radiation quality. Thus, for reliable dose estimation in vitro dose responses must be determined for different radiation qualities. This paper reports the work for setting up the relationship for the dicentric production in the lymphocytes exposed in vitro to 192Ir g-rays at Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection (CLOR). In a case of a radiation accident in industrial radiography using 192Ir sealed sources, this will be the basis for the indirect evaluation of the g-ray dose to which an accidental victim was exposed.

  7. External beam irradiation plus 192Ir implant after breast-preserving surgery in women with early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide more information for the clinician and to analyze the impact of the boost with brachytherapy on the local disease-free survival (LDFS), disease-free survival (DFS), specific overall survival (OS), and cosmesis, a retrospective study of external radiation therapy and 192Ir implantation in early breast cancer at Institut Catala d'Oncologia has been undertaken. Patients and Methods: From 1986 to 1996, 530 patients were selected for this study with a median follow-up period of 39.5 months (range, 10-115 months). External radiation therapy (combined with brachytherapy) was administered postoperatively to the breast in all patients. Mean given dose was 48.7 Gy (range, 42-52 Gy) with external radiation therapy to the breast, and 16.8 Gy (range, 10-27 Gy) was the mean dose with brachytherapy. Variables have been tested for cosmesis. Univariate and multivariate analysis have also been carried out. Results: Mean age of the patients was 54 years (range, 28-81 years). Stages were distributed as follows: 350 patients (66%) in Stage I, 173 in Stage II (32.8%), and 7 in Stage III (1.1%). Pathologic distribution was 445 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma (84%), 20 patients with infiltrating lobular carcinoma (4%), and 65 patients (12%) of a miscellaneous group. OS for the entire group was 89.4% and 85.9% at 5 and 7 years respectively. Probability of DFS was 81.7% and 70.1% at 5 and 7 years. The LDFS was 94.9% and 91.7% at 5 and 7 years. The MFS probability was 85.5% and 76.9% at 5 and 7 years, respectively. Univariate analysis demonstrated that age (older than 52 years), premenopausal status, moderate and high histologic grades (Grades II-III), and presence of intraductal comedocarcinoma were prognostic factors for local relapse. Multivariate analysis for local disease-free survival demonstrated that only perineural or muscular infiltration remain as prognostic factors. Tumor dose bed of 70 Gy or higher had a negative impact in breast subcutaneous

  8. Size Effects of Gold and Iron Nanoparticles on Radiation Dose Enhancement in Brachytherapy and Teletherapy: A Monte Carlo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahad Ollah Ezzati

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In this study, we aimed to calculate dose enhancement factor (DEF for gold (Au and iron (Fe nanoparticles (NPs in brachytherapy and teletherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC method. Materials and Methods In this study, a new algorithm was introduced to calculate dose enhancement by AuNPs and FeNPs for Iridium-192 (Ir-192 brachytherapy and Cobalt-60 (Co-60 teletherapy sources, using the MC method. In this algorithm, the semi-random distribution of NPs was used instead of the regular distribution. Diameters were assumed to be 15, 30, and 100 nm in brachytherapy and 15 and 30 nm in teletherapy. Monte Carlo MCNP4C code was used for simulations, and NP density values were 0.107 mg/ml and 0.112 mg/ml in brachytherapy and teletherapy, respectively. Results AuNPs significantly enhanced the radiation dose in brachytherapy (approximately 60%, and 100 nm diameter NPs showed the most uniform dose distribution. AuNPs had an insignificant effect on teletherapy radiation field, with a dose enhancement ratio of 3% (about the calculation uncertainty or less. In addition, FeNPs had an insignificant effect on both brachytherapy and teletherapy radiation fields. FeNPs dose enhancement was 3% in brachytherapy and 6% (about the calculation uncertainty or less in teletherapy. Conclusion It can be concluded that AuNPs can significantly increase the absorbed dose in brachytherapy; however, FeNPs do not have a noticeable effect on the absorbed dose

  9. Invited review, recent developments in brachytherapy source dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of radioactive isotopes is the treatment of choice around the globe for many cancer sites. In this technique, the accuracy of the radiation delivery is highly dependent on the accuracy of radiation dosimetry around individual brachytherapy sources. Moreover, in order to have compatible clinical results, an identical method of source dosimetry must be employed across the world. This problem has been recently addressed by task group 43 from the American Association of Medical Physics with a protocol for dosimetric characterization of brachytherapy sources. This new protocol has been further updated using published data from international sources, by a new Task Group from the American Association of Medical Physics. This has resulted in an updated protocol known as TG43U1 that has been published in March 2004 issue of Medical Physics. The goal of this presentation is to review the original Task Group 43 protocol and associated algorithms for brachytherapy source dosimetry. In addition, the shortcomings of the original protocol that has been resolved in the updated recommendation will be highlighted. I am sure that this is not the end of the line and more work is needed to complete this task. I invite the scientists to join this task and complete the project, with the hope of much better clinical results for cancer patients

  10. Implementation of microsource high dose rate (mHDR) brachytherapy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy using remote afterloading of a single high dose rate 192Ir microsource was developed in the 1970s. After its introduction to clinics, this system has spread rapidly among developed Member States and has become a highly desirable modality in cancer treatment. This technique is now gradually being introduced to the developing Member States. The 192Ir sources are produced with a high specific activity. This results in a high dose rate (HDR) to the tumour and shorter treatment times. The high specific activity simultaneously results in a much smaller source (so-called micro source, around I mm in diameter) which may be easily inserted into tissue through a thin delivery tube, the so-called interstitial treatment, as well as easily inserted into body cavities, the so-called intracavitary or endoluminal treatment. Another advantage is the ability to change dwell time (the time a source remains in one position) of the stepping source which allows dose distribution to match the target volume more closely. The purpose of this TECDOC is to advise radiation oncologists, medical physicists and hospital administrators in hospitals which are planning to introduce 192Ir microsource HDR (mHDR) remote afterloading systems. The document supplements IAEA-TECDOC-1040, Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects, and will facilitate implementation of this new brachytherapy technology, especially in developing countries. The operation of the system, 'how to use the system', is not within the scope of this document. This TECDOC is based on the recommendations of an Advisory Group meeting held in Vienna in April 1999

  11. Calculated organ doses using Monte Carlo simulations in a reference male phantom undergoing HDR brachytherapy applied to localized prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian [Radioprotection Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to obtain equivalent doses in radiosensitive organs (aside from the bladder and rectum) when applying high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to a localized prostate carcinoma using {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir sources. These data are compared with results in a water phantom and with expected values in an infinite water medium. A comparison with reported values from proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is also provided. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed using a voxelized phantom described in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110, which reproduces masses and shapes from an adult reference man defined in ICRP Publication 89. Point sources of {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir with photon energy spectra corresponding to those exiting their capsules were placed in the center of the prostate, and equivalent doses per clinical absorbed dose in this target organ were obtained in several radiosensitive organs. Values were corrected to account for clinical circumstances with the source located at various positions with differing dwell times throughout the prostate. This was repeated for a homogeneous water phantom. Results: For the nearest organs considered (bladder, rectum, testes, small intestine, and colon), equivalent doses given by {sup 60}Co source were smaller (8%-19%) than from {sup 192}Ir. However, as the distance increases, the more penetrating gamma rays produced by {sup 60}Co deliver higher organ equivalent doses. The overall result is that effective dose per clinical absorbed dose from a {sup 60}Co source (11.1 mSv/Gy) is lower than from a {sup 192}Ir source (13.2 mSv/Gy). On the other hand, equivalent doses were the same in the tissue and the homogeneous water phantom for those soft tissues closer to the prostate than about 30 cm. As the distance increased, the differences of photoelectric effect in water and soft tissue, and appearance of other materials

  12. Experiences in Recycling and Reuse of Radioactive Sources in BRIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT), a unit of the Department of Atomic Energy in India, produces and supplies various types of sealed radiation sources in India. The sealed sources include teletherapy sources using 60Co, industrial radiography sources using 60Co and 192Ir, nucleonic gauging sources using 60Co, 137Cs, among others, and 137Cs brachytherapy sources. BRIT has acquired considerable experience in the reuse and recycling of these sealed sources. This has proved to be very useful in continuous control of these sources over the life cycle. (author)

  13. Verification of Oncentra brachytherapy planning using independent calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safian, N. A. M.; Abdullah, N. H.; Abdullah, R.; Chiang, C. S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was done to investigate the verification technique of treatment plan quality assurance for brachytherapy. It is aimed to verify the point doses in 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy between Oncentra Masterplan brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent calculation software at a region of rectum, bladder and prescription points for both pair ovoids and full catheter set ups. The Oncentra TPS output text files were automatically loaded into the verification programme that has been developed based on spreadsheets. The output consists of source coordinates, desired calculation point coordinates and the dwell time of a patient plan. The source strength and reference dates were entered into the programme and then dose point calculations were independently performed. The programme shows its results in a comparison of its calculated point doses with the corresponding Oncentra TPS outcome. From the total of 40 clinical cases that consisted of two fractions for 20 patients, the results that were given in term of percentage difference, it shows an agreement between TPS and independent calculation are in the range of 2%. This programme only takes a few minutes to be used is preferably recommended to be implemented as the verification technique in clinical brachytherapy dosimetry.

  14. SU-F-19A-10: Recalculation and Reporting Clinical HDR 192-Ir Head and Neck Dose Distributions Using Model Based Dose Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To retrospectively re-calculate dose distributions for selected head and neck cancer patients, earlier treated with HDR 192Ir brachytherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and compare results to distributions from the planning system derived using TG43 formalism. To study differences between dose to medium (as obtained with the MC code) and dose to water in medium as obtained through (1) ratios of stopping powers and (2) ratios of mass energy absorption coefficients between water and medium. Methods: The MC code Algebra was used to calculate dose distributions according to earlier actual treatment plans using anonymized plan data and CT images in DICOM format. Ratios of stopping power and mass energy absorption coefficients for water with various media obtained from 192-Ir spectra were used in toggling between dose to water and dose to media. Results: Differences between initial planned TG43 dose distributions and the doses to media calculated by MC are insignificant in the target volume. Differences are moderate (within 4–5 % at distances of 3–4 cm) but increase with distance and are most notable in bone and at the patient surface. Differences between dose to water and dose to medium are within 1-2% when using mass energy absorption coefficients to toggle between the two quantities but increase to above 10% for bone using stopping power ratios. Conclusion: MC predicts target doses for head and neck cancer patients in close agreement with TG43. MC yields improved dose estimations outside the target where a larger fraction of dose is from scattered photons. It is important with awareness and a clear reporting of absorbed dose values in using model based algorithms. Differences in bone media can exceed 10% depending on how dose to water in medium is defined

  15. Cs-137 brachytherapy sources calibration with well chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the procedures and actions developed for the identification and reference air kerma rate (Sk) verification of Cs-137 sources used in gynecological brachytherapy practices. Following the IAEA TECDOC 1151 recommendations, the first stage consisted in designing the documentation required for the inventory and shipping registry of sources, along with the digital spreadsheets for calculating the decay and Sk of the sources at the moment of implantation. As a second stage, the Sk of sources was measured, following the low dose rate sources protocol advise, with a Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber calibrated at the University of Wisconsin SSDL. The documentation generated through this procedure allows identify each source clearly and uni-vocally. No significant differences were found between the Sk values obtained from the well chamber calibration procedure and those reported by the manufacturer in the corresponding certificates. The highest percent difference found was 2.3%. (author)

  16. Development and implementation of a remote audit tool for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy using optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to create a mailable phantom with measurement accuracy suitable for Radiological Physics Center (RPC) audits of high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources at institutions participating in National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative clinical trials. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) were chosen as the dosimeter to be used with the phantom.Methods: The authors designed and built an 8 × 8 × 10 cm3 prototype phantom that had two slots capable of holding Al2O3:C OSLDs (nanoDots; Landauer, Glenwood, IL) and a single channel capable of accepting all 192Ir HDR brachytherapy sources in current clinical use in the United States. The authors irradiated the phantom with Nucletron and Varian 192Ir HDR sources in order to determine correction factors for linearity with dose and the combined effects of irradiation energy and phantom characteristics. The phantom was then sent to eight institutions which volunteered to perform trial remote audits.Results: The linearity correction factor was kL= (−9.43 × 10−5× dose) + 1.009, where dose is in cGy, which differed from that determined by the RPC for the same batch of dosimeters using 60Co irradiation. Separate block correction factors were determined for current versions of both Nucletron and Varian 192Ir HDR sources and these vendor-specific correction factors differed by almost 2.6%. For the Nucletron source, the correction factor was 1.026 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.023–1.028], and for the Varian source, it was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.995–1.005). Variations in lateral source positioning up to 0.8 mm and distal/proximal source positioning up to 10 mm had minimal effect on dose measurement accuracy. The overall dose measurement uncertainty of the system was estimated to be 2.4% and 2.5% for the Nucletron and Varian sources, respectively (95% CI). This uncertainty was sufficient to establish a ±5% acceptance criterion for source strength audits under a formal RPC audit

  17. Radiation Protection in Brachytherapy. Report of the SEFM Task Group on Brachytherapy; Proteccion radiologica en Braquiterapia. Informe del grupo de trabajo de Braquiterapia de la SEFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calatayud, J.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Crispin Contreras, V.; Eudaldo Puell, T.; Frutos Baraja, J. de; Pino Sorroche, F.; Pujades Claumarchirant, M. C.; Richart Sancho, J.

    2015-07-01

    This document presents the report of the Brachytherapy Task Group of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics. It is dedicated to the radiation protection aspects involved in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to include the more relevant aspects related to radiation protection issues that appear in clinical practice, and for the current equipment in Spain. Basically this report focuses on the typical contents associated with high dose rate brachytherapy with {sup 1}92Ir and {sup 6}0Co sources, and permanent seed implants with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}03Pd and {sup 1}31Cs, which are the most current and widespread modalities. Ophthalmic brachytherapy (COMS with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}06Ru, {sup 9}0Sr) is also included due to its availability in a significant number of spanish hospitals. The purpose of this report is to assist to the medical physicist community in establishing a radiation protection program for brachytherapy procedures, trying to solve some ambiguities in the application of legal requirements and recommendations in clinical practice. (Author)

  18. Dose effects of guide wires for catheter-based intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Guide wires with high torquability and steerability are commonly used to navigate through a tortuous and/or branching arterial tree in a catheter-based intravascular brachytherapy procedure. The dosimetric effects due to the presence of metallic guide wires have not been addressed. This work investigates these dose effects for the three most commonly used β and γ sources (90Sr, 32P, and 192Ir). Methods and Materials: The EGS4 Monte Carlo codes were used to calculate the dose distributions for the 90Sr(NOVOSTE), 32P (Guidant), and 192Ir (BEST Ind.) with and without a guide wire in place. Energy spectra for particles exiting the sources were calculated from the full phase-space data obtained from the Monte Carlo simulations of the source constructions. Guide wires of various thicknesses and compositions were studied. Results: The dose perturbations due to the presence of guide wires were found to be far more significant for the 90Sr/90Y and 32P beta sources than those for the 192Ir gamma source. Because of the attenuation by the guide wires, a dose reduction of up to 60% behind a guide wire was observed for the beta sources, whereas the dose perturbation was found to be negligible for the γ source. For a β source, the dose perturbations depend on the thickness and the material of the guide wire. When the region behind a guide wire is part of an intravascular brachytherapy target, the presence of the guide wire results in a significant underdosing for β sources. The underdosed region can extend a few mm behind the guide wire and up to 1 mm in other directions. Conclusion: Significant dose perturbations by the presence of a metallic guide wire have been found in catheter-based intravascular brachytherapy using β sources. The dose effects should be considered in the dose prescription and/or in analyzing the treatment outcome for β sources. Such precautions are not necessary if using a gamma source

  19. Effective treatment of Stage I uterine papillary serous carcinoma with high dose-rate vaginal apex radiation (192Ir) and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a morphologically distinct variant of endometrial carcinoma that is associated with a poor prognosis, high recurrence rate, frequent clinical understaging, and poor response to salvage treatment. We retrospectively analyzed local control, actuarial overall survival (OS), actuarial disease-free survival (DFS), salvage rate, and complications for patients with Federation International of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) (1988) Stage I UPSC. Methods and Materials: This retrospective analysis describes 38 patients with FIGO Stage I UPSC who were treated with the combinations of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, total abdominal hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH/BSO), with or without a surgical staging procedure. Twenty of 38 patients were treated with a combination of low dose-rate (LDR) uterine/vaginal brachytherapy using 226Ra or 137Cs and conventional whole-abdomen radiation therapy (WART) or whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). Of 20 patients (10%) in this treatment group, 2 received cisplatin chemotherapy. Eighteen patients were treated with high dose-rate (HDR) vaginal apex brachytherapy using 192Ir with an afterloading device and cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (CAP) chemotherapy (5 of 18 patients). Only 6 of 20 UPSC patients treated with combination LDR uterine/vaginal brachytherapy and conventional external beam radiotherapy underwent complete surgical staging, consisting of TAH/BSO, pelvic/para-aortic lymph node sampling, omentectomy, and peritoneal fluid analysis, compared to 15 of 18 patients treated with HDR vaginal apex brachytherapy. Results: The 5-year actuarial OS for patients with complete surgical staging and adjuvant radiation/chemotherapy treatment was 100% vs. 61% for patients without complete staging (p = 0.002). The 5-year actuarial OS for all Stage I UPSC patients treated with postoperative HDR vaginal apex brachytherapy and systemic chemotherapy was 94% (18

  20. Retreatment of recurrent carcinoma of the head and neck by afterloading interstitial 192Ir implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emami, B.; Marks, J.E.

    1983-10-01

    From January 1975 to December 1980, 25 patients with persistent or recurrent carcinomas of the head and neck were retreated for palliation at the Division of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. These patients had all undergone extensive previous treatment by surgery and/or radiation. All were retreated with 192Ir interstitial implant with or without external radiation and/or surgical excision. Of 25 patients, 13 had complete response (CR) and 6 had partial response for a follow-up period of 1 to 7 years. Of 13 patients with CR, 6 are alive with no evidence of disease (NED) and two died NED. Detailed results are presented and the new strategy for such patients is discussed.

  1. Synthesis of phosphosilicate matrix for application to brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy with beta sources can be useful for in situ radiotherapy of cancers where tiny radioactive seeds are injected directly into the tumor. Phosphorus 31P can be activated to b-emitter 32P by neutron activation with a half-life of 14.3 days. In this work, phosphosilicate matrices were synthesized through sol-gel process by hydrolysis and condensation of the tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) under two different conditions of synthesis. In both conditions the phosphoric acid and drying control chemical additives (DCCA's) were the same. Three drying control chemical additives were utilized: propylene carbonate, N,N-dimethylformamide and ethylene glycol. The casting solutions were prepared with phosphorus content of 3.2 wt.% and xerogels were thermally treated at 900 deg C. Different microstructures were observed under different conditions of synthesis. The microstructures of phosphosilicate matrices obtained with ethylene glycol and without DCCA's have shown the presence of a globular structure regions with large amount of phosphorous. (author)

  2. Dosimetry of the 198Au Source used in Interstitial Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauffy, L; Braby, L; Berner, B

    2004-05-18

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 report, AAPM TG-43, provides an analytical model and a dosimetry protocol for brachytherapy dose calculations, as well as documentation and results for some sealed sources. The radionuclide {sup 198}Au (T{sub 1/2} = 2.70 days, E{gamma} = 412 keV) has been used in the form of seeds for brachytherapy treatments including brain, eye, and prostate tumors. However, the TG-43 report has no data for {sup 198}Au seeds, and none have previously been obtained. For that reason, and because of the conversion of most treatment planning systems to TG-43 based methods, both Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP 4C) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are used in this work to determine these data. The geometric variation in dose is measured using an array of TLDs in a solid water phantom, and the seed activity is determined using both a well ion chamber and a High Purity Germanium detector (HPGe). The results for air kerma strength, S{sub k}, per unit apparent activity, are 2.06 (MCNP) and 2.09 (measured) U mCi{sup -1}. The former is identical to what was published in 1991 in the AAPM Task Group 32 report. The dose rate constant results, {Lambda}, are 1.12 (MCNP) and 1.10 (measured), cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. The radial dose function, g(r), anisotropy function, F(r,{theta}), and anisotropy factor, {psi}{sub an}(r), are given. The anisotropy constant values are 0.973 (MCNP) and 0.994 (measured) and are consistent with both source geometry and the emitted photon energy.

  3. A Monte Carlo dosimetry study using Henschke applicator for cervical brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Pei-Chieh [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cathay General Hospital, 280 Renai Rd. Sec.4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chao, Tsi-Chian [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chung-Chi [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsin Street, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ching-Jung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cathay General Hospital, 280 Renai Rd. Sec.4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tung, Chuan-Jong, E-mail: cjtung@mail.cgu.edu.t [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-21

    In recent years the Henschke applicator has been widely used for gynecologic patients treated by brachytherapy in Taiwan. However, the commercial brachytherapy planning system did not properly evaluate the dose perturbation caused by the Henschke applicator. Since the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology advised that the effect of source shielding should be incorporated into the brachytherapy planning system, it required calculation and comparison of the dose distribution around the applicator. This study used the Monte Carlo MCNP code to simulate the dose distribution in a water phantom that contained the Henschke applicator with one tandem and two ovoids. Three dwell positions of a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir source were simulated by including and excluding the applicator. The mesh tally option of the MCNP was applied to facilitate the calculation of a large number of tallies in the phantom. The voxel size effect and the charge particle equilibrium were studied by comparing the results calculated with different tally options. The calculated results showed that the brachytherapy planning system overestimated the rectal dose and that the shielding material in the applicator contributed more than 40% to the rectal dose.

  4. Conceptual source design and dosimetric feasibility study for intravascular treatment: a proposal for intensity modulated brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Si Yong; Han, Eun Young; Palta, Jatinder R. [College of Medicine, Florida Univ., Florida (United States); Ha, Sung W. [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    To propose a conceptual design of a novel source for intensity modulated brachytherapy. The source design incorporates both radioactive and shielding materials (stainless steel or tungsten), to provide an asymmetric dose intensity in the azimuthal direction. The intensity modulated intravascular brachytherapy was performed by combining a series of dwell positions and times, distributed along the azimuthal coordinates. Two simple designs for the beta-emitting sources, with similar physical dimensions to a {sub 90}Sr/Y Novoste Beat-Cath source, were considered in the dosimetric feasibility study. In the first design, the radioactive and materials each occupy half of the cylinder and in the second, the radioactive material occupies only a quarter of the cylinder. The radial and azimuthal dose distributions around each source were calculated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The preliminary hypothetical simulation and optimization results demonstrated the 87% difference between the maximum and minimum doses to the lumen wall, due to off-centering of the radiation source, could be reduced to less than 7% by optimizing the azimuthal dwell positions and times of the partially shielded intravascular brachytherapy sources. The novel brachytherapy source design, and conceptual source delivery system, proposed in this study show promising dosimetric characteristics for the realization of intensity modulated brachytherapy in intravascular treatment. Further development of this concept will center on building a delivery system that can precisely control the angular motion of a radiation source in a small-diameter catheter.

  5. Simulation of dose distribution for iridium-192 brachytherapy source type-H01 using MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purwaningsih, Anik [Center for development of nuclear informatics, National Nuclear Energy Agency, PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Banten 15310 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    Dosimetric data for a brachytherapy source should be known before it used for clinical treatment. Iridium-192 source type H01 was manufactured by PRR-BATAN aimed to brachytherapy is not yet known its dosimetric data. Radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution are some primary keys in brachytherapy source. Dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 was obtained from the dose calculation formalism recommended in the AAPM TG-43U1 report using MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo simulation code. To know the effect of cavity on Iridium-192 type H01 caused by manufacturing process, also calculated on Iridium-192 type H01 if without cavity. The result of calculation of radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 were compared with another model of Iridium-192 source.

  6. Evaluation of organ doses in brachytherapy treatment of uterus cancer using mathematical reference Indian adult phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantifying organ dose to healthy organs during radiotherapy is essential to estimate the radiation risk. Dose factors are generated by simulating radiation transport through an anthropomorphic mathematical phantom representing a reference Indian adult using the Monte Carlo method. The mean organ dose factors (in mGy min-1 GBq-1) are obtained considering the Micro Selectron 192Ir source and BEBIG 60Co sources in the uterus of a reference Indian adult female phantom. The present study provides the factors for mean absorbed dose to organs applicable to the Indian female patient population undergoing brachytherapy treatment of uterus cancer. This study also includes a comparison of the dimension of organs in the phantom model with measured values of organs in the various investigated patients. (author)

  7. A Scintillating Fiber Dosimeter for Radiology and Brachytherapy with photodiode readout

    CERN Document Server

    Rêgo, Florbela; Abreu, Maria da Conceição

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: For more than a decade that plastic optical fiber based dosimeters have been developed for medical applications. The feasibility of dosimeters using optical fibers that are almost Cherenkov light free has been demonstrated in some prototypes, particularly suitable for photon high-energy beams. In the energy range up to a few hundred keV, where the production of Cherenkov light by secondary electrons is negligible or small, the largest source of background are the fluorescence mechanisms. Methods: In recent years our group has developed an optical fiber dosimeter with photodiode readout named DosFib, which has small energy dependence in the range below 100 keV relevant for radiology. Photodiodes are robust photodetectors, presenting good stability over time and enough sensitivity to allow the use of an electrometer as a measuring device without extra electronics. Results: In-vitro tests using a High Dose Rate 192Ir source have demonstrated its suitability for brachytherapy applications using this impo...

  8. Source localisation and dose verification for a novel brachytherapy unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxas, Marinos G.

    A recent development in the field of radiotherapy has been the introduction of the PRS Intrabeam system (Carl Zeiss Surgical GmbH, Oberkochen, Germany). This is essentially a portable, miniaturised, electron-driven photon generator that allows high intensity, soft-energy x-rays (50 kVp) to be delivered directly to the tumour site in a single fraction. The system has been used for the interstitial radiation treatment of both brain and breast tumours. At present, a standardised in-vivo dose verification technique is not available for the PRS treatments. The isotropical distribution of photons about the tip of the PRS probe inserted in the tissue can effectively be viewed as a point source of radiation buried in the body. This work has looked into ways of localising the PRS source utilising its own radiation field. Moreover, the response of monoenergetic sources, mimicking realistic brachytherapy sources, has also been investigated. The purpose of this project was to attempt to localise the source as well as derive important dosimetric information from the resulting image. A detection system comprised of a well-collimated Germanium detector (HPGe) has been devised in a rotate-translate Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) modality. The superior energy resolving ability of the detection system allowed for energy selective reconstruction to be carried out in the case of the monoenergetic source (241Am). Results showed that the monoenergetic source can be localised to within 1 mm and the continuous PRS x-ray source to within 3mm. For the PRS dose map derivation, Monte Carlo studies have been employed in order to extract information on the dosimetric aspect of the resulting image. The final goal of this work was therefore to formulate a direct mathematical relation (Transform Map) between the image created by the escaping photons and the dose map as predicted by the theoretical model. The formation therefore of the in-vivo PRS image could allow for a real-time monitoring

  9. Production of 125I seed sources for brachytherapy uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of radioactive sources of 125I, used mainly for the brachytherapy of prostate and ocular cancer, is a work that is being carried out in the plant of production of radioisotopes (PPR) of the Nuclear Center Racso of the IPEN. The employed methodology is based on the 125I physical-chemistry adsorption at silver wires coated with palladium. In the realization of the tests, it has been considered the procedure used by India and Iran participants of this CRP. In the execution of this work, the 131I radioisotope is been used simulating the 125I, because in the PPR-IPEN we produce the 131I. In total 50 samples were used, they were divided in ten groups. In first place with nine working groups, the optimum conditions for work for the coating of the silver wires with palladium were obtained, these being the following: simple method, employing PdCl2 0.1 m, pH of 5.5 to 6.5 and a temperature of 100 deg. C. Later on, a series of tests were carried out to determine the appropriate parameters for the adsorption of 131I in the previously treated wires, these being the following: carrier concentration of Ki 0.03 m, time of adsorption of 6 hours, and temperature of 70 deg. C. Finally, the percentage of 131I adsorption was obtained in the silver wires tried previously with palladium chloride solution of 98.24%. The control of leachability was made, having very good results. To confirm these previously mentioned parameters, a test was made with ten pieces of silver wires, corresponding to the group 10, giving the confirmation as a result of these. Also, samples of the titanium tube have been sent for test with microplasma welding to a French company: air welding liquidates export. With these results obtained, subsequently the production of these radioactive sources will be carried out employing 125I as a radioisotope. (author)

  10. COMS eye plaque brachytherapy dosimetric sensitivity to source photon energy and seed design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study explores the influence of source photon energy on eye plaque brachytherapy dose distributions for a 16 mm COMS plaque filled with 103Pd, 125I, or 131Cs sources or monoenergetic photon emissions ranging from 12 keV to 100 keV. Dose distributions were similarly created for all permutations of three common brachytherapy seed designs. Within this range, sources with average energy ≤22 keV may reduce dose to the opposite eye wall by more than a factor of 2 while maintaining tolerable proximal sclera doses when prescribing to depths of 9 mm or less. Current commercially-available brachytherapy sources can exhibit up to 15% relative dosimetric sensitivity to seed design at regions within the eye. - Highlights: • Episcleral eye plaque brachytherapy utilizes low-energy photon-emitting sources. • Dose distribution sensitivity to source photon energy and seed design was examined. • Tumor dose conformity and critical structure sparing from ≤22 keV photons is preferred. • Ocular dose distributions varied by up to 15% with seed design permutations

  11. Attenuation measurements show that the presence of a TachoSil surgical patch will not compromise target irradiation in intra-operative electron radiation therapy or high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgery of locally advanced and/or recurrent rectal cancer can be complemented with intra-operative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) to deliver a single dose of radiation directly to the unresectable margins, while sparing nearby sensitive organs/structures. Haemorrhages may occur and can affect the dose distribution, leading to an incorrect target irradiation. The TachoSil (TS) surgical patch, when activated, creates a fibrin clot at the surgical site to achieve haemostasis. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of TS on the dose distribution, and ascertain whether it could be used in combination with IOERT. This characterization was extended to include high dose rate (HDR) intraoperative brachytherapy, which is sometimes used at other institutions instead of IOERT. CT images of the TS patch were acquired for initial characterization. Dosimetric measurements were performed in a water tank phantom, using a conventional LINAC with a hard-docking system of cylindrical applicators. Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curves were obtained, and measurements made at the depth of dose maximum for the three clinically used electron energies (6, 9 and 12MeV), first without any attenuator and then with the activated patch of TS completely covering the tip of the IOERT applicator. For HDR brachytherapy, a measurement setup was improvised using a solid water phantom and a Farmer ionization chamber. Our measurements show that the attenuation of a TachoSil patch is negligible, both for high energy electron beams (6 to 12MeV), and for a HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source. Our results cannot be extrapolated to lower beam energies such as 50 kVp X-rays, which are sometimes used for breast IORT. The TachoSil surgical patch can be used in IORT procedures using 6MeV electron energies or higher, or HDR 192Ir brachytherapy

  12. Differential dose contributions on total dose distribution of (125)I brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camgöz, B; Yeğin, G; Kumru, M N

    2010-01-01

    This work provides an improvement of the approach using Monte Carlo simulation for the Amersham Model 6711 (125)I brachytherapy seed source, which is well known by many theoretical and experimental studies. The source which has simple geometry was researched with respect to criteria of AAPM Tg-43 Report. The approach offered by this study involves determination of differential dose contributions that come from virtual partitions of a massive radioactive element of the studied source to a total dose at analytical calculation point. Some brachytherapy seeds contain multi-radioactive elements so the dose at any point is a total of separate doses from each element. It is momentous to know well the angular and radial dose distributions around the source that is located in cancerous tissue for clinical treatments. Interior geometry of a source is effective on dose characteristics of a distribution. Dose information of inner geometrical structure of a brachytherapy source cannot be acquired by experimental methods because of limits of physical material and geometry in the healthy tissue, so Monte Carlo simulation is a required approach of the study. EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation software was used. In the design of a simulation, the radioactive source was divided into 10 rings, partitioned but not separate from each other. All differential sources were simulated for dose calculation, and the shape of dose distribution was determined comparatively distribution of a single-complete source. In this work anisotropy function was examined also mathematically.

  13. In-phantom dosimetric measurements as quality control for brachytherapy. System check and constancy check; Messungen im Festkoerperphantom als Qualitaetskontrolle in der Brachytherapie. Systempruefung und Konstanzpruefung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollefrath, Michael; Bruggmoser, Gregor; Nanko, Norbert; Gainey, Mark [Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde

    2015-09-01

    In brachytherapy dosimetric measurements are difficult due to the inherent dose-inhomogeneities. Typically in routine clinical practice only the nominal dose rate is determined for computer controlled afterloading systems. The region of interest lies close to the source when measuring the spatial dose distribution. In this region small errors in the positioning of the detector, and its finite size, lead to large measurement uncertainties that exacerbate the routine dosimetric control of the system in the clinic. The size of the measurement chamber, its energy dependence, and the directional dependence of the measurement apparatus are the factors which have a significant influence on dosimetry. Although ionisation chambers are relatively large, they are employed since similar chambers are commonly found on clinical brachytherapy units. The dose is determined using DIN 6800 [11] since DIN 6809-2 [12], which deals with dosimetry in brachytherapy, is antiquated and is currently in the process of revision. Further information regarding dosimetry for brachytherapy can be found in textbooks [1] and [2]. The measurements for this work were performed with a HDR (High-Dose-Rate) {sup 192}Ir source, type mHDR V2, and a Microselectron Afterloader V2 both from Nucletron/Elekta. In this work two dosimetric procedures are presented which, despite the aforemention difficulties, should assist in performing checks of the proper operation of the system. The first is a system check that measures the dose distribution along a line and is to be performed when first bringing the afterloader into operation, or after significant changes to the system. The other is a dosimetric constancy check, which with little effort can be performed monthly or weekly. It simultaneously verifies the positioning of the source at two positions, the functionality of the system clock and the automatic re-calculation of the source activity.

  14. Metal stent and endoluminal high-dose rate 192iridium brachytherapy in palliative treatment of malignant biliary tract obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since December 1989, 9 patients with inoperable malignant biliary tract obstruction were treated palliatively by a combined modality treatment consisting of placement of a permanent biliary endoprosthesis followed by intraluminal high dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy. A dose of 10 Gy was delivered in a hyperfractionated schedule at the point of reference in a distance of 7.5 mm of centre of the source. External small field radiotherapy (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per day, 5 fractions per week) was also given in six cases (M/O, Karnofsky >60%). In 9/9 cases an unrestrained bile flow and an interruption of pruritus was achieved, in 78% (7/9) of cases the duration of palliation was as long as the survival time (median survival time 7.5 months). (orig.)

  15. Establishment of Ge-doped optical fibres as thermoluminescence dosimeters for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Issa, Fatma, E-mail: f.issa@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Radiotherapy, Tripoli Medical Centre (TMC), Tripoli (Libya); Abdul Rahman, A.T. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Material Studies, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, Campus of Negeri Sembilan, 72000 Kuala Pilah (Malaysia); Hugtenburg, Richard P. [Department of Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg UHB and School of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Bradley, David A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Radiological Sciences, King Saud University, P.O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11432 (Saudi Arabia); Nisbet, Andrew [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford, GU2 7XX (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    This study aims to establish the sensitive, {approx}120 {mu}m high spatial resolution, high dynamic range Ge-doped optical fibres as thermoluminescence (TL) dosimeters for brachytherapy dose distribution. This requires investigation to accommodate sensitivity of detection, both for the possibility of short range dose deposition from beta components as well as gamma/x-mediated dose. In-air measurements are made at distances close to radionuclide sources, evaluating the fall off in dose along the transverse axis of {sup 133}Ba and {sup 60}Co radioactive sources, at distances from 2 mm up to 20 mm from their midpoints. Measurements have been compared with Monte Carlo code DOSRZnrc simulations for photon-mediated dose only, agreement being obtained to within 3% and 1% for the {sup 133}Ba and {sup 60}Co sources, respectively. As such, in both cases it is determined that as intended, beta dose has been filtered out by source encapsulation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We seek to establish Ge-doped optical fibres as TLDs for brachytherapy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dose was evaluated along the central axis of {sup 133}Ba and {sup 60}Co, at 2 mm-20 mm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We verify values using DOSRZnrc Monte Carlo code simulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good agreement is between dose measurements and calculation to within 3% and 1%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methodology is to be used in obtaining doses around {sup 125}I and {sup 192}Ir sources.

  16. Dosimetric and clinical comparison between MammoSite and interstitial HDR brachytherapy in treatment of early stage breast cancer after conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To comparatively study dosimetric evaluation, side effects in early and late stage, and cosmetic outcome between MammoSite and interstitial using high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in early stage breast cancer patient after conserving surgery. Methods: From January 2004 to December 2004, 10 breast cancer cases were treated with HDR 192Ir APBI after Lumpectomy surgery, 6 cases with interstitial brachytherapy, 4 cases with MammoSite. Sources were placed during the operation in all patients, distance from cavity to skin > 5-7 mm in interstitial brachytherapy group, one case is 6.5 mm, 3 cases > 10 mm in MammoSite group. Treatment Target area is 20 mm away from cavity in interstitial brachytherapy group with DHI 0.77, 10 mm away from Balloon margin in MammoSite with DHI 0.73. Results: Follow up 12-24 months while median follow-up was 18 months for the whole group (100%). During the treatment, grade III acute reactions were not seen in both group, grade I or II were seen including: erythema, edema, tenderness and infection. More late toxicity reaction including skin fibrosis, breast tenderness and fat necrosis were observed in interstitial brachytherapy group than that of MammoSite group. Cosmetic outcome evaluation were excellent in 12 months 100% (patient) and 83% (doctor) in interstitial brachytherapy, 100% in MammoSite group, respectively, none recurrence. Conclusions: Interstitial brachytherapy shows more uniformity in dose distribution as well as larger treatment volume, while MammoSite tends to be stable in repeatability and easy in use. Both groups show excellent cosmetic results, with same acute and late reactions. (authors)

  17. Deterministic calculations of radiation doses from brachytherapy seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy is used for treating certain types of cancer by inserting radioactive sources into tumours. CDTN/CNEN is developing brachytherapy seeds to be used mainly in prostate cancer treatment. Dose calculations play a very significant role in the characterization of the developed seeds. The current state-of-the-art of computation dosimetry relies on Monte Carlo methods using, for instance, MCNP codes. However, deterministic calculations have some advantages, as, for example, short computer time to find solutions. This paper presents a software developed to calculate doses in a two-dimensional space surrounding the seed, using a deterministic algorithm. The analysed seeds consist of capsules similar to IMC6711 (OncoSeed), that are commercially available. The exposure rates and absorbed doses are computed using the Sievert integral and the Meisberger third order polynomial, respectively. The software also allows the isodose visualization at the surface plan. The user can choose between four different radionuclides (192Ir, 198Au, 137Cs and 60Co). He also have to enter as input data: the exposure rate constant; the source activity; the active length of the source; the number of segments in which the source will be divided; the total source length; the source diameter; and the actual and effective source thickness. The computed results were benchmarked against results from literature and developed software will be used to support the characterization process of the source that is being developed at CDTN. The software was implemented using Borland Delphi in Windows environment and is an alternative to Monte Carlo based codes. (author)

  18. Brachytherapy optimal planning with application to intravascular radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Mourtada, Firas A.; Taylor, Russell H.;

    1999-01-01

    . Dose rate calculations are based on the sosimetry formulation of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Task Group 43. We apply the technique to optimal planning for intravascular brachytherapy of intimal hyperplasia using ultrasound data and 192Ir seeds. The planning includes......We have been studying brachytherapy planning with the objective of manimizing the maximum deviation of the delivered dose from prescribed dose bounds for treatment volumes. A general framework for optimal treatment planning is presented and the minmax optimization is formulated as a linear program...

  19. Detailed dose distribution prediction of Cf-252 brachytherapy source with boron loading dose enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dose rate distribution and to determine the boron effect on dose rate distribution for 252Cf brachytherapy source. This study was carried out using a Monte Carlo simulation. To validate the Monte Carlo computer code, the dosimetric parameters were determined following the updated TG-43 formalism and compared with current literature data. The validated computer code was then applied to evaluate the neutron and photon dose distribution and to illustrate the boron loading effect.

  20. A case of percutaneous high dose rate brachytherapy for superior pulmonary sulcus tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakura, Tamaki; Imamura, Masahiro; Murata, Takashi [Kansai Medical Univ., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    A 64-year-old man with advanced superior pulmonary sulcus tumor suffered severe unrelieved pain even after chemotherapy, external irradiation and hyperthermia. So we planned to introduce a percutaneous high dose rate brachytherapy using the microselectron HDR {sup 192}Ir. With the estimation using the Pain Score, satisfying pain relief was attainable with a combination of the percutaneous high dose rate brachytherapy and conventional treatment. So the percutaneous high dose rate brachytherapy had the possibility to contribute to the alleviation of the pain. (author)

  1. CT-guided brachytherapy. A novel percutaneous technique for interstitial ablation of liver malignancies; CT-gesteuerte Brachytherapie. Eine neue perkutane Technik zur interstitiellen Ablation von Lebermetastasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricke, J.; Wust, P.; Stohlmann, A.; Beck, A.; Cho, C.H.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Spors, B.; Werk, M.; Rosner, C.; Haenninen, E.L.; Felix, R. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    Purpose: to assess safety and efficacy of CT-guided brachytherapy of liver malignancies. Patients and methods: 21 patients with 21 liver malignancies (19 metastases, two primary liver tumors) were treated with interstitial CT-guided brachytherapy applying a {sup 192}Ir source. In all patients, the use of image-guided thermal tumor ablation such as by radiofrequency or laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) was impeded either by tumor size {>=} 5 cm in seven, adjacent portal or hepatic vein in ten, or adjacent bile duct bifurcation in four patients. Dosimetry was performed using three-dimensional CT data sets acquired after CT-guided positioning of the brachytherapy catheters. Results: the mean tumor diameter was 4.6 cm (2.5-11 cm). The mean minimal tumor dose inside the tumor margin amounted to 17 Gy (12-20 Gy). The proportion of the liver parenchyma exposed to > 5 gy was 18% (5-39%) of total liver parenchyma minus tumor volume. Nausea and vomiting were observed in six patients after brachytherapy (28%). One patient demonstrated obstructive jaundice due to tumor edema after irradiation of a metastasis adjacent to the bile duct bifurcation. We commonly encountered asymptomatic increases of liver enzymes. Local control rates after 6 and 12 months were 87% and 70%, respectively. Conclusion: CT-guided brachytherapy is safe and effective. This technique displays broader indications compared to image-guided thermal ablation by radiofrequency or LITT with respect to tumor size or localization. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Analyse der Sicherheit und Effektivitaet CT-gesteuerter Brachytherapie zur Ablation von Lebermalignomen. Patienten und Methodik: 21 Patienten mit 21 Lebermalignomen (19 Metastasen, zwei primaere Lebermalignome) wurden mit perkutaner, CT-gesteuerter interstitieller Brachytherapie mit {sup 192}Ir behandelt. Alle Patienten wiesen Umstaende auf, die eine bildgefuehrte thermische Ablation mit Radiofrequenz oder laserinduzierter Thermotherapie (LITT) einschraenkten

  2. Monte Carlo Dosimetry of the 60Co BEBIG High Dose Rate for Brachytherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Tourinho Campos

    Full Text Available The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy is currently a widespread practice worldwide. The most common isotope source is 192Ir, but 60Co is also becoming available for HDR. One of main advantages of 60Co compared to 192Ir is the economic and practical benefit because of its longer half-live, which is 5.27 years. Recently, Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG, Germany, introduced a new afterloading brachytherapy machine (MultiSource®; it has the option to use either the 60Co or 192Ir HDR source. The source for the Monte Carlo calculations is the new 60Co source (model Co0.A86, which is referred to as the new BEBIG 60Co HDR source and is a modified version of the 60Co source (model GK60M21, which is also from BEBIG.The purpose of this work is to obtain the dosimetry parameters in accordance with the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism with Monte Carlo calculations regarding the BEBIG 60Co high-dose-rate brachytherapy to investigate the required treatment-planning parameters. The geometric design and material details of the source was provided by the manufacturer and was used to define the Monte Carlo geometry. To validate the source geometry, a few dosimetry parameters had to be calculated according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism. The dosimetry studies included the calculation of the air kerma strength Sk, collision kerma in water along the transverse axis with an unbounded phantom, dose rate constant and radial dose function. The Monte Carlo code system that was used was EGSnrc with a new cavity code, which is a part of EGS++ that allows calculating the radial dose function around the source. The spectrum to simulate 60Co was composed of two photon energies, 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. Only the gamma part of the spectrum was used; the contribution of the electrons to the dose is negligible because of the full absorption by the stainless-steel wall around the metallic 60Co. The XCOM photon cross-section library was used in subsequent simulations, and the photoelectric effect, pair

  3. An orthodontic device for retaining implanted radioactive sources during brachytherapy for cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An orthodontic retainer was devised to keeping implanted radioactive sources in position and improve the quality of life during brachytherapy for cancer of the oral cavity. The retainer was used in 3 patients with oral cancer, one with cancer of the hard palate, one with cancer of the soft palate, and one with cancer of the floor of mouth, during brachytherapy using 198Au grains and 137Cs needles. These patients could speak freely. One with cancer of the hard palate could drink water and ingest semi-liquid food during treatment instead of nasal tube feeding. The plaster dental model obtained while making the retainer proved to be useful for training radiation oncologists. (author)

  4. Interstitial brachytherapy of intracranial germinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金林; 肖湘生; 施增儒; 陶晓峰; 肖珊; 丁学华; 卢亦成; 张耀范

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the process of tumor response to interstitial brachytherapy of intracranial germinomas during and immediately after the therapy. Methods: Fractionated brachytherapy using 192Ir was used in 13 patients with intracranial germinomas. The average age at diagnosis was 14.3 years (range 5 - 27 years). The frequency of fractionation had been increased stepwise from 3 fractionations within 5 d in the past to 26 - 30 fractionations in 15 - 20 d at present, Results: Of 9 pineal tumors, the average reduction of tumor volume was 73.2% at a cumulated radiation dose of 20 Gy and85.3 % at 30 Gy, respectively. In 4 cases of basal ganglia and thalamus areas tumors, the reduction of tumor volume was from an average 56.1% at a cumulated radiation dose of 30 Gy to 75.2% at the end of therapy. That intratumoral hemorrhage was absorbed quickly accompanying tumor regression was demonstrated in all but one patient; 6 patients died; 7 patients were still in follow-up without any evidence of tumor recurrence. Conclusion: Interstitial brachytherapy could be given as the first optional therapy for intraeranial germinomas. The histological diagnosis of germinomas can be verified by stereotactic biopsy simultaneously. Germinoma is one of the sensitive tumors to interstitial brachytberapy. The radiation injury to surrounding brain tissue could be reduced by using a conformal dynamic brachytherapy.

  5. Metal stent and endoluminal high-dose rate [sup 192]iridium brachytherapy in palliative treatment of malignant biliary tract obstruction. First experiences. Metallgeflecht-Endoprothese und intraluminare High-dose-rate-[sup 192]Iridium-Brachytherapie zur palliativen Behandlung maligner Gallengangsobstruktionen. Erste Erfahrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakisch, B.; Stuecklschweiger, G.; Poier, E.; Leitner, H.; Poschauko, J.; Hackl, A. (Universitaets-Klinik fuer Radiologie, Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie, Graz (Austria)); Klein, G.E.; Lammer, J.; Hausegger, K.A. (Universitaets-Klinik fuer Radiologie, Abt. fuer Spezielle Roentgendiagnostik und Digitale Bilddiagnostische Verfahren, Graz (Austria))

    1992-06-01

    Since December 1989, 9 patients with inoperable malignant biliary tract obstruction were treated palliatively by a combined modality treatment consisting of placement of a permanent biliary endoprosthesis followed by intraluminal high dose-rate [sup 192]Ir brachytherapy. A dose of 10 Gy was delivered in a hyperfractionated schedule at the point of reference in a distance of 7.5 mm of centre of the source. External small field radiotherapy (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per day, 5 fractions per week) was also given in six cases (M/O, Karnofsky >60%). In 9/9 cases an unrestrained bile flow and an interruption of pruritus was achieved, in 78% (7/9) of cases the duration of palliation was as long as the survival time (median survival time 7.5 months). (orig.).

  6. Low dose rate caesium-137 implant time of intracavitary brachytherapy source of a selected oncology center in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    John Owusu Banahene; Emmanuel Ofori Darko; Baffour Awuah

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment time taken for a radioactive source is found to be very important in intracavitary brachytherapy treatment. The duration of the treatment time depends on the prescribed dose requested to a reference point and the calculated dose rate to the same point. The duration of the treatment time of source is found to depend on the tumour stage. In this work, the treatment time of implant has been calculated for a Caesium-137 low dose rate brachytherapy source at an oncology f...

  7. Novel tools for stepping source brachytherapy treatment planning: Enhanced geometrical optimization and interactive inverse planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinkla, Anna M., E-mail: a.m.dinkla@amc.uva.nl; Laarse, Rob van der; Koedooder, Kees; Petra Kok, H.; Wieringen, Niek van; Pieters, Bradley R.; Bel, Arjan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam 1105 AZ (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Dose optimization for stepping source brachytherapy can nowadays be performed using automated inverse algorithms. Although much quicker than graphical optimization, an experienced treatment planner is required for both methods. With automated inverse algorithms, the procedure to achieve the desired dose distribution is often based on trial-and-error. Methods: A new approach for stepping source prostate brachytherapy treatment planning was developed as a quick and user-friendly alternative. This approach consists of the combined use of two novel tools: Enhanced geometrical optimization (EGO) and interactive inverse planning (IIP). EGO is an extended version of the common geometrical optimization method and is applied to create a dose distribution as homogeneous as possible. With the second tool, IIP, this dose distribution is tailored to a specific patient anatomy by interactively changing the highest and lowest dose on the contours. Results: The combined use of EGO–IIP was evaluated on 24 prostate cancer patients, by having an inexperienced user create treatment plans, compliant to clinical dose objectives. This user was able to create dose plans of 24 patients in an average time of 4.4 min/patient. An experienced treatment planner without extensive training in EGO–IIP also created 24 plans. The resulting dose-volume histogram parameters were comparable to the clinical plans and showed high conformance to clinical standards. Conclusions: Even for an inexperienced user, treatment planning with EGO–IIP for stepping source prostate brachytherapy is feasible as an alternative to current optimization algorithms, offering speed, simplicity for the user, and local control of the dose levels.

  8. Assessment of the risks associated with Iodine-125 handling production sources for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Daiane C.B.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.; Vicente, Roberto; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Souza, Carla D.; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Anderson S.; Batista, Talita Q.; Melo, Emerson R.; Camargo, Anderson R., E-mail: dcsouza@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Karam Junior, Dib, E-mail: dib.karam@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In Brazil, prostate cancer is the second most frequent disease, with an estimated 68,800 new cases in 2013. This type of cancer can be treated with brachytherapy, which uses sealed sources of Iodine-125 implanted permanently in the prostate. These sources are currently imported at a high cost, making public treatment in large scale impractical. To reduce costs and to meet domestic demand, the laboratory for production of brachytherapy sources at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) is currently nationalizing the production of this radioisotope. Iodine is quite volatile making the handling of its radioactive isotopes potentially dangerous. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the risks to which workers are exposed during the production and handling of the sources. The research method consisted initially of a literature review on the toxicity of iodine, intake limits, related physical risks, handling of accidents, generation of radioactive wastes, etc. The results allowed for establishing safety and radioprotection policies in order to ensure efficient and safe production in all stages and the implementation of good laboratory practices. (author)

  9. Assessment of the risks associated with Iodine-125 handling production sources for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Brazil, prostate cancer is the second most frequent disease, with an estimated 68,800 new cases in 2013. This type of cancer can be treated with brachytherapy, which uses sealed sources of Iodine-125 implanted permanently in the prostate. These sources are currently imported at a high cost, making public treatment in large scale impractical. To reduce costs and to meet domestic demand, the laboratory for production of brachytherapy sources at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) is currently nationalizing the production of this radioisotope. Iodine is quite volatile making the handling of its radioactive isotopes potentially dangerous. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the risks to which workers are exposed during the production and handling of the sources. The research method consisted initially of a literature review on the toxicity of iodine, intake limits, related physical risks, handling of accidents, generation of radioactive wastes, etc. The results allowed for establishing safety and radioprotection policies in order to ensure efficient and safe production in all stages and the implementation of good laboratory practices. (author)

  10. Detailed dose distribution prediction of Cf-252 brachytherapy source with boron loading dose enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghassoun, J. [EPRA, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, PO Box: 2390, 40000 Marrakech (Morocco)], E-mail: ghassoun@ucam.ac.ma; Mostacci, D.; Molinari, V. [Laboratorio di Ingegneria Nucleare di Montecuccolino, via dei Colli 16, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Jehouani, A. [EPRA, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, PO Box: 2390, 40000 Marrakech (Morocco)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dose rate distribution and to determine the boron effect on dose rate distribution for {sup 252}Cf brachytherapy source. This study was carried out using a Monte Carlo simulation. To validate the Monte Carlo computer code, the dosimetric parameters were determined following the updated TG-43 formalism and compared with current literature data. The validated computer code was then applied to evaluate the neutron and photon dose distribution and to illustrate the boron loading effect.

  11. Effect of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distributions from Cf-252 brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassoun, J

    2013-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method was used to determine the effect of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distribution from a Cf-252 brachytherapy source. Neutron and gamma-ray fluences, energy spectra and dose rate distributions were determined in both homogenous and inhomogeneous phantoms. Simulations were performed using the MCNP5 code. Obtained results were compared with experimentally measured values published in literature. Results showed a significant change in neutron dose rate distributions in presence of heterogeneities. However, their effect on gamma rays dose distribution is minimal. PMID:23069196

  12. Detailed dose distribution prediction of Cf-252 brachytherapy source with boron loading dose enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassoun, J; Mostacci, D; Molinari, V; Jehouani, A

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dose rate distribution and to determine the boron effect on dose rate distribution for (252)Cf brachytherapy source. This study was carried out using a Monte Carlo simulation. To validate the Monte Carlo computer code, the dosimetric parameters were determined following the updated TG-43 formalism and compared with current literature data. The validated computer code was then applied to evaluate the neutron and photon dose distribution and to illustrate the boron loading effect. PMID:19889549

  13. Development of high-activity 252Cf sources for neutron brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center of Wayne State University (WSU), Detroit, Michigan, is using 252Cf medical sources for neutron brachytherapy. These sources are based on a 20-year-old design containing ≤ 30 microg 252Cf in the form of a cermet wire of Cf2O3 in a palladium matrix. The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been asked to develop tiny high-activity 252Cf neutron sources for use with remote afterloading equipment to reduce treatment times and dose to clinical personnel and to expedite treatment of brain and other tumors. To date, the REDC has demonstrated that 252Cf loadings can be greatly increased in cermet wires much smaller than before. Equipment designed for hot cell fabrication of these wires is being tested. A parallel program is under way to relicense the existing source design for fabrication at the REDC

  14. Calculated neutron air kerma strength conversion factors for a generically encapsulated Cf-252 brachytherapy source

    CERN Document Server

    Rivard, M J; D'Errico, F; Tsai, J S; Ulin, K; Engler, M J

    2002-01-01

    The sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron air kerma strength conversion factor (S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f) is a parameter needed to convert the radionuclide mass (mu g) provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory into neutron air kerma strength required by modern clinical brachytherapy dosimetry formalisms indicated by Task Group No. 43 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The impact of currently used or proposed encapsulating materials for sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf brachytherapy sources (Pt/Ir-10%, 316L stainless steel, nitinol, and Zircaloy-2) on S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f was calculated and results were fit to linear equations. Only for substantial encapsulation thicknesses, did S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f decrease, while the impact of source encapsulation composition is increasingly negligible as Z increases. These findings are explained on the basis of the non-relativistic kinematics governing the majority of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron interactions. Neutron kerma and energy spectra resul...

  15. Experimental dosimetry of a {sup 32}P catheter-based endovascular brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piermattei, A [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Fidanzio, A [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Perrone, F [Azienda Ospedaliera Pisana, UO Fisica Sanitaria, Pisa (Italy); Azario, L [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Grimaldi, L [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Viola, P [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica S Cuore, Rome (Italy); Capote, R [Dpto Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda Sanchez Pizjuan 4, E41009 Sevilla (Spain)

    2003-08-07

    The experimental dosimetry in a water phantom of a {sup 32}P linear source, 20 mm in length, used for the brachytherapy of coronary vessels is reported. The source content activity, A, was determined by means of a calibrated well ion-chamber and the value was compared with the contained activity reported in the manufacturer's certification. In this field of brachytherapy dosimetry, radiochromic film supplies a high enough spatial resolution. A highly sensitive radiochromic film, that presents only one active layer, was used in this work for the source dosimetry in a water phantom. The radiochromic film was characterized by electron beams produced by a clinical linac. A Monte Carlo calculation of beta spectra in water at different distances along the source transverse bisector axis allowed to take into account the low dependence of film response from the electron beam energy. The adopted experimental set-up, with the source in its catheter positioned on the film plane inside the water phantom, supplies accurate dosimetric information. The measured dose rate to water per unit of source activity at reference distance, D-dot (r{sub 0}, {theta}{sub 0})/A, in units of cGy s{sup -1} GBq{sup -1}, was in agreement with the value reported in the manufacturer's certification within the experimental uncertainty. The radial dose function, g(r), is in good agreement with the literature data. The anisotropy function F(r, {theta}) is also reported. The analysis of the dose profile obtained at 2 mm from the source longitudinal axis shows that the uniformity is within 10% along 75% of the 20 mm treatment length. The adopted experimental set-up seems to be adequate for the quality control procedure of the dose homogeneity distribution in the water medium.

  16. Study on the method to scale 192ir radioactivity%192Ir源两种刻度方法的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓红; 徐利明; 张沪生

    2000-01-01

    purpose: To calibrate the accurate value of 192Ir radioactivity again. materials and methods: To measure the dose rate of radioactivity in water and at air by ion chamber. results: To scale the activity of 192Ir radioactivity by air Kerma is agreement to the scaling method according to the JJG 773-92. conclusion: The investigation demonstrates that the accurate value of 192Ir radioactivity can be calibrated by the method of air Kerma.%目的:通过对192Ir源的再次刻度,校准源活度的精确值。材料与方法:用电离室法,分别测量源在水介质中和自由空气中的照射量率。结果:两种方法在刻度192Ir源活性上得到的结果是一致的。结论:利用空气比释动能法可以对192Ir源进行精确刻度。

  17. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the different ways to treat prostate cancer, brachytherapy with iodine- 125 seeds is an option that provides good results and fewer side effects. In the present study several deposition methods of radioactive iodine in a silver substrate were compared in order to choose the most suitable alternative for the routine production to be implemented at IPEN's laboratory. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers present. Therefore, the 131I was used for testing (same chemical behavior as 131I). Four methods were selected: Method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method developed by D.Kubiatowicz) presented 65.16% efficiency; Method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by D. Kubiatowicz - HCl) with the result of 70.80% efficiency; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) with 55.80% efficiency; Method 4 (IQ-IPEN) resulted in 99% efficiency. Since this method has more radioactive material fixation (which represents virtually the entire cost of the seed), the final price is the cheapest. This method is the suggested one to be implemented in the IPEN's laboratory for brachytherapy sources production. Besides, the method is the fasted one. (author)

  18. International Standardization of the Clinical Dosimetry of Beta Radiation Brachytherapy Sources: Progress of an ISO Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Christopher

    2006-03-01

    In 2004 a new work item proposal (NWIP) was accepted by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee 85 (TC85 -- Nuclear Energy), Subcommittee 2 (Radiation Protection) for the development of a standard for the clinical dosimetry of beta radiation sources used for brachytherapy. To develop this standard, a new Working Group (WG 22 - Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry and Protocols in Medical Applications) was formed. The standard is based on the work of an ad-hoc working group initiated by the Dosimetry task group of the Deutsches Insitiut für Normung (DIN). Initially the work was geared mainly towards the needs of intravascular brachytherapy, but with the decline of this application, more focus has been placed on the challenges of accurate dosimetry for the concave eye plaques used to treat ocular melanoma. Guidance is given for dosimetry formalisms, reference data to be used, calibrations, measurement methods, modeling, uncertainty determinations, treatment planning and reporting, and clinical quality control. The document is currently undergoing review by the ISO member bodies for acceptance as a Committee Draft (CD) with publication of the final standard expected by 2007. There are opportunities for other ISO standards for medical dosimetry within the framework of WG22.

  19. A Monte Carlo study on tissue dose enhancement in brachytherapy: a comparison between gadolinium and gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to quantify the dose enhancement by gadolinium and gold nanoparticles in brachytherapy. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used to simulate four brachytherapy sources: 60Co, 198Au, 192Ir, 169Yb. To verify the accuracy of our simulations, the obtained values of dose rate constants and radial dose functions were compared with corresponding published values for these sources. To study dose enhancements, a spherical soft tissue phantom with 15 cm in radius was simulated. Gadolinium and gold nanoparticles at 10, 20 and 30 mg/ml concentrations were separately assumed in a 1 × 1 × 1 cm3 volume simulating tumour. The simulated dose to the tumour with the impurity was compared to the dose without impurity, as a function of radial distance and concentration of the impurity, to determine the enhancement of dose due to the presence of the impurity. Dose enhancements in the tumour obtained in the presence of gadolinium and gold nanoparticles with concentration of 30 mg/ml, were found to be in the range of −0.5–106.1 and 0.4–153.1 % respectively. In addition, at higher radial distances from the source center, higher dose enhancements were observed. GdNPs can be used as a high atomic number material to enhance dose in tumour volume with dose enhancements up to 106.1 % when used in brachytherapy. Regardless considering the clinical limitations of the here-in presented model, for a similar source and concentration of nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles show higher dose enhancement than gadolinium nanoparticles and can have more clinical usefulness as dose enhancer material.

  20. Investigations into the Optimization of Multi-Source Strength Brachytherapy Treatment Procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, D L; Yoo, S

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of multi-strength and multi-specie radioactive sources in permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In order to fulfill the requirement for an optimal dose distribution, the prescribed dose should be delivered to the target in a nearly uniform dose distribution while simultaneously sparing sensitive structures. The treatment plan should use a small number of needles and sources while satisfying the treatment requirements. The hypothesis for the use of multi-strength and/or multi-specie sources is that a better treatment plan using fewer sources and needles could be obtained than by treatment plans using single-strength sources could reduce the overall number of sources used for treatment. We employ a recently developed greedy algorithm based on the adjoint concept as the optimization search engine. The algorithm utilizes and ''adjoint ratio'', which provides a means of ranking source positions, as the pseudo-objective function. It ha s been shown that the gre...

  1. Effect of tissue Inhomogeneities on dose distributions from Cf-252 brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo method was used to determine the effect of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distribution from a Cf-252 brachytherapy source. Neutron and gamma-ray fluences, energy spectra and dose rate distributions were determined in both homogenous and inhomogeneous phantoms. Simulations were performed using the MCNP5 code. Obtained results were compared with experimentally measured values published in literature. Results showed a significant change in neutron dose rate distributions in presence of heterogeneities. However, their effect on gamma rays dose distribution is minimal. - Highlights: ► The effect of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distribution has been investigated. ► A comparison of our results with experimental data available in the literature is presented. ► Obtained results showed a significant change in neutron dose rate distributions.

  2. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M., E-mail: fernandopeleias@gmail.com, E-mail: czeituni@ipen.br, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br; and others

    2013-07-01

    Cancer is a term used generically to represent a group of more than 100 illnesses, including malignant tumors from different locations. According to World Health Organization (WHO), is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounted for 7.6 million deaths. Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type in the world, representing about 10% of all cases of cancer and its treatment may be by surgery, radiotherapy or even vigilant observation. A method of radiotherapy which has been extensively used in the early and intermediate stages of the illness is brachytherapy, where radioactive seeds are placed inside or next to the area requiring treatment, which reduces the probability of unnecessary damage to surrounding healthy tissues. Currently, the radioactive isotope Iodine-125, adsorbed on silver substrate, is one of the most used in prostate brachytherapy. The present study compares several deposition methods of radioactive Iodine on silver substrate, in order to choose the most suitable one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers of the institute. Therefore, Iodine-131 was used for testing (same chemical behavior of Iodine -125). Three methods were selected: method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method, developed by David Kubiatowicz) which presented efficiency of 65.16% ; method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by David Kubiatowicz -HCl) which presented efficiency of 70.80%; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) which presented efficiency of 55.80% . Based on the results, the second method is the suggested one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. (author)

  3. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is a term used generically to represent a group of more than 100 illnesses, including malignant tumors from different locations. According to World Health Organization (WHO), is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounted for 7.6 million deaths. Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type in the world, representing about 10% of all cases of cancer and its treatment may be by surgery, radiotherapy or even vigilant observation. A method of radiotherapy which has been extensively used in the early and intermediate stages of the illness is brachytherapy, where radioactive seeds are placed inside or next to the area requiring treatment, which reduces the probability of unnecessary damage to surrounding healthy tissues. Currently, the radioactive isotope Iodine-125, adsorbed on silver substrate, is one of the most used in prostate brachytherapy. The present study compares several deposition methods of radioactive Iodine on silver substrate, in order to choose the most suitable one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers of the institute. Therefore, Iodine-131 was used for testing (same chemical behavior of Iodine -125). Three methods were selected: method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method, developed by David Kubiatowicz) which presented efficiency of 65.16% ; method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by David Kubiatowicz -HCl) which presented efficiency of 70.80%; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) which presented efficiency of 55.80% . Based on the results, the second method is the suggested one to be implemented at the laboratory of radioactive sources production of IPEN. (author)

  4. Harmony search optimization for HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Aditya

    In high dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, multiple catheters are inserted interstitially into the target volume. The process of treating the prostate involves calculating and determining the best dose distribution to the target and organs-at-risk by means of optimizing the time that the radioactive source dwells at specified positions within the catheters. It is the goal of this work to investigate the use of a new optimization algorithm, known as Harmony Search, in order to optimize dwell times for HDR prostate brachytherapy. The new algorithm was tested on 9 different patients and also compared with the genetic algorithm. Simulations were performed to determine the optimal value of the Harmony Search parameters. Finally, multithreading of the simulation was examined to determine potential benefits. First, a simulation environment was created using the Python programming language and the wxPython graphical interface toolkit, which was necessary to run repeated optimizations. DICOM RT data from Varian BrachyVision was parsed and used to obtain patient anatomy and HDR catheter information. Once the structures were indexed, the volume of each structure was determined and compared to the original volume calculated in BrachyVision for validation. Dose was calculated using the AAPM TG-43 point source model of the GammaMed 192Ir HDR source and was validated against Varian BrachyVision. A DVH-based objective function was created and used for the optimization simulation. Harmony Search and the genetic algorithm were implemented as optimization algorithms for the simulation and were compared against each other. The optimal values for Harmony Search parameters (Harmony Memory Size [HMS], Harmony Memory Considering Rate [HMCR], and Pitch Adjusting Rate [PAR]) were also determined. Lastly, the simulation was modified to use multiple threads of execution in order to achieve faster computational times. Experimental results show that the volume calculation that was

  5. A Comparison of the Dosimetric Parameters of Cs-137 Brachytherapy Source in Different Tissues with Water Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Sina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction After the publication of Task Group number 43 dose calculation formalism by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM, this method has been known as the most common dose calculation method in brachytherapy treatment planning. In this formalism, the water phantom is introduced as the reference dosimetry phantom, while the attenuation coefficient of the sources in the water phantom is different from that of different tissues. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the phantom materials on the TG-43 dosimetery parameters of the Cs-137 brachytherapy source using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. Materials and Methods In this research, the Cs-137 (Model Selectron brachytherapy source was simulated in different phantoms (bone, soft tissue, muscle, fat, and the inhomogeneous phantoms of water/bone of volume 27000 cm3 using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. *F8 tally was used to obtain the dose in a fine cubical lattice. Then the TG-43 dosimetry parameters of the brachytherapy source were obtained in water phantom and compared with those of different phantoms. Results The percentage difference between the radial dose function g(r of bone and the g(r of water phantom, at a distance of 10 cm from the source center is 20%, while such differences are 1.7%, 1.6% and 1.1% for soft tissue, muscle, and fat, respectively. The largest difference of the dose rate constant of phantoms with those of water is 4.52% for the bone phantom, while the differences for soft tissue, muscle, and fat are 1.18%, 1.27%, and 0.18%, respectively. The 2D anisotropy function of the Cs-137 source for different tissues is identical to that of water. Conclusion The results of the simulations have shown that dose calculation in water phantom would introduce errors in the dose calculation around brachytherapy sources. Therefore, it is suggested that the correction factors of different tissues be applied after dose calculation in water phantoms, in order to

  6. Influence of radioactive sources discretization in the Monte Carlo computational simulations of brachytherapy procedures: a case study on the procedures for treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy computational simulation procedures using Monte Carlo (MC) methods have shown to be increasingly important to the improvement of cancer fighting strategies. One of the biases in this practice is the discretization of the radioactive source in brachytherapy simulations, which often do not match with a real situation. This study had the aim to identify and to measure the influence of radioactive sources discretization in brachytherapy MC simulations when compared to those that do not present discretization, using prostate brachytherapy with Iodine-125 radionuclide as model. Simulations were carried out with 108 events with both types of sources to compare them using EGSnrc code associated to MASH phantom in orthostatic and supine positions with some anatomic adaptations. Significant alterations were found, especially regarding bladder, rectum and the prostate itself. It can be concluded that there is a need to discretized sources in brachytherapy simulations to ensure its representativeness. (author)

  7. Methodology study for fixation of radioactive iodine in polymeric substrate for brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is now the second leading cause of death by disease in several countries, including Brazil. Prostate cancer is the most common among men. Brachytherapy is a modality of radiotherapy in which radioactive seeds are placed inside or in contact with the organ to be treated. The most widely used radioisotope in prostate brachytherapy is Iodine-125 which is presented fixated on a silver substrate that is subsequently placed inside a titanium capsule. A large dose of radiation is released only in the targeted tumor protecting healthy surrounding tissues. The technique requires the application of 80 - 120 seeds per patient. The implants of seeds have low impact and non-surgical procedures. Most patients can return to normal life within three days with little or no pain. This work proposes an alternative to the seeds that have already been developed, in order to reduce the cost by obtaining a better efficiency on fixing the radioactive iodine onto the epoxy resin. Methods have been developed to perform the fixation of Iodine-125 onto polymeric substrates. The parameters analyzed were the immersion time, type of static or dynamic reaction, concentration of the adsorption solution, the specific activity of the radioactive source, the need for carrier and chemical form of the radioactive Iodine. These experiments defined the most effective method to fixate the Iodine onto the polymeric material (epoxy resin), the Iodine activity in the polymeric substrate, the activity of the distribution of variation in a plot of polymeric cores and the efficiency of the epoxy resin to seal the seed. (author)

  8. Long term response stability of a well-type ionization chamber used in calibration of high dose rate brachytherapy sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Well-type ionization chamber is often used to measure strength of brachytherapy sources. This study aims to check long term response stability of High Dose Rate (HDR -1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber in terms of reference air kerma rate (RAKR of a reference 137 Cs brachytherapy source and recommend an optimum frequency of recalibration. An HDR-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber, a reference 137 Cs brachytherapy source (CDCSJ5, and a MAX-4000 electrometer were used in this study. The HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was calibrated in terms of reference air kerma rate by the Standards Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, Vienna. The response of the chamber was verified at regular intervals over a period of eight years using the reference 137 Cs source. All required correction factors were applied in the calculation of the RAKR of the 137 Cs source. This study reveals that the response of the HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was well within ±0.5% for about three years after calibration/recalibration. However, it shows deviations larger than ±0.5% after three years of calibration/recalibration and the maximum variation in response of the chamber during an eight year period was 1.71%. The optimum frequency of recalibration of a high dose rate well-type chamber should be three years.

  9. Long term response stability of a well-type ionization chamber used in calibration of high dose rate brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandana, S; Sharma, S D

    2010-04-01

    Well-type ionization chamber is often used to measure strength of brachytherapy sources. This study aims to check long term response stability of High Dose Rate (HDR)-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber in terms of reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of a reference (137)Cs brachytherapy source and recommend an optimum frequency of recalibration. An HDR-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber, a reference (137)Cs brachytherapy source (CDCSJ5), and a MAX-4000 electrometer were used in this study. The HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was calibrated in terms of reference air kerma rate by the Standards Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna. The response of the chamber was verified at regular intervals over a period of eight years using the reference (137)Cs source. All required correction factors were applied in the calculation of the RAKR of the (137)Cs source. This study reveals that the response of the HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was well within +/-0.5% for about three years after calibration/recalibration. However, it shows deviations larger than +/-0.5% after three years of calibration/recalibration and the maximum variation in response of the chamber during an eight year period was 1.71%. The optimum frequency of recalibration of a high dose rate well-type chamber should be three years.

  10. Preparation and determination of kerma for Iridium 192 sources of low dose rate for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The practice of Brachytherapy with Iridium-192 sources of low dose rate (0.4 - 0.8 Gy/h) is a technique used in the treatment of diverse illnesses. in this work the preparation, quality control and calibration are presented in terms of kerma in air of Iridium-192 using as target these recycled Iridium-Platinum wires. The targets were obtained as decayed sources of different radio therapeutical centers in the country and they were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy in order to determine their chemical composition. Subsequently it was developed an experimental design to establish the effect of neutron flux, geometrical array and irradiation time over the activity and percentage of the sources homogeneity. The homogeneity was determined by auto radiography and by Gamma spectroscopy. Once the optimal irradiation conditions were established, it is determined the apparent activity and kerma in air using a well type ionization chamber with traceability to a primary laboratory. Iridium-192 sources were obtained with an average homogeneity 96 %, apparent activity 282.129 ± 0.531 M Bq and kerma in air 0.03200 ± 0.00006 m Gy m/h A. (Author)

  11. Chemical digestion and radionuclidic assay of TiNi-encapsulated 32P intravascular brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very quantitative, destructive assay procedure was devised for accurately measuring the 32P activity content of TiNi-encapsulated intravascular brachytherapy sources and was applied to four different sources (termed 'seeds') which were developed and provided by Guidant Intravascular Intervention (formerly NeoCardia). These seeds are intended for use in the prophylactic treatment of restenosis following balloon angioplasty in heart-disease patients. The assays involved the dissolution of the TiNi jacket, extraction of the activity from the internal 32P-containing source material, quantitative solution transfers, and a gravimetrically-based dilution; followed by liquid scintillation (LS) spectrometry of the resulting master solution with 3H-standard efficiency tracing using composition-matched LS cocktails. The LS spectrometry utilized a previously-developed method for resolving the always-present 33P impurity. The protocol included provisions for accounting for all possible losses of 32P in the digestion procedure (based on radiochemical tracing experiments), for any unrecovered activity in the remaining source material, and for any residual activity in the solution-transfer and containing vessels. Sections of the TiNi jackets adjacent to the cut-off active seed portions were also assayed for any contained activity. Such destructive assays were required for relating measurements of the absorbed dose spatial distribution for the seeds to theoretic dose modelling and for establishing calibration factors for subsequent non-destructive radionuclidic measurements on the seeds

  12. Quality assurance programme in high dose rate brachytherapy with Iridium-192 source. Recommendations of the French Medical Physicists Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report on Quality Assurance in High Dose Rate brachytherapy with Iridium-192 source has been prepared by the task group of the Brachytherapy committee of the French Medical Physicists Society. This report provides recommendations on what should be tested, the methods to be used, the test frequencies and the tolerances. The Quality Assurance Programme concerns mainly the Q.A. on the treatment unit, the treatment planning system and the patient procedure. Tolerances and action levels are linked to international recommendations. Safety standards are linked to national legislation and to international recommendations. It is the responsibility of the Institution to verify that the source calibration provided by the manufacturer is correct. The calibration of the Iridium-192 source should be an in-air measurement of air-kerma using an ionization chamber. The recommended tolerance between manufacturer and Institution calibration is 3 %. Quality Control on remote afterloading systems should include consideration of the accuracy and reproducibility of positioning of sources in the applicators. Safety features must also be evaluated regularly and emergency procedures should be tested regularly and posted in a prominent place. After the detailed acceptance tests of dose calculation algorithm, routine checks should be done after software update. An independent dose calculation is recommended before treatment. The recommended agreement with the computer calculation should be within 10%. A written dosimetry report for each brachytherapy procedure is recommended to be inserted in patient charts. The results of all tests should be recorded in a logbook. Fault conditions should be carefully documented

  13. Effect of Uniform and Non-uniform High-z Nanoparticles Distribution in Tumor Volume on Dose Enhancement Factor During 192Ir Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zabihzadeh

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: increase of atomic number and concentrations of NPs enhance the absorbed dose due to increased possibility of photoelectric phenomena. Non-uniform distribution of NPs underestimated dose compared to uniform distribution; therefore, considering accurate NPs distribution inside the tumor volume is crucial to calculation of dose enhancement. Targeted labeling of NPs for the maximum absorption by tumor and for the minimal penetration into peripheral tissues has potential to increase radiation therapeutic ratio.

  14. Monte Carlo characterization of the Gamma-Med Hdr plus Ir-192 brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, E.; Sosa, M. A.; Gil V, A. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Av. Insurgentes 2354, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Monzon, E., E-mail: eric_1985@fisica.ugto.mx [IMSS, Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad No. 1, Av. Adolfo Lopez Mateos 1813, 37340 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The MCNP4C Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the dosimetry around the Gamma-Med Hdr Plus iridium-192 brachytherapy source in both air/vacuum and water environments. Dosimetry data in water was calculated and are presented into an away-along table. All dosimetric quantities recommended by the AAPM Task Group 43 report have been also calculated. These quantities are air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function. The obtained data are compared to this source reference data, finding results in good agreement with them. In this study, recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report have been followed and comply with the most recent AAPM and ESTRO physics committee recommendations about Monte Carlo techniques. The data in the present study complement published data and can be used as input in the Tps or as benchmark data to verify the results of the treatment planning systems as well as a means of comparison with other datasets from this source. (Author)

  15. The Role of Dosimetry Audits in Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Eight Years of Experience in Greek External Beam Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) runs dosimetry audits through on-site visits for photon and electron beams and for 192Ir brachytherapy high dose rate systems in all Greek radiotherapy centres. In audits, absolute and relative dosimetry measurements are being performed. The deviation, expressed as the percentage difference of the measured values by the GAEC to the respective stated values by the radiotherapy centre of absorbed dose to water or air kerma strength were recorded and compared to the action levels of ±3% (preventive actions needed) and ±5% (immediate corrective actions needed). The results of the subsequent audit rounds, each one lasting for approximately four years, are presented in this work. During the first round, 79.2% of photon beams exhibited deviations of less than 3%, while during the second round this photon beam percentage increased to 96.9%. During the first round, 76.4% of the electron beams recorded deviations less than 3% and 12.9% higher than 5%. All brachytherapy sources showed deviations less than 3%. An improvement in dose accuracy was recorded during the subsequent rounds of the audits. (author)

  16. Low dose rate caesium-137 implant time of intracavitary brachytherapy source of a selected oncology center in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Owusu Banahene

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The treatment time taken for a radioactive source is found to be very important in intracavitary brachytherapy treatment. The duration of the treatment time depends on the prescribed dose requested to a reference point and the calculated dose rate to the same point. The duration of the treatment time of source is found to depend on the tumour stage. In this work, the treatment time of implant has been calculated for a Caesium-137 low dose rate brachytherapy source at an oncology facility in Ghana. Objective: The objective was to determine how the treatment time of tumours depends on the dose rate to the reference point prescribed by the Oncologists and the dose rate determined by the dosimetrists at the facility. Materials and Method: Depending upon the stage of the cancer, the Oncologist determines the type of treatment modality, source configuration for the cancer patient and positions of both tandem and ovoids in the cervix. Depending also on the tumour stage, two orthogonal radiographic X-ray films are taken using a simulator machine. The treatment machine used in the study is AMRA-Curietron. The maximum activity of the source was 259GBq. It has five channels which is a manual remote afterloader. In clinical practice, the treatment time t is very short(only some few days for such low dose rate brachytherapy source like Cs-137 which lasts only for some few days in comparison with the half life of the Cs-137 source. The mathematical equation for the calculation of treatment time is written as t=D/D. Hence t is the treatment time of the radioactive source of patients undergoing intracavitary brachytherapy treatment, D is prescribed dose to a reference point and D is the dose rate to the same reference point. Results: The calculated treatment time of the Cs-137 brachytherapy source for different source arrangements or channels used in clinical practice at the brachytherapy Centre have been determined. Also provided, are the

  17. Occupational skin doses in manual implantation of Cs and Ir sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manual handling of sealed 137Cs sources and 192Ir wires for brachytherapy could cause radiation doses to the hand of the operator in excess of 1/10 of the dose limits. This type of work has been monitored in a Radiation Therapy Department for four years using TL finger and wrist dosemeters. The measurements have been re-evaluated to find the average dose equivalent, H'(0.07), to the skin of the hands. The finger dosemeter consisting of two LiF chips in a sachet was calibrated on a Lucite slab phantom. The dose ratio of fingertip/wrist was estimated to be 5. In this type of work the skin dose measured was in the range of 0-43 mSv per month, 1.5 mSv on average. (author)

  18. Fabrication of Miniature Titanium Capsule for Brachytherapy Sources Using Tungsten Inert Gas Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capsules containing radioactive materials as brachytherapy sources are used for implanting into some target organs for malignant disorders treatments, such as prostate, eyes, and brain cancers. The conventional method for sealing the tubes is to weld them using a laser beam which is now a part of tube melting methods (self welding). The purpose of this study was to seal miniature titanium tubes containing radioactive materials in the form of capsules. This study introduced a new method based on melting process. A piece of commercially pure titanium grade 2 in the form of disk was used for the experiment. The sample was melted at the top of the tube by a Tungsten Inert Gas welding device for a short time duration. After completion of the melting, the disk in the form of a drop was mixed with a small part of it and both were solidified and hence closed the tube. We evaluated the tubes for the metallurgical properties and seal process which took place by Tungsten Inert Gas in different zones, including the heat affected zone, fusion zone, and interface of the joint of the drop to the tube. Finally, the produced samples were tested according to the ISO2919 and ISO9978 and the results confirmed the Disk and Tungsten Inert Gas procedure.

  19. A novel optical calorimetry dosimetry approach applied to an HDR Brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavan, A.; Meyer, J.

    2013-06-01

    The technique of Digital Holographic Interferometry (DHI) is applied to the measurement of radiation absorbed dose distribution in water. An optical interferometer has been developed that captures the small variations in the refractive index of water due to the radiation induced temperature increase ΔT. The absorbed dose D is then determined with high temporal and spatial resolution using the calorimetric relation D=cΔT (where c is the specific heat capacity of water). The method is capable of time resolving 3D spatial calorimetry. As a proof-of-principle of the approach, a prototype DHI dosimeter was applied to the measurement of absorbed dose from a High Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy source. Initial results are in agreement with modelled doses from the Brachyvision treatment planning system, demonstrating the viability of the system for high dose rate applications. Future work will focus on applying corrections for heat diffusion and geometric effects. The method has potential to contribute to the dosimetry of diverse high dose rate applications which require high spatial resolution such as microbeam radiotherapy (MRT) or small field proton beam dosimetry but may potentially also be useful for interface dosimetry.

  20. Automation system for quality control in manufacture of iodine-125 sealed sources used in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somessari, Samir L.; Feher, Anselmo; Sprenger, Francisco E.; Rostellato, Maria E.C.M.; Moura, Joao A.; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Calvo, Wilson A.P., E-mail: somessar@ipen.b, E-mail: afeher@ipen.b, E-mail: sprenger@ipen.b, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.b, E-mail: olcosta@ipen.b, E-mail: wapcalvo@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an automation system for Quality Control in the production of Iodine-125 sealed sources, after undergoing the process of laser beam welding. These sources, also known as Iodine-125 seeds are used, successfully, in the treatment of cancer by brachytherapy, with low-dose rates. Each small seed is composed of a welded titanium capsule with 0.8 mm diameter and 4.5 mm in length, containing Iodine-125 adsorbed on an internal silver wire. The seeds are implanted in the human prostate to irradiate the tumor and treat the cancerous cells. The technology to automate the quality control system in the manufacture of Iodine-125 seeds consists in developing and associate mechanical parts, electronic components and pneumatic circuits to control machines and processes. The automation technology for Iodine-125 seed production developed in this work employs programmable logic controller, step motors, drivers of control, electrical-electronic interfaces, photoelectric sensors, interfaces of communication and software development. Industrial automation plays an important role in the production of Iodine-125 seeds, with higher productivity and high standard of quality, facilitating the implementation and operation of processes with good manufacturing practices. Nowadays, the Radiation Technology Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP imports and distributes 36,000 Iodine-125 seeds per year for clinics and hospitals in the whole country. However, the Brazilian potential market is of 8,000 Iodine-125 seeds per month. Therefore, the local production of these radioactive seeds has become a priority for the Institute, aiming to reduce the price and increase the supply to the population in Brazil. (author)

  1. Automation system for quality control in manufacture of iodine-125 sealed sources used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to develop an automation system for Quality Control in the production of Iodine-125 sealed sources, after undergoing the process of laser beam welding. These sources, also known as Iodine-125 seeds are used, successfully, in the treatment of cancer by brachytherapy, with low-dose rates. Each small seed is composed of a welded titanium capsule with 0.8 mm diameter and 4.5 mm in length, containing Iodine-125 adsorbed on an internal silver wire. The seeds are implanted in the human prostate to irradiate the tumor and treat the cancerous cells. The technology to automate the quality control system in the manufacture of Iodine-125 seeds consists in developing and associate mechanical parts, electronic components and pneumatic circuits to control machines and processes. The automation technology for Iodine-125 seed production developed in this work employs programmable logic controller, step motors, drivers of control, electrical-electronic interfaces, photoelectric sensors, interfaces of communication and software development. Industrial automation plays an important role in the production of Iodine-125 seeds, with higher productivity and high standard of quality, facilitating the implementation and operation of processes with good manufacturing practices. Nowadays, the Radiation Technology Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP imports and distributes 36,000 Iodine-125 seeds per year for clinics and hospitals in the whole country. However, the Brazilian potential market is of 8,000 Iodine-125 seeds per month. Therefore, the local production of these radioactive seeds has become a priority for the Institute, aiming to reduce the price and increase the supply to the population in Brazil. (author)

  2. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornero-López, Ana M.; Guirado, Damián; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, E-18012 Granada (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Servicio de Radioterapia, Unidad de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, E-46026 Valencia (Spain); Simancas, Fernando; Lallena, Antonio M. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Gazdic-Santic, Maja [Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Safety, Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of {sup 125}I seeds.Methods: Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for {sup 125}I selectSeed{sup TM} brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level.Results: Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber.Conclusions: Variations of the altitude and

  3. Air-kerma evaluation at the maze entrance of HDR brachytherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the absence of procedures for evaluating the design of brachytherapy (BT) facilities for radiation protection purposes, the methodology used for external beam radiotherapy facilities is often adapted. The purpose of this study is to adapt the NCRP 151 methodology for estimating the air-kerma rate at the door in BT facilities. Such methodology was checked against Monte Carlo (MC) techniques using the code Geant4. Five different facility designs were studied for 192Ir and 60Co HDR applications to account for several different bunker layouts. For the estimation of the lead thickness needed at the door, the use of transmission data for the real spectra at the door instead of the ones emitted by 192Ir and 60Co will reduce the lead thickness by a factor of five for 192Ir and ten for 60Co. This will significantly lighten the door and hence simplify construction and operating requirements for all bunkers. The adaptation proposed in this study to estimate the air-kerma rate at the door depends on the complexity of the maze: it provides good results for bunkers with a maze (i.e. similar to those used for linacs for which the NCRP 151 methodology was developed) but fails for less conventional designs. For those facilities, a specific Monte Carlo study is in order for reasons of safety and cost-effectiveness. (paper)

  4. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Cheng, Chih-Yao, E-mail: shic@uthscsa.ed [Radiation Oncology Department, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma, OK 73104 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V{sub 100} reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as

  5. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, CHUQ Pavillon L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The goal of this work is to compare D{sub m,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D{sub w,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether applying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Methods: Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D{sub w,m} over D{sub m,m} are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using {sup 103}Pd) and prostate (using {sup 125}I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D{sub 90} values are compared for D{sub w,m} and D{sub m,m}. Results: (1) Differences (D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m}-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m} is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D

  6. A comparison of the relative biological effectiveness of low energy electronic brachytherapy sources in breast tissue: a Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Shane A.; Reniers, Brigitte; de Jong, Evelyn E. C.; Rusch, Thomas; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Electronic brachytherapy sources use low energy photons to treat the tumor bed during or after breast-conserving surgery. The relative biological effectiveness of two electronic brachytherapy sources was explored to determine if spectral differences due to source design influenced radiation quality and if radiation quality decreased with distance in the breast. The RBE was calculated through the number of DNA double strand breaks (RBEDSB) using the Monte Carlo damage simulator (MCDS) in combination with other Monte Carlo electron/photon spectrum calculations. 50kVp photons from the Intrabeam (Carl Zeiss Surgical) and Axxent (Xoft) through 40-mm spherical applicators were simulated to account for applicator and tissue attenuation in a variety of breast tissue compositions. 40kVp Axxent photons were also simulated. Secondary electrons (known to be responsible for most DNA damage) spectra at different distance were inputted into MCDS to calculate the RBEDSB. All RBEDSB used a cobalt-60 reference. RBEDSB data was combined with corresponding average photon spectrum energy for the Axxent and applied to model-based average photon energy distributions to produce an RBEDSB map of an accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) patient. Both Axxent and Intrabeam 50kVp spectra were shown to have a comparable RBEDSB of between 1.4 and 1.6 at all distances in spite of progressive beam hardening. The Axxent 40kVp also demonstrated a similar RBEDSB at distances. Most RBEDSB variability was dependent on the tissue type as was seen in rib (RBEDSB  ≈  1.4), gland (≈1.55), adipose (≈1.59), skin (≈1.52) and lung (≈1.50). RBEDSB variability between both sources was within 2%. A correlation was shown between RBEDSB and average photon energy and used to produce an RBEDSB map of a dose distribution in an APBI patient dataset. Radiation quality is very similar between electronic brachytherapy sources studied. No significant reductions in RBEDSB were observed with

  7. Chemonuclear studies for identification for new production routes for the therapeutically useful radionuclides {sup 140}Nd, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 191}Pt, {sup 193m}Pt, und {sup 195m}Pt; Kernchemische Studien zur Entwicklung neuerer Produktionsverfahren fuer die therapierelevanten Radionuklide {sup 140}Nd, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 191}Pt, {sup 193m}Pt, und {sup 195m}Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgers, K.

    2005-12-15

    New production routes for the therapeutically useful radionuclides {sup 140}Nd, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 191}Pt, {sup 193m}Pt and {sup 195m}Pt were investigated. Cross section data were measured using the stacked-foil technique and compared with theoretical calculations. A production method for the platinum nuclides was developed. The {sup 141}Pr(p, 2n){sup 140}Nd and {sup nat}Ce({sup 3}He, xn){sup 140}Nd reactions were investigated for production of {sup 140}Nd. Cross section data of nuclear reactions leading to the side products {sup 141}Nd, {sup 139}Nd and {sup 139}Ce could also be achieved. The experimental data were compared with theoretical calculations using the code ALICE-IPPE. A comparison of the calculated thick target yields showed that the {sup 141}Pr(p, 2n){sup 140}Nd reaction gives a higher yield. The {sup 192}Os(p, n){sup 192}Ir reaction was examined in the context of the production of {sup 192}Ir. Cross section data were determined and compared with theoretical calculations using the codes ALICE-IPPE and EMPIRE II. The yield of this reaction was compared with the yield of the reactor production of this nuclide. The reactor production seems to be more suitable because of a higher purity and yield. Cross section data were measured for the {sup 192}Os({alpha}, n){sup 195m}Pt, {sup 192}Os({alpha}, 3n){sup 193m}Pt and {sup 192}Os({sup 3}He, 4n){sup 191}Pt reactions. The activity of {sup 193m}Pt and {sup 195m}Pt was determined by X-ray spectroscopy after a chemical separation procedure. The ALICE-IPPE code was found to be inappropriate to reproduce the experimental values. The calculated yields were compared with the yields of other reactions, especially the reactor production of {sup 195m}Pt. The yield of the {sup 192}Os({alpha}, n){sup 195m}Pt reaction is lower compared to the yield of the reactor production, but offers lower target costs and higher specific activity. A production method for {sup 193m}Pt and {sup 195m}Pt was developed. Batch yields of 0.9 MBq

  8. Development of methods for activity determination for radionuclides with double decay emission β- β+ / electron capture - application to the standardization of 192Ir, 152Eu and 186 Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work alternative procedures have been developed for standardization of radionuclides with double decay, β- β+ / electron capture using the 4πβ-γ coincidence technique, applying different systems. Two 4πβ-γ coincidence systems were used: one with a 4π gas-flow proportional counter coupled to a pair of NaI(Tl) scintillators and the other one with the same type of proportional counter coupled to HPGe detector. The radionuclides selected for this standardization, due to great interest in nuclear medicine, detector calibration and industrial radiography, were 192Ir, 152Eu and 186 Re. The first and the second were part of international comparisons sponsored by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), France, who supplied the radioactive solution. For 186Re, the gamma-ray emission probability per decay was measured by means REGe spectrometer system, previously calibrated with standard ampoules. All the uncertainties involved were treated rigorously, by means of covariance analysis. (author)

  9. Neutron dosimetry for low dose rate Cf-252 AT sources and adherence to recent clinical dosimetry protocol for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, M.J.; Wierzbicki, J.G.; Van den Heuvel, F. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Martin, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1997-12-01

    In 1995, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 (AAPM TG-43) published a protocol obsoleting all mixed-field radiation dosimetry for Cf-252. Recommendations for a new brachytherapy dosimetry formalism made by this Task Group favor quantification of source strength in terms of air kerma rather than apparent Curies or other radiation units. Additionally, representation of this dosimetry data in terms of radial dose functions, anisotropy functions, geometric factors, and dose rate constants are in an angular and radial (spherical) coordinate system as recommended, rather than the along-away dosimetry data (Cartesian coordinate system) currently available. This paper presents the initial results of calculated neutron dosimetry in a water phantom for a Cf-252 applicator tube (AT) type medical source soon available from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  10. Verification and analysis of the positioning of a source of brachytherapy high dose within an applicator gynecological interstitial fletcher Utrecht TC/RM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applicators are guides that circulate and are located within the patient brachytherapy sources. Applicators can suffer mechanical deformations due to processes of sterilization or shock, which may result in that the source do not place within these very precise and coincides with the planned. In these cases the planned treatment deviate actually managed. The object of this study is to verify that the position of the source into the dispenser coincides with the planned position, with a procedure that is described. (Author)

  11. Determination of surface dose rate of indigenous 32P patch brachytherapy source by experimental and Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope production and Application Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Center developed 32P patch sources for treatment of superficial tumors. Surface dose rate of a newly developed 32P patch source of nominal diameter 25 mm was measured experimentally using standard extrapolation ionization chamber and Gafchromic EBT film. Monte Carlo model of the 32P patch source along with the extrapolation chamber was also developed to estimate the surface dose rates from these sources. The surface dose rates to tissue (cGy/min) measured using extrapolation chamber and radiochromic films are 82.03±4.18 (k=2) and 79.13±2.53 (k=2) respectively. The two values of the surface dose rates measured using the two independent experimental methods are in good agreement to each other within a variation of 3.5%. The surface dose rate to tissue (cGy/min) estimated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code works out to be 77.78±1.16 (k=2). The maximum deviation between the surface dose rates to tissue obtained by Monte Carlo and the extrapolation chamber method is 5.2% whereas the difference between the surface dose rates obtained by radiochromic film measurement and the Monte Carlo simulation is 1.7%. The three values of the surface dose rates of the 32P patch source obtained by three independent methods are in good agreement to one another within the uncertainties associated with their measurements and calculation. This work has demonstrated that MCNP based electron transport simulations are accurate enough for determining the dosimetry parameters of the indigenously developed 32P patch sources for contact brachytherapy applications. - Highlights: • Surface dose rates of 25 mm nominal diameter newly developed 32P patch sources were measured experimentally using extrapolation chamber and Gafchromic EBT2 film. Monte Carlo model of the 32P patch source along with the extrapolation chamber was also developed. • The surface dose rates to tissue (cGy/min) measured using extrapolation chamber and

  12. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR

  13. Multidisciplinary treatment for advanced and recurrent breast cancer including brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukiyama, Iwao; Ohno, Tatsuya (Tochigi Cancer Center, Utsunomiya (Japan). Hospital); Takizawa, Yoshikazu; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Egawa, Sunao; Ogino, Takashi

    1994-06-01

    Between 1986 and 1992, 10 patients (12 lesions) of advanced breast cancer were treated with multidisciplinary treatment including brachytherapy. The lesions treated included 5 primary breast tumors, 3 metastatic lesions in the contra lateral breast, 2 recurrences after external beam irradiation, 1 metastasis to the axillary lymph node and 1 metastasis to the upper arm skin. The interstitial irradiation techniques used were [sup 192]Ir low dose-rate irradiation for 5 lesions and high dose-rate for 7 lesions (including 3 with mould irradiation). External hyperthermia as performed for 6 lesions and interstitial hyperthermia were performed for 4 lesions. The local response was CR for 3 lesions, PRa for 8 lesions, PRb for 1 lesion with the local response rate being 100%. Excellent local control could be achieved by combination external and interstitial irradiation, indicating that radiotherapy is definitely useful for the treatment of advanced breast cancer. (author).

  14. Production techniques and quality control of sealed radioactive sources of palladium-103, iodine-125, iridium-192 and ytterbium-169. Final report of a coordinated research project 2001-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes have been used extensively for many years for several medical and industrial applications either in the form of an open source or encapsulated in an appropriate metallic container (sealed source). The design and technology for the preparation of radioactive sealed sources is an area of continuous development to satisfy an ever increasing demand for a larger variety of shapes, sizes, type of radioisotope and levels of radioactivity required for newer and specialized applications. In medicine, sealed sources using the radioisotopes of 125I, 192Ir and 103Pd are commonly used for brachytherapy for the treatment of malignant diseases, and for bone density measurements. In industry, they are widely used for non-destructive testing (NDT), radiation processing, 'on-line' process control systems and on-line elemental analysis of mineral resources. Some well-known examples of such sources are 60Co for industrial nucleonic gauges, 192Ir sources for industrial radiography, 241Am sources for smoke detectors and chemical analysers and, more recently, 169Yb for NDT measurements of thin metallic tubes and plates. The current challenges in development include the production of miniature size sources with a high level of activity, a high degree of uniformity in the distribution of the radioactivity and the highest degree of safety, requiring stringent quality control methods. The IAEA has been promoting and supporting activities designed to increase the utilization of radiation and radioisotopes in several areas. In particular, in view of the proven benefits of, and an increasing demand for radioactive sealed sources for medical and industrial applications, upon the recommendation of several experts, a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Radioactive Sources for Emerging Therapeutic and Industrial Applications was begun in 2002. The aim of the CRP was the optimization and testing of procedures and methods for the fabrication and quality control of

  15. PDR brachytherapy with flexible implants for interstitial boost after breast-conserving surgery and external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: For radiobiological reasons the new concept of pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy seems to be suitable to replace traditional CLDR brachytherapy with line sources. PDR brachytherapy using a stepping source seems to be particularly suitable for the interstitial boost of breast carcinoma after breast-conserving surgery and external beam irradiation since in these cases the exact adjustment of the active lengths is essential in order to prevent unwanted skin dose and consequential unfavorable cosmetic results. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and morbidity of a PDR boost with flexible breast implants. Materials and methods: Sixty-five high risk patients were treated with an interstitial PDR boost. The criteria for an interstitial boost were positive margin or close margin, extensive intraductal component (EIC), intralymphatic extension, lobular carcinoma, T2 tumors and high nuclear grade (GIII). Dose calculation and specification were performed following the rules of the Paris system. The dose per pulse was 1 Gy. The pulse pauses were kept constant at 1 h. A geometrically optimized dose distribution was used for all patients. The treatment schedule was 50 Gy external beam to the whole breast and 20 Gy boost. PDR irradiations were carried out with a nominal 37 GBq 192-Ir source. Results: The median follow-up was 30 months (minimum 12 months, maximum 54 months). Sixty percent of the patients judged their cosmetic result as excellent, 27% judged it as good, 11% judged it as fair and 2% judged it as poor. Eighty-six percent of the patients had no radiogenous skin changes in the boost area. In 11% of patients minimal punctiform telangiectasia appeared at single puncture sites. In 3% ((2(65))) of patients planar telangiectasia appeared on the medial side of the implant. The rate of isolated local recurrences was 1.5%. In most cases geometrical volume optimization (GVO) yields improved dose distributions with respect to

  16. A dosimetry method for low dose rate brachytherapy by EGS5 combined with regression to reflect source strength shortage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Tateoka, Kunihiko; Asanuma, Osamu; Kamo, Ken-ichi; Sato, Kaori; Takeda, Hiromitsu; Takagi, Masaru; Hareyama, Masato; Takada, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The post-implantation dosimetry for brachytherapy using Monte Carlo calculation by EGS5 code combined with the source strength regression was investigated with respect to its validity. In this method, the source strength for the EGS5 calculation was adjusted with the regression, so that the calculation would reproduce the dose monitored with the glass rod dosimeters (GRDs) on a water phantom. The experiments were performed, simulating the case where one of two 125I sources of Oncoseed 6711 was lacking strength by 4–48%. As a result, the calculation without regression was in agreement with the GRD measurement within 26–62%. In this case, the shortage in strength of a source was neglected. By the regression, in order to reflect the strength shortage, the agreement was improved up to 17–24%. This agreement was also comparable with accuracy of the dose calculation for single source geometry reported previously. These results suggest the validity of the dosimetry method proposed in this study. PMID:24449715

  17. Interstitial brachytherapy for eyelid carcinoma. Outcome analysis in 60 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyelid cancer is a therapeutic challenge due to the cosmetic and functional implications of this anatomical region and the objectives of therapy are tumor control, functional and cosmetic outcome. The present study was performed to analyze local control, toxicity, functional and cosmetic results in patients with eyelid carcinoma treated by interstitial brachytherapy. In this study 60 patients with eyelid carcinoma were treated by interstitial brachytherapy using iridium (192Ir) wires with a linear activity of 1.2-1.7 mCi/cm. The prescription dose was 51-70 Gy (mean 65 Gy, median 66 Gy). Of the 60 patients 51 (85.0 %) had received no prior treatment, 4 (6.7 %) had received previous surgery with positive or close margins and 5 (8.3 %) had suffered local recurrence after surgery. Of the tumors 52 (86.7 %) were basal cell carcinoma, 7 (11.7 %) squamous cell carcinoma and 1 (1.7 %) Merkel cell carcinoma. Clinical stage of the 51 previously untreated tumors was 38 T1N0, 12 T2N0 and 1 T3N0. Mean follow-up was 92 months (range 6-253 months). Local control was maintained in 96.7 % of patients. Late effects higher than grade 2 were observed in 3.0 % of cases. Functional and cosmetic outcomes were optimal in 68.4 % of patients. Interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the eyelid can achieve local control, cosmetic and functional results comparable to those of surgery. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of absorbed dose in the cervix carcinoma therapy by brachytherapy of high dose rate using the conventional planning and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to compare the doses received for patients submitted to brachytherapy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method of treatment of the cervix carcinoma, performed in the planning system PLATO BPS with the doses obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using the radiation transport code MCNP 5 and one female anthropomorphic phantom based on voxel, the FAX. The implementation of HDR brachytherapy treatment for the cervix carcinoma consists of the insertion of an intrauterine probe and an intravaginal probe (ring or ovoid) and then two radiographs are obtained, anteroposterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) to confirm the position of the applicators in the patient and to allow the treatment planning and the determination of the absorbed dose at points of interest: rectum, bladder, sigmoid and point A, which corresponds anatomically to the crossings of the uterine arteries with ureters The absorbed doses obtained with the code MCNP 5, with the exception of the absorbed dose in the rectum and sigmoid for the simulation considering a point source of 192Ir, are lower than the absorbed doses from PLATO BPS calculations because the MCNP 5 considers the chemical compositions and densities of FAX body, not considering the medium as water. When considering the Monte Carlo simulation for a source with dimensions equal to that used in the brachytherapy irradiator used in this study, the values of calculated absorbed dose to the bladder, to the rectum, to the right point A and to the left point A were respectively lower than those determined by the treatment planning system in 33.29, 5.01, 22.93 and 19.04%. These values are almost all larger than the maximum acceptable deviation between patient planned and administered doses (5 %). With regard to the rectum and bladder, which are organs that must be protected, the present results are in favor of the radiological protection of patients. The point A, that is on the isodose of 100%, used to tumor treatment, the results indicate an

  19. CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collettini, Federico; Schreiber, Nadja; Schnapauff, Dirk; Denecke, Timm; Hamm, Bernd; Gebauer, Bernhard [ChariteUniversitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Wust, Peter [ChariteUniversitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Schott, Eckart [Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Gastroenterology, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Over a 6-year period, 98 patients with 212 unresectable HCC underwent CT-HDRBT applying a {sup 192}Ir source at our institution. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up was performed 6 weeks after the intervention and then every 3 months. The primary endpoint was local tumor control (LTC); secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Patients were available for MRI evaluation for a mean follow-up of 23.1 months (range 4-64 months; median 20 months). Mean tumor diameter was 5 cm (range 1.8-12 cm). Eighteen of 212 (8.5 %) tumors showed local progression after a mean LTC of 21.1 months. In all, 67 patients (68.4 %) experienced distant tumor progression. The mean PFS was 15.2 months. Forty-six patients died during the follow-up period. Median OS was 29.2 months. Actuarial 1-, 2-, and 3-year OS rates were 80, 62, and 46 %, respectively. CT-HDRBT is an effective therapy to attain local tumor control in patients with unresectable HCC. Prospective randomized studies comparing CT-HDRBT with the standard treatments like Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and chemoembolization (TACE) are mandatory. (orig.) [German] Zweck der vorliegenden Arbeit war die Analyse der klinischen Effektivitaet der CT-gesteuerten Hochdosis-Brachytherapie (CT-HDRBT) bei Patienten mit inoperablem hepatozellulaeren Karzinom (HCC). Ueber einen Zeitraum von 6 Jahren, wurden an unserer Klinik 98 Patienten mit 212 inoperablen HCC mittels CT-HDRBT mit {sup 192}Ir behandelt. MRT-Verlaufskontrollen erfolgten 6 Wochen nach der Intervention und dann alle 3 Monate. Primaerer Endpunkt der Studie war die lokale Tumorkontrolle (LTC); sekundaere Endpunkte waren das progressionsfreie Ueberleben (PFS) und Gesamtueberleben (OS). Die mittlere Nachbeobachtungszeit betrug 23,1 Monate (Spanne 4

  20. Absorbed dose simulations in near-surface regions using high dose rate Iridium-192 sources applied for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy treatment with Iridium-192 high dose rate (HDR) sources is widely used for various tumours and it could be developed in many anatomic regions. Iridium-192 sources are inserted inside or close to the region that will be treated. Usually, the treatment is performed in prostate, gynaecological, lung, breast and oral cavity regions for a better clinical dose coverage compared with other techniques, such as, high energy photons and Cobalt-60 machines. This work will evaluate absorbed dose distributions in near-surface regions around Ir-192 HDR sources. Near-surface dose measurements are a complex task, due to the contribution of beta particles in the near-surface regions. These dose distributions should be useful for non-tumour treatments, such as keloids, and other non-intracavitary technique. For the absorbed dose distribution simulations the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE with the general code penEasy was used. Ir-192 source geometry and a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) tube, for beta particles shield were modelled to yield the percentage depth dose (PDD) on a cubic water phantom. Absorbed dose simulations were realized at the central axis to yield the Ir-192 dose fall-off along central axis. The results showed that more than 99.2% of the absorbed doses (relative to the surface) are deposited in 5 cm depth but with slower rate at higher distances. Near-surface treatments with Ir-192 HDR sources yields achievable measurements and with proper clinical technique and accessories should apply as an alternative for treatment of lesions where only beta sources were used. - Highlights: ► A PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) tube was used to surround the HDR Ir-192 to shield the beta particles. ► 99.2% of the absorbed doses (relative to the surface) are deposited in 5 cm depth. ► Near-surface treatments with Ir-192 HDR sources yields achievable measurements

  1. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of HDR brachytherapy alone for T1/T2 breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, toxicity, cosmetic outcome, and local control of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone without whole breast external beam irradiation for early-stage breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and August 1999, 32 women diagnosed with a total of 33 AJCC Stage I/II breast carcinomas underwent surgical breast excision and postoperative irradiation using HDR brachytherapy interstitial implantation as part of a multi-institutional clinical Phase I/II protocol. Eligible patients included those with T1, T2, N0, N1 (≤3 nodes positive), and M0 tumors of nonlobular histologic features with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular lymph node extension, and a negative postexcision mammogram. Brachytherapy catheters were placed at the initial excision, reexcision, or either sentinel or full-axillary sampling. Direct visualization, surgical clips, and ultrasound and/or CT scan assisted in the delineation of the target volume, defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. High-activity 192Ir (3-10 Ci) was used to deliver 340 cGy/fraction, 2 fractions/d, for 5 consecutive days, to a total dose of 34 Gy to the target volume. Source position and dwell times were calculated using standard volume optimization techniques. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 33 months, and the mean patient age was 63 years. The mean tumor size was 1.3 cm, and 55% had an extensive intraductal component. Three patients had positive axillary nodes. Two patients experienced moderate perioperative pain that required narcotic analgesics. No peri- or postoperative infections occurred. No wound healing problems and no significant skin reactions related to the implant developed. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring scheme was applied to the entire 33-case cohort. In the assessment of the skin, 30 cases were Grade 0-1 and 3 cases were Grade 2. Subcutaneous toxicity was scored as 11 patients with

  2. Study and parameters survey for iodine-125 source dosimetry to be applied in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of brachytherapy technique with iodine-125 seeds to prostate cancer treatment has been used for decades with good clinical outcomes. To aim the Brazilian population necessities, IPEN-CNEN/SP developed the iodine-125 seed prototype with national technology. The objectives of this work are the development and the study of dosimetric procedures associates with the experimental acquisition of the useful parameters for the iodine-125 dosimetric characterization and to evaluate if the developed procedures, in this work, have the basic conditions to determinate the dosimetric analysis, that are fundamental for clinical procedures. The dosimeters selected for the analysis are the TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti), initially these dosimeters were submitted for two selection steps to choose the dosimeters more reproducible for the dosimetric analysis. The two steps were the selection by the mass of the dosimeters and the reproducibility after four irradiation series in a Cobalt-60 irradiator (CTR-IPEN). Afterwards these steps, the dosimeters were irradiated in linear accelerator with 6 MV energy (Service of Radiotherapy - Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein) to yield the individual calibration factors to each dosimeter. After, the dosimeters were used to the irradiations with iodine-125 seed, 6711 model, (GE-Healthcare). The irradiations and others analysis with iodine-125 seeds yield the useful values for the determination of the parameters suggested by the AAPM (American Association of Physicists in Medicine): constant of dose rate, geometry function, dose radial function and anisotropy function. The results showed good agreement with the values published by the literature, for the same iodine- 125 model, this fact confirms that the realized parameters will be able to be used for the IPEN-CNEN iodine-125 seeds dosimetry and quality control. (author)

  3. Quantification of iodine in porous hydroxyapatite matrices for application as radioactive sources in brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kássio André Lacerda

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, non-radioactive iodine was incorporated in two types of biodegradable hydroxyapatite-based porous matrices (HA and HACL through impregnation process from sodium iodine aqueous solutions with varying concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 mol/L . The results revealed that both systems presented a high capacity of incorporating iodine into their matrices. The quantity of incorporated iodine was measured through Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA. The porous ceramic matrices based on hydroxyapatite demonstrated a great potential for uses in low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy.Materiais cerâmicos porosos à base de compostos de fosfatos de cálcio (CFC vêm sendo estudados e desenvolvidos para várias aplicações biomédicas tais como implantes, sistemas para liberação de drogas e fontes radioativas para braquiterapia. Dois tipos de matrizes porosas biodegradáveis de hidroxiapatita (HA e HACL foram avaliadas em termos da capacidade de incorporação de iodo em suas estruturas. Resultados revelaram que as matrizes porosas a base de hidroxiapatita apresentaram alta capacidade de incorporar iodo em sua estrutura. A quantidade de iodo foi mensurada através da técnica de Análise por Ativação Nêutronica (AAN. As matrizes cerâmicas porosas à base de hidroxiapatita demostraram ter grande potencial para aplicação em braquiterapia de baixa taxa de dose (LDR - Low Dose Rate.

  4. Brachytherapy in vulvar cancer: analysis of 18 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INTRODUCTION: Vulvar cancer is a rather common neoplasm in elderly patients. Surgery, followed eventually by postoperative radiotherapy, is the treatment of choice. The results of exclusive radiotherapy (external beam irradiation and/or brachytherapy) are not well defined and in the recent literature only small series are reported. Radiotherapy however is the only therapeutic option in patients who are not fit for radical surgery. It is thus necessary to review its indications and its modalities. PATIENTS METHODS AND RESULTS: From 1990 to 1994 18 pts with a diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva have been submitted to brachytherapy. Age ranged from 60 to 92 years (mean age 76, 1 ys). 14 pts were treated at diagnosis (11 pts) or for recurrent disease after surgery (3 pts). In 8 of them brachytherapy (total dose 35-45 Gy, dose rate: 0,4-0,78 Gy/h) was preceded by external beam irradiation (Co60 or electron beam, 40-50 Gy to primary and inguinal nodes); 6 pts were treated with brachytherapy alone (58-60 Gy; dose rate 0,44-0,63 Gy/h). 4 pts underwent to brachytherapy alone for local recurrence after surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (total dose 45-60 Gy; dose rate 0,37-0,49 Gy/h). Brachytherapy was always performed with 192 Ir. Plastic tubes (2 to 5 lines) were used for single plane implantation of small exophytic lesions limited to the labia (8 cases); a perineal template (10 cases) was employed in lesions extended to the vaginal mucosa or involving the clitoris or the area of the perineum. (10(14)) pts treated at diagnosis are alive and free from local recurrence after 11-48 mos. 3 of them, treated with brachytherapy alone, have presented a nodal recurrence in the groin after 14, 15 and 27 mos. respectively. All of them are alive and free from disease after surgery and external radiotherapy. None of the pts treated for recurrent disease after surgery + external beam radiotherapy has achieved a local control. CONCLUSION: Brachytherapy alone or

  5. Study and methodology development for quality control in the production process of iodine-125 radioactive sealed sources applied to brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today cancer is the second cause of death by disease in several countries, including Brazil. Excluding skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most incident in the population. Prostate tumor can be treated by several ways, including brachytherapy, which consists in introducing sealed radioactive sources (Iodine - 125 seeds) inside the tumor. The target region of treatment receives a high radiation dose, but healthy neighbor tissues receive a significantly reduced radiation dose. The seed is made of a welding sealed titanium capsule, 0.8 mm external diameter and 4.5 mm length, enclosing a 0.5 mm diameter silver wire with Iodine-125 adsorbed. After welded, the seeds have to be submitted to a leak test to prevent any radioactive material release. The aims of this work were: (a) the study of the different leakage test methods applied to radioactive seeds and recommended by the ISO 997820, (b) the choice of the appropriate method and (c) the flowchart determination of the process to be used during the seeds production. The essays exceeded the standards with the use of ultra-sound during immersion and the corresponding benefits to leakage detection. Best results were obtained with the immersion in distilled water at 20 degree C for 24 hours and distilled water at 70 degree C for 30 minutes. These methods will be used during seed production. The process flowchart has all the phases of the leakage tests according to the sequence determined in the experiments. (author)

  6. Specification of absorbed dose to water using model-based dose calculation algorithms for treatment planning in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), recently introduced in treatment planning systems (TPS) for brachytherapy, calculate tissue absorbed doses. In the TPS framework, doses have hereto been reported as dose to water and water may still be preferred as a dose specification medium. Dose to tissue medium Dmed then needs to be converted into dose to water in tissue Dw,med. Methods to calculate absorbed dose to differently sized water compartments/cavities inside tissue, infinitesimal (used for definition of absorbed dose), small, large or intermediate, are reviewed. Burlin theory is applied to estimate photon energies at which cavity sizes in the range 1 nm–10 mm can be considered small or large. Photon and electron energy spectra are calculated at 1 cm distance from the central axis in cylindrical phantoms of bone, muscle and adipose tissue for 20, 50, 300 keV photons and photons from 125I, 169Yb and 192Ir sources; ratios of mass-collision-stopping powers and mass energy absorption coefficients are calculated as applicable to convert Dmed into Dw,med for small and large cavities. Results show that 1–10 nm sized cavities are small at all investigated photon energies; 100 µm cavities are large only at photon energies w,med/Dmed is discussed in terms of the cavity size in relation to the size of important cellular targets. Free radicals from DNA bound water of nanometre dimensions contribute to DNA damage and cell killing and may be the most important water compartment in cells implying use of ratios of mass-collision-stopping powers for converting Dmed into Dw,med. (paper)

  7. Impact of Heterogeneity-Based Dose Calculation Using a Deterministic Grid-Based Boltzmann Equation Solver for Intracavitary Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikell, Justin K. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Klopp, Ann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gonzalez, Graciela M.N. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kisling, Kelly D. [Department of Radiation Physics-Patient Care, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Price, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (United States); Berner, Paula A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eifel, Patricia J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mourtada, Firas, E-mail: fmourtad@christianacare.org [Department of Radiation Physics-Patient Care, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Newark, Delaware (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric impact of the heterogeneity dose calculation Acuros (Transpire Inc., Gig Harbor, WA), a grid-based Boltzmann equation solver (GBBS), for brachytherapy in a cohort of cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The impact of heterogeneities was retrospectively assessed in treatment plans for 26 patients who had previously received {sup 192}Ir intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer with computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance-compatible tandems and unshielded colpostats. The GBBS models sources, patient boundaries, applicators, and tissue heterogeneities. Multiple GBBS calculations were performed with and without solid model applicator, with and without overriding the patient contour to 1 g/cm{sup 3} muscle, and with and without overriding contrast materials to muscle or 2.25 g/cm{sup 3} bone. Impact of source and boundary modeling, applicator, tissue heterogeneities, and sensitivity of CT-to-material mapping of contrast were derived from the multiple calculations. American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 (TG-43) guidelines and the GBBS were compared for the following clinical dosimetric parameters: Manchester points A and B, International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) report 38 rectal and bladder points, three and nine o'clock, and {sub D2cm3} to the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid. Results: Points A and B, D{sub 2} cm{sup 3} bladder, ICRU bladder, and three and nine o'clock were within 5% of TG-43 for all GBBS calculations. The source and boundary and applicator account for most of the differences between the GBBS and TG-43 guidelines. The D{sub 2cm3} rectum (n = 3), D{sub 2cm3} sigmoid (n = 1), and ICRU rectum (n = 6) had differences of >5% from TG-43 for the worst case incorrect mapping of contrast to bone. Clinical dosimetric parameters were within 5% of TG-43 when rectal and balloon contrast were mapped to bone and radiopaque packing was not overridden

  8. Impact of Heterogeneity-Based Dose Calculation Using a Deterministic Grid-Based Boltzmann Equation Solver for Intracavitary Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric impact of the heterogeneity dose calculation Acuros (Transpire Inc., Gig Harbor, WA), a grid-based Boltzmann equation solver (GBBS), for brachytherapy in a cohort of cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The impact of heterogeneities was retrospectively assessed in treatment plans for 26 patients who had previously received 192Ir intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer with computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance-compatible tandems and unshielded colpostats. The GBBS models sources, patient boundaries, applicators, and tissue heterogeneities. Multiple GBBS calculations were performed with and without solid model applicator, with and without overriding the patient contour to 1 g/cm3 muscle, and with and without overriding contrast materials to muscle or 2.25 g/cm3 bone. Impact of source and boundary modeling, applicator, tissue heterogeneities, and sensitivity of CT-to-material mapping of contrast were derived from the multiple calculations. American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 (TG-43) guidelines and the GBBS were compared for the following clinical dosimetric parameters: Manchester points A and B, International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) report 38 rectal and bladder points, three and nine o’clock, and D2cm3 to the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid. Results: Points A and B, D2 cm3 bladder, ICRU bladder, and three and nine o’clock were within 5% of TG-43 for all GBBS calculations. The source and boundary and applicator account for most of the differences between the GBBS and TG-43 guidelines. The D2cm3 rectum (n = 3), D2cm3 sigmoid (n = 1), and ICRU rectum (n = 6) had differences of >5% from TG-43 for the worst case incorrect mapping of contrast to bone. Clinical dosimetric parameters were within 5% of TG-43 when rectal and balloon contrast were mapped to bone and radiopaque packing was not overridden. Conclusions: The GBBS has minimal impact on clinical

  9. Determination of the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy sources relative to {sup 60}Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, J. L., E-mail: jlreed2@wisc.edu; Micka, J. A.; Culberson, W. S.; DeWerd, L. A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Rasmussen, B. E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UP Health System Marquette, 580 West College Avenue, Marquette, Michigan 49855 (United States); Davis, S. D. [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal General Hospital (L5-112), 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy sources relative to {sup 60}Co. Methods: LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs were irradiated with low-energy brachytherapy sources and with a {sup 60}Co teletherapy source. The brachytherapy sources measured were the Best 2301 {sup 125}I seed, the OncoSeed 6711 {sup 125}I seed, and the Best 2335 {sup 103}Pd seed. The TLD light output per measured air-kerma strength was determined for the brachytherapy source irradiations, and the TLD light output per air kerma was determined for the {sup 60}Co irradiations. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to calculate the dose-to-TLD rate per air-kerma strength for the brachytherapy source irradiations and the dose to TLD per air kerma for the {sup 60}Co irradiations. The measured and MC-calculated results for all irradiations were used to determine the TLD intrinsic energy dependence for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd relative to {sup 60}Co. Results: The relative TLD intrinsic energy dependences (relative to {sup 60}Co) and associated uncertainties (k = 1) were determined to be 0.883 ± 1.3%, 0.870 ± 1.4%, and 0.871 ± 1.5% for the Best 2301 seed, OncoSeed 6711 seed, and Best 2335 seed, respectively. Conclusions: The intrinsic energy dependence of TLD-100 is dependent on photon energy, exhibiting changes of 13%–15% for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources relative to {sup 60}Co. TLD measurements of absolute dose around {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy sources should explicitly account for the relative TLD intrinsic energy dependence in order to improve dosimetric accuracy.

  10. Characteristics and locations of sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahtinen, J.; Poellaenen, R.; Toivonen, H. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Ten artificial radiation sources were placed in the terrain in order to test the capability of airborne measuring teams to detect them. One of the sources was a line source, others were point sources (three of them collimated). The radionuclides used in the sources were {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 192}Ir. The source activities ranged from about 26 MBq (one of the cobalt sources) to 0.56 TBq (iridium). (au).

  11. Numerical calculation of relative dose rates from spherical 106Ru beta sources used in ophthalmic brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva, Eduardo

    Concave beta sources of 106Ru/106Rh are used in radiotherapy to treat ophthalmic tumors. However, a problem that arises is the difficult determination of absorbed dose distributions around such sources mainly because of the small range of the electrons and the steep dose gradients. In this sense, numerical methods have been developed to calculate the dose distributions around the beta applicators. In this work a simple code in Fortran language is developed to estimate the dose rates along the central axis of 106Ru/106Rh curved plaques by numerical integration of the beta point source function and results are compared with other calculated data.

  12. Preparation and evaluation of various 32P sources for intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relatively high per cent of restenoses, being a long-term complication of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), can be significantly reduced by short-range ionizing radiation applied locally, immediately after PTCA. In search for dosimetrically favourable and easy to handle radiation sources for this purpose, we tried a pure β- emitter 32P (t1/2=14.3 days). Ways of preparation of 32 P sources were the following: (1) Neutron activation of 31P layers implanted into metallic surfaces by ionic methods; (2) Conversion coating of metallic surfaces in aqueous solutions containing 32PO43- ions; (3) Direct application of Na2H32 PO4 solutions in the angioplasty balloon. It was shown that: (1) 32 P sources obtained by 31 P ion implantation followed by neutron activation can be useful, but only if activation of the support material by thermal neutrons is negligible; (2) Phosphate layers on stainless steel surface exhibit rather poor adhesion. Similar layers on titanium require further studies; (3) Liquid 32 P sources ensure very good radial dose distribution but only utmost care in filling the balloon can give a reliable activity-dose dependence. Dosimetry of liquid sources, performed in a PMMA phantom by thermoluminescence method showed that 32 P sources of radioactive concentration of 200 MBq/cm3 can deposit therapeutic dose during about 12 min of exposition. TL detectors manufactured for this purpose in our laboratory show very good spatial resolution and can be recommended for similar studies. (author)

  13. Low dose rate 137Cs Brachytherapy source calibration with farmer type ionisation chamber and specialised fabricated jig in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important part of a general quality assurance (QA) program for brachytherapy dosimetry is the source calibration because wide ranges of uncertainties are quoted by manufactures. This research is aimed at calibrating LDR 137Cs brachytherapy source in the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital by multiple-distance air kerma measurement technique using a specialized designed jig and a calibrated therapy ionization chamber. Specialized jig was fabricated with source holder positions and ionization chamber positions on the jig. Farmer type ionization chamber of volume 0.6cm3 was used with and without build up cap. The results were validated using well type ionization chamber on channels on 1 and 5 taking into account decay correction. Air Kerma rates were determined at multiple distances between 8cm to 12cm from measured charges recorded by Max 4000 electrometer. The scatter dose relationship described by Ezzell [1992] was used to determine scattered radiation. The analytical method of determining air kerma calibration factor of 137Cs described by Sharma et.al [2011] was used to determine beam quality correction factor for the 137Cs. Beam attenuation was determined. Experimental data were compared with manufacturer's quoted source strength for verification. Well type ionization chamber results and experimental results on channel V1 and V5 deviated by 2.39% and 1.58% respectively. Experimental data deviated by 4.73% and 1.24% from theoretical data on channels V1 and V5 respectively. The mean of the experimental data deviated from the theoretical data by ±3.1% and from the well type measurements data by ±1.98%. The well type chamber results compared well with the experimental data. This is an indication that the method used for source calibration is a reliable alternative method of source calibration. The method used in this work has proven to be an efficient way of determining the actual source strength of the LDR brachytherapy 137Cs source in Korle-Bu Radiotherapy Centre

  14. Brachytherapy for the prevention of neointimal hyperplasia in the canine inferior vena cava after stent placement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isota, Masayuki; Kaminou, Toshio; Sakai, Yukimasa; Nakamura, Kenji; Yamada, Ryusaku [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Medical School

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of brachytherapy for preventing neointimal hyperplasia in the inferior vena cava (IVC) after stent placement. Sixteen beagles underwent Z-stent placement in the IVC and the aorta. For 8 of 16 beagles, irradiation (15 Gy) was delivered endoluminally to the stented segments of each vessel immediately after stent placement using the {sup 192}Ir. All animals were sacrificed after 6 weeks for morphometric and histopathologic examination. Morphometrically, neointimal thickness in the IVC of the radiation group was significantly decreased compared with the control group as well as that in the aorta (p<0.05). Histopathologic findings showed the neointima in the IVC of the control group contained markedly organization of thrombus and neovascularization though that in the IVC of the radiation group consisted mainly of smooth muscle cells without organization of thrombus and neovascularization. From these data intravenous irradiation may prevent clinical restenosis after stent placement. (author)

  15. Interstitial prostate brachytherapy. LDR-PDR-HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, Gyoergy [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Interdiscipliary Brachytherapy Unit; Hoskin, Peter (ed.) [London Univ. College (United Kingdom). Mount Vernon Cancer Centre

    2013-07-01

    The first comprehensive overview of interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. Written by an interdisciplinary team who have been responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Teaching Course. Discusses in detail patient selection, the results of different methods, the role of imaging, and medical physics issues. Prostate brachytherapy has been the subject of heated debate among surgeons and the proponents of the various brachytherapy methods. This very first interdisciplinary book on the subject provides a comprehensive overview of innovations in low dose rate (LDR), high dose rate (HDR), and pulsed dose rate (PDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. In addition to detailed chapters on patient selection and the use of imaging in diagnostics, treatment guidance, and implantation control, background chapters are included on related medical physics issues such as treatment planning and quality assurance. The results obtained with the different treatment options and the difficult task of salvage treatment are fully discussed. All chapters have been written by internationally recognized experts in their fields who for more than a decade have formed the teaching staff responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Prostate Brachytherapy Teaching Course. This book will be invaluable in informing residents and others of the scientific background and potential of modern prostate brachytherapy. It will also prove a useful source of up-to-date information for those who specialize in prostate brachytherapy or intend to start an interstitial brachytherapy service.

  16. Evaluation of a lithium formate EPR dosimetry system for dose measurements around Ir-192 brachytherapy sources

    OpenAIRE

    Antonovic, Laura; Gustafsson, Håkan; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa

    2009-01-01

    A dosimetry system using lithium formate monohydrate (HCO2Li center dot H2O) as detector material and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for readout has been used to measure absorbed dose distributions around clinical Ir-192 sources. Cylindrical tablets with diameter of 4.5 mm, height of 4.8 mm, and density of 1.26 g/cm(3) were manufactured. Homogeneity test and calibration of the dosimeters were performed in a 6 MV photon beam. Ir-192 irradiations were performed in a PMMA pha...

  17. Brachytherapy applications and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Devlin, Phillip M

    2015-01-01

    Written by the foremost experts in the field, this volume is a comprehensive text and practical reference on contemporary brachytherapy. The book provides detailed, site-specific information on applications and techniques of brachytherapy in the head and neck, central nervous system, breast, thorax, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract, as well as on gynecologic brachytherapy, low dose rate and high dose rate sarcoma brachytherapy, vascular brachytherapy, and pediatric applications. The book thoroughly describes and compares the four major techniques used in brachytherapy-intraca

  18. Clinical outcome of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in patients with oral cavity cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Moon, Sung Ho; Choi, Sung Weon; Park, Joo Yong; Yun, Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Chi Young [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) in patients with oral cavity cancer. Sixteen patients with oral cavity cancer treated with HDR remote-control afterloading brachytherapy using 192Ir between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Brachytherapy was administered in 11 patients as the primary treatment and in five patients as salvage treatment for recurrence after the initial surgery. In 12 patients, external beam radiotherapy (50-55 Gy/25 fractions) was combined with IBT of 21 Gy/7 fractions. In addition, IBT was administered as the sole treatment in three patients with a total dose of 50 Gy/10 fractions and as postoperative adjuvant treatment in one patient with a total of 35 Gy/7 fractions. The 5-year overall survival of the entire group was 70%. The actuarial local control rate after 3 years was 84%. All five recurrent cases after initial surgery were successfully salvaged using IBT +/- external beam radiotherapy. Two patients developed local recurrence at 3 and 5 months, respectively, after IBT. The acute complications were acceptable (< or =grade 2). Three patients developed major late complications, such as radio-osteonecrosis, in which one patient was treated by conservative therapy and two required surgical intervention. HDR IBT for oral cavity cancer was effective and acceptable in diverse clinical settings, such as in the cases of primary or salvage treatment.

  19. Clinical outcome of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in patients with oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) in patients with oral cavity cancer. Sixteen patients with oral cavity cancer treated with HDR remote-control afterloading brachytherapy using 192Ir between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Brachytherapy was administered in 11 patients as the primary treatment and in five patients as salvage treatment for recurrence after the initial surgery. In 12 patients, external beam radiotherapy (50-55 Gy/25 fractions) was combined with IBT of 21 Gy/7 fractions. In addition, IBT was administered as the sole treatment in three patients with a total dose of 50 Gy/10 fractions and as postoperative adjuvant treatment in one patient with a total of 35 Gy/7 fractions. The 5-year overall survival of the entire group was 70%. The actuarial local control rate after 3 years was 84%. All five recurrent cases after initial surgery were successfully salvaged using IBT +/- external beam radiotherapy. Two patients developed local recurrence at 3 and 5 months, respectively, after IBT. The acute complications were acceptable (< or =grade 2). Three patients developed major late complications, such as radio-osteonecrosis, in which one patient was treated by conservative therapy and two required surgical intervention. HDR IBT for oral cavity cancer was effective and acceptable in diverse clinical settings, such as in the cases of primary or salvage treatment.

  20. Comparison of absorbed dose in the cervix carcinoma therapy by brachytherapy of high dose rate using the conventional planning and Monte Carlo simulation; Comparacao da dose absorvida no tratamento do cancer ginecologico por braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose utilizando o planejamento convencional do tratamento e simulacao de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Aneli Oliveira da

    2010-07-01

    This study aims to compare the doses received for patients submitted to brachytherapy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method of treatment of the cervix carcinoma, performed in the planning system PLATO BPS with the doses obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using the radiation transport code MCNP 5 and one female anthropomorphic phantom based on voxel, the FAX. The implementation of HDR brachytherapy treatment for the cervix carcinoma consists of the insertion of an intrauterine probe and an intravaginal probe (ring or ovoid) and then two radiographs are obtained, anteroposterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) to confirm the position of the applicators in the patient and to allow the treatment planning and the determination of the absorbed dose at points of interest: rectum, bladder, sigmoid and point A, which corresponds anatomically to the crossings of the uterine arteries with ureters The absorbed doses obtained with the code MCNP 5, with the exception of the absorbed dose in the rectum and sigmoid for the simulation considering a point source of {sup 192}Ir, are lower than the absorbed doses from PLATO BPS calculations because the MCNP 5 considers the chemical compositions and densities of FAX body, not considering the medium as water. When considering the Monte Carlo simulation for a source with dimensions equal to that used in the brachytherapy irradiator used in this study, the values of calculated absorbed dose to the bladder, to the rectum, to the right point A and to the left point A were respectively lower than those determined by the treatment planning system in 33.29, 5.01, 22.93 and 19.04%. These values are almost all larger than the maximum acceptable deviation between patient planned and administered doses (5 %). With regard to the rectum and bladder, which are organs that must be protected, the present results are in favor of the radiological protection of patients. The point A, that is on the isodose of 100%, used to tumor treatment, the results

  1. SU-F-19A-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Novel CT/MR Compatible Fletcher Applicator for Intracavitary Brachytherapy of the Cervix Uteri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gifford, K; Han, T [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mourtada, F [Christiana Care Hospital, Newark, DE (United States); Eifel, P [The UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To validate a Monte Carlo model and evaluate the dosimetric capabilities of a novel commercial CT/MR compatible Fletcher applicator for cervical cancer brachytherapy. Methods: MCNPX 2.7.0 was used to model the Fletcher CT/MR shielded applicator (FA) and 192Ir HDR source. Energy deposition was calculated with a track length estimator modified by an energy-dependent heating function. A high density polystyrene phantom was constructed with three film pockets for validation of the MCNPX model. Three planes of data were calculated with the MCNPX model corresponding to the three film planes in phantom. The planes were located 1 cm from the most anterior, posterior, and medial extents of the FA right ovoid. Unshielded distributions were calculated by modeling the shielded cells as air instead of the tungsten alloy. A third order polynomial fit to the OD to dose curve was used to convert OD of the three film planes to dose. Each film and MCNPX plane dose distribution was normalized to a point 2 cm from the center of the film plane and in a region of low dose gradient. MCNPX and film were overlaid and compared with a distance-to-agreement criterion of (±2%/±2mm). Shielded and unshielded distributions were overlaid and a percent shielded plot was created. Results: 85.2%, 97.1%, and 96.6% of the MCNPX points passed the (±2%/±2mm) criterion respectively for the anterior, lateral, and posterior film comparison planes. A majority of the points in the anterior plane that exceeded the DTA criterion were either along edges of where the film was cut or near the terminal edges of the film. The percent shielded matrices indicated that the maximum % shielding was 50%. Conclusion: These data confirm the validity of the FA Monte Carlo model. The FA ovoid can shield up to 50% of the dose in the anteroposterior direction.

  2. A novel approach for the adsorption of iodine-125 on silver wire as matrix for brachytherapy source for the treatment of eye and prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, C.; Majali, M.A. E-mail: mythili@magnum.barc.ernet.in; Balakrishnan, S.A

    2002-09-01

    The adsorption of iodine-125 on silver wire bits coated with palladium to be sealed in titanium capsules as brachytherapy sources was studied. A method was optimized to obtain quantitative adsorption of {sup 125}I on the palladium treated silver wires. A comparative evaluation of palladium coated and uncoated (bare) silver wires on the adsorption of {sup 125}I was made. While, the adsorption of bare silver wires showed low, inconsistent uptake ({approx}60%) of {sup 125}I with high leachability ({approx}4%), the Pd coated silver wires showed quantitative and consistent uptake of {sup 125}I ({approx}90%) and exhibited low leachability (0.01%). {sup 125}I adsorbed on Pd coated silver wires could be used as a matrix for the preparation of interstitial sources in eye and prostate cancer therapy.

  3. {sup 32}P Brachytherapy Conformal Source Model RIC-100 for High-Dose-Rate Treatment of Superficial Disease: Monte Carlo Calculations, Diode Measurements, and Clinical Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Gil' ad N., E-mail: coheng@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Munro, John J. [Montrose Technology, Inc, North Andover, Massachusetts (United States); Kirov, Assen; Losasso, Thomas [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Williamson, Matthew; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Zaider, Marco [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: A novel {sup 32}P brachytherapy source has been in use at our institution intraoperatively for temporary radiation therapy of the spinal dura and other localized tumors. We describe the dosimetry and clinical implementation of the source. Methods and Materials: Dosimetric evaluation for the source was done with a complete set of MCNP5 Monte Carlo calculations preceding clinical implementation. In addition, the depth dose curve and dose rate were measured by use of an electron field diode to verify the Monte Carlo calculations. Calibration procedures using the diode in a custom-designed phantom to provide an absolute dose calibration and to check dose uniformity across the source area for each source before treatment were established. Results: Good agreement was established between the Monte Carlo calculations and diode measurements. Quality assurance measurements results are provided for about 100 sources used to date. Clinical source calibrations were usually within 10% of manufacturer specifications. Procedures for safe handling of the source are described. Discussion: Clinical considerations for using the source are discussed.

  4. Combined transperineal radiofrequency (RF) interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer (PC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakami, Shinji; Gonda, Nobuko; Kikuno, Nobuyuki [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)] (and others)

    2001-05-01

    Hyperthermia has been used effectively as a radiation sensitizer. Interstitial hyperthermoradiotherapy has been therefore utilized as a minimal invasive therapy in attempts to improve local tumor control for various cancers, but not for urological cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and feasibility of transperineal hyperthermoradiotherapy for localized PC. Based on our basic study of hyperthermoradiotherapy, we devised the procedure of combined transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Two patients with localized PC underwent transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia combined with brachytherapy operation the 192-Ir remote after-loading system (RALS). Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, a total number of 12-18 stainless steel needles for 192-Ir RALS were implanted into the prostatic gland and seminal vesicles (SV) in an optimized pattern. Eight of the needles were used as electrodes for hyperthermia, and were electrically insultated using the vinyl catheter along the length of the subdermal fatty tissue to protect from overheating. Three other needles were utilized for continuous temperature mapping in the prostate. Rectal temperature was also monitored. Total radiation doses of 70 Gy to the prostate and SV were planned as a combination of brachytherapy (24 Gy/4 fraction) and external irradiation using a four-field box technique (46 Gy/23 fraction). Hyperthermic treatment (goal of 42 to 43 deg C for 60 minutes) was performed twice following the 1st and 4th brachytherapy at an interval of more than 48 hours for the recovery of cancer cells from thermotolerance. Both patients reached the treatment goal of all intraprostatic temperatures >43.0 deg C, which was considered favorable for hyperthermia, and the rectal temperatures of both patients remained <38 deg C during hyperthermia. In serial PSA measurements of both patients, serum PSA was less than 1.0 ng/ml within 3 months and has since

  5. A robotic device for MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerburg, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the treatment options for prostate cancer is brachytherapy with iodine-125 sources. In prostate brachytherapy a high radiation dose is delivered to the prostate with a steep dose fall off to critical surrounding organs. The implantation of the iodine sources is currently performed under ultra

  6. Intra coronary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the initial promise of vasculopathy intervention restenosis- a consequence of the (normal) would healing process-has emerged as a major problem. Angiographic restenosis has been reported in 40-60% of patients after successful P TCA. The basic mechanism of restenosis, (acute recoil, negative remodeling and neo intimal hyperplasia), are only partially counteracted by endovascular prosthetic devices (s tents). The rate of in-s tent restenosis, which is primarily caused by neo intimal hyperplasia due to the (micro) trauma of the arterial wall by the s tent struts, has been reduced to 18-32%. Ionizing (beta or gamma) radiations has been established as a potent treatment for malignant disorders. In recent years, there has also been increasing interest among clinicians in the management of benign lesions with radiation. Over the past several years, there has been a growing body of evidence that endovascular brachytherapy has a major impact on the biology of the restenosis. It must be underlined that understanding the biology and pathophysiology of restenosis and assessing various treatment options should preferably be a team effort, with the three gracesbeing interventional cardiologist, nuclear oncologist, and industrial partners. The vast amount of data in over 20000 patients from a wide range of randomized controlled trials, has shown that brachytherapy is the only effective treatment for in-s tent restenosis. We are learning more and more about how to improve brachytherapy. While the new coated s tents that we heard about today is fascinating and extremely promising, brachytherapy still has a very important place in difficult patients, such as those with total occlusions, osti al lesions, left main lesions, multivessel disease and diabetes. Regarding to above mentioned tips, we (a research team work, in the Nuclear Research Center Of the Atomic Energy Organization Of Iran), focused on synthesis and preparation of radioactive materials for use in I c-B T. We

  7. Study and development of methodology for radioactive iodine fixation in polymeric substrate for manufacturing sources used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According global estimates of Globocan 2012 project of the International Agency for Research of Cancer, of the World Health Organization, there were 14,1 million new cases of cancer and a total of 8,2 million deaths from cancer. Also show that in 2030, the overall load will be 21,4 million new cases and 13,2 million cancer deaths. One of the prostate cancer therapy is brachytherapy, used in early and middle stages of the disease. It is made with the introduction of seeds with radioactive material within the tumor or in nearby regions, affecting the minimum surrounding tissues. The aim of this work is the study and developing the deposition of radioactive iodine on the polymeric substrate method, and an analysis relating the efficiency of the method to implementation in the laboratory of brachytherapy from IPEN. Iodine-125 is adsorbed on an epoxy resin solution. The objective of this study is to offer a new proposal for seeds. The results will give the data for the radiation protection and the procedures for radioactive waste management

  8. The American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for low-dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This report presents guidelines for using low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the management of patients with cervical cancer. Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in LDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer performed a literature review, supplemented by their clinical experience, to formulate guidelines for LDR brachytherapy of cervical cancer. Results: The ABS strongly recommends that radiation treatment for cervical carcinoma (with or without chemotherapy) should include brachytherapy as a component. Precise applicator placement is essential for improved local control and reduced morbidity. The outcome of brachytherapy depends, in part, on the skill of the brachytherapist. Doses given by external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy depend upon the initial volume of disease, the ability to displace the bladder and rectum, the degree of tumor regression during pelvic irradiation, and institutional practice. The ABS recognizes that intracavitary brachytherapy is the standard technique for brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. Interstitial brachytherapy should be considered for patients with disease that cannot be optimally encompassed by intracavitary brachytherapy. The ABS recommends completion of treatment within 8 weeks, when possible. Prolonging total treatment duration can adversely affect local control and survival. Recommendations are made for definitive and postoperative therapy after hysterectomy. Although recognizing that many efficacious LDR dose schedules exist, the ABS presents suggested dose and fractionation schemes for combining external beam radiotherapy with LDR brachytherapy for each stage of disease. The dose prescription point (point A) is defined for intracavitary insertions. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.65 Gy/h are suggested for intracavitary brachytherapy. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.70 Gy/h to the periphery of the implant are suggested for interstitial implant. Use of differential source activity or

  9. Influence of radioactive sources discretization in the Monte Carlo computational simulations of brachytherapy procedures: a case study on the procedures for treatment of prostate cancer; Influencia da discretizacao das fontes radioativas nas simulacoes computacionais Monte Carlo de procedimentos de braquiterapia: um estudo de caso sobre os procedimentos para tratamento do cancer de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Antonio Konrado de Santana; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Costa, Kleber Souza Silva [Faculdade Integrada de Pernambuco (FACIPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Radiotherapy computational simulation procedures using Monte Carlo (MC) methods have shown to be increasingly important to the improvement of cancer fighting strategies. One of the biases in this practice is the discretization of the radioactive source in brachytherapy simulations, which often do not match with a real situation. This study had the aim to identify and to measure the influence of radioactive sources discretization in brachytherapy MC simulations when compared to those that do not present discretization, using prostate brachytherapy with Iodine-125 radionuclide as model. Simulations were carried out with 108 events with both types of sources to compare them using EGSnrc code associated to MASH phantom in orthostatic and supine positions with some anatomic adaptations. Significant alterations were found, especially regarding bladder, rectum and the prostate itself. It can be concluded that there is a need to discretized sources in brachytherapy simulations to ensure its representativeness. (author)

  10. The role of brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre of Khartoum (RICK)

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, A M

    2000-01-01

    As there are many efforts devoted in order to manage the cancer, here the researcher handle one of these efforts that play a major part in treating the cancer internationally, it is a brachytherapy system. Brachytherapy was carried out mostly with radium sources, but recently some artificial sources are incorporated in this mode of treatment such as Cs-137, Ir-192, Au-198, P-32, Sr-90 and I-125. The research cover history of brachytherapy and radioactive sources used in, techniques of implementation, radiation protection and methods of brachytherapy dose calculation, as well as brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre in Khartoum.

  11. Comprehensive brachytherapy physical and clinical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Baltas, Dimos; Meigooni, Ali S; Hoskin, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy is one of the most important oncological treatment modalities requiring an integrated approach that utilizes new technologies, advanced clinical imaging facilities, and a thorough understanding of the radiobiological effects on different tissues, the principles of physics, dosimetry techniques and protocols, and clinical expertise. A complete overview of the field, Comprehensive Brachytherapy: Physical and Clinical Aspects is a landmark publication, presenting a detailed account of the underlying physics, design, and implementation of the techniques, along with practical guidance for practitioners. Bridging the gap between research and application, this single source brings together the technological basis, radiation dosimetry, quality assurance, and fundamentals of brachytherapy. In addition, it presents discussion of the most recent clinical practice in brachytherapy including prostate, gynecology, breast, and other clinical treatment sites. Along with exploring new clinical protocols, ...

  12. Evolution of different reaction methods resulting in the formation of AgI125 for use in brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer represents about 10% of all cases of cancer in the world. Brachytherapy has been extensively used in the early and intermediate stages of the illness. The radiotherapy method reduces the damage probability to surrounding healthy tissues. The present study compares several deposition methods of iodine-125 on silver substrate (seed core), in order to choose the most suitable one to be implemented at IPEN. Four methods were selected: method 1 (assay based on electrodeposition) which presented efficiency of 65.16%; method 2 (assay based on chemical reactions, developed by David Kubiatowicz) which presented efficiency of 70.80%; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the methodology developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) which presented efficiency of 55.80%; new method developed by IPEN with 90.5% efficiency. Based on the results, the new method is the suggested one to be implemented. (authors)

  13. Image guided Brachytherapy: The paradigm of Gynecologic and Partial Breast HDR Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantopoulos, S.; Kantemiris, I.; Konidari, A.; Zaverdinos, P.

    2015-09-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy uses high strength radioactive sources and temporary interstitial implants to conform the dose to target and minimize the treatment time. The advances of imaging technology enable accurate reconstruction of the implant and exact delineation of high-risk CTV and the surrounding critical structures. Furthermore, with sophisticated treatment planning systems, applicator devices and stepping source afterloaders, brachytherapy evolved to a more precise, safe and individualized treatment. At the Radiation Oncology Department of Metropolitan Hospital Athens, MRI guided HDR gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with brachytherapy are performed routinely. Contouring and treatment planning are based on the recommendations of the GEC - ESTRO Working group. The task of this presentation is to reveal the advantages of 3D image guided brachytherapy over 2D brachytherapy. Thus, two patients treated at our department (one GYN and one APBI) will be presented. The advantage of having adequate dose coverage of the high risk CTV and simultaneous low doses to the OARs when using 3D image- based brachytherapy will be presented. The treatment techniques, equipment issues, as well as implantation, imaging and treatment planning procedures will be described. Quality assurance checks will be treated separately.

  14. SU-C-16A-01: In Vivo Source Position Verification in High Dose Rate (HDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Flat Panel Imager: Initial Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franich, R; Smith, R; Millar, J [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Haworth, A [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Taylor, M [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Australian Federal Police, Canberra, ACT (Australia); McDermott, L [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We report our initial clinical experience with a novel position-sensitive source-tracking system based on a flat panel imager. The system has been trialled with 4 prostate HDR brachytherapy patients (8 treatment fractions) in this initial study. Methods: The flat panel imaging system was mounted under a customised carbon fibre couch top assembly (Figure 1). Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate of each patient at the time of catheter placement. X-ray dwell position markers were inserted into three catheters and a radiograph acquired to locate the implant relative to the imaging device. During treatment, as the HDR source dwells were delivered, images were acquired and processed to determine the position of the source in the patient. Source positions measured by the imaging device were compared to the treatment plan for verification of treatment delivery. Results: Measured dwell positions provided verification of relative dwell spacing within and between catheters, in the coronal plane. Measurements were typically within 2.0mm (0.2mm – 3.3mm, s.d. 0.8mm) of the planned positions over 60 dwells (Figure 2). Discrimination between larger dwell intervals and catheter differentiation were clear. This confirms important delivery attributes such as correct transfer tube connection, source step size, relative catheter positions and therefore overall correct plan selection and delivery. The fiducial markers, visible on the radiograph, provided verification of treatment delivery to the correct anatomical location. The absolute position of the dwells was determined by comparing the measured dwell positions with the x-ray markers from the radiograph, validating the programmed treatment indexer length. The total impact on procedure time was less than 5 minutes. Conclusion: The novel, noninvasive HDR brachytherapy treatment verification system was used clinically with minor impact on workflow. The system allows verification of correct treatment

  15. Physical aspects of radioisotope brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report represents an attempt to provide, within a necessarily limited compass, an authoritative guide to all important physical aspects of the use of sealed gamma sources in radiotherapy. Within the report, reference is made wherever necessary to the more extensive but scattered literature on this subject. While this report attempts to cover all the physical aspects of radioisotope 'brachytherapy' it does not, of course, deal exhaustively with any one part of the subject. 384 refs, 3 figs, 6 tabs

  16. Verification and source-position error analysis of film reconstruction techniques used in the brachytherapy planning systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Liyun; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Chui, Chen-Shou; Du, Yi-Chun; Chen Tainsong [Institute of Biochemical Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Sinlau Christian Hospital, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sinlau Christian Hospital, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Physics, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2009-09-15

    A method was presented that employs standard linac QA tools to verify the accuracy of film reconstruction algorithms used in the brachytherapy planning system. Verification of reconstruction techniques is important as suggested in the ESTRO booklet 8: ''The institution should verify the full process of any reconstruction technique employed clinically.'' Error modeling was also performed to analyze seed-position errors. The ''isocentric beam checker'' device was used in this work. It has a two-dimensional array of steel balls embedded on its surface. The checker was placed on the simulator couch with its center ball coincident with the simulator isocenter, and one axis of its cross marks parallel to the axis of gantry rotation. The gantry of the simulator was rotated to make the checker behave like a three-dimensional array of balls. Three algorithms used in the ABACUS treatment planning system: orthogonal film, 2-films-with-variable-angle, and 3-films-with-variable-angle were tested. After exposing and digitizing the films, the position of each steel ball on the checker was reconstructed and compared to its true position, which can be accurately calculated. The results showed that the error is dependent on the object-isocenter distance, but not the magnification of the object. The averaged errors were less than 1 mm within the tolerance level defined by Roueet al. [''The EQUAL-ESTRO audit on geometric reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy,'' Radiother. Oncol. 78, 78-83 (2006)]. However, according to the error modeling, the theoretical error would be greater than 2 mm if the objects were located more than 20 cm away from the isocenter with a 0.5 deg. reading error of the gantry and collimator angles. Thus, in addition to carefully performing the QA of the gantry and collimator angle indicators, it is suggested that the patient, together with the applicators or seeds inside, should be placed close to

  17. A BrachyPhantom for verification of dose calculation of HDR brachytherapy planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austerlitz, C. [Clinica Diana Campos, Recife, PE 52020-030 (Brazil); Campos, C. A. T. [Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22451-900 (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a calibration phantom for {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy units that renders possible the direct measurement of absorbed dose to water and verification of treatment planning system.Methods: A phantom, herein designated BrachyPhantom, consists of a Solid Water™ 8-cm high cylinder with a diameter of 14 cm cavity in its axis that allows the positioning of an A1SL ionization chamber with its reference measuring point at the midheight of the cylinder's axis. Inside the BrachyPhantom, at a 3-cm radial distance from the chamber's reference measuring point, there is a circular channel connected to a cylindrical-guide cavity that allows the insertion of a 6-French flexible plastic catheter from the BrachyPhantom surface. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to calculate a factor, P{sub sw}{sup lw}, to correct the reading of the ionization chamber to a full scatter condition in liquid water. The verification of dose calculation of a HDR brachytherapy treatment planning system was performed by inserting a catheter with a dummy source in the phantom channel and scanning it with a CT. The CT scan was then transferred to the HDR computer program in which a multiple treatment plan was programmed to deliver a total dose of 150 cGy to the ionization chamber. The instrument reading was then converted to absorbed dose to water using the N{sub gas} formalism and the P{sub sw}{sup lw} factor. Likewise, the absorbed dose to water was calculated using the source strength, S{sub k}, values provided by 15 institutions visited in this work.Results: A value of 1.020 (0.09%, k= 2) was found for P{sub sw}{sup lw}. The expanded uncertainty in the absorbed dose assessed with the BrachyPhantom was found to be 2.12% (k= 1). To an associated S{sub k} of 27.8 cGy m{sup 2} h{sup −1}, the total irradiation time to deliver 150 cGy to the ionization chamber point of reference was 161.0 s. The deviation between the absorbed doses to water assessed with

  18. Development of a phantom to validate high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment planning systems with heterogeneous algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Eduardo S., E-mail: emoura@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares—IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil); Micka, John A.; Hammer, Cliff G.; Culberson, Wesley S.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Rostelato, Maria Elisa C. M.; Zeituni, Carlos A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares—IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: This work presents the development of a phantom to verify the treatment planning system (TPS) algorithms used for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. It is designed to measure the relative dose in a heterogeneous media. The experimental details used, simulation methods, and comparisons with a commercial TPS are also provided. Methods: To simulate heterogeneous conditions, four materials were used: Virtual Water™ (VM), BR50/50™, cork, and aluminum. The materials were arranged in 11 heterogeneity configurations. Three dosimeters were used to measure the relative response from a HDR {sup 192}Ir source: TLD-100™, Gafchromic{sup ®} EBT3 film, and an Exradin™ A1SL ionization chamber. To compare the results from the experimental measurements, the various configurations were modeled in the PENELOPE/penEasy Monte Carlo code. Images of each setup geometry were acquired from a CT scanner and imported into BrachyVision™ TPS software, which includes a grid-based Boltzmann solver Acuros™. The results of the measurements performed in the heterogeneous setups were normalized to the dose values measured in the homogeneous Virtual Water™ setup and the respective differences due to the heterogeneities were considered. Additionally, dose values calculated based on the American Association of Physicists in Medicine-Task Group 43 formalism were compared to dose values calculated with the Acuros™ algorithm in the phantom. Calculated doses were compared at the same points, where measurements have been performed. Results: Differences in the relative response as high as 11.5% were found from the homogeneous setup when the heterogeneous materials were inserted into the experimental phantom. The aluminum and cork materials produced larger differences than the plastic materials, with the BR50/50™ material producing results similar to the Virtual Water™ results. Our experimental methods agree with the PENELOPE/penEasy simulations for most setups and dosimeters. The

  19. High dose rate brachytherapy using custom made superficial mould applicators and Leipzig applicators for non melanoma localized skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellizzon, A. Cassio A.; Miziara, Daniela; Lima, Flavia Pedroso de; Miziara, Miguel

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: advances in technology and the commercial production of Leipzig applicators allowed High Dose Rate after-load brachytherapy (HDR-BT) to address a number of the challenges associated with the delivery of superficial radiation to treat localized non melanoma skin cancer (NMSK). We reviewed our uni-institutional experience on the treatment of NMSK with HDR-BT. Methods: data were collected retrospectively from patients attending the Radiation Oncology Department at AV Carvalho Insitute, Sao Paulo, Brazil. HDR-BT was done using the stepping source HDR 192Ir Microselectron (Nucletron BV). The planning target volume consisted of the macroscopic lesion plus a 5mm to 10mm margin.The depth of treatment was 0.5 cm in smaller (< 2.0 cm) tumors and 10 to 15 mm for lesions bigger than that. Results: Thirteen patients were treated with HDR-BT from June, 2007 to June 2013. The median age and follow up time were 72 (38-90) years old and 36 (range, 7-73) months, respectively. There a predominance of males (61.5%) and of patients referred for adjuvant treatment due positive surgical margins or because they have had only a excision biopsy without safety margins (61.5%). Six (46.2%) patients presented with squamous cell carcinoma and 7 (53.8%) patients presented with basal cell carcinoma. The median tumor size was 20 (range, 5-42) mm. Patients were treated with a median total dose of 40 Gy (range, 20 -60), given in 10 (range, 2-15) fractions, given daily or twice a week. All patients responded very well to treatment and only one patient has failed locally so far, after 38 months of the end of the irradiation. The crude and actuarial 3-year local control rates were 100% and 80%, respectively. Moist desquamation, grade 2 RTOG, was observed in 4 (30.8%) patients. Severe late complication, radiation-induced dyspigmentation, occurred in 2 patients and 1 of the patients also showed telangiectasia in the irradiated area. The cosmetic result was considered good in 84% (11/13) patients

  20. Prototypes of phosphorus-32 sealed sources for use in Brachytherapy; Prototipo de fuente radiactiva de fosforo para uso medico en braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anaya Garro, Olgger; Vela Mora, Mariano; Revilla Silva, Angel Revilla [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN), Lima (Peru)]. E-mail: oanaya@ipen.gob.pe; mvela@ipen.gob.pe; arevilla@ipen.gob.pe

    2005-07-01

    It has developed prototypes of phosphorus-32 sealed sources for use in Brachytherapy. This one was made in two stages, at the first one, we designed and constructed the container (capsule), the filling system and the sealed system; at the second one, we made the irradiation of the capsules containing the 'target'. The prototypes was made of aluminum in cylindrical geometry. During the irradiation test was made using two different dimensions: one of 1 mm outer diameter and 1 cm length and another one of 0.8 mm outer diameter and 5 mm length. They were radiated in the core of the RP-10 research reactor, at 7.93 x10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}.s thermal neutron flux during 27 operation cycles. Activities of 144.53 MBq (3.91 mCi) and 107.67 MBq (2.91 mCi) was obtained for each case. This activities are adequate to restenosis and for some tumors treatment. We can observed that the capsules irradiated passed visual inspection in its physical integrity (leakage and geometry). It has been demonstrated, that the beta radiation for his minor power of penetration and its high interaction, causes major local damage to the malignant tissue, minimizing the damage of the healthy surrounding tissues. It has been advisable to use for the treatment of illnesses of the circulatory system and some tumors. At the present, the source of strontium-90 are the most beta ray source used, but of this one are obtained as fission product of uranium target, where valuable radioactive waste is generated, whereas if we were using phosphorus-32 that we propose, radioactive waste would not be generated since it would take place directly as sealed source, for reaction (n, {beta}). (author)

  1. Determination of the dose around an ovoid for treatments in intracavitary brachytherapy Hdr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On this work the results of the dosimetric measurements are presented around an ovoid of 2 cm diameter. The measurements were carried out using a water mannequin, an ovoid, a radiation gamma source of 192Ir and thermoluminescent dosemeters. The dosimetry was realized in the direction of the rectum and bladder. To know the effect of the shielding of the devices type Manchester in the dose, the thermoluminescent dosemeters were irradiated to a radiation gamma source of 192Ir contained in the Gamma med Plus equipment. The planning was realized normalizing the calculation to 2.5 cm from the applicator center on the transverse plane (2.5, 0, 0). The results show that the dose distribution for an ovoid without shielding is more uniform in the transversal plane to the source axis. The results were compared with the calculated results by means of the planning system BrachyVision. While the absorbed dose distribution around an ovoid with shielding is completely anisotropic. This anisotropic is due to the shielding. (Author)

  2. Effectiveness of brachytherapy in treating carcinoma of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radical radiotherapeutic management of vulvar cancer often incorporates brachytherapy as a portion of the treatment regimen. However, few studies using this modality alone to manage vulvar cancer have been published. Methods and Materials: Thirty four patients were treated with iridium-192 (192Ir) brachytherapy for vulvar cancer between 1975 and 1993 at Centre Alexis Vautrin. Twenty-one patients were treated at first presentation when surgery was contraindicated or declined. Of these patients, 12 had International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Classification Stage III or IV disease, 8 were Stage II, 1 was Stage I, and 1 was Stage 0. Thirteen patients were treated for recurrent disease. Paris system rules for implantation and dose prescription were followed. The median reference dose was 60 Gy (range 53 to 88 Gy). At the time of analysis, 10 of 34 patients were alive. Median follow-up in these 10 patients was 31 months (range: 21 months to 107 months). Fourteen of the 24 deaths were from causes other than vulvar cancer. Results: Kaplan-Meier actuarial 5-year local control was 47% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 23 to 73%) and 5-year actuarial loco-regional control was 45% (95% CI = 21 to 70%). Kaplan-Meier actuarial 5-year disease-specific survival was 56% (95% CI = 33 to 76%) and actuarial 5-year survival was 29% (95% CI = 15 to 49%). Median time to death was 14 months. Subset analysis revealed a higher actuarial 5-year local control in patients treated at first presentation than those treated for recurrence (80 vs. 19%, log rank, p = 0.04). Similarly, actuarial 5-year loco-regional control was higher in patients treated at first presentation (80 vs. 16%, log rank, p 0.01). The two groups did not differ significantly in disease-specific or overall survival. The actuarial 5-year disease specific survival of 56% is somewhat less than the expected 5-year disease-specific survival after surgery in a group having a similar proportion of early stage

  3. Post-stenting Intravascular Brachytherapy Trials on Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits Using 32P Liquid Sources: Implications for Prevention of In-Stent Restenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Liquid sources of radiation delivered in angioplasty balloons may be a convenient self-centering device used for prevention of in-stent restenosis. To test the effectiveness of this method an intravascular brachytherapy study was performed using 32P liquid sources in an animal model. Methods: The radial dose distribution around angioplasty balloons filled with solutions of Na2H32PO4 was calibrated by thermoluminescence dosimetry. The animal experiments were performed in rabbits with induced hypercholesterolemia. The balloons containing 32P were introduced into iliac arteries immediately after stent implantation. Estimated 7-49 Gy doses required 30-100 minirradiations. Radiation effects were evaluated by comparing the thickness of various components of the artery wall. Results:Doses of 7, 12, 16 or 49 Gy on the internal artery surface required 30-100 min of irradiation. The dose of 49 Gy at 'zero' distance corresponding to 16 Gy at 1.0 mm from the balloon surface reduced hypertrophy in every layer of the arterial wall: in the intima the cross-sectional areas were 0.13 versus 0.91 mm2, in the media were 0.5 versus 0.46 mm2 and in the adventitia were 0.04 versus 0.3 mm2 (p <0.05). A dose of 7 Gyat the balloon surface produced adverse irradiation effects: the intimal area of the artery was 2.087 versus 0.857 mm2, the medial area was 0.59 versus 0.282 mm2 and the adventitial area was 0.033 versus 0.209 mm2 in treated and control arteries, respectively.Conclusion: Application of a 49 Gy irradiation dose to the internal arterial surface effectively prevented in-stentrestenosis

  4. Interstitial brachytherapy for eyelid carcinoma. Outcome analysis in 60 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krengli, M.; Deantonio, L. [University Hospital ' ' Maggiore della Carita' ' , Division of Radiotherapy, Novara (Italy); University of ' ' Piemonte Orientale' ' , Department of Translational Medicine, Novara (Italy); Masini, L.; Filomeno, A.; Gambaro, G. [University Hospital ' ' Maggiore della Carita' ' , Division of Radiotherapy, Novara (Italy); Comoli, A.M. [University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Ophthalmology, Novara (Italy); Negri, E. [University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Medical Physics, Novara (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    Eyelid cancer is a therapeutic challenge due to the cosmetic and functional implications of this anatomical region and the objectives of therapy are tumor control, functional and cosmetic outcome. The present study was performed to analyze local control, toxicity, functional and cosmetic results in patients with eyelid carcinoma treated by interstitial brachytherapy. In this study 60 patients with eyelid carcinoma were treated by interstitial brachytherapy using iridium ({sup 192}Ir) wires with a linear activity of 1.2-1.7 mCi/cm. The prescription dose was 51-70 Gy (mean 65 Gy, median 66 Gy). Of the 60 patients 51 (85.0 %) had received no prior treatment, 4 (6.7 %) had received previous surgery with positive or close margins and 5 (8.3 %) had suffered local recurrence after surgery. Of the tumors 52 (86.7 %) were basal cell carcinoma, 7 (11.7 %) squamous cell carcinoma and 1 (1.7 %) Merkel cell carcinoma. Clinical stage of the 51 previously untreated tumors was 38 T1N0, 12 T2N0 and 1 T3N0. Mean follow-up was 92 months (range 6-253 months). Local control was maintained in 96.7 % of patients. Late effects higher than grade 2 were observed in 3.0 % of cases. Functional and cosmetic outcomes were optimal in 68.4 % of patients. Interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the eyelid can achieve local control, cosmetic and functional results comparable to those of surgery. (orig.) [German] Das Karzinom des Augenlids stellt aufgrund der funktionellen und kosmetischen Beeintraechtigungen dieser anatomischen Region eine therapeutische Herausforderung dar. Ziele der Therapie sind sowohl die Tumorkontrolle als auch ein gutes funktionelles und kosmetisches Ergebnis. Lokale Kontrolle, Toxizitaet sowie funktionelle und kosmetische Ergebnisse bei Patienten mit Karzinom des Augenlids, die mit interstitieller Brachytherapie behandelt wurden, sollten analysiert werden. Sechzig Patienten mit Karzinom des Augenlids wurden mit interstitieller Brachytherapie mit Iridium-192-Draehten

  5. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette Benedicte;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised       by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in       single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the       potential benefit in patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 14...

  6. Divergence of Cs-137 sources fluence used in brachytherapy; Divergencia da fluencia de fontes de Cs-137 usadas em braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianello, E.A.; Almeida, C.E. de [Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas- LCR-DBB (UERJ). R. Sao Francisco Xavier, 524- Pav. HLC, sala 136 terreo- CEP 20.550- 013. Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    In this work the experimental determination of correction factor for fluence divergence (kln) of linear Cs-137 sources CDCS J4, with Farmer ionization chamber model 2571 in a central and perpendicular plan to source axis, for distances range from 1 to 7 cm., has been presented. The experimental results were compared to calculating by Kondo and Randolph (1960) isotropic theory and Bielajew (1990) anisotropic theory. (Author)

  7. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing 32 P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  8. Study of photon angular distribution from a new Best 2300 series 125I source for interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    125I seeds employed for permanent and temporary interstitial implants exhibit significant radiation fluence anisotropy due to self absorption in the marker and oblique filtration through the encapsulation jacket. A silver wire 125I seed (Model 6711), introduced in 1983 by 3M Company, failed to improve the photon distribution anisotropy. In addition to the known 125I photon spectrum, the new seed emitted two silver characteristic x-rays, lowering the mean photon energy from 28.4 to 27.4 keV. A double wall uniform thickness encapsulated 125I source, laser welded at one end, has been developed for clinical use. The source uses a carbon coated thin tungsten filament for enhanced radiographic visualization. Measurements made by NaI and intrinsic Ge detectors indicate that the 2300 series 125I source emits a pure 125I spectrum. The angular dependence of individual photon peaks and total photon spectrum as well as the corresponding anisotropy factors were measured. The 4π averaged anisotropy factor for the total radiation fluence is 0.92 compared to 0.87 for model 6711 seed. The dose distribution around the new 125I source in water is very isotropic. (author). 11 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  9. EchoSeed Model 6733 Iodine-125 brachytherapy source: Improved dosimetric characterization using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; Hadad, K.; Faghihi, R.; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, M.; Naghshnezhad, Z.; Meigooni, A. S. [Center for Research in Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering and Physics Unit, Radiotherapy Department, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz 71936-13311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radiation Research Center and Medical Radiation Department, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71936-13311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89169 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This study primarily aimed to obtain the dosimetric characteristics of the Model 6733 {sup 125}I seed (EchoSeed) with improved precision and accuracy using a more up-to-date Monte-Carlo code and data (MCNP5) compared to previously published results, including an uncertainty analysis. Its secondary aim was to compare the results obtained using the MCNP5, MCNP4c2, and PTRAN codes for simulation of this low-energy photon-emitting source. The EchoSeed geometry and chemical compositions together with a published {sup 125}I spectrum were used to perform dosimetric characterization of this source as per the updated AAPM TG-43 protocol. These simulations were performed in liquid water material in order to obtain the clinically applicable dosimetric parameters for this source model. Dose rate constants in liquid water, derived from MCNP4c2 and MCNP5 simulations, were found to be 0.993 cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1} ({+-}1.73%) and 0.965 cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1} ({+-}1.68%), respectively. Overall, the MCNP5 derived radial dose and 2D anisotropy functions results were generally closer to the measured data (within {+-}4%) than MCNP4c and the published data for PTRAN code (Version 7.43), while the opposite was seen for dose rate constant. The generally improved MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulation may be attributed to a more recent and accurate cross-section library. However, some of the data points in the results obtained from the above-mentioned Monte Carlo codes showed no statistically significant differences. Derived dosimetric characteristics in liquid water are provided for clinical applications of this source model.

  10. Integer Programs for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Needle and Dose Planning that Directly Optimize Clinical Objectives

    OpenAIRE

    Siauw, Ko-Ay Timmy

    2012-01-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a radiation therapy for cancer in the prostate, cervix, breast, head, and neck, including other sites. In HDR brachytherapy, hollow needles are inserted or placed near the cancer site. Radiation is delivered to the patient by a radioactive source which is sequentially threaded through the needles. The dose distribution is controlled by altering the dwell times, the time spent at pre-defined positions on the needles.HDR brachytherapy has a 90\\% cancer-free...

  11. SU-E-T-548: Modeling of Breast IORT Using the Xoft 50 KV Brachytherapy Source and 316L Steel Rigid Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnside, W [Mountain View, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Xoft provides a set of 316L Stainless Steel Rigid Shields to be used with their 50 kV X-ray source for Breast IORT treatments. Modeling the different shield sizes in MCNP provides information to help make clinical decisions for selecting the appropriate shield size. Methods: The Xoft Axxent 50 kV Electronic Brachytherapy System has several applications in radiation therapy, one of which is treating cancer of the breast intraoperatively by placing the miniaturized X-ray tube inside an applicator balloon that is expanded to fill the lumpectomy bed immediately following tumor removal. The ribs, lung, and muscular chest wall are all regions at risk to receive undesired dose during the treatment. A Xoft 316L Stainless Steel Rigid Shield can be placed between the intracostal muscles of the chest wall and the remaining breast tissue near the balloon to attenuate the beam and protect these organs. These shields are provided in 5 different sizes, and the effects on dose to the surrounding tissues vary with shield size. MCNP was used to model this environment and tally dose rate to certain regions of interest. Results: The average rib dose rate calculated using 0cm (i.e., no shield), 3cm, and 5cm diameter shields were 26.89, 15.43, and 8.91 Gy/hr respectively. The maximum dose rates within the rib reached 94.74 Gy/hr, 53.56 Gy/hr, and 31.44 Gy/hr for the 0cm, 3cm, and 5cm cases respectively. The shadowing effect caused by the steel shields was seen in the 3-D meshes and line profiles. Conclusion: This model predicts a higher dose rate to the underlying rib region with the 3cm shield compared to the 5cm shield; it may be useful to select the largest possible diameter when choosing a shield size for a particular IORT patient. The ability to attenuate the beam to reduce rib dose was also confirmed. Research sponsored by Xoft Inc, a subsidiary of iCAD.

  12. SU-E-T-548: Modeling of Breast IORT Using the Xoft 50 KV Brachytherapy Source and 316L Steel Rigid Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Xoft provides a set of 316L Stainless Steel Rigid Shields to be used with their 50 kV X-ray source for Breast IORT treatments. Modeling the different shield sizes in MCNP provides information to help make clinical decisions for selecting the appropriate shield size. Methods: The Xoft Axxent 50 kV Electronic Brachytherapy System has several applications in radiation therapy, one of which is treating cancer of the breast intraoperatively by placing the miniaturized X-ray tube inside an applicator balloon that is expanded to fill the lumpectomy bed immediately following tumor removal. The ribs, lung, and muscular chest wall are all regions at risk to receive undesired dose during the treatment. A Xoft 316L Stainless Steel Rigid Shield can be placed between the intracostal muscles of the chest wall and the remaining breast tissue near the balloon to attenuate the beam and protect these organs. These shields are provided in 5 different sizes, and the effects on dose to the surrounding tissues vary with shield size. MCNP was used to model this environment and tally dose rate to certain regions of interest. Results: The average rib dose rate calculated using 0cm (i.e., no shield), 3cm, and 5cm diameter shields were 26.89, 15.43, and 8.91 Gy/hr respectively. The maximum dose rates within the rib reached 94.74 Gy/hr, 53.56 Gy/hr, and 31.44 Gy/hr for the 0cm, 3cm, and 5cm cases respectively. The shadowing effect caused by the steel shields was seen in the 3-D meshes and line profiles. Conclusion: This model predicts a higher dose rate to the underlying rib region with the 3cm shield compared to the 5cm shield; it may be useful to select the largest possible diameter when choosing a shield size for a particular IORT patient. The ability to attenuate the beam to reduce rib dose was also confirmed. Research sponsored by Xoft Inc, a subsidiary of iCAD

  13. CT-guided interstitial HDR brachytherapy for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. Long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselis, N.; Roeddiger, S.; Filipowicz, I.; Kontova, M.; Heyd, R.; Zamboglou, N. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Interdisciplinary Oncology; Kolotas, C. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Interdisciplinary Oncology; Hirslanden Medical Center, Aarau (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiotherapy; Birn, G. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Fountzilas, G.; Selviaridis, P. [Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki School of Medicine, Thessaloniki (Greece); Baltas, D.; Anagnostopoulos, G. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics and Engineering

    2007-10-15

    Background and Purpose: Recurrences of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) within previously irradiated volumes pose a serious therapeutic challenge. This retrospective study evaluates the long-term tumor control of recurrent GBM treated with interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BRT). Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2003, 84 patients were treated for recurrent cerebral GBM located within previously irradiated volumes. All patients had received adjuvant external radiotherapy following primary surgery, with a focal dose up to 60 Gy. The median recurrent tumor volume was 51 cm{sup 3} (3-207 cm{sup 3}), and the HDR-BRT consisted of an afterloading {sup 192}Ir implant which delivered a median dose of 40 Gy (30-50 Gy). Catheter implantation was implemented using interactive computed tomography (CT) guidance under local anesthesia and sedoanalgesia. Results: After a median follow-up of 61 months, 5/84 patients (6%) were alive. The median post-BRT survival was 37 weeks, and the median overall survival 78 weeks. Moderate to severe complications occurred in 5/84 cases (6%). Conclusion: For patients with recurrences of GBM within previously irradiated volumes, CT-guided interstitial HDR-BRT is a feasible treatment option that can play an important role in providing palliation. (orig.)

  14. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  15. Comparison between methods for fixing radioactive iodine in silver substrate for manufacturing brachytherapy sources; Comparacao entre metodos de fixacao do iodo radioativo em substrato de prata para confeccao de fontes utilizadas em braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Carla Daruich

    2012-07-01

    Among the different ways to treat prostate cancer, brachytherapy with iodine- 125 seeds is an option that provides good results and fewer side effects. In the present study several deposition methods of radioactive iodine in a silver substrate were compared in order to choose the most suitable alternative for the routine production to be implemented at IPEN's laboratory. The methodology used was chosen based on the available infrastructure and experience of the researchers present. Therefore, the {sup 131}I was used for testing (same chemical behavior as {sup 131}I). Four methods were selected: Method 1 (test based on electrodeposition method developed by D.Kubiatowicz) presented 65.16% efficiency; Method 2 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by D. Kubiatowicz - HCl) with the result of 70.80% efficiency; method 3 (chemical reaction based on the method developed by Dr. Maria Elisa Rostelato) with 55.80% efficiency; Method 4 (IQ-IPEN) resulted in 99% efficiency. Since this method has more radioactive material fixation (which represents virtually the entire cost of the seed), the final price is the cheapest. This method is the suggested one to be implemented in the IPEN's laboratory for brachytherapy sources production. Besides, the method is the fasted one. (author)

  16. 南京“5.7”192Ir源放射事故患者的临床救治%Medical management of the victim exposed to 192Ir source at "5.7" accident in Nanjing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉龙; 王优优; 余道江; 戴宏; 卞华慧; 陈炜博; 李元; 陈学英; 冯骏超

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the treatment technique,occurrence and development patterns of such radiation injuries as in a major radiological accident that occurred in Nanjing on 7th May in 2014,in which a victim suffered mild bone marrow radiation sickness combined with Degree Ⅳ acute radiationinduced skin injury,based on his dose estimation,clinical manifestations and disease treatments.Methods History inquiry in detail,earlier physical dose estimation and biological dose estimation were conducted in conjunction with examination of temperature changes in radiation injured parts by using infra-red thermoimaging.A comprehensive analysis was made on the basis of estimated dose,clinical manifestation,laboratory examination and imaging examination results with a view to preparing the diagnosis and treatment plan.Comprehensive treatment measures were taken for systemic and topical treatments along with synchronous physical-and psycho-therapy.Systemic treatments included microcirculation improvement,immunity enhancement,nutrition support,anti-infection,application of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and symptomatic treatment,etc.Topical treatments included analgesia,dressing,debridement and twice myocutaneous flap transplantations,umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) infusion,vacuum sealing drainage (VSD),etc.Results The biological dose of whole body was estimated to be 1.51 Gy,while the physical dose in right lower limb was about 4 100 Gy.Dose estimates were consistent with clinical manifestations.After 40 d the patient transited smoothly into the recovery period.After 378 d of active treatment,the wound in right lower limb had healed completely but with dysfunction.Conclusions The biological dose estimates made in the early stage after non-uniform local radiation exposure was consistent with the clinical diagnosis.The treatment plan was made after systemic medical examination.There had not been significant staging courses in mild bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness,but had a better prognosis.Severe local radiation injury had a protracted course.The key of treatment lied in myocutaneous flap transplantations,and microsurgery operation,VSD technique and MSCs infusion guaranteed the success of the surgery treatment.Moreover,anti-infection,nutrition support,and psychological intervention also contributed to the recovery the patient.%目的 通过对南京“5.7”192Ir源放射事故患者的剂量估算、临床表现和医学处理的总结,探讨类似放射损伤的救治技术和发生、发展规律.方法 医护人员询问受照患者的详细病史,进行物理剂量和生物剂量估算,应用红外线热成像仪动态监测损伤部位的温度改变.进行综合分析,确定诊断和治疗方案.治疗上,全身和局部治疗并重,躯体治疗和心理治疗同步,采取综合措施.给予改善微循环、增强免疫功能、营养支持、抗感染、应用粒细胞集落刺激因子(G-CSF)及对症治疗等进行全身治疗;局部治疗包括镇痛、换药、清创及两次肌皮瓣移植术、脐带间充质干细胞(MSCs)输注、负压封闭引流(VSD)等.结果 患者全身生物剂量估算结果为1.51 Gy,物理估算右下肢皮肤最大剂量值约为4 100 Gy,该结果和临床表现一致;患者受照后约40 d平稳进入恢复期;经过378 d的精心救治,右下肢Ⅳ度急性放射性皮肤损伤伤口愈合,但仍存在活动障碍.结论 早期进行局部不均匀照射的生物剂量估算结果与临床诊断相符,结合系统的医学检查指导救治方案的制定;轻度骨髓型急性放射病病程分期不明显,预后较好;局部严重放射性损伤迁延不愈,肌皮瓣移植是治疗的关键,显微外科技术、VSD封闭式引流技术及MSCs输注是手术成功的关键;抗感染、营养治疗及心理疏导对患者全身及局部的康复起到了积极作用.

  17. Restenosis: Intracoronary Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachman, Douglas E.; Simon, Daniel I.

    2002-04-01

    Though interventional strategies have revolutionized the management of patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease, in-stent restenosis has emerged as the single most important limitation of long-term success following percutaneous coronary intervention. Once present, in-stent restenosis is extraordinarily difficult to treat, with conventional revascularization techniques failing in 50% to 80% of patients. Intracoronary radiation, or brachytherapy, targets cellular proliferation within the culprit neointima. Clinical trials have demonstrated that brachytherapy is a highly effective treatment for in-stent restenosis, reducing angiographic restenosis by 50% to 60% and the need for target vessel revascularization by 40% to 50%. The benefits of intracoronary brachytherapy may be particularly pronounced in certain patient subgroups (eg, those with diabetes, long lesions, or lesions in saphenous vein bypass grafts), but comes at the cost of an increased rate of late stent thrombosis and the need for extended antiplatelet therapy. The role of brachytherapy in the arsenal of the interventional cardiologist will continue to evolve, particularly in light of the unprecedented recent advances with the use of drug-eluting stents for restenosis prevention. PMID:11858773

  18. Retrospective Analysis of Local Control and Cosmetic Outcome of 147 Periorificial Carcinomas of the Face Treated With Low-Dose Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Skin cancer is the most common malignancy in white populations. We evaluated the local cure rate and cosmetic outcome of patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the face treated with low-dose rate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between February 1990 and May 2000, 147 facial carcinomas in 132 patients were treated by 192Ir wire implantation. Side effects of brachytherapy were noted. Follow-up was 2 years or more. Locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and overall survival were recorded. Group A included patients treated by primary brachytherapy, and Group B included those treated after recurrence. Results: A total of 121 carcinomas were BCCs (82.3%) and 26 were SCCs (17.7%); the median tumor size was 10 mm. Of the tumors, 86 (58.5%) were in men and 61 (41.5%) were in women; the median age was 71 years. Group A comprised 116 lesions (78.9%), and Group B, 31 (21.1%). There were 17 relapses (11.6%) after a median follow-up of 72 months: 12 local, 4 nodal, and 1 local and nodal. Locoregional-free survival was 96.6% at 2 years and 87.3% at 5 years. Five-year LRFS was 82.6% in men and 93.3% in women (p = 0.027). After adjustment for gender, LRFS was better after primary treatment than after recurrence (hasard ratio HR, 2.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-8.03; p = 0.039). Five-year LRFS was 90.4% for BCC and 70.8% for SCC (p = 0.03). There were no Grade 3 complications. Conclusions: Low-dose rate brachytherapy offers good local control and cosmetic outcome in patients with periorificial skin carcinomas, with no Grade 3 complications. Brchytherapy is more efficient when used as primary treatment.

  19. Verification and analysis of the positioning of a source of brachytherapy high dose within an applicator gynecological interstitial fletcher Utrecht TC/RM; Verificacion y analysis del posicionamiento de una fuente de braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis dentro de un aplicador ginecologico fletcher intersticial UTRECHT TC/RM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panedo Cobos, J. M.; Garcia castejon, M. A.; Huertas Martinez, C.; Gomez-Tejedor Alonso, S.; Rincon Perez, M.; Luna Tirado, J.; Perez Casas, A. M.

    2013-07-01

    Applicators are guides that circulate and are located within the patient brachytherapy sources. Applicators can suffer mechanical deformations due to processes of sterilization or shock, which may result in that the source do not place within these very precise and coincides with the planned. In these cases the planned treatment deviate actually managed. The object of this study is to verify that the position of the source into the dispenser coincides with the planned position, with a procedure that is described. (Author)

  20. Development of a Brachytherapy Software Nomogram Equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this project is developing a software nomogram equivalent. A nomogram is a graph typically comprised of three parallel lines. Each of the lines is graduated for a different variable, often in a non-linear scale. The lines are oriented in such a manner that if a straight line is drawn connecting two of the three variables, the value of the third variable is uniquely determined by the intersection of the connecting line and the graduated line of the third variable. The value of the third variable is determined by reading the graduated scale at the point of intersection. A nomogram as applied in brachytherapy is used for determining the required amount of radioactive material to be implanted in a diseased site. A typical brachytherapy nomogram relates the average dimension of a site, the air kerma strength per source and the number of sources required for yielding a therapeutic radiation dose to the site. More sophisticated nomograms also provide scales for recommending source and needle spacings. For decades the nomogram has been clinically employed as a brachytherapy treatment planning tool. Imaging modalities such as CT and ultrasound ushered in modern image-based brachytherapy treatment planning. These modern imaging techniques dramatically advanced the state of the art of brachytherapy, often obviating the use of nomograms. Although the routine use of nomograms has decreased, there are clinical situations where nomograms still prove useful for brachytherapy treatment planning. Often times the dimensions of a tumor or tumor bed are not known prior to surgery and delineated images of the site are not available. In such situations the tumor dimensions can be measured in the OR and a nomogram applied for rapid treatment planning. By definition a nomogram is a graphical tool, which is fixed and cannot be modified. Differences of opinion and treatment philosophies exist among physicians and institutions. These varying approaches can lead to

  1. Development of a multi-electrode extrapolation chamber as a prototype of a primary standard for the realization of the unit of the absorbed dose to water for beta brachytherapy sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bambynek, M

    2002-01-01

    The prototype of a primary standard has been developed, built and tested, which enables the realization of the unit of the absorbed dose to water for beta brachytherapy sources. In the course of the development of the prototype, the recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 60 (TG60) and the Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik (DGMP) Arbeitskreis 18 (AK18) were taken into account. The prototype is based on a new multi-electrode extrapolation chamber (MEC) which meets, in particular, the requirements on high spatial resolution and small uncertainty. The central part of the MEC is a segmented collecting electrode which was manufactured in the clean room center of PTB by means of electron beam lithography on a wafer. A precise displacement device consisting of three piezoelectric macrotranslators has been incorporated to move the wafer collecting electrode against the entrance window. For adjustment of the wafer collecting electrode parallel to the entranc...

  2. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR, namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage.

  3. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, V; Kurup, P G G; Mahadev, P; Mahalakshmi, S

    2010-04-01

    Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR), namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage.

  4. Dosimetric calculus in intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the cardiovascular diseases, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment). Known as Intravascular Brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, 0.30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several radionuclides. Two stent sources employing 32P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the radionuclides and source geometries are discussed and the dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients. (author)

  5. Preparation and determination of kerma for Iridium 192 sources of low dose rate for brachytherapy; Preparacion y determinacion del kerma de fuentes de iridio-192 de baja tasa de dosis para braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendilla, J.I.; Tovar M, V.; Mitsoura, E.; Aguilar H, F.; Alanis M, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, C.P. 52045-1, Salazar, Esrado de Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The practice of Brachytherapy with Iridium-192 sources of low dose rate (0.4 - 0.8 Gy/h) is a technique used in the treatment of diverse illnesses. in this work the preparation, quality control and calibration are presented in terms of kerma in air of Iridium-192 using as target these recycled Iridium-Platinum wires. The targets were obtained as decayed sources of different radio therapeutical centers in the country and they were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy in order to determine their chemical composition. Subsequently it was developed an experimental design to establish the effect of neutron flux, geometrical array and irradiation time over the activity and percentage of the sources homogeneity. The homogeneity was determined by auto radiography and by Gamma spectroscopy. Once the optimal irradiation conditions were established, it is determined the apparent activity and kerma in air using a well type ionization chamber with traceability to a primary laboratory. Iridium-192 sources were obtained with an average homogeneity 96 %, apparent activity 282.129 {+-} 0.531 M Bq and kerma in air 0.03200 {+-} 0.00006 m Gy m/h A. (Author)

  6. Determination of the dose around an ovoid for treatments in intracavitary brachytherapy Hdr; Determinacion de la dosis alrededor de un ovoide para tratamientos en braquiterapia intracavitaria HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Legaria No. 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Velasco V, R. A. E. [Hospital Central Militar, Periferico y Ejercito Nacional s/n, Lomas de Sotelo, 11200 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Serrano F, A. K. [Hospital Juarez de Mexico, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional No. 5190, Col. Magdalena de las Salinas, 03220 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J., E-mail: trivera@ipn.m [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    On this work the results of the dosimetric measurements are presented around an ovoid of 2 cm diameter. The measurements were carried out using a water mannequin, an ovoid, a radiation gamma source of {sup 192}Ir and thermoluminescent dosemeters. The dosimetry was realized in the direction of the rectum and bladder. To know the effect of the shielding of the devices type Manchester in the dose, the thermoluminescent dosemeters were irradiated to a radiation gamma source of {sup 192}Ir contained in the Gamma med Plus equipment. The planning was realized normalizing the calculation to 2.5 cm from the applicator center on the transverse plane (2.5, 0, 0). The results show that the dose distribution for an ovoid without shielding is more uniform in the transversal plane to the source axis. The results were compared with the calculated results by means of the planning system BrachyVision. While the absorbed dose distribution around an ovoid with shielding is completely anisotropic. This anisotropic is due to the shielding. (Author)

  7. Importance of the neutrons kerma coefficient in the planning of Brachytherapy treatments with Cf-252 sources; Importancia del coeficiente de kerma de neutrones en la planeacion de tratamientos de Braquiterapia con fuentes de Cf-252

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes G, L.; Balcazar G, M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyocac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, 09000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Francois L, J.L. [UNAM, 04500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: lpg@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The Cf-252 is a fast neutrons emitting radioisotope by spontaneous fission that can be used as sealed source in medicine applications, industry and research. Commercially its offer sources of different sizes, compact and with a fast neutrons emission of the order of 10{sup 6} n/s-{mu}g and an energy spectra that presents respectively maxim and average energy in 2.1 MeV and 0.7 MeV. In medicine new applications are being developed for the treatment of patient with hypoxic and voluminous tumors, where the therapy with photons has not given positive results, as well as for the protocols of therapy treatment by boron neutron capture, where very small sources of Cf-252 will be used with the interstitial brachytherapy technique of high and low dose rate. In this work an analysis of how the small differences that exist in the elementary composition of 4 wicked tumors, 4 ICRU healthy tissues and 3 substitute materials of ICRU tissue used in dosimetry are presented, its generate changes in the neutrons kerma coefficient in function of the energy and consequently in the absorbed dose in the interval of 11 eV to 29 MeV. These differences can produce maximum variations of the neutron kerma coefficients ratio for E{sub n} > 1 keV of the one: 15% tumor/ICRU guest healthy tissue, 12% ICRU tumor/muscle, 12% ICRU healthy tissues ICRU/ICRU muscle, 22% substitutes tissue/tumor and 22% ICRU substitutes tissue/muscle. Also, it was found that the average value of the neutrons kerma coefficient for the 4 wicked tumors is from 6% to 7% smaller that the average value for the soft tissue in the interval energy of interest for therapy with fast neutrons with E{sub n} > 1 MeV. These results have a special importance during the planning process of brachytherapy treatments with sources of {sup 252}Cf, to optimize and to individualize the patients treatments. (Author)

  8. Avaliação da biodegradação de matrizes porosas à base de hidroxiapatita para aplicação como fontes radioativas em braquiterapia Evaluation of the biodegradation of porous hydroxyapatite matrices for application as radioactive sources in brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kássio André Lacerda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous ceramic materials based on calcium phosphate compounds (CPC have been studied aiming at different biomedical applications such as implants, drug delivery systems and radioactive sources for brachytherapy. Two kinds of hydroxyapatite (HAp powders and their ceramic bodies were characterized by a combination of different techniques (XRF, BET method, SEM, ICP/AES and neutron activation analysis - NAA to evaluate their physico-chemical and microstructural characteristics in terms of chemical composition, segregated phases, microstructure, porosity, chemical and thermal stability, biodegradation and incorporation of substances in their structures. The results revealed that these systems presented potential for use as porous biodegradable radioactive sources able to be loaded with a wide range of radionuclides for cancer treatment by the brachytherapy technique.

  9. Uncertainty analysis in MCNP5 calculations for brachytherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerardy, I., E-mail: gerardy@isib.be [Institut Superieur Industriel de Bruxelles, 150, Rue Royale, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Rodenas, J.; Gallardo, S. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method can be applied to simulate brachytherapy treatment planning. The MCNP5 code gives, together with results, a statistical uncertainty associated with them. However, the latter is not the only existing uncertainty related to the simulation and other uncertainties must be taken into account. A complete analysis of all sources of uncertainty having some influence on results of the simulation of brachytherapy treatment is presented in this paper. This analysis has been based on the recommendations of the American Association for Physicist in Medicine (AAPM) and of the International Standard Organisation (ISO).

  10. Validation of GPUMCD for low-energy brachytherapy seed dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe; Carrier, Jean-Francois [Ecole polytechnique de Montreal, Departement de genie informatique et genie logiciel, 2500 chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, QC, H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, QC, G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada) and Departement de radio-oncologie and Centre de recherche du CHUM, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Montreal, QC, H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To validate GPUMCD, a new package for fast Monte Carlo dose calculations based on the GPU (graphics processing unit), as a tool for low-energy single seed brachytherapy dosimetry for specific seed models. As the currently accepted method of dose calculation in low-energy brachytherapy computations relies on severe approximations, a Monte Carlo based approach would result in more accurate dose calculations, taking in to consideration the patient anatomy as well as interseed attenuation. The first step is to evaluate the capability of GPUMCD to reproduce low-energy, single source, brachytherapy calculations which could ultimately result in fast and accurate, Monte Carlo based, brachytherapy dose calculations for routine planning. Methods: A mixed geometry engine was integrated to GPUMCD capable of handling parametric as well as voxelized geometries. In order to evaluate GPUMCD for brachytherapy calculations, several dosimetry parameters were computed and compared to values found in the literature. These parameters, defined by the AAPM Task-Group No. 43, are the radial dose function, the 2D anisotropy function, and the dose rate constant. These three parameters were computed for two different brachytherapy sources: the Amersham OncoSeed 6711 and the Imagyn IsoStar IS-12501. Results: GPUMCD was shown to yield dosimetric parameters similar to those found in the literature. It reproduces radial dose functions to within 1.25% for both sources in the 0.5< r <10 cm range. The 2D anisotropy function was found to be within 3% at r = 5 cm and within 4% at r = 1 cm. The dose rate constants obtained were within the range of other values reported in the literature.Conclusion: GPUMCD was shown to be able to reproduce various TG-43 parameters for two different low-energy brachytherapy sources found in the literature. The next step is to test GPUMCD as a fast clinical Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations with multiple seeds and patient geometry, potentially providing

  11. HDR neutron brachytherapy for prostatic cancer in lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to analyse the physical and radiobiological background of the HDR Cf-252 Neutron brachytherapy boost in the combined radiation therapy for locally advanced prostatic cancer. The treatment schedule:two fractions of the Cf-252 brachytherapy(5Gy-eq at the dose point 2 cm from source movement trajectory) with interval 24 hours; 5-8 fractions of the photon beam external radiation therapy(5 fractions per week, 2 Gy per fraction) to the prostate, two fractions of the Cf-252 brachytherapy and after that external beam radiation therapy is continued till total dose 40-45 Gy. Six patients completed the proposed combined radiation therapy. The results of this trial will be discussed

  12. Nodal recurrences after exclusive brachytherapy for T1-T2 N0 cancer of the oral tongue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INTRODUCTION: Exclusive brachytherapy represents the treatment of choice in small volume cancer of the oral tongue. In this neoplasm however the incidence of subclinical metastasis in neck nodes is not negligible, and prophylactic neck dissection is advocated by some Authors after interstitial irradiation. We have thus reviewed the incidence of nodal recurrences in a group of pts treated with brachytherapy alone for tongue cancer. PATIENTS METHODS AND RESULTS: From 1982 to 1994 44 pts (27 males, 17 females, age 35-84 years, median 63,3 years) were treated with 192 Ir interstitial irradiation alone for clinically N0 epidermoid cancer of the oral tongue (T1: 19 pts, T2: 25 pts). Brachytherapy was performed with hairpins or plastic tubes, according to the rules of the Paris system. Dose ranged from 60-70 Gy with a dose rate of 0.38-0.62 Gy/h (median: 63.8 and 0.52 respectively). Local recurrences were observed in 8 pts (18.1 %), 3 of whom are free from disease after salvage surgery. Neck nodes metastasis appeared after 3-11 months (mos) from primary treatment (median 6,3 mos) and represented the first site of failure in 16 pts (36,3 %; T1 (6(19)): 31,5 %. T2(10(25)) : 40 %; volume 3cc.: 55.5 %). After neck dissection and external radiotherapy 10 of them were rendered free from disease and are still alive at 12-123 mos. Definitive control above the clavicles was thus 75 % ((33(44)) pts). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Exclusive brachytherapy can obtain excellent local control rates in T1 T2 oral tongue cancer (81.9 % in our experience). Nodal recurrences are however frequent after interstitial irradiation in large volume cancers and salvage of pts relapsed in the neck is not easily achievable. Prophylactic neck dissection could be advisable to enhance regional control rate in these pts. The role of newer methods to evaluate neck nodes during follow up (ultrasonography and fine needle aspiration of suspicious nodes) is now being investigated in our centre

  13. The Activity Check of Brachytherapy Isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An isotope Ir-192, which is used in brachytherapy depends on import in whole quantities. There are a few ways for its activity. measurement using Welltype chamber or the way to rely on authentic decay table of manufacturer. In-air dosimetry using Farmer Chamber, etc. In this paper, let me introduce the way using Farmer chamber which is easier and simple. With the Farmer chamber and source calibration jig, take a measurement the activity of an isotope Ir-192 and compare the value with the value from decay table of manufacturer and check the activity of source. The result of measurement, compared the value from decay table, by ±2.1. (which belongs to recommendable value for AAPM ±5% as difference of error range). It is possible to use on clinical medicine. With the increase in use of brachytherapy, the increase of import is essential. And an accurate activity check of source is compulsory. For the activity check of source, it was possible to use Farmer chamber and source calibration jig without additional purchase of Well type chamber.

  14. Long term effect of cervix carcinoma treated by HDR 192 Ir afterloding intracavitory radiotherapy combined with external irradiation.%高剂量率192Ir后装腔内加外照射治疗宫颈癌的远期疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王青; 侯晓玲; 赵淑红

    2001-01-01

    Objective To analyze retrosrectively long- term effect of cervix carcinona treated by HDR 192Ir afterloading intracavitory radiotherapy combined with external irradiation. Methods From Mar 1993 to Dec 1994, 128 cases of cervix cancer(age from 29 years to 80 years) were treated with combination of external irradiation and HDR 192Ir afterloading intracavitory radiotherapy. 47 cases were stage Ⅱ and 81 were stage Ⅲ. The dose of external radiotherapy was 40 Gy or 50 Gy and afterloading irradiation was given in 6 or 7 fractions of 8 Gy. Results The overall local tumor control was 94.5%, the 1,3,5 year survival rates were 91.61%, 81.89%and 67.36%. The 1,3,5 year survival rates of stage Ⅱ and stage Ⅲ cases were 95.28% and 89. 47%, 87.19% and 79.50%, 72.76% and 64.95% (P>0.05). The rate of severe complications was 7.03% (9/128). Conclusion HDR 192Ir afterloading intracavitory radiotherapy combined with external irradiation for cervix carcinoma is effective and less side effects.%目的分析高剂量率192Ir后装腔内加外照射治疗宫颈癌的远期疗效及并发症。方法对128例Ⅱ、Ⅲ期放疗后宫颈癌进行了回顾分析。其中Ⅱ期47例,Ⅲ期81例。全盆腔外照射Dr20Gy/10次,全盆中间挡铅4cmDr20Gy~30Gy/10次~15次;后装A点剂量48Gy~56Gy/6次~7次。结果 1、3、5年生存率分别为91.61%、81.8%和67.36%;Ⅱ、Ⅲ期1、3、5年生存率无统计学差异(P>0.05);远期严重并发症的发生率7.03%(9/128)。结论高剂量率192Ir后装腔内加外照射治疗宫颈癌疗效肯定,并发症少。盆腔局部复发仍是放疗失败的主要原因。

  15. Dose determination in breast tumor in brachytherapy using Iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry studies in vivo and in vitro aiming to determing radiation dose in the breast tumor, in brachytherapy using Iridium-192 was done. The correlation between radiation doses in tumor and external surface of the breast was investigated for correcting the time interval of radiation source implantation. (author)

  16. Sealed source and device design safety testing: Technical report on the findings of task 4 -- Investigation of failed Nitinol brachytherapy wire. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benac, D.J.; Burghard, H.C. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-03-01

    This report covers an investigation of the nature and cause of failure in Nitinol brachytherapy sourcewires. The investigation was initiated after two clinical incidents in which sourcewires failed during or immediately after a treatment. The investigation determined that the two clinical Nitinol sourcewires failed in a brittle manner, which is atypical for Nitinol. There were no material anomalies or subcritical flaws to explain the brittle failures. The bend tests also demonstrated that neither moist environment, radiation, nor low-temperature structural transformation was a likely root cause of the failures. However, degradation of the PTFE was consistently evident, and those sourcewires shipped or stored with PTFE sleeves consistently failed in laboratory bend tests. On the basis of the results of this study, it was concluded that the root cause of the in-service failures of the sourcewires was environmentally induced embrittlement due to the breakdown of the PTFE protective sleeves in the presence of the high-radiation field and subsequent reaction or interaction of the breakdown products with the Nitinol alloy.

  17. An approach to using conventional brachytherapy software for clinical treatment planning of complex, Monte Carlo-based brachytherapy dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Physics Section, ' ' La Fe' ' University Hospital, Avenida Campanar 21, E-46009 Valencia (Spain); Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Spain and IFIC (University of Valencia-CSIC), C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Certain brachytherapy dose distributions, such as those for LDR prostate implants, are readily modeled by treatment planning systems (TPS) that use the superposition principle of individual seed dose distributions to calculate the total dose distribution. However, dose distributions for brachytherapy treatments using high-Z shields or having significant material heterogeneities are not currently well modeled using conventional TPS. The purpose of this study is to establish a new treatment planning technique (Tufts technique) that could be applied in some clinical situations where the conventional approach is not acceptable and dose distributions present cylindrical symmetry. Dose distributions from complex brachytherapy source configurations determined with Monte Carlo methods were used as input data. These source distributions included the 2 and 3 cm diameter Valencia skin applicators from Nucletron, 4-8 cm diameter AccuBoost peripheral breast brachytherapy applicators from Advanced Radiation Therapy, and a 16 mm COMS-based eye plaque using {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs seeds. Radial dose functions and 2D anisotropy functions were obtained by positioning the coordinate system origin along the dose distribution cylindrical axis of symmetry. Origin:tissue distance and active length were chosen to minimize TPS interpolation errors. Dosimetry parameters were entered into the PINNACLE TPS, and dose distributions were subsequently calculated and compared to the original Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. The new planning technique was able to reproduce brachytherapy dose distributions for all three applicator types, producing dosimetric agreement typically within 2% when compared with Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. Agreement between Monte Carlo-derived and planned dose distributions improved as the spatial resolution of the fitted dosimetry parameters improved. For agreement within 5% throughout the clinical volume, spatial resolution of

  18. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  19. Brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor at the Radiotherapy Department of the A.C.Camargo Hospital between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival, in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferential technique to each clinical situation. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were Gold198, Cesium137 and Iridium192. The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40 Gy to 60 Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20 Gy to 40 Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% (13/21 patients) and 72,2% (13/18 patients) respectively. (author)

  20. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in brachytherapy; Uso del metodo de Monte Carlo en braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero Cabanero, D.

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo method has become a fundamental tool for brachytherapy dosimetry mainly because no difficulties associated with experimental dosimetry. In brachytherapy the main handicap of experimental dosimetry is the high dose gradient near the present sources making small uncertainties in the positioning of the detectors lead to large uncertainties in the dose. This presentation will review mainly the procedure for calculating dose distributions around a fountain using the Monte Carlo method showing the difficulties inherent in these calculations. In addition we will briefly review other applications of the method of Monte Carlo in brachytherapy dosimetry, as its use in advanced calculation algorithms, calculating barriers or obtaining dose applicators around. (Author)

  1. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm3. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  2. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm3. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy

  3. Experiences with alanine dosimetry in afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present, the most commonly used dosimetry for radiotherapy applications are ionisation chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). However, there are some undesirable characteristics of these dosimetry systems, such as large detection volume (ionisation chamber) as well as fading of the radiation induced signal with time and destructive readout (TLG). The present study is an investigation into the use of the alanine/ESR dosimetry in fractionated afterloading brachytherapy during the whole radiotherapy course. There are some qualities which make alanine dosimetry attractive. These are the linear energy response, low fading under standard conditions, and the nondestructive readout. Thus the alanine dosimetry makes possible cumulative dose measurements during the radiotherapy course and an archival storage. By ionizing radiation (gamma, e, n, p, charged particles) free radicals (unpaired electrons) are produced in the amino acid alanine. The continuous wave electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to determine the number of free radicals, which is proportional to the absorbed dose and the alanine content of the dosimeter. The ESR measurements were made at room temperature using a Bruker EPR analyzer EMS-104. The dosimeters used in the test are alanine pellets (23.72 mg weight, 4.9 mm diameter, 1 mm height) as well as flexible alanine film dosimeters (thickness about 500 μm). The dosimeters consist of a blend of L-alpha-alanine and a binder. The alanine content of the pellets and the film dosimeters is about 88 % and 50 % by weight, respectively. The dosimeters for the calculation of the dose-effect-relationship were irradiated at the Physical-Technical Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig by a standard 60Co source. The maximum deviation from the calculated linear function is about 0.12 Gy in the dose range up to 80 Gy. The goal of medical applications was the superficial dose measurement in afterloading brachytherapy during the radiotherapy course in

  4. Radiological protection on interstitial brachytherapy and dose determination and exposure rate of an Ir-192 source through the MCNP-4B; Proteccion radiologica en braquiterapia intersticial y determinacion de la dosis y tasa de exposicion de una fuente de Ir-192 mediante el MCNP-4B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales L, M.E. [INEN, Av. Angamos Este 2520- Surquillo, Lima (Peru)

    2006-07-01

    The present work was carried out in the Neurological Sciences Institute having as objective to determine the dose and the rate of exhibition of the sources of Iridium 192, Iodine 125 and Palladium 103; which are used to carry out implant in the Interstitial Brachytherapy according to the TG43. For it we carry out a theoretical calculation, its are defined in the enter file: the geometry, materials of the problem and the radiation source, etc; in the MCNP-4B Monte Carlo code, considering a punctual source and for the dose determination we simulate thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD): at 5 cm, 50 cm, 100 cm and 200 cm of the source. Our purpose is to analyze the radioprotection measures that should take into account in this Institute in which are carried out brain biopsies using a Micro mar stereotactic mark, and in a near future with the collaboration of a doctor and a cuban physique seeks to be carried out the Interstitial Brachytherapy technique with sources of Ir-192 for patient with tumors like glioblastoma, astrocytoma, etc. (Author)

  5. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M., E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b, E-mail: amms@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  6. Brachytherapy in Gynecologic Cancers: Why Is It Underused?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kathy; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2016-04-01

    Despite its established efficacy, brachytherapy is underused in the management of cervical and vaginal cancers in some parts of the world. Possible reasons for the underutilization of brachytherapy include the adoption of less invasive techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy; reimbursement policies favoring these techniques over brachytherapy; poor physician or patient access to brachytherapy; inadequate maintenance of brachytherapy skills among practicing radiation oncologists; transitioning to high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with increased time requirements; and insufficient training of radiation oncology residents.

  7. Brachytherapy in coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Chun [Chonnam National University Medicine School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality across the world. Percutaneous coronary intervention has become the major technique of revascularization. However, restenosis remains a major limitation of this procedure. Recently the need for repeat intervention due to restenosis, the most vexing long-term failure of percutaneous coronary intervention, has been significantly reduced owing to the introduction to two major advances, intracoronary brachytherapy and the drug-eluting stents, intracoronary brachytherapy has been employed in recent years to prevent restenosis lesions with effective results, principally in in-stent restenosis. Restenosis is generally considered as an excessive form of normal wound healing divided up in processes: elastic recoil, neointimal hyperplasia, and negative vascular remodeling. Restenosis has previously been regarded as a proliferative process in which neointimal thickening, mediated by a cascade of inflammatory mediators and other factors, is the key factor. Ionizing radiation has been shown to decrease the proliferative response to injury in animal models of restenosis. Subsequently, several randomized, double-blind trials have demonstrated that intracoronary brachytherapy can reduce the rates to both angiographic restenosis and clinical event rates in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for in-stent restenosis. Some problems, such as late thrombosis and edge restenosis, have been identified as limiting factors of this technique. Brachytherapy is a promising method of preventing and treating coronary artery restenosis.

  8. Brachytherapy for prostate cancer: Comparative characteristics of procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kanaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of interstitial radiation sources is the «youngest» of the radical method of treatment of patients with prostate cancer (PC. The high level of efficiency comparable to prostatectomy at a significantly lower rate of complications causes rapid growth of clinical use of brachytherapy (BT. Depending on the radiation source and the mode of administration into the prostate gland are two types BT – high-dose rate (temporary (HDR-BT and low-dose rate (permanent (LDR-BT brachytherapy. At the heart of these two methods are based on a single principle of direct effect of the quantum gamma radiation on the area of interest. However, the differences between the characteristics of isotopes used and technical aspects of the techniques cause the difference in performance and complication rates for expression HDR-BT and LDR-BT.

  9. Intraluminal brachytherapy after metallic stent placement in primary bile duct carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the effect of intraluminal brachytherapy on stent patency and survival after metallic stent placement in patients with primary bile duct carcinoma. Twenty-seven patients with primary bile duct carcinoma underwent metallic stent placement; in 16 of the 27 intraluminal brachytherapy with an iridium-192 source (dose, 25 Gy) was the performed. Obstuction was due to either hilar (n=14) or non-hilar involvement (n=13). For statistical comparison of patients who underwent/did not undergo intraluminal brachytherapy, stent patency and survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and an independent t test. The mean durations of stent patency and survival were 9.1 and 10.0 months respectively in patients who underwent intraluminal brachytherapy, and 4.2 and 5.0 months in those who did not undergo this procedure (ρ<0.05). The mean durations of stent patency and survival among the 22 patients who died were 7.6 (range, 0.8-16.1) and 8.3 (range, 0.8-17.3) months, respectively, in the eleven patients who underwent intraluminal brachytherapy, and 4.2 (range, 0.9-8.0) and 5.0 (range, 0.9-8.4) months in those whom the procedure was not performed (ρ<0.05). Intraluminal brachytherapy after stent placement extended both stent patency and survival in patients with primary bile duct carcinoma

  10. Toxicity and cosmetic result of partial breast high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for conservatively operated early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Objective To study the method, side effects and cosmetic outcome of high- dose-rate (HDR) accelerated partial breast interstitial irradiation (APBI) alone in early stage breast cancer' after conservative surgery. Methods: From February 2002 to June 2003,47 breast cancer lesions from 46 patients suffering from stage I/II breast cancer were treated with HDR 192Ir APBI after conservative surgery. All patients were over 40 year-old, with T1-2N0-1 (≤3 lymph nodes positive), surgical margin > 1-2 mm, but those having lobular or inflammatory breast cancer were excluded. HDR brachytherapy with 34 Gy, 10 fractions/5 days was used after surgery, toxic reaction and cosmetic outcome were observed in one month, 6 and 12 months respectively. Results: Follow up of 1846 months, 34 months was carried out for the whole group. During the treatment, acute reactions including: erythema, edema, tenderness and infection, all under I-II grade, none of III-IV grade were observed in 21 patients(46%); late toxicity reactions: skin fibrosis, breast tenderness, fat necrosis, and telangiectasia, totally 20 patients (43%) were observed: 2 patients in III grade but one patient received 6 cycle chemotherapy. The result of cosmetic outcome evaluation was excellent or good, at 6 months 95% and 12 months 98%, respectively, but there was no recurfence. Conclusions: Excellent and favorable cosmetic results are noted after APBI by interstitial alone. Acute and late reactions are few. Long term observation is necessary for the rate of' local control. (authors)

  11. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  12. Exclusive brachytherapy for T1-T2 N0 cancer of the oral tongue: prognostic factors for local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INTRODUCTION: The files of a group of patients (pts) treated with brachytherapy alone for cancer of the oral tongue were reviewed to assess the prognostic role of T stage, volume of disease, total dose and dose-rate. PATIENTS METHODS AND RESULTS: From 1982 to 1994 46 pts (29 males, 17 females, age 38-84 years, median 63.1 years) were treated with 192 Ir brachytherapy, in 2 cases followed by prophylactic neck dissection for cancer of the oral tongue (T1N0: 19 pts; T2N0: 27 pts). Brachytherapy was performed with hairpins in the early years of the study (17 pts) and more recently with plastic tubes (29 pts), according to the Parts System. Dose ranged from 60-70 Gy with a dose-rate of 0.38-0.62 Gy/h (median 63.8 and 0.52 respectively). Volume of the disease was retrospectively assessed as the product of the three diameters of the lesion calculated for provisional dosimetry (range 0.25- 16 cc.). Median follow up is 72 mos (range: 14-153 mos). RESULTS: Overall local control was 82.6% ((38(46)) pts; T1: (18(19)), 94.7 %; T2: (22(27)), 81.5 %). Five of 8 pts who recurred were submitted to salvage surgery, and 3 of them are alive and free from disease at 34, 52 and 87 mos respectively. Recurrences appeared after 3-13 mos (median 5.5 mos) and were related to total dose ( 63 Gy (1(18)); 5.5 %) and to dose-rate ( 45 cGy/h (4(36)): 11.1 %). The volume of disease was not of prognostic significance since local control was 79.6 % ((6(28)) pts) in pts with a disease smaller than 3 cc. and 88.9 % in pts with large volume ((2(18)) pts). Seven (15.2 %) grade 3 complications (necrosis of the mandibular bone and- or of the soft tissues) were observed. Complication rate was higher in the high dose group (>63 Gy (4(18)) pts: 22.2 %) and was less affected by dose-rate (> 45 cGy/h (6(36)) pts: 16.6 %). No relationship between complications and volume was observed ( 3cc.: 16.6 %). All complications healed spontaneously. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: For T1-T2 cancer of the oral tongue exclusive

  13. Development and Evaluation of Rhenium-188-labeled Radioactive Stents for Restenosis Therapy and Development of Strategies for Radiolabeling Brachytherapy Sources with Palladium-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project involved collaboration between InnerDyne, Inc., and radiopharmaceutical research programs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which explored new strategies for the development and animal testing of radioactive rhenium-188-labeled implantable stent sources for the treatment of coronary restenosis after angioplasty and the development of chemical species radiolabeled with the palladium-103 radioisotope for the treatment of cancer. Rhenium-188 was made available for these studies from radioactive decay of tungsten-188 produced in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Stent activation and coating technology was developed and provided by InnerDyne, Inc., and stent radiolabeling technology and animal studies were conducted by InnerDyne staff in conjunction with investigators at BNL. Collaborative studies in animals were supported at sites by InnerDyne, Inc. New chemical methods for attaching the palladium-103 radioisotope to bifunctional chelate technologies were developed by investigators at ORNL

  14. A quality management program in intravascular brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakri, Abderrahim; Thomadsen, Bruce

    2002-12-01

    While simple, intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) presents a considerable potential for harm to the patient. The medical physicist maintains the responsibility to minimize the likelihood of operational problems or dosimetric errors. The principals for safe operation remain the same as with any radiotherapy treatment: to deliver the correct dose, to the correct location, safety. To develop an effective and comprehensive quality management (QM) program for IVB, a physicist should utilize proven risk assessment techniques rather than simply thinking of things to check, and follow guidances such as ISO9001:2000. The proposed QM program includes the following: Procedures designed to assure the safety of the patient. Identification of the patient; tests of the integrity and patency for the delivery catheter, operation of the source train, and patency of the catheter in the treatment position; a check for recovery preparations; and verification of source recovery. Procedures to assure positional accuracy of the treatment: Verification of the positioning the catheter in the artery and of the sources in the catheter. Procedures to assure dosimetry accuracy: Acceptance testing of the device, including verification of the source strength and uniformity, and of the treatment duration tables; verification of the treatment prescription and duration for each patient; and control measures that minimize the likelihood of errors removing the source at the correct time. PMID:12512720

  15. On the question of 3D seed reconstruction in prostate brachytherapy: the determination of x-ray source and film locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Mutian [Radiation Safety Office, Columbia University Medical Center, 722 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Zaider, Marco [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Worman, Michael [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Cohen, Gilad [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States)

    2004-10-07

    Inaccuracy in seed placement during permanent prostate implants may lead to significant dosimetric deviations from the intended plan. In two recent publications (Todor et al 2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 2031-48, Todor et al 2003 Phys. Med. Biol. 48 1153-71), methodology was described for identifying intraoperatively the positions of seeds already implanted, thus allowing re-optimization of the treatment plan and correcting for such seed misplacement. Seed reconstruction is performed using fluoroscopic images and an important (and non-trivial) component of this approach is the ability to accurately determine the position of the gantry relative to the treatment volume. We describe the methodology for acquiring this information, based on the known geometry of six markers attached to the ultrasound probe. This method does not require the C-arm unit to be isocentric and films can be taken with the gantry set at any arbitrary position. This is significant because the patient positioning on the operating table (in the lithotomy position) restricts the range of angles at which films can be taken to a quite narrow (typically {+-}10{sup 0}) interval and, as a general rule, the closer the angles the larger the uncertainty in the seed location reconstruction along the direction from the x-ray source to the film. (note)

  16. Afterloading: The Technique That Rescued Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronowitz, Jesse N., E-mail: jesse.aronowitz@umassmemorial.org

    2015-07-01

    Although brachytherapy had been established as a highly effective modality for the treatment of cancer, its application was threatened by mid-20th century due to appreciation of the radiation hazard to health care workers. This review examines how the introduction of afterloading eliminated exposure and ushered in a brachytherapy renaissance.

  17. A Multi-Institutional Study of Feasibility, Implementation, and Early Clinical Results With Noninvasive Breast Brachytherapy for Tumor Bed Boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, Subarna, E-mail: shamid@tuftsmedicalcenter.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Rocchio, Kathy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Arthur, Douglas; Vera, Robyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Sha, Sandra; Jolly, Michele [Central Florida Cancer Institute, Davenport, FL (United States); Cavanaugh, Sean; Wooten, Eric [Atlanta Oncology Associates, Hawkinsville, GA (United States); Benda, Rashmi; Greenfield, Brad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boca Raton Community Hospital, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Prestidge, Bradley [Texas Cancer Clinic, San Antonio, TX (United States); Ackerman, Scot [First Coast Oncology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Kuske, Robert; Quiet, Coral; Snyder, Margaret [Arizona Breast Cancer Specialists, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Wazer, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, implementation, and early results of noninvasive breast brachytherapy (NIBB) for tumor bed boost with whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: NIBB is a commercially available (AccuBoost, Billerica, MA) mammography-based, brachytherapy system in which the treatment applicators are centered on the planning target volume (PTV) to direct {sup 192}Ir emissions along orthogonal axes. A privacy-encrypted online data registry collected information from 8 independent academic and community-based institutions. Data were from 146 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer after lumpectomy and WBRT receiving boost with NIBB between July 2007 and March 2010. Toxicity and cosmesis were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (v. 3.0) and the Harvard scale. Median follow-up was 6 months (1-39 months). Results: Grade 1-2 skin toxicity was observed in 64%, 48%, and 21% during the acute (1-3 weeks), intermediate (4-26 weeks), and late-intermediate (>26 weeks) periods. There was no Grade 4 toxicity. At 6 months, for the entire cohort, cosmesis was excellent/good in 62%/38%. The subset receiving NIBB before WBRT had cosmetic scores of 32% and 63%, whereas during WBRT, 58% and 37% were rated as excellent and good, respectively. Breast compression was scored as 'uncomfortable' in 12%, 29%, and 59% when NIBB was delivered before, during, or after WBRT. For each patient, the fraction-to-fraction variability in PTV was low. Skin flash was associated with a higher proportion of excellent cosmesis (58% vs. 42%) relative to having the applicator all within breast tissue. Conclusions: These data indicate that NIBB is feasible and can be consistently implemented in a broad array of practice settings. Preliminary evaluation suggests that NIBB is associated with acceptably mild normal tissue toxicity and favorable early cosmesis. The application of NIBB before WBRT may be associated with better patient tolerance

  18. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, FMIPA Institut Teknologi Bandung, Physics Buildings, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm{sup 3}. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm{sup 3}. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  19. High dose rate endovascular brachytherapy in aorto-iliac lesion for the prevention of restenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Hideya [Toyonaka Municipal Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Tomoda, Kaname; Shiomi, Hiroya [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine] [and others

    2002-02-01

    This study examined the applicability of endovascular brachytherapy to larger del arteries such as the abdominal aorta and iliac artery. Endovascular brachytherapy using an Ir-192 HDR source was administered 11 times to nine patients who had undergone percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) between 1995 and 1999. The follow-up lasted 13 to 55 months after treatment (median, 24 months). Eight of the 11 lesions have been controlled so far. Although one case developed thrombus inside the stent five months later, recanalization was achieved by means of retreatment. One patient who underwent low-dose irradiation (6 Gy) without stent implantation showed restenosis five months after treatment. We used a centering catheter that did not block the blood stream for exact centering of the radiation source in larger vessels such as the abdominal aorta. Although endovascular brachytherapy is a promising and safe procedure, careful follow-up is needed to detect untoward reactions such as thrombosis. (author)

  20. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  1. An investigation of a PRESAGE® in vivo dosimeter for brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidovic, A K; Juang, T; Meltsner, S; Adamovics, J; Chino, J; Steffey, B; Craciunescu, O; Oldham, M

    2014-07-21

    Determining accurate in vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy treatment with high dose gradients is challenging. Here we introduce, investigate, and characterize a novel in vivo dosimeter and readout technique with the potential to address this problem. A cylindrical (4 mm × 20 mm) tissue equivalent radiochromic dosimeter PRESAGE® in vivo (PRESAGE®-IV) is investigated. Two readout methods of the radiation induced change in optical density (OD) were investigated: (i) volume-averaged readout by spectrophotometer, and (ii) a line profile readout by 2D projection imaging utilizing a high-resolution (50 micron) telecentric optical system. Method (i) is considered the gold standard when applied to PRESAGE® in optical cuvettes. The feasibility of both methods was evaluated by comparison to standard measurements on PRESAGE® in optical cuvettes via spectrophotometer. An end-to-end feasibility study was performed by a side-by-side comparison with TLDs in an (192)Ir HDR delivery. 7 and 8 Gy was delivered to PRESAGE®-IV and TLDs attached to the surface of a vaginal cylinder. Known geometry enabled direct comparison of measured dose with a commissioned treatment planning system. A high-resolution readout study under a steep dose gradient region showed 98.9% (5%/1 mm) agreement between PRESAGE®-IV and Gafchromic® EBT2 Film. Spectrometer measurements exhibited a linear dose response between 0-15 Gy with sensitivity of 0.0133 ± 0.0007 ΔOD/(Gy ⋅ cm) at the 95% confidence interval. Method (ii) yielded a linear response with sensitivity of 0.0132 ± 0.0006 (ΔOD/Gy), within 2% of method (i). Method (i) has poor spatial resolution due to volume averaging. Method (ii) has higher resolution (∼1 mm) without loss of sensitivity or increased noise. Both readout methods are shown to be feasible. The end-to-end comparison revealed a 2.5% agreement between PRESAGE®-IV and treatment plan in regions of uniform high dose. PRESAGE®-IV shows promise for in vivo dose

  2. Extended (5-year) Outcomes of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using MammoSite Balloon Brachytherapy: Patterns of Failure, Patient Selection, and Dosimetric Correlates for Late Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, John A.; Verma, Vivek; Kim, Hayeon; Kalash, Ronny; Heron, Dwight E.; Johnson, Ronald; Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon and catheter-based brachytherapy has gained increasing popularity in recent years and is the subject of ongoing phase III trials. Initial data suggest promising local control and cosmetic results in appropriately selected patients. Long-term data continue to evolve but are limited outside of the context of the American Society of Breast Surgeons Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 157 patients completing APBI after breast-conserving surgery and axillary staging via high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy from June 2002 to December 2007 was made. APBI was delivered with a single-lumen MammoSite balloon-based applicator to a median dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over a 5-day period. Tumor coverage and critical organ dosimetry were retrospectively collected on the basis of computed tomography completed for conformance and symmetry. Results: At a median follow-up time of 5.5 years (range, 0-10.0 years), the 5-year and 7-year actuarial incidences of ipsilateral breast control were 98%/98%, of nodal control 99%/98%, and of distant control 99%/99%, respectively. The crude rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence was 2.5% (n=4); of nodal failure, 1.9% (n=3); and of distant failure, 0.6% (n=1). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 89%/86%, with breast cancer–specific survival of 100%/99%, respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes were achieved in 93.4% of patients. Telangiectasia developed in 27% of patients, with 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial incidence of 7%/24%/33%; skin dose >100% significantly predicted for the development of telangiectasia (50% vs 14%, P<.0001). Conclusions: Long-term single-institution outcomes suggest excellent tumor control, breast cosmesis, and minimal late toxicity. Skin toxicity is a function of skin dose, which may be ameliorated with dosimetric optimization afforded by newer multicatheter brachytherapy

  3. Which modality for prostate brachytherapy; Quelle modalite de curietherapie prostatique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossi, A. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2010-10-15

    Brachytherapy techniques by permanent implant of radioactive sources or by temporary high-dose-rate (HDR) fractions are nowadays extensively used for the treatment of prostatic carcinoma. Long-term results (at 20 years) concerning large amount of patients have been published by major centers confirming both in terms of efficacy and toxicities that permanent implant of radioactive iodine-125 seeds yields at least the same good results of surgery and of external beam irradiation when proposed to patients affected by low-risk disease. For intermediate to high-risk tumors, HDR temporary implants are proposed as a boost for dose escalation. For both techniques, several topics still need to be clarified dealing with a recent enlargement of indications (HDR alone for low-risk, iodine-125 seeds boost for intermediate-high-risk cancers), or with technical aspects (loose seeds versus linked ones, number of fractions and dose for HDR protocols), while dosimetric issues have only recently been addressed by cooperatives groups. Last but not least, there is a real need to address and clearly characterize the correct definition of biochemical disease control both for iodine permanent implant and for HDR implant. New challenges are facing the prostate-brachytherapy community in the near future: local relapse after external beam radiotherapy are currently managed by several salvage treatments (prostatectomy, cryo, high intensity focused ultrasounds [HIFU]) but the role of reirradiation by brachytherapy is also actively investigated. Focal therapy has gained considerable interest in the last 5 years aiming at treating only the area of cancer foci inside the prostate and preserving nearby healthy tissues. Encouraging results have been obtained with the so-called 'minimally invasive' approaches and both permanent seed implantation and HDR brachytherapy techniques may be worthwhile testing in this setting because of their capability of exactly sculpting the dose inside the

  4. Radiological protection of patients in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The prefix 'brachy' means short-range, so brachytherapy is the administration of radiation therapy using small radioactive sources in the form of needles, tubes, wires or seeds, which are placed within the tumor -interstitial form- or very near of it, superficially or in an endo-cavity form. This technique, which was limited by the size of the primary tumor, has the advantage, that the radiation, can be adjusted to the size and shape of the tumor volume and the radioisotope used, - short range -, is selected with the criteria of getting the dose in the organs at risk, as low as possible, making what it is known as conformal radiotherapy. Radioactive sources may be permanent or temporary implants. The application of radioactive material, can be manually or automatically. In the first case, a major breakthrough from the radioprotection point of view, was the use of afterloading devices, methodology highly recommended to reduce the radiation exposure to staff. With the development of technology, remotely controlled afterloading devices were introduced, which in addition to complying with the above requirement, allow the source to move in different positions along catheters housed in one or more channels, making therapeutic brachytherapy treatments in tumor volumes possible, that due to its length, decades ago would have been an unthinkable deal. In all cases, sources, which may vary from the 3 mm in length, 125 Iodine or 198 Gold seeds, to extensive wires of 192 Iridium, are encapsulated for two main purposes: preventing leakage of radioactive material and absorption of unwanted radiation, alpha and beta, produced by the radioactive decay. Consequently, it should be highly unlikely that the radioactive material, could be lost or located in the patient, in a different place of the one that was planned. However, history shows us the opposite. Its is known the kind of deterministic effect that radiation is going to produce in the tumor, where the severity of

  5. High-dose-rate brachytherapy with local injection of bleomycin for N0 oral tongue cancer. Possibilities of the control of tumor implant by inserting applicators and the decrease in tumor dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-eight patients with N0 oral tongue cancer were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy combined with local injection of bleomycin between December 1997 and June 2001 at the Department of Radiology, National Kyushu Medical Center Hospital. A median dose of 5 mg of bleomycin was injected locally, and 16-20 Gy was delivered to the area surrounding applicators for control of the tumor implant during the initial two days. The two-year local recurrence-free survival rate was 96% [T1, 2: 100% (8/8, 15/15), T3: 80% (4/5)]. The two-year secondary neck node metastasis rate was 7.1% [T1: 12.5% (1/8), T2: 6.7% (1/15), T3: 0% (0/5)]. There were no tumor implants in any patients. We tried to decrease the minimal tumor dose step by step. The groups with median minimal tumor doses of 60 Gy, 50 Gy, and 40 Gy had local recurrence rates of 12.5% (1/8), 0% (0/14), and 0% (0/6), respectively. Local recurrence rates were not increased by decreasing the minimal tumor dose. Two patients (7%) had secondary neck node metastasis. Late adverse effects were tongue ulcer: 11% (3/28), oral floor ulcer: 4% (1/28), and osteonecrosis: 4% (1/28). These results suggest that control of the tumor implant and the decrease in minimal tumor dose below 60 Gy may be possible with the local injection of bleomycin and delivery of doses to the area surrounding the applicators when N0 tongue cancer is treated using 192Ir-HDR brachytherapy. (author)

  6. Construction of a anthropomorphic phantom for dose measurement in hands in brachytherapy procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this work was to show the differences between the dose value measured by dosimeter endpoint and the values measured in different points inside the hand during brachytherapy procedures. For this, the procedures involved in the handling of sources were analyzed and the simulated using an anthropomorphic phantom hand

  7. Study and development of methodology for radioactive iodine fixation in polymeric substrate for manufacturing sources used in brachytherapy; Estudo e desenvolvimento de metodologia para fixacao de iodo radioativo em substrato polimerico para confeccao de fontes utilizadas em braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Carla D.; Benega, Marcos A.G. and others, E-mail: bteigarodrigues@gmail.com, E-mail: carladdsouza@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marcosagbenega@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes

    2014-07-01

    According global estimates of Globocan 2012 project of the International Agency for Research of Cancer, of the World Health Organization, there were 14,1 million new cases of cancer and a total of 8,2 million deaths from cancer. Also show that in 2030, the overall load will be 21,4 million new cases and 13,2 million cancer deaths. One of the prostate cancer therapy is brachytherapy, used in early and middle stages of the disease. It is made with the introduction of seeds with radioactive material within the tumor or in nearby regions, affecting the minimum surrounding tissues. The aim of this work is the study and developing the deposition of radioactive iodine on the polymeric substrate method, and an analysis relating the efficiency of the method to implementation in the laboratory of brachytherapy from IPEN. Iodine-125 is adsorbed on an epoxy resin solution. The objective of this study is to offer a new proposal for seeds. The results will give the data for the radiation protection and the procedures for radioactive waste management.

  8. Preliminary experience on the implementation of computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 source in University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalludin, Z.; Min, U. N.; Ishak, W. Z. Wan; Malik, R. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    This study presents our preliminary work of the computed tomography (CT) image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) implementation on cervical cancer patients. We developed a protocol in which patients undergo two Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) examinations; a) prior to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and b) prior to intra-cavitary brachytherapy for tumour identification and delineation during IGBT planning and dosimetry. For each fraction, patients were simulated using CT simulator and images were transferred to the treatment planning system. The HR-CTV, IR-CTV, bladder and rectum were delineated on CT-based contouring for cervical cancer. Plans were optimised to achieve HR-CTV and IR-CTV dose (D90) of total EQD2 80Gy and 60Gy respectively, while limiting the minimum dose to the most irradiated 2cm3 volume (D2cc) of bladder and rectum to total EQD2 90Gy and 75Gy respectively. Data from seven insertions were analysed by comparing the volume-based with traditional point- based doses. Based on our data, there were differences between volume and point doses of HR- CTV, bladder and rectum organs. As the number of patients having the CT-based IGBT increases from day to day in our centre, it is expected that the treatment and dosimetry accuracy will be improved with the implementation.

  9. A Prospective Cohort Study to Compare Treatment Results Between 2 Fractionation Schedules of High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in Patients With Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Eng-Yen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan (China); Sun, Li-Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zuoying Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hao [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lan, Jen-Hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chanchien, Chan-Chao [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Chang-Yu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chong-Jong, E-mail: cjw1010@adm.cgmh.org.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the treatment results of 2 fractionation schedules for high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2001 through January 2008, 267 patients with stage IB-IVA cervical cancer were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent 4-field pelvic irradiation and HDR-ICBT. The median central and parametrial doses were 39.6 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively. Patient underwent either 6 Gy Multiplication-Sign 4 (HDR-4) (n=144) or 4.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 6 (HDR-6) (n=123) to point A of ICBT using {sup 192}Ir isotope twice weekly. The rates of overall survival, locoregional failure, distant metastasis, proctitis, cystitis, and enterocolitis were compared between HDR-4 and HDR-6. Results: There were no significant differences in the demographic data between HDR-4 and HDR-6 except for total treatment time. The 5-year proctitis rates were 23.0% and 21.5% in HDR-4 and HDR-6 (P=.399), respectively. The corresponding rates of grade 2-4 proctitis were 18.7% and 9.6% (P=.060). The corresponding rates of grades 3-4 proctitis were 5.2% and 1.3% (P=.231). Subgroup analysis revealed that HDR-4 significantly increased grade 2-4 proctitis in patients aged {>=}62 years old (P=.012) but not in patients aged <62 years (P=.976). The rates of overall survival, locoregional failure, distant metastasis, cystitis, and enterocolitis were not significantly different between HDR-4 and HDR-6 schedules. Conclusion: The small fraction size of HDR-ICBT is associated with grade 2 proctitis without compromise of prognosis in elderly patients. This schedule is suggested for patients who tolerate an additional 2 applications of HDR-ICBT.

  10. Value of diffusion weighted MR imaging as an early surrogate parameter for evaluation of tumor response to high-dose-rate brachytherapy of colorectal liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the value of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) as an early surrogate parameter for treatment response of colorectal liver metastases to image-guided single-fraction 192Ir-high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Thirty patients with a total of 43 metastases underwent CT- or MRI-guided HDR-BT. In 13 of these patients a total of 15 additional lesions were identified, which were not treated at the initial session and served for comparison. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including breathhold echoplanar DWI sequences was performed prior to therapy (baseline MRI), 2 days after HDR-BT (early MRI) as well as after 3 months (follow-up MRI). Tumor volume (TV) and intratumoral apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were measured independently by two radiologists. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate comparison, ANOVA and paired t test as well as Pearson's correlation. At early MRI no changes of TV and ADC were found for non-treated colorectal liver metastases. In contrast, mean TV of liver lesions treated with HDR-BT increased by 8.8% (p = 0.054) while mean tumor ADC decreased significantly by 11.4% (p < 0.001). At follow-up MRI mean TV of non-treated metastases increased by 50.8% (p = 0.027) without significant change of mean ADC values. In contrast, mean TV of treated lesions decreased by 47.0% (p = 0.026) while the mean ADC increased inversely by 28.6% compared to baseline values (p < 0.001; Pearson's correlation coefficient of r = -0.257; p < 0.001). DWI is a promising imaging biomarker for early prediction of tumor response in patients with colorectal liver metastases treated with HDR-BT, yet the optimal interval between therapy and early follow-up needs to be elucidated

  11. Long-term outcome with interstitial brachytherapy in the management of patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience with interstitial implant boosts to determine their long-term impact on local control and cosmetic results. Methods and Materials: Between January 1, 1980 and December 31, 1987, 390 women with 400 cases of Stage I and II breast cancer were managed with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) at William Beaumont Hospital. All patients were treated with an excisional biopsy and 253 (63%) underwent reexcision. Radiation consisted of 45-50 Gy external beam irradiation to the whole breast followed by a boost to the tumor bed to at least 60 Gy using either electrons [108], photons [15], or an interstitial implant [277] with either 192Ir [190] or 125I [87]. Long-term local control and cosmetic outcome were assessed and contrasted between patients boosted with either interstitial implants, electrons, or photons. Results: With a median follow-up of 81 months, 25 patients have recurred in the treated breast for a 5- and 8-year actuarial rate of local recurrence of 4 and 8%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in the 5- or 8-year actuarial rates of local recurrence using either electrons, photons, or an interstitial implant. Greater than 90% of patients obtained a good or excellent cosmetic result, and no statistically significant differences in cosmetic outcome were seen whether electrons, photons, or implants were used. Conclusions: We conclude that patients with Stage I and II breast cancer undergoing BCT and judged to be candidates for boosts can be effectively managed with LDR interstitial brachytherapy. Long-term local control and cosmetic outcome are excellent and similar to patients boosted with either electrons or photons

  12. Value of diffusion weighted MR imaging as an early surrogate parameter for evaluation of tumor response to high-dose-rate brachytherapy of colorectal liver metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röhl Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the value of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI as an early surrogate parameter for treatment response of colorectal liver metastases to image-guided single-fraction 192Ir-high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT. Methods Thirty patients with a total of 43 metastases underwent CT- or MRI-guided HDR-BT. In 13 of these patients a total of 15 additional lesions were identified, which were not treated at the initial session and served for comparison. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI including breathhold echoplanar DWI sequences was performed prior to therapy (baseline MRI, 2 days after HDR-BT (early MRI as well as after 3 months (follow-up MRI. Tumor volume (TV and intratumoral apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were measured independently by two radiologists. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate comparison, ANOVA and paired t test as well as Pearson's correlation. Results At early MRI no changes of TV and ADC were found for non-treated colorectal liver metastases. In contrast, mean TV of liver lesions treated with HDR-BT increased by 8.8% (p = 0.054 while mean tumor ADC decreased significantly by 11.4% (p p = 0.027 without significant change of mean ADC values. In contrast, mean TV of treated lesions decreased by 47.0% (p = 0.026 while the mean ADC increased inversely by 28.6% compared to baseline values (p Conclusions DWI is a promising imaging biomarker for early prediction of tumor response in patients with colorectal liver metastases treated with HDR-BT, yet the optimal interval between therapy and early follow-up needs to be elucidated.

  13. Brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer. Low dose rate to high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the compatibility of low dose rate (LDR) with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, we reviewed 399 patients with early oral tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0) treated solely by brachytherapy at Osaka University Hospital between 1967 and 1999. For patients in the LDR group (n=341), the treatment sources consisted of Ir-192 pin for 227 patients (1973-1996; irradiated dose, 61-85 Gy; median, 70 Gy), Ra-226 needle for 113 patients (1967-1986; 55-93 Gy; median, 70 Gy). Ra-226 and Ir-192 were combined for one patient. Ir-192 HDR (microSelectron-HDR) was used for 58 patients in the HDR group (1991-present; 48-60 Gy; median, 60 Gy). LDR implantations were performed via oral and HDR via a submental/submandibular approach. The dose rates at the reference point for the LDR group were 0.30 to 0.8 Gy/h, and for the HDR group 1.0 to 3.4 Gy/min. The patients in the HDR group received a total dose of 48-60 Gy (8-10 fractions) during one week. Two fractions were administered per day (at least a 6-h interval). The 3- and 5-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were 85% and 80%, respectively, and those in the HDR group were both 84%. HDR brachytherapy showed the same lymph-node control rate as did LDR brachytherapy (67% at 5 years). HDR brachytherapy achieved the same locoregional result as did LDR brachytherapy. A converting factor of 0.86 is applicable for HDR in the treatment of early oral tongue cancer. (author)

  14. Brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer: low dose rate to high dose rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Furukawa, Souhei; Kakimoto, Naoya; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2003-03-01

    To examine the compatibility of low dose rate (LDR) with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, we reviewed 399 patients with early oral tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0) treated solely by brachytherapy at Osaka University Hospital between 1967 and 1999. For patients in the LDR group (n = 341), the treatment sources consisted of Ir-192 pin for 227 patients (1973-1996; irradiated dose, 61-85 Gy; median, 70 Gy), Ra-226 needle for 113 patients (1967-1986; 55-93 Gy; median, 70 Gy). Ra-226 and Ir-192 were combined for one patient. Ir-192 HDR (microSelectron-HDR) was used for 58 patients in the HDR group (1991-present; 48-60 Gy; median, 60 Gy). LDR implantations were performed via oral and HDR via a submental/submandibular approach. The dose rates at the reference point for the LDR group were 0.30 to 0.8 Gy/h, and for the HDR group 1.0 to 3.4 Gy/min. The patients in the HDR group received a total dose of 48-60 Gy (8-10 fractions) during one week. Two fractions were administered per day (at least a 6-h interval). The 3- and 5-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were 85% and 80%, respectively, and those in the HDR group were both 84%. HDR brachytherapy showed the same lymph-node control rate as did LDR brachytherapy (67% at 5 years). HDR brachytherapy achieved the same locoregional result as did LDR brachytherapy. A converting factor of 0.86 is applicable for HDR in the treatment of early oral tongue cancer.

  15. Intraluminal brachytherapy in treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the practicability and preliminary effect of intraluminal brachytherapy in treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice. Methods: Intraluminal brachytherapy was performed in 4 patients who had been treated with biliary stent implantation. Results: No complications related to intraluminal brachytherapy had happened. One patient was followed up by means of CT, showing reduction in tumor size. Conclusion: Intraluminal brachytherapy is a safe and effective method in treating malignant tumor causing obstructive jaundice

  16. Dose volume analysis in brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozer-Loft, S.M

    2000-12-01

    A brief introduction to three branches of radiotherapy is given: interstitial brachytherapy, external beam megavoltage radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. The current interest in issues around conformity, uniformity and optimisation is explained in the light of technical developments in these fields. A novel method of displaying dose-volume information, which mathematically suppresses the inverse-square law, as first suggested by L.L. Anderson for use in brachytherapy is explained in detail, and some improvements proposed. These 'natural' histograms are extended to show the effects of real point sources which do not exactly follow the inverse-square law, and to demonstrate the in-target dose-volume distribution, previously unpublished. The histograms are used as a way of mathematically analysing the properties of theoretical mono-energetic radionuclides, and for demonstrating the dosimetric properties of a potential new brachytherapy source (Ytterbium-169). A new modification of the Anderson formalism is then described for producing Anderson Inverse-Square Shifted (AISS) histograms for the Gamma Knife, which are shown to be useful for demonstrating the quality of stereotactic radiosurgery dose distributions. A study is performed analysing the results of Gamma Knife treatments on 44 patients suffering from a benign brain tumour (acoustic neuroma). Follow-up data is used to estimate the volume shrinkage or growth of each tumour, and this measure of outcome is compared with a range of figures of merit which express different aspects of the quality of each dose distributions. The results are analysed in an attempt to answer the question: What are the important features of the dose distribution (conformality, uniformity, etc) which show a definite relationship with the outcome of the treatment? Initial results show positively that, when Gamma Knife radiosurgery is used to treat acoustic neuroma, some measures of conformality seem to have a surprising

  17. Radiation Protection Training in Intracoronary Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report the educational objectives and contents on Radiation Protection (RP) for the practice of Intracoronary Brachytherapy (ICB) procedures. The wide international experience on training programs for ICB as well as our own experience organizing several courses aimed at Cardiologists, Radio therapists and Medical Physicists has been used to elaborate specific RP objectives and contents. The objectives, differentiated for Cardiologists, Radio therapists, Medical Physicists, Nurses and Technicians, pretend to guarantee the safety and RP of both patient and staff in the procedures of ICB. The objectives are necessarily different because their RP formation and their role in the procedure are different. The general topics included in RP training programmes for ICB could be: general topics on RP (Interaction of radiation and matter, RP principles, radiobiology, etc), principles of operation of ICB and interventional X-ray equipment, quantification of radiation dose and risks, optimisation of protection of staff and patients, accidents and emergencies, regulations, responsibilities, quality assurance program, handling of ICB sources, installation and commissioning. Training programs based on the objectives presented in this paper would encourage positive safety culture in ICB and can also be used as a starting point by the Regulatory Authority for the authorization of new Installations and credentialing of professionals involved in this technique as well as for the continuous education of the staff involved. (Author) 10 refs

  18. Brachytherapy next generation: robotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Tiberiu; Kacsó, Alex Cristian; Pisla, Doina; Kacsó, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    In a field dominated by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), both the therapeutic and technical possibilities of brachytherapy (BT) are underrated, shadowed by protons and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Decreasing expertise and indications, as well as increasing lack of specific BT training for radiation therapy (RT) residents led to the real need of shortening its learning curve and making it more popular. Developing robotic BT devices can be a way to mitigate the above issues. There are many teams working at custom-made robotic BT platforms to perfect and overcome the limitations of the existing systems. This paper provides a picture of the current state-of-the-art in robotic assisted BT, as it also conveys the author's solution to the problem, a parallel robot that uses CT-guidance. PMID:26816510

  19. Medical physics aspects of ophthalmic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraocular melanoma is the most common primary malignancy of the eye. Radiation therapy using ophthalmic plaque has proved successful in the management of various ocular lesions. Although a few centres were using 90Sr/90Y plaques for shallow turtlours some years ago, eye plaque therapy was not a common practice in India. A revived interest in the use of eye plaque therapy and very high cost of imported sources has led to the development and production of 125I seed sources by the Radiopharmaceuticals Division, BARC. This report presents a brief description on the clinical, dosimetry and radiation safety aspects of 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta ray and 125I gamma ray eye plaque applicators. This report has been divided in five Sections. Section I presents general introduction of ophthalmic brachytherapy including the structure of a human eye, types of ophthalmic plaques and characteristics of radioisotopes commonly used in such applications. A brief review of sources, applicators and dosimetry of 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta and 125I gamma ophthalmic plaques are given in Section II and Section III, respectively. Section IV contains the single seed dosimetry data of BARC OcuProsta 125I seed as well as dosimetry data of typical eye plaques loaded with BARC OcuProsta 125I seed. Quality assurance and radiation safety aspects of these eye applicators are described in Section V. A proforma of the application required to be filled in by the user institution for obtaining regulatory consent to start eye plaque therapy has also been appended to this report. (author)

  20. Biological Shielding Design Effectiveness of the Brachytherapy Unit at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana Using Mcnp5 Monte Carlo Code

    OpenAIRE

    C.C. Arwui; E.O. Darko; P. Deatanyah; S. Wotorchi-Gordon; H. Lawluvi; Kpeglo, D. O.; G. Emi-Reynolds

    2011-01-01

    Design objectives for brachytherapy treatment facilities require sufficient shielding to reduce primary and scatter radiation to design limit in order to limit exposure to patients, staff and the general public. The primary aim of this study is to verify whether shielding of the brachytherapy unit at the Korle Bu teaching Hospital in Ghana provides adequate protection in order to assess any radiological health and safety impact and also test the suitability of other available sources. The stu...

  1. Physics and quality assurance of low dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this course is to review the physical principles underlying design, clinical application and execution of interstitial and intracavitary implants in the classical low dose-rate (LDR) range. This year, the course will focus on quality assurance of sources, applicators and treatment planning software. In addition, development of procedures and QA checks designed optimize treatment delivery accuracy and patient safety during each individual procedure will be reviewed. The level of presentation will be designed to accommodate both physicists and physicians. Implementation of recently published AAPM Task Group reports (no. 40, 'Comprehensive Quality Assurance' and No. 43, 'Dosimetry of Interstitial Brachytherapy Sources') will be reviewed. Outline: (A) General Principles (1) QA endpoints: temporal accuracy, positional accuracy, dose delivery accuracy, and safety of the patient, personnel, and the institution (2) QA procedure development: forms, checklists, test development and design of treatment delivery procedures (B) QA of treatment delivery devices (1) Source acceptance testing and QA a) calibration and source strength specification standards b) leakage tests and source geometry verification (2) Applicator acceptance testing and QA (3) Remote afterloading devices (4) Treatment planning systems a) graphic input/output devices, implant geometry reconstruction, and graphical display b) dose calculation accuracy i) review of brachytherapy dose calculation algorithms ii) dosimetric benchmarks available: Task Group 43 report (C) Procedure-specific QA 1) Organization of treatment delivery team 2) Preplanning and preparation 3) Applicator insertion 4) Radiographic examination of the implant, prescription, and treatment calculation 5) Source insertion 6) Treatment planning and physicist review of treatment plans 7) QA during patient treatment and removal of sources and applicators

  2. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rubo, R., E-mail: gabrielpaivafonseca@gmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05403-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  3. Comparison of dose calculation methods for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Finger, Paul T.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Mourtada, Firas; Napolitano, Mary E.; Rogers, D. W. O.; Thomson, Rowan M.; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Quality MediPhys LLC, Denville, New Jersey 07834 (United States); New York Eye Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89169 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States) and Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Physics, Elekta Inc., Norcross, Georgia 30092 (United States); Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric differences among several clinical treatment planning systems (TPS) and Monte Carlo (MC) codes for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors using {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd plaques, and to evaluate the impact on the prescription dose of the adoption of MC codes and certain versions of a TPS (Plaque Simulator with optional modules). Methods: Three clinical brachytherapy TPS capable of intraocular brachytherapy treatment planning and two MC codes were compared. The TPS investigated were Pinnacle v8.0dp1, BrachyVision v8.1, and Plaque Simulator v5.3.9, all of which use the AAPM TG-43 formalism in water. The Plaque Simulator software can also handle some correction factors from MC simulations. The MC codes used are MCNP5 v1.40 and BrachyDose/EGSnrc. Using these TPS and MC codes, three types of calculations were performed: homogeneous medium with point sources (for the TPS only, using the 1D TG-43 dose calculation formalism); homogeneous medium with line sources (TPS with 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes); and plaque heterogeneity-corrected line sources (Plaque Simulator with modified 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes). Comparisons were made of doses calculated at points-of-interest on the plaque central-axis and at off-axis points of clinical interest within a standardized model of the right eye. Results: For the homogeneous water medium case, agreement was within {approx}2% for the point- and line-source models when comparing between TPS and between TPS and MC codes, respectively. For the heterogeneous medium case, dose differences (as calculated using the MC codes and Plaque Simulator) differ by up to 37% on the central-axis in comparison to the homogeneous water calculations. A prescription dose of 85 Gy at 5 mm depth based on calculations in a homogeneous medium delivers 76 Gy and 67 Gy for specific {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources, respectively, when accounting for COMS-plaque heterogeneities. For off

  4. ACPSEM brachytherapy working group recommendations for quality assurance in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM) Radiation Oncology Specialty Group (ROSG) formed a series of working groups in 2011 to develop recommendation papers for guidance of radiation oncology medical physics practice within the Australasian setting. These recommendations are intended to provide guidance for safe work practices and a suitable level of quality control without detailed work instructions. It is the responsibility of the medical physicist to ensure that locally available equipment and procedures are sufficiently sensitive to establish compliance to these recommendations. The recommendations are endorsed by the ROSG, have been subject to independent expert reviews and have also been approved by the ACPSEM Council. For the Australian audience, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with the Tripartite Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. This publication presents the recommendations of the ACPSEM Brachytherapy Working Group (BTWG) and has been developed in alignment with other international associations. However, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with relevant national, state or territory legislation and local requirements, which take precedence over the ACPSEM recommendation papers. It is hoped that the users of this and other ACPSEM recommendation papers will contribute to the development of future versions through the Radiation Oncology Specialty Group of the ACPSEM.

  5. Influence of trace elements in human tissue in low-energy photon brachytherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to determine the dosimetric impact of trace elements in human tissues for low-energy photon sources used in brachytherapy. Monte Carlo dose calculations were used to investigate the dosimetric effect of trace elements present in normal or cancerous human tissues. The effect of individual traces (atomic number Z = 11–30) was studied in soft tissue irradiated by low-energy brachytherapy sources. Three other tissue types (prostate, adipose and mammary gland) were also simulated with varying trace concentrations to quantify the contribution of each trace to the dose distribution. The dose differences between cancerous and healthy prostate tissues were calculated in single- and multi-source geometries. The presence of traces in a tissue produces a difference in the dose distribution that is dependent on Z and the concentration of the trace. Low-Z traces (Na) have a negligible effect (3%). There is a potentially significant difference in the dose distribution between cancerous and healthy prostate tissues (4%) and even larger if compared to the trace-free composition (15%) in both single- and multi-sourced geometries. Trace elements have a non-negligible (up to 8% in prostate D90) effect on the dose in tissues irradiated with low-energy photon sources. This study underlines the need for further investigation into accurate determination of the trace composition of tissues associated with low-energy brachytherapy. Alternatively, trace elements could be incorporated as a source of uncertainty in dose calculations. (paper)

  6. On the Development of a Miniature Neutron Generator for the Brachytherapy Treatment of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, L.

    2009-03-01

    Brachytherapy refers to application of an irradiation source within a tumor. 252Cf needles used in brachytherapy have been successfully applied to treatment of some of the most virulent cancers but it is doubtful that it will be widely used because of difficulty in dealing with unwanted dose (source cannot be turned off) and in adhering to stringent NRC regulations that have been exacerbated in our post 911 environment. We have been working on the development of a miniature neutron generator with the reaction target placed at the end of a needle (tube) for brachytherapy applications. Orifice geometries are most amenable, e.g. rectum and cervix, but interstitial use is possible with microsurgery. This paper dicusses the results of a 30 watt DD neutron generator SBU project that demonstrates that sufficient hydrogen isotope current can be delivered down a small diameter needle required for a DT neutron treatment device, and, will summarize the progress of building a commercial device pursued by the All Russian Institute for Automatics (VNIIA) supported by the DOE's Industrial Proliferation Prevention Program (IPP). It is known that most of the fast neutron (FN) beam cancer treatment facilities have been closed down. It appears that the major limitation in the use of FN beams has been damage to healthy tissue, which is relatively insensitive to photons, but this problem is alleviated by brachytherapy. Moreover, recent clinical results indicate that fast neutrons in the boost mode are most highly effective in treating large, hypoxic, and rapidly repopulating diseases. It appears that early boost application of FN may halt angiogenesis (development and repair of tumor vascular system) and shrink the tumor resulting in lower hypoxia. The boost brachytherapy application of a small, low cost neutron generator holds promise of significant contribution to the treatment of cancer.

  7. Investigation of palladium-103 production and IR07-103Pd brachytherapy seed preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We report the cyclotron production of 103-palladium via 103Rh(p,n)103Pd reaction. → 103Pd was absorbed on resin beads for brachytherapy seed preparation. → The optimum absorption of 103Pd in resin was achieved at 0.5 M HCl. → Version 5 of MCNP code was employed to model a new 103Pd brachytherapy seed. - Abstract: In this study, design and fabrication of 103Pd brachytherapy seed was investigated. The excitation functions of 103Rh(p,n)103Pd and 103Rh(d,2n)103Pd reactions were calculated using EMPIRE (version 3.1 Rivoli), ALICE/ASH and TALYS-1.2 codes, the TENDL-2010 database and compared with the published data. Production of 103Pd was done via 103Rh(p,n)103Pd nuclear reaction. The target was bombarded with 18 MeV protons at 200 μA beam current for 15 h. After irradiation and radiochemical separation of the electroplated rhodium target, the optimum condition for absorption of 103Pd into Amberlite (registered) IR-93 resin was achieved at 0.5 M HCl. Version 5 of the (MCNP) Monte Carlo radiation transport code was employed to calculate the dosimetric parameters around the 103Pd brachytherapy seed. Finally the calculated results were compared with published results for other commercial sources.

  8. Brachytherapy Application With In Situ Dose Painting Administered by Gold Nanoparticle Eluters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recent studies show promise that administering gold nanoparticles (GNP) to tumor cells during brachytherapy could significantly enhance radiation damage to the tumor. A new strategy proposed for sustained administration of the GNP in prostate tumors is to load them into routinely used brachytherapy spacers for customizable in situ release after implantation. This in silico study investigated the intratumor biodistribution and corresponding dose enhancement over time due to GNP released from such GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS). Method and Materials: An experimentally determined intratumoral diffusion coefficient (D) for 10-nm nanoparticles was used to estimate D for other sizes by using the Stokes-Einstein equation. GNP concentration profiles, obtained using D, were then used to calculate the corresponding dose enhancement factor (DEF) for each tumor voxel, using dose painting-by-numbers approach, for times relevant to the considered brachytherapy sources' lifetimes. The investigation was carried out as a function of GNP size for the clinically applicable low-dose-rate brachytherapy sources iodine-125 (I-125), palladium-103 (Pd-103), and cesium-131 (Cs-131). Results: Results showed that dose enhancement to tumor voxels and subvolumes during brachytherapy can be customized by varying the size of GNP released or eluted from the GBS. For example, using a concentration of 7 mg/g GNP, significant DEF (>20%) could be achieved 5 mm from a GBS after 5, 12, 25, 46, 72, 120, and 195 days, respectively, for GNP sizes of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 nm and for 80 nm when treating with I-125. Conclusions: Analyses showed that using Cs-131 provides the highest dose enhancement to tumor voxels. However, given its relatively longer half-life, I-125 presents the most flexibility for customizing the dose enhancement as a function of GNP size. These findings provide a useful reference for further work toward development of potential new brachytherapy application

  9. Calculating of Dose Distribution in Tongue Brachytherapy by Different Radioisotopes using Monte Carlo Simulation and Comparing by Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banafsheh Zeinali Rafsanjani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among different kinds of oral cavity cancers, the frequency of tongue cancer occurrence is more significant. Brachytherapy is the most common method to cure tongue cancers. Long sources are used in different techniques of tongue brachytherapy. The objective of this study is to asses the dose distribution around long sources, comparing different radioisotopes as brachytherapy sources, measuring the homogeneity of delivered dose to treatment volume and also comparing mandible dose and dose of tongue in the regions near the mandible with and without using shield. Material and Method: The Monte Carlo code MCNP4C was used for simulation. The accuracy of simulation was verified by comparing the results with experimental data. The sources like Ir-192, Cs-137, Ra-226, Au-198, In-111 and Ba-131 were simulated and the position of sources was determined by Paris system. Results: The percentage of mandible dose reduction with use of 2 mm Pb shield for the sources mentioned above were: 35.4%, 20.1%, 86.6%, 32.24%, 75.6%, and 36.8%. The tongue dose near the mandible with use of shied did not change significantly. The dose homogeneity from the most to least was obtained from these sources: Cs-137, Au-198, Ir-192, Ba-131, In-111 and Ra-226. Discussion and Conclusion: Ir-192 and Cs-137 were the best sources for tongue brachytherapy treatment but In-111 and Ra-226 were not suitable choices for tongue brachytherapy. The sources like Au-198 and Ba-131 had rather the same performance as Ir-192

  10. Quality assurance in MR image guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Final results of the EMBRACE study dummy run

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirisits, Christian; Federico, Mario; Nkiwane, Karen;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Upfront quality assurance (QA) is considered essential when starting a multicenter clinical trial in radiotherapy. Despite the long experience gained for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) trials, there are only limited audit QA methods for brachytherapy (BT) and none include the specific...... aspects of image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). METHODS AND MATERIALS: EMBRACE is a prospective multicenter trial aiming to assess the impact of (MRI)-based IGABT in locally advanced cervical cancer. An EMBRACE dummy run was designed to identify sources and magnitude of uncertainties and errors...

  11. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  12. Early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner; Nag; Young; Bahnson

    2000-12-15

    Introduction: Transperineal prostate brachytherapy is gaining popularity as a treatment for clinically localized carcinoma of the prostate. Very little prospective data exists addressing the issue of complications associated with this procedure. We present an analysis of the early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: Forty-six consecutive patients who underwent Palladium-103 (Pd-103) seed placement for clinically localized prostate carcinoma were evaluated prospectively for any morbidity associated with the procedure. Twenty-three patients completed an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire preoperatively, at their first postoperative visit, and at their second postoperative visit. The total IPSS, each of the seven individual components, and the "bother" score were evaluated separately for each visit, and statistical significance was determined. Results: Urinary retention occurred in 7/46 patients (15%). Of these, 5 were able to void spontaneously after catheter removal. One patient is maintained with a suprapubic tube, and one patient is currently on continuous intermittent catheterization. Baseline IPSS was 7.1 and this went to 20.0 at the first postoperative visit (p<0.001). By the second postoperative visit, the IPSS was 8.0. Conclusions: In our experience, prostate brachytherapy for localized carcinoma of the prostate is associated with a 15% catheterization rate and a significant increase in the IPSS (7.1 to 20.0). This increase in the IPSS seems to be self-limited. Patients need to be educated on these issues prior to prostate brachytherapy. PMID:11113369

  13. Study and parameters survey for iodine-125 source dosimetry to be applied in brachytherapy; Estudo e levantamentos de parametros para dosimetria de fontes de iodo-125 aplicadas em braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Eduardo Santana de

    2011-07-01

    The use of brachytherapy technique with iodine-125 seeds to prostate cancer treatment has been used for decades with good clinical outcomes. To aim the Brazilian population necessities, IPEN-CNEN/SP developed the iodine-125 seed prototype with national technology. The objectives of this work are the development and the study of dosimetric procedures associates with the experimental acquisition of the useful parameters for the iodine-125 dosimetric characterization and to evaluate if the developed procedures, in this work, have the basic conditions to determinate the dosimetric analysis, that are fundamental for clinical procedures. The dosimeters selected for the analysis are the TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti), initially these dosimeters were submitted for two selection steps to choose the dosimeters more reproducible for the dosimetric analysis. The two steps were the selection by the mass of the dosimeters and the reproducibility after four irradiation series in a Cobalt-60 irradiator (CTR-IPEN). Afterwards these steps, the dosimeters were irradiated in linear accelerator with 6 MV energy (Service of Radiotherapy - Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein) to yield the individual calibration factors to each dosimeter. After, the dosimeters were used to the irradiations with iodine-125 seed, 6711 model, (GE-Healthcare). The irradiations and others analysis with iodine-125 seeds yield the useful values for the determination of the parameters suggested by the AAPM (American Association of Physicists in Medicine): constant of dose rate, geometry function, dose radial function and anisotropy function. The results showed good agreement with the values published by the literature, for the same iodine- 125 model, this fact confirms that the realized parameters will be able to be used for the IPEN-CNEN iodine-125 seeds dosimetry and quality control. (author)

  14. Langzeitergebnisse bei Aderhautmelanom nach 106Ruthenium-Brachytherapie

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Nona

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: 106Ruthenium-brachytherapy (106Ru-brachytherapy) is an established therapy for small and medium-sized uveal melanomas. The aim of this study was to examine the long-time results in regard to recurrence rate, complication rate, ocular preservation, metastasis rate and survival with malignant uveal and ciliary body melanoma, as well as relevant prognosis factors, subsequent to 106Ru-brachytherapy. Methodology: In this retrospective study of all cases with uveal or with ciliary ...

  15. Computational Program of Isodose and TPS of 125I Seed for Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive sources are widely used in several fields including for medical purposes. One use of radioactive sources in medical field is radiotherapy to cure the cancerous organs. Brachytherapy term is the radiotherapy where the radiation source is placed inside or as close as possible to the cancer needing treatment. In order to support the domestic application of 125I seeds in brachytherapy, a computational program for isodose and TPS (Treatment Planning System) calculation shall be available. The preparation of the such program has been successfully developed using Microsoft Visual Basic for Windows and its supporting tools. This program can display the two-dimensions-isodose contour of 1-20 125I seeds presented in direction of lateral, anterior (AP) and caodal. The dose rate at the distances of 1, 2, 3 and 4 cm from the center point assumed as (0,0) can also be calculated from 1 to 360 days after implantation of the 125I seeds. The entered data as well as the resulting calculation and the contour presentation can be saved and be quickly traced and redisplayed at any time necessarily. This computer program is hopefully able to assist physicians in the implementation of 125I seeds implantation for brachytherapy. (author)

  16. Verification of the calculation program for brachytherapy planning system of high dose rate (PLATO); Programa de verificacion del calculo para un sistema de planificacion de braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis (PLATO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almansa, J.; Alaman, C.; Perez-Alija, J.; Herrero, C.; Real, R. del; Ososrio, J. L.

    2011-07-01

    In our treatments are performed brachytherapy high dose rate since 2007. The procedures performed include gynecological intracavitary treatment and interstitial. The treatments are performed with a source of Ir-192 activity between 5 and 10 Ci such that small variations in treatment times can cause damage to the patient. In addition the Royal Decree 1566/1998 on Quality Criteria in radiotherapy establishes the need to verify the monitor units or treatment time in radiotherapy and brachytherapy. All this justifies the existence of a redundant system for brachytherapy dose calculation that can reveal any abnormality is present.

  17. Ocular brachytherapy dosimetry for 103Pd and 125I in the presence of gold nanoparticles: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Somayeh; Vaez-Zadeh, Mehdi; Vahidian, Mohammad; Marghchouei, Mahdieh; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present Monte Carlo study is to evaluate the variation of energy deposition in healthy tissues in the human eye which is irradiated by brachytherapy sources in comparison with the resultant dose increase in the gold nanoparticle (GNP)-loaded choroidal melanoma. The effects of these nanoparticles on normal tissues are compared between 103Pd and 125I as two ophthalmic brachytherapy sources. Dose distribution in the tumor and healthy tissues has been taken into account for both brachytherapy sources. Also, in certain points of the eye, the ratio of the absorbed dose by the normal tissue in the presence of GNPs to the absorbed dose by the same point in the absence of GNPs has been calculated. In addition, differences of the absorbed dose in the tumor observed in the comparison of simple water phantom and actual simulated human eye in presence of GNPs are also a matter of interest that have been considered in the present work. The difference between the eye globe and the water phantom is more obvious for 125I than that of the 103Pd when the ophthalmic dosimetry is done in the presence of GNPs. Whenever these nanoparticles are utilized in enhancing the absorbed dose by the tumor, the use of 125I brachytherapy source will greatly amplify the amount of dose enhancement factor (DEF) in the tumor site without inflicting much dam-age to healthy organs, when compared to the 103Pd source. For instance, in the concentration of 30 mg GNPs, the difference amongst the calculated DEF for 125I between these phantoms is 5.3%, while it is 2.45% for 103Pd. Furthermore, in Monte Carlo studies of eye brachytherapy, more precise definition of the eye phantom instead of a water phantom will become increasingly important when we use 125I as opposed to 103Pd. PMID:27167265

  18. Design and implementation of an intravascular brachytherapy installation in cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intravascular Brachytherapy (IVB) is a very promising technique for reducing restenosis rates. However, neither the exact absolute dose needed nor the optimal spatial and temporal distribution of dose inside the vessel wall for a successful treatment, nor the physical dosimetry of the various radioactive sources and devices for dose delivery, are well known. In this paper, an overview will be given of the design strategy, the dosimetric and radiation protection-related problems that we have met during the implementation of this technique at San Carlos hospital, adopted or foreseen solutions, and future research fields that we intend to carry out in order to reduce uncertainties and to achieve a deeper knowledge of the parameters that have an influence on the treatment. (author)

  19. CT use for nasopharingeal molds realization in endocavitary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We present the following procedure for the making of individual molds with dental silicone for endocavitary brachytherapy of nasopharingeal cancer aided by CT scan. Procedure: Head immobilization during the realization of nasopharynx CT. Planification of treatment using these CT images, to determine the optimum position of radioactive sources. Printing on paper CT images with the nasopharynx contoured walls and the radioactive sources position. Realization of the mold in plastiline with the aid of the cuts of printer paper cut out with the nasopharynx form. Obtaining of the negative of the mold of plastiline by means of the use of alginate. Placement of two number 20 rectal rigid catheters with metal malleable bars inside them, in order to give them an adequate form in relation to the previous carried out planning. Filling in of alginato negative, where rectal catheters were placed, with Provil MCD Bayer Dental, a silicone based material for precision impression. We recommend to crossing the catheters' end with a number 2 silk thread to secure the catheter. An end of the silk thread is left outside the mold in order to help the extraction at the end of application. We advise to carry out a neuroleptic anaesthesia for its insertion, for the purpose of achieving a soft palate suitable relaxation. It makes the insertion easier. Repeat CT with the mold and phantoms in position to know a definitive dose distribution calculation. Conclusion: This method avoids the necessity of general anaesthesia in the realization of individual molds of nasopharyx for endocavitary brachytherapy and it improves the implant dosimetry

  20. Poster — Thur Eve — 40: Automated Quality Assurance for Remote-Afterloading High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Anthony; Ravi, Ananth [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre/Odette Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    High dose rate (HDR) remote afterloading brachytherapy involves sending a small, high-activity radioactive source attached to a cable to different positions within a hollow applicator implanted in the patient. It is critical that the source position within the applicator and the dwell time of the source are accurate. Daily quality assurance (QA) tests of the positional and dwell time accuracy are essential to ensure that the accuracy of the remote afterloader is not compromised prior to patient treatment. Our centre has developed an automated, video-based QA system for HDR brachytherapy that is dramatically superior to existing diode or film QA solutions in terms of cost, objectivity, positional accuracy, with additional functionalities such as being able to determine source dwell time and transit time of the source. In our system, a video is taken of the brachytherapy source as it is sent out through a position check ruler, with the source visible through a clear window. Using a proprietary image analysis algorithm, the source position is determined with respect to time as it moves to different positions along the check ruler. The total material cost of the video-based system was under $20, consisting of a commercial webcam and adjustable stand. The accuracy of the position measurement is ±0.2 mm, and the time resolution is 30 msec. Additionally, our system is capable of robustly verifying the source transit time and velocity (a test required by the AAPM and CPQR recommendations), which is currently difficult to perform accurately.

  1. Poster — Thur Eve — 40: Automated Quality Assurance for Remote-Afterloading High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High dose rate (HDR) remote afterloading brachytherapy involves sending a small, high-activity radioactive source attached to a cable to different positions within a hollow applicator implanted in the patient. It is critical that the source position within the applicator and the dwell time of the source are accurate. Daily quality assurance (QA) tests of the positional and dwell time accuracy are essential to ensure that the accuracy of the remote afterloader is not compromised prior to patient treatment. Our centre has developed an automated, video-based QA system for HDR brachytherapy that is dramatically superior to existing diode or film QA solutions in terms of cost, objectivity, positional accuracy, with additional functionalities such as being able to determine source dwell time and transit time of the source. In our system, a video is taken of the brachytherapy source as it is sent out through a position check ruler, with the source visible through a clear window. Using a proprietary image analysis algorithm, the source position is determined with respect to time as it moves to different positions along the check ruler. The total material cost of the video-based system was under $20, consisting of a commercial webcam and adjustable stand. The accuracy of the position measurement is ±0.2 mm, and the time resolution is 30 msec. Additionally, our system is capable of robustly verifying the source transit time and velocity (a test required by the AAPM and CPQR recommendations), which is currently difficult to perform accurately

  2. Australasian brachytherapy audit: results of 'end-to-end' dosimetry pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of a pilot study to test the feasibility of a brachytherapy dosimetry audit. The feasibility study was conducted at seven sites from four Australian states in both public and private centres. A purpose-built cylindrical water phantom was imaged using the local imaging protocol and a treatment plan was generated to deliver 1Gy to the central (1 of 3) thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) from six dwell positions. All centres completed the audit, consisting of three consecutive irradiations, within a 2-h time period, with the exception of one centre that uses a pulsed dose rate brachytherapy unit. All TLD results were within 4.5% of the predicted value, with the exception of one subset where the dwell position step size was incorrectly applied. While the limited data collected in the study demonstrated considerable heterogeneity in clinical practice, the study proved a brachytherapy dosimetry audit to be feasible. Future studies should include verification of source strength using a Standard Dosimetry Laboratory calibrated chamber, a phantom that more closely mimics the clinical situation, a more comprehensive review of safety and quality assurance (QA) procedures including source dwell time and position accuracy, and a review of patient treatment QA procedures such as applicator position verification.

  3. Radiation risk to patient and intervention personell from intracoronary brachytherapy; Die Dosisbelastung von Patienten und Interventionspersonal in der intravaskulaeren Brachytherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hefner, A. [Austrian Research Centers Seibersdorf (Austria); Kirisits, C.; Georg, D.; Poetter, R. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Strahlenbiologie, Wien (Austria); Aiginger, H. [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Wien (Austria)

    2001-07-01

    During the last years coronary brachytherapy has been extensively explored as a new treatment to prevent restenosis after percutaneous coronary interventions. While clinical and physical aspects of such treatments are addressed in literature, there is little information available on radiation protection and radiation safety aspects. In this paper we estimate the radiation risk for the patient using analytical methods and Monte Carlo calculations for three delivering systems currently used in clinics. Additionally, radiation risk to personell involved in such treatments is investigated. For gamma emitting sources the radiation exposure to patients is in the order of magnitude of the exposure due to diagnostic angiography. Doses to organs at risk when applying beta emitting sources are significantly lower. Measured doses for intervention personell are consistent with the estimated whole body dose. They are smaller than 7,5 {mu} {mu}Sv per intervention, which is a dose much less than 0,1 permille of the annual radiation workers maximum permissible dose (MPD) recommended by EC regulations. (orig.) [German] Intrakoronaere Brachytherapie ist in den letzten Jahren zu einer vielversprechenden Methode der Strahlenbehandlung geworden, um die Rate an Wiederverschluessen von Gefaessen nach revaskularisierenden Eingriffen zu verringern. Waehrend ueber die klinischen Behandlungsmethoden ausreichend Literatur vorhanden ist, stehen auf dem Gebiete des Strahlenschutzes fast keine Veroeffentlichungen zur Verfuegung. In dieser Veroeffentlichung gehen wir insbesondere auf die Abschaetzung des Strahlenrisikos des Patienten durch analytische Methoden und Monte Carlo-Rechnung fuer die drei derzeit in den Kliniken verwendeten Systeme ein. Ausserdem geben wir eine Abschaetzung des Strahlenrisikos des mit der Behandlung betrauten Personals. Die Strahlenbelastung des Patienten mit Systemen mit Gammastrahlern lieht in der Groessenordnung der Dosisbelastung bei der diagnostischen Angiographie

  4. Tissue modeling schemes in low energy breast brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsharpour, Hossein; Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-11-21

    Breast tissue is heterogeneous and is mainly composed of glandular (G) and adipose (A) tissues. The proportion of G versus A varies considerably among the population. The absorbed dose distributions in accelerated partial breast irradiation therapy with low energy photon brachytherapy sources are very sensitive to tissue heterogeneities. Current clinical algorithms use the recommendations of the AAPM TG43 report which approximates the human tissues by unit density water. The aim of this study is to investigate various breast tissue modeling schemes for low energy brachytherapy. A special case of breast permanent seed implant is considered here. Six modeling schemes are considered. Uniform and non-uniform water breast (UWB and NUWB) consider the density but neglect the effect of the composition of tissues. The uniform and the non-uniform G/A breast (UGAB and NUGAB) as well the age-dependent breast (ADB) models consider the effect of the composition. The segmented breast tissue (SBT) method uses a density threshold to distinguish between G and A tissues. The PTV D(90) metric is used for the analysis and is based on the dose to water (D(90(w,m))). D(90(m,m)) is also reported for comparison to D(90(w,m)). The two-month post-implant D(90(w,m)) averaged over 38 patients is smaller in NUWB than in UWB by about 4.6% on average (ranging from 5% to 13%). Large average differences of G/A breast models with TG43 (17% and 26% in UGAB and NUGAB, respectively) show that the effect of the chemical composition dominates the effect of the density on dose distributions. D(90(w,m)) is 12% larger in SBT than in TG43 when averaged. These differences can be as low as 4% or as high as 20% when the individual patients are considered. The high sensitivity of dosimetry on the modeling scheme argues in favor of an agreement on a standard tissue modeling approach to be used in low energy breast brachytherapy. SBT appears to generate the most geometrically reliable breast tissue models in this

  5. The Preliminary Prototype of Medium Dose Rate Brachytherapy Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Satmoko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary prototype of a brachytherapy equipment has been constructed. The work started by developing conceptual design, followed by basic design and detailed design. In the conceptual design, design requirements are stated. In the basic design, technical specifications for main components are determined. In detailed design, general drawings are discussed. The prototype consists of three main systems: a mechanical system, an instrumentation system, and a safety system. The mechanical system assures the movement mechanism of the isotope source position beginning from the standby position until the applicators. It consists of three main modules: a position handling module, a container module, and a channel distribution module. The position handling module serves to move the isotope source position. As shielding, the second module is to store the source when the equipment is in standby position. The prototype provides 12 output channels. The channel selection is performed by the third module. The instrumentation system controls the movement of source position by handling motor operations. It consists of several modules. A microcontroller module serves as a control center whose task includes both controlling motors and communicating with computer. A motor module serves to handle motors. 10 sensors, including their signal conditionings, are introduced to read the environment conditions of the equipment. LEDs are used to display these conditions. In order to facilitate the operators’ duty, communication via RS232 is provided. The brachytherapy equipment can therefore be operated by using computer. Interface software is developed using C# language. To complete both mechanical and instrumentation systems performance, a safety system is developed to make sure that the safety for operator and patients from receiving excessive radiation. An interlock system is introduced to guard against abnormal conditions. In the worst case, a manual intervention

  6. CT-Based Brachytherapy Treatment Planning using Monte Carlo Simulation Aided by an Interface Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Moslemi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In brachytherapy, radioactive sources are placed close to the tumor, therefore, small changes in their positions can cause large changes in the dose distribution. This emphasizes the need for computerized treatment planning. The usual method for treatment planning of cervix brachytherapy uses conventional radiographs in the Manchester system. Nowadays, because of their advantages in locating the source positions and the surrounding tissues, CT and MRI images are replacing conventional radiographs. In this study, we used CT images in Monte Carlo based dose calculation for brachytherapy treatment planning, using an interface software to create the geometry file required in the MCNP code. The aim of using the interface software is to facilitate and speed up the geometry set-up for simulations based on the patient’s anatomy. This paper examines the feasibility of this method in cervix brachytherapy and assesses its accuracy and speed. Material and Methods: For dosimetric measurements regarding the treatment plan, a pelvic phantom was made from polyethylene in which the treatment applicators could be placed. For simulations using CT images, the phantom was scanned at 120 kVp. Using an interface software written in MATLAB, the CT images were converted into MCNP input file and the simulation was then performed. Results: Using the interface software, preparation time for the simulations of the applicator and surrounding structures was approximately 3 minutes; the corresponding time needed in the conventional MCNP geometry entry being approximately 1 hour. The discrepancy in the simulated and measured doses to point A was 1.7% of the prescribed dose.  The corresponding dose differences between the two methods in rectum and bladder were 3.0% and 3.7% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Comparing the results of simulation using the interface software with those of simulation using the standard MCNP geometry entry showed a less than 1

  7. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Jimmy L.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Hazle, John D.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy seed therapy is an increasingly common way to treat prostate cancer through localized radiation. The current standard of care relies on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) for imaging guidance during the seed placement procedure. As visualization of individual metallic seeds tends to be difficult or inaccurate under TRUS guidance, guide needles are generally tracked to infer seed placement. In an effort to improve seed visualization and placement accuracy, the use of photoacoustic (PA...

  8. Brachytherapy in treatment of vaginal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    A. D. Kaprin; V. N. Galkin; S. A. Ivanov; V. A. Solodkiy; V. A. Titova

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of diagnosis and treatment of different types of primary vaginal cancer are highlighted, the role and place of brachytherapy as independent method or combined treatment modality for this pathology is shown in the review. Epidemiological data on incidence of vaginal cancer in Russia are represented, presumptive mechanisms for development of the disease, risk factors, histological types, features of the course, clinical presentation, diagnostic algorithm are described. Treatment...

  9. Current status of high dose rate brachytherapy in cervical cancer in Korea and optimal treatment schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Seung Jae [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-01

    Brachytherapy is an essential part of radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. The low dose rate (LDR) regimen has been the major technique of intracavitary therapy for cervical cancer. However, there has been an expansion in the last 20 years of high dose rate (HDR) machines using Ir-192 sources. Since 1979, HDR brachytherapy has been used for the treatment of uterine cervical cancer in Korea. The number of institutions employing HDR has been increasing, while the number of low dose rate system has been constant. In 1995, there was a total 27 HDR brachytherapy units installed and 1258 cases of patients with cervical cancer were treated with HDR. Most common regimens of HDR brachytherapy are total dose of 30-39 Gy at point A with 10-13 fractions in three fractions per week, 24-32 Gy with 6-8 fractions in two fractions per week, and 30-35 Gy with 6-7 fractions in two fractions per week. The average fractionation regimen of HDR brachytherapy is about 8 fractions of 4. 1 Gy each to point A. In Korea, treatment results for HDR brachytherapy are comparable with the LDR series and appears to be a safe and effective alternative to LDR therapy for the treatment of cervical carcinoma. Studies from the major centers report the five-year survival rate of cervical cancer as, 78-86% for Stage I, 68-85% for stage II, and 38-56% for Stage III. World-wide questionnaire study and Japanese questionnaire survey of multiple institutions showed no survival difference in any stages and dose-rate effect ratio (HDR/LDR) was calculated to be 0.54 to 0.58. However, the optimum treatment doses and fractionation schemes appropriate to generate clinical results comparable to conventional LDR schemes have yet to be standardized. In conclusion, HDR intracavitary radiotherapy is increasingly practiced in Korea and an effective treatment modality for cervical cancer. To determine the optimum radiotherapy dose and fractionation schedule, a nation-wide prospective study is necessary in Korea. In

  10. Preparation and deployment of indigenous 125I-seeds for the treatment of prostate cancer. Dawn of prostate brachytherapy in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Permanent seed implantation' using 125I- seeds has emerged as an effective treatment modality for management of prostate cancer. An indigenous technology for the production of 125I brachytherapy sources ('BARC 125I Ocu-Prosta seed') has been developed. In this current work, we describe an overview of our experience on large scale production of 125I brachytherapy sources, their quality assessment, in vivo bio-evaluation and initial experience on their journey from bench to bed-side for the treatment of prostate cancer. (author)

  11. Radiation protection for an intraoperative X-ray source compared to C-arm fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Frank; Clausen, Sven; Jahnke, Anika; Steil, Volker; Wenz, Frederik [Heidelberg Univ., University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bludau, Frederic; Obertacke, Udo [Heidelberg Univ., University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Trauma Surgery; Suetterlin, Marc [Heidelberg Univ., University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    2014-10-01

    Background: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) using the INTRABEAM {sup registered} system promises a flexible use regarding radiation protection compared to other approaches such as electron treatment or HDR brachytherapy with {sup 192}Ir or {sup 60}Co. In this study we compared dose rate measurements of breast- and Kypho-IORT with C-arm fluoroscopy which is needed to estimate radiation protection areas. Materials and Methods: C-arm fluoroscopy, breast- and Kypho-IORTs were performed using phantoms (silicon breast or bucket of water). Dose rates were measured at the phantom's surface, at 30 cm, 100 cm and 200 cm distance. Those measurements were confirmed during 10 Kypho-IORT and 10 breast-IORT patient treatments. Results: The measured dose rates were in the same magnitude for all three paradigms and ranges from 20 μSv/h during a simulated breast-IORT at two meter distance up to 64 mSv/h directly at the surface of a simulated Kypho-IORT. Those measurements result in a circle of controlled area (yearly doses > 6 mSv) for each paradigm of about 4 m ± 2 m. Discussion/Conclusions: All three paradigms show comparable dose rates which implies that the radiation protection is straight forward and confirms the flexible use of the INTRABEAM {sup registered} system. (orig.)

  12. Dosimetric Considerations to Determine the Optimal Technique for Localized Prostate Cancer Among External Photon, Proton, or Carbon-Ion Therapy and High-Dose-Rate or Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg, Dietmar, E-mail: Dietmar.Georg@akhwien.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hopfgartner, Johannes [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Gòra, Joanna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Kuess, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Kragl, Gabriele [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Berger, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hegazy, Neamat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Goldner, Gregor; Georg, Petra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), scanned proton therapy (intensity-modulated proton therapy, IMPT), scanned carbon-ion therapy (intensity-modulated carbon-ion therapy, IMIT), and low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were considered for this planning study. For external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), planning target volume was created by adding a margin of 5 mm (lateral/anterior–posterior) and 8 mm (superior–inferior) to the clinical target volume. Bladder wall (BW), rectal wall (RW), femoral heads, urethra, and pelvic tissue were considered as organs at risk. For VMAT and IMPT, 78 Gy(relative biological effectiveness, RBE)/2 Gy were prescribed. The IMIT was based on 66 Gy(RBE)/20 fractions. The clinical target volume planning aims for HDR-BT ({sup 192}Ir) and LDR-BT ({sup 125}I) were D{sub 90%} ≥34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction and D{sub 90%} ≥145 Gy. Both physical and RBE-weighted dose distributions for protons and carbon-ions were converted to dose distributions based on 2-Gy(IsoE) fractions. From these dose distributions various dose and dose–volume parameters were extracted. Results: Rectal wall exposure 30-70 Gy(IsoE) was reduced for IMIT, LDR-BT, and HDR-BT when compared with VMAT and IMPT. The high-dose region of the BW dose–volume histogram above 50 Gy(IsoE) of IMPT resembled the VMAT shape, whereas all other techniques showed a significantly lower high-dose region. For all 3 EBRT techniques similar urethra D{sub mean} around 74 Gy(IsoE) were obtained. The LDR-BT results were approximately 30 Gy(IsoE) higher, HDR-BT 10 Gy(IsoE) lower. Normal tissue and femoral head sparing was best with BT. Conclusion: Despite the different EBRT prescription and fractionation schemes, the high-dose regions of BW and RW expressed in Gy(IsoE) were on the same order of magnitude. Brachytherapy techniques

  13. SU-E-T-564: Multi-Helix Rotating Shield Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, H; Wu, X [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Flynn, R; Kim, Y [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel and practical brachytherapy technique, called multi-helix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT enables RSBT delivery using only translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. H-RSBT overcomes the challenges associated with previously proposed RSBT approaches based on a serial (S-RSBT) step-and-shoot delivery technique, which required independent translational and rotational motion. Methods: A Fletcher-type applicator, compatible with the combination of a Xoft Axxent™ electronic brachytherapy source and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten shield, is proposed. The wall of the applicator contains six evenly-spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the shield as a function of depth. The shield contains three protruding keys and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients representative of a wide range of high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. The number of beamlets used in the treatment planning process was nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. For all the treatment plans the EQD2 of the HR-CTV was escalated until the EQD{sub 2cc} tolerance of either the bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon was reached. Results: Treatment times for H-RSBT tended to be shorter than for S-RSBT, with changes of −38.47% to 1.12% with an average of −8.34%. The HR-CTV D{sub 90} changed by −8.81% to 2.08% with an average of −2.46%. Conclusion: H-RSBT is a mechanically feasible technique in the curved applicators needed for cervical cancer brachytherapy. S-RSBT and H-RSBT dose distributions were clinically equivalent for all patients

  14. Optical fibre luminescence sensor for real-time LDR brachytherapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woulfe, P.; Sullivan, F. J.; O'Keeffe, S.

    2016-05-01

    An optical fibre sensor for monitoring low dose radiation is presented. The sensor is based on a scintillation material embedded within the optical fibre core, which emits visible light when exposed to low level ionising radiation. The incident level of ionising radiation can be determined by analysing the optical emission. An optical fibre sensor is presented, based on radioluminescence whereby radiation sensitive scintillation material, terbium doped gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd2O2S:Tb), is embedded in a cavity of 250μm of a 500μm plastic optical fibre. The sensor is designed for in-vivo monitoring of the radiation dose during radio-active seed implantation for brachytherapy, in prostate cancer treatment, providing oncologists with real-time information of the radiation dose to the target area and/or nearby critical structures. The radiation from the brachytherapy seeds causes emission of visible light from the scintillation material through the process of radioluminescence, which penetrates the fibre, propagating along the optical fibre for remote detection using a multi-pixel photon counter. The sensor demonstrates a high sensitivity to Iodine-125, the radioactive source most commonly used in brachytherapy for treating prostate cancer.

  15. Radiation exposure to operating room staff during prostate brachytherapy using iodine-125 seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The French defense radiation protection service (SPRA) and the French national institute for research and safety (INRS) conducted a joint study to assess the radiation exposure to operating room staff during prostate brachytherapy using iodine-125 seeds at the Val-de-Grace military hospital. The purpose of the study was the assessment of the effective doses, the equivalent doses to the extremities and lens received by a novice team, the different ambient dose equivalent rates measurements and the delineation of areas. After six brachy-therapies, all the recorded doses with whole-body InLightR OSL and nanoDotR dosimeters remained below the detection limit for the whole staff. The dose rate measured at the end of implantation by an AT1123R survey meter is about 170 μSv/h at the perineum of the patient. The controlled area limit is estimated to be about 20 cm from the patient perineum. From these results, the authors propose recommendations for the categorization of workers, the delineation of areas and the dose monitoring procedures. This study demonstrates that real-time ultrasound-guided trans-perineal prostate brachytherapy delivers low dose to the operators because of the radioactive source characteristics and the instrumentation providing an effective radiation protection for the surgical team. (authors)

  16. Prospective multi-center trial utilizing electronic brachytherapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified form of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy has been developed called Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT). EBT uses a kilovolt X-ray source and does not require treatment in a shielded vault or a HDR afterloader unit. A multi-center clinical study was carried out to evaluate the success of treatment delivery, safety and toxicity of EBT in patients with endometrial cancer. A total of 15 patients with stage I or II endometrial cancer were enrolled at 5 sites. Patients were treated with vaginal EBT alone or in combination with external beam radiation. The prescribed doses of EBT were successfully delivered in all 15 patients. From the first fraction through 3 months follow-up, there were 4 CTC Grade 1 adverse events and 2 CTC Grade II adverse events reported that were EBT related. The mild events reported were dysuria, vaginal dryness, mucosal atrophy, and rectal bleeding. The moderate treatment related adverse events included dysuria, and vaginal pain. No Grade III or IV adverse events were reported. The EBT system performed well and was associated with limited acute toxicities. EBT shows acute results similar to HDR brachytherapy. Additional research is needed to further assess the clinical efficacy and safety of EBT in the treatment of endometrial cancer

  17. Current Brachytherapy Quality Assurance Guidance: Does It Meet the Challenges of Emerging Image-Guided Technologies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past decade, brachytherapy has shifted from the traditional surgical paradigm to more modern three-dimensional image-based planning and delivery approaches. The role of intraoperative and multimodality image-based planning is growing. Published American Association of Physicists in Medicine, American College of Radiology, European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and International Atomic Energy Agency quality assurance (QA) guidelines largely emphasize the QA of planning and delivery devices rather than processes. These protocols have been designed to verify compliance with major performance specifications and are not risk based. With some exceptions, complete and clinically practical guidance exists for sources, QA instrumentation, non-image-based planning systems, applicators, remote afterloading systems, dosimetry, and calibration. Updated guidance is needed for intraoperative imaging systems and image-based planning systems. For non-image-based brachytherapy, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group reports 56 and 59 provide reasonable guidance on procedure-specific process flow and QA. However, improved guidance is needed even for established procedures such as ultrasound-guided prostate implants. Adaptive replanning in brachytherapy faces unsolved problems similar to that of image-guided adaptive external beam radiotherapy

  18. Prospective multi-center trial utilizing electronic brachytherapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thropay John P

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A modified form of high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy has been developed called Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT. EBT uses a kilovolt X-ray source and does not require treatment in a shielded vault or a HDR afterloader unit. A multi-center clinical study was carried out to evaluate the success of treatment delivery, safety and toxicity of EBT in patients with endometrial cancer. Methods A total of 15 patients with stage I or II endometrial cancer were enrolled at 5 sites. Patients were treated with vaginal EBT alone or in combination with external beam radiation. Results The prescribed doses of EBT were successfully delivered in all 15 patients. From the first fraction through 3 months follow-up, there were 4 CTC Grade 1 adverse events and 2 CTC Grade II adverse events reported that were EBT related. The mild events reported were dysuria, vaginal dryness, mucosal atrophy, and rectal bleeding. The moderate treatment related adverse events included dysuria, and vaginal pain. No Grade III or IV adverse events were reported. The EBT system performed well and was associated with limited acute toxicities. Conclusions EBT shows acute results similar to HDR brachytherapy. Additional research is needed to further assess the clinical efficacy and safety of EBT in the treatment of endometrial cancer.

  19. Quality control of the breast cancer treatments on Hdr brachytherapy with TLD-100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres H, F. [Universidad de Cordoba, Materials and Applied Physics Group, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia); De la Espriella V, N. [Universidad de Cordoba, Grupo Avanzado de Materiales y Sistemas Complejos, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia); Sanchez C, A., E-mail: franciscotorreshoyos@yahoo.com [Universidad de Cordoba, Departamento de Enfermeria, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia)

    2014-07-01

    An anthropomorphic Phantom, a female trunk, was built with a natural bone structure and experimental material coated, glycerin and water-based material called JJT to build soft tissue equivalent to the muscle of human tissue, and a polymer (styrofoam) to build the lung as critical organ to simulate the treatment of breast cancer, with high dose rate brachytherapy (Hdr) and sources of Ir-192. The treatments were planned and calculated for the critical organ: Lung, and injury of 2 cm in diameter in breast with Micro Selectron Hdr system and the software Plato Brachytherapy V 14.1 of the Nucletron (Netherlands) which uses the standard protocol of radiotherapy for brachytherapy treatments. The dose experimentally measured with dosimeters TLD-100 LiF: Mg; Ti, which were previously calibrated, were placed in the same positions and bodies mentioned above, with less than 5% uncertainty. The reading dosimeters was carried out in a Harshaw TLD 4500. The results obtained for calculated treatments, using the standard simulator, and the experimental with TLD-100, show a high concordance, as they are on average a ± 1.1% making process becomes in a quality control of this type of treatments. (Author)

  20. BrachyView, a novel in-body imaging system for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Experimental evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Alnaghy, S.; Cutajar, D.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B., E-mail: anatoly@uow.edu.au [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong 2522 (Australia); Franklin, D. R. [Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Technology, Sydney 2007 (Australia); Bucci, J. [St George Hospital Cancer Care Centre, Kogarah 2217 (Australia); Carrara, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan 20133 (Italy); Zaider, M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: This paper presents initial experimental results from a prototype of high dose rate (HDR) BrachyView, a novel in-body source tracking system for HDR brachytherapy based on a multipinhole tungsten collimator and a high resolution pixellated silicon detector array. The probe and its associated position estimation algorithms are validated and a comprehensive evaluation of the accuracy of its position estimation capabilities is presented. Methods: The HDR brachytherapy source is moved through a sequence of positions in a prostate phantom, for various displacements in x, y, and z. For each position, multiple image acquisitions are performed, and source positions are reconstructed. Error estimates in each dimension are calculated at each source position and combined to calculate overall positioning errors. Gafchromic film is used to validate the accuracy of source placement within the phantom. Results: More than 90% of evaluated source positions were estimated with an error of less than one millimeter, with the worst-case error being 1.3 mm. Experimental results were in close agreement with previously published Monte Carlo simulation results. Conclusions: The prototype of HDR BrachyView demonstrates a satisfactory level of accuracy in its source position estimation, and additional improvements are achievable with further refinement of HDR BrachyView’s image processing algorithms.

  1. Effect of improved operating practices in collective dose reduction during fabrication of kilo curie level of sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since last 3 decades, fabrication of 60Co and 192Ir sealed sources in hot cells at Radiological Laboratories is being carried out for their widespread applications in industry and medicine. Many improvements in operating practices and modification in design of source capsules have been implemented since then with respect to radiation safety aspects. The radiological data generated during fabrication of sealed sources have been served as guidelines for designing of the new upcoming hot cell facilities. The radiological data indicates the collective dose reduction by a factor of ∼2 as compared with earlier values of 1999. In this paper, efforts have been made to analyze data keeping in focus the critical groups and jobs involved in source fabrication work. (author)

  2. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Samia de Freitas Brandao; Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de Campos

    2013-01-01

    Objective Comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted int...

  3. Perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent keloid scars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Evaluation of the results of perioperative interstitial brachytherapy with low dose-rate (L.D.R.) Ir-192 in the treatment of keloid scars. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 73 histologically confirmed keloids (from 58 patients) resistant to medico surgical treated by surgical excision plus early perioperative brachytherapy. All lesions were initially symptomatic. Local control was evaluated by clinical evaluation. Functional and cosmetic results were assessed in terms of patient responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Median age was 28 years (range 13-71 years). Scars were located as follows: 37% on the face, 32% on the trunk or abdomen, 16% on the neck, and 15% on the arms or legs. The mean delay before loading was four hours (range, 1-6 h). The median dose was 20 Gy (range, 15-40 Gy). Sixty-four scars (from 53 patients) were evaluated. Local control was 86% (follow-up, 44.5 months; range, 14-150 months). All relapses occurred early within 2 years posttreatment. At 20 months, survival without recurrence was significantly lower when treated lengths were more than 6 cm long. The rate was 100% for treated scars below 4.5 cm in length, 95% (95% CI: 55-96) for those 4.5-6 cm long, and 75% (95% CI: 56-88) beyond 6 cm (p = 0.038). Of the 35 scars (28 patients) whose results were reassessed, six remained symptomatic and the esthetic results were considered to be good in 51% (18/35) and average in 37% (13/35) (median follow-up, 70 months; range, 16-181 months). Conclusion: Early perioperative L.D.R. brachytherapy delivering 20 Gy at 5 mm reduced the rate of recurrent keloids resistant to other treatments and gave good functional results. (authors)

  4. The application of Geant4 simulation code for brachytherapy treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Agostinelli, S; Garelli, S; Paoli, G; Nieminen, P; Pia, M G

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapeutic modality that makes use of radionuclides to deliver a high radiation dose to a well-defined volume while sparing surrounding healthy structures. At the National Institute for Cancer Research of Genova a High Dose Rate remote afterloading system provides Ir(192) endocavitary brachytherapy treatments. We studied the possibility to use the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit in brachytherapy for calculation of complex physical parameters, not directly available by experiment al measurements, used in treatment planning dose deposition models.

  5. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: Report of Task Group 192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podder, Tarun K., E-mail: tarun.podder@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44122 (United States); Beaulieu, Luc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Univ de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Caldwell, Barrett [Schools of Industrial Engineering and Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Crass, Jostin B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Fenster, Aaron [Department of Imaging Research, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Fichtinger, Gabor [School of Computer Science, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Meltsner, Michael A. [Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, Wisconsin 53711 (United States); Moerland, Marinus A. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, 3508 GA (Netherlands); Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Salcudean, Tim [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Song, Danny Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Thomadsen, Bruce R. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    should mimic the real operating procedure as closely as possible. Additional recommendations on robotic brachytherapy systems include display of the operational state; capability of manual override; documented policies for independent check and data verification; intuitive interface displaying the implantation plan and visualization of needle positions and seed locations relative to the target anatomy; needle insertion in a sequential order; robot–clinician and robot–patient interactions robustness, reliability, and safety while delivering the correct dose at the correct site for the correct patient; avoidance of excessive force on radioactive sources; delivery confirmation of the required number or position of seeds; incorporation of a collision avoidance system; system cleaning, decontamination, and sterilization procedures. These recommendations are applicable to end users and manufacturers of robotic brachytherapy systems.

  6. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: report of Task Group 192.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Tarun K; Beaulieu, Luc; Caldwell, Barrett; Cormack, Robert A; Crass, Jostin B; Dicker, Adam P; Fenster, Aaron; Fichtinger, Gabor; Meltsner, Michael A; Moerland, Marinus A; Nath, Ravinder; Rivard, Mark J; Salcudean, Tim; Song, Danny Y; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Yu, Yan

    2014-10-01

    mimic the real operating procedure as closely as possible. Additional recommendations on robotic brachytherapy systems include display of the operational state; capability of manual override; documented policies for independent check and data verification; intuitive interface displaying the implantation plan and visualization of needle positions and seed locations relative to the target anatomy; needle insertion in a sequential order; robot-clinician and robot-patient interactions robustness, reliability, and safety while delivering the correct dose at the correct site for the correct patient; avoidance of excessive force on radioactive sources; delivery confirmation of the required number or position of seeds; incorporation of a collision avoidance system; system cleaning, decontamination, and sterilization procedures. These recommendations are applicable to end users and manufacturers of robotic brachytherapy systems.

  7. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: Report of Task Group 192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    should mimic the real operating procedure as closely as possible. Additional recommendations on robotic brachytherapy systems include display of the operational state; capability of manual override; documented policies for independent check and data verification; intuitive interface displaying the implantation plan and visualization of needle positions and seed locations relative to the target anatomy; needle insertion in a sequential order; robot–clinician and robot–patient interactions robustness, reliability, and safety while delivering the correct dose at the correct site for the correct patient; avoidance of excessive force on radioactive sources; delivery confirmation of the required number or position of seeds; incorporation of a collision avoidance system; system cleaning, decontamination, and sterilization procedures. These recommendations are applicable to end users and manufacturers of robotic brachytherapy systems

  8. Characteristics of the radiochromic film Gafchromictm EBT3 model for use in brachytherapy; Caracterizacao do filme radiocromico Gafchromictm modelo EBT3 para uso em braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luvizotto, Jessica

    2015-07-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy treatment modality using radioactive sealed sources within walking distance of the tumor, reducing the risk of applying an unwanted dose to adjacent healthy tissues. For brachytherapy is reliable, it is necessary to establish a dosimetric practices program aimed at determining the optimal dose of radiation for this radiotherapy practice. This paper presents the application of two methodologies for the dosimetry using radiochromic films. Experimental measurements were performed with EBT3 films in phantoms consisting of homogeneous and heterogeneous material (lung, bone and soft tissue) built especially for dose measurements in brachytherapy. The processing and analysis of the resulting images of the experimental procedure were performed with ImageJ software and MATLAB. The results were evaluated from comparisons dose of experimental measurements and simulations obtained by the Monte Carlo method. (author)

  9. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, de l' Universite Laval, CHUQ, Pavillon L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, {sup 131}Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium D{sub w,m} as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium D{sub m,m}. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 125}I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 103}Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations

  10. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: 125I, 103Pd, 131Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium Dw,m as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium Dm,m. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using 125I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D90 values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using 103Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D90 values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations in the mean compositions of tissues affect low energy

  11. Applicability of a prototype for determination of absorbed dose using brachytherapy equipment with Ir-192 sources; Aplicabilidade de um prototipo para determinacao da dose absorvida utilizando equipamentos de braquiterapia com fontes de IR-192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vivianne Lucia Bormann; Almeida, Mayara Gabriella Oliveira de; Vieira, Rafaela Etelvina de Amorim; Silva, Waldecy Ananias da; Nascimento, Rizia Keila, E-mail: vlsouza@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: mayaradqf@hotmail.com, E-mail: rodriguesss@hootmail.com, E-mail: waldecy@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: riziakeila@hotmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work aims at the development and improvement of a device to perform the absolute dosimetry sources of Ir-192 using the Fricke solution contained in a flask. The Fricke solution used was prepared using amounts of ferrous ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and sulfuric acid, diluted with water tri distilled pre-established in the literature. The spectrophotometer used was a UV-VIS spectrophotometer (Beckman DU-640 Counter) for measuring the optical density at wavelength 304 nm. The calculation for determining the radial dose takes into account the radial distance and the angle formed with the transverse axis of the source. As the results obtained can be seen that the states of Pernambuco, Ceara, Paraiba e Piaui are in accordance with the recommendations of international standards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which considers not acceptable a difference greater than 5% of prescribed dose and measured dose.

  12. Development of irradiation support devices for production of brachytherapy seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Fabio R.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Souza, Carla D.; Moura, Joao A.; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Karan Junior, Dib; Feher, Anselmo; Oliveira, Tiago B.; Benega, Marcos A.G., E-mail: tiagooliveira298@gmail.com, E-mail: mattos.fr@gmail.com, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br, E-mail: czeituni@ipen.br, E-mail: carladdsouza@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: jamoura@ipen.br, E-mail: ernandopeleias@gmail.com, E-mail: s, E-mail: dib.karan@usp.br, E-mail: afeher@ipen.br, E-mail: marcosagbenega@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Ophthalmic tumors treatment with brachytherapy sources has been widely used as a primary or secondary therapy for non-malignant or malignant tumors, for example, choroid melanoma, and retinoblastoma. Ruthenium-106, Iodine-125, Palladium -103, Gold-198 and Iridium-192, are some radionuclides that can be applied for treatment of ocular tumors. These sources are in small sizes (a few millimeters) and different shapes (rods, wires, disks). To ensure high accuracy during treatment, they are positioned in eye applicators, specially designed to fit on the surface of tumor. The Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN) in a partnership with Paulista Medicine School (UNIFESP) created a project that aims to develop a prototype of Iridium-192 seeds for treatment of eye cancer. This seed consists in a core of Ir -Pt alloy (20%-80%) with a length of 3 mm, to be activated in IPEN's IEA-R1 Reactor, and a titanium capsule sealing the core. It was imperative to develop a sustainer device for irradiation. This piece is used to avoid overlapping of one cores and, therefore, avoiding the 'shadow effect' that does not allow full activation of each core due to the high density. (author)

  13. A study of brachytherapy for intraocular tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose of this study is to perform brachytherapy for intraocular tumor. The result were as followed. 1. Eye model was determined as a 25 mm diameter sphere. Ir-192 was considered the most appropriate as radioisotope for brachytherapy, because of the size, half, energy and availability. 2. Considering the biological response with human tissue and protection of exposed dose, we made the plaques with gold, of which size were 15 mm, 17 mm and 20 mm in diameter, and 1.5 mm in thickness. 3. Transmission factor of plaques are all 0.71 with TLD and film dosimetry at the surface of plaques and 0.45, 0.49 at 1.5 mm distance of surface, respectively. 4. As compared the measured data for the plaque with Ir-192 seeds to results of computer dose calculation model by Gary Luxton et al. and CAP-PLAN (Radiation Treatment Planning System), absorbed doses are within ±10% and distance deviations are within 0.4 mm. Maximum error is -11.3% and 0.8 mm, respectively. 7 figs, 2 tabs, 28 refs. (Author)

  14. Rapid emission angle selection for rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang Wenjun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: The authors present a rapid emission angle selection (REAS) method that enables the efficient selection of the azimuthal shield angle for rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT). The REAS method produces a Pareto curve from which a potential RSBT user can select a treatment plan that balances the tradeoff between delivery time and tumor dose conformity. Methods: Two cervical cancer patients were considered as test cases for the REAS method. The RSBT source considered was a Xoft Axxent{sup TM} electronic brachytherapy source, partially shielded with 0.5 mm of tungsten, which traveled inside a tandem intrauterine applicator. Three anchor RSBT plans were generated for each case using dose-volume optimization, with azimuthal shield emission angles of 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 270 Degree-Sign . The REAS method converts the anchor plans to treatment plans for all possible emission angles by combining neighboring beamlets to form beamlets for larger emission angles. Treatment plans based on exhaustive dose-volume optimization (ERVO) and exhaustive surface optimization (ERSO) were also generated for both cases. Uniform dwell-time scaling was applied to all plans such that that high-risk clinical target volume D{sub 90} was maximized without violating the D{sub 2cc} tolerances of the rectum, bladder, and sigmoid colon. Results: By choosing three azimuthal emission angles out of 32 potential angles, the REAS method performs about 10 times faster than the ERVO method. By setting D{sub 90} to 85-100 Gy{sub 10}, the delivery times used by REAS generated plans are 21.0% and 19.5% less than exhaustive surface optimized plans used by the two clinical cases. By setting the delivery time budget to 5-25 and 10-30 min/fx, respectively, for two the cases, the D{sub 90} contributions for REAS are improved by 5.8% and 5.1% compared to the ERSO plans. The ranges used in this comparison were selected in order to keep both D{sub 90} and the delivery time within acceptable

  15. Brachytherapy in thetreatment of the oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Zhumankulov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the methods of radiotherapy of malignant tumors of oral cavity and oropharyngeal region today is interstitial radiation therapy – brachytherapy, allowing you to create the optimum dose of irradiation to the tumor, necessary for its destruction, without severe radiation reactions in the surrounding tissues unchanged. Brachytherapy has the following advantages: high precision – the ability of the local summarization of high single doses in a limited volume of tissue; good tolerability; a short time of treatment. At this time, brachytherapy is the method of choice used as palliative therapy and as a component of radical treatment.Objective: The purpose of this article is a literature review about the latest achievements of interstitial brachytherapy in malignant tumors of the oral cavity and oropharynx.

  16. Nursing intervention in gynecologic brachytherapy under general anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reconsidered our nursing intervention in gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy as general anesthesia was introduced. We recognized that safety, comfort, privacy protection and relief of anxiety of the patients were important points for nursing with corporation of other medical staffs. (author)

  17. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M., E-mail: mharkenrider@lumc.edu; Alite, Fiori; Silva, Scott R.; Small, William

    2015-07-15

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy.

  18. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  19. Results of the European research project 'Improving the effectiveness of cancer treatment with 3D Brachytherapy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project iMERA + T2.J06 'Improving the effectiveness of cancer treatment using 3D brachytherapy' was solved in the period 2008-2011 in collaboration of metrology institutes from 10 European Union countries, including participation of the Czech Republic. Its main objective was to create a means to ensure metrological quantity absorbed dose in water from brachyterapeutical (BT) sources enabling more accurate assessment of therapeutic benefit than using existing dosimetry protocols that are based on the quantity kerma in the air. This project is discussed.

  20. Implementation of 'early alert system' area detector at patient from entrance in afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system of area monitors to detect the involuntary exit of the radiation sources used in low dose rate deferred brachytherapy treatment is being implemented in all facilities in Chile. The first implementation of this system, named 'Early Alert', was 5 years ago as a complement to the administrative procedures and verification measures by the medical physics carried out through visual verifications and by means of portable radiation detectors. This detector of the system should be located preferentially at the exit of the treatment room at a height not smaller than two meters. This has resulted in an increase of facilities safety in this practice. (author)

  1. Ocular Brachytherapy Dosimetry for 103Pd and 125I in The Presence of Gold Nanoparticles: Monte Carlo Study

    CERN Document Server

    Asadi, S; Vahidian, M; Marghchouei, M; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present Monte Carlo study is to evaluate the variation of energy deposition in healthy tissues in the human eye which is irradiated by brachytherapy sources in comparison with the resultant dose increase in the gold nanoparticle(GNP)-loaded choroidal melanoma. The effects of these nanoparticles on normal tissues are compared between 103Pd and 125I as two ophthalmic brachytherapy sources. Dose distribution in the tumor and healthy tissues have been taken into account for both mentioned brachytherapy sources. Also, in a certain point of the eye, the ratio of the absorbed dose by the normal tissue in the presence of GNPs to the absorbed dose by the same point in the absence of GNPs has been calculated. In addition, differences observed in the comparison of simple water phantom and actual simulated human eye in presence of GNPs are also a matter of interest that have been considered in the present work. The results show that the calculated dose enhancement factor in the tumor for 125I is higher tha...

  2. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy; Calculos dosimetricos em braquiterapia intravascular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Laelia Pumilla Botelho

    2000-03-01

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing {sup 32} P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  3. Predictors of Metastatic Disease After Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify predictors of metastatic disease after brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients who received either brachytherapy alone (implant) or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy for treatment of localized prostate cancer at The Mount Sinai Hospital between June 1990 and March 2007 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed on the following variables: risk group, Gleason score (GS), clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, post-treatment prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), treatment type (implant vs. implant plus external beam radiation therapy), treatment era, total biological effective dose, use of androgen deprivation therapy, age at diagnosis, and race. PSA-DT was analyzed in the following ordinate groups: 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 180 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days. Results: We included 1,887 patients in this study. Metastases developed in 47 of these patients. The 10-year freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM) rate for the entire population was 95.1%. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 2–15 years). The only two significant predictors of metastatic disease by multivariable analyses were GS and PSA-DT (p < 0.001 for both variables). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for GS of 6 or less, GS of 7, and GS of 8 or greater were 97.9%, 94.3%, and 76.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated FFDM rates for PSA-DT of 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 181 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days were 17.5%, 67.9%, 74%, and 94.8%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 98.6%, 96.2%, and 86.7%, respectively. A demographic shift to patients presenting with higher-grade disease in more recent years was observed. Conclusions: GS and post-treatment PSA-DT are both statistically significant independent predictors of metastatic

  4. Braquiterapia guiada por imagen Image-guided brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Villafranca

    2009-01-01

    calculation possible. In recent years there have been changes affecting two aspects of brachytherapy. In the first place, the incorporation of imaging techniques such as echography, computerised tomography (CT and magnetic resonance (MR, indispensable for diagnosis and tumoural staging. Their use when the implant is being done helps in guiding and carrying out the operation with greater precision. In the second place, the use of CT, MR and echography makes better coverage of the tumour possible, or reduces the dose to healthy organs. They are used in inverse planning systems, which carry out dose calculation on the basis of the doses to be administered to the tumour and healthy organs. In these planning programs it is possible to make calculations more rapidly, taking account of the placement of the source at each moment in time. This technique, called real-time planning, is starting to show advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer. Incorporation of imaging techniques and improvements in calculation systems mean that brachytherapy is currently playing an important role in treating cancer of the prostate, cervix, breast, head and neck tumours, bronchial tubes or oesophagus.

  5. Dosimetric analysis of BNCT - Boron Neutron Capture Therapy - coupled to 252Cf brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of brain tumors is increasing in world population; however, the treatments employed in this type of tumor have a high rate of failure and in some cases have been considered palliative, depending on histology and staging of tumor. Its necessary to achieve the control tumor dose without the spread irradiation cause damage in the brain, affecting patient neurological function. Stereotactic radiosurgery is a technique that achieves this; nevertheless, other techniques that can be used on the brain tumor control must be developed, in order to guarantee lower dose on health surroundings tissues other techniques must be developing. The 252Cf brachytherapy applied to brain tumors has already been suggested, showing promising results in comparison to photon source, since the active source is placed into the tumor, providing greater dose deposition, while more distant regions are spared. BNCT - Boron Neutron Capture Therapy - is another technique that is in developing to brain tumors control, showing theoretical superiority on the rules of conventional treatments, due to a selective irradiation of neoplasics cells, after the patient receives a borate compound infusion and be subjected to a epithermal neutrons beam. This work presents dosimetric studies of the coupling techniques: BNCT with 252Cf brachytherapy, conducted through computer simulation in MCNP5 code, using a precise and well discretized voxel model of human head, which was incorporated a representative Glioblastoma Multiform tumor. The dosimetric results from MCNP5 code were exported to SISCODES program, which generated isodose curves representing absorbed dose rate in the brain. Isodose curves, neutron fluency, and dose components from BNCT and 252Cf brachytherapy are presented in this paper. (author)

  6. The use of fluoroscopy to guide needle placement in interstitial gynecological brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Interstitial brachytherapy is generally performed for gynecological malignancies with extensive parametrial involvement, by inserting the needles through a transperineal template. Often, the implanted needles are not parallel, and the multiple sources can be difficult to identify on localization radiographs, especially if obtained with a portable X-ray unit. We have used fluoroscopy to guide the needles for interstitial brachytherapy to treat various gynecological malignancies. Because the resultant needles are parallel, dosimetry can be performed based on the template hole positions used, rather than identifying individual sources. This report focuses on the technique; the outcome of patients implanted with this technique will be reported separately. Methods: Seventy-one patients were implanted transperineally with 192iridium using a Syed template under fluoroscopic guidance, from September 1989 to May 1995, for bulky parametrial disease, narrow vagina, extensive vaginal involvement, recurrent disease after previous course of pelvic radiation therapy, or in cases in which the patient had previously undergone hysterectomy. 137Cesium was added in a central tandem in cases with a cervical os. Thirty patients were treated for primary cervical or vaginal carcinoma; 41 patients were treated for recurrent disease from endometrial or cervical cancers. The brachytherapy dose (prescribed to the periphery of the implant) was 40 to 55 Gy when used alone (15 patients) and 22-40 Gy when used as a boost to 34.2 to 59.4 Gy of pelvic external-beam radiotherapy (56 patients). The patients were followed for 6 to 63 months. Results: In all cases, some of the needles had to be repositioned to improve the alignment. Hence, the use of fluoroscopy aided in achieving parallel placement of the needles in all implants as seen on anterior-posterior radiographs. Because the 192iridium sources were ordered beforehand based on the preplan, and the dosimetry was based on idealized

  7. Toward endobronchial Ir-192 high-dose-rate brachytherapy therapeutic optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, H A [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Allison, R R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Downie, G H [Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Mota, H C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Austerlitz, C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Jenkins, T [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Sibata, C H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States)

    2007-06-07

    A number of patients with lung cancer receive either palliative or curative high-dose-rate (HDR) endobronchial brachytherapy. Up to a third of patients treated with endobronchial HDR die from hemoptysis. Rather than accept hemoptysis as an expected potential consequence of HDR, we have calculated the radial dose distribution for an Ir-192 HDR source, rigorously examined the dose and prescription points recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS), and performed a radiobiological-based analysis. The radial dose rate of a commercially available Ir-192 source was calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation. Based on the linear quadratic model, the estimated palliative, curative and blood vessel rupture radii from the center of an Ir-192 source were obtained for the ABS recommendations and a series of customized HDR prescriptions. The estimated radius at risk for blood vessel perforation for the ABS recommendations ranges from 7 to 9 mm. An optimized prescription may in some situations reduce this radius to 4 mm. The estimated blood perforation radius is generally smaller than the palliative radius. Optimized and individualized endobronchial HDR prescriptions are currently feasible based on our current understanding of tumor and normal tissue radiobiology. Individualized prescriptions could minimize complications such as fatal hemoptysis without sacrificing efficacy. Fiducial stents, HDR catheter centering or spacers and the use of CT imaging to better assess the relationship between the catheter and blood vessels promise to be useful strategies for increasing the therapeutic index of this treatment modality. Prospective trials employing treatment optimization algorithms are needed.

  8. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  9. Interstitial brachytherapy in carcinoma of the penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, A.J.; Ghosh, S.; Bhalavat, R.L. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kulkarni, J.N. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Surgery; Sequeira, B.V.E. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Keeping in line with the increasing emphasis on organ preservation, we at the Tata Memorial Hospital have evaluated the role of Ir-192 interstitial implant as regards local control, functional and cosmetic outcome in early as well as locally recurrent carcinoma of the distal penis. Patients and Methods: From October 1988 to December 1996, 23 patients with histopathologically proven cancer of the penis were treated with radical radiation therapy using Ir-192 temporary interstitial implant. Our patients were in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The primary lesions were T1 and 7, T2 in 7 and recurrent in 9 patients. Only 7 patients had palpable groin nodes at presentation, all of which were pathologically negative. The median dose of implant was 50 Gy (range 40 to 60 Gy), using the LDR afterloading system and the Paris system of implant rules for dosimetry. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 117 months (median 24 months). Results: At last follow-up 18 of the 23 patients remained locally controlled with implant alone. Three patients failed only locally, 2 locoregionally and 1 only at the groin. Of the 5 patients who failed locally, 4 were successfully salvaged with partial penectomy and remained controlled when last seen. Local control with implant alone at 8 years was 70% by life table analysis. The patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We did not record any case of skin or softtissue necrosis. Only 2 patients developed meatal stenosis, both of which were treated endoscopically. Conclusion: Our results lead us to interpret that interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 offers excellent local control rates with preservation of organ and function. Penectomy can be reserved as a means for effective salvage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Das Prinzip des Organerhalts gewinnt in der Onkologie zunehmend an Bedeutung. Ziel dieser Untersuchung war es, die Rolle der interstitiellen Brachytherapie mit Ir-192 zur Behandlung des fruehen und rezidivierten Peniskarzinoms zu

  10. A dynamic dosimetry system for prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y.; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2013-03-01

    The lack of dynamic dosimetry tools for permanent prostate brachytherapy causes otherwise avoidable problems in prostate cancer patient care. The goal of this work is to satisfy this need in a readily adoptable manner. Using the ubiquitous ultrasound scanner and mobile non-isocentric C-arm, we show that dynamic dosimetry is now possible with only the addition of an arbitrarily configured marker-based fiducial. Not only is the system easily configured from accessible hardware, but it is also simple and convenient, requiring little training from technicians. Furthermore, the proposed system is built upon robust algorithms of seed segmentation, fiducial detection, seed reconstruction, and image registration. All individual steps of the pipeline have been thoroughly tested, and the system as a whole has been validated on a study of 25 patients. The system has shown excellent results of accurately computing dose, and does so with minimal manual intervention, therefore showing promise for widespread adoption of dynamic dosimetry.

  11. Verification of ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ophthalmic brachytherapy dose calculations were performed as an independent verification of commercial dosimetry software (BEBIG Plaque Simulator). Excel spreadsheets were constructed to follow the formalism of the AAPM Task Group No. 43. As a software commissioning tool, TG43 seed-based coordinates were reformatted to be compatible with plaque-based BEBIG dose tables for centrally positioned seeds. Plaque central axis doses were also calculated for rings of seeds. Close agreement with BEBIG doses was obtained in both cases. Tailored spreadsheet versions were subsequently created to verify patient treatment plans. Treatment time and dose to a specified central-axis point are calculated for ROPES plaques fully loaded with I-125 model 6702 seeds. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  12. Radiological safety problems in intracavitary brachytherapy using the manual afterloading in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In three venezuelan public hospitals it was detected radioactive contamination for Cs-137 during inspection with the wipe test technique in areas where is applied intracavitary brachytherapy using manual afterloading. This caused a condition of great stress in the personal engaged the treatments. In each Cs-137 source in these hospitals was tested leakage. The source plastic holder was analysed. The authors were able to demonstrate: a) The radioactive contamination found in the treatment area had its origin in the Cs-137 capsule corrosion and b) The corrosion in the source capsule was produced by the radiolytic degradation of the PVC tube used as source-holder in the intracavitary treatments. (authors). 3 refs., 1 tab

  13. Brachytherapy of carcinoma of vulva with 252Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty patients with carcinoma of vulva were treated with interstitial neutron radiotherapy with 252Cf. Age of patients was from 32 to 83 years. Stage I was in I patient, stage II - in 12, stage III was in 10 patients. The diagnosis of vulvar cancer was made for the first time in 11 cases, 19 patients had recurrences after the initial treatment. Most of these patients also received external irradiation for cancer of vulva and bilateral inguinal sites with a single fraction dose of 2 Gy to a total dose 30-50 Gy. Enlarged inguinal lymph nodes were irradiated additionally to 60 Gy with reduced field of irradiation. When radiotherapy was used repeatedly interstitial brachytherapy comprised the major part of irradiation dose or the therapy was used alone delivering 35-55 iGy. We used 252Cf sources with increased activity at the ends 20-30 mm long. A number of inserted sources varied from 2 to 10, irradiation dose rate from 20.3 to 236.7 cGy/h, time of irradiation from 10.2 to 12. hours, RBE from 4.6 to 6.33. Special template device made it possible to implant sources in strictly pre-set geometry. Analysis of survival of patients showed that 2 years survival was 66%, 3 years - 60%, and 5 years survival was 49%. In two cases necrotic epithelitis developed with following radiation ulcer which were cured in 3-4 months. Clinical data showed great effectiveness of interstitial neutron therapy having in mind that 19 patients were treated for recurrences of vulvar cancer after previuos treatment

  14. Methods for prostate stabilization during transperineal LDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In traditional prostate brachytherapy procedures for a low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation seed implant, stabilizing needles are first inserted to provide some rigidity and support to the prostate. Ideally this will provide better seed placement and an overall improved treatment. However, there is much speculation regarding the effectiveness of using regular brachytherapy needles as stabilizers. In this study, we explored the efficacy of two types of needle geometries (regular brachytherapy needle and hooked needle) and several clinically feasible configurations of the stabilization needles. To understand and assess the prostate movement during seed implantation, we collected in vivo data from patients during actual brachytherapy procedures. In vitro experimentation with tissue-equivalent phantoms allowed us to further understand the mechanics behind prostate stabilization. We observed superior stabilization with the hooked needles compared to the regular brachytherapy needles (more than 40% in bilateral parallel needle configuration). Prostate movement was also reduced significantly when regular brachytherapy needles were in an angulated configuration as compared to the parallel configuration (more than 60%). When the hooked needles were angulated for stabilization, further reduction in prostate displacement was observed. In general, for convenience of dosimetric planning and to avoid needle collision, all needles are desired to be in a parallel configuration. In this configuration, hooked needles provide improved stabilization of the prostate. On the other hand, both regular and hooked needles appear to be equally effective in reducing prostate movement when they are in angulated configurations, which will be useful in seed implantation using a robotic system. We have developed nonlinear spring-damper model for the prostate movement which can be used for adapting dosimetric planning during brachytherapy as well as for developing more realistic haptic devices and

  15. Studies on 192Ir afterloading irradiation of the canine prostate with special consideration of thermoluminescent dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for high dose rate afterloading irradiation of the prostate with iridium 192 was developed. The isodoses of the urethra and rectum, which were measured by means of thermoluminescent dosimetry, showed deviations from the doses pre-calculated by computer (BRACHY), because this calculation is based on an anatomically ideal condition. (MBC)

  16. Addendum to brachytherapy dose-volume histogram commissioning with multiple planning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossman, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    The process for validating dose-volume histogram data in brachytherapy software is presented as a supplement to a previously published article. Included is the DVH accuracy evaluation of the Best NOMOS treatment planning system called "Best TPS VolumePlan." As done previously in other software, a rectangular cuboid was contoured in the treatment planning system. A single radioactive 125I source was positioned coplanar and concentric with one end. Calculations were performed to estimate dose deposition in partial volumes of the cuboid structure, using the brachytherapy dosimetry formalism defined in AAPM Task Group 43. Hand-calculated, dose-volume results were compared to TPS-generated, point-source-approximated dose-volume histogram data to establish acceptance. The required QA for commissioning was satisfied for the DVH as conducted previously for other software, using the criterion that the DVH %VolTPS "actual variance" calculations should differ by no more than 5% at any specific radial distance with respect to %VolTG-43, and the "average variance" DVH %VolTPS calculations should differ by no more than 2% over all radial distances with respect to %VolTG-43. The average disagreement observed between hand calculations and treatment planning system DVH was less than 0.5% on average for this treatment planning system and less than 1.1% maximally for 1 ≤ r ≤ 5 cm. PMID:27167288

  17. SU-E-P-05: Electronic Brachytherapy: A Physics Perspective On Field Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, S; Ayyalasomayajula, S; Lee, S [iCAD Inc., Los Gatos, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We want to summarize our experience implementing a successful program of electronic brachytherapy at several dermatology clinics with the help of a cloud based software to help us define the key program parameters and capture physics QA aspects. Optimally developed software helps the physicist in peer review and qualify the physical parameters. Methods: Using the XOFT™ Axxent™ electronic brachytherapy system in conjunction with a cloud-based software, a process was setup to capture and record treatments. It was implemented initially at about 10 sites in California. For dosimetric purposes, the software facilitated storage of the physics parameters of surface applicators used in treatment and other source calibration parameters. In addition, the patient prescription, pathology and other setup considerations were input by radiation oncologist and the therapist. This facilitated physics planning of the treatment parameters and also independent check of the dwell time. From 2013–2014, nearly1500 such calculation were completed by a group of physicists. A total of 800 patients with multiple lesions have been treated successfully during this period. The treatment log files have been uploaded and documented in the software which facilitated physics peer review of treatments per the standards in place by AAPM and ACR. Results: The program model was implemented successfully at multiple sites. The cloud based software allowed for proper peer review and compliance of the program at 10 clinical sites. Dosimtery was done on 800 patients and executed in a timely fashion to suit the clinical needs. Accumulated physics data in the software from the clinics allows for robust analysis and future development. Conclusion: Electronic brachytherapy implementation experience from a quality assurance perspective was greatly enhanced by using a cloud based software. The comprehensive database will pave the way for future developments to yield superior physics outcomes.

  18. SU-E-P-05: Electronic Brachytherapy: A Physics Perspective On Field Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We want to summarize our experience implementing a successful program of electronic brachytherapy at several dermatology clinics with the help of a cloud based software to help us define the key program parameters and capture physics QA aspects. Optimally developed software helps the physicist in peer review and qualify the physical parameters. Methods: Using the XOFT™ Axxent™ electronic brachytherapy system in conjunction with a cloud-based software, a process was setup to capture and record treatments. It was implemented initially at about 10 sites in California. For dosimetric purposes, the software facilitated storage of the physics parameters of surface applicators used in treatment and other source calibration parameters. In addition, the patient prescription, pathology and other setup considerations were input by radiation oncologist and the therapist. This facilitated physics planning of the treatment parameters and also independent check of the dwell time. From 2013–2014, nearly1500 such calculation were completed by a group of physicists. A total of 800 patients with multiple lesions have been treated successfully during this period. The treatment log files have been uploaded and documented in the software which facilitated physics peer review of treatments per the standards in place by AAPM and ACR. Results: The program model was implemented successfully at multiple sites. The cloud based software allowed for proper peer review and compliance of the program at 10 clinical sites. Dosimtery was done on 800 patients and executed in a timely fashion to suit the clinical needs. Accumulated physics data in the software from the clinics allows for robust analysis and future development. Conclusion: Electronic brachytherapy implementation experience from a quality assurance perspective was greatly enhanced by using a cloud based software. The comprehensive database will pave the way for future developments to yield superior physics outcomes

  19. Iodine-125 thin seeds decrease prostate swelling during transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate swelling following seed implantation is a well-recognised phenomenon. The purpose of this intervention was to assess whether using thinner seeds reduces post-implant swelling with permanent prostate brachytherapy. Eighteen consecutive patients eligible for prostate seed brachytherapy underwent seed implantation using iodine-125 (I-125) thin seeds. Operative time, dosimetry, prostate swelling and toxicity were assessed and compared with standard I-125 stranded seed controls, sourced from the department's brachytherapy database. A learning curve was noted with the thin seeds in terms of greater bending and deviation of needles from their intended path. This translated into significantly longer total operative time (88 vs 103 minutes; P=0.009, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.1-24.3) and time per needle insertion (2.6 vs 3.7 minutes; P<0.001, 95% CI 0.5-1.3) for the thin seeds. Day 30 prostate volumes were significantly smaller in the thin seed group compared with standard seeds (40.9cc vs 46.8cc; P=0.001, 95% CI 1.5-5.6). The ratio of preoperative transrectal ultrasound to day 30 post-implant CT volume was also smaller in the thin seed group (1.2±0.1 for standard seeds vs 1.1±0.1 for thin seeds). Post-implant dosimetric parameters were comparable for both groups. No significant differences were seen in acute urinary morbidity or quality of life between the two groups. I-125 thin seeds are associated with an initial learning curve, with longer operative time, even for experienced brachytherapists. The significant reduction in day 30 prostate volumes with the thin seeds has useful implications in terms of optimising dose coverage to the prostate in the early period post-implantation, as well as improving the accuracy of post-implant dosimetric assessments.

  20. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Grace L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  1. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  2. Percutaneous interstitial brachytherapy for adrenal metastasis. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed and evaluated the feasibility of a brachytherapy technique as a safe and effective treatment for adrenal metastasis. Adapting a paravertebral insertion technique in radiofrequency ablation of adrenal tumors, we developed an interstitial brachytherapy for adrenal metastasis achievable on an outpatient basis. Under local anesthesia and under X-ray CT guidance, brachytherapy applicator needles were percutaneously inserted into the target. A treatment plan was created to eradicate the tumor while preserving normal organs including the spinal cord and kidney. We applied this interstitial brachytherapy technique to two patients: one who developed adrenal metastasis as the third recurrence of uterine cervical cancer after reirradiation, and one who developed metachronous multiple metastases from malignant melanoma. The whole procedure was completed in 2.5 hours. There were no procedure-related or radiation-related early/late complications. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-CT images at two and three months after treatment showed absence of FDG uptake, and no recurrence of the adrenal tumor was observed for over seven months until expiration, and for six months until the present, respectively. This interventional interstitial brachytherapy procedure may be useful as a safe and eradicative treatment for adrenal metastasis. (author)

  3. Automated treatment planning engine for prostate seed implant brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a computer-intelligent planning engine for automated treatment planning and optimization of ultrasound- and template-guided prostate seed implants. Methods and Materials: The genetic algorithm was modified to reflect the 2D nature of the implantation template. A multi-objective decision scheme was used to rank competing solutions, taking into account dose uniformity and conformity to the planning target volume (PTV), dose-sparing of the urethra and the rectum, and the sensitivity of the resulting dosimetry to seed misplacement. Optimized treatment plans were evaluated using selected dosimetric quantifiers, dose-volume histogram (DVH), and sensitivity analysis based on simulated seed placement errors. These dosimetric planning components were integrated into the Prostate Implant Planning Engine for Radiotherapy (PIPER). Results: PIPER has been used to produce a variety of plans for prostate seed implants. In general, maximization of the minimum peripheral dose (mPD) for given implanted total source strength tended to produce peripherally weighted seed patterns. Minimization of the urethral dose further reduced the loading in the central region of the PTV. Isodose conformity to the PTV was achieved when the set of objectives did not reflect seed positioning uncertainties; the corresponding optimal plan generally required fewer seeds and higher source strength per seed compared to the manual planning experience. When seed placement uncertainties were introduced into the set of treatment planning objectives, the optimal plan tended to reach a compromise between the preplanned outcome and the likelihood of retaining the preferred outcome after implantation. The reduction in the volatility of such seed configurations optimized under uncertainty was verified by sensitivity studies. Conclusion: An automated treatment planning engine incorporating real-time sensitivity analysis was found to be a useful tool in dosimetric planning for prostate

  4. Quality assurance for high dose rate brachytherapy treatment planning optimization: using a simple optimization to verify a complex optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As dose optimization for high dose rate brachytherapy becomes more complex, it becomes increasingly important to have a means of verifying that optimization results are reasonable. A method is presented for using a simple optimization as quality assurance for the more complex optimization algorithms typically found in commercial brachytherapy treatment planning systems. Quality assurance tests may be performed during commissioning, at regular intervals, and/or on a patient specific basis. A simple optimization method is provided that optimizes conformal target coverage using an exact, variance-based, algebraic approach. Metrics such as dose volume histogram, conformality index, and total reference air kerma agree closely between simple and complex optimizations for breast, cervix, prostate, and planar applicators. The simple optimization is shown to be a sensitive measure for identifying failures in a commercial treatment planning system that are possibly due to operator error or weaknesses in planning system optimization algorithms. Results from the simple optimization are surprisingly similar to the results from a more complex, commercial optimization for several clinical applications. This suggests that there are only modest gains to be made from making brachytherapy optimization more complex. The improvements expected from sophisticated linear optimizations, such as PARETO methods, will largely be in making systems more user friendly and efficient, rather than in finding dramatically better source strength distributions. (paper)

  5. Effect of pH grade on polymer-gel dosimeter and its brachytherapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate impact of pH grade on characteristics of polymer-gel dosimeter and its application in dose distribution verification in brachytherapy. A polymer-gel dosimeter based on radiation induced polymerization and crosslinking of acrylic monomers (acrylic acid, N,N' methylen-bis-acrylamide) was investigated with respect to its pH grade. pH grade of a dosimeter was varied by concentration of natrium hydroxide. Afterwards, dosimeter was split into several samples which were uniformly irradiated with Co-60 gamma rays. The range of doses applied was usually from 0 to 50 Gy with the main interest in region up to 20 Gy. Evaluation of dosimeter dose response was performed using MRI (T2). Dose response curves obtained were evaluated with respect to pH grade as a parameter. In parallel, there was studied temperature resistance (melting temperature) of gels with various pH grade. pH grade modified polymer-gel dosimeter was then used to compare dose distribution calculated with brachytherapy treatment planning system for simple irradiation geometry with Ir-192 HDR source. Additionaly, Monte Carlo calculated data were also included in the brachytherapy study. There was observed effect of pH grade on dose-response curve parameters (slope of linear fit, background response, linear range and maximum measurable dose). In general, the lower pH grade the higher sensitivity. Another positive effect of decreased pH grade is significantly higher maximum measurable dose. Maximum melting temperature of a gel was observed with pH grade between 3.5 and 4. For both higher and lower pH grades the melting temperature was lower. Using pH modified polymer-gel dosimeter simple brachytherapy dose distribution was measured and compared with calculated and Monte Carlo simulated data. There was observed strong dependence of dose-response relationship on pH grade of polymer-gel dosimeter resulting in significant improvement of dosimeter characteristics, namely sensitivity, applicable range of

  6. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with prior evidence of prostatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To refute a misconception that a prior history of prostatitis is a contraindication to prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Five patients with clinical or pathologic evidence of prior prostatitis were treated with transperineal brachytherapy. Four of the patients received a single i.v. dose of ciprofloxacin (500 mg) intraoperatively. Postimplant antibiotics were not given. The pretreatment biopsy slides were reviewed. Results: Two of the five patients developed postimplant urinary retention requiring short-term catheterization, and both resolved spontaneously. One patient developed what appeared to be an exacerbation of his chronic prostatitis. Conclusion: We continue to recommend prostate brachytherapy for the treatment of clinically organ-confined cancer, with no concern about prior clinical or pathologic evidence of prostatitis

  7. Fundamental approach to the design of a dose-rate calculation program for use in brachytherapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassell, K.J. (Saint Luke' s Hospital, Guildford (UK))

    1983-02-01

    A method, developed from the Quantisation Method, of calculating dose-rate distributions around uniformly and non-uniformly loaded brachytherapy sources is described. It allows accurate and straightforward corrections for oblique filtration and self-absorption to be made. Using this method, dose-rate distributions have been calculated for sources of radium 226, gold 198, iridium 192, caesium 137 and cobalt 60, all of which show very good agreement with existing measured and calculated data. This method is now the basis of the Interstitial and Intracavitary Dosimetry (IID) program on the General Electric RT/PLAN computerised treatment planning system.

  8. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy: Human error and critical tasks in remote afterloading brachytherapy and approaches for improved system performance. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callan, J.R.; Kelly, R.T.; Quinn, M.L. [Pacific Science and Engineering Group, San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error.

  9. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy: Human error and critical tasks in remote afterloading brachytherapy and approaches for improved system performance. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error

  10. Halo's production in vitro on brachytherapy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since earlier of 1960, one of the most significant contributions of radiation biology has been the theory of cell killing as a function of increasing doses of a cytotoxic agent, as well as the demonstration of repair of sublethal or potentially lethal damage after irradiation. The impact of cellular and molecular radiobiology, by exploitation of cellular mechanisms related to apoptosis, may be the cell killing with irradiation by including changes other than unrepaired DNA damage. Based on the understanding of the tumor microenvironment and how growth factors and proteins produced by irradiated cells may alter cellular processes, improved combined-modality strategies may emerge. This effect was show since 1960's, but here we propose to demonstrate this phenomenon in Brachytherapy. The present goal is to verify the macroscopic response through the production and analysis of clonogenic control based on halos generation by radioactive seeds of Ho-165 and Sm-153, aiming to study the effect of this type of irradiation. Confluent cell culture flasks with HeLa cell line were subjected to radiation in a period up to five half-lives of radionuclide, respectively. Devices were introduced which set the polymer-ceramic Ho-165 and Sm-153 seeds in the vials. After a period of exposure, the flasks were stained with violet Gensiana. The results showed the formation of halos control of confluent cancer cells. This paper will describe these experiments in the current stage of the research and report the implications of this new way of therapy for cancer treatment. (author)

  11. Brachytherapy on restenosis. {sup 32}P radioisotope in animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergoc, R.; Rivera, E.; Cocca, C.; Martin, G.; Cricco, G. [Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry; Croci, M.; Guzman, L.

    2000-05-01

    Despite a notorious decline in age-adjusted death rates for cardiovascular pathologies, coronary artery disease still remains as the main cause of mortality above the age of 40 in men and 60 in women. More than 25% of death in persons over the age of 35 are due to coronary disease. In about 50% of men and 30% of women, the first manifestation of the disease is an acute myocardial infarction and 10% a sudden cardiac death. In Argentina it is estimated that in 1998 about 100.000-115.000 people suffered as first manifestation of coronary illness a myocardial acute infarct. Angioplasty has an important and well established site in the treatment of the coronary illness and restenosis represents the principal complication of this method for myocardial re-vascularization. About a 35-40% of treated arteries present restenosis within the first six month the intervention with the concomitant need of re-interventions, re-hospitalizations, by-pass surgery, work discontinuity and the high cost for the health system. A number of drugs were tested as anti-restenosis: anticoagulants, aspirin, antispasmodics and lipid-lowering agents but none was clearly efficient; also, experimental studies in which intravascular irradiation with different source types and energies, radiation doses and doses rate to prevent restenosis was utilized; however, there is no consensus in many aspects of this intravascular brachytherapy. The first step in this work was to induce the experimental model in rabbits. Afterwards, by means of the balloon methodology and stent implantation, brachytherapy experiments were carried out to evaluate the biological effect on different layers of arteries, with different Doses using a beta particle emitting radioisotope ({sup 32}P). The arteriosclerotic lesions were induced in New Zealand rabbits through the administration of a diet with high cholesterol content. Angioplastic interventions on femoral arteries were done with balloon methodology and controlled by

  12. Brachytherapy on restenosis. 32P radioisotope in animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite a notorious decline in age-adjusted death rates for cardiovascular pathologies, coronary artery disease still remains as the main cause of mortality above the age of 40 in men and 60 in women. More than 25% of death in persons over the age of 35 are due to coronary disease. In about 50% of men and 30% of women, the first manifestation of the disease is an acute myocardial infarction and 10% a sudden cardiac death. In Argentina it is estimated that in 1998 about 100.000-115.000 people suffered as first manifestation of coronary illness a myocardial acute infarct. Angioplasty has an important and well established site in the treatment of the coronary illness and restenosis represents the principal complication of this method for myocardial re-vascularization. About a 35-40% of treated arteries present restenosis within the first six month the intervention with the concomitant need of re-interventions, re-hospitalizations, by-pass surgery, work discontinuity and the high cost for the health system. A number of drugs were tested as anti-restenosis: anticoagulants, aspirin, antispasmodics and lipid-lowering agents but none was clearly efficient; also, experimental studies in which intravascular irradiation with different source types and energies, radiation doses and doses rate to prevent restenosis was utilized; however, there is no consensus in many aspects of this intravascular brachytherapy. The first step in this work was to induce the experimental model in rabbits. Afterwards, by means of the balloon methodology and stent implantation, brachytherapy experiments were carried out to evaluate the biological effect on different layers of arteries, with different Doses using a beta particle emitting radioisotope (32P). The arteriosclerotic lesions were induced in New Zealand rabbits through the administration of a diet with high cholesterol content. Angioplastic interventions on femoral arteries were done with balloon methodology and controlled by fluoroscopy

  13. Dosimetry on ocular brachytherapy with ROPES plaque with Iodine-125 and Palladium-103 seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is an alternative to ocular enucleation. However, the irradiation of ocular region can bring deleterious effects due to the high doses, mainly in the lens, retina and in the bone structures in growth phase. Brachytherapy instead of teletherapy looks for departuring absorbed doses in tumor minimizing doses in the lens and the adjacent tissues of the eyeball (orbital region), avoiding deleterious effects. Thus, a three-dimensional computational model of ocular area was developed to simulate orbital irradiation with ROPES ophthalmologic plaque placed on the sclera surface filled to ten iodine-125 seeds, and palladium-103 seeds. Simulations are performed on the MCNP5 code. The computational simulation allows evaluating how the dose rates are spatially distributed in the orbital volume. The results are normalized to 100% at the maximum dose on the tumor base, and by the applied source activity. The maximum dose is found onto the eyeball, in the vitreous. The present model represents an advance in simulating and predicting absorbed dose on ocular brachytherapy. (author)

  14. Dosimetry on ocular brachytherapy with ROPE plaque with iodine125 and palladium-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is an alternative to ocular enucleation. However, the irradiation of ocular region can bring deleterious effects due to the high doses, mainly in the lens, retina and in the bone structures in growth phase. Brachytherapy instead of teletherapy looks for departing absorbed doses in tumor minimizing doses in the lens and the adjacent tissues of the eyeball (orbital region), avoiding deleterious effects. Thus, a three-dimensional computational model of ocular area was developed to simulate orbital irradiation with ROPES ophthalmologic plaque placed on the sclera surface filled to ten iodine-125 seeds, and palladium-103 seeds. Simulations are performed on the MCNP5 code. The computational simulation allows evaluating how the dose rates are spatially distributed in the orbital volume. The results are normalized to 100% at the maximum dose on the tumor base, and by the applied source activity. The maximum dose is found onto the eyeball, in the vitreous. The present model represents an advance in simulating and predicting absorbed dose on ocular brachytherapy. (author)

  15. Intraluminal brachytherapy with metallic stenting in the palliative treatment of malignant obstruction of the bile duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to describe the outcome of intraluminal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with metallic stenting in patients with obstructing extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Eight patients with inoperable and/or unresectable extrahepatic bile duct carcinomas were treated with intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT) followed by self-expandable metallic stent placement. Following percutaneous transhepatic drainage, ILBT was delivered by an HDR-Ir-192 source using the Micro-Selectron afterloading device. Two treatments were planned one week apart, with each treatment consisting of a single 10 Gy fraction. Biliary patency and palliative effect were assessed by serial labs (including bilirubin/alkaline phosphatase), symptomatic improvement, and/or cholangiography. All eight patients tolerated the first application of ILBT well, and five of them completed two-intraluminal treatments. Six of eight had satisfactory control of jaundice until death. Pain relief was observed in four of five (80%) and pruritis in six of seven (86%) patients experiencing such symptoms. The mean and median times of stent patency were 6.9 and 5 months (range, 4-14), respectively. Gastrointestinal bleeding and/or cholangitis occurred in three patients. HDR ILBT with metallic stenting for patients with obstructive jaundice from extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma appears to be feasible and associated with acceptable toxicity. These treatments may lead to an improved quality of life in these patients. (author)

  16. Radioactive seed migration after prostate brachytherapy with Iodine-125 using loose seeds versus stranded seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To assess the incidence and clinical parameters that could influence migration of seeds in localized prostate cancer patients treated by stranded versus loose sources by Iodine-125 brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: 100 patients were treated from January/1998 until December/2006. Age, PSA, clinical stage, Gleason, prostate volume, number of seeds, activity of radioactive seeds, and dosimetric parameters, such as V100, V150 and D90 were evaluated. Results: Mean follow-up was 79 months (18 - 120. CI 95%: 72 - 85). Overall, 6 of 100 patients experienced seed migration. Seed migration was found in 4/50 (8%) patients using loose seeds and in 2/50 (4%) treated by stranded seeds. Mean value dosimetric parameters for stranded seeds were greater than those for loose seeds (V100(%): 88.7/82, D90(Gy): 149.2/140.3, D90(%): 104.2/93.8, V150 (%): 53.8/47, respectively). No significant difference in migration of seeds was detected between loose and stranded seeds considering age (p = 0.33), PSA (p = 0.391), prostate volume (p 0.397), activity of radioactive seeds (p = 0.109), number of seeds (p 0.338), V100 (p = 0.332), although significant differences were measured in the values of D90 (% and Gy) (p = 0.022 and 0.011) and V150 (p = 0.023). Conclusions: Seed migration after brachytherapy might occur and it does affect post-implant dosimetry. (author)

  17. Monte Carol-Based Dosimetry of Beta-Emitters for Intravascular Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, C.K.

    2002-06-25

    Monte Carlo simulations for radiation dosimetry and the experimental verifications of the simulations have been developed for the treatment geometry of intravascular brachytherapy, a form of radionuclide therapy for occluded coronary disease (restenosis). Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, has been used to calculate the radiation dose from the encapsulated array of B-emitting seeds (Sr/Y-source train). Solid water phantoms have been fabricated to measure the dose on the radiochromic films that were exposed to the beta source train for both linear and curved coronary vessel geometries. While the dose difference for the 5-degree curved vessel at the prescription point of f+2.0 mm is within the 10% guideline set by the AAPM, however, the difference increased dramatically to 16.85% for the 10-degree case which requires additional adjustment for the acceptable dosimetry planning. The experimental dose measurements agree well with the simulation results

  18. Real-time in vivo dosimetry and error detection during afterloading brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir

    Image guided afterloaded brachytherapy (BT) allows for conformal and patient specific radiotherapy (RT) treatments against cancer, where high dose concentrations are administered to the tumor volume and small doses to organs at risk (OARs). In afterloaded BT, ionizing radiation is delivered...... by means of a radionuclide attached to a source chain that is placed inside source catheters implanted in the target region. As for any RT treatment modality, BT treatments are subject to discrepancies between the delivered and planned treatments. Given the localized and high dose concentration near BT...... cervical cancer at the Aarhus University Hospital. The tools and methods developed for the implementation targeted requirements for accurate IVD and the demands for a time-efficient and straightforward clinical approach. The performance of all developments was explored based on IVD results for 20 PDR BT...

  19. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  20. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth [Department of Psychology, Sigmund Freud Private University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore [Department of Anaesthesia, General Intensive Care and Pain Management, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Sturdza, Alina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dimopoulos, Johannes C. [Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  1. Randomized comparison between intracoronary β-radiation brachytherapy and implantation of paclitaxel-eluting stents for the treatment of diffuse in-stent restenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Intracoronary brachytherapy was the primary therapeutic option for the treatment of in-stent restenosis (ISR) during the last years. Especially for the treatment of diffuse ISR (lesions >10 mm), β-source brachytherapy was significantly superior to singular balloon angioplasty. Despite lacking clinical database, the implantation of drug eluting stents recently became a common procedure for the treatment of ISR. This randomized trial aimed to compare the efficacy of β-brachytherapy with β-radioisotopes 90Sr/90Y and paclitaxel-eluting stent implantation for the treatment of diffuse ISR. Material and methods: Thirty-seven patients with diffuse ISR were randomly assigned to β-brachytherapy after balloon angioplasty (Beta-CathTM in 17 patients) or paclitaxel-eluting stent implantation (Taxus-Express2TM in 20 patients). Six-month clinical follow-up was obtained for all patients, while angiographic follow-up was available for 30 patients. Results: Binary ISR (restenosis >50%) within target segment was observed in three patients treated with Beta-CathTM, of which one needed target segment revascularisation for recurrent ISR, whereas no significant restenosis occurred in the patients treated with Taxus-Express2TM (P = 0.037). No further major adverse cardiac (target segment revascularisation, myocardial infarction, death) was found in either group (P = NS). Stent implantation was the more time-saving (31 ± 11 min versus 60 ± 23 min, P TM arm, we found no difference in clinical outcome after implantation of paclitaxel-eluting stents for the treatment of diffuse ISR when compared to β-brachytherapy

  2. History of dose specification in Brachytherapy: From Threshold Erythema Dose to Computational Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2006-09-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evolution of brachytherapy dosimetry from 1900 to the present. Dosimetric practices in brachytherapy fall into three distinct eras: During the era of biological dosimetry (1900-1938), radium pioneers could only specify Ra-226 and Rn-222 implants in terms of the mass of radium encapsulated within the implanted sources. Due to the high energy of its emitted gamma rays and the long range of its secondary electrons in air, free-air chambers could not be used to quantify the output of Ra-226 sources in terms of exposure. Biological dosimetry, most prominently the threshold erythema dose, gained currency as a means of intercomparing radium treatments with exposure-calibrated orthovoltage x-ray units. The classical dosimetry era (1940-1980) began with successful exposure standardization of Ra-226 sources by Bragg-Gray cavity chambers. Classical dose-computation algorithms, based upon 1-D buildup factor measurements and point-source superposition computational algorithms, were able to accommodate artificial radionuclides such as Co-60, Ir-192, and Cs-137. The quantitative dosimetry era (1980- ) arose in response to the increasing utilization of low energy K-capture radionuclides such as I-125 and Pd-103 for which classical approaches could not be expected to estimate accurate correct doses. This led to intensive development of both experimental (largely TLD-100 dosimetry) and Monte Carlo dosimetry techniques along with more accurate air-kerma strength standards. As a result of extensive benchmarking and intercomparison of these different methods, single-seed low-energy radionuclide dose distributions are now known with a total uncertainty of 3%-5%.

  3. Factors influencing outcome of I-125 prostate cancer brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinnen, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy is becoming an increasingly popular prostate cancer treatment, probably due to the specific advantages of the procedure, such as the minimal invasiveness and the lower chance of impotence and incontinence. Nonetheless, because of the long follow-up that is required to obtain prostate c

  4. In vivo dosimetry: trends and prospects for brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Rosenfeld, A.; Beddar, S.;

    2014-01-01

    The error types during brachytherapy (BT) treatments and their occurrence rates are not well known. The limited knowledge is partly attributed to the lack of independent verification systems of the treatment progression in the clinical workflow routine. Within the field of in vivo dosimetry (IVD)...

  5. Remote Afterloading High Dose Rate Brachytherapy AMC EXPERIANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su Gyong; Chang, Hye Sook; Choi, Eun Kyong; Yi, Byong Yong [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-12-15

    Remote afterloading high dose rate brachytherapy(HDRB) is a new technology and needs new biological principle for time and dose schedule. Here, authors attempt to evaluate the technique and clinical outcome in 116 patients, 590 procedures performed at Asan Medical Center for 3 years. From Sep. 1985 to Aug 1992, 471 procedures of intracavitary radiation in 55 patients of cervical cancer and 26 of nasopharyngeal cancer, 79 intraluminal radiation in 12 of esophageal cancer, 11 of endobronchial cancer and 1 Klatskin tumor and 40 interstitial brachytherapy in 4 of breast cancer, 1 sarcoma and 1 urethral cancer were performed. Median follow-up was 7 months with range 1-31 months. All procedures except interstitial were performed under the local anesthesia and they were all well tolerated and completed the planned therapy except 6 patients. 53/58 patients with cervical cancer and 22/26 patients with nasopharynx cancer achieved CR. Among 15 patients with palliative therapy, 80% achieves palliation. We will describe the details of the technique and results in the text. To evaluate biologic effects of HDRB and optimal time/dose/fractionation schedule, we need longer follow-up. But authors feel that HDRB with proper fractionation schedule may yield superior results compared to the low dose rate brachytherapy considering the advantages of HDRB in safety factor for operator, better control of radiation dose and volume and patients comfort over the low dose brachytherapy.

  6. Brachytherapy in Europe: philosophies, current practice and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Five months sabbatical leave provided an opportunity to visit six radiotherapy centres in France, Holland and England. While brachytherapy philosophies and practices within each country were similar, there were considerable differences in attitudes between countries. The Institute Gustave Roussy, home of the Paris System and host for the French sector confirmed that the Paris System is still very much the preferred dosimetry method in this part of the world. Though their preference for low dose rate brachytherapy is still evident, high dose rate brachytherapy has found some applications but the rules of the Paris System are never far away and the words 'what about the hyperdose sleeve' are firmly implanted into this visitor's brain. The use of real time dosimetry for I-125 prostate brachytherapy at the Institute Curie (Paris) provided an interesting contrast to the standard pre and post implant dosimetry techniques commonly employed elsewhere. The two Dutch centres on the itinerary, in stark contrast to the traditional techniques seen in France, have applied the power of computers to investigate optimisation of the classic dosimetry systems and called on the analysis techniques (DVH, NTCP, TCP etc) now familiar to us all in external beam therapy. The Cookridge Hospital in England fitted somewhere between the French and Dutch centres. This centre showed how both modern and traditional techniques could be applied in an efficient way for a large variety of treatment sites. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  7. Initial application of digital tomosynthesis to improve brachytherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydush, Alan H.; Mirzaei McKee, Mahta; King, June; Godfrey, Devon J.

    2007-03-01

    We present preliminary investigations that examine the feasibility of incorporating volumetric images generated using digital tomosynthesis into brachytherapy treatment planning. The Integrated Brachytherapy Unit (IBU) at our facility consists of an L-arm, C-arm isocentric motion system with an x-ray tube and fluoroscopic imager attached. Clinically, this unit is used to generate oblique, anterior-posterior, and lateral images for simple treatment planning and dose prescriptions. Oncologists would strongly prefer to have volumetric data to better determine three dimensional dose distributions (dose-volume histograms) to the target area and organs at risk. Moving the patient back and forth to CT causes undo stress on the patient, allows extensive motion of organs and treatment applicators, and adds additional time to patient treatment. We propose to use the IBU imaging system with digital tomosynthesis to generate volumetric patient data, which can be used for improving treatment planning and overall reducing treatment time. Initial image data sets will be acquired over a limited arc of a human-like phantom composed of real bones and tissue equivalent material. A brachytherapy applicator will be incorporated into one of the phantoms for visualization purposes. Digital tomosynthesis will be used to generate a volumetric image of this phantom setup. This volumetric image set will be visually inspected to determine the feasibility of future incorporation of these types of images into brachytherapy treatment planning. We conclude that initial images using the tomosynthesis reconstruction technique show much promise and bode well for future work.

  8. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  9. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia de Freitas Brandao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results Intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the I 1 and I 2 tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the I 1 and I 2 infiltration zones. Conclusion Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones.

  10. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /1 and /2 tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /1 and /2 infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  11. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Samia de Freitas, E-mail: samiabrandao@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  12. Brachytherapy: The need for a national metrology lab in Spain; Branquiterapia: la necesidad de un laboratorio nacional de metrologia en Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aviles Lucas, P.

    2011-07-01

    Radiotherapy, along with chemotherapy and surgery, is an essential therapeutic technique for treating malignant tumours. Part of the challenge of a suitable radiotherapy treatment lies on the optimisation of the irradiated volume, which must be adapted to the tumour volume as far as possible. Depending on position of the radiation source relative to the patient, the procedure in question could be external radiotherapy, or brachytherapy. In a brachytherapy procedure, relatively small encapsulated radioactive sources are placed close to or in the tumour volume to be treated. This therapeutic treatment has two obvious advantages; on one hand the prescribed dose can be adjusted to the tumour volume, preventing unnecessary exposure of the adjacent healthy tissues, and on the other, it decreases the treatment duration compared to a radiotherapy treatment. (Author) 19 refs.

  13. Verification of dosimetry planning in brachytherapy in format Dicom and EUD calculation of Risk in bodies; Verificacion de la planificacion dosimetria en braquiterapia en formato Dicom y calculo del EUD en organos de riesgo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Hernandez, M. J.; Sendon del Rio, J. R.; Ayala Lazaro, R.; Jimenez Rojas, M. R.; Gomez Cores, S.; Polo Cezon, R.; Lopez Bote, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    This work Describes a program that automates the verification of the schedules in brachytherapy (configuration and dosimetric treatment parameters) for sources of Ir-192 (mHDR v2) and Co-60 (Co0.A86) from the plan exported in DICOM format data. (Author)

  14. Calculation Monte Carlo equivalent dose to organs in a treatment of prostate with Brachytherapy of high rate; Calculo Monte Carlo de dosis equivalente a organos en un tratamiento de prostata con braquiterapia de alta tasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, C.; Vijande, J.; Granero, D.; Ballester, F.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Rivard, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs when applies brachytherapy high dose (HDR) with sources of 60 Co or 192 Go to a localized carcinoma of the prostate. The results are compared with those reported in the literature on treatment with protons and intensity modulated (IMRT) radiation therapy. (Author)

  15. Epimacular brachytherapy for wet AMD: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casaroli-Marano RP

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ricardo P Casaroli-Marano,1,2 Socorro Alforja,1 Joan Giralt,1 Michel E Farah2 1Instituto Clínic de Oftalmología (Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is considered the most common cause of blindness in the over-60 age group in developed countries. There are basically two forms of presentation: geographic (dry or atrophic and wet (neovascular or exudative. Geographic atrophy accounts for approximately 85%–90% of ophthalmic frames and leads to a progressive degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium and the photoreceptors. Wet AMD causes the highest percentage of central vision loss secondary to disease. This neovascular form involves an angiogenic process in which newly formed choroidal vessels invade the macular area. Today, intravitreal anti-angiogenic drugs attempt to block the angiogenic events and represent a major advance in the treatment of wet AMD. Currently, combination therapy for wet AMD includes different forms of radiation delivery. Epimacular brachytherapy (EMBT seems to be a useful approach to be associated with current anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents, presenting an acceptable efficacy and safety profile. However, at the present stage of research, the results of the clinical trials carried out to date are insufficient to justify extending routine use of EMBT for the treatment of wet AMD. Keywords: macular degeneration, radiation, vascular endothelial growth factor, combined therapy, intravitreal therapy, vitrectomy

  16. Progress on system for applying simultaneous heat and brachytherapy to large-area surface disease (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Schlorff, Jaime L.; Juang, Titania; Neuman, Daniel G., Jr.; Johnson, Jessi E.; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Pouliot, Jean

    2005-04-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that thermal enhancement of radiation response increases substantially for higher thermal dose (approaching 100 CEM43) and when hyperthermia and radiation are delivered simultaneously. Unfortunately, equipment capable of delivering uniform doses of heat and radiation simultaneously has not been available to test the clinical potential of this approach. We present recent progress on the clinical implementation of a system that combines the uniform heating capabilities of flexible printed circuit board microwave array applicators with an array of brachytherapy catheters held a fixed distance from the skin for uniform radiation of tissue deep with a scanning high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy source. The system is based on the Combination Applicator which consists of an array of up to 32 Dual Concentric Conductor (DCC) apertures driven at 915 MHz for heating tissue, coupled with an array of 1 cm spaced catheters for HDR therapy. Efforts to optimize the clinical interface and move from rectangular to more complex shape applicators that accommodate the entire disease in a larger number of patients are described. Improvements to the system for powering and controlling the applicator are also described. Radiation dosimetry and experimental performance results of a prototype 15 x 15 cm dual-purpose applicator demonstrate dose distributions with good homogeneity under large contoured surfaces typical of diffuse chestwall recurrence of breast carcinoma. Investigations of potential interaction between heat and brachytherapy components of a Combination Applicator demonstrate no perceptible perturbation of the heating field from an HDR source or leadwire, no perceptible effect of a scanning HDR source on fiberoptic thermometry, and heat and radiation simultaneously for maximum synergism of modalities, this dual therapy system should expand the number of patients that can benefit from effective thermoradiotherapy treatments.

  17. Health physics of an acute overexposure to a radiography source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An outline account is given of the results of an accident to a 6,7 Ci 192Ir-source which fell out of its container on 8 January 1977 at a South African construction site. Due to a faulty monitor, the accident was not noticed by the radiographer and 3 hours later a construction supervisor picked up the source and put it in the left breast pocket of his shirt, where it remained for approximately 2h 40min. Local reactions of the main subject included an erythema of the left hand, leading to amputation of the index and middle fingers after 24 months. The estimated dose equivalent was over 5000 rads. Erythema of the chest wall also developed, leading to excision of the necrotic area and pedicle skin graft 18 months after the incident. Using the Strandquist method, the central necrotic part was estimated to have received between 5000 and 10,000 rad, the adjoining area between 1000 and 2,250 rad. This was in remarkable agreement with the physical calculations, especially since the source was not stationary. (U.K.)

  18. Design and Implementation of a Complementary Treatment Planning Software for the GZP6 HDR Brachytherapy System (GZP6 CTPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Hariri Tabrizi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Brachytherapy is one of the most common treatment modalities for gynecological cancer. The GZP6 brachytherapy system is one of the devices utilized in Iran. It has been considered particularly due to its low cost compared to other more complete and established systems. This system has some deficiencies including lack of a treatment planning software for non-predefined treatments, inability to change the gradually changeable dosimetric variables and using a point source estimation in dose calculation. This report presents a complementary treatment planning software (CTPS to the system’s own dedicated program. Material and Methods: First, the dosimetric characteristics of three GZP6 sources were calculated based on the TG-43 protocol using the MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. Then, the calculated dose distribution around the implanted applicators, based on the selected dwell positions and dwell times, was shown in a graphical user interface (GUI written using the MATLAB software. Results: The computation uncertainty in the resulting TG-43 parameters was about 1% and the calculated parameters were in good agreement with similar studies on cobalt-60 source dosimetry. Furthermore, the GUI is prepared as a user-friendly executable file which can be installed on any operating system. Discussion and Conclusion: Since different patients have distinct anatomy and physical conditions, a program for non-predefined situations of source arrangement is necessary. Using GZP6 CTPS can satisfy this requirement.

  19. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Sources Fondation Pablo Iglesias. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Archives privées de Manuel ArijaArchives extérieuresArchives FNJS de EspañaPrensa Archives Générales de l’Administration. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Opposition au franquismeSig. 653 Sig TOP 82/68.103-68.602.Índice de las cartas colectivas, Relaciones, Cartas al Ministro de Información de Marzo de 1965. c.662. Sources cinématographiques Filmothèque Nationale d’Espagne.NO.DO. N° 1157C. 08/03/1965.aguirre Javier, Blanco vertical....

  20. A theoretical derivation of the nomograms for permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study calculates the required minimum radioactivity to deliver a prescribed dose of radiation to a target using radioisotopes in permanent prostate brachytherapy. Assuming the radioactivity to be in a continuous form, an integral equation -- Fredholm equation of the first kind, can be formulated with the radioactivity density used as the variable. The density distribution to produce a uniform volume dose rate is determined using a quadrature method and the radial profile behaves smoothly from the zero radius, and peaks sharply approaching the volume boundary. The density for Pd-103 is about 1.5 times that of I-125 due to its higher spatial attenuation. A nomogram is the relationship between the total activity per unit dose (A) and the dimension of the volume (d). Expressing the nomogram as A=cxdn U/Gy, then (c,n)= [(0.0098, 2.09) I-125] and [(0.031, 2.25) Pd-103]. Compared with the Memorial nomogram, (c,n)=[(0.011,2.2) I-125] and [(0.036,2.56) Pd-103], or that quoted by AAPM TG64, (c,n)=[(0.014,2.05) I-125] and [(0.056,2.22) Pd-103], our calculation determined an average 33% and 35% decrease for I-125, and 89% and 77% decrease for Pd-103, respectively. Two reasons for the extra total activity found in the Memorial and AAPM nomograms are: (a) An imperfect clinical situation limited by the restraints of implant techniques (e.g., use of templates) associated with the presence of adjacent normal organs, and (b) source discretization into seeds. When radioactivity is clumped as discrete seeds, higher activity is needed because of 'wastage' in two aspects: (a) Dose cold-spots at intersource spaces, (b) hot-spots around the sources. Thus in theory, use of lower activity seeds will require less total activity to deliver a prescribed dose. Based on our study, Pd-103 delivers a higher therapeutic ratio and a lower integral dose to the patient compared to I-125

  1. Monte Carlo calculation of spectral lines for use in the Italian Protocol for dosimetry in Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Italian Committee for Dosimetry in Radiotherapy is about to produce a protocol for the dosimetry of brachytherapy sources that defines methods to measure the quantity 'air kerma rate in free air in a reference point' using ionisation chambers. Several parameters and quantities necessary to apply the protocol have to be calculated. In this presentation we show the methods used to calculate two of them: Pair, that account for the attenuation and scattering of photons in air; Nk(source), the calibration factor for each dosimeter and source type. Both quantities have been calculated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. To calculate Pair we score the photon fluence in the detector area, separately for 'primary photons', i.e. photons coming directly from the source without interacting in air; 'scattered photons', i.e. photons that are diffused from the air towards the scoring region; 'attenuated photons', i.e. primary photons directed towards the scoring region that are subtracted from the primary fluence by interactions in air. Pair is calculated as a combination of those fluences. Nk(source) is calculated starting from the air kerma rates due to spectral lines emitted by the source and from the corresponding calibration factors. The Monte Carlo code EGS4 is used, in a version modified in order to take into account the characteristics X-ray production. Results are shown for some of the sources most used in Italy

  2. A study on room design and radiation safety around room for Co-60 after loading HDR brachytherapy unit converted from room for Ir-192 after loading HDR brachytherapy unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Gurjar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Use of Co-60 source in place of Ir-192 in high dose rate brachytherapy unit (HDR unit has come for discussion in recent publications. Co-60 based system has been advocated for centers which have fewer brachytherapy procedures as it has comparative economically and administrative advantage. This study has direct practical application for such institutions, which are at the cusp of moving from Ir-192 to Co-60 based brachytherapy. Aims: Conversion of Ir-192 HDR room to Co-60 HDR room and to analyze radiation safety around the room. Materials and Methods: Uniform thickness of 15 cm concrete was added to all walls (except one wall adjoining to linear accelerator bunker to convert existing room forIr-192 HDR unit to suitable room for Co-60 HDR unit. Radiation survey around room was done. Actual and calculated wall thicknesses were compared. Results: Radiation survey data indicates that modified room is suitable for Co-60 HDR unit and all values are in full conformity to annual dose limits mentioned in Safety Code for Radiation Therapy Sources (SCRTS, Atomic Energy Regulatory Body (AERB; the regulatory body in India. Also, modified wall thicknesses are appropriate for annual design dose limits mentioned in Safety Report Series No. 47 of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA. However, console wall thickness (0.45 m is less than the calculated thickness (0.53 m for instantaneous dose rate (IDR design dose limit (7.5 ΅Sv/h as perabove safety report of IAEA. Conclusions: The modified wall thicknesses are appropriate for annual design dose limits. However, console wall thickness is less than the required thickness for IDR design dose limit. It has been suggested to add 2.64 cm steel on console wall. It has been found that design dose limits should be considered while making room layout plan and regulatory body should add these constraints inSCRTS.

  3. High-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy inverse planning on dose-volume criteria by simulated annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deist, T M; Gorissen, B L

    2016-02-01

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy is a tumor treatment method where a highly radioactive source is brought in close proximity to the tumor. In this paper we develop a simulated annealing algorithm to optimize the dwell times at preselected dwell positions to maximize tumor coverage under dose-volume constraints on the organs at risk. Compared to existing algorithms, our algorithm has advantages in terms of speed and objective value and does not require an expensive general purpose solver. Its success mainly depends on exploiting the efficiency of matrix multiplication and a careful selection of the neighboring states. In this paper we outline its details and make an in-depth comparison with existing methods using real patient data. PMID:26760757

  4. Development of an Iridium-192 seed for use in ophthalmic brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Fabio R.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Zeituni, Carlos; Moura, Joao A.; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Feher, Anselmo; Moura, Eduardo S.; Souza, Carla D.; Peleias Junior, Fernando S., E-mail: frmattos@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Institute for Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN), in partnership with the School or Medicine (UNIFESP), created a project that aims to develop and implement an ophthalmic therapeutic treatment for cancer with Iridium-192 seeds. The School of Medicine treats many cancer cases in the SUS (Brazilian Public Health System), and brachytherapy group of IPEN has extensive experience in prototype sources. The seed to be manufactured will perform as follows: a core of Iridium-192 is packaged inside small cylindrical seeds consist of a titanium capsule of 0.8 mm outer diameter, 0.05 mm wall thickness and 4 5 mm in length. The core is an alloy of platinum-iridium (20/80) of 3.0 mm in length and 0.3 mm in diameter. Material analysis, neutron activation and activity measurements were carried out. (author)

  5. Intraoperative brachytherapy in the management of keloids: about 114 cases; Place de la curietherapie dans le traitement des cheloides a propos de 114 cas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maalej, M.; Frikha, H.; Bouaouina, N.; Daoud, J.; Besbes, M.; Benna, F.; Sellami, D.; Bennour, N. [Institut Salah-Azaiz, Service de Radiotherapie, Tunis (Tunisia); Jellouli, M.; Gritli, S. [Institut Salah-Azaiz, Service d' ORL, Tunis (Tunisia); Guigua, M. [Institut Salah-Azaiz, Service de Chirurgie reparatrice et esthetique, Tunis (Tunisia); Ben Abdallah, M. [Institut Salah-Azaiz, Service de Statistique Medicale, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2000-08-01

    Keloid scars are unsightly, especially when located on the face or bare zones. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic results of intraoperative brachytherapy in the management of keloids. This retrospective study was based on the study of 82 patients with keloids treated in Salah Azaiz Institute (Tunisia) between 1982 and 1994 (65 women and 17 men). The mean age of patients was 23.4 years ({+-}8.4). A total of 114 lesions have been treated with surgical resection and intraoperative brachytherapy using an iridium source placed under the surgical scar. The length of iridium was chosen with the result that the radioactive thread exceeded 5 mm on each side of the surgical scar. The iridium source was loaded less than six hours after resection. Average iridium activity was 1.5{+-}0.3 mCi/cm. Average iridium length was 56.8{+-}34 mm. The referred isodose chosen for the target volume included the surgical scar and a margin of 5 mn around the iridium source, which was placed under the surgical scar. The average administered dose was 20.4 Gy ({+-}3.2 Gy). The 2-year local control rate was 87% for the whole group of lesions treated (n=114). Local control rate of keloids processed by resection and intraoperative brachytherapy as the first treatment (59 cases) was 96% at two years. This rate was better than the local control of lesions that had been previously treated with anterior surgical resection (84% in 55 cases). For the latter group, lesions treated with a dose of more than 20 Gy had better local control, but the difference was not statistically significant (87 vs. 65% at two years, P = 0.41). Intraoperative brachytherapy is effective for improving local control of keloids and preventing a recurrence. A rigorous technique and an adequate dose according to previous surgical treatment allows very good results. (author)

  6. SU-E-T-04: 3D Printed Patient-Specific Surface Mould Applicators for Brachytherapy Treatment of Superficial Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumming, I; Lasso, A; Rankin, A; Fichtinger, G [Laboratory for Percutaneous Surgery, School of Computing, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Joshi, C P; Falkson, C; Schreiner, L John [CCSEO, Kingston General Hospital and Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the feasibility of constructing 3D-printed patient-specific surface mould applicators for HDR brachytherapy treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: We propose using computer-aided design software to create 3D printed surface mould applicators for brachytherapy. A mould generation module was developed in the open-source 3D Slicer ( http://www.slicer.org ) medical image analysis platform. The system extracts the skin surface from CT images, and generates smooth catheter paths over the region of interest based on user-defined start and end points at a specified stand-off distance from the skin surface. The catheter paths are radially extended to create catheter channels that are sufficiently wide to ensure smooth insertion of catheters for a safe source travel. An outer mould surface is generated to encompass the channels. The mould is also equipped with fiducial markers to ensure its reproducible placement. A surface mould applicator with eight parallel catheter channels of 4mm diameters was fabricated for the nose region of a head phantom; flexible plastic catheters of 2mm diameter were threaded through these channels maintaining 10mm catheter separations and a 5mm stand-off distance from the skin surface. The apparatus yielded 3mm thickness of mould material between channels and the skin. The mould design was exported as a stereolithography file to a Dimension SST1200es 3D printer and printed using ABS Plus plastic material. Results: The applicator closely matched its design and was found to be sufficiently rigid without deformation during repeated application on the head phantom. Catheters were easily threaded into channels carved along catheter paths. Further tests are required to evaluate feasibility of channel diameters smaller than 4mm. Conclusion: Construction of 3D-printed mould applicators show promise for use in patient specific brachytherapy of superficial lesions. Further evaluation of 3D printing techniques and materials is required

  7. SU-E-T-04: 3D Printed Patient-Specific Surface Mould Applicators for Brachytherapy Treatment of Superficial Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Evaluate the feasibility of constructing 3D-printed patient-specific surface mould applicators for HDR brachytherapy treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: We propose using computer-aided design software to create 3D printed surface mould applicators for brachytherapy. A mould generation module was developed in the open-source 3D Slicer ( http://www.slicer.org ) medical image analysis platform. The system extracts the skin surface from CT images, and generates smooth catheter paths over the region of interest based on user-defined start and end points at a specified stand-off distance from the skin surface. The catheter paths are radially extended to create catheter channels that are sufficiently wide to ensure smooth insertion of catheters for a safe source travel. An outer mould surface is generated to encompass the channels. The mould is also equipped with fiducial markers to ensure its reproducible placement. A surface mould applicator with eight parallel catheter channels of 4mm diameters was fabricated for the nose region of a head phantom; flexible plastic catheters of 2mm diameter were threaded through these channels maintaining 10mm catheter separations and a 5mm stand-off distance from the skin surface. The apparatus yielded 3mm thickness of mould material between channels and the skin. The mould design was exported as a stereolithography file to a Dimension SST1200es 3D printer and printed using ABS Plus plastic material. Results: The applicator closely matched its design and was found to be sufficiently rigid without deformation during repeated application on the head phantom. Catheters were easily threaded into channels carved along catheter paths. Further tests are required to evaluate feasibility of channel diameters smaller than 4mm. Conclusion: Construction of 3D-printed mould applicators show promise for use in patient specific brachytherapy of superficial lesions. Further evaluation of 3D printing techniques and materials is required

  8. Dosimetry evaluation of SAVI-based HDR brachytherapy for partial breast irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoharan Sivasubramanian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI with high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy offers an excellent compact course of radiation due to its limited number of fractions for early-stage carcinoma of breast. One of the recent devices is SAVI (strut-adjusted volume implant, which has 6, 8 or 10 peripheral source channels with one center channel. Each channel can be differentially loaded. This paper focuses on the treatment planning, dosimetry and quality assurance aspects of HDR brachytherapy implant with GammaMed Plus HDR afterloader unit. The accelerated PBI balloon devices normally inflate above 35 cc range, and hence these balloon type devices cannot be accommodated in small lumpectomy cavity sizes. CT images were obtained and 3-D dosimetric plans were done with Brachyvision planning system. The 3-D treatment planning and dosimetric data were evaluated with planning target volume (PTV_eval V90, V95, V150, V200 skin dose and minimum distance to skin. With the use of the SAVI 6-1 mini device, we were able to accomplish an excellent coverage - V90, V95, V150 and V200 to 98%, 95%, 37 cc (<50 cc volume and 16 cc (<20 cc volume, respectively. Maximum skin dose was between 73% and 90%, much below the prescribed dose of 34 Gy. The minimum skin distance achieved was 5 to 11 mm. The volume that received 50% of the prescribed radiation dose was found to be lower with SAVI. The multi-channel SAVI-based implants reduced the maximum skin dose to markedly lower levels as compared to other modalities, simultaneously achieving best dose coverage to target volume. Differential-source dwell-loading allows modulation of the radiation dose distribution in symmetric or asymmetric opening of the catheter shapes and is also advantageous in cavities close to chest wall.

  9. Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for Delivery of Localized Combined Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajiv, E-mail: r.kumar@neu.edu [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Belz, Jodi [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Markovic, Stacey [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niedre, Mark [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sridhar, Srinivas [Nanomedicine Science and Technology Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy-inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Methods and Materials: Here we have fabricated implantable nanoplatforms or chemoradiation therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow-release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemoradiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix and are physically identical in size to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5 mm × 0.8 mm). The silica nanoparticles, 250 nm in diameter, were conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug, and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology, and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with an anticancer drug, docetaxel. We evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results: The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked by the use of optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue in contrast to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer, which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth in contrast to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions: The imaging with the Cy7.5 spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in a slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, in contrast to the rapid clearance of the drugs when

  10. 3T MR-Guided Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Malignancies

    CERN Document Server

    Kapur, Tina; Damato, Antonio; Schmidt, Ehud J; Viswanathan, Akila N; 10.1016/j.mri.2012.06.003

    2013-01-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are a leading cause of death in women worldwide. Standard treatment for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancer cases includes a combination of external beam radiation, followed by brachytherapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is benefitial in diagnostic evaluation, in mapping the tumor location to tailor radiation dose, and in monitoring the tumor response to treatment. Initial studies of MR-guidance in gynecologic brachtherapy demonstrate the ability to optimize tumor coverage and reduce radiation dose to normal tissues, resulting in improved outcomes for patients. In this article we describe a methodology to aid applicator placement and treatment planning for 3 Tesla (3T) MR-guided brachytherapy that was developed specifically for gynecologic cancers. This has been used in 18 cases to date in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating suite at Brigham and Women's Hospital. It is comprised of state of the art methods for MR imaging, image analysis, and treatment plann...

  11. Iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain tumours - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine-125 brachytherapy has been applied to brain tumours since 1979. Even though the physical and biological characteristics make these implants particularly attractive for minimal invasive treatment, the place for stereotactic brachytherapy is still poorly defined. An extensive review of the literature has been performed, especially concerning indications, results and complications. Iodine-125 seeds have been implanted in astrocytomas I-III, glioblastomas, metastases and several other tumour entities. Outcome data given in the literature are summarized. Complications are rare in carefully selected patients. All in all, for highly selected patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent primary or metastatic tumours, this method provides encouraging survival rates with relatively low complication rates and a good quality of life

  12. IMAGE-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY AND -BRACHYTHERAPY FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh eDutta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy.Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT, allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  13. Distortions induced by radioactive seeds into interstitial brachytherapy dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi; Modrick, Joseph M

    2004-12-01

    In a previous article, we presented development and verification of an integral transport equation-based deterministic algorithm for computing three-dimensional brachytherapy dose distributions. Recently, we have included fluorescence radiation physics and parallel computation to the standing algorithms so that we can compute dose distributions for a large set of seeds without resorting to the superposition methods. The introduction of parallel computing capability provided a means to compute the dose distribution for multiple seeds in a simultaneous manner. This provided a way to study strong heterogeneity and shadow effects induced by the presence of multiple seeds in an interstitial brachytherapy implant. This article presents the algorithm for computing fluorescence radiation, algorithm for parallel computing, and display results for an 81-seed implant that has a perfect and imperfect lattice. The dosimetry data for a single model 6711 seeds is presented for verification and heterogeneity factor computations using simultaneous and superposition techniques are presented.

  14. Dose volume analysis in brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery

    CERN Document Server

    Tozer-Loft, S M

    2000-01-01

    compared with a range of figures of merit which express different aspects of the quality of each dose distributions. The results are analysed in an attempt to answer the question: What are the important features of the dose distribution (conformality, uniformity, etc) which show a definite relationship with the outcome of the treatment? Initial results show positively that, when Gamma Knife radiosurgery is used to treat acoustic neuroma, some measures of conformality seem to have a surprising, but significant association with outcome. A brief introduction to three branches of radiotherapy is given: interstitial brachytherapy, external beam megavoltage radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. The current interest in issues around conformity, uniformity and optimisation is explained in the light of technical developments in these fields. A novel method of displaying dose-volume information, which mathematically suppresses the inverse-square law, as first suggested by L.L. Anderson for use in brachytherapy i...

  15. Cataract extraction after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, G.E.; Jost, B.F.; Snyder, W.I.; Fuller, D.G.; Birch, D.G. (Texas Retina Associates, Dallas (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Thirteen eyes of 55 consecutive patients treated with brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid developed postirradiation cataracts. Cataract development was more common in older patients and in patients with larger and more anterior tumors. Eleven eyes had extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Initial visual improvement occurred in 91% of eyes, with an average improvement of 5.5 lines. Visual acuity was maintained at 20/60 or better in 55% of the eyes over an average period of follow-up of 24 months (range, 6 to 40 months). These data suggest that, visually, cataract extraction can be helpful in selected patients who develop a cataract after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid.

  16. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  17. Biological Shielding Design Effectiveness of the Brachytherapy Unit at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana Using Mcnp5 Monte Carlo Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Arwui

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Design objectives for brachytherapy treatment facilities require sufficient shielding to reduce primary and scatter radiation to design limit in order to limit exposure to patients, staff and the general public. The primary aim of this study is to verify whether shielding of the brachytherapy unit at the Korle Bu teaching Hospital in Ghana provides adequate protection in order to assess any radiological health and safety impact and also test the suitability of other available sources. The study evaluates the effectiveness of the biological shielding design of a Cs-137 brachytherapy unit at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana using MCNP5. The facility was modeled based on the design specifications for LDR Cs-137, MDR Cs-137, HDR Co-60 and HDR Ir-192 treatment modalities. The estimated dose rate ranged from (0.01-0.15 μSv/h and (0.37-3.05 μSv/h for the existing initial and decayed activities of LDR Cs-137 for the public and controlled areas respectively, (0.03-0.57 μSv/h and (1.53-8.06 μSv/h for MDR Cs-137, (7.47-59.46 μSv/h and (144.87-178.74 μSv/h for HDR Co- 60, (0.13-6.95 μSv/h and (19.47-242.98 μSv/h for HDR Ir-192 for the public and controlled areas respectively. The results were verified by dose rates measurement for the current LDR setup at the Brachytherapy unit and agreed quiet well. It was also compared with the reference values of 0.5 μSv/h for public areas and 7.5 μSv/h for controlled areas respectively. It can be concluded that the shielding is adequate for the existing source.

  18. The use of nomograms in LDR-HDR prostate brachytherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pujades, Ma Carmen; Camacho, Cristina; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Richart, José; Gimeno, Jose; Lliso, Françoise; Carmona, Vicente; Ballester, Facundo; Crispín, Vicente; Rodríguez, Silvia; Tormo, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The common use of nomograms in Low Dose Rate (LDR) permanent prostate brachytherapy (BT) allows to estimate the number of seeds required for an implant. Independent dosimetry verification is recommended for each clinical dosimetry in BT. Also, nomograms can be useful for dose calculation quality assurance and they could be adapted to High Dose Rate (HDR). This work sets nomograms for LDR and HDR prostate-BT implants, which are applied to three different institutions that use different...

  19. Brachytherapy in Lip Carcinoma: Long-Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, Mireille, E-mail: mireilleguib@voila.fr [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Larrey Hospital, Toulouse (France); David, Isabelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Vergez, Sebastien [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Larrey Hospital, Toulouse (France); Rives, Michel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas [Department of Epidemiology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Bonnet, Jacques; Delannes, Martine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-dose-rate brachytherapy for local control and relapse-free survival in squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas of the lips. We compared two groups: one with tumors on the skin and the other with tumors on the lip. Patients and methods: All patients had been treated at Claudius Regaud Cancer Centre from 1990 to 2008 for squamous cell or basal cell carcinoma. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy was performed with iridium 192 wires according to the Paris system rules. On average, the dose delivered was 65 Gy. Results: 172 consecutive patients were included in our study; 69 had skin carcinoma (squamous cell or basal cell), and 92 had squamous cell mucosal carcinoma. The average follow-up time was 5.4 years. In the skin cancer group, there were five local recurrences and one lymph node recurrence. In the mucosal cancer group, there were ten local recurrences and five lymph node recurrences. The 8-year relapse-free survival for the entire population was 80%. The 8-year relapse-free survival was 85% for skin carcinoma 75% for mucosal carcinoma, with no significant difference between groups. The functional results were satisfactory for 99% of patients, and the cosmetic results were satisfactory for 92%. Maximal toxicity observed was Grade 2. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate brachytherapy can be used to treat lip carcinomas at Stages T1 and T2 as the only treatment with excellent results for local control and relapse-free survival. The benefits of brachytherapy are also cosmetic and functional, with 91% of patients having no side effects.

  20. Salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy after brachytherapy: our experience

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Govorov; A. O. Vasilyev; E. A. Prilepskaya; K. B. Kоlоntaryov; D. Yu. Pushkar

    2014-01-01

    In case of recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy patient may be offered salvage radical prostatectomy (both open and laparoscopic/robotic), hormone therapy, and a number of alternative techniques such as salvage cryoablation, HIFU-therapy and brachytherapy. Results of monitoring of patients for 10 years after salvage treatment of prostate cancer are known only after salvage prostatectomy. Technically radical prostatectomy after radiation therapy is associated with a large numb...

  1. HDR neutron brachytherapy for cervix carcinoma in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1988 and December 1995, a total of 285 patients with stage I-17, with stage II-157, with stage III-104 and stage IV-7 carcinoma of the cervix were treated with a combination of external beam radiation or surgery and HDR brachytherapy. The dose prescription for HDR brachytherapy was point A. The goals of combined radiation therapy were to deliver a total dose of 60.5-68.5 Gy to point A and 53-58 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes (point B) or 14 Gy-eq to point A in case of preoperative brachytherapy. Dosimetric planning was performed in Gray- equivalents by the use of PC-based computer programme. Relative biological effectiveness of the Cf-252 neutrons was physical gamma and neutron dose rate dependent. Most of the insertions were performed weekly when dose per fraction was 8-10 Gy or 2 insertions were done in one week at lower fractions. The median follow-up for the various stages of disease ranged from 0.5 to 6.5 year. Treatment results, acute and late toxicity will be discussed

  2. Stereolithographic modelling as an aid to orbital brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper describes the technique of stereolithographic biomodelling and its application to a patient who was treated using orbital brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The process uses a moving laser beam, directed by a computer, to draw cross-sections of the model onto the surface of photo-curable liquid plastic. Using a stereolithographic apparatus (SLA), solid or surface data is sliced by software into very thin cross-sections. A helium cadmium (HeCd) laser then generates a small intense spot of ultraviolet (UV) light that is moved across the top of a vat of liquid photo monomer by a computerised optical scanning system. The laser polymerises the liquid into a solid where it touches, precisely printing each cross-section. A vertical elevator lowers the newly formed layer, and a recoating and levelling system establishes the next layer's thickness. Successive cross-sections (0.25 mm thick), each one adhering to the one below, are built one on top of the other, to form the part from the bottom up. The biomodel allowed the implant to be planned in detail prior to the surgery. The accurate placement of brachytherapy catheters was assured, and the dosimetry could be determined and optimised prior to the definitive procedure. Conclusions: Stereolithography is a useful technique in the area of orbital brachytherapy. It allows the implant to to be carried out with greater accuracy and confidence. For the patient, it minimises the risk to the eye and provides them with a greater understanding of the procedure

  3. Criteria for the evaluation of brachytherapy for malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty two patients with recurrent or unresectable malignant brain tumors were treated by interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 seeds. After-loading catheters were stereotactically implanted under local anesthesia using a Brown-Roberts-wells (BRW) CT guided stereotactic system. The response to the therapy was followed by serial CT and MRI scans and evaluated three months after implantation by the standard criteria for the evaluation of chemotherapy because there is no set of criteria available for radiation therapy. After interstitial brachytherapy, the most commonly observed CT and MRI finding was central low attenuation, that is, the central enhanced tumor replaced by the radiation necrosis. Three months after the treatment, these findings were observed in 23 patients out of 32 patients on the CT and MRI. We observed complete response (CR) in 6 of 32 patients, partial response (PR) in 9, no change (NC) in 7 and progressive disease (PD) in 9. In 6 CR patients, the tumor disappeared by three months after treatment. In 15 patients of 17 NC and PD pa