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Sample records for 15n chemical shifts

  1. Qualitative Study of Substituent Effects on NMR 15N and 17O Chemical Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Rubén H.; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Bustamante, Manuel G.; Pasqualini, Enrique E.; Melo, Juan I.; Tormena, Cláudio F.

    2009-08-01

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-β substituent effects on both 15N and 17O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and σ-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds.

  2. Qualitative study of substituent effects on NMR (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I; Bustamante, Manuel G; Pasqualini, Enrique E; Melo, Juan I; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2009-09-10

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-beta substituent effects on both (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and sigma-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds. PMID:19685922

  3. Predicting 15N chemical shifts in proteins using the preceding residue-specific individual shielding surfaces from φ, ψi-1, and χ1torsion angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Empirical shielding surfaces are most commonly used to predict chemical shifts in proteins from known backbone torsion angles, φ and ψ. However, the prediction of 15N chemical shifts using this technique is significantly poorer, compared to that for the other nuclei such as 1Hα, 13Cα, and 13Cβ. In this study, we investigated the effects from the preceding residue and the side-chain geometry, χ1, on 15N chemical shifts by statistical methods. For an amino acid sequence XY, the 15N chemical shift of Y is expressed as a function of the amino acid types of X and Y, as well as the backbone torsion angles, φ and ψi-1. Accordingly, 380 empirical 'Preceding Residue Specific Individual (PRSI)' 15N chemical shift shielding surfaces, representing all the combinations of X and Y (except for Y=Pro), were built and used to predict 15N chemical shift from φ and ψi-1. We further investigated the χ1 effects, which were found to account for differences in 15N chemical shifts by ∼5 ppm for amino acids Val, Ile, Thr, Phe, His, Tyr, and Trp. Taking the χ1 effects into account, the χ1-calibrated PRSI shielding surfaces (XPRSI) were built and used to predict 15N chemical shifts for these amino acids. We demonstrated that 15N chemical shift predictions are significantly improved by incorporating the preceding residue and χ1 effects. The present PRSI and XPRSI shielding surfaces were extensively compared with three recently published programs, SHIFTX (Neal et al., 2003), SHIFTS (Xu and Case, 2001 and 2002), and PROSHIFT (Meiler, 2003) on a set of ten randomly selected proteins. A set of Java programs using XPRSI shielding surfaces to predict 15N chemical shifts in proteins were developed and are freely available for academic users at http://www.pronmr.com or by sending email to one of the authors Yunjun Wang

  4. Combining ambiguous chemical shift mapping with structure-based backbone and NOE assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMRbased drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically. However, automated methods are necessary for high-throughput drug screening. We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C- labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-toone mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better. Copyright © 2011 ACM.

  5. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  6. Automated prediction of 15N, 13Cα, 13Cβ and 13C' chemical shifts in proteins using a density functional database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A database of peptide chemical shifts, computed at the density functional level, has been used to develop an algorithm for prediction of 15N and 13C shifts in proteins from their structure; the method is incorporated into a program called SHIFTS (version 4.0). The database was built from the calculated chemical shift patterns of 1335 peptides whose backbone torsion angles are limited to areas of the Ramachandran map around helical and sheet configurations. For each tripeptide in these regions of regular secondary structure (which constitute about 40% of residues in globular proteins) SHIFTS also consults the database for information about sidechain torsion angle effects for the residue of interest and for the preceding residue, and estimates hydrogen bonding effects through an empirical formula that is also based on density functional calculations on peptides. The program optionally searches for alternate side-chain torsion angles that could significantly improve agreement between calculated and observed shifts. The application of the program on 20 proteins shows good consistency with experimental data, with correlation coefficients of 0.92, 0.98, 0.99 and 0.90 and r.m.s. deviations of 1.94, 0.97, 1.05, and 1.08 ppm for 15N, 13Cα, 13Cβ and 13C', respectively. Reference shifts fit to protein data are in good agreement with 'random-coil' values derived from experimental measurements on peptides. This prediction algorithm should be helpful in NMR assignment, crystal and solution structure comparison, and structure refinement

  7. The HSP90 binding mode of a radicicol-like E-oxime from docking, binding free energy estimations, and NMR 15N chemical shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spichty, Martin; Taly, Antoine; Hagn, Franz; Kessler, Horst; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas; Karplus, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We determine the binding mode of a macrocyclic radicicol-like oxime to yeast HSP90 by combining computer simulations and experimental measurements. We sample the macrocyclic scaffold of the unbound ligand by parallel tempering simulations and dock the most populated conformations to yeast HSP90. Docking poses are then evaluated by the use of binding free energy estimations with the linear interaction energy method. Comparison of QM/MM-calculated NMR chemical shifts with experimental shift data for a selective subset of back-bone 15N provides an additional evaluation criteria. As a last test we check the binding modes against available structure-activity-relationships. We find that the most likely binding mode of the oxime to yeast HSP90 is very similar to the known structure of the radicicol-HSP90 complex. PMID:19482409

  8. Site-specific protein backbone and side-chain NMR chemical shift and relaxation analysis of human vinexin SH3 domain using a genetically encoded {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-labeled unnatural amino acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Pan [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Xi, Zhaoyong; Wang, Hu [School of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Shi, Chaowei [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Xiong, Ying, E-mail: yxiong73@ustc.edu.cn [School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Tian, Changlin, E-mail: cltian@ustc.edu.cn [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemical synthesis of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine. {yields} Site-specific incorporation of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine to SH3. {yields} Site-specific backbone and side chain chemical shift and relaxation analysis. {yields} Different internal motions at different sites of SH3 domain upon ligand binding. -- Abstract: SH3 is a ubiquitous domain mediating protein-protein interactions. Recent solution NMR structural studies have shown that a proline-rich peptide is capable of binding to the human vinexin SH3 domain. Here, an orthogonal amber tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair for {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine ({sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-tfmF) has been applied to achieve site-specific labeling of SH3 at three different sites. One-dimensional solution NMR spectra of backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F were obtained for SH3 with three different site-specific labels. Site-specific backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F chemical shift and relaxation analysis of SH3 in the absence or presence of a peptide ligand demonstrated different internal motions upon ligand binding at the three different sites. This site-specific NMR analysis might be very useful for studying large-sized proteins or protein complexes.

  9. Backbone and Ile-δ1, Leu, Val Methyl 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shift assignments for human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Cuifeng; Aramini, James M.; Ma, LiChung; Cort, John R.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Krug, R. M.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2011-10-01

    Human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein (ISG15), also called ubiquitin cross-reactive protein (UCRP), is the first identified ubiquitin-like protein containing two ubiquitin-like domains fused in tandem. The active form of ISG15 is conjugated to target proteins via the C-terminal glycine residue through an isopeptide bond in a manner similar to ubiquitin. The biological role of ISG15 is strongly associated with the modulation of cell immune function, and there is mounting evidence suggesting that many viral pathogens evade the host innate immune response by interfering with ISG15 conjugation to both host and viral proteins in a variety of ways. Here we report nearly complete backbone 1HN, 15N, 13CO, and 13Ca, as well as side chain 13Cb, methyl (Ile-d1, Leu, Val), amide (Asn, Gln), and indole NH (Trp) NMR resonance assignments for the 157-residue human ISG15 protein. These resonance assignments provide the basis for future structural and functional solution NMR studies of the biologically important human ISG15 protein.

  10. Easy and unambiguous sequential assignments of intrinsically disordered proteins by correlating the backbone {sup 15}N or {sup 13}C′ chemical shifts of multiple contiguous residues in highly resolved 3D spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, Yuichi; Kulminskaya, Natalia V.; Mulder, Frans A. A., E-mail: fmulder@chem.au.dk [Aarhus University, Department of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) (Denmark)

    2015-02-15

    Sequential resonance assignment strategies are typically based on matching one or two chemical shifts of adjacent residues. However, resonance overlap often leads to ambiguity in resonance assignments in particular for intrinsically disordered proteins. We investigated the potential of establishing connectivity through the three-bond couplings between sequentially adjoining backbone carbonyl carbon nuclei, combined with semi-constant time chemical shift evolution, for resonance assignments of small folded and larger unfolded proteins. Extended sequential connectivity strongly lifts chemical shift degeneracy of the backbone nuclei in disordered proteins. We show here that 3D (H)N(COCO)NH and (HN)CO(CO)NH experiments with relaxation-optimized multiple pulse mixing correlate up to seven adjacent backbone amide nitrogen or carbonyl carbon nuclei, respectively, and connections across proline residues are also obtained straightforwardly. Multiple, recurrent long-range correlations with ultra-high resolution allow backbone {sup 1}H{sup N}, {sup 15}N{sup H}, and {sup 13}C′ resonance assignments to be completed from a single pair of 3D experiments.

  11. (15)N Heteronuclear Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Haifeng; Xu, Jiadi; Yadav, Nirbhay N; McMahon, Michael T; Harden, Bradley; Frueh, Dominique; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2016-09-01

    A two-step heteronuclear enhancement approach was combined with chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) to magnify (15)N MRI signal of molecules through indirect detection via water protons. Previous CEST studies have been limited to radiofrequency (rf) saturation transfer or excitation transfer employing protons. Here, the signal of (15)N is detected indirectly through the water signal by first inverting selectively protons that are scalar-coupled to (15)N in the urea molecule, followed by chemical exchange of the amide proton to bulk water. In addition to providing a small sensitivity enhancement, this approach can be used to monitor the exchange rates and thus the pH sensitivity of the participating (15)N-bound protons. PMID:27548755

  12. Protein Chemical Shift Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Anders S

    2014-01-01

    The protein chemical shifts holds a large amount of information about the 3-dimensional structure of the protein. A number of chemical shift predictors based on the relationship between structures resolved with X-ray crystallography and the corresponding experimental chemical shifts have been developed. These empirical predictors are very accurate on X-ray structures but tends to be insensitive to small structural changes. To overcome this limitation it has been suggested to make chemical shift predictors based on quantum mechanical(QM) calculations. In this thesis the development of the QM derived chemical shift predictor Procs14 is presented. Procs14 is based on 2.35 million density functional theory(DFT) calculations on tripeptides and contains corrections for hydrogen bonding, ring current and the effect of the previous and following residue. Procs14 is capable at performing predictions for the 13CA, 13CB, 13CO, 15NH, 1HN and 1HA backbone atoms. In order to benchmark Procs14, a number of QM NMR calculatio...

  13. Retrospective characterization of ontogenetic shifts in killer whale diets via δ13C and δ15N analysis of teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Seth D.; Etnier, Michael A.; Monson, Daniel H.; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolically inert, accretionary structures such as the dentin growth layers in teeth provide a life history record of individual diet with near-annual resolution. We constructed ontogenetic ??13C and ??15N profiles by analyzing tooth dentin growth layers from 13 individual killer whales Orcinus orca collected in the eastern northeast Pacific Ocean between 1961 and 2003. The individuals sampled were 6 to 52 yr old, representing 2 ecotypes-resident and transient - collected across ???25?? of latitude. The average isotopic values of transient individuals (n = 10) are consistent with a reliance on mammalian prey, while the average isotopic values of residents (n = 3) are consistent with piscivory. Regardless of ecotype, most individuals show a decrease in ??15N values of ???2.5% through the first 3 yr of life, roughly equivalent to a decrease of one trophic level. We interpret this as evidence of gradual weaning, after which, ontogenetic shifts in isotopic values are highly variable. A few individuals (n = 2) maintained relatively stable ??15N and ??13C values throughout the remainder of their lives, whereas ??15N values of most (n = 11) increased by ???1.5%, suggestive of an ontogenetic increase in trophic level. Significant differences in mean ??13C and ??15N values among transients collected off California suggest that individuality in prey preferences may be prevalent within this ecotype. Our approach provides retrospective individual life history and dietary information that cannot be obtained through traditional field observations of free-ranging and elusive species such as killer whales, including unique historic ecological information that pre-dates modern studies. By providing insights into individual diet composition, stable isotope analysis of teeth and/or bones may be the only means of evaluating a number of hypothesized historical dietary shifts in killer whales of the northeast Pacific Ocean. ?? Inter-Research 2009.

  14. Retrospective characterization of ontogenetic shifts in killer whale diets via δ13C and δ15N analysis of teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Seth D.; Etnier, Michael A.; Monson, Daniel H.; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolically inert, accretionary structures such as the dentin growth layers in teeth provide a life history record of individual diet with near-annual resolution. We constructed ontogenetic δ13C and δ15N profiles by analyzing tooth dentin growth layers from 13 individual killer whales Orcinus orca collected in the eastern northeast Pacific Ocean between 1961 and 2003. The individuals sampled were 6 to 52 yr old, representing 2 ecotypes—resident and transient—collected across ~25° of latitude. The average isotopic values of transient individuals (n = 10) are consistent with a reliance on mammalian prey, while the average isotopic values of residents (n = 3) are consistent with piscivory. Regardless of ecotype, most individuals show a decrease in δ15N values of ~2.5‰ through the first 3 yr of life, roughly equivalent to a decrease of one trophic level. We interpret this as evidence of gradual weaning, after which, ontogenetic shifts in isotopic values are highly variable. A few individuals (n = 2) maintained relatively stable δ15N and δ13C values throughout the remainder of their lives, whereas δ15N values of most (n = 11) increased by ~1.5‰, suggestive of an ontogenetic increase in trophic level. Significant differences in mean δ13C and δ15N values among transients collected off California suggest that individuality in prey preferences may be prevalent within this ecotype. Our approach provides retrospective individual life history and dietary information that cannot be obtained through traditional field observations of free-ranging and elusive species such as killer whales, including unique historic ecological information that pre-dates modern studies. By providing insights into individual diet composition, stable isotope analysis of teeth and/or bones may be the only means of evaluating a number of hypothesized historical dietary shifts in killer whales of the northeast Pacific Ocean

  15. Chemical shift prediction for denatured proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prestegard, James H., E-mail: jpresteg@ccrc.uga.edu; Sahu, Sarata C.; Nkari, Wendy K.; Morris, Laura C.; Live, David; Gruta, Christian

    2013-02-15

    While chemical shift prediction has played an important role in aspects of protein NMR that include identification of secondary structure, generation of torsion angle constraints for structure determination, and assignment of resonances in spectra of intrinsically disordered proteins, interest has arisen more recently in using it in alternate assignment strategies for crosspeaks in {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC spectra of sparsely labeled proteins. One such approach involves correlation of crosspeaks in the spectrum of the native protein with those observed in the spectrum of the denatured protein, followed by assignment of the peaks in the latter spectrum. As in the case of disordered proteins, predicted chemical shifts can aid in these assignments. Some previously developed empirical formulas for chemical shift prediction have depended on basis data sets of 20 pentapeptides. In each case the central residue was varied among the 20 amino common acids, with the flanking residues held constant throughout the given series. However, previous choices of solvent conditions and flanking residues make the parameters in these formulas less than ideal for general application to denatured proteins. Here, we report {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N shifts for a set of alanine based pentapeptides under the low pH urea denaturing conditions that are more appropriate for sparse label assignments. New parameters have been derived and a Perl script was created to facilitate comparison with other parameter sets. A small, but significant, improvement in shift predictions for denatured ubiquitin is demonstrated.

  16. Relative stability of soil carbon revealed by shifts in δ15N and C:N ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Alewell

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Life on earth drives a continuous exchange of carbon between soils and the atmosphere. Some forms of soil carbon, or organic matter, are more stable and have a longer residence time in soil than others. Relative differences in stability have often been derived from shifts in δ13C (which is bound to a vegetation change from C3 to C4 type or through 14C-dating (which is bound to small sample numbers because of high measurement costs. Here, we propose a new concept based on the increase in δ15N and the decrease in C:N ratio with increasing stability. We tested the concept on grasslands at different elevations in the Swiss Alps. Depending on elevation and soil depth, it predicted mineral-associated organic carbon to be 3 to 73 times more stable than particulate organic carbon. Analysis of 14C-ages generally endorsed these predictions.

  17. Relative stability of soil carbon revealed by shifts in δ15N and C:N ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Alewell

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Life on earth drives a continuous exchange of carbon between soils and the atmosphere. Some forms of soil carbon, or organic matter, are more stable and have a longer residence time in soil than others. Relative differences in stability have often been derived from shifts in δ13C (which is bound to a vegetation change from C3 to C4 type or through 14C-dating (which is bound to small sample numbers because of high measurement costs. Here, we propose a new concept based on the increase in δ15N and the decrease in C:N ratio with increasing stability. We tested the concept on grasslands at different elevations in the Swiss Alps. Depending on elevation and soil depth, it predicted mineral-associated organic carbon to be 3 to 73 times more stable than particulate organic carbon. Analysis of 14C-ages generally endorsed these predictions.

  18. Real-time pure shift {sup 15}N HSQC of proteins: a real improvement in resolution and sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiraly, Peter; Adams, Ralph W.; Paudel, Liladhar; Foroozandeh, Mohammadali [University of Manchester, School of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Aguilar, Juan A. [Durham University, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Timári, István [University of Debrecen, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (Hungary); Cliff, Matthew J. [University of Manchester, Manchester Institute of Biotechnology (United Kingdom); Nilsson, Mathias [University of Manchester, School of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Sándor, Péter [Agilent Technologies R& D and Marketing GmbH & Co. KG (Germany); Batta, Gyula [University of Debrecen, Department of Organic Chemistry (Hungary); Waltho, Jonathan P. [University of Manchester, Manchester Institute of Biotechnology (United Kingdom); Kövér, Katalin E. [University of Debrecen, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (Hungary); Morris, Gareth A., E-mail: g.a.morris@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, School of Chemistry (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    Spectral resolution in proton NMR spectroscopy is reduced by the splitting of resonances into multiplets due to the effect of homonuclear scalar couplings. Although these effects are often hidden in protein NMR spectroscopy by low digital resolution and routine apodization, behind the scenes homonuclear scalar couplings increase spectral overcrowding. The possibilities for biomolecular NMR offered by new pure shift NMR methods are illustrated here. Both resolution and sensitivity are improved, without any increase in experiment time. In these experiments, free induction decays are collected in short bursts of data acquisition, with durations short on the timescale of J-evolution, interspersed with suitable refocusing elements. The net effect is real-time (t{sub 2}) broadband homodecoupling, suppressing the multiplet structure caused by proton–proton interactions. The key feature of the refocusing elements is that they discriminate between the resonances of active (observed) and passive (coupling partner) spins. This can be achieved either by using band-selective refocusing or by the BIRD element, in both cases accompanied by a nonselective 180° proton pulse. The latter method selects the active spins based on their one-bond heteronuclear J-coupling to {sup 15}N, while the former selects a region of the {sup 1}H spectrum. Several novel pure shift experiments are presented, and the improvements in resolution and sensitivity they provide are evaluated for representative samples: the N-terminal domain of PGK; ubiquitin; and two mutants of the small antifungal protein PAF. These new experiments, delivering improved sensitivity and resolution, have the potential to replace the current standard HSQC experiments.

  19. δ13C and δ15N changes after dietary shift in veliger larvae of the slipper limpet Crepidula fornicata: an experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comtet, T.; Riera, P.

    2006-12-01

    δ13C and δ15N measurements are still poorly conducted in benthic invertebrate larvae. To assess the δ13C and δ15N changes occurring after a dietary shift, experiments were conducted on veliger larvae of Crepidula fornicata fed with two cultured microalgae ( Isochrysis galbana and Pavlova lutheri) of known isotopic composition, 13C-enriched and 15N-depleted compared to the initial values of the larvae. Rapid changes in larval δ13C and δ15N were observed after the dietary shift, with an increase in δ13C and a decrease in δ15N. After 19 days of feeding, isotopic equilibrium was still not reached, a period which is close to the duration of the pelagic life of the larvae. This implies that the isotopic composition measured in field-collected larvae might only partly reflect actual larval feeding but also the parental isotopic signature, especially during the early developmental stages. Isotopic measurements in marine invertebrate larvae should thus be interpreted cautiously. In planktonic food web investigations, the study of field-collected larvae of different size/developmental stage may reduce potential misinterpretations.

  20. A Short History of Three Chemical Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi

    2007-01-01

    A short history of chemical shifts in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and Mossbauer spectroscopy, which are useful for chemical studies, is described. The term chemical shift is shown to have originated in the mistaken assumption that nuclei of a given element would all undergo resonance at the…

  1. Protein Structure Determination Using Chemical Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen

    In this thesis, a protein structure determination using chemical shifts is presented. The method is implemented in the open source PHAISTOS protein simulation framework. The method combines sampling from a generative model with a coarse-grained force field and an energy function that includes...... chemical shifts. The method is benchmarked on folding simulations of five small proteins. In four cases the resulting structures are in excellent agreement with experimental data, the fifth case fail likely due to inaccuracies in the energy function. For the Chymotrypsin Inhibitor protein, a structure...

  2. RefDB: A database of uniformly referenced protein chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RefDB is a secondary database of reference-corrected protein chemical shifts derived from the BioMagResBank (BMRB). The database was assembled by using a recently developed program (SHIFTX) to predict protein 1H, 13C and 15N chemical shifts from X-ray or NMR coordinate data of previously assigned proteins. The predicted shifts were then compared with the corresponding observed shifts and a variety of statistical evaluations performed. In this way, potential mis-assignments, typographical errors and chemical referencing errors could be identified and, in many cases, corrected. This approach allows for an unbiased, instrument-independent solution to the problem of retrospectively re-referencing published protein chemical shifts. Results from this study indicate that nearly 25% of BMRB entries with 13C protein assignments and 27% of BMRB entries with 15N protein assignments required significant chemical shift reference readjustments. Additionally, nearly 40% of protein entries deposited in the BioMagResBank appear to have at least one assignment error. From this study it evident that protein NMR spectroscopists are increasingly adhering to recommended IUPAC 13C and 15N chemical shift referencing conventions, however, approximately 20% of newly deposited protein entries in the BMRB are still being incorrectly referenced. This is cause for some concern. However, the utilization of RefDB and its companion programs may help mitigate this ongoing problem. RefDB is updated weekly and the database, along with its associated software, is freely available at http://redpoll.pharmacy.ualberta.ca and the BMRB website

  3. ¹H and (15)N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially ¹H-(15)N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate (15)N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS (15)N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via ¹H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D ¹H and 2D ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  4. ¹H and (15)N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-09-07

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially ¹H-(15)N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate (15)N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS (15)N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via ¹H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D ¹H and 2D ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin.

  5. Protein backbone chemical shifts predicted from searching a database for torsion angle and sequence homology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical shifts of nuclei in or attached to a protein backbone are exquisitely sensitive to their local environment. A computer program, SPARTA, is described that uses this correlation with local structure to predict protein backbone chemical shifts, given an input three-dimensional structure, by searching a newly generated database for triplets of adjacent residues that provide the best match in φ/ψ/χ1 torsion angles and sequence similarity to the query triplet of interest. The database contains 15N, 1HN, 1Hα, 13Cα, 13Cβ and 13C' chemical shifts for 200 proteins for which a high resolution X-ray (≤2.4 A) structure is available. The relative importance of the weighting factors for the φ/ψ/χ1 angles and sequence similarity was optimized empirically. The weighted, average secondary shifts of the central residues in the 20 best-matching triplets, after inclusion of nearest neighbor, ring current, and hydrogen bonding effects, are used to predict chemical shifts for the protein of known structure. Validation shows good agreement between the SPARTA-predicted and experimental shifts, with standard deviations of 2.52, 0.51, 0.27, 0.98, 1.07 and 1.08 ppm for 15N, 1HN, 1Hα, 13Cα, 13Cβ and 13C', respectively, including outliers

  6. Accessible surface area from NMR chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accessible surface area (ASA) is the surface area of an atom, amino acid or biomolecule that is exposed to solvent. The calculation of a molecule’s ASA requires three-dimensional coordinate data and the use of a “rolling ball” algorithm to both define and calculate the ASA. For polymers such as proteins, the ASA for individual amino acids is closely related to the hydrophobicity of the amino acid as well as its local secondary and tertiary structure. For proteins, ASA is a structural descriptor that can often be as informative as secondary structure. Consequently there has been considerable effort over the past two decades to try to predict ASA from protein sequence data and to use ASA information (derived from chemical modification studies) as a structure constraint. Recently it has become evident that protein chemical shifts are also sensitive to ASA. Given the potential utility of ASA estimates as structural constraints for NMR we decided to explore this relationship further. Using machine learning techniques (specifically a boosted tree regression model) we developed an algorithm called “ShiftASA” that combines chemical-shift and sequence derived features to accurately estimate per-residue fractional ASA values of water-soluble proteins. This method showed a correlation coefficient between predicted and experimental values of 0.79 when evaluated on a set of 65 independent test proteins, which was an 8.2 % improvement over the next best performing (sequence-only) method. On a separate test set of 92 proteins, ShiftASA reported a mean correlation coefficient of 0.82, which was 12.3 % better than the next best performing method. ShiftASA is available as a web server ( http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com ) for submitting input queries for fractional ASA calculation

  7. Random coil chemical shift for intrinsically disordered proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Brander, Søren; Poulsen, Flemming Martin

    2011-01-01

    Secondary chemical shift analysis is the main NMR method for detection of transiently formed secondary structure in intrinsically disordered proteins. The quality of the secondary chemical shifts is dependent on an appropriate choice of random coil chemical shifts. We report random coil chemical....... Temperature has a non-negligible effect on the (13)C random coil chemical shifts, so temperature coefficients are reported for the random coil chemical shifts to allow extrapolation to other temperatures. The pH dependence of the histidine random coil chemical shifts is investigated in a titration series......, which allows the accurate random coil chemical shifts to be obtained at any pH. By correcting the random coil chemical shifts for the effects of temperature and pH, systematic biases of the secondary chemical shifts are minimized, which will improve the reliability of detection of transient secondary...

  8. Effects of structural differences on the NMR chemical shifts in isostructural dipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altheimer, Benjamin D; Mehta, Manish A

    2014-04-10

    Porous crystalline dipeptides have gained recent attention for their potential as gas-storage materials. Within this large class is a group of dipeptides containing alanine, valine, and isoleucine with very similar crystal structures. We report the (13)C (carbonyl and Cα) and (15)N (amine and amide) solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shifts in a series of seven such isostructural porous dipeptides as well as shift tensor data for the carbonyl and amide sites. Using their known crystal structures and aided by ab initio quantum chemical calculations for the resonance assignments, we elucidate trends relating local structure, hydrogen-bonding patterns, and chemical shift. We find good correlation between the backbone dihedral angles and the Cα1 and Cα2 shifts. For the C1 shift tensor, the δ11 value shifts downfield as the hydrogen-bond distance increases, δ22 shifts upfield, and δ33 shows little variation. The C2 shift tensor shows no appreciable correlation with structural parameters. For the N2 tensor, δ11 shows little dependence on the hydrogen-bond length, whereas δ22 and δ33 both show a decrease in shielding as the hydrogen bond shortens. Our analysis teases apart some, but not all, structural contributors to the observed differences the solid-state NMR chemical shifts.

  9. Automated assignment of NMR chemical shifts based on a known structure and 4D spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautwein, Matthias; Fredriksson, Kai; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    Apart from their central role during 3D structure determination of proteins the backbone chemical shift assignment is the basis for a number of applications, like chemical shift perturbation mapping and studies on the dynamics of proteins. This assignment is not a trivial task even if a 3D protein structure is known and needs almost as much effort as the assignment for structure prediction if performed manually. We present here a new algorithm based solely on 4D [(1)H,(15)N]-HSQC-NOESY-[(1)H,(15)N]-HSQC spectra which is able to assign a large percentage of chemical shifts (73-82 %) unambiguously, demonstrated with proteins up to a size of 250 residues. For the remaining residues, a small number of possible assignments is filtered out. This is done by comparing distances in the 3D structure to restraints obtained from the peak volumes in the 4D spectrum. Using dead-end elimination, assignments are removed in which at least one of the restraints is violated. Including additional information from chemical shift predictions, a complete unambiguous assignment was obtained for Ubiquitin and 95 % of the residues were correctly assigned in the 251 residue-long N-terminal domain of enzyme I. The program including source code is available at https://github.com/thomasexner/4Dassign . PMID:27484442

  10. (H)N(COCA)NH and HN(COCA)NH experiments for 1H-15N backbone assignments in 13C/15N-labeled proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, Clay; Palmer, Arthur G. III [Columbia University, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics (United States); Cavanagh, John [New York State Department of Health, NMR Structural Biology Facility, Wadsworth Center (United States)

    1997-01-15

    Triple resonance HN(COCA)NH pulse sequences for correlating 1H(i), 15N(i),1H(i-1), and 15N(i-1) spins that utilize overlapping coherence transfer periods provide increased sensitivity relative to pulse sequences that utilize sequential coherence transfer periods. Although the overlapping sequence elements reduce the overall duration of the pulse sequences, the principal benefit derives from a reduction in the number of 180 deg. pulses. Two versions of the technique are presented: a 3D (H)N(COCA)NH experiment that correlates 15N(i),1H(i-1), and 15N(i-1) spins, and a 3D HN(COCA)NH experiment that correlates 1H(i), 15N(i),1H(i-1), and 15N(i-1) spins by simultaneously encoding the 1H(i) and 15N(i) chemical shifts during the t1 evolution period. The methods are demonstrated on a 13C/15N-enriched sample of the protein ubiquitin and are easily adapted for application to 2H/13C/15N-enriched proteins.

  11. Handling the influence of chemical shift in amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basse, Kristoffer; Shankar, Ravi; Bjerring, Morten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Nielsen, Anders B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of chemical shifts on amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling experiments in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The method is demonstrated using the Rotor Echo Short Pulse IRrAdiaTION mediated Cross-Polarization (RESPIRATIONCP) experiment as an example. By going into the pulse sequence rf interaction frame and employing a quintuple-mode operator-based Floquet approach, we describe how chemical shift offset and anisotropic chemical shift affect the efficiency of heteronuclear polarization transfer. In this description, it becomes transparent that the main attribute leading to non-ideal performance is a fictitious field along the rf field axis, which is generated from second-order cross terms arising mainly between chemical shift tensors and themselves. This insight is useful for the development of improved recoupling experiments. We discuss the validity of this approach and present quaternion calculations to determine the effective resonance conditions in a combined rf field and chemical shift offset interaction frame transformation. Based on this, we derive a broad-banded version of the RESPIRATIONCP experiment. The new sequence is experimentally verified using SNNFGAILSS amyloid fibrils where simultaneous 15N → 13CO and 15N → 13Cα coherence transfer is demonstrated on high-field NMR instrumentation, requiring great offset stability.

  12. Probabilistic Approach to Determining Unbiased Random-coil Carbon-13 Chemical Shift Values from the Protein Chemical Shift Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a probabilistic model for deriving, from the database of assigned chemical shifts, a set of random coil chemical shift values that are 'unbiased' insofar as contributions from detectable secondary structure have been minimized (RCCSu). We have used this approach to derive a set of RCCSu values for 13Cα and 13Cβ for 17 of the 20 standard amino acid residue types by taking advantage of the known opposite conformational dependence of these parameters. We present a second probabilistic approach that utilizes the maximum entropy principle to analyze the database of 13Cα and 13Cβ chemical shifts considered separately; this approach yielded a second set of random coil chemical shifts (RCCSmax-ent). Both new approaches analyze the chemical shift database without reference to known structure. Prior approaches have used either the chemical shifts of small peptides assumed to model the random coil state (RCCSpeptide) or statistical analysis of chemical shifts associated with structure not in helical or strand conformation (RCCSstruct-stat). We show that the RCCSmax-ent values are strikingly similar to published RCCSpeptide and RCCSstruct-stat values. By contrast, the RCCSu values differ significantly from both published types of random coil chemical shift values. The differences (RCCSpeptide-RCCSu) for individual residue types show a correlation with known intrinsic conformational propensities. These results suggest that random coil chemical shift values from both prior approaches are biased by conformational preferences. RCCSu values appear to be consistent with the current concept of the 'random coil' as the state in which the geometry of the polypeptide ensemble samples the allowed region of (φ,ψ)-space in the absence of any dominant stabilizing interactions and thus represent an improved basis for the detection of secondary structure. Coupled with the growing database of chemical shifts, this probabilistic approach makes it possible to refine

  13. Chemical weathering and the role of sulfuric and nitric acids in carbonate weathering: Isotopes (13C, 15N, 34S, and 18O) and chemical constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cai; Ji, Hongbing

    2016-05-01

    Multiple isotopes (13C-DIC, 34S and 18O-SO42-, 15N and 18O-NO3-) and water chemistry were used to evaluate weathering rates and associated CO2 consumption by carbonic acid and strong acids (H2SO4 and HNO3) in a typical karst watershed (Wujiang River, Southwest China). The dual sulfate isotopes indicate that sulfate is mainly derived from sulfide oxidation in coal stratum and sulfide-containing minerals, and dual nitrate isotopes indicate that nitrate is mainly derived from soil N and nitrification. The correlation between isotopic compositions and water chemistry suggests that sulfuric and nitric acids, in addition to carbonic acid, are involved in carbonate weathering. The silicate and carbonate weathering rates are 7.2 t km-2 yr-1 and 76 t km-2 yr-1, respectively. In comparison with carbonate weathering rates (43 t km-2 yr-1) by carbonic acid alone, the subsequent increase in rates indicates significant enhancement of weathering when combined with sulfuric and nitric acids. Therefore, the role of sulfuric and nitric acids in the rock weathering should be considered in the global carbon cycle.

  14. Synthesis of Gemcitabine-13C, 15N2 and Gemcitabine-13C, 15N2 Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Cheng-gu;YANG Shao-zu;YAN Sheng-wang;FANG Ning-jing;CAI Ding-long;LI Gang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Homemade urea-13C, 15N2 was used to react with 3-methyl acrylonitrile closure to form cytosine-13C, 15N2 (2,which was protected by trimethylsilylation with BSA and condensed with 2-deoxy-2,2-difluoro-D-erythro-pentofuranose-3,5-dibenzoate-1-methanesulfonate at 120 ℃ to afford blocked gemcitabine-13C, 15N2. Hydrolytic removal of the blocking groups of gemcitabine-13C, 15N2 with NaOH gave gemcitabine-13C, 15N2, and its metabolite was obtained by further hydrolytic deamination of gemcitabine-13C, 15N2. The final products were characterized and detected by HPLC, LC-MS and NMR, and confirmed that the chemical purities were higher than 98%, isotopic abundances were 99% 13C, 98% 15N, and they were suitable for drug metabolism studies.

  15. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  16. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ((13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 (13)C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited "hand-picked" data sets, we show that ~94% of the (13)C NMR data and almost all (15)N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6% of the (13)C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. -2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided

  17. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ((13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 (13)C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited "hand-picked" data sets, we show that ~94% of the (13)C NMR data and almost all (15)N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6% of the (13)C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. -2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided

  18. Improved chemical shift prediction by Rosetta conformational sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Ye [Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States); Opella, Stanley J. [University of California San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org [Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Chemical shift frequencies represent a time-average of all the conformational states populated by a protein. Thus, chemical shift prediction programs based on sequence and database analysis yield higher accuracy for rigid rather than flexible protein segments. Here we show that the prediction accuracy can be significantly improved by averaging over an ensemble of structures, predicted solely from amino acid sequence with the Rosetta program. This approach to chemical shift and structure prediction has the potential to be useful for guiding resonance assignments, especially in solid-state NMR structural studies of membrane proteins in proteoliposomes.

  19. SPARTA+: a modest improvement in empirical NMR chemical shift prediction by means of an artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.go [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2010-09-15

    NMR chemical shifts provide important local structural information for proteins and are key in recently described protein structure generation protocols. We describe a new chemical shift prediction program, SPARTA+, which is based on artificial neural networking. The neural network is trained on a large carefully pruned database, containing 580 proteins for which high-resolution X-ray structures and nearly complete backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts are available. The neural network is trained to establish quantitative relations between chemical shifts and protein structures, including backbone and side-chain conformation, H-bonding, electric fields and ring-current effects. The trained neural network yields rapid chemical shift prediction for backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} atoms, with standard deviations of 2.45, 1.09, 0.94, 1.14, 0.25 and 0.49 ppm for {delta}{sup 15}N, {delta}{sup 13}C', {delta}{sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {delta}{sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, {delta}{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {delta}{sup 1}H{sup N}, respectively, between the SPARTA+ predicted and experimental shifts for a set of eleven validation proteins. These results represent a modest but consistent improvement (2-10%) over the best programs available to date, and appear to be approaching the limit at which empirical approaches can predict chemical shifts.

  20. Calculations of proton chemical shifts in olefins and aromatics

    CERN Document Server

    Escrihuela, M C

    2000-01-01

    induced reagents on alpha,beta unsaturated ketones has also been investigated in order to deduce molecular structures and to obtain the assignment of the spectra of these molecules. A semi-empirical calculation of the partial atomic charges in organic compounds based on molecular dipole moments (CHARGE3) was developed into a model capable of predicting proton chemical shifts in a wide variety of organic compounds to a reasonable degree of accuracy. The model has been modified to include condensed aromatic hydrocarbons and substituted benzenes, alkenes, halo-monosubstituted benzenes and halo-alkenes. Within the aromatic compounds the influence of the pi electron densities and the ring current have been investigated, along with the alpha, beta and gamma effects. The model gives the first accurate calculation of the proton chemical shifts of condensed aromatic compounds and the proton substituent chemical shifts (SCS) in the benzene ring. For the data set of 55 proton chemical shifts spanning 3 ppm the rms error...

  1. Counterion influence on chemical shifts in strychnine salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metaxas, Athena E.; Cort, John R.

    2013-05-01

    The highly toxic plant alkaloid strychnine is often isolated in the form of the anion salt of its protonated tertiary amine. Here we characterize the relative influence of different counterions on 1H and 13C chemical shifts in several strychnine salts in D2O, methanol-d4 (CD3OD) and chloroform-d (CDCl3) solvents. In organic solvents, but not in water, substantial variation in chemical shifts of protons near the tertiary amine was observed among different salts. These secondary shifts reveal differences in the way each anion influences electronic structure within the protonated amine. The distributions of secondary shifts allow salts to be easily distinguished from each other as well as from the free base form. The observed effects are much greater in organic solvents than in water. Slight concentration-dependence in chemical shifts of some protons near the amine was observed for two salts in CDCl3, but this effect is small compared to the influence of the counterion. Distinct chemical shifts in different salt forms of the same compound may be useful as chemical forensic signatures for source attribution and sample matching of alkaloids such as strychnine and possibly other organic acid and base salts.

  2. Counterion influence on chemical shifts in strychnine salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxas, Athena E; Cort, John R

    2013-05-01

    The highly toxic plant alkaloid strychnine is often isolated in the form of the anion salt of its protonated tertiary amine. Here, we characterize the relative influence of different counterions on (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts in several strychnine salts in D2O, methanol-d4 (CD3OD), and chloroform-d (CDCl3) solvents. In organic solvents but not in water, substantial variation in chemical shifts of protons near the tertiary amine was observed among different salts. These secondary shifts reveal differences in the way each anion influences electronic structure within the protonated amine. The distributions of secondary shifts allow salts to be easily distinguished from each other as well as from the free base form. Slight concentration dependence in chemical shifts of some protons near the amine was observed for two salts in CDCl3, but this effect is small compared with the influence of the counterion. Distinct chemical shifts in different salt forms of the same compound may be useful as chemical forensic signatures for source attribution and sample matching of alkaloids such as strychnine and possibly other organic acid and base salts. PMID:23495106

  3. Natural-abundance 15N NMR studies of Turkey ovomucoid third domain. Assignment of peptide 15N resonances to the residues at the reactive site region via proton-detected multiple-quantum coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Polo, Gilberto; Krishnamoorthi, R.; Markley, John L.; Live, David H.; Davis, Donald G.; Cowburn, David

    Heteronuclear two-dimensional 1H{ 15N} multiple-quantum (MQ) spectroscopy has been applied to a protein sample at natural abundance: ovomucoid third domain from turkey ( Meleagris gallopavo), a serine proteinase inhibitor of 56 amino acid residues. Peptide amide 1H NMR assignments obtained by two-dimensional 1H{ 1H} NMR methods (R. Krishnamoorthi and J. L. Markley, unpublished data) led to identification of the corresponding 1H{ 15N} MQ coherence cross peaks. From these, 15N NMR chemical shifts were determined for several specific backbone amide groups of amino acid residues located around the reactive site region of the inhibitor. The results suggest that amide 15N chemical shifts, which are readily obtained in this way, may serve as sensitive probes for conformational studies of proteins.

  4. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Christensen, Anders Steen; Hamelryck, Thomas Wim;

    2015-01-01

    Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model......, and a bias is introduced which might result in incorrect structures. In the inferential structure determination framework, both the unknown structure and the disagreement between experimental and back-calculated data are formulated as a joint probability distribution, thus utilizing the full information...... content of the data. Here, we present the formulation of such a probability distribution where the error in chemical shift prediction is described by either a Gaussian or Cauchy distribution. The methodology is demonstrated and compared to a set of empirically weighted potentials through Markov chain...

  5. Ab Initio Prediction of 29Si-NMR Chemical Shifts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Shidong; LI Yingxia; SONG Ni; GUAN Huashi

    2002-01-01

    The ability of several ab initio models to predict experimental 29Si-NMR chemical shift is examined. The shielding values of trimethylsilyl chloride (A), t-butyldimethylsilyl chloride (B) and allyltrimethylsilane (C) are calculated by GIAO, CSGT and IGAIM methods, using HF/6-31G*, B3LYP/6-31G*, HF/6-311+G**, B3LYP/6-311+G** and MPWlPW91/6-311+G** models respectively. The 29Si chemical shifts calculated by GIAO method using HF/6-311+G**model are highly in agreement with those obtained experimentally. All of the models above reproduce the trends of chemical shifts in all cases studied, suggesting that the models are of practical value.

  6. 15N NMR spectroscopy of Pseudomonas cytochrome c-551

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    15N-1H correlation spectroscopy with detection at the 1H frequency has been used at natural abundance to detect nitrogen nuclei bonded to protons in the ferrocytochrome c-551 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 19429). Side-chain aromatic nitrogen, main-chain amides, and side-chain amides have been assigned to specific residues by comparison to previous proton assignments. Assignment ambiguities arising from overlap in the proton dimension have been resolved by examining spectra as a function of temperature and pH. Nitrogen chemical shifts are reported at pH 4.6 and 9.4 and three temperatures, 32, 50, and 60 degree C. Significant differences arise from the observed protein shifts and expected shifts in the random coil polypeptide

  7. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsching, Keith J., E-mail: kfritzsc@brandeis.edu [Brandeis University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Hong, Mei [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus, E-mail: srohr@brandeis.edu [Brandeis University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2016-02-15

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ({sup 13}C–{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N–{sup 13}C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 {sup 13}C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited “hand-picked” data sets, we show that ∼94 % of the {sup 13}C NMR data and almost all {sup 15}N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6 % of the {sup 13}C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. −2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra

  8. Predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional classification analysis of NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2016-09-01

    A tool for predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional analyses of different combinations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts has been developed. A data set of cysteine [Formula: see text], (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (1)H(α), (1)H(N), and (15)N(H) chemical shifts was created, classified according to redox state and secondary structure, using a library of 540 re-referenced BioMagResBank (BMRB) entries. Multi-dimensional analyses of three, four, five, and six chemical shifts were used to derive rules for predicting the structural states of cysteine residues. The results from 60 BMRB entries containing 122 cysteines showed that four-dimensional analysis of the C(α), C(β), H(α), and N(H) chemical shifts had the highest prediction accuracy of 100 and 95.9 % for the redox state and secondary structure, respectively. The prediction of secondary structure using 3D, 5D, and 6D analyses had the accuracy of ~90 %, suggesting that H(N) and [Formula: see text] chemical shifts may be noisy and made the discrimination worse. A web server (6DCSi) was established to enable users to submit NMR chemical shifts, either in BMRB or key-in formats, for prediction. 6DCSi displays predictions using sets of 3, 4, 5, and 6 chemical shifts, which shows their consistency and allows users to draw their own conclusions. This web-based tool can be used to rapidly obtain structural information regarding cysteine residues directly from experimental NMR data.

  9. Evolution of the chemical (NH4) and isotopic (δ15N-NH4) composition of pig manure stored in an experimental deep pit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    during eight months, from November 2001 to July 2002 at atmospheric conditions. Ammonium concentration and its nitrogen isotopic composition were analysed weekly during the first six months and every ten days during the last two months. Ammonium concentration oscillates between 3000 and 4000 ppm, with no progressive decrease in time as it would be expected in a volatilisation process. This is caused by the loss of manure volume due to evaporation (50 % in eight months) which compensates the ammonia volatilisation and keeps the ammonium concentration stable. The nitrogen isotopic composition of the ammonium is controlled by the volatilisation process. During the first ten days, the pig manure has an isotopic composition between +8 and +10 per mille, and after eight months, it raises up to +25 per mille. However, the pig manure is not stored in the deep pits more than six months; consequently, the range of δ15NNH4 values to be considered for pig manure as an input of nitrogen contamination should be from +8 to +15 per mille. Still, this isotopic composition can be higher if manure is stored during the summer time since the higher temperatures may increase the volatilisation rate and raise the ammonium isotopic composition in a shorter period of time. Unlike synthetic fertilisers, which are characterised by a δ15N close to the 0 per mille, the organic fertilisers (pig manure) are enriched in 15N15N from +8 to +15 per mille). Therefore the nitrogen isotopic composition is a valuable tool to evaluate the origin of nitrate agricultural contaminations. As an example, nitrate nitrogen isotopic composition has been used in some areas in Catalonia to confirm that pig manure is the main contributor to the nitrate pollution in groundwaters

  10. Calculations of NMR chemical shifts with APW-based methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowski, Robert; Blaha, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present a full potential, all electron augmented plane wave (APW) implementation of first-principles calculations of NMR chemical shifts. In order to obtain the induced current we follow a perturbation approach [Pickard and Mauri, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.63.245101 63, 245101 (2001)] and extended the common APW + local orbital (LO) basis by several LOs at higher energies. The calculated all-electron current is represented in traditional APW manner as Fourier series in the interstitial region and with a spherical harmonics representation inside the nonoverlapping atomic spheres. The current is integrated using a “pseudocharge” technique. The implementation is validated by comparison of the computed chemical shifts with some “exact” results for spherical atoms and for a set of solids and molecules with available published data.

  11. Improving 3D structure prediction from chemical shift data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schot, Gijs van der [Utrecht University, Computational Structural Biology, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of Science-Chemistry (Netherlands); Zhang, Zaiyong [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Biomolecular NMR and Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science, Department Chemie (Germany); Vernon, Robert [University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Shen, Yang [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Vranken, Wim F. [VIB, Department of Structural Biology (Belgium); Baker, David [University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J., E-mail: a.m.j.j.bonvin@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Computational Structural Biology, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of Science-Chemistry (Netherlands); Lange, Oliver F., E-mail: oliver.lange@tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Biomolecular NMR and Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science, Department Chemie (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    We report advances in the calculation of protein structures from chemical shift nuclear magnetic resonance data alone. Our previously developed method, CS-Rosetta, assembles structures from a library of short protein fragments picked from a large library of protein structures using chemical shifts and sequence information. Here we demonstrate that combination of a new and improved fragment picker and the iterative sampling algorithm RASREC yield significant improvements in convergence and accuracy. Moreover, we introduce improved criteria for assessing the accuracy of the models produced by the method. The method was tested on 39 proteins in the 50-100 residue size range and yields reliable structures in 70 % of the cases. All structures that passed the reliability filter were accurate (<2 A RMSD from the reference)

  12. Magnetic shift of the chemical freezeout and electric charge fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the effect of a strong magnetic field on the chemical freezeout points in the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collision. As a result of the inverse magnetic catalysis or the magnetic inhibition, the crossover onset to hot and dense matter out of quarks and gluons should be shifted to a lower temperature. To quantify this shift we employ the hadron resonance gas model and an empirical condition for the chemical freezeout. We point out that the charged particle abundances are significantly affected by the magnetic field so that the electric charge fluctuation is largely enhanced especially at high baryon density. The charge conservation partially cancels the enhancement but our calculation shows that the electric charge fluctuation could serve as a magnetometer.

  13. Chemical-shift MRI of exogenous lipoid pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, J.E.; Choplin, R.H.; Chiles, C. [Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia results from the aspiration or inhalation of fatty substances, such as mineral oil found in laxatives or nasal medications containing liquid paraffin. We present standard and lipid-sensitive (chemical-shift) MR findings in a patient with histologically confirmed lipoid pneumonia. The loss of signal intensity in an area of airspace disease on opposed-phase imaging was considered specific for the presence of lipid. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Substituent effects on 61Ni NMR chemical shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Bühl, Michael; Peters, Dietmund; Herges, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Ni-61 chemical shifts of Ni(all-trans-cdt) L (cdt = cyclododecatriene, L = none, CO, PMe3), Ni(CO)(4), Ni(C2H4)(2)(PMe3), Ni(cod)(2) (cod = cyclooctadiene) and Ni(PX3)(4) (X = Me, F, Cl) are computed at the GIAO (gauge-including atomic orbitals), BPW91, B3LYP and BHandHLYP levels, using BP86-optimised geometries and an indirect referencing scheme. For this set of compounds, substituent effects on delta(Ni-61) are better described with hybrid functionals than with the pure BPW91 functional. On...

  15. Characterization of mu s-ms dynamics of proteins using a combined analysis of N-15 NMR relaxation and chemical shift: Conformational exchange in plastocyanin induced by histidine protonations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, M. A. S.; Thuesen, Marianne Hallberg; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager;

    2004-01-01

    An approach is presented that allows a detailed, quantitative characterization of conformational exchange processes in proteins on the mus-ms time scale. The approach relies on a combined analysis of NMR relaxation rates and chemical shift changes and requires that the chemical shift...... variabilis (A.v. PCu) (Ma, L.; Hass, M. A. S.; Vierick, N.; Kristensen, S. M.; Ulstrup, J.; Led, J. J. Biochemistry 2003, 42, 320-330). The R-1 and R-2 relaxation rates of the backbone N-15 nuclei were measured at a series of pH and temperatures on an 15N labeled sample of A.v. PCu, and the 15 N chemical...... quantitatively by the correlation between the R-ex terms and the corresponding chemical shift differences of the exchanging species. By this approach, the R-ex terms of N-15 nuclei belonging to contiguous regions in the protein could be assigned to the same exchange process. Furthermore, the analysis...

  16. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method

  17. Methods of 15N tracer research in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the stable isotope 15N is of increasing importance in different scientific disciplines, especially in medicine, agriculture, and the biosciences. The close correlation between the growing interest and improvements of analytical procedures resulted in remarkable advances in the 15N tracer technique. On the basis of the latest results of 15N tracer research in life sciences and agriculture methods of 15N tracer research in biological systems are compiled. The 15N methodology is considered under three headings: Chemical analysis with a description of methods of sample preparation (including different separation and isolation methods for N-containing substances of biological and agricultural origin) and special procedures converting ammonia to molecular nitrogen. Isotopic analysis with a review on the most important methods of isotopic analysis of nitrogen: mass spectrometry (including the GC-MS technique), emission spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy, and other analytical procedures. 15N-tracer techniques with a consideration of the role of the isotope dilution analysis as well as different labelling techniques and the mathematical interpretation of tracer data (modelling, N turnover experiments). In these chapters also sources of errors in chemical and isotopic analysis, the accuracy of the different methods and its importance on tracer experiments are discussed. Procedures for micro scale 15N analysis and aspects of 15N analysis on the level of natural abundance are considered. Furthermore some remarks on isotope effects in 15N tracer experiments are made. (author)

  18. Computational Assignment of Chemical Shifts for Protein Residues

    CERN Document Server

    Bratholm, Lars A

    2013-01-01

    Fast and accurate protein structure prediction is one of the major challenges in structural biology, biotechnology and molecular biomedicine. These fields require 3D protein structures for rational design of proteins with improved or novel properties. X-ray crystallography is the most common approach even with its low success rate, but lately NMR based approaches have gained popularity. The general approach involves a set of distance restraints used to guide a structure prediction, but simple NMR triple-resonance experiments often provide enough structural information to predict the structure of small proteins. Previous protein folding simulations that have utilised experimental data have weighted the experimental data and physical force field terms more or less arbitrarily, and the method is thus not generally applicable to new proteins. Furthermore a complete and near error-free assignment of chemical shifts obtained by the NMR experiments is needed, due to the static, or deterministic, assignment. In this ...

  19. Chemical shift assignment of the alternative scaffold protein IscA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Matija; Pastore, Annalisa

    2016-04-01

    The IscA protein (11.5 kDa) is an essential component of the iron sulphur cluster biogenesis machine. In bacteria, the machine components are clustered in operons, amongst which the most important is the isc operon. Bacterial IscA has direct homologues also in eukaryotes. Like the protein IscU, IscA is thought to assist cluster formation as an alternative scaffold protein which receives the cluster before transferring it further to the final acceptors. Several crystal structures have been published. They all report an IscA dimeric form, although the packing of the protomers in the dimers differs amongst structures. No solution studies have currently been reported. Here we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone and side-chain chemical shift assignments of the cluster-free E. coli IscA as a starting point for further studies of the structure and functions of this still poorly characterized protein. We show that IscA exists in solution as an equilibrium between different species. Spectrum assignment was thus challenging given the heterogeneous nature of the sample but doable through judicious choice of selective labelling and concentration dependent studies.

  20. Synthesis of 15N labeled glyphosate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amongst the actually commercialized herbicides the Glyphosate is the most used in Brazil. Its efficiency as well as the others herbicides against undesirable weeds is harmed by its final composts left at the environment. Although studies has being carried out to improve the knowledge about the herbicides behavior at the environment its complexity has led them towards innumerous to new significant research work where the use of radiolabeled composts (radiative tracers) are recommended to evaluate their bio-availability in the soil. However is the use, the manipulation and the storage of radiolabeled composts is requires an extra care under chemical safety point of view. The use of non radiolabeled composts is a world tendency especially for field researches. Under this context the presented work describes a method for the synthesis of 15N labeled glyphosate. The 15N-herbicide was undertaken by phosphometilation with the phosphit dialquil and 15N-glycine. The tests where carried out through a micro scale production plant and of equimolars amounts. At these conditions it's was possible to reach approximately a 20% of yield. At the conclusion of a best operational condition its expected to offer another important toll that shall be used in glyphosate behavior at the environment and undesirably weeds. (author)

  1. Detection of organic sulfur by [sup 15]N and [sup 19]F NMR via formation of iminosulfuranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Lamb, C.N.

    1992-08-01

    We have synthesized new iminosulfuranes from a variety of diaryl-and dialkyl sulfides and dibenzothiophene. The pattern of [sup 15]N chemical shifts indicates that functional groups attached to sulfur are not simply resolved into aryl and alkyl groups. Thus, resolution of sulfur functional groups using [sup 15]N NMR via iminosulfurane does not appear practicable. However, iminosulfurane formation, together with the N-haloamide reaction and the Pummerer rearrangement, provides pathways for chemical discrimination of different sulfur substituents using unique [sup 15]N- or, [sup 19]F-labelled fragments for different categories of sulfur functional groups. In efforts currently underway, we are applying these reactions to methylated extracts and conversion products of the high-organic-sulfur containing Yugoslavian Rasa and Spanish Mequinenza lignites. 1 tab, 14 refs.

  2. Detection of organic sulfur by {sup 15}N and {sup 19}F NMR via formation of iminosulfuranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Lamb, C.N.

    1992-08-01

    We have synthesized new iminosulfuranes from a variety of diaryl-and dialkyl sulfides and dibenzothiophene. The pattern of {sup 15}N chemical shifts indicates that functional groups attached to sulfur are not simply resolved into aryl and alkyl groups. Thus, resolution of sulfur functional groups using {sup 15}N NMR via iminosulfurane does not appear practicable. However, iminosulfurane formation, together with the N-haloamide reaction and the Pummerer rearrangement, provides pathways for chemical discrimination of different sulfur substituents using unique {sup 15}N- or, {sup 19}F-labelled fragments for different categories of sulfur functional groups. In efforts currently underway, we are applying these reactions to methylated extracts and conversion products of the high-organic-sulfur containing Yugoslavian Rasa and Spanish Mequinenza lignites. 1 tab, 14 refs.

  3. 15N Solid-State NMR as a Probe of Flavin H-bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Dongtao; Koder, Ronald L.; Dutton, P. Leslie; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2011-01-01

    Flavins mediate a wide variety of different chemical reactions in biology. To learn how one cofactor can be made to execute different reactions in different enzymes, we are developing solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to probe the flavin electronic structure, via the 15N chemical shift tensor principal values (δii). We find that SSNMR has superior responsiveness to H-bonds, compared to solution NMR. H-bonding to a model of the flavodoxin active site produced an increase of 10 ppm in the δ11 of N5 altho...

  4. Pitfalls of adrenal imaging with chemical shift MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical shift (CS) MRI of the adrenal glands exploits the different precessional frequencies of fat and water protons to differentiate the intracytoplasmic lipid-containing adrenal adenoma from other adrenal lesions. The purpose of this review is to illustrate both technical and interpretive pitfalls of adrenal imaging with CS MRI and emphasize the importance of adherence to strict technical specifications and errors that may occur when other imaging features and clinical factors are not incorporated into the diagnosis. When performed properly, the specificity of CS MRI for the diagnosis of adrenal adenoma is over 90%. Sampling the in-phase and opposed-phase echoes in the correct order and during the same breath-hold are essential requirements, and using the first echo pair is preferred, if possible. CS MRI characterizes more adrenal adenomas then unenhanced CT but may be non-diagnostic in a proportion of lipid-poor adenomas; CT washout studies may be able to diagnose these lipid-poor adenomas. Other primary and secondary adrenal tumours and supra-renal disease entities may contain lipid or gross fat and mimic adenoma or myelolipoma. Heterogeneity within an adrenal lesion that contains intracytoplasmic lipid could be due to myelolipoma, lipomatous metaplasia of adenoma, or collision tumour. Correlation with previous imaging, other imaging features, clinical history, and laboratory investigations can minimize interpretive errors

  5. Applications of Chemical Shift Imaging to Marine Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haakil Lee

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The successful applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in medicine are mostly due to the non-invasive and non-destructive nature of MRI techniques. Longitudinal studies of humans and animals are easily accomplished, taking advantage of the fact that MRI does not use harmful radiation that would be needed for plain film radiographic, computerized tomography (CT or positron emission (PET scans. Routine anatomic and functional studies using the strong signal from the most abundant magnetic nucleus, the proton, can also provide metabolic information when combined with in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. MRS can be performed using either protons or hetero-nuclei (meaning any magnetic nuclei other than protons or 1H including carbon (13C or phosphorus (31P. In vivo MR spectra can be obtained from single region ofinterest (ROI or voxel or multiple ROIs simultaneously using the technique typically called chemical shift imaging (CSI. Here we report applications of CSI to marine samples and describe a technique to study in vivo glycine metabolism in oysters using 13C MRS 12 h after immersion in a sea water chamber dosed with [2-13C]-glycine. This is the first report of 13C CSI in a marine organism.

  6. Diagnostic value of chemical shift artifact in distinguishing benign lymphadenopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Today, distinguishing metastatic lymph nodes from secondary benign inflammatory ones via using non-invasive methods is increasingly favorable. In this study, the diagnostic value of chemical shift artifact (CSA) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated to distinguish benign lymphadenopathy. Subjects and methods: A prospective intraindividual internal review board-approved study was carried out on 15 men and 15 women having lymphadenopathic lesions in different locations of the body who underwent contrast-enhanced dynamic MR imaging at 1.5 T. Then, the imaging findings were compared with pathology reports, using the statistics analyses. Results: Due to the findings of the CSA existence in MRI, a total of 56.7% of the studied lesions (17 of 30) were identified as benign lesions and the rest were malignant, whereas the pathology reports distinguished twelve malignant and eighteen benign cases. Furthermore, the CSA findings comparing the pathology reports indicated that CSA, with confidence of 79.5%, has a significant diagnostic value to differentiate benign lesions from malignant ones. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that CSA in MR imaging has a suitable diagnostic potential nearing readiness for clinical trials. Furthermore, CSA seems to be a feasible tool to differentiate benign lymph nodes from malignant ones; however, further studies including larger numbers of patients are required to confirm our results.

  7. Chemical shifts assignments of the archaeal MC1 protein and a strongly bent 15 base pairs DNA duplex in complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Karine; Landon, Céline; Paquet, Françoise

    2015-04-01

    MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55 in laboratory growth conditions and is structurally unrelated to other DNA-binding proteins. MC1 functions are to shape and to protect DNA against thermal denaturation by binding to it. Therefore, MC1 has a strong affinity for any double-stranded DNA. However, it recognizes and preferentially binds to bent DNA, such as four-way junctions and negatively supercoiled DNA minicircles. Combining NMR data, electron microscopy data, biochemistry, molecular modelisation and docking approaches, we proposed recently a new type of DNA/protein complex, in which the monomeric protein MC1 binds on the concave side of a strongly bent 15 base pairs DNA. We present here the NMR chemical shifts assignments of each partner in the complex, (1)H (15)N MC1 protein and (1)H (13)C (15)N bent duplex DNA, as first step towards the first experimental 3D structure of this new type of DNA/protein complex.

  8. 19-Fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift variability in trifluoroacetyl species

    OpenAIRE

    Sloop, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Joseph C SloopSchool of Science and Technology, Georgia Gwinnett College, Lawrenceville, GA, USAAbstract: This review examines the variability of chemical shifts observed in 19-fluorine (19F) nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the trifluoroacetyl (TFA) functional group. The range of 19F chemical shifts reported spectra for the TFA group varies generally from −85 to −67 ppm relative to CFCl3. The literature revealed several factors that impact chemical shifts of the TFA...

  9. Solid state NMR of proteins at high MAS frequencies: symmetry-based mixing and simultaneous acquisition of chemical shift correlation spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellstedt, Peter [Fritz Lipmann Institute, Biomolecular NMR spectroscopy, Leibniz Institute for Age Research (Germany); Herbst, Christian [Ubon Ratchathani University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Thailand); Haefner, Sabine; Leppert, Joerg; Goerlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai, E-mail: raman@fli-leibniz.de [Fritz Lipmann Institute, Biomolecular NMR spectroscopy, Leibniz Institute for Age Research (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    We have carried out chemical shift correlation experiments with symmetry-based mixing sequences at high MAS frequencies and examined different strategies to simultaneously acquire 3D correlation spectra that are commonly required in the structural studies of proteins. The potential of numerically optimised symmetry-based mixing sequences and the simultaneous recording of chemical shift correlation spectra such as: 3D NCAC and 3D NHH with dual receivers, 3D NC Prime C and 3D C Prime NCA with sequential {sup 13}C acquisitions, 3D NHH and 3D NC Prime H with sequential {sup 1}H acquisitions and 3D CANH and 3D C'NH with broadband {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N mixing are demonstrated using microcrystalline samples of the {beta}1 immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G (GB1) and the chicken {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain.

  10. Equilibrium simulations of proteins using molecular fragment replacement and NMR chemical shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Tian, Pengfei; Frellsen, J.;

    2014-01-01

    Significance Chemical shifts are the most fundamental parameters measured in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Since these parameters are exquisitely sensitive to the local atomic environment, they can provide detailed information about the three-dimensional structures of proteins. It has...... their thermal fluctuations, thereby broadening the scope of chemical shifts in structural biology....

  11. Carbon-13 magnetic resonance chemical shift additivity relationships of clinically used furocoumarins and furchromones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of various clinically used furocoumarins and furochromones have been studied. The assignments of carbon chemical shift values were based on the theory of chemical shift, additivity rules, SFORD spectra and model compounds. (author)

  12. Synthesis of {sup 15}N labeled glyphosate; Sintese do glifosato enriquecido com {sup 15}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Claudineia R. de; Bendassolli, Jose Albertino; Tavares, Glauco Arnold; Rossete, Alexssandra L.R.M.; Tagliassachi, Romulo Barbieri; Prestes, Cleuber Vieira [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Isotopos Estaveis]. E-mail: crolivei@cena.usp.br

    2005-07-01

    Amongst the actually commercialized herbicides the Glyphosate is the most used in Brazil. Its efficiency as well as the others herbicides against undesirable weeds is harmed by its final composts left at the environment. Although studies has being carried out to improve the knowledge about the herbicides behavior at the environment its complexity has led them towards innumerous to new significant research work where the use of radiolabeled composts (radiative tracers) are recommended to evaluate their bio-availability in the soil. However is the use, the manipulation and the storage of radiolabeled composts is requires an extra care under chemical safety point of view. The use of non radiolabeled composts is a world tendency especially for field researches. Under this context the presented work describes a method for the synthesis of {sup 15}N labeled glyphosate. The {sup 15}N-herbicide was undertaken by phosphometilation with the phosphit dialquil and {sup 15}N-glycine. The tests where carried out through a micro scale production plant and of equimolars amounts. At these conditions it's was possible to reach approximately a 20% of yield. At the conclusion of a best operational condition its expected to offer another important toll that shall be used in glyphosate behavior at the environment and undesirably weeds. (author)

  13. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts are investigated in a series of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines (HBQ’s) The OH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in these hydrogen bonded systems are rather unusual. The formal four-bond effects are found...... to be negative, indicating transmission via the hydrogen bond. In addition unusual long-range effects are seen. Structures, NMR chemical shifts and changes in nuclear shieldings upon deuteriation are calculated using DFT methods. Two-bond deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are correlated...... with calculated OH stretching frequencies. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are calculated for systems with OH exchanged by OD. Hydrogen bond potentials are discussed. New and more soluble nitro derivatives are synthesized....

  14. (13)C, (15)N CPMAS NMR and GIAO DFT calculations of stereoisomeric oxindole alkaloids from Cat's Claw (Uncaria tomentosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wolniak, Michał; Pisklak, Maciej; Gliński, Jan A; Davey, Matthew H; Wawer, Iwona

    2008-11-01

    Oxindole alkaloids, isolated from the bark of Uncaria tomentosa [Willd. ex Schult.] Rubiaceae, are considered to be responsible for the biological activity of this herb. Five pentacyclic and two tetracyclic alkaloids were studied by solid-state NMR and theoretical GIAO DFT methods. The (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra were recorded for mitraphylline, isomitraphylline, pteropodine (uncarine C), isopteropodine (uncarine E), speciophylline (uncarine D), rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline. Theoretical GIAO DFT calculations of shielding constants provide arguments for identification of asymmetric centers and proper assignment of NMR spectra. These alkaloids are 7R/7S and 20R/20S stereoisomeric pairs. Based on the (13)C CP MAS chemical shifts the 7S alkaloids (delta C3 70-71ppm) can be easily and conveniently distinguished from 7R (deltaC3 74.5-74.9ppm), also 20R (deltaC20 41.3-41.7ppm) from the 20S (deltaC20 36.3-38.3ppm). The epiallo-type isomer (3R, 20S) of speciophylline is characterized by a larger (15)N MAS chemical shift of N4 (64.6ppm) than the allo-type (3S, 20S) of isopteropodine (deltaN4 53.3ppm). (15)N MAS chemical shifts of N1-H in pentacyclic alkaloids are within 131.9-140.4ppm.

  15. Chemical shift as a probe of molecular interfaces: NMR studies of DNA binding by the three amino-terminal zinc finger domains from transcription factor IIIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Mark P.; Wuttke, Deborah S.; Clemens, Karen R.; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar; Tennant, Linda; Reymond, Martine; Chung, John; Wright, Peter E. [Scripps Research Institute, Department of Molecular Biology and Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology (United States)

    1998-07-15

    We report the NMR resonance assignments for a macromolecular protein/DNA complex containing the three amino-terminal zinc fingers (92 amino acid residues) of Xenopus laevis TFIIIA (termed zf1-3) bound to the physiological DNA target (15 base pairs), and for the free DNA. Comparisons are made of the chemical shifts of protein backbone{sup 1} H{sup N}, {sup 15}N,{sup 13} C{sup {alpha}} and{sup 13} C{sup {beta}} and DNA base and sugar protons of the free and bound species. Chemical shift changes are analyzed in the context of the structures of the zf1-3/DNA complex to assess the utility of chemical shift change as a probe of molecular interfaces. Chemical shift perturbations that occur upon binding in the zf1-3/DNA complex do not correspond directly to the structural interface, but rather arise from a number of direct and indirect structural and dynamic effects.

  16. Inferential protein structure determination and refinement using fast, electronic structure based backbone amide chemical shift predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Anders S

    2015-01-01

    This report covers the development of a new, fast method for calculating the backbone amide proton chemical shifts in proteins. Through quantum chemical calculations, structure-based forudsiglese the chemical shift for amidprotonen in protein has been parameterized. The parameters are then implemented in a computer program called Padawan. The program has since been implemented in protein folding program Phaistos, wherein the method andvendes to de novo folding of the protein structures and to refine the existing protein structures.

  17. Method of evaluating chemical shifts of X-ray emission lines in molecules and solids

    OpenAIRE

    Lomachuk, Yuriy V.; Titov, Anatoly V.

    2013-01-01

    Method of evaluating chemical shifts of X-ray emission lines for sufficiently heavy atoms (beginning from period 4 elements) in chemical compounds is developed. This method is based on the pseudopotential model and one-center restoration method (to reconstruct the proper electronic structure in heavy-atom cores). The approximations of instantaneous transition and frozen inner core spinors of the atom are used for derivation of an expression for chemical shift as a difference between mean valu...

  18. Ab Initio Calculation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors 1. Influence of Basis Set on the Calculation of 31P Chemical Shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, T.M.

    1998-09-01

    The influence of changes in the contracted Gaussian basis set used for ab initio calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phosphorous chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors was investigated. The isotropic chemical shitl and chemical shift anisotropy were found to converge with increasing complexity of the basis set at the Hartree-Fock @IF) level. The addition of d polarization function on the phosphorous nucIei was found to have a major impact of the calculated chemical shi~ but diminished with increasing number of polarization fimctions. At least 2 d polarization fimctions are required for accurate calculations of the isotropic phosphorous chemical shift. The introduction of density fictional theory (DFT) techniques through tie use of hybrid B3LYP methods for the calculation of the phosphorous chemical shift tensor resulted in a poorer estimation of the NMR values, even though DFT techniques result in improved energy and force constant calculations. The convergence of the W parametem with increasing basis set complexity was also observed for the DFT calculations, but produced results with consistent large deviations from experiment. The use of a HF 6-31 l++G(242p) basis set represents a good compromise between accuracy of the simulation and the complexity of the calculation for future ab initio calculations of 31P NMR parameters in larger complexes.

  19. Mechanism of Solid-State Thermolysis of Ammonia Boraine: 15N NMR Study Using Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Takeshi [Ames Laboratory; Gupta, Shalabh [Ames Laboratory; Caporini, Marc A [Bruker BioSpin Corporation; Pecharsky, Vitalij K [Ames Laboratory; Pruski, Marek [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-28

    The solid-state thermolysis of ammonia borane (NH3BH3, AB) was explored using state-of-the-art 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy, including 2D indirectly detected 1H{15N} heteronuclear correlation and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced 15N{1H} cross-polarization experiments as well as 11B NMR. The complementary use of 15N and 11B NMR experiments, supported by density functional theory calculations of the chemical shift tensors, provided insights into the dehydrogenation mechanism of AB—insights that have not been available by 11B NMR alone. Specifically, highly branched polyaminoborane derivatives were shown to form from AB via oligomerization in the “head-to-tail” manner, which then transform directly into hexagonal boron nitride analog through the dehydrocyclization reaction, bypassing the formation of polyiminoborane.

  20. Reliable resonance assignments of selected residues of proteins with known structure based on empirical NMR chemical shift prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Wei; Meng, Dan; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    A robust NMR resonance assignment method is introduced for proteins whose 3D structure has previously been determined by X-ray crystallography. The goal of the method is to obtain a subset of correct assignments from a parsimonious set of 3D NMR experiments of 15N, 13C labeled proteins. Chemical shifts of sequential residue pairs are predicted from static protein structures using PPM_One, which are then compared with the corresponding experimental shifts. Globally optimized weighted matching identifies the assignments that are robust with respect to small changes in NMR cross-peak positions. The method, termed PASSPORT, is demonstrated for 4 proteins with 100-250 amino acids using 3D NHCA and a 3D CBCA(CO)NH experiments as input producing correct assignments with high reliability for 22% of the residues. The method, which works best for Gly, Ala, Ser, and Thr residues, provides assignments that serve as anchor points for additional assignments by both manual and semi-automated methods or they can be directly used for further studies, e.g. on ligand binding, protein dynamics, or post-translational modification, such as phosphorylation.

  1. Correlation of chemical shifts predicted by molecular dynamics simulations for partially disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karp, Jerome M.; Erylimaz, Ertan; Cowburn, David, E-mail: cowburn@cowburnlab.org, E-mail: David.cowburn@einstein.yu.edu [Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Department of Biochemistry (United States)

    2015-01-15

    There has been a longstanding interest in being able to accurately predict NMR chemical shifts from structural data. Recent studies have focused on using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation data as input for improved prediction. Here we examine the accuracy of chemical shift prediction for intein systems, which have regions of intrinsic disorder. We find that using MD simulation data as input for chemical shift prediction does not consistently improve prediction accuracy over use of a static X-ray crystal structure. This appears to result from the complex conformational ensemble of the disordered protein segments. We show that using accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations improves chemical shift prediction, suggesting that methods which better sample the conformational ensemble like aMD are more appropriate tools for use in chemical shift prediction for proteins with disordered regions. Moreover, our study suggests that data accurately reflecting protein dynamics must be used as input for chemical shift prediction in order to correctly predict chemical shifts in systems with disorder.

  2. Unified Electrostatic Understanding on the Solvation-Induced Changes in the CN Stretching Frequency and the NMR Chemical Shifts of a Nitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Hajime

    2016-09-15

    Understanding on the spectroscopic properties of a functional group is essential to use it to detect changes in the structural and/or dynamical properties through the situations of intermolecular interactions. The present study is devoted to elucidating the factors that control the solvation-induced changes in the C≡N stretching frequency and the (13)C and (15)N NMR chemical shifts of the nitrile group. It is shown that the nonelectrostatic contribution of the hydration-induced changes in the C≡N stretching frequency as previously thought, as well as the specific effect of hydrogen bonding on the (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts, actually originate from the spatially inhomogeneous nature of the electrostatic situation generated by the hydrogen-bond donating water molecule, especially by the OH bond dipole. On this basis, a unified electrostatic interaction model that encompasses the cases of both hydration and dipolar solvation is constructed. The responses of electrons in these two cases are also discussed. PMID:27547990

  3. Toward structural dynamics: protein motions viewed by chemical shift modulations and direct detection of C'N multiple-quantum relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Mirko; Kateb, Fatiha; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Piccioli, Mario; Abergel, Daniel

    2010-03-17

    Multiple quantum relaxation in proteins reveals unexpected relationships between correlated or anti-correlated conformational backbone dynamics in alpha-helices or beta-sheets. The contributions of conformational exchange to the relaxation rates of C'N coherences (i.e., double- and zero-quantum coherences involving backbone carbonyl (13)C' and neighboring amide (15)N nuclei) depend on the kinetics of slow exchange processes, as well as on the populations of the conformations and chemical shift differences of (13)C' and (15)N nuclei. The relaxation rates of C'N coherences, which reflect concerted fluctuations due to slow chemical shift modulations (CSMs), were determined by direct (13)C detection in diamagnetic and paramagnetic proteins. In well-folded proteins such as lanthanide-substituted calbindin (CaLnCb), copper,zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn SOD), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP12), slow conformational exchange occurs along the entire backbone. Our observations demonstrate that relaxation rates of C'N coherences arising from slow backbone dynamics have positive signs (characteristic of correlated fluctuations) in beta-sheets and negative signs (characteristic of anti-correlated fluctuations) in alpha-helices. This extends the prospects of structure-dynamics relationships to slow time scales that are relevant for protein function and enzymatic activity.

  4. Correlations of the chemical shift on fasly rotating biological solids by means of NMR spectroscopy; Korrelationen der chemischen Verschiebung an schnell rotierenden biologischen Festkoerpern mittels NMR-Spektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Christian

    2010-04-27

    The basic aim of the thesis was the development and improvement of homo- and heteronuclear feedback sequences for the generation of correlation spectra of the chemical shift. In a first step the possibility of the acquisition of {sup 13}C-{sup 13} correlation spectra of the chemical shift by means of inversion pulses with low RF power factor was studied. Furthermore it was shown that broad-band phase-modulated inversion and universal rotational pulses can be constructed by means of global optimization procedures like the genetic algorithms under regardment of the available RF field strength. By inversion, universal rotational, and 360 pulses as starting values of the optimization efficient homonuclear CN{sub n}{sup {nu}} and RN{sub n}{sup {nu}} mixing sequences as well as heteronuclear RN{sub n}{sup {nu}{sub s},{nu}{sub k}} feedback sequences were generated. The satisfactory power of the numerically optimized sequences was shown by means of the simulation as well by means of correlation experiments of the chemical shift of L-histidine, L-arginine, and the (CUG){sub 97}-RNA. This thesis deals furthermore with the possibility to acquire simultaneously different signals with several receivers. By means of numerically optimized RN{sub n}{sup {nu}{sub s},{nu}{sub k}} pulse sequences both {sup 15}N-{sup 13}C and {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N correlation spectra were simultaneously generated. Furthermore it could be shown that the simultaneous acquisition of 3D-{sup 15}N-{sup 13}C-{sup 13}C and {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N-({sup 1}H)-{sup 1}H correlation spectra is possible. By this in only one measurement process resonance assignments can be met and studies of the global folding performed. A further application of several receivers is the simultaneous acquisition of CHHC, NHHN, NHHC, as well as CHHN spectra. By such experiments it is possible to characterize the hydrogen-bonding pattern and the glycosidic torsion angle {sup {chi}} in RNA. This was demonstrated by means of the (CUG){sub 97

  5. A robust algorithm for optimizing protein structures with NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berjanskii, Mark; Arndt, David; Liang, Yongjie; Wishart, David S

    2015-11-01

    Over the past decade, a number of methods have been developed to determine the approximate structure of proteins using minimal NMR experimental information such as chemical shifts alone, sparse NOEs alone or a combination of comparative modeling data and chemical shifts. However, there have been relatively few methods that allow these approximate models to be substantively refined or improved using the available NMR chemical shift data. Here, we present a novel method, called Chemical Shift driven Genetic Algorithm for biased Molecular Dynamics (CS-GAMDy), for the robust optimization of protein structures using experimental NMR chemical shifts. The method incorporates knowledge-based scoring functions and structural information derived from NMR chemical shifts via a unique combination of multi-objective MD biasing, a genetic algorithm, and the widely used XPLOR molecular modelling language. Using this approach, we demonstrate that CS-GAMDy is able to refine and/or fold models that are as much as 10 Å (RMSD) away from the correct structure using only NMR chemical shift data. CS-GAMDy is also able to refine of a wide range of approximate or mildly erroneous protein structures to more closely match the known/correct structure and the known/correct chemical shifts. We believe CS-GAMDy will allow protein models generated by sparse restraint or chemical-shift-only methods to achieve sufficiently high quality to be considered fully refined and "PDB worthy". The CS-GAMDy algorithm is explained in detail and its performance is compared over a range of refinement scenarios with several commonly used protein structure refinement protocols. The program has been designed to be easily installed and easily used and is available at http://www.gamdy.ca.

  6. A robust algorithm for optimizing protein structures with NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berjanskii, Mark; Arndt, David; Liang, Yongjie; Wishart, David S., E-mail: david.wishart@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Computing Science (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Over the past decade, a number of methods have been developed to determine the approximate structure of proteins using minimal NMR experimental information such as chemical shifts alone, sparse NOEs alone or a combination of comparative modeling data and chemical shifts. However, there have been relatively few methods that allow these approximate models to be substantively refined or improved using the available NMR chemical shift data. Here, we present a novel method, called Chemical Shift driven Genetic Algorithm for biased Molecular Dynamics (CS-GAMDy), for the robust optimization of protein structures using experimental NMR chemical shifts. The method incorporates knowledge-based scoring functions and structural information derived from NMR chemical shifts via a unique combination of multi-objective MD biasing, a genetic algorithm, and the widely used XPLOR molecular modelling language. Using this approach, we demonstrate that CS-GAMDy is able to refine and/or fold models that are as much as 10 Å (RMSD) away from the correct structure using only NMR chemical shift data. CS-GAMDy is also able to refine of a wide range of approximate or mildly erroneous protein structures to more closely match the known/correct structure and the known/correct chemical shifts. We believe CS-GAMDy will allow protein models generated by sparse restraint or chemical-shift-only methods to achieve sufficiently high quality to be considered fully refined and “PDB worthy”. The CS-GAMDy algorithm is explained in detail and its performance is compared over a range of refinement scenarios with several commonly used protein structure refinement protocols. The program has been designed to be easily installed and easily used and is available at http://www.gamdy.ca http://www.gamdy.ca.

  7. Mineral Moessbauer spectroscopy: correlations between chemical shift and quadrupole splitting parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variety of coordination numbers, symmetries, distortions and ligand environments in thermally-stable iron-bearing minerals provide wide ranges of chemical shift (δ) and quadrupole splitting (Δ) parameters, which serve to characterize the crystal chemistries and site occupancies of Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions in minerals of terrestrial and extraterrestrial origins. Correlations between ferrous and ferric chemical shifts enable thermally-induced electron delocalization behavior in mixed-valence Fe2+-Fe3+ minerals to be identified, while chemical shift versus quadrupole splitting correlations serve to identify nanophase ferric oxides and oxyhydroxides in oxidized minerals and in meteorites subjected to aqueous oxidation before and after they arrived on Earth. (orig.)

  8. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen eSong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2, photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly 13C/15N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB chromophore. 2D 13C–13C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of 13C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, 13C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS 13C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive homogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that dehydration indeed leads to motional and electronic structural changes of the bilin chromophore and its binding pocket and is not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely used in previous MAS NMR and

  9. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Kopycki, Jakub; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2), photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS) was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of (13)C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, (13)C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS (13)C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive inhomogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that the effect of dehydration process indeed leads to changes of electronic structure of the bilin chromophore and a decrease in its mobility within the binding pocket, but not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely

  10. PPM-One: a static protein structure based chemical shift predictor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dawei; Brüschweiler, Rafael, E-mail: bruschweiler.1@osu.edu [The Ohio State University, Campus Chemical Instrument Center (United States)

    2015-07-15

    We mined the most recent editions of the BioMagResDataBank and the protein data bank to parametrize a new empirical knowledge-based chemical shift predictor of protein backbone atoms using either a linear or an artificial neural network model. The resulting chemical shift predictor PPM-One accepts a single static 3D structure as input and emulates the effect of local protein dynamics via interatomic steric contacts. Furthermore, the chemical shift prediction was extended to most side-chain protons and it is found that the prediction accuracy is at a level allowing an independent assessment of stereospecific assignments. For a previously established set of test proteins some overall improvement was achieved over current top-performing chemical shift prediction programs.

  11. Supramolecular chemical shift reagents inducing conformational transitions: NMR analysis of carbohydrate homooligomer mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beeren, Sophie; Meier, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the concept of supramolecular chemical shift reagents as a tool to improve signal resolution for the NMR analysis of homooligomers. Non-covalent interactions with the shift reagent can constrain otherwise flexible analytes inducing a conformational transition that results in signal...

  12. AFNMR: automated fragmentation quantum mechanical calculation of NMR chemical shifts for biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swails, Jason [Rutgers University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and BioMaPS Institute (United States); Zhu, Tong; He, Xiao, E-mail: xiaohe@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [East China Normal University, State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Science (China); Case, David A., E-mail: case@biomaps.rutgers.edu [Rutgers University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and BioMaPS Institute (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We evaluate the performance of the automated fragmentation quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach (AF-QM/MM) on the calculation of protein and nucleic acid NMR chemical shifts. The AF-QM/MM approach models solvent effects implicitly through a set of surface charges computed using the Poisson–Boltzmann equation, and it can also be combined with an explicit solvent model through the placement of water molecules in the first solvation shell around the solute; the latter substantially improves the accuracy of chemical shift prediction of protons involved in hydrogen bonding with solvent. We also compare the performance of AF-QM/MM on proteins and nucleic acids with two leading empirical chemical shift prediction programs SHIFTS and SHIFTX2. Although the empirical programs outperform AF-QM/MM in predicting chemical shifts, the differences are in some cases small, and the latter can be applied to chemical shifts on biomolecules which are outside the training set employed by the empirical programs, such as structures containing ligands, metal centers, and non-standard residues. The AF-QM/MM described here is implemented in version 5 of the SHIFTS software, and is fully automated, so that only a structure in PDB format is required as input.

  13. Chemical shift MRI can aid in the diagnosis of indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douis, H. [University Hospital Birmingham, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Davies, A.M. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Jeys, L. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Sian, P. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Spinal Surgery and Spinal Oncology, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate the role of chemical shift MRI in the characterisation of indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine as benign or malignant. Fifty-five patients (mean age 54.7 years) with 57 indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine were included in this retrospective study. In addition to conventional MRI at 3 T which included at least sagittal T1WI and T2WI/STIR sequences, patients underwent chemical shift MRI. A cut-off value with a signal drop-out of 20 % was used to differentiate benign lesions from malignant lesions (signal drop-out <20 % being malignant). There were 45 benign lesions and 12 malignant lesions. Chemical shift imaging correctly diagnosed 33 of 45 lesions as benign and 11 of 12 lesions as malignant. In contrast, there were 12 false positive cases and 1 false negative case based on chemical shift MRI. This yielded a sensitivity of 91.7 %, a specificity of 73.3 %, a negative predictive value of 97.1 %, a positive predictive value of 47.8 % and a diagnostic accuracy of 82.5 %. Chemical shift MRI can aid in the characterisation of indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine in view of its high sensitivity in diagnosing malignant lesions. Chemical shift MRI can potentially avoid biopsy in a considerable percentage of patients with benign skeletal lesions of the spine. (orig.)

  14. Chemical shift MRI can aid in the diagnosis of indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the role of chemical shift MRI in the characterisation of indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine as benign or malignant. Fifty-five patients (mean age 54.7 years) with 57 indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine were included in this retrospective study. In addition to conventional MRI at 3 T which included at least sagittal T1WI and T2WI/STIR sequences, patients underwent chemical shift MRI. A cut-off value with a signal drop-out of 20 % was used to differentiate benign lesions from malignant lesions (signal drop-out <20 % being malignant). There were 45 benign lesions and 12 malignant lesions. Chemical shift imaging correctly diagnosed 33 of 45 lesions as benign and 11 of 12 lesions as malignant. In contrast, there were 12 false positive cases and 1 false negative case based on chemical shift MRI. This yielded a sensitivity of 91.7 %, a specificity of 73.3 %, a negative predictive value of 97.1 %, a positive predictive value of 47.8 % and a diagnostic accuracy of 82.5 %. Chemical shift MRI can aid in the characterisation of indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine in view of its high sensitivity in diagnosing malignant lesions. Chemical shift MRI can potentially avoid biopsy in a considerable percentage of patients with benign skeletal lesions of the spine. (orig.)

  15. From NMR chemical shifts to amino acid types: Investigation of the predictive power carried by nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach to automatic prediction of the amino acid type from NMR chemical shift values of its nuclei is presented here, in the frame of a model to calculate the probability of an amino acid type given the set of chemical shifts. The method relies on systematic use of all chemical shift values contained in the BioMagResBank (BMRB). Two programs were designed, one (BMRB stats) for extracting statistical chemical shift parameters from the BMRB and another one (RESCUE2) for computing the probabilities of each amino acid type, given a set of chemical shifts. The Bayesian prediction scheme presented here is compared to other methods already proposed: PROTYP (Grzesiek and Bax, J. Biomol. NMR, 3, 185-204, 1993) RESCUE (Pons and Delsuc, J. Biomol. NMR, 15, 15-26, 1999) and PLATON (Labudde et al., J. Biomol. NMR, 25, 41-53, 2003) and is found to be more sensitive and more specific. Using this scheme, we tested various sets of nuclei. The two nuclei carrying the most information are Cβ and Hβ, in agreement with observations made in Grzesiek and Bax, 1993. Based on four nuclei: Hβ, Cβ, Cα and C', it is possible to increase correct predictions to a rate of more than 75%. Taking into account the correlations between the nuclei chemical shifts has only a slight impact on the percentage of correct predictions: indeed, the largest correlation coefficients display similar features on all amino acids

  16. Further conventions for NMR shielding and chemical shifts (IUPAC Recommendations 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, R.K. [University of Durham, Durham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Becker, E.D. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Menezes, S.M. Cabral de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES); Granger, P. [University Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France). Inst. of Chemistry; Hoffman, R.E. [The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Safra Campus, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Organic Chemistry; Zilm, K.W., E-mail: r.k.harris@durham.ac.uk [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    IUPAC has published a number of recommendations regarding the reporting of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data, especially chemical shifts. The most recent publication [Pure Appl. Chem. 73, 1795 (2001)] recommended that tetramethylsilane (TMS) serve as a universal reference for reporting the shifts of all nuclides, but it deferred recommendations for several aspects of this subject. This document first examines the extent to which the {sup 1}H shielding in TMS itself is subject to change by variation in temperature, concentration, and solvent. On the basis of recently published results, it has been established that the shielding of TMS in solution [along with that of sodium-3- (trimethylsilyl)propanesulfonate, DSS, often used as a reference for aqueous solutions] varies only slightly with temperature but is subject to solvent perturbations of a few tenths of a part per million (ppm). Recommendations are given for reporting chemical shifts under most routine experimental conditions and for quantifying effects of temperature and solvent variation, including the use of magnetic susceptibility corrections and of magic-angle spinning (MAS). This document provides the first IUPAC recommendations for referencing and reporting chemical shifts in solids, based on high-resolution MAS studies. Procedures are given for relating {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts in solids to the scales used for high resolution studies in the liquid phase. The notation and terminology used for describing chemical shift and shielding tensors in solids are reviewed in some detail, and recommendations are given for best practice. (author)

  17. Global Fold of Human Cannabinoid Type 2 Receptor Probed by Solid-State 13C-, 15N-MAS NMR and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Tomohiro; Vukoti, Krishna; Lynch, Diane L.; Hurst, Dow P.; Grossfield, Alan; Pitman, Michael C.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Yeliseev, Alexei A.; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The global fold of human cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor in the agonist-bound active state in lipid bilayers was investigated by solid-state 13C- and 15N magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR, in combination with chemical-shift prediction from a structural model of the receptor obtained by microsecond-long molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Uniformly 13C-, and 15N-labeled CB2 receptor was expressed in milligram quantities by bacterial fermentation, purified, and functionally reconstituted into l...

  18. Method for evaluating chemical shifts of x-ray emission lines in molecules and solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomachuk, Yuriy V.; Titov, Anatoly V.

    2013-12-01

    A method of evaluating chemical shifts of x-ray emission lines for period four and heavier elements is developed. This method is based on the relativistic pseudopotential model and one-center restoration approach [Int. J. Quantum Chem.IJQCB20020-760810.1002/qua.20418 104, 223 (2005)] to recover a proper electronic structure in heavy-atom cores after the pseudopotential simulation of chemical compounds. The approximations of instantaneous transition and frozen core are presently applied to derive an expression for chemical shift as a difference between mean values of certain effective operator. The method allows one to avoid evaluation of small quantities (chemical shifts ˜0.01-1 eV) as differences of very large values (transition energies ˜1-100 keV in various compounds). The results of our calculations of chemical shifts for the Kα1, Kα2, and L transitions of group-14 metal cations with respect to neutral atoms are presented. Calculations of Kα1-line chemical shifts for the Pb core transitions in PbO and PbF2 with respect to those in the Pb atom are also performed and discussed. The accuracy of approximations used is estimated and the quality of the calculations is analyzed.

  19. Method of evaluating chemical shifts of X-ray emission lines in molecules and solids

    CERN Document Server

    Lomachuk, Yuriy V

    2013-01-01

    Method of evaluating chemical shifts of X-ray emission lines for sufficiently heavy atoms (beginning from period 4 elements) in chemical compounds is developed. This method is based on the pseudopotential model and one-center restoration method (to reconstruct the proper electronic structure in heavy-atom cores). The approximations of instantaneous transition and frozen inner core spinors of the atom are used for derivation of an expression for chemical shift as a difference between mean values of some effective operator. The method allows one to avoid evaluating small values (chemical shifts ~ 0.01{\\div}1 eV) as differences of very large values (transition energies ~ 1{\\div}100 keV in various compounds). The results of our calculations of chemical shifts for the K_{\\alpha1,2} and L transitions of the group 14 metal cations with respect to neutral atoms are presented. The calculations of chemical shift of K_{\\alpha1}-line in the Pb-core transition within PbO and PbF_2 with respect to the neutral Pb are also p...

  20. Effect of shifting cultivation on soil physical and chemical properties in Bandarban hill district, Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khandakar Showkat Osman; M. Jashimuddin; S. M. Sirajul Haque; Sohag Miah

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the effects of shifting cultivation at slashing stage on soil physicochemical properties at Bandarban Sadar Upazila in Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh. At this initial stage of shifting cultivation no general trend was found for moisture content, maximum water holding capacity, field capacity, dry and moist bulk density, parti-cle density for some chemical properties between shifting cultivated land and forest having similar soil texture. Organic matter was significantly (p≤0.05) lower in 1-year and 3-year shifting cultivated lands and higher in 2-year shifting cultivation than in adjacent natural forest. Significant differences were also found for total N, exchangeable Ca, Mg and K and in CEC as well as for available P. Slashed area showed higher soil pH. Deterioration in land quality starts from burning of slashing materials and continues through subsequent stages of shifting cultivation.

  1. Theoretical Modeling of (99)Tc NMR Chemical Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Gabriel B; Andersen, Amity; Washton, Nancy M; Chatterjee, Sayandev; Levitskaia, Tatiana G

    2016-09-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc) displays a rich chemistry due to its wide range of accessible oxidation states (from -I to +VII) and ability to form coordination compounds. Determination of Tc speciation in complex mixtures is a major challenge, and (99)Tc nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used to probe chemical environments of Tc in odd oxidation states. However, interpretation of (99)Tc NMR data is hindered by the lack of reference compounds. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations can help to fill this gap, but to date few computational studies have focused on (99)Tc NMR of compounds and complexes. This work evaluates the effectiveness of both pure generalized gradient approximation and their corresponding hybrid functionals, both with and without the inclusion of scalar relativistic effects, to model the (99)Tc NMR spectra of Tc(I) carbonyl compounds. With the exception of BLYP, which performed exceptionally well overall, hybrid functionals with inclusion of scalar relativistic effects are found to be necessary to accurately calculate (99)Tc NMR spectra. The computational method developed was used to tentatively assign an experimentally observed (99)Tc NMR peak at -1204 ppm to fac-Tc(CO)3(OH)3(2-). This study examines the effectiveness of DFT computations for interpretation of the (99)Tc NMR spectra of Tc(I) coordination compounds in high salt alkaline solutions. PMID:27518482

  2. Detection of initiation sites in protein folding of the four helix bundle ACBP by chemical shift analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modig, K.; Jürgensen, Vibeke Würtz; Lindorff-Larsen, K.;

    2007-01-01

    A simple alternative method for obtaining "random coil" chemical shifts by intrinsic referencing using the protein's own peptide sequence is presented. These intrinsic random coil backbone shifts were then used to calculate secondary chemical shifts, that provide important information on the resi......A simple alternative method for obtaining "random coil" chemical shifts by intrinsic referencing using the protein's own peptide sequence is presented. These intrinsic random coil backbone shifts were then used to calculate secondary chemical shifts, that provide important information...... on the residual secondary structure elements in the acid-denatured state of an acylcoenzyme A binding protein. This method reveals a clear correlation between the carbon secondary chemical shifts and the amide secondary chemical shifts 3-5 residues away in the primary sequence. These findings strongly suggest...... transient formation of short helix-like segments, and identify unique sequence segments important for protein folding....

  3. Stereoelectronic effects on 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts in methoxybenzenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Maja; Olsen, Lars; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2006-12-01

    Investigation of all O-methyl ethers of 1,2,3-benzenetriol and 4-methyl-1,2,3-benzenetriol (3-16) by 1H NMR spectroscopy and density-functional calculations disclosed practically useful conformational effects on 1H NMR chemical shifts in the aromatic ring. While the conversion of phenol (2) to anisole (1) causes only small positive changes of 1H NMR chemical shifts (Delta delta Hmeta > Hpara, the experimental O-methylation induced shifts in ortho-disubstituted phenols are largest for Hpara, Delta delta equals; 0.19 +/- 0.02 ppm (n = 11). The differences are due to different conformational behavior of the OH and OCH3 groups; while the ortho-disubstituted OH group remains planar in polyphenols due to hydrogen bonding and conjugative stabilization, the steric congestion in ortho-disubstituted anisoles outweighs the conjugative effects and forces the Ar-OCH3 torsion out of the ring plane, resulting in large stereoelectronic effects on the chemical shift of Hpara. Conformational searches and geometry optimizations for 3-16 at the B3LYP/6-31G** level, followed by B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) calculations for all low-energy conformers, gave excellent correlation between computed and observed 1H NMR chemical shifts, including agreement between computed and observed chemical shift changes caused by O-methylation. The observed regularities can aid structure elucidation of partly O-methylated polyphenols, including many natural products and drugs, and are useful in connection with chemical shift predictions by desktop computer programs. PMID:17137372

  4. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labudde, D.; Leitner, D.; Krueger, M.; Oschkinat, H. [Forschungsinstitut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (Germany)], E-mail: oschkinat@fmp-berlin.de

    2003-01-15

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely {alpha}-helix, {beta}-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  5. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders S Christensen

    Full Text Available We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts--sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM calculations and reproduces high level QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94. ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift-based structural refinements, starting from high-resolution X-ray structures of Protein G, ubiquitin, and SMN Tudor Domain, result in average chemical shifts, hydrogen bond geometries, and trans-hydrogen bond ((h3J(NC' spin-spin coupling constants that are in excellent agreement with experiment. We show that the structural sensitivity of the QM-based amide proton chemical shift predictions is needed to obtain this agreement. The ProCS method thus offers a powerful new tool for refining the structures of hydrogen bonding networks to high accuracy with many potential applications such as protein flexibility in ligand binding.

  6. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Anders S; Borg, Mikael; Boomsma, Wouter; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94). ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift-based structural refinements, starting from high-resolution X-ray structures of Protein G, ubiquitin, and SMN Tudor Domain, result in average chemical shifts, hydrogen bond geometries, and trans-hydrogen bond (h3JNC') spin-spin coupling constants that are in excellent agreement with experiment. We show that the structural sensitivity of the QM-based amide proton chemical shift predictions is needed to refine protein structures to this...

  7. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the α-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely α-helix, β-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time

  8. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between “static......” and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N−. The paper will be deal with both secondary...... and primary isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles...

  9. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between “static......” and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N−. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary...... isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles...

  10. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of negatively charged NH.N systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Grech, Eugeniusz;

    2013-01-01

    ” and equilibrium cases. NMR assignments of the former have been revised. The NH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are rather unusual in these strongly hydrogen bonded systems between a NH and a negatively charged nitrogen atom. The formal four-bond effects are found to be negative...... indicating transmission via the hydrogen bond. In addition, unusual long range effects are seen. Structures, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts and changes in nuclear shieldings upon deuteriation are calculated using density functional theory methods......Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are investigated in anions of 1,8-bis(4-toluenesulphonamido)naphthalenes together with N,N-(naphthalene-1,8-diyl)bis(2,2,2-trifluoracetamide) all with bis(1,8-dimethylamino)napthaleneH+ as counter ion. These compounds represent both “static...

  11. Improved 3D triple resonance experiments, HNN and HN(C)N, for HN and 15N sequential correlations in (13C, 15N) labeled proteins: Application to unfolded proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panchal, Sanjay C.; Bhavesh, Neel S.; Hosur, Ramakrishna V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2001-06-15

    Two triple resonance experiments, HNN and HN(C)N, are presented which correlate H{sup N} and {sup 15}N resonances sequentially along the polypeptide chain of a doubly ({sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) labeled protein. These incorporate several improvements over the previously published sequences for a similar purpose and have several novel features. The spectral characteristics enable direct identification of certain triplets of residues, which provide many starting points for the sequential assignment procedure. The experiments are sensitive and their utility has been demonstrated with a 22 kDa protein under unfolding conditions where most of the standard triple resonance experiments such as HNCA, CBCANH etc. have limited success because of poor amide, C{sup {alpha}} and C{sup {beta}} chemical shift dispersions.

  12. Improved 3D triple resonance experiments, HNN and HN(C)N, for HN and 15N sequential correlations in (13C, 15N) labeled proteins: Application to unfolded proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two triple resonance experiments, HNN and HN(C)N, are presented which correlate HN and 15N resonances sequentially along the polypeptide chain of a doubly (13C, 15N) labeled protein. These incorporate several improvements over the previously published sequences for a similar purpose and have several novel features. The spectral characteristics enable direct identification of certain triplets of residues, which provide many starting points for the sequential assignment procedure. The experiments are sensitive and their utility has been demonstrated with a 22 kDa protein under unfolding conditions where most of the standard triple resonance experiments such as HNCA, CBCANH etc. have limited success because of poor amide, Cα and Cβ chemical shift dispersions

  13. From NMR chemical shifts to amino acid types: Investigation of the predictive power carried by nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, Antoine; Malliavin, Therese E. [Institut de Biologie Physico-Chimique, Laboratoire de Biochimie Theorique, CNRS UPR 9080 (France)], E-mail: therese.malliavin@ibpc.fr; Nicolas, Pierre; Delsuc, Marc-Andre [INRA - Domaine de Vilvert, Unite Mathematique Informatique et Genome (France)

    2004-09-15

    An approach to automatic prediction of the amino acid type from NMR chemical shift values of its nuclei is presented here, in the frame of a model to calculate the probability of an amino acid type given the set of chemical shifts. The method relies on systematic use of all chemical shift values contained in the BioMagResBank (BMRB). Two programs were designed, one (BMRB stats) for extracting statistical chemical shift parameters from the BMRB and another one (RESCUE2) for computing the probabilities of each amino acid type, given a set of chemical shifts. The Bayesian prediction scheme presented here is compared to other methods already proposed: PROTYP (Grzesiek and Bax, J. Biomol. NMR, 3, 185-204, 1993) RESCUE (Pons and Delsuc, J. Biomol. NMR, 15, 15-26, 1999) and PLATON (Labudde et al., J. Biomol. NMR, 25, 41-53, 2003) and is found to be more sensitive and more specific. Using this scheme, we tested various sets of nuclei. The two nuclei carrying the most information are C{sub {beta}} and H{sub {beta}}, in agreement with observations made in Grzesiek and Bax, 1993. Based on four nuclei: H{sub {beta}}, C{sub {beta}}, C{sub {alpha}} and C', it is possible to increase correct predictions to a rate of more than 75%. Taking into account the correlations between the nuclei chemical shifts has only a slight impact on the percentage of correct predictions: indeed, the largest correlation coefficients display similar features on all amino acids.

  14. Pulse NMR in solids: chemical shift, lead fluoride, and thorium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fluorine chemical shift of a single crystal CaF2 was measured up to 4 kilobar at room temperature using multiple pulse NMR. The pressure dependence of the shift is found to be --1.7 +- 1 ppM/kbar, while an overlap model predicts a shift of --0.46 ppM/kbar.The chemical shift tensor is separated into ''geometrical'' and ''chemical'' contributions, and comparison of the proposed model calculations with recent data on hydroxyl proton chemical shift tensors shows that the geometrical portion accounts for the qualitative features of the measured tensors. A study of fluoride ion motion in β-PbF2 doped with NaF was conducted by measurement of the 19F transverse relaxation time (T2), spin lattice relaxation time (T1) and the spin lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame (T/sub 1r). Two samples of Th4H15, prepared under different conditions but both having the proper ratio of H/Th (to within 1 percent), were studied. The structure of the Th4H15 suggested by x-ray measurements is confirmed through a moment analysis of the rigid lattice line shape

  15. Ab Initio Calculations of Deuterium Isotope Effects on Chemical Shifts of Salt-Bridged Lysines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Saif; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Williamson, Mike P.;

    2011-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects measure the change in chemical shift on substitution of a proton by deuterium. They have been calculated by direct treatment of the H/D nuclear quantum effect using a multicomponent ab initio molecular orbital method based on a non-Born−Oppenheimer approximation. This me......Deuterium isotope effects measure the change in chemical shift on substitution of a proton by deuterium. They have been calculated by direct treatment of the H/D nuclear quantum effect using a multicomponent ab initio molecular orbital method based on a non-Born−Oppenheimer approximation...

  16. Ontogenetic shift in response to prey-derived chemical cues in prairie rattlesnakes Crotalus viridis viridis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anthony J.SAVIOLA; David CHISZAR; Stephen P.MACKESSY

    2012-01-01

    Snakes often have specialized diets that undergo a shift from one prey type to another depending on the life stage of the snake.Crotalus viridis viridis (prairie rattlesnake) takes different prey at different life stages,and neonates typically prey on ectotherms,while adults feed almost entirely on small endotherms.We hypothesized that elevated rates of tongue flicking to chemical stimuli should correlate with particular prey consumed,and that this response shifts from one prey type to another as individuals age.To examine if an ontogenetic shift in response to chemical cues occurred,we recorded the rate of tongue flicking for 25 neonate,20 subadult,and 20 adult (average SVL=280.9,552,789.5 mm,respectively) wild-caught C.v.viridis to chemical stimuli presented on a cotton-tipped applicator; water-soluble cues from two ectotherms (prairie lizard,Sceloporus undulatus,and house gecko,Hemidactylusfrenatus),two endotherms (deer mouse,Peromyscus maniculatus and lab mouse,Mus musculus),and water controls were used.Neonates tongue flicked significantly more to chemical cues of their common prey,S.undulatus,than to all other chemical cues; however,the response to this lizard's chemical cues decreased in adult rattlesnakes.Subadults tongue flicked with a higher rate of tongue flicking to both S.undulatus and P.maniculatus than to all other treatments,and adults tongue flicked significantly more to P.maniculatus than to all other chemical cues.In addition,all three sub-classes demonstrated a greater response for natural prey chemical cues over chemical stimuli of prey not encountered in the wild (M.musculus and H.frenatus).This shift in chemosensory response correlated with the previously described ontogenetic shifts in C.v.viridis diet.Because many vipers show a similar ontogenetic shift in diet and venom composition,we suggest that this shift in prey cue discrimination is likely a general phenomenon among viperid snakes.

  17. Proton Magnetic Resonance and Human Thyroid Neoplasia III. Ex VivoChemical-Shift Microimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Allison; Künnecke, Basil; Dowd, Susan; Russell, Peter; Delbridge, Leigh; Mountford, Carolyn E.

    1996-03-01

    Magnetic-resonance chemical-shift microimaging, with a spatial resolution of 40 × 40 μm, is a modality which can detect alterations to cellular chemistry and hence markers of pathological processes in human tissueex vivo.This technique was used as a chemical microscope to assess follicular thyroid neoplasms, lesions which are unsatisfactorily investigated using standard histopathological techiques or water-based magnetic-resonance imaging. The chemical-shift images at the methyl frequency (0.9 ppm) identify chemical heterogeneity in follicular tumors which are histologically homogeneous. The observed changes to cellular chemistry, detectable in foci of approximately 100 cells or less, support the existence of a preinvasive state hitherto unidentified by current pathological techniques.

  18. The effect of organic matter and nitrification inhibitor on 15 N H4 and 15 N O3 absorption by the maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the forms 15 N H4 and 15 N O3 in presence or absence of organic matter and of the nitrification inhibitor AM (2-amino-4-chloro-6-methyl-pyrimidine) in dry matter weight and nitrogen content of the plant derived from soil and form fertilizer is studied. The experiment was carried out in greenhouse and the test plant was the hybrid Maize Centralmex . The fertilizers (15 N H4)2 S O4 and Na15 N O3, were added in two levels: 40 and 120 Kg N/ha, with 1,02% of N and 1,4% of 15 N in excess, respectively. Three soils of different physical and chemical characteristics were used; Regosol intergrade, Latosol Roxo and Podzolized de Lins e Marilia var. Marilia. (M.A.C.)

  19. 15N in biological nitrogen fixation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bibliography with 298 references on the use of the stable nitrogen isotope 15N in the research on the biological fixation of dinitrogen is presented. The literature pertaining to this bibliography covers the period from 1975 to the middle of 1985. (author)

  20. Effects of growth and change of food on the δ15N in marine fishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is limited concerning variation of the δ15N with growth in marine organisms and consequently the effect of growth of marine biota on the δ15N is not yet well understood. The δ15N in 26 species of marine fishes taken from Japanese coastal waters together with 4664 stomach contents of these fishes were examined to investigate the effects of food habits and growth on the δ15N. The mean δ15N for two species that fed mainly on large-size fishes and six species that fed mainly on small-size fishes were 14.5±1.0per mille and 12.8±0.7per mille, respectively. For five species that fed mainly on decapod crustaceans, two species that fed mainly on zooplankton, and three species that fed mainly on benthos (mainly Polychaeta), the δ15N were 13.0±0.7, 9.7±0.9, and 12.2±1.2per mille, respectively. The mean δ15N in the species whose prey were mainly fish or decapod crustaceans was about 3-5per mille higher than the species whose prey was mainly zooplankton. Within the four species that shift their food habits with growth to higher trophic level, the δ15N significantly increased with growth in one species (Pacific cod), while not significant increase in the δ15N with growth in the remaining species. (author)

  1. Binding of thiocyanate to lactoperoxidase: 1H and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modi, S.; Behere, D.V.; Mitra, S. (Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (India))

    1989-05-30

    The binding of thiocyanate to lactoperoxidase (LPO) has been investigated by 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy. 1H NMR of LPO shows that the major broad heme methyl proton resonance at about 61 ppm is shifted upfield by addition of the thiocyanate, indicating binding of the thiocyanate to the enzyme. The pH dependence of line width of 15N resonance of SC15N- in the presence of the enzyme has revealed that the binding of the thiocyanate to the enzyme is facilitated by protonation of an ionizable group (with pKa of 6.4), which is presumably distal histidine. Dissociation constants (KD) of SC15N-/LPO, SC15N-/LPO/I-, and SC15N-/LPO/CN- equilibria have been determined by 15N T1 measurements and found to be 90 +/- 5, 173 +/- 20, and 83 +/- 6 mM, respectively. On the basis of these values of KD, it is suggested that the iodide ion inhibits the binding of the thiocyanate but cyanide ion does not. The thiocyanate is shown to bind at the same site of LPO as iodide does, but the binding is considerably weaker and is away from the ferric ion. The distance of 15N of the bound thiocyanate ion from the iron is determined to be 7.2 +/- 0.2 A from the 15N T1 measurements.

  2. Sequence correction of random coil chemical shifts: correlation between neighbor correction factors and changes in the Ramachandran distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming Martin

    2011-01-01

    Random coil chemical shifts are necessary for secondary chemical shift analysis, which is the main NMR method for identification of secondary structure in proteins. One of the largest challenges in the determination of random coil chemical shifts is accounting for the effect of neighboring residues...... use random coil peptides containing glutamine instead of glycine to determine the random coil chemical shifts and the neighbor correction factors. The resulting correction factors correlate to changes in the populations of the major wells in the Ramachandran plot, which demonstrates that changes...... in the conformational ensemble are an important source of neighbor effects in disordered proteins. Glutamine derived random coil chemical shifts and correction factors modestly improve our ability to predict (13)C chemical shifts of intrinsically disordered proteins compared to existing datasets, and may thus improve...

  3. CO{sub H}(N)CACB experiments for assigning backbone resonances in {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrof, Nathan; Bracken, Clay; Cavanagh, John; Palmer, Arthur G

    1998-05-15

    A triple resonance NMR experiment, denoted CO{sub H}(N)CACB, correlates{sup 1}H{sup N} and {sup 13}CO spins with the{sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} spins of adjacent amino acids. The pulse sequence is an 'out-and-back' design that starts with{sup 1}H{sup N} magnetization and transfers coherence via the {sup 15}N spin simultaneously to the {sup 13}CO and{sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} spins, followed by transfer to the{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} spin. Two versions of the sequence are presented: one in which the {sup 13}CO spins are frequency labeled during an incremented t{sub 1} evolution period prior to transfer of magnetization from the {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} to the{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} resonances, and one in which the{sup 13}CO spins are frequency labeled in a constant-time manner during the coherence transfer to and from the{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} resonances. Because {sup 13}COand {sup 15}N chemical shifts are largely uncorrelated, the technique will be especially useful when degeneracy in the{sup 1}H{sup N}-{sup 15}N chemical shifts hinders resonance assignment. The CO{sub H}(N)CACB experiment is demonstrated using uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled ubiquitin.

  4. Stereoelectronic effects on 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts in methoxybenzenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, Maja; Olsen, Lars; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2006-01-01

    Investigation of all O-methyl ethers of 1,2,3-benzenetriol and 4-methyl-1,2,3-benzenetriol (3-16) by 1H NMR spectroscopy and density-functional calculations disclosed practically useful conformational effects on 1H NMR chemical shifts in the aromatic ring. While the conversion of phenol (2) to an...

  5. Chemical shifts in transition metal dithiocarbamates from infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, R.; Magee, R. J.; Liesegang, J.

    1982-11-01

    Measurements of the IR stretching frequencies of the NC and MS bonds in transition-metal (M) dithiocarbamates show significant correlation with measurement of core level XPS chemical shifts. This is believed to be the first demonstration of such a correlation for a series of solid-phase compounds.

  6. Computation of Chemical Shifts for Paramagnetic Molecules: A Laboratory Experiment for the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Benjamin P.; Simpson, Scott; Zurek, Eva; Autschbach, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    A computational experiment investigating the [superscript 1]H and [superscript 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of molecules with unpaired electrons has been developed and implemented. This experiment is appropriate for an upper-level undergraduate laboratory course in computational, physical, or inorganic chemistry. The…

  7. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen; Linnet, Troels Emtekær; Borg, Mikael;

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level...

  8. Database proton NMR chemical shifts for RNA signal assignment and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank contains NMR chemical shift depositions for 132 RNAs and RNA-containing complexes. We have analyzed the 1H NMR chemical shifts reported for non-exchangeable protons of residues that reside within A-form helical regions of these RNAs. The analysis focused on the central base pair within a stretch of three adjacent base pairs (BP triplets), and included both Watson–Crick (WC; G:C, A:U) and G:U wobble pairs. Chemical shift values were included for all 43 possible WC-BP triplets, as well as 137 additional triplets that contain one or more G:U wobbles. Sequence-dependent chemical shift correlations were identified, including correlations involving terminating base pairs within the triplets and canonical and non-canonical structures adjacent to the BP triplets (i.e. bulges, loops, WC and non-WC BPs), despite the fact that the NMR data were obtained under different conditions of pH, buffer, ionic strength, and temperature. A computer program (RNAShifts) was developed that enables convenient comparison of RNA 1H NMR assignments with database predictions, which should facilitate future signal assignment/validation efforts and enable rapid identification of non-canonical RNA structures and RNA-ligand/protein interaction sites.

  9. Using NMR chemical shifts to calculate the propensity for structural order and disorder in proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamiola, Kamil; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy offers the unique possibility to relate the structural propensities of disordered proteins and loop segments of folded peptides to biological function and aggregation behaviour. Backbone chemical shifts are ideally suited for this task, provided that appropriate reference data are a

  10. Identification of helix capping and {beta}-turn motifs from NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2012-03-15

    We present an empirical method for identification of distinct structural motifs in proteins on the basis of experimentally determined backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts. Elements identified include the N-terminal and C-terminal helix capping motifs and five types of {beta}-turns: I, II, I Prime , II Prime and VIII. Using a database of proteins of known structure, the NMR chemical shifts, together with the PDB-extracted amino acid preference of the helix capping and {beta}-turn motifs are used as input data for training an artificial neural network algorithm, which outputs the statistical probability of finding each motif at any given position in the protein. The trained neural networks, contained in the MICS (motif identification from chemical shifts) program, also provide a confidence level for each of their predictions, and values ranging from ca 0.7-0.9 for the Matthews correlation coefficient of its predictions far exceed those attainable by sequence analysis. MICS is anticipated to be useful both in the conventional NMR structure determination process and for enhancing on-going efforts to determine protein structures solely on the basis of chemical shift information, where it can aid in identifying protein database fragments suitable for use in building such structures.

  11. The statistical shift of the chemical potential causing anomalous conductivity in hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lof, R.W.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of the electrical conductivity in hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μ c-Si:H) that is frequently observed is explained by considering the statistical shift in the chemical potential as a function of the crystalline fraction (Xc), the dangling bond density (N db), and the doping den

  12. Elucidating the Link between NMR Chemical Shifts and Electronic Structure in d(0) Olefin Metathesis Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Stéphanie; Copéret, Christophe; Raynaud, Christophe; Eisenstein, Odile

    2016-02-24

    The nucleophilic carbon of d(0) Schrock alkylidene metathesis catalysts, [M] = CHR, display surprisingly low downfield chemical shift (δ(iso)) and large chemical shift anisotropy. State-of-the-art four-component relativistic calculations of the chemical shift tensors combined with a two-component analysis in terms of localized orbitals allow a molecular-level understanding of their orientations, the magnitude of their principal components (δ11 > δ22 > δ33) and associated δ(iso). This analysis reveals the dominating influence of the paramagnetic contribution yielding a highly deshielded alkylidene carbon. The largest paramagnetic contribution, which originates from the coupling of alkylidene σ(MC) and π*(MC) orbitals under the action of the magnetic field, is analogous to that resulting from coupling σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene; thus, δ11 is in the MCH plane and is perpendicular to the MC internuclear direction. The higher value of carbon-13 δ(iso) in alkylidene complexes relative to ethylene is thus due to the smaller energy gap between σ(MC) and π*(MC) vs this between σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene. This effect also explains why the highest value of δ(iso) is observed for Mo and the lowest for Ta, the values for W and Re being in between. In the presence of agostic interaction, the chemical shift tensor principal components orientation (δ22 or δ33 parallel or perpendicular to π(MX)) is influenced by the MCH angle because it determines the orientation of the alkylidene CHR fragment relative to the MC internuclear axis. The orbital analysis shows how the paramagnetic terms, understood with a localized bond model, determine the chemical shift tensor and thereby δ(iso). PMID:26787258

  13. Elucidating the Link between NMR Chemical Shifts and Electronic Structure in d(0) Olefin Metathesis Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Stéphanie; Copéret, Christophe; Raynaud, Christophe; Eisenstein, Odile

    2016-02-24

    The nucleophilic carbon of d(0) Schrock alkylidene metathesis catalysts, [M] = CHR, display surprisingly low downfield chemical shift (δ(iso)) and large chemical shift anisotropy. State-of-the-art four-component relativistic calculations of the chemical shift tensors combined with a two-component analysis in terms of localized orbitals allow a molecular-level understanding of their orientations, the magnitude of their principal components (δ11 > δ22 > δ33) and associated δ(iso). This analysis reveals the dominating influence of the paramagnetic contribution yielding a highly deshielded alkylidene carbon. The largest paramagnetic contribution, which originates from the coupling of alkylidene σ(MC) and π*(MC) orbitals under the action of the magnetic field, is analogous to that resulting from coupling σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene; thus, δ11 is in the MCH plane and is perpendicular to the MC internuclear direction. The higher value of carbon-13 δ(iso) in alkylidene complexes relative to ethylene is thus due to the smaller energy gap between σ(MC) and π*(MC) vs this between σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene. This effect also explains why the highest value of δ(iso) is observed for Mo and the lowest for Ta, the values for W and Re being in between. In the presence of agostic interaction, the chemical shift tensor principal components orientation (δ22 or δ33 parallel or perpendicular to π(MX)) is influenced by the MCH angle because it determines the orientation of the alkylidene CHR fragment relative to the MC internuclear axis. The orbital analysis shows how the paramagnetic terms, understood with a localized bond model, determine the chemical shift tensor and thereby δ(iso).

  14. Natural abundance (14)N and (15)N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinberg, Stanislav L; Johnston, Karen E; Jaroszewicz, Michael J; Kispal, Brianna M; Mireault, Christopher R; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W

    2016-06-29

    (14)N ultra-wideline (UW), (1)H{(15)N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and (15)N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (14)N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. A case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW (14)N SSNMR spectra of stationary samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R''NH(+) and RR'NH2(+)) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments. Directly-excited (14)N NMR spectra were acquired using the WURST-CPMG pulse sequence, which incorporates WURST (wideband, uniform rate, and smooth truncation) pulses and a CPMG (Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill) refocusing protocol. In certain cases, spectra were acquired using (1)H → (14)N broadband cross-polarization, via the BRAIN-CP (broadband adiabatic inversion - cross polarization) pulse sequence. These spectra provide (14)N electric field gradient (EFG) tensor parameters and orientations that are particularly sensitive to variations in local structure and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. The (1)H{(15)N} idHETCOR spectra, acquired under conditions of fast magic-angle spinning (MAS), used CP transfers to provide (1)H-(15)N chemical shift correlations for all nitrogen environments, except for two sites in acebutolol and nicardipine. One of these two sites (RR'NH2(+) in acebutolol) was successfully detected using the DNP-enhanced (15)N{(1)H} CP/MAS measurement, and one (RNO2 in nicardipine) remained elusive due to the absence of

  15. Magnetic Shift of the Chemical Freeze-out and Electric Charge Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hidaka, Yoshimasa

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the effect of a strong magnetic field on the chemical freeze-out points in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. As a result of inverse magnetic catalysis or magnetic inhibition, the crossover onset to hot and dense matter out of quarks and gluons should be shifted to a lower temperature. To quantify this shift we employ the hadron resonance gas model and an empirical condition for the chemical freeze-out. We point out that the charged particle abundances are significantly affected by the magnetic field so that the electric charge fluctuation is largely enhanced, especially at high baryon density. The charge conservation partially cancels the enhancement, but our calculation shows that the electric charge fluctuation could serve as a magnetometer. We find that the fluctuation exhibits a crossover behavior rapidly increased for e B ≳(0.4 GeV )2, while the charge chemical potential has smoother behavior with an increasing magnetic field.

  16. 15N2 incorporation by rhizosphere soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterotrophic nitrogen fixation by rhizosphere soil samples from 20 rice cultivars grown under uniform field conditions was estimated employing 15N-tracer technique. Rhizosphere soil samples from different rice cultivars showed striking differences with regard to their ability to incorporate 15N2. Rhizosphere samples from rice straw-amended (3 and 6 tons/ha) soil exhibited more pronounced nitrogen-fixing activity than the samples form unamended soil; while the activity of the rhizosphere samples from soil receiving combined nitrogen (40 and 80 kg N/ha) was relatively low. However, the inhibitory effect of combined nitrogen was not expressed in the presence of rice straw at 6 tons/ha. Results suggest that plant variety, application of combined nitrogen and organic matter influence the rhizosphere nitrogen fixation. (orig.)

  17. Noninvasive Temperature Mapping With MRI Using Chemical Shift Water-Fat Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Soher, Brian J.; Wyatt, Cory; Reeder, Scott B.; MacFall, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Tissues containing both water and lipids, e.g., breast, confound standard MR proton reference frequency-shift methods for mapping temperatures due to the lack of temperature-induced frequency shift in lipid protons. Generalized Dixon chemical shift–based water-fat separation methods, such as GE’s iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation method, can result in complex water and fat images. Once separated, the phase change over time of the water s...

  18. NMR experiments for resonance assignments of 13C, 15N doubly-labeled flexible polypeptides: Application to the human prion protein hPrP(23-230)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of three heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR experiments tailored for sequential resonance assignments in uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled flexible polypeptide chains is described. The 3D (H)N(CO-TOCSY)NH, 3D (H)CA(CO-TOCSY)NH and 3D (H)CBCA(CO-TOCSY)NH schemes make use of the favorable 15N chemical shift dispersion in unfolded polypeptides, exploit the slow transverse 15N relaxation rates of unfolded polypeptides in high resolution constant-time [1H, 15N]-correlation experiments, and use carbonyl carbon homonuclear isotropic mixing to transfer magnetization sequentially along the amino acid sequence. Practical applications are demonstrated with the 100-residue flexible tail of the recombinant human prion protein, making use of spectral resolution up to 0.6 Hz in the 15N dimension, simultaneous correlation with the two adjacent amino acid residues to overcome problems associated with spectral overlap, and the potential of the presently described experiments to establish nearest-neighbor correlations across proline residues in the amino acid sequence

  19. Secondary structural analysis of proteins based on 13C chemical shift assignments in unresolved solid-state NMR spectra enhanced by fragmented structure database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magic-angle-spinning solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy is useful for structural analysis of non-crystalline proteins. However, the signal assignments and structural analysis are often hampered by the signal overlaps primarily due to minor structural heterogeneities, especially for uniformly-13C,15N labeled samples. To overcome this problem, we present a method for assigning 13C chemical shifts and secondary structures from unresolved two-dimensional 13C–13C MAS NMR spectra by spectral fitting, named reconstruction of spectra using protein local structures (RESPLS). The spectral fitting was conducted using databases of protein fragmented structures related to 13Cα, 13Cβ, and 13C′ chemical shifts and cross-peak intensities. The experimental 13C–13C inter- and intra-residue correlation spectra of uniformly isotope-labeled ubiquitin in the lyophilized state had a few broad peaks. The fitting analysis for these spectra provided sequence-specific Cα, Cβ, and C′ chemical shifts with an accuracy of about 1.5 ppm, which enabled the assignment of the secondary structures with an accuracy of 79 %. The structural heterogeneity of the lyophilized ubiquitin is revealed from the results. Test of RESPLS analysis for simulated spectra of five different types of proteins indicated that the method allowed the secondary structure determination with accuracy of about 80 % for the 50–200 residue proteins. These results demonstrate that the RESPLS approach expands the applicability of the NMR to non-crystalline proteins exhibiting unresolved 13C NMR spectra, such as lyophilized proteins, amyloids, membrane proteins and proteins in living cells.

  20. Identifying Stereoisomers by ab-initio Calculation of Secondary Isotope Shifts on NMR Chemical Shieldings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Heinz Böhm

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We present ab-initio calculations of secondary isotope effects on NMR chemical shieldings. The change of the NMR chemical shift of a certain nucleus that is observed if another nucleus is replaced by a different isotope can be calculated by computing vibrational corrections on the NMR parameters using electronic structure methods. We demonstrate that the accuracy of the computational results is sufficient to even distinguish different conformers. For this purpose, benchmark calculations for fluoro(2-2Hethane in gauche and antiperiplanar conformation are carried out at the HF, MP2 and CCSD(T level of theory using basis sets ranging from double- to quadruple-zeta quality. The methodology is applied to the secondary isotope shifts for 2-fluoronorbornane in order to resolve an ambiguity in the literature on the assignment of endo- and exo-2-fluoronorbornanes with deuterium substituents in endo-3 and exo-3 positions, also yielding insight into mechanistic details of the corresponding synthesis.

  1. Protein backbone and sidechain torsion angles predicted from NMR chemical shifts using artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A new program, TALOS-N, is introduced for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts. The program relies far more extensively on the use of trained artificial neural networks than its predecessor, TALOS+. Validation on an independent set of proteins indicates that backbone torsion angles can be predicted for a larger, {>=}90 % fraction of the residues, with an error rate smaller than ca 3.5 %, using an acceptance criterion that is nearly two-fold tighter than that used previously, and a root mean square difference between predicted and crystallographically observed ({phi}, {psi}) torsion angles of ca 12 Masculine-Ordinal-Indicator . TALOS-N also reports sidechain {chi}{sup 1} rotameric states for about 50 % of the residues, and a consistency with reference structures of 89 %. The program includes a neural network trained to identify secondary structure from residue sequence and chemical shifts.

  2. First-principles calculation of core-level binding energy shift in surface chemical processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Combined with third generation synchrotron radiation light sources, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with higher energy resolution, brilliance, enhanced surface sensitivity and photoemission cross section in real time found extensive applications in solid-gas interface chemistry. This paper reports the calculation of the core-level binding energy shifts (CLS) using the first-principles density functional theory. The interplay between the CLS calculations and XPS measurements to uncover the structures, adsorption sites and chemical reactions in complex surface chemical processes are highlight. Its application on clean low index (111) and vicinal transition metal surfaces, molecular adsorption in terms of sites and configuration, and reaction kinetics are domonstrated.

  3. Relationship between electrophilicity index, Hammett constant and nucleus-independent chemical shift

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Elango; R Parthasarathi; G Karthik Narayanan; A Md Sabeelullah; U Sarkar; N S Venkatasubramaniyan; V Subramanian; P K Chattaraj

    2005-01-01

    Inter-relationships between the electrophilicity index (), Hammett constant (ó) and nucleusindependent chemical shift (NICS (1) - NICS value one å ngstrom above the ring centre) have been investigated for a series of meta- and para-substituted benzoic acids. Good linear relationships between Hammett constant vs electrophilicity and Hammett constant vs NICS (1) values have been observed. However, the variation of NICS (1) against shows only a low correlation coefficient.

  4. Using Neural Networks for 13C NMR Chemical Shift Prediction-Comparison with Traditional Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiler, Jens; Maier, Walter; Will, Martin; Meusinger, Reinhard

    2002-08-01

    Interpretation of 13C chemical shifts is essential for structure elucidation of organic molecules by NMR. In this article, we present an improved neural network approach and compare its performance to that of commonly used approaches. Specifically, our recently proposed neural network ( J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci. 2000, 40, 1169-1176) is improved by introducing an extended hybrid numerical description of the carbon atom environment, resulting in a standard deviation (std. dev.) of 2.4 ppm for an independent test data set of ˜42,500 carbons. Thus, this neural network allows fast and accurate 13C NMR chemical shift prediction without the necessity of access to molecule or fragment databases. For an unbiased test dataset containing 100 organic structures the accuracy of the improved neural network was compared to that of a prediction method based on the HOSE code ( hierarchically ordered spherical description of environment) using S PECI NFO. The results show the neural network predictions to be of quality (std. dev.=2.7 ppm) comparable to that of the HOSE code prediction (std. dev.=2.6 ppm). Further we compare the neural network predictions to those of a wide variety of other 13C chemical shift prediction tools including incremental methods (C HEMD RAW, S PECT OOL), quantum chemical calculation (G AUSSIAN, C OSMOS), and HOSE code fragment-based prediction (S PECI NFO, ACD/CNMR, P REDICTI T NMR) for the 47 13C-NMR shifts of Taxol, a natural product including many structural features of organic substances. The smallest standard deviations were achieved here with the neural network (1.3 ppm) and S PECI NFO (1.0 ppm).

  5. Fragment-Based Electronic Structure Approach for Computing Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shifts in Molecular Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Joshua D; Beran, Gregory J O

    2014-11-11

    First-principles chemical shielding tensor predictions play a critical role in studying molecular crystal structures using nuclear magnetic resonance. Fragment-based electronic structure methods have dramatically improved the ability to model molecular crystal structures and energetics using high-level electronic structure methods. Here, a many-body expansion fragment approach is applied to the calculation of chemical shielding tensors in molecular crystals. First, the impact of truncating the many-body expansion at different orders and the role of electrostatic embedding are examined on a series of molecular clusters extracted from molecular crystals. Second, the ability of these techniques to assign three polymorphic forms of the drug sulfanilamide to the corresponding experimental (13)C spectra is assessed. This challenging example requires discriminating among spectra whose (13)C chemical shifts differ by only a few parts per million (ppm) across the different polymorphs. Fragment-based PBE0/6-311+G(2d,p) level chemical shielding predictions correctly assign these three polymorphs and reproduce the sulfanilamide experimental (13)C chemical shifts with 1 ppm accuracy. The results demonstrate that fragment approaches are competitive with the widely used gauge-invariant projector augmented wave (GIPAW) periodic density functional theory calculations. PMID:26584373

  6. Substituent effects in the 13C NMR chemical shifts of alpha-mono-substituted acetonitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Adriana K C A; Rittner, Roberto

    2007-03-01

    13C chemical shifts empirical calculations, through a very simple additivity relationship, for the alpha-methylene carbon of some alpha-mono-substituted acetonitriles, Y-CH(2)-CN (Y=H, F, Cl, Br, I, OMe, OEt, SMe, SEt, NMe(2), NEt(2), Me and Et), lead to similar, or even better, results in comparison to the reported values obtained through Quantum Mechanics methods. The observed deviations, for some substituents, are very similar for both approaches. This divergence between experimental and calculated, either empirically or theoretically, values are smaller than for the corresponding acetones, amides, acetic acids and methyl esters, which had been named non-additivity effects (or intramolecular interaction chemical shifts, ICS) and attributed to some orbital interactions. Here, these orbital interactions do not seem to be the main reason for the non-additivity effects in the empirical calculations, which must be due solely to the magnetic anisotropy of the heavy atom present in the substituent. These deviations, which were also observed in the theoretical calculations, were attributed in that case to the non-inclusion of relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling in the Hamiltonian. Some divergence is also observed for the cyano carbon chemical shifts, probably due to the same reasons.

  7. 15N-labed glycine synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Claudinéia R. O. Tavares; José A. Bendassolli; Fernando Coelho; Carlos R. Sant Ana Filho; Clelber V. Prestes

    2006-01-01

    This work describes a method for 15N-isotope-labeled glycine synthesis, as well as details about a recovery line for nitrogen residues. To that effect, amination of alpha-haloacids was performed, using carboxylic chloroacetic acid and labeled aqueous ammonia (15NH3). Special care was taken to avoid possible 15NH3 losses, since its production cost is high. In that respect, although the purchase cost of the 13N-labeled compound (radioactive) is lower, the stable tracer produced constitutes an i...

  8. Using a macroalgal δ15N bioassay to detect cruise ship waste water effluent inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Green macroalgae exposed to nutrient solutions exhibited changes in tissue 15N signatures. → Macroalgae exhibited no fractionation with NO3 and slight fractionation with NH4. → Algae exposed to cruise ship waste water had increased tissue δ15N indicating a heavy N source. → Field bioassays exhibited decreased δ15N indicating isotopically light riverine δ15N-NO3 was likely the dominant N source. → Algal bioassays could not detect a δ15N cruise ship waste water signal in this system. - Abstract: Green macroalgae bioassays were used to determine if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in a small harbor. Opportunistic green macroalgae (Ulva spp.) were collected, cultured under nutrient depleted conditions and characterized with regard to N content and δ15N. Samples of algae were used in controlled incubations to evaluate the direction of isotope shift from exposure to CSWWE. Algae samples exposed to CSWWE exhibited an increase of 1-2.5 per mille in δ15N values indicating that the CSWWE had an enriched isotope signature. In contrast, algae samples exposed to field conditions exhibited a significant decrease in the observed δ15N indicating that a light N source was used. Isotopically light, riverine nitrogen derived from N2-fixing trees in the watershed may be a N source utilized by algae. These experiments indicate that the δ15N CSWWE signature was not detectable under the CSWWE loading conditions of this experiment.

  9. DFT calculations of 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts in transition metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rosal, I; Maron, L; Poteau, R; Jolibois, F

    2008-08-14

    Transition metal hydrides are of great interest in chemistry because of their reactivity and their potential use as catalysts for hydrogenation. Among other available techniques, structural properties in transition metal (TM) complexes are often probed by NMR spectroscopy. In this paper we will show that it is possible to establish a viable methodological strategy in the context of density functional theory, that allows the determination of 1H NMR chemical shifts of hydride ligands attached to transition metal atoms in mononuclear systems and clusters with good accuracy with respect to experiment. 13C chemical shifts have also been considered in some cases. We have studied mononuclear ruthenium complexes such as Ru(L)(H)(dppm)2 with L = H or Cl, cationic complex [Ru(H)(H2O)(dppm)2]+ and Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2, in which hydride ligands are characterized by a negative 1H NMR chemical shift. For these complexes all calculations are in relatively good agreement compared to experimental data with errors not exceeding 20% except for the hydrogen atom in Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2. For this last complex, the relative error increases to 30%, probably owing to the necessity to take into account dynamical effects of phenyl groups. Carbonyl ligands are often encountered in coordination chemistry. Specific issues arise when calculating 1H or 13C NMR chemical shifts in TM carbonyl complexes. Indeed, while errors of 10 to 20% with respect to experiment are often considered good in the framework of density functional theory, this difference in the case of mononuclear carbonyl complexes culminates to 80%: results obtained with all-electron calculations are overall in very satisfactory agreement with experiment, the error in this case does not exceed 11% contrary to effective core potentials (ECPs) calculations which yield errors always larger than 20%. We conclude that for carbonyl groups the use of ECPs is not recommended, although their use could save time for very large systems, for

  10. Overall structure and sugar dynamics of a DNA dodecamer from homo- and heteronuclear dipolar couplings and 31P chemical shift anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solution structure of d(CGCGAATTCGCG)2 has been determined on the basis of an exceptionally large set of residual dipolar couplings. In addition to the heteronuclear 13C-1H and 15N-1H and qualitative homonuclear 1H-1H dipolar couplings, previously measured in bicelle medium, more than 300 quantitative 1H-1H and 22 31P-1H dipolar restraints were obtained in liquid crystalline Pf1 medium, and 22 31P chemical shift anisotropy restraints. High quality DNA structures can be obtained solely on the basis of these new restraints, and these structures are in close agreement with those calculated previously on the basis of 13C-1H and 15N-1H dipolar couplings. In the newly calculated structures, 31P-1H dipolar and 3JsubH3'Psub couplings and 31P CSA data restrain the phosphodiester backbone torsion angles. The final structure represents a quite regular B-form helix with a modest bending of ∼10 deg., which is essentially independent of whether or not electrostatic terms are used in the calculation. Combined, the number of homo- and heteronuclear dipolar couplings significantly exceeds the number of degrees of freedom in the system. Results indicate that the dipolar coupling data cannot be fit by a single structure, but are compatible with the presence of rapid equilibria between C2'-endo and C3'-endo deoxyribose puckers (sugar switching). The C2'-H2'/H2'' dipolar couplings in B-form DNA are particularly sensitive to sugar pucker and yield the largest discrepancies when fit to a single structure. To resolve these discrepancies, we suggest a simplified dipolar coupling analysis that yields N/S equilibria for the ribose sugar puckers, which are in good agreement with previous analyses of NMR JHH couplings, with a population of the minor C3'-endo form higher for pyrimidines than for purines

  11. NMR Chemical Shift Ranges of Urine Metabolites in Various Organic Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görling, Benjamin; Bräse, Stefan; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Signal stability is essential for reliable multivariate data analysis. Urine samples show strong variance in signal positions due to inter patient differences. Here we study the exchange of the solvent of a defined urine matrix and how it affects signal and integral stability of the urinary metabolites by NMR spectroscopy. The exchange solvents were methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, and dimethyl formamide. Some of these solvents showed promising results with a single batch of urine. To evaluate further differences between urine samples, various acid, base, and salt solutions were added in a defined way mimicking to some extent inter human differences. Corresponding chemical shift changes were monitored. PMID:27598217

  12. Parameter-free calculation of K alpha chemical shifts for Al, Si, and Ge oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2001-01-01

    The chemical shifts of the K alpha radiation line from Al, Si, and Ge ions between their elemental and oxide forms are calculated within the framework of density functional theory using ultrasoft pseudopotentials. It is demonstrated that this theoretical approach yields quantitatively accurate...... results fur the systems investigated, provided that relaxations of the valence electrons upon the core-hole transition are properly accounted for. Therefore, such calculations provide a powerful tool for identification of impurity states based on x-ray fluorescence data. Results for an Al impurity...

  13. Model analysis of influences of the high-temperature reactor on location shifting in chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis is presented of the influences of High-Temperature Reactor on probable location shifting of big chemical plants, in the future. This is done by a spatial location model, that includes an investigation on 116 industrial locations within the first six countries of Common Market. The results of a computerized program show differences in location qualities when furnished either with traditional or with nuclear energy systems. In addition to location factor energy some other important factors, as subventions, taxes, labour, and transport costs are analysed, and their influence on industrial location is quantified. (orig.)

  14. Calculation of NMR chemical shifts. 7. Gauge-invariant INDO method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, H.; Miura, K.; Hirai, A.

    A gauge-invariant INDO method based on the coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory is presented and applied to the calculation of 1H and 13C chemical shifts of hydrocarbons including ring compounds. Invariance of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic shieldings with respect to displacement of the coordinate origin is discussed. Comparison between calculated and experimental results exhibits fairly good agreement, provided that the INDO parameters of Ellis et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.94, 4069 (1972)) are used with the inclusion of all multicenter one-electron integrals.

  15. NMR Chemical Shift Ranges of Urine Metabolites in Various Organic Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Görling

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Signal stability is essential for reliable multivariate data analysis. Urine samples show strong variance in signal positions due to inter patient differences. Here we study the exchange of the solvent of a defined urine matrix and how it affects signal and integral stability of the urinary metabolites by NMR spectroscopy. The exchange solvents were methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, and dimethyl formamide. Some of these solvents showed promising results with a single batch of urine. To evaluate further differences between urine samples, various acid, base, and salt solutions were added in a defined way mimicking to some extent inter human differences. Corresponding chemical shift changes were monitored.

  16. NMR Chemical Shift Ranges of Urine Metabolites in Various Organic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görling, Benjamin; Bräse, Stefan; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Signal stability is essential for reliable multivariate data analysis. Urine samples show strong variance in signal positions due to inter patient differences. Here we study the exchange of the solvent of a defined urine matrix and how it affects signal and integral stability of the urinary metabolites by NMR spectroscopy. The exchange solvents were methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, and dimethyl formamide. Some of these solvents showed promising results with a single batch of urine. To evaluate further differences between urine samples, various acid, base, and salt solutions were added in a defined way mimicking to some extent inter human differences. Corresponding chemical shift changes were monitored. PMID:27598217

  17. Three model space experiments on chemical reactions. [Gibbs adsorption, equilibrium shift and electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzka, P.; Facemire, B.

    1977-01-01

    Three investigations conducted aboard Skylab IV and Apollo-Soyuz involved phenomena that are of interest to the biochemistry community. The formaldehyde clock reaction and the equilibrium shift reaction experiments conducted aboard Apollo Soyuz demonstrate the effect of low-g foams or air/liquid dispersions on reaction rate and chemical equilibrium. The electrodeposition reaction experiment conducted aboard Skylab IV demonstrate the effect of a low-g environment on an electrochemical displacement reaction. The implications of the three space experiments for various applications are considered.

  18. Change of 15N natural abundance (δ15N) in a forest soil receiving elevated N deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural abundance of 15N15N) has been used to interpret N mineralization in forest ecosystems. Forest litter typically has depleted δ15N values ranging from -8 to 0 per mille and δ15N values of organic N in forest soil profiles become more enriched with depth. This study investigated (1) the change of δ15N and total N with depth, and (2) the relation between the change of δ15N within the 0 to 10, 10 to 20 and 20 to 30 cm intervals of the mineral layer and the N mineralization rates in these layers

  19. Predicting Pt-195 NMR chemical shift using new relativistic all-electron basis set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal, D; Guerra, C Fonseca; de Oliveira, M A L; Ramalho, T C; Dos Santos, H F

    2016-10-01

    Predicting NMR properties is a valuable tool to assist the experimentalists in the characterization of molecular structure. For heavy metals, such as Pt-195, only a few computational protocols are available. In the present contribution, all-electron Gaussian basis sets, suitable to calculate the Pt-195 NMR chemical shift, are presented for Pt and all elements commonly found as Pt-ligands. The new basis sets identified as NMR-DKH were partially contracted as a triple-zeta doubly polarized scheme with all coefficients obtained from a Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) second-order scalar relativistic calculation. The Pt-195 chemical shift was predicted through empirical models fitted to reproduce experimental data for a set of 183 Pt(II) complexes which NMR sign ranges from -1000 to -6000 ppm. Furthermore, the models were validated using a new set of 75 Pt(II) complexes, not included in the descriptive set. The models were constructed using non-relativistic Hamiltonian at density functional theory (DFT-PBEPBE) level with NMR-DKH basis set for all atoms. For the best model, the mean absolute deviation (MAD) and the mean relative deviation (MRD) were 150 ppm and 6%, respectively, for the validation set (75 Pt-complexes) and 168 ppm (MAD) and 5% (MRD) for all 258 Pt(II) complexes. These results were comparable with relativistic DFT calculation, 200 ppm (MAD) and 6% (MRD). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The 15N-enrichment in dark clouds and Solar System objects

    CERN Document Server

    Hily-Blant, Pierre; Faure, Alexandre; Quirico, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The line intensities of the fundamental rotational transitions of H13CN and HC15N were observed towards two prestellar cores, L183 and L1544, and lead to molecular isotopic ratios 140 6 14N/15N 6 250 and 140 6 14N/15N 6 360, respectively. The range of values reflect genuine spatial variations within the cores. A comprehensive analysis of the available measurements of the nitrogen isotopic ratio in prestellar cores show that molecules carrying the nitrile functional group appear to be systematically 15N-enriched com- pared to those carrying the amine functional group. A chemical origin for the differential 15N-enhance- ment between nitrile- and amine-bearing interstellar molecules is proposed. This sheds new light on several observations of Solar System objects: (i) the similar N isotopic fractionation in Jupiter's NH3 and solar wind N+; (ii) the 15N-enrichments in cometary HCN and CN (that might represent a direct inter- stellar inheritance); and (iii) 15N-enrichments observed in organics in primitive cosmoma...

  1. The interplay between transient a-helix formation and side chain rotamer distributions in disordered proteins probed by methyl chemical shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Poulsen, Flemming M

    2011-01-01

    of ¿-gauche effect. To overcome this, we reference the chemical shifts to those in a more disordered state resulting in residue specific random coil chemical shifts. The (13)C secondary chemical shifts of the methyl groups of valine, leucine, and isoleucine show sequence specific effects, which allow...

  2. Water-fat imaging and general chemical shift imaging with spectrum modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Li

    Water-fat chemical shift imaging (CSI) has been an active research area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since the early 1980's. There are two main reasons for water- fat imaging. First, water-fat imaging can serve as a fat- suppression method. Removing the usually bright fatty signals not only extends the useful dynamic range of an image, but also allows better visualization of lesions or injected contrast, and removes chemical shift artifacts, which may contribute to improved diagnosis. Second, quantification of water and fat provides useful chemical information for characterizing tissues such as bone marrow, liver, and adrenal masses. A milestone in water- fat imaging is the Dixon method that can produce separate water and fat images with only two data acquisitions. In practice, however, the Dixon method is not always successful due to field inhomogeneity problems. In recent years, many variations of the Dixon method have been proposed to overcome the field inhomogeneity problem. In general, these methods can at best separate water and fat without identifying the two because the water and fat magnetization vectors are sampled symmetrically, only parallel and anti-parallel. Furthermore, these methods usually depend on two-dimensional phase unwrapping which itself is sensitive to noise and artifacts, and becomes unreliable when the images have disconnected tissues in the field-of-view (FOV). We will first introduce the basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chapter 1, and briefly review the existing water-fat imaging techniques in chapter 2. In chapter 3, we will introduce a new method for water-fat imaging. With three image acquisitions, a general direct phase encoding (DPE) of the chemical shift information is achieved, which allows an unambiguous determination of water and fat on a pixel by pixel basis. Details of specific implementations and noise performance will be discussed. Representative results

  3. Chemical potential shift in organic field-effect transistors identified by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamura, Naoka; Kitada, Yuta; Tsurumi, Junto; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Horiba, Koji; Honma, Itaru; Takeya, Jun; Oshima, Masaharu

    2015-06-01

    A chemical potential shift in an organic field effect transistor (OFET) during operation has been revealed by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy analysis performed using a three-dimensional nanoscale electron-spectroscopy chemical analysis system. OFETs were fabricated using ultrathin (3 ML or 12 nm) single-crystalline C10-DNBDT-NW films on SiO2 (200 nm)/Si substrates with a backgate electrode and top source/drain Au electrodes, and C 1s line profiles under biasing at the backgate and drain electrodes were measured. When applying -30 V to the backgate, there is C 1s core level shift of 0.1 eV; this shift can be attributed to a chemical potential shift corresponding to band bending by the field effect, resulting in p-type doping.

  4. Chemical potential shift in organic field-effect transistors identified by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical potential shift in an organic field effect transistor (OFET) during operation has been revealed by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy analysis performed using a three-dimensional nanoscale electron-spectroscopy chemical analysis system. OFETs were fabricated using ultrathin (3 ML or 12 nm) single-crystalline C10-DNBDT-NW films on SiO2 (200 nm)/Si substrates with a backgate electrode and top source/drain Au electrodes, and C 1s line profiles under biasing at the backgate and drain electrodes were measured. When applying −30 V to the backgate, there is C 1s core level shift of 0.1 eV; this shift can be attributed to a chemical potential shift corresponding to band bending by the field effect, resulting in p-type doping

  5. Chemical potential shift in organic field-effect transistors identified by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamura, Naoka, E-mail: NAGAMURA.Naoka@nims.go.jp; Kitada, Yuta; Honma, Itaru [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Tsurumi, Junto; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Horiba, Koji [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Oshima, Masaharu [Synchrotron Radiation Research Organization, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2015-06-22

    A chemical potential shift in an organic field effect transistor (OFET) during operation has been revealed by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy analysis performed using a three-dimensional nanoscale electron-spectroscopy chemical analysis system. OFETs were fabricated using ultrathin (3 ML or 12 nm) single-crystalline C10-DNBDT-NW films on SiO{sub 2} (200 nm)/Si substrates with a backgate electrode and top source/drain Au electrodes, and C 1s line profiles under biasing at the backgate and drain electrodes were measured. When applying −30 V to the backgate, there is C 1s core level shift of 0.1 eV; this shift can be attributed to a chemical potential shift corresponding to band bending by the field effect, resulting in p-type doping.

  6. Soil N and 15N variation with time in a California annual grassland ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, D.L.; Amundson, Ronald; Baisden, W. Troy; Kendall, C.; Harden, J.

    2001-01-01

    The %N and ??15N values of soils and plants were measured along a chronosequence spanning 3 to 3000 Ky in a California annual grassland. Total soil N decreased with increasing soil age (1.1 to 0.4 kg N m-2) while the mean ?? 15N values of the soil N increased by several ??? from the youngest to oldest sites (+3.5 to +6.2 ???). The ?? 15N values of plants varied along the gradient, reflecting changing soil N pools and differences in the form of N uptake. The decline in total N storage with time is hypothesized to be due to a shift from N to P limitation with increasing soil age. The general increase in ?? 15N values with time is interpreted using a N mass balance model, and appears to reflect a shift toward an increasing proportional losses of inorganic mineral forms of N (vs. organic forms) with increasing soil age. We develop a quantitative index of this trend (mineral vs. organic forms of N loss) using mass balance considerations and parameters. The %N and ?? 15N values along the California age gradient were compared to the published data for a comparably aged chronosequence in Hawaii. Most striking in this comparison is the observation that the California soil and plant ?? 15N values are several ??? greater than those on comparably aged Hawaiian sites. Multiple explanations are plausible, but assuming the sites have a similar range in ?? 15N values of atmospheric inputs, the isotopic differences suggest that N may be, at least seasonally, in greater excess in the strongly seasonal, semi-arid, California grassland. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  7. Oligomeric complexes of some heteroaromatic ligands and aromatic diamines with rhodium and molybdenum tetracarboxylates: 13C and 15N CPMAS NMR and density functional theory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Kamieński, Bohdan; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-05-01

    Seven new oligomeric complexes of 4,4'-bipyridine; 3,3'-bipyridine; benzene-1,4-diamine; benzene-1,3-diamine; benzene-1,2-diamine; and benzidine with rhodium tetraacetate, as well as 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetraacetate, have been obtained and investigated by elemental analysis and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR. The known complexes of pyrazine with rhodium tetrabenzoate, benzoquinone with rhodium tetrapivalate, 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetrakistrifluoroacetate and the 1 : 1 complex of 2,2'-bipyridine with rhodium tetraacetate exhibiting axial-equatorial ligation mode have been obtained as well for comparison purposes. Elemental analysis revealed 1 : 1 complex stoichiometry of all complexes. The (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra of all new complexes consist of one narrow signal, indicating regular uniform structures. Benzidine forms a heterogeneous material, probably containing linear oligomers and products of further reactions. The complexes were characterized by the parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δcomplex  - δligand). This parameter ranged from around -40 to -90 ppm in the case of heteroaromatic ligands, from around -12 to -22 ppm for diamines and from -16 to -31 ppm for the complexes of molybdenum tetracarboxylates with 4,4'-bipyridine. The experimental results have been supported by a density functional theory computation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts and complexation shifts at the non-relativistic Becke, three-parameter, Perdew-Wang 91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] and GGA-PBE/QZ4P levels of theory and at the relativistic scalar and spin-orbit zeroth order regular approximation/GGA-PBE/QZ4P level of theory. Nucleus-independent chemical shifts have been calculated for the selected compounds. PMID:25614975

  8. Reassigning the Structures of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts Computed with Quantum Mechanics: A Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Teresa A.; Truong, Tiana T.; Wong, Shirley M. T.; Mack, Emma T.; Lodewyk, Michael W.; Harrison, Jason G.; Gamage, R. Alan; Siegel, Justin B.; Kurth, Mark J.; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    An applied computational chemistry laboratory exercise is described in which students use modern quantum chemical calculations of chemical shifts to assign the structure of a recently isolated natural product. A pre/post assessment was used to measure student learning gains and verify that students demonstrated proficiency of key learning…

  9. Visualizing the principal component of {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N-HSQC NMR spectral changes that reflect protein structural or functional properties: application to troponin C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Ian M.; Boyko, Robert F.; Sykes, Brian D., E-mail: brian.sykes@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Laboratories often repeatedly determine the structure of a given protein under a variety of conditions, mutations, modifications, or in a number of states. This approach can be cumbersome and tedious. Given then a database of structures, identifiers, and corresponding {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N-HSQC NMR spectra for homologous proteins, we investigated whether structural information could be ascertained for a new homolog solely from its {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N-HSQC NMR spectrum. We addressed this question with two different approaches. First, we used a semi-automated approach with the program, ORBplus. ORBplus looks for patterns in the chemical shifts and correlates these commonalities to the explicit property of interest. ORBplus ranks resonances based on consistency of the magnitude and direction of the chemical shifts within the database, and the chemical shift correlation of the unknown protein with the database. ORBplus visualizes the results by a histogram and a vector diagram, and provides residue specific predictions on structural similarities with the database. The second method we used was partial least squares (PLS), which is a multivariate statistical technique used to correlate response and predictor variables. We investigated the ability of these methods to predict the tertiary structure of the contractile regulatory protein troponin C. Troponin C undergoes a closed-to-open conformational change, which is coupled to its function in muscle. We found that both ORBplus and PLS were able to identify patterns in the {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N-HSQC NMR data from different states of troponin C that correlated to its conformation.

  10. Improving the chemical shift dispersion of multidimensional NMR spectra of intrinsically disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermel, Wolfgang [Bruker BioSpin GmbH (Germany); Bruix, Marta [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Instituto de Quimica Fisica ' ' Rocasolano' ' (Spain); Felli, Isabella C., E-mail: felli@cerm.unifi.it [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry ' Ugo Shiff' (Italy); Kumar, M.V. Vasantha [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (Italy); Pierattelli, Roberta, E-mail: pierattelli@cerm.unifi.it [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry ' Ugo Shiff' (Italy); Serrano, Soraya [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Instituto de Quimica Fisica ' ' Rocasolano' ' (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) have recently attracted the attention of the scientific community challenging the well accepted structure-function paradigm. In the characterization of the dynamic features of proteins nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) is a strategic tool of investigation. However the peculiar properties of IDPs, with the lack of a unique 3D structure and their high flexibility, have a strong impact on NMR observables (low chemical shift dispersion, efficient solvent exchange broadening) and thus on the quality of NMR spectra. Key aspects to be considered in the design of new NMR experiments optimized for the study of IDPs are discussed. A new experiment, based on direct detection of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, is proposed.

  11. Study of wavelength-shifting chemicals for use in large-scale water Cherenkov detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherenkov detectors employ various methods to maximize light collection at the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). These generally involve the use of highly reflective materials lining the interior of the detector, reflective materials around the PMTs, or wavelength-shifting sheets around the PMTs. Recently, the use of water-soluble wavelength-shifters has been explored to increase the measurable light yield of Cherenkov radiation in water. These wave-shifting chemicals are capable of absorbing light in the ultraviolet and re-emitting the light in a range detectable by PMTs. Using a 250 L water Cherenkov detector, we have characterized the increase in light yield from three compounds in water: 4-Methylumbelliferone, Carbostyril-124, and Amino-G Salt. We report the gain in PMT response at a concentration of 1 ppm as 1.88±0.02 for 4-Methylumbelliferone, stable within 0.5% over 50 days, 1.37±0.03 for Carbostyril-124, and 1.20±0.02 for Amino-G Salt. The response of 4-Methylumbelliferone was modeled, resulting in a simulated gain within 9% of the experimental gain at 1 ppm concentration. Finally, we report an increase in neutron detection performance of a large-scale (3.5 kL) gadolinium-doped water Cherenkov detector at a 4-Methylumbelliferone concentration of 1 ppm.

  12. Study of wavelength-shifting chemicals for use in large-scale water Cherenkov detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweany, M; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Dunmore, J; Felde, J; Svoboda, R; Tripathi, S M

    2011-09-21

    Cherenkov detectors employ various methods to maximize light collection at the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). These generally involve the use of highly reflective materials lining the interior of the detector, reflective materials around the PMTs, or wavelength-shifting sheets around the PMTs. Recently, the use of water-soluble wavelength-shifters has been explored to increase the measurable light yield of Cherenkov radiation in water. These wave-shifting chemicals are capable of absorbing light in the ultravoilet and re-emitting the light in a range detectable by PMTs. Using a 250 L water Cherenkov detector, we have characterized the increase in light yield from three compounds in water: 4-Methylumbelliferone, Carbostyril-124, and Amino-G Salt. We report the gain in PMT response at a concentration of 1 ppm as: 1.88 {+-} 0.02 for 4-Methylumbelliferone, stable to within 0.5% over 50 days, 1.37 {+-} 0.03 for Carbostyril-124, and 1.20 {+-} 0.02 for Amino-G Salt. The response of 4-Methylumbelliferone was modeled, resulting in a simulated gain within 9% of the experimental gain at 1 ppm concentration. Finally, we report an increase in neutron detection performance of a large-scale (3.5 kL) gadolinium-doped water Cherenkov detector at a 4-Methylumbelliferone concentration of 1 ppm.

  13. Study of wavelength-shifting chemicals for use in large-scale water Cherenkov detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sweany, M; Dazeley, S; Dunmore, J; Felde, J; Svoboda, R; Tripathi, M

    2011-01-01

    Cherenkov detectors employ various methods to maximize light collection at the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). These generally involve the use of highly reflective materials lining the interior of the detector, reflective materials around the PMTs, or wavelength-shifting sheets around the PMTs. Recently, the use of water-soluble wavelength-shifters has been explored to increase the measurable light yield of Cherenkov radiation in water. These wave-shifting chemicals are capable of absorbing light in the ultravoilet and re-emitting the light in a range detectable by PMTs. Using a 250 L water Cherenkov detector, we have characterized the increase in light yield from three compounds in water: 4-Methylumbelliferone, Carbostyril-124, and Amino-G Salt. We report the gain in PMT response at a concentration of 1 ppm as: 1.88 $\\pm$ 0.02 for 4-Methylumbelliferone, stable to within 0.5% over 50 days, 1.37 $\\pm$ 0.03 for Carbostyril-124, and 1.20 $\\pm$ 0.02 for Amino-G Salt. The response of 4-Methylumbelliferone was modele...

  14. Nitrogen cycling in an extreme hyperarid environment inferred from δ15N analyses of plants, soils and herbivore diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Francisca P.; Frugone, Matías; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A.; Latorre, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Climate controls on the nitrogen cycle are suggested by the negative correlation between precipitation and δ15N values across different ecosystems. For arid ecosystems this is unclear, as water limitation among other factors can confound this relationship. We measured herbivore feces, foliar and soil δ15N and δ13C values and chemically characterized soils (pH and elemental composition) along an elevational/climatic gradient in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Although very positive δ15N values span the entire gradient, soil δ15N values show a positive correlation with aridity as expected. In contrast, foliar δ15N values and herbivore feces show a hump-shaped relationship with elevation, suggesting that plants are using a different N source, possibly of biotic origin. Thus at the extreme limits of plant life, biotic interactions may be just as important as abiotic processes, such as climate in explaining ecosystem δ15N values.

  15. Nitrogen cycling in an extreme hyperarid environment inferred from δ(15)N analyses of plants, soils and herbivore diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Francisca P; Frugone, Matías; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A; Latorre, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Climate controls on the nitrogen cycle are suggested by the negative correlation between precipitation and δ(15)N values across different ecosystems. For arid ecosystems this is unclear, as water limitation among other factors can confound this relationship. We measured herbivore feces, foliar and soil δ(15)N and δ(13)C values and chemically characterized soils (pH and elemental composition) along an elevational/climatic gradient in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Although very positive δ(15)N values span the entire gradient, soil δ(15)N values show a positive correlation with aridity as expected. In contrast, foliar δ(15)N values and herbivore feces show a hump-shaped relationship with elevation, suggesting that plants are using a different N source, possibly of biotic origin. Thus at the extreme limits of plant life, biotic interactions may be just as important as abiotic processes, such as climate in explaining ecosystem δ(15)N values. PMID:26956399

  16. Sequence-specific 1H, 13C and 15N backbone resonance assignments of the plakin repeat domain of human envoplakin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeeves, Mark; Fogl, Claudia; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Chidgey, Martyn; Overduin, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The plakin repeat domain is a distinctive hallmark of the plakin superfamily of proteins, which are found within all epithelial tissues. Plakin repeat domains mediate the interactions of these proteins with the cell cytoskeleton and are critical for the maintenance of tissue integrity. Despite their biological importance, no solution state resonance assignments are available for any homologue. Here we report the essentially complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone chemical shift assignments of the singular 22 kDa plakin repeat domain of human envoplakin, providing the means to investigate its interactions with ligands including intermediate filaments. PMID:26590577

  17. The C$^{14}$N/C$^{15}$N Ratio in Diffuse Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ritchey, Adam M; Lambert, David L

    2015-01-01

    We report the first detection of C$^{15}$N in diffuse molecular gas from a detailed examination of CN absorption lines in archival VLT/UVES spectra of stars probing local diffuse clouds. Absorption from the C$^{15}$N isotopologue is confidently detected (at $\\gtrsim4\\sigma$) in three out of the four directions studied and appears as a very weak feature between the main $^{12}$CN and $^{13}$CN absorption components. Column densities for each CN isotopologue are determined through profile fitting, after accounting for weak additional line-of-sight components of $^{12}$CN, which are seen in the absorption profiles of CH and CH$^+$ as well. The weighted mean value of C$^{14}$N/C$^{15}$N for the three sight lines with detections of C$^{15}$N is $274\\pm18$. Since the diffuse molecular clouds toward our target stars have relatively high gas kinetic temperatures and relatively low visual extinctions, their C$^{14}$N/C$^{15}$N ratios should not be affected by chemical fractionation. The mean C$^{14}$N/C$^{15}$N ratio ...

  18. Fragment-based 13C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals: An alternative to planewave methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We assess the quality of fragment-based ab initio isotropic 13C chemical shift predictions for a collection of 25 molecular crystals with eight different density functionals. We explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, combined cluster/fragment, and the planewave gauge-including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) models relative to experiment. When electrostatic embedding is employed to capture many-body polarization effects, the simple and computationally inexpensive two-body fragment model predicts both isotropic 13C chemical shifts and the chemical shielding tensors as well as both cluster models and the GIPAW approach. Unlike the GIPAW approach, hybrid density functionals can be used readily in a fragment model, and all four hybrid functionals tested here (PBE0, B3LYP, B3PW91, and B97-2) predict chemical shifts in noticeably better agreement with experiment than the four generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals considered (PBE, OPBE, BLYP, and BP86). A set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided based on these benchmark calculations. Statistical cross-validation procedures are used to demonstrate the robustness of these fits

  19. Attainable entanglement of unitary transformed thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with the chemical shift

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, Y; Ohba, I; Yoshida, N; Mikami, Shuji; Ohba, Ichiro; Ota, Yukihiro; Yoshida, Noriyuki

    2006-01-01

    Recently, Yu, Brown, and Chuang [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 71}, 032341 (2005)] investigated the entanglement attainable from unitary transformed thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Their research gave an insight into the role of the entanglement in a liquid-state NMR quantum computer. Moreover, they attempted to reveal the role of mixed-state entanglement in quantum computing. However, they assumed that the Zeeman energy of each nuclear spin which corresponds to a qubit takes a common value for all; there is no chemical shift. In this paper, we research a model with the chemical shifts and analytically derive the physical parameter region where unitary transformed thermal states are entangled, by the positive partial transposition (PPT) criterion with respect to any bipartition. We examine the effect of the chemical shifts on the boundary between the separability and the nonseparability, and find it is negligible.

  20. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.A. [Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  1. Origin of the conformational modulation of the 13C NMR chemical shift of methoxy groups in aromatic natural compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toušek, Jaromír; Straka, Michal; Sklenář, Vladimír; Marek, Radek

    2013-01-24

    The interpretation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters is essential to understanding experimental observations at the molecular and supramolecular levels and to designing new and more efficient molecular probes. In many aromatic natural compounds, unusual (13)C NMR chemical shifts have been reported for out-of-plane methoxy groups bonded to the aromatic ring (~62 ppm as compared to the typical value of ~56 ppm for an aromatic methoxy group). Here, we analyzed this phenomenon for a series of aromatic natural compounds using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. First, we checked the methodology used to optimize the structure and calculate the NMR chemical shifts in aromatic compounds. The conformational effects of the methoxy group on the (13)C NMR chemical shift then were interpreted by the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Natural Chemical Shift (NCS) approaches, and by excitation analysis of the chemical shifts, breaking down the total nuclear shielding tensor into the contributions from the different occupied orbitals and their magnetic interactions with virtual orbitals. We discovered that the atypical (13)C NMR chemical shifts observed are not directly related to a different conjugation of the lone pair of electrons of the methoxy oxygen with the aromatic ring, as has been suggested. Our analysis indicates that rotation of the methoxy group induces changes in the virtual molecular orbital space, which, in turn, correlate with the predominant part of the contribution of the paramagnetic deshielding connected with the magnetic interactions of the BD(CMet-H)→BD*(CMet-OMet) orbitals, resulting in the experimentally observed deshielding of the (13)C NMR resonance of the out-of-plane methoxy group.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants and chemical shifts in linear 199Hg compounds: a comparison of three relativistic computational methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Melo, Juan I; Hemmingsen, Lars; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2011-07-28

    We investigate the importance of relativistic effects on NMR shielding constants and chemical shifts of linear HgL(2) (L = Cl, Br, I, CH(3)) compounds using three different relativistic methods: the fully relativistic four-component approach and the two-component approximations, linear response elimination of small component (LR-ESC) and zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA). LR-ESC reproduces successfully the four-component results for the C shielding constant in Hg(CH(3))(2) within 6 ppm, but fails to reproduce the Hg shielding constants and chemical shifts. The latter is mainly due to an underestimation of the change in spin-orbit contribution. Even though ZORA underestimates the absolute Hg NMR shielding constants by ∼2100 ppm, the differences between Hg chemical shift values obtained using ZORA and the four-component approach without spin-density contribution to the exchange-correlation (XC) kernel are less than 60 ppm for all compounds using three different functionals, BP86, B3LYP, and PBE0. However, larger deviations (up to 366 ppm) occur for Hg chemical shifts in HgBr(2) and HgI(2) when ZORA results are compared with four-component calculations with non-collinear spin-density contribution to the XC kernel. For the ZORA calculations it is necessary to use large basis sets (QZ4P) and the TZ2P basis set may give errors of ∼500 ppm for the Hg chemical shifts, despite deceivingly good agreement with experimental data. A Gaussian nucleus model for the Coulomb potential reduces the Hg shielding constants by ∼100-500 ppm and the Hg chemical shifts by 1-143 ppm compared to the point nucleus model depending on the atomic number Z of the coordinating atom and the level of theory. The effect on the shielding constants of the lighter nuclei (C, Cl, Br, I) is, however, negligible. PMID:21806118

  3. Accurate determination of order parameters from 1H,15N dipolar couplings in MAS solid-state NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2009-10-01

    A reliable site-specific estimate of the individual N-H bond lengths in the protein backbone is the fundamental basis of any relaxation experiment in solution and in the solid-state NMR. The N-H bond length can in principle be influenced by hydrogen bonding, which would result in an increased N-H distance. At the same time, dynamics in the backbone induces a reduction of the experimental dipolar coupling due to motional averaging. We present a 3D dipolar recoupling experiment in which the (1)H,(15)N dipolar coupling is reintroduced in the indirect dimension using phase-inverted CP to eliminate effects from rf inhomogeneity. We find no variation of the N-H dipolar coupling as a function of hydrogen bonding. Instead, variations in the (1)H,(15)N dipolar coupling seem to be due to dynamics of the protein backbone. This is supported by the observed correlation between the H(N)-N dipolar coupling and the amide proton chemical shift. The experiment is demonstrated for a perdeuterated sample of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain. Perdeuteration is a prerequisite to achieve high accuracy. The average error in the analysis of the H-N dipolar couplings is on the order of +/-370 Hz (+/-0.012 A) and can be as small as 150 Hz, corresponding to a variation of the bond length of +/-0.005 A.

  4. Regional Differences in Muscle Energy Metabolism in Human Muscle by 31P-Chemical Shift Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kime, Ryotaro; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported significant region-dependent differences in the fiber-type composition of human skeletal muscle. It is therefore hypothesized that there is a difference between the deep and superficial parts of muscle energy metabolism during exercise. We hypothesized that the inorganic phosphate (Pi)/phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio of the superficial parts would be higher, compared with the deep parts, as the work rate increases, because the muscle fiber-type composition of the fast-type may be greater in the superficial parts compared with the deep parts. This study used two-dimensional 31Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging (31P-CSI) to detect differences between the deep and superficial parts of the human leg muscles during dynamic knee extension exercise. Six healthy men participated in this study (age 27±1 year, height 169.4±4.1 cm, weight 65.9±8.4 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed dynamic one-legged knee extension exercise in the prone position, with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps muscles in the magnet. The subjects pulled down an elastic rubber band attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 Hz for 320 s each. The intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the Pi peak relative to PCr. No significant difference in Pi/PCr was observed between the deep and the superficial parts of the quadriceps muscles at rest. The Pi/PCr of the superficial parts was not significantly increased with increasing work rate. Compared with the superficial areas, the Pi/PCr of the deep parts was significantly higher (p<0.05) at 1 Hz. The pHi showed no significant difference between the two parts. These results suggest that muscle oxidative metabolism is different between deep and superficial parts of quadriceps muscles during dynamic exercise. PMID:26782194

  5. Regional Differences in Muscle Energy Metabolism in Human Muscle by 31P-Chemical Shift Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kime, Ryotaro; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported significant region-dependent differences in the fiber-type composition of human skeletal muscle. It is therefore hypothesized that there is a difference between the deep and superficial parts of muscle energy metabolism during exercise. We hypothesized that the inorganic phosphate (Pi)/phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio of the superficial parts would be higher, compared with the deep parts, as the work rate increases, because the muscle fiber-type composition of the fast-type may be greater in the superficial parts compared with the deep parts. This study used two-dimensional 31Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging (31P-CSI) to detect differences between the deep and superficial parts of the human leg muscles during dynamic knee extension exercise. Six healthy men participated in this study (age 27±1 year, height 169.4±4.1 cm, weight 65.9±8.4 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed dynamic one-legged knee extension exercise in the prone position, with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps muscles in the magnet. The subjects pulled down an elastic rubber band attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 Hz for 320 s each. The intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the Pi peak relative to PCr. No significant difference in Pi/PCr was observed between the deep and the superficial parts of the quadriceps muscles at rest. The Pi/PCr of the superficial parts was not significantly increased with increasing work rate. Compared with the superficial areas, the Pi/PCr of the deep parts was significantly higher (p<0.05) at 1 Hz. The pHi showed no significant difference between the two parts. These results suggest that muscle oxidative metabolism is different between deep and superficial parts of quadriceps muscles during dynamic exercise.

  6. SUBSTITUENT CHEMICAL SHIFT (SCS) AND THE SEQUENCE STRUCTURE OF ETHYLENE-VINYL ALCOHOL COPOLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zinan; TIAN Wenjing; WU Shengrong; DAI Yingkun; FENG Zhiliu; SHEN Lianfang; YUAN Hanzhen

    1992-01-01

    Three ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers were studied by means of the substituent chemical shift(SCS) method. The SCS parameters of hydroxy (-OH)in two different solvents were obtained: in deuterium oxide/phenol (20/80 W/W ) the parameters are S1 = 42.77 ± 0.08ppm, S2 = 7.15 ±0.06 ppm,S3(s )=-4.08±0.02ppm, S3(t)=-3.09±0.20ppm,S4=0.48±0.03ppm, S5 =0.26±0.05ppm. In o-dichlorobenzen-d4 S1(s)=44.79±0.61ppm, S2=7.40±0.00ppm, S3 (s)=-4.51±0.17ppm, S3 (t)= -3.13± 0.00 ppm, S4 =0 . 63±0.04ppm, S5=0.36±0.00ppm. Simultaneously the 13CNMR spectra of EVA copolymers were assigned by using the SCS parameters obtained.

  7. Multinuclear NMR of 15 N labelled organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the application of multinuclear NMR techniques to the study of 15 N labeled organic molecules. There are some important points of great interest in such type of research, namely, structure determination, i.e. location of the 15 N in molecule and determination of 15 N concentration in order to obtain quantitative results about the intramolecular short and long range interaction. Different NMR techniques were used in the study of 13 C, 1 H and 15 N. Obtaining the 15 N NMR signal imposes some special preparation of the spectrometer. First, we had to manage a very large spectral window (-400 to +1200 ppm) which makes difficult finding the signal. Secondly, in the condition of proton decoupling, in a very large band, a decrease of the signal can occur due to the NOE negative effect. To avoid this effect, other decoupling method, called 'inverse gated 1 H decoupling' was used. As a reference, for 15 N, we used CH3NO2, fixed at 0 ppm. In order to find the suitable spectral window we used the formamide (15 N). The results of obtaining the 15 N-labeled procaine are presented. (author)

  8. Correlation of 1H NMR Chemical Shift for Aqueous Solutions by Statistical Associating Fluid Theory Association Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许波; 李浩然; 王从敏; 许映杰; 韩世钧

    2005-01-01

    1H NMR chemical shifts of binary aqueous mixtures of acylamide, alcohol, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), and acetone are correlated by statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT) association model. The comparison between SAFT association model and Wilson equation shows that the former is better for dealing with aqueous solutions. Finally, the specialties of both models are discussed.

  9. Analysis of the contributions of ring current and electric field effects to the chemical shifts of RNA bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-02-21

    Ring current and electric field effects can considerably influence NMR chemical shifts in biomolecules. Understanding such effects is particularly important for the development of accurate mappings between chemical shifts and the structures of nucleic acids. In this work, we first analyzed the Pople and the Haigh-Mallion models in terms of their ability to describe nitrogen base conjugated ring effects. We then created a database (DiBaseRNA) of three-dimensional arrangements of RNA base pairs from X-ray structures, calculated the corresponding chemical shifts via a hybrid density functional theory approach and used the results to parametrize the ring current and electric field effects in RNA bases. Next, we studied the coupling of the electric field and ring current effects for different inter-ring arrangements found in RNA bases using linear model fitting, with joint electric field and ring current, as well as only electric field and only ring current approximations. Taken together, our results provide a characterization of the interdependence of ring current and electric field geometric factors, which is shown to be especially important for the chemical shifts of non-hydrogen atoms in RNA bases.

  10. 15N Fractionation in Star-Forming Regions and Solar System Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirstrom, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, GIlles; Charnley, Steven; Cordiner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristinemolecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N15N 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N15N 100.

  11. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectral and X-ray structural studies of 2-arylsulfonylamino-5-chlorobenzophenones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six 2-(4-R-phenylsulfonylamino)-5-chlorobenzophenones were prepared and their 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectra recorded and assigned. The dependence between the chemical shift of the amide proton and Hammett σ substituent constants is of the V type. Substituent effect on the chemical shift of the amide nitrogen atom was found insignificant. X-ray analysis shows that the terminal benzene rings in 2-(4-nitro-phenylsulfonylamino)-5-chlorobenzophenones are located close to each other. They are not, however, parallel, dihedral angle between them being equal to 10.86 deg (MP2/6-31G**//HF/6-31G** ab initio calculations show this to be 20.44 deg). This shows that the mutual orientation of two benzene rings in the molecule of this compound is caused by the π-π stacking. It is additionally reinforced by the intramolecular NH...O=C hydrogen bond. Except the dihedral angle between the benzene rings, X-ray determined structure of 2-(4-nitro-phenylsulfonylamino)-5-chlorobenzophenones is very similar to this optimized by the ab initio calculations. (author)

  12. A comparison of chemical shift sensitivity of trifluoromethyl tags: optimizing resolution in {sup 19}F NMR studies of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Libin; Larda, Sacha Thierry; Frank Li, Yi Feng [University of Toronto, UTM, Department of Chemistry (Canada); Manglik, Aashish [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology (United States); Prosser, R. Scott, E-mail: scott.prosser@utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, UTM, Department of Chemistry (Canada)

    2015-05-15

    The elucidation of distinct protein conformers or states by fluorine ({sup 19}F) NMR requires fluorinated moieties whose chemical shifts are most sensitive to subtle changes in the local dielectric and magnetic shielding environment. In this study we evaluate the effective chemical shift dispersion of a number of thiol-reactive trifluoromethyl probes [i.e. 2-bromo-N-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (BTFMA), N-(4-bromo-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (3-BTFMA), 3-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-ol (BTFP), 1-bromo-3,3,4,4,4-pentafluorobutan-2-one (BPFB), 3-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-one (BTFA), and 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl-1-thiol (TFET)] under conditions of varying polarity. In considering the sensitivity of the {sup 19}F NMR chemical shift to the local environment, a series of methanol/water mixtures were prepared, ranging from relatively non-polar (MeOH:H{sub 2}O = 4) to polar (MeOH:H{sub 2}O = 0.25). {sup 19}F NMR spectra of the tripeptide, glutathione ((2S)-2-amino-4-{[(1R)-1-[(carboxymethyl)carbamoyl] -2-sulfanylethyl]carbamoyl}butanoic acid), conjugated to each of the above trifluoromethyl probes, revealed that the BTFMA tag exhibited a significantly greater range of chemical shift as a function of solvent polarity than did either BTFA or TFET. DFT calculations using the B3LYP hybrid functional and the 6-31G(d,p) basis set, confirmed the observed trend in chemical shift dispersion with solvent polarity.

  13. Female sea lamprey shift orientation toward a conspecific chemical cue to escape a sensory trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, Cory O.; Johnson, Nicholas; Li, Ke; Buchinger, Tyler J.; Li, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    The sensory trap model of signal evolution hypothesizes that signalers adapt to exploit a cue used by the receiver in another context. Although exploitation of receiver biases can result in conflict between the sexes, deceptive signaling systems that are mutually beneficial drive the evolution of stable communication systems. However, female responses in the nonsexual and sexual contexts may become uncoupled if costs are associated with exhibiting a similar response to a trait in both contexts. Male sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) signal with a mating pheromone, 3-keto petromyzonol sulfate (3kPZS), which may be a match to a juvenile cue used by females during migration. Upstream movement of migratory lampreys is partially guided by 3kPZS, but females only move toward 3kPZS with proximal accuracy during spawning. Here, we use in-stream behavioral assays paired with gonad histology to document the transition of female preference for juvenile- and male-released 3kPZS that coincides with the functional shift of 3kPZS as a migratory cue to a mating pheromone. Females became increasingly biased toward the source of synthesized 3kPZS as their maturation progressed into the reproductive phase, at which point, a preference for juvenile odor (also containing 3kPZS naturally) ceased to exist. Uncoupling of female responses during migration and spawning makes the 3kPZS communication system a reliable means of synchronizing mate search. The present study offers a rare example of a transition in female responses to a chemical cue between nonsexual and sexual contexts, provides insights into the origins of stable communication signaling systems.

  14. Quantification of fat using chemical shift imaging and 1H-MR spectroscopy in phantom model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of chemical shift imaging (CSI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) for fat quantification in phantom model. Methods: Eleven phantoms were made according to the volume percentage of fat ranging from 0 to 100% with an interval of 10%. The fat concentration in the phantoms were measured respectively by CSI and MRS and compared using one-sample t test. The correlation between the two methods was also analyzed. The concentration of saturated fatty acids (FS), unsaturated fatty acids (FU) and the poly, unsaturation degree (PUD) were calculated by using MRS. Results: The fat concentration was (48.0±1.0)%, (57.0±0.5)%, (67.3±0.6)%, (77.3± 0.6)%, (83.3±0.6)% and (91.0±1.0)% respectively with fat volume of 50% to 100% by CSI. The fat concentration was (8.3±0.6)%, (16.3±0.7)%, (27.7±0.6)%, (36.0±1.0)%, (43.5± 0.6)% and (56.5±1.0)% respectively with fat volume of 10% to 60% by MRS, the fat concentration were underestimated by CSI and MRS (P<0.05), and had high linear correlation with the real concentration in phantoms (CSI: r=0.998, MRS: r=0.996, P<0.01). There was also a linear correlation between two methods (r=0.992, P<0.01) but no statistically significant difference (paired- samples t test, t=-0.125, P=0.903). By using MRS, the relative ratio of FS and FU in fat were 0. 15 and 0.85, the PUD was 0.0325, respectively, and highly consistent with these in phantoms. Conclusion: Both CSI and MRS are efficient and accurate methods in fat quantification at 7.0 T MR. (authors)

  15. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by /sup 15/N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Live, D.H.; Cowburn, D.

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, /sup 15/N labeling being used to identify specific backbone /sup 15/N and /sup 1/H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence for hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neutrophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of /sup 15/N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone. The results suggest significant conformational alteration in neurophysin-hormone complexes at low pH possibly associated with protonation of the carboxyl group of the hormone-protein salt bridge.

  16. Anomalous chemical shifts in X-ray photoelectron spectra of sulfur-containing compounds of silver (I) and (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Ag 3d5/2 binding energy for Ag(II)SO4 is as large as 370.1 eV. • This is the largest value ever measured for a silver (II) compound. • Large shift is connected with the extreme oxidizing nature of Ag(II) species. • Ag(I)2S2O7 exhibits both positive and negative shifts with respect to metallic Ag. • Two distinct Ag(I) sites are responsible for large BE difference of 3.6 eV. - Abstract: Anomalous chemical shifts, i.e. cases when binding energy decreases with the increase of the oxidation state, have been well-documented for selected compounds of silver, and well understood based on analysis of initial- and final-state effects in the XPS spectra. Here we report two examples of even more exotic behaviour of chemical shifts for two silver compounds. The first one is Ag2S2O7 which exhibits both positive and negative substantial shifts with respect to metallic Ag for two distinct Ag(I) sites in its crystal structure, which differ by as much as 3.6 eV. Another is AgSO4, a rare example of oxo silver (II) salt, which exhibits “normal” chemical shift but the Ag 3d5/2 binding energy takes the largest value measured for a silver (II) compound (370.1 eV). This property is connected predominantly with the extremely strongly oxidizing nature of Ag(II) species

  17. Halogen effect on structure and 13C NMR chemical shift of 3,6-disubstituted-N-alkyl carbazoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radula-Janik, Klaudia; Kupka, Teobald; Ejsmont, Krzysztof;

    2013-01-01

    ). The decreasing electronegativity of the halogen substituent (F, Cl, Br and I) was reflected in both nonrelativistic and relativistic NMR results as decreased values of chemical shifts of carbon atoms attached to halogen (C3 and C6) leading to a strong sensitivity to halogen atom type at 3 and 6 positions....... The relativistic effect of Br and I atoms on nuclear shieldings was modeled using the spin-orbit ZORA method. Significant heavy atom shielding effects for the carbon atom directly bonded with bromine and iodine were observed (~ -10 and ~ -30 ppm while the other carbon shifts were practically unaffected...

  18. Study on synthesis of 15N-hydrazine hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 15N labeled hydrazine hydrate is a strong reducing agent in the synthesis procedure of stable isotope labeled compounds, and it has been widely used in the isotope-labeled pharmaceutical synthesis. The reaction conditions of 15N labeled hydrazine hydrate were mainly investigated by single-factor design, and the following optimized conditions were obtained: the concentration of available chlorine was 115-120 g/L, the chlorination re- action time was 30∼40 min, the reflux time was 7 min, and the mass ratio of material was m(catalyst) : m (urea) = 1.0 : 10.0, and the yield of 15N labeled hydrazine hydrate was 76.1%, the abundance of 15N was 99.20%. (authors)

  19. Elucidating the trophodynamics of four coral reef fishes of the Solomon Islands using δ15N and δ13C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, N. D. W.; Sweeting, C. J.; Polunin, N. V. C.

    2010-09-01

    Size-related diet shifts are important characteristics of fish trophodynamics. Here, body size-related changes in muscle δ15N and δ13C of four coral reef fishes, Acanthurus nigrofuscus (herbivore), Chaetodon lunulatus (corallivore) , Chromis xanthura (planktivore) and Plectropomus leopardus (piscivore) were investigated at two locations in the Solomon Islands. All four species occupied distinct isotopic niches and the concurrent δ13C' values of C. xanthura and P. leopardus suggested a common planktonic production source. Size-related shifts in δ15N, and thus trophic level, were observed in C. xanthura, C. lunulatus and P. leopardus, and these trends varied between location, indicating spatial differences in trophic ecology. A literature review of tropical fishes revealed that positive δ15N-size trends are common while negative δ15N-size trends are rare. Size-δ15N trends fall into approximately equal groups representing size-based feeding within a food chain, and that associated with a basal resource shift and occurs in conjunction with changes in production source, indicated by δ13C. The review also revealed large scale differences in isotope-size trends and this, combined with small scale location differences noted earlier, highlights a high degree of plasticity in the reef fishes studied. This suggests that trophic size analysis of reef fishes would provide a productive avenue to identify species potentially vulnerable to reef impacts as a result of constrained trophic behaviour.

  20. Cuticular hydrocarbon divergence in the jewel wasp Nasonia : evolutionary shifts in chemical communication channels?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buellesbach, J.; Gadau, J.; Beukeboom, L. W.; Echinger, F.; Raychoudhury, R.; Werren, J. H.; Schmitt, T.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution and maintenance of intraspecific communication channels constitute a key feature of chemical signalling and sexual communication. However, how divergent chemical communication channels evolve while maintaining their integrity for both sender and receiver is poorly understood. In this s

  1. A NMR experiment for simultaneous correlations of valine and leucine/isoleucine methyls with carbonyl chemical shifts in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugarinov, Vitali; Venditti, Vincenzo; Marius Clore, G

    2014-01-01

    A methyl-detected 'out-and-back' NMR experiment for obtaining simultaneous correlations of methyl resonances of valine and isoleucine/leucine residues with backbone carbonyl chemical shifts, SIM-HMCM(CGCBCA)CO, is described. The developed pulse-scheme serves the purpose of convenience in recording a single data set for all Ile(δ1), Leu(δ) and Val(γ) (ILV) methyl positions instead of acquiring two separate spectra selective for valine or leucine/isoleucine residues. The SIM-HMCM(CGCBCA)CO experiment can be used for ILV methyl assignments in moderately sized protein systems (up to ~100 kDa) where the backbone chemical shifts of (13)C(α), (13)Cβ and (13)CO are known from prior NMR studies and where some losses in sensitivity can be tolerated for the sake of an overall reduction in NMR acquisition time.

  2. Phenylalanine δ15N in Paleo Archives as a New Proxy for δ15N of Exported Primary Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, M.; Batista, F. C.; Vokhshoori, N. L.; Brown, J. T.; Guilderson, T. P.; Ravelo, A. C.; Sherwood, O.

    2012-12-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis of individual amino acids (CSI-AA) is emerging as a powerful new tool for studying the paleo nitrogen cycle. Because most detrital organic nitrogen is composed of amino acids, CSI-AA can reveal the mechanistic basis for organic nitrogen diagenesis, preserve a record of past food web structure, and potentially reconstruct the δ15N values of past nitrate and primary production. Within the commonly measured amino acids, the δ15N value of phenylalanine (Phe) appears uniquely promising as a new proxy that reflects the nitrogen isotopic value of the original source. Phe δ15N values remain almost unchanged with trophic transfer through food webs, and also during at least the initial stages of organic matter degradation. Here we synthesize results from both bio-archives and recent sediments, which together suggest that at least in Holocene archives the Phe δ15N value does in fact record the average inorganic nitrogen δ15N value at the base of planktonic food webs. However, several important unknowns also remain. These include the extent of variation in amino acid isotopic fractionation patterns in phylogenetically distinct algal groups. The stability of Phe δ15N values in older sediments where organic matter has undergone extensive diagenesis is also an important research area, which may ultimately establish the temporal limit for application of this approach to study past geological epochs. Together, however, results to date suggest that of Phe δ15N values in paleo archives represent a novel molecular-level proxy which is not tied to any specific organism or group, but rather can provide an integrated estimate of δ15N value of exported primary production.

  3. Phosphorus-31, 15N, and 13C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (ES3PGlyph) of glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by 31P, 15N, and 13C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts (δ) for each of the three nuclei. By 31P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The 13C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The 15N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complex is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the 31P δ and the C-P-O bond angle, and the 13C and 15N δ values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield 31P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P 31P δ vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the ES3P binary complex, while the ES3PGlyph complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle

  4. Differential dynamic engagement within 24 SH3 domain: peptide complexes revealed by co-linear chemical shift perturbation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott J Stollar

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence for the functional importance of multiple dynamically populated states within single proteins. However, peptide binding by protein-protein interaction domains, such as the SH3 domain, has generally been considered to involve the full engagement of peptide to the binding surface with minimal dynamics and simple methods to determine dynamics at the binding surface for multiple related complexes have not been described. We have used NMR spectroscopy combined with isothermal titration calorimetry to comprehensively examine the extent of engagement to the yeast Abp1p SH3 domain for 24 different peptides. Over one quarter of the domain residues display co-linear chemical shift perturbation (CCSP behavior, in which the position of a given chemical shift in a complex is co-linear with the same chemical shift in the other complexes, providing evidence that each complex exists as a unique dynamic rapidly inter-converting ensemble. The extent the specificity determining sub-surface of AbpSH3 is engaged as judged by CCSP analysis correlates with structural and thermodynamic measurements as well as with functional data, revealing the basis for significant structural and functional diversity amongst the related complexes. Thus, CCSP analysis can distinguish peptide complexes that may appear identical in terms of general structure and percent peptide occupancy but have significant local binding differences across the interface, affecting their ability to transmit conformational change across the domain and resulting in functional differences.

  5. Distinguishing between cystic teratomas and endometriomas of the ovary using chemical shift gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishijima Hideyuki; Ishizaka Hiroshi; Inoue Tomio [Gunma University Hospital, Gunma (Japan). Depts. of Diagnostic Radiaology and Nuclear Medicine

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of chemical shift gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in distinguishing between cystic teratomas and endometriomas of the ovary, using a 1.5 T magnet. The study included 22 patients with 31 ovarian lesions (15 cystic teratomas and 16 endometriomas), which showed high signal intensity on T1-weighted spin echo images. Chemical shift gradient echo images with three different echo times (TE = 2.5, 4.5 and 6.5 ms) were obtained in all cases. Indices were calculated on the basis of the signal intensities of lesions on the chemical shift gradient echo images. All endometriomas had signal intensity indices of less than 2.1, while all cystic teratomas had signal intensity indices of 18.1 or greater. It was concluded that the method used in this study presents the following advantages: the acquisition time is short; it needs no special software; and it does not depend on magnetic field homogeneity. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Chemical shift of Mn and Cr K-edges in X-ray absorption spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Joseph; A K Yadav; S N Jha; D Bhattacharyya

    2013-11-01

    Mn and Cr K X-ray absorption edges were measured in various compounds containing Mn in Mn2+, Mn3+ and Mn4+ oxidation states and Cr in Cr3+ and Cr6+ oxidation states. Few compounds possess tetrahedral coordination in the 1st shell surrounding the cation while others possess octahedral coordination. Measurements have been carried out at the energy dispersive EXAFS beamline at INDUS-2 Synchrotron Radiation Source at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore. Energy shifts of ∼8–16 eV were observed for Mn K edge in the Mn-compounds while a shift of 13–20 eV was observed for Cr K edge in Cr-compounds compared to values in elementalMn and Cr, respectively. The different chemical shifts observed for compounds having the same oxidation state of the cation but different anions or ligands show the effect of different chemical environments surrounding the cations in determining their X-ray absorption edges in the above compounds. The above chemical effect has been quantitatively described by determining the effective charges on Mn and Cr cations in the above compounds.

  7. Predicting Heats of Explosion of Nitroaromatic Compounds through NBO Charges and 15N NMR Chemical Shifts of Nitro Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Infante-Castillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new quantitative model to predict the heat of explosion of nitroaromatic compounds using the natural bond orbital (NBO charge and 15N NMR chemical shifts of the nitro groups (15NNitro as structural parameters. The values of the heat of explosion predicted for 21 nitroaromatic compounds using the model described here were compared with experimental data. The prediction ability of the model was assessed by the leave-one-out cross-validation method. The cross-validation results show that the model is significant and stable and that the predicted accuracy is within 0.146 MJ kg−1, with an overall root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP below 0.183 MJ kg−1. Strong correlations were observed between the heat of explosion and the charges (R2 = 0.9533 and 15N NMR chemical shifts (R2 = 0.9531 of the studied compounds. In addition, the dependence of the heat of explosion on the presence of activating or deactivating groups of nitroaromatic explosives was analyzed. All calculations, including optimizations, NBO charges, and 15NNitro NMR chemical shifts analyses, were performed using density functional theory (DFT and a 6-311+G(2d,p basis set. Based on these results, this practical quantitative model can be used as a tool in the design and development of highly energetic materials (HEM based on nitroaromatic compounds.

  8. Balance study of the fate of 15N fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An interim report is presented on a series of experiments with wooden box-type lysimeters (60 cm x 60 cm x 70 cm) loaded with a sandy soil, a loess soil and straw-amended soil. The lysimeters support crops rotated over a five-year period to be studied - potato, barley, sugar-beet, barley (with winter rape) and finally (1979) potato. Each lysimeter received split applications of urea at total rates of 0, 50 or 100 kg.ha-1. The effects of soil residues of the herbicide monolinuron were also studied. The report deals with data collected during the first three years of the planned experiments (1975 - 1977 inclusive). 15N-labelled urea (47 atom 15N% excess) was initially used but in some experiments this was followed by applications of unlabelled urea in order to study the fate of the residual 15N in the subsequent years. The results to date indicated that in the first year highest recoveries in the plant of the applied 15N obtained on the sandy soil. The low recoveries of 15N in the subsequent years when unlabelled urea was supplied also indicated significant storage by soil or root organic matter of the applied 15N. Compared with the control (zero application of urea nitrogen), potato took up more total nitrogen in the presence of fertilizer including more of the unlabelled soil pool nitrogen. Analyses of the soil profiles in terms of total soil nitrogen and fertilizer-derived nitrogen (on the basis of 15N assays) indicated leaching of the labelled nitrogen down the soil profile in all cases during the three-year period. Analysis of NO3-N in leachates confirmed the presence of labelled urea-derived nitrogen. (author)

  9. Identification of zinc-ligated cysteine residues based on 13Calpha and 13Cbeta chemical shift data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhaber, Gregory J; Snyder, David; Moseley, Hunter N B; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2006-04-01

    Although a significant number of proteins include bound metals as part of their structure, the identification of amino acid residues coordinated to non-paramagnetic metals by NMR remains a challenge. Metal ligands can stabilize the native structure and/or play critical catalytic roles in the underlying biochemistry. An atom's chemical shift is exquisitely sensitive to its electronic environment. Chemical shift data can provide valuable insights into structural features, including metal ligation. In this study, we demonstrate that overlapped 13Cbeta chemical shift distributions of Zn-ligated and non-metal-ligated cysteine residues are largely resolved by the inclusion of the corresponding 13Calpha chemical shift information, together with secondary structural information. We demonstrate this with a bivariate distribution plot, and statistically with a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and hierarchical logistic regression analysis. Using 287 13Calpha/13Cbeta shift pairs from 79 proteins with known three-dimensional structures, including 86 13Calpha and 13Cbeta shifts for 43 Zn-ligated cysteine residues, along with corresponding oxidation state and secondary structure information, we have built a logistic regression model that distinguishes between oxidized cystines, reduced (non-metal ligated) cysteines, and Zn-ligated cysteines. Classifying cysteines/cystines with a statistical model incorporating all three phenomena resulted in a predictor of Zn ligation with a recall, precision and F-measure of 83.7%, and an accuracy of 95.1%. This model was applied in the analysis of Bacillus subtilis IscU, a protein involved in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. The model predicts that all three cysteines of IscU are metal ligands. We confirmed these results by (i) examining the effect of metal chelation on the NMR spectrum of IscU, and (ii) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. To gain further insight into the frequency of occurrence of non-cysteine Zn

  10. Using delta15N values to characterise the nitrogen nutrient pathways from intensive animal units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, R A; Ineson, P; Jones, H; Sleep, D; Rank, R

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies on foliar delta15N values, in certain bryophytes, have indicated signature similarities to source pollutants. The object of this study was to investigate the effect further, by examining the mechanisms whereby isotopic fractionation occurs in systems such as atmospheric ammonia (NH3), throughfall, vegetation and soil. Measurements taken in and around point emission sources will then be used to characterise the various fractionation effects associated with these N transformations, as well as to demonstrate some of the issues associated with using delta15N values as pollution indicators. The atmospheric dispersion model UK-ADMS has also been used to model atmospheric delta15NH3 emissions, with signatures exhibiting marked negative shifts immediately downwind of an agricultural NH3 source. Similar dispersion patterns were mapped for NH3 concentration data illustrating the link between these two forms of measurement.

  11. Utilization of 15N-urea in laying hens. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 3 colostomized laying hens the incorporation of heavy nitrogen from urea into the amino acids of the 21 eggs laid during the 8-day experiment was determined. In these eggs the content of 15 amino acids was ascertained separately in white and yolk of the eggs and their atom-% 15N excess (15N') was determined. The heavy nitrogen could be detected in all amino acids investigated. The incorporation of 15N' into the essential amino acids of the white and yolk of eggs is very low. Of the 15N' amount of the urea applied 0.18% could be detected in the 9 essential amino acids of the white of egg and 0.12% in those of the yolk. For the 6 analyzed nonessential amino acids the rediscovery quota of 15N' in the white of egg was 0.50% and in the yolk 0.81% is that the NPN-source urea is insignificant for egg protein synthesis. (author)

  12. Performance of a neural-network-based determination of amino acid class and secondary structure from 1H-15N NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neural network which can determine both amino acid class and secondary structure using NMR data from 15N-labeled proteins is described. We have included nitrogen chemical shifts,3JHNHα coupling constants, α-proton chemical shifts, and side-chain proton chemical shifts as input to a three-layer feed-forward network. The network was trained with 456 spin systems from several proteins containing various types of secondary structure, and tested on human ubiquitin, which has no sequence homology with any of the proteins in the training set. A very limited set of data,representative of those from a TOCSY-HSQC and HNHA experiment, was used.Nevertheless, in 60% of the spin systems the correct amino acid class was among the top two choices given by the network, while in 96% of the spin systems the secondary structure was correctly identified. The performance of this network clearly shows the potential of the neural network algorithm in the automation of NMR spectral analysis

  13. HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH experiment for {sup 1}H{sup N} and {sup 15}N sequential correlations in ({sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Goradia, Nishit; Häfner, Sabine [Leibniz Institute for Age Research, Fritz Lipmann Institute, Research Group Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy (Germany); Herbst, Christian [Ubon Ratchathani University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Thailand); Görlach, Matthias; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Ramachandran, Ramadurai, E-mail: raman@fli-leibniz.de [Leibniz Institute for Age Research, Fritz Lipmann Institute, Research Group Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    A simple triple resonance NMR experiment that leads to the correlation of the backbone amide resonances of each amino acid residue ‘i’ with that of residues ‘i−1’ and ‘i+1’ in ({sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is presented. The experimental scheme, {HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH}, exploits the favourable relaxation properties of IDPs and the presence of {sup 1}J{sub CαN} and {sup 2}J{sub CαN} couplings to transfer the {sup 15}N{sub x} magnetisation from amino acid residue ‘i’ to adjacent residues via the application of a band-selective {sup 15}N–{sup 13}C{sup α} heteronuclear cross-polarisation sequence of ∼100 ms duration. Employing non-uniform sampling in the indirect dimensions, the efficacy of the approach has been demonstrated by the acquisition of 3D HNN chemical shift correlation spectra of α-synuclein. The experimental performance of the RF pulse sequence has been compared with that of the conventional INEPT-based HN(CA)NH pulse scheme. As the availability of data from both the HCCNH and HNN experiments will make it possible to use the information extracted from one experiment to simplify the analysis of the data of the other and lead to a robust approach for unambiguous backbone and side-chain resonance assignments, a time-saving strategy for the simultaneous collection of HCCNH and HNN data is also described.

  14. Bonding and chemical shifts in aluminosilicate glasses: importance of Madelung effects

    CERN Document Server

    Cruguel, H; Kerjan, O; Bart, F; Gautier-Soyer, M

    2003-01-01

    A detailed study of the XPS binding energy shifts of Si 2p, O 1s and Zr 3d in a series of aluminosilicate glasses (a three oxide glass: SiO sub 2 -Al sub 2 O sub 3 -CaO, three four-oxide glasses: SiO sub 2 -Al sub 2 O sub 3 -CaO-TiO sub 2 , ZrO sub 2 or CeO sub 2 , along with a six-oxide glass SiO sub 2 -Al sub 2 O sub 3 -CaO-TiO sub 2 -ZrO sub 2 -CeO sub 2) is presented. Their composition is such that these glasses have the same mean electronegativity, so that no changes in the atomic charges is expected. The binding energy shifts are interpreted in terms of initial and final state effects, and the balance of charge transfer contribution and electrostatic effects is discussed. Referred to the ternary glass, the binding energy shifts of the Si 2p, O 1s and Zr 3d lines in the complex glasses are due to an initial state effect, as the extraatomic relaxation is similar along the glass series. These shifts originate from electrostatic Madelung effects, likely coming from a structural change induced by the presenc...

  15. ~(15)N Isotope Used for Study of Groundwater Nitrogen Pollution in Shijiazhuang City, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Shijiazhuang City is the capital of Hebei province, China. Groundwater is the major water supply source for living and industry need of the city. Due to a rapid increase of population and development of industry and agriculture, a series of groundwater environmental problems are created. In the paper, the situation of groundwater pollution in Shijiazhuang city is reported. Based on the groundwater chemical data and ~(15)N measurement results both on groundwater and soils, the reason of groundwater nitra...

  16. An atomic electronegative distance vector and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of alcohols and alkanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU, Shu-Shea; XIA, Zhi-Ning; CAI, Shao-Xi; LIU, Yan

    2000-01-01

    A novel atomic electronegative distance vector (AEDV) has been developed to express the chemical environment of various chemically equivalent carbon atoms in alcohols and alkanes.Combining AEDV and γ parameter, four five-parameter Iinear relationship equations of chemical shift for four types of carbon atoms are created by using multiple linear regression.Correlation coefficients are R = 0.9887, 0.9972, 0.9978 and 0.9968 and roots of mean square error are RMS = 0.906, 0.821, 1.091and 1.091of four types of carbons, i.e., type1,2, 3, and 4 for primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary carbons, respectively. The stability and prediction capacity for external samples of four models have been tested by cross- validation.

  17. Mechanism of the bisphosphatase reaction of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase probed by (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okar, D A; Live, D H; Devany, M H; Lange, A J

    2000-08-15

    The histidines in the bisphosphatase domain of rat liver 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase were labeled with (15)N, both specifically at N1' and globally, for use in heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) NMR spectroscopic analyses. The histidine-associated (15)N resonances were assigned by correlation to the C2' protons which had been assigned previously [Okar et al., Biochemistry 38, 1999, 4471-79]. Acquisition of the (1)H-(15)N HSQC from a phosphate-free sample demonstrated that the existence of His-258 in the rare N1' tautomeric state is dependent upon occupation of the phosphate binding site filled by the O2 phosphate of the substrate, fructose-2,6-bisphosphate, and subsequently, the phosphohistidine intermediate. The phosphohistidine intermediate is characterized by two hydrogen bonds involving the catalytic histidines, His-258 and His-392, which are directly observed at the N1' positions of the imidazole rings. The N1' of phospho-His-258 is protonated ((1)H chemical shift, 14.0 ppm) and hydrogen bonded to the backbone carbonyl of Gly-259. The N1' of cationic His-392 is hydrogen bonded ((1)H chemical shift, 13.5 ppm) to the phosphoryl moiety of the phosphohistidine. The existence of a protonated phospho-His-258 intermediate and the observation of a fairly strong hydrogen bond to the same phosphohistidine implies that hydrolysis of the covalent intermediate proceeds without any requirement for an "activated" water. Using the labeled histidines as probes of the catalytic site mutation of Glu-327 to alanine revealed that, in addition to its function as the proton donor to fructose-6-phosphate during formation of the transient phosphohistidine intermediate at the N3' of His-258, this residue has a significant role in maintaining the structural integrity of the catalytic site. The (1)H-(15)N HSQC data also provide clear evidence that despite being a surface residue, His-446 has a very acidic pK(a), much less than 6.0. On the basis of

  18. Observed and calculated 1H and 13C chemical shifts induced by the in situ oxidation of model sulfides to sulfoxides and sulfones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracínský, Martin; Pohl, Radek; Slavetínská, Lenka; Budesínský, Milos

    2010-09-01

    A series of model sulfides was oxidized in the NMR sample tube to sulfoxides and sulfones by the stepwise addition of meta-chloroperbenzoic acid in deuterochloroform. Various methods of quantum chemical calculations have been tested to reproduce the observed (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts of the starting sulfides and their oxidation products. It has been shown that the determination of the energy-minimized conformation is a very important condition for obtaining realistic data in the subsequent calculation of the NMR chemical shifts. The correlation between calculated and observed chemical shifts is very good for carbon atoms (even for the 'cheap' DFT B3LYP/6-31G* method) and somewhat less satisfactory for hydrogen atoms. The calculated chemical shifts induced by oxidation (the Delta delta values) agree even better with the experimental values and can also be used to determine the oxidation state of the sulfur atom (-S-, -SO-, -SO(2)-).

  19. Predicting paramagnetic 1H NMR chemical shifts and state-energy separations in spin-crossover host-guest systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isley, William C; Zarra, Salvatore; Carlson, Rebecca K; Bilbeisi, Rana A; Ronson, Tanya K; Nitschke, Jonathan R; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J

    2014-06-14

    The behaviour of metal-organic cages upon guest encapsulation can be difficult to elucidate in solution. Paramagnetic metal centres introduce additional dispersion of signals that is useful for characterisation of host-guest complexes in solution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, paramagnetic centres also complicate spectral assignment due to line broadening, signal integration error, and large changes in chemical shifts, which can be difficult to assign even for known compounds. Quantum chemical predictions can provide information that greatly facilitates the assignment of NMR signals and identification of species present. Here we explore how the prediction of paramagnetic NMR spectra may be used to gain insight into the spin crossover (SCO) properties of iron(II)-based metal organic coordination cages, specifically examining how the structure of the local metal coordination environment affects SCO. To represent the tetrahedral metal-organic cage, a model system is generated by considering an isolated metal-ion vertex: fac-ML3(2+) (M = Fe(II), Co(II); L = N-phenyl-2-pyridinaldimine). The sensitivity of the (1)H paramagnetic chemical shifts to local coordination environments is assessed and utilised to shed light on spin crossover behaviour in iron complexes. Our data indicate that expansion of the metal coordination sphere must precede any thermal SCO. An attempt to correlate experimental enthalpies of SCO with static properties of bound guests shows that no simple relationship exists, and that effects are likely due to nuanced dynamic response to encapsulation. PMID:24752730

  20. Pressure dependence of backbone chemical shifts in the model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlach, Markus Beck; Koehler, Joerg; Crusca, Edson; Kremer, Werner; Munte, Claudia E; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-06-01

    For a better understanding of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detected pressure responses of folded as well as unstructured proteins the availability of data from well-defined model systems are indispensable. In this work we report the pressure dependence of chemical shifts of the backbone atoms (1)H(α), (13)C(α) and (13)C' in the protected tetrapeptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2 (Xxx one of the 20 canonical amino acids). Contrary to expectation the chemical shifts of these nuclei have a nonlinear dependence on pressure in the range from 0.1 to 200 MPa. The polynomial pressure coefficients B 1 and B 2 are dependent on the type of amino acid studied. The coefficients of a given nucleus show significant linear correlations suggesting that the NMR observable pressure effects in the different amino acids have at least partly the same physical cause. In line with this observation the magnitude of the second order coefficients of nuclei being direct neighbors in the chemical structure are also weakly correlated. PMID:27335085

  1. Pressure dependence of backbone chemical shifts in the model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlach, Markus Beck; Koehler, Joerg; Crusca, Edson; Kremer, Werner; Munte, Claudia E; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-06-01

    For a better understanding of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detected pressure responses of folded as well as unstructured proteins the availability of data from well-defined model systems are indispensable. In this work we report the pressure dependence of chemical shifts of the backbone atoms (1)H(α), (13)C(α) and (13)C' in the protected tetrapeptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2 (Xxx one of the 20 canonical amino acids). Contrary to expectation the chemical shifts of these nuclei have a nonlinear dependence on pressure in the range from 0.1 to 200 MPa. The polynomial pressure coefficients B 1 and B 2 are dependent on the type of amino acid studied. The coefficients of a given nucleus show significant linear correlations suggesting that the NMR observable pressure effects in the different amino acids have at least partly the same physical cause. In line with this observation the magnitude of the second order coefficients of nuclei being direct neighbors in the chemical structure are also weakly correlated.

  2. Vertical δ13C and δ15N changes during pedogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunn, Melanie; Spielvogel, Sandra; Wells, Andrew; Condron, Leo; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2015-04-01

    The natural abundance of soil organic matter (SOM) stable C and N isotope ratios are subjected to vertical changes throughout the soil profile. This vertical distribution is a widely reported phenomenon across varieties of ecosystems and constitutes important insights of soil carbon cycling. In most ecosystems, SOM becomes enriched in heavy isotopes by several per mill in the first few centimeters of the topsoil. The enrichment of 13C in SOM with soil depth is attributed to biological and physical-chemical processes in soil e.g., plant physiological impacts, microbial decomposition, sorption and transport processes. Such vertical trends in 13C and 15N abundance have rarely been related to SOM composition during pedogenesis. The aims of our study were to investigate short and long-term δ13C and δ15N depth changes and their interrelations under progressing pedogenesis and ecosystem development. We sampled soils across the well studied fordune progradation Haast-chronosequence, a dune ridge system under super-humid climate at the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island (43° 53' S, 169° 3' E). Soils from 11 sites with five replicates each covered a time span of around 2870 yr of soil development (from Arenosol to Podzol). Vertical changes of δ13C and δ15N values of SOM were investigated in the organic layers and in 1-cm depth intervals of the upper 10 cm of the mineral soil. With increasing soil depth SOM became enriched in δ13C by 1.9 ± SE 0.1 o and in δ15N by 6.0 ± 0.4 ‰˙Litter δ13C values slightly decreased with increasing soil age (r = -0.61; p = 0.00) likely due to less efficient assimilation linked to nutrient limitations. Fractionation processes during mycorrhizal transfer appeared to affect δ15N values in the litter. We found a strong decrease of δ15N in the early succession stages ≤ 300 yr B.P. (r = -0.95; p = 0.00). Positive relations of vertical 13C and 15N enrichment with soil age might be related to decomposition and appeared to be

  3. Preparation of double labeled 13C, 15N3-nitrofurantoin%双标记13C,15N3-呋喃妥因的制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐建飞; 杜晓宁; 王伟; 张彰

    2012-01-01

    以双标记13C,15N3 -氨基脲为原料,先与苯甲醛缩合,继而与氯乙酸乙酯取代、环化,再经盐酸水解反应后与5-硝基糠醛二乙酯反应,最终制得双标记13C,15N3-呋喃妥因.产物经红外光谱、高效液相色谱及质谱表征.结果表明,所选用的合成路线反应条件温和,产物总收率高于60%,且同位素丰度不下降;目标产物的化学纯度>99.0%,13C同位素丰度>98%,15N同位素丰度>99%.%A novel method was established to synthesize double labeled 13C,15N3-nitrofurantoin. Starting material 13C,15 N3-semicarbazide was firstly converted to benzaldehyde semicarbazone (II) by condensation with benzaldehyde. Compound (II) was then allowed to react with ethyl a-chloroacetate in the presence of sodium ethoxide, forming 1-benzylideneaminohydratoin (III). Compound (III) was hydrolyzed with hydrochloric acid and condensed with 5-nitro furfural diacetate, generating the target compound) nitrofurantoin-13C,l5N3) (V). As-synthesized target product was characterized by infrared spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatog-raphy, and mass spectrometry. It has been found that the established synthetic route is dominated by mild reaction conditions and gives rise to the final product in a yield of above 60%, while the abundance of the isotopes does not tend to decline. Namely, the chemical purity of the target product is above 99. 0%, and the abundances of 13C and 15N are above 98% and 99%, respectively.

  4. The contamination of commercial 15N2 gas stocks with 15N-labeled nitrate and ammonium and consequences for nitrogen fixation measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Dabundo

    Full Text Available We report on the contamination of commercial 15-nitrogen (15N N2 gas stocks with 15N-enriched ammonium, nitrate and/or nitrite, and nitrous oxide. 15N2 gas is used to estimate N2 fixation rates from incubations of environmental samples by monitoring the incorporation of isotopically labeled 15N2 into organic matter. However, the microbial assimilation of bioavailable 15N-labeled N2 gas contaminants, nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, is liable to lead to the inflation or false detection of N2 fixation rates. 15N2 gas procured from three major suppliers was analyzed for the presence of these 15N-contaminants. Substantial concentrations of 15N-contaminants were detected in four Sigma-Aldrich 15N2 lecture bottles from two discrete batch syntheses. Per mole of 15N2 gas, 34 to 1900 µmoles of 15N-ammonium, 1.8 to 420 µmoles of 15N-nitrate/nitrite, and ≥21 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide were detected. One 15N2 lecture bottle from Campro Scientific contained ≥11 µmoles of 15N-nitrous oxide per mole of 15N2 gas, and no detected 15N-nitrate/nitrite at the given experimental 15N2 tracer dilutions. Two Cambridge Isotopes lecture bottles from discrete batch syntheses contained ≥0.81 µmoles 15N-nitrous oxide per mole 15N2, and trace concentrations of 15N-ammonium and 15N-nitrate/nitrite. 15N2 gas equilibrated cultures of the green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta confirmed that the 15N-contaminants are assimilable. A finite-differencing model parameterized using oceanic field conditions typical of N2 fixation assays suggests that the degree of detected 15N-ammonium contamination could yield inferred N2 fixation rates ranging from undetectable, <0.01 nmoles N L(-1 d(-1, to 530 nmoles N L(-1 d(-1, contingent on experimental conditions. These rates are comparable to, or greater than, N2 fixation rates commonly detected in field assays. These results indicate that past reports of N2 fixation should be interpreted with caution, and demonstrate that the purity of

  5. Gradient-echo in-phase and opposed-phase chemical shift imaging: Role in evaluating bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable information for assessing the bone marrow, while adding little to total examination time. In this article, we review the uses of CSI for evaluating bone marrow abnormalities. CSI can be used for differentiating marrow-replacing lesions from a range of non-marrow-replacing processes, although the sequence is associated with technical limitations and pitfalls. Particularly at 3 T, susceptibility artefacts are prevalent, and optimal technical parameters must be implemented with appropriate choices for echo times

  6. A multiple pulse zero crossing NMR technique, and its application to F-19 chemical shift measurements in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W.-K.

    1978-01-01

    A simple multiple-pulse 'zero crossing technique' for accurately determining the first moment of a solid-state NMR spectrum is introduced. This technique was applied to obtain the F-19 chemical shift versus pressure curves up to 5 kbar for single crystals of CaF2 (0.29 + or - 0.02 ppm/kbar) and BaF2 (0.62 + or - 0.05 ppm/kbar). Results at ambient temperature and pressure are also reported for a number of other fluorine compounds. Because of its high data rate, this technique is potentially several orders of magnitude more sensitive than similar CW methods.

  7. Combining automated peak tracking in SAR by NMR with structure-based backbone assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2012-03-21

    Background: Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMR-based drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically, which is not efficient for high-throughput drug screening.Results: We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C-labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-to-one mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better.Conclusions: Our mathematical programming approach for modeling chemical shift mapping as a graph problem, while modeling the errors directly, is potentially a time- and cost-effective first step for high-throughput drug screening based on limited NMR data and homologous 3D structures. 2012 Jang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  8. Effect of pH, urea, peptide length, and neighboring amino acids on alanine alpha-proton random coil chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Elizabeth A; Holder, Jessica L; Maranda, Abby M; de Alwis, Adamberage R; Selkie, Ellen L; McKay, Sonya L

    2007-01-01

    Accurate random coil alpha-proton chemical shift values are essential for precise protein structure analysis using chemical shift index (CSI) calculations. The current study determines the chemical shift effects of pH, urea, peptide length and neighboring amino acids on the alpha-proton of Ala using model peptides of the general sequence GnXaaAYaaGn, where Xaa and Yaa are Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, His, Trp or Pro, and n = 1-3. Changes in pH (2-6), urea (0-1M), and peptide length (n = 1-3) had no effect on Ala alpha-proton chemical shifts. Denaturing concentrations of urea (8M) caused significant downfield shifts (0.10 +/- 0.01 ppm) relative to an external DSS reference. Neighboring aliphatic residues (Leu, Val) had no effect, whereas aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, His and Trp) and Pro caused significant shifts in the alanine alpha-proton, with the extent of the shifts dependent on the nature and position of the amino acid. Smaller aromatic residues (Phe, Tyr, His) caused larger shift effects when present in the C-terminal position (approximately 0.10 vs. 0.05 ppm N-terminal), and the larger aromatic tryptophan caused greater effects in the N-terminal position (0.15 ppm vs. 0.10 C-terminal). Proline affected both significant upfield (0.06 ppm, N-terminal) and downfield (0.25 ppm, C-terminal) chemical shifts. These new Ala correction factors detail the magnitude and range of variation in environmental chemical shift effects, in addition to providing insight into the molecular level interactions that govern protein folding.

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Assisted Prediction of Secondary Structure for RNA: Incorporation of Direction-Dependent Chemical Shift Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan L; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Tubbs, Jason D; Kennedy, Scott D; Lopez, Michael J; Mathews, David H; Turner, Douglas H

    2015-11-17

    Knowledge of RNA structure is necessary to determine structure-function relationships and to facilitate design of potential therapeutics. RNA secondary structure prediction can be improved by applying constraints from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments to a dynamic programming algorithm. Imino proton walks from NOESY spectra reveal double-stranded regions. Chemical shifts of protons in GH1, UH3, and UH5 of GU pairs, UH3, UH5, and AH2 of AU pairs, and GH1 of GC pairs were analyzed to identify constraints for the 5' to 3' directionality of base pairs in helices. The 5' to 3' directionality constraints were incorporated into an NMR-assisted prediction of secondary structure (NAPSS-CS) program. When it was tested on 18 structures, including nine pseudoknots, the sensitivity and positive predictive value were improved relative to those of three unrestrained programs. The prediction accuracy for the pseudoknots improved the most. The program also facilitates assignment of chemical shifts to individual nucleotides, a necessary step for determining three-dimensional structure.

  10. Application of multivariate image analysis in QSPR study of 13C chemical shifts of naphthalene derivatives: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garkani-Nejad, Zahra; Poshteh-Shirani, Marziyeh

    2010-11-15

    A new implemented QSPR method, whose descriptors achieved from bidimensional images, was applied for predicting (13)C NMR chemical shifts of 25 mono substituted naphthalenes. The resulted descriptors were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and the most significant principal components (PCs) were extracted. MIA-QSPR (multivariate image analysis applied to quantitative structure-property relationship) modeling was done by means of principal component regression (PCR) and principal component-artificial neural network (PC-ANN) methods. Eigen value ranking (EV) and correlation ranking (CR) were used here to select the most relevant set of PCs as inputs for PCR and PC-ANN modeling methods. The results supported that the correlation ranking-principal component-artificial neural network (CR-PC-ANN) model could predict the (13)C NMR chemical shifts of all 10 carbon atoms in mono substituted naphthalenes with R(2) ≥ 0.922 for training set, R(2) ≥ 0.963 for validation set and R(2) ≥ 0.936 for the test set. Comparison of the results with other existing factor selection method revealed that less accurate results were obtained by the eigen value ranking procedure. PMID:21035668

  11. Isotopic enrichment of 15N by ionic exchange cromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionic exchange chromatographic method in columns of resin which is employed in the study of isotopic enrichment of 15N is presented. Determinations are made of the isotopic separation constant for the exchange of isotopes 15N and 14N in the equilibrium involving ammonium hidroxide in the solution phase and ions NH4+ adsorbed in cationic resins: Dowex 50W-X8 and X12, 100-200 mesh. Experiments are also conducted for determination of height of theoretical plates for situations of equilibrium of the NH4+ band in two systems of resin's columns aimed at estimating the experimental conditions used. The isotopic analyses of nitrogen are carried out by mass spectrometry

  12. Synthesis of 15 alpha-hydroxyestrogen 15-N-acetylglucosaminides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, E; Namba, S; Kurihara, H; Goto, J; Matsuki, Y; Nambara, T

    1995-03-01

    The synthesis of 15-N-acetylglucosaminides of 15 alpha-hydroxyesterone, 15 alpha-hydroxyestradiol, and 15 alpha-hydroxyestriol (estetrol) is described. The latter two were prepared by condensation of 2-acetamido-1 alpha-chloro-1,2-dideoxy-3,4,6-trio-O-acetyl-D-glucopyranose with appropriately protected 15 alpha-hydroxyestrogens by the Koenigs-Knorr reaction employing cadmium carbonate as a catalyst. Subsequent removal of protecting groups with methanolic potassium hydroxide provided the desired conjugates. 15 alpha-Hydroxyestrone 15-N-acetylglucosaminide was synthesized from the corresponding 15 alpha-hydroxyestradiol derivative by Jones oxidation followed by brief alkaline hydrolysis. These conjugates underwent enzymatic hydrolysis with beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Jack beans to produce 15 alpha-hydroxyestrogens. PMID:7792832

  13. Geomorphic control on the δ15N of mountain forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Hilton

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mountain forests are subject to high rates of physical erosion which can export particulate nitrogen from ecosystems. However, the impact of geomorphic processes on nitrogen budgets remains poorly constrained. We have used the elemental and isotopic composition of soil and plant organic matter to investigate nitrogen cycling in the mountain forest of Taiwan, from 24 sites with distinct geomorphic (topographic slope and climatic (precipitation, temperature characteristics. The organic carbon to nitrogen ratio of soil organic matter decreased with soil 14C age, providing constraint on average rates of nitrogen loss using a mass balance model. Model predictions suggest that present day estimates of nitrogen deposition exceed contemporary and historic nitrogen losses. We found ∼6‰ variability in the stable isotopic composition (δ15N of soil and plants which was not related to soil 14C age or climatic conditions. Instead, δ15N was significantly, negatively correlated with topographic slope. Using the mass balance model, we demonstrate that the correlation can be explained by an increase in nitrogen loss by non-fractioning pathways on steeper slopes, where physical erosion most effectively removes particulate nitrogen. Published data from forests on steep slopes are consistent with the correlation. Based on our dataset and these observations, we hypothesise that variable physical erosion rates can significantly influence soil δ15N, and suggest particulate nitrogen export is a major, yet underappreciated, loss term in the nitrogen budget of mountain forests.

  14. Nitrogen input 15N-signatures are reflected in plant 15N natural abundances of N-rich tropical forest in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdisa Gurmesa, Geshere; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Yunting, Fang; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested the measurement of natural abundance of 15N15N) for its ability to assess changes in N cycling due to increased N deposition in two forest types; namely, an old-growth broadleaved forest and a pine forest, in southern China. We measured δ15N values of inorganic N in input and output fluxes under ambient N deposition, and N concentration and δ15N of major ecosystem compartments under ambient and increased N deposition. Our results showed that N deposition to the forests was 15N-depleted, and was dominated by NH4-N. Plants were 15N-depleted due to imprint from the 15N-depleted atmospheric N deposition. The old-growth forest had larger N concentration and was more 15N-enriched than the pine forest. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect N concentration, but it significantly increased δ15N values of plants, and slightly more so in the pine forest, toward the 15N signature of the added N in both forests. The result indicates that the pine forest may rely more on the 15N-depleted deposition N. Soil δ15N values were slightly decreased by the N addition. Our result suggests that ecosystem δ15N is more sensitive to the changes in ecosystem N status and N cycling than N concentration in N-saturated sub-tropical forests.

  15. NMR chemical shift as analytical derivative of the Helmholtz free energy

    CERN Document Server

    Heuvel, Willem Van den

    2012-01-01

    We present a theory for the temperature-dependent nuclear magnetic shielding tensor of molecules with arbitrary electronic structure. The theory is a generalization of Ramsey's theory for closed-shell molecules. The shielding tensor is defined as a second derivative of the Helmholtz free energy of the electron system in equilibrium with the applied magnetic field and the nuclear magnetic moments. This derivative is analytically evaluated and expressed as a sum over states formula. Special consideration is given to a system with an isolated degenerate ground state for which the size of the degeneracy and the composition of the wave functions are arbitrary. In this case the paramagnetic part of the shielding tensor is expressed in terms of the $g$ and $A$ tensors of the EPR spin Hamiltonian of the degenerate state. As an illustration of the proposed theory, we provide an explicit formula for the paramagnetic shift of the central lanthanide ion in endofullerenes Ln@C$_{60}$, with Ln=Ce$^{3+}$, Nd$^{3+}$, Sm$^{3+...

  16. On the use of pseudocontact shifts in the structure determination of metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Hansen, D Flemming; Ayna, Umit; Dagil, Robert; Hass, Mathias A S; Christensen, Hans E M; Led, Jens J

    2006-03-01

    The utility of pseudocontact shifts in the structure refinement of metalloproteins has been evaluated using a native, paramagnetic Cu(2+) metalloprotein, plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis (A.v.), as a model protein. First, the possibility of detecting signals of nuclei spatially close to the paramagnetic metal ion is investigated using the WEFT pulse sequence in combination with the conventional TOCSY and (1)H-(15)N HSQC sequences. Second, the importance of the electrical charge of the metal ion for the determination of correct pseudocontact shifts from the obtained chemical shifts is evaluated. Thus, using both the Cu(+) plastocyanin and Cd(2+)-substituted plastocyanin as the diamagnetic references, it is found that the Cd(2+)-substituted protein with the same electrical charge of the metal ion as the paramagnetic Cu(2+) plastocyanin provides the most appropriate diamagnetic reference signals. Third, it is found that reliable pseudocontact shifts cannot be obtained from the chemical shifts of the (15)N nuclei in plastocyanin, most likely because these shifts are highly dependent on even minor differences in the structure of the paramagnetic and diamagnetic proteins. Finally, the quality of the obtained (1)H pseudocontact shifts, as well as the possibility of improving the accuracy of the obtained structure, is demonstrated by incorporating the shifts as restraints in a refinement of the solution structure of A.v. plastocyanin. It is found that incorporation of the pseudocontact shifts enhances the precision of the structure in regions with only few NOE restraints and improves the accuracy of the overall structure.

  17. COVALENT BINDING OF REDUCED METABOLITES OF [15N3] TNT TO SOIL ORGANIC MATTER DURING A BIOREMEDIATION PROCESS ANALYZED BY 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY. (R826646)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding ofbiologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-15N3-trinitrotoluene(TNT) to different soil fractions (humic acids, fulvicacids, and humin) using liquid 15N NMR spectroscopy. Asilylation p...

  18. Dynamic of N fertilizers: urea (15 N) and aqua ammonia (15 N) incorporated to the sugar cane soil. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic of N fertilizers, urea and aqua ammonia, in the soil of sugar cane crops are studied with an emphasis on the horizontal and vertical moving. The nitrogen routing from urea and aqua ammonia sources, by isotopic technique with 15 N in relation to the leaching, volatilization and extraction by the cultivation and residue of N immobilized manure in the soil with sugar cane plantation is also analysed. (C.G.C.)

  19. Liver fat quantification: Comparison of dual-echo and triple-echo chemical shift MRI to MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satkunasingham, Janakan; Besa, Cecilia [Department of Radiology, Body MRI, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Bane, Octavia [Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Shah, Ami [Department of Radiology, Body MRI, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Oliveira, André de; Gilson, Wesley D.; Kannengiesser, Stephan [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Taouli, Bachir, E-mail: bachir.taouli@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiology, Body MRI, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We present a large cohort of patients who underwent dual and triple echo chemical shift imaging against multi-echo T{sub 2} corrected MR spectroscopy (MRS) for liver fat quantification. • Our data suggests that a triple-echo sequence is highly accurate for detection of liver fat, even in the presence of T{sub 2}{sup *} shortening, with minor discrepancies when compared with the advanced fat quantification method. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess the diagnostic value of MRI using dual-echo (2PD) and triple-echo (3PD) chemical shift imaging for liver fat quantification against multi-echo T{sub 2} corrected MR spectroscopy (MRS) used as the reference standard, and examine the effect of T{sub 2}{sup *} imaging on accuracy of MRI for fat quantification. Materials and methods: Patients who underwent 1.5 T liver MRI that incorporated 2PD, 3PD, multi-echo T{sub 2}{sup *} and MRS were included in this IRB approved prospective study. Regions of interest were placed in the liver to measure fat fraction (FF) with 2PD and 3PD and compared with MRS-FF. A random subset of 25 patients with a wide range of MRS-FF was analyzed with an advanced FF calculation method, to prove concordance with the 3PD. The statistical analysis included correlation stratified according to T{sub 2}{sup *}, Bland-Altman analysis, and calculation of diagnostic accuracy for detection of MRS-FF > 6.25%. Results: 220 MRI studies were identified in 217 patients (mean BMI 28.0 ± 5.6). 57/217 (26.2%) patients demonstrated liver steatosis (MRS-FF > 6.25%). Bland-Altman analysis revealed strong agreement between 3PD and MRS (mean ± 1.96 SD: −0.5% ± 4.6%) and weaker agreement between 2PD and MRS (4.7% ± 16.0%). Sensitivity of 3PD for diagnosing FF> 6.25% was higher than that of 2PD. 3PD-FF showed minor discrepancies (coefficient of variation <10%) from FF measured with the advanced method. Conclusion: Our large series study validates the use of 3PD chemical shift sequence for detection of

  20. Liver fat quantification: Comparison of dual-echo and triple-echo chemical shift MRI to MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We present a large cohort of patients who underwent dual and triple echo chemical shift imaging against multi-echo T2 corrected MR spectroscopy (MRS) for liver fat quantification. • Our data suggests that a triple-echo sequence is highly accurate for detection of liver fat, even in the presence of T2* shortening, with minor discrepancies when compared with the advanced fat quantification method. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess the diagnostic value of MRI using dual-echo (2PD) and triple-echo (3PD) chemical shift imaging for liver fat quantification against multi-echo T2 corrected MR spectroscopy (MRS) used as the reference standard, and examine the effect of T2* imaging on accuracy of MRI for fat quantification. Materials and methods: Patients who underwent 1.5 T liver MRI that incorporated 2PD, 3PD, multi-echo T2* and MRS were included in this IRB approved prospective study. Regions of interest were placed in the liver to measure fat fraction (FF) with 2PD and 3PD and compared with MRS-FF. A random subset of 25 patients with a wide range of MRS-FF was analyzed with an advanced FF calculation method, to prove concordance with the 3PD. The statistical analysis included correlation stratified according to T2*, Bland-Altman analysis, and calculation of diagnostic accuracy for detection of MRS-FF > 6.25%. Results: 220 MRI studies were identified in 217 patients (mean BMI 28.0 ± 5.6). 57/217 (26.2%) patients demonstrated liver steatosis (MRS-FF > 6.25%). Bland-Altman analysis revealed strong agreement between 3PD and MRS (mean ± 1.96 SD: −0.5% ± 4.6%) and weaker agreement between 2PD and MRS (4.7% ± 16.0%). Sensitivity of 3PD for diagnosing FF> 6.25% was higher than that of 2PD. 3PD-FF showed minor discrepancies (coefficient of variation <10%) from FF measured with the advanced method. Conclusion: Our large series study validates the use of 3PD chemical shift sequence for detection of liver fat in the clinical environment, even in the presence of

  1. Molecular structure and vibrational bands and 13C chemical shift assignments of both enmein-type diterpenoids by DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wu, Yi fang; Wang, Xue liang

    2014-01-01

    We report here theoretical and experimental studies on the molecular structure and vibrational and NMR spectra of both natural enmein type diterpenoids molecule (6, 7-seco-ent-kaurenes enmein type), isolated from the leaves of Isodon japonica (Burm.f.) Hara var. galaucocalyx (maxin) Hara. The optimized geometry, total energy, NMR chemical shifts and vibrational wavenumbers of epinodosinol and epinodosin have been determined using B3LYP method with 6-311G (d,p) basis set. A complete vibrational assignment is provided for the observed IR spectra of studied compounds. The calculated wavenumbers and 13C c.s. are in an excellent agreement with the experimental values. Quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level of theory have been carried out on studied compounds to obtain a set of molecular electronic properties (MEP,HOMO, LUMO and gap energies ΔEg). Electrostatic potential surfaces have been mapped over the electron density isosurfaces to obtain information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and chemical reactivity of the molecules.

  2. A novel method for trapping and analyzing 15N in NO for tracing NO sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ronghua; Mulder, Jan; Dörsch, Peter

    2016-04-01

    15N isotope tracing is an effective and direct approach to investigate the biological and chemical sources of nitric oxide (NO) in soil. However, NO is highly reactive and rapidly converted to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the presence of ozone. Various chemical conversions of NO to the more stable solutes nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) have been proposed, which allow analysing the 15N abundance without major fractionation. However, NO emissions from soils are usually small, posing major challenges to conversion efficiency and background contamination. Here we present a novel method in which NO is oxidized to NO2- by chromium trioxide (CrO3) prior to conversion to NO2- and NO3- in an alkaline hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution. Immediately following trapping, manganese dioxide (MnO2) and 5M HCl are added to remove excess H2O2, and to adjust the pH to around 6.0-7.0, respectively. The resulting solution can be stored until analysis and is none-toxic, allowing to use a modified denitrifier method (Zhu et al., submitted), where NO2- and NO3- are reduced quantitatively to nitrous oxide (N2O). Optimum NO conversion rates of > 90% even at extremely low initial NO concentration were obtained with 4% H2O2, 0.5 M NaOH, and 0.5 L min-1 gas flow rate. In a laboratory test, using NO gas with different 15N signals produced from unlabelled and labelled NO2-, we found an overall precision of 0.4‰ for unlabelled and 49.7‰ for NO enriched with 1.0 atom% 15N, respectively. This indicates that this method can be used for both natural abundance studies of NO, as well as in labelling studies tracing NO sources. Zhu J, Yu L, Bakken LR, Mørkved PT, Mulder J, Dörsch P. Controlled induction of denitrification in Pseudomonas aureofaciens: a modified denitrifier method for 15N and 18O analysis in NO3- from natural water samples by IRMS. Submitted.

  3. NMR chemical shift analysis of the conformational transition between the monomer and tetramer of melittin in an aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Yoshinori

    2016-05-01

    It is known that melittin in an aqueous solution undergoes a conformational transition between the monomer and tetramer by variation in temperature. The transition correlates closely with isomers of the proline residue; monomeric melittin including a trans proline peptide bond (trans-monomer) is involved directly in the transition, whereas monomeric melittin having a cis proline peptide bond (cis-monomer) is virtually not. The transition has been explored by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in order to clarify the stability of the tetrameric conformation and the cooperativity of the transition. In the light of temperature dependence of chemical shifts of resonances from the isomeric monomers, we qualitatively estimate the temperature-, salt-, and concentration-dependence of the relative equilibrium populations of the trans-monomer and tetramer, and show that the tetramer has a maximum conformational stability at 30-45 °C and that the transition cooperativity is very low. PMID:26658745

  4. Backbone and stereospecific (13)C methyl Ile (δ1), Leu and Val side-chain chemical shift assignments of Crc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rakhi; Sahu, Bhubanananda; Ray, Malay K; Deshmukh, Mandar V

    2015-04-01

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) allows bacteria to selectively assimilate a preferred compound among a mixture of several potential carbon sources, thus boosting growth and economizing the cost of adaptability to variable nutrients in the environment. The RNA-binding catabolite repression control (Crc) protein acts as a global post-transcriptional regulator of CCR in Pseudomonas species. Crc triggers repression by inhibiting the expression of genes involved in transport and catabolism of non-preferred substrates, thus indirectly favoring assimilation of preferred one. We report here a nearly complete backbone and stereospecific (13)C methyl side-chain chemical shift assignments of Ile (δ1), Leu and Val of Crc (~ 31 kDa) from Pseudomonas syringae Lz4W. PMID:24496608

  5. Compound specific amino acid δ15N in marine sediments: A new approach for studies of the marine nitrogen cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Fabian C.; Ravelo, A. Christina; Crusius, John; Casso, Michael A.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-10-01

    The nitrogen (N) isotopic composition (δ15N) of bulk sedimentary N (δ15Nbulk) is a common tool for studying past biogeochemical cycling in the paleoceanographic record. Empirical evidence suggests that natural fluctuations in the δ15N of surface nutrient N are reflected in the δ15N of exported planktonic biomass and in sedimentary δ15Nbulk. However, δ15Nbulk is an analysis of total combustible sedimentary N, and therefore also includes mixtures of N sources and/or selective removal or preservation of N-containing compounds. Compound-specific nitrogen isotope analyses of individual amino acids (δ15NAA) are novel measurements with the potential to decouple δ15N changes in nutrient N from trophic effects, two main processes that can influence δ15Nbulk records. As a proof of concept study to examine how δ15NAA can be applied in marine sedimentary systems, we compare the δ15NAA signatures of surface and sinking POM sources with shallow surface sediments from the Santa Barbara Basin, a sub-oxic depositional environmental that exhibits excellent preservation of sedimentary organic matter. Our results demonstrate that δ15NAA signatures of both planktonic biomass and sinking POM are well preserved in such surface sediments. However, we also observed an unexpected inverse correlation between δ15N value of phenylalanine (δ15NPhe; the best AA proxy for N isotopic value at the base of the food web) and calculated trophic position. We used a simple N isotope mass balance model to confirm that over long time scales, δ15NPhe values should in fact be directly dependent on shifts in ecosystem trophic position. While this result may appear incongruent with current applications of δ15NAA in food webs, it is consistent with expectations that paleoarchives will integrate N dynamics over much longer timescales. We therefore propose that for paleoceanographic applications, key δ15NAA parameters are ecosystem trophic position, which determines relative partitioning of 15N

  6. Thickness-Dependent Binding Energy Shift in Few-Layer MoS2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Chen, Ruei-San; Chou, Tsu-Chin; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2016-08-31

    The thickness-dependent surface states of MoS2 thin films grown by the chemical vapor deposition process on the SiO2-Si substrates are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Raman and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy suggest the thicknesses of MoS2 films to be ranging from 3 to 10 layers. Both the core levels and valence band edges of MoS2 shift downward ∼0.2 eV as the film thickness increases, which can be ascribed to the Fermi level variations resulting from the surface states and bulk defects. Grainy features observed from the atomic force microscopy topographies, and sulfur-vacancy-induced defect states illustrated at the valence band spectra imply the generation of surface states that causes the downward band bending at the n-type MoS2 surface. Bulk defects in thick MoS2 may also influence the Fermi level oppositely compared to the surface states. When Au contacts with our MoS2 thin films, the Fermi level downshifts and the binding energy reduces due to the hole-doping characteristics of Au and easy charge transfer from the surface defect sites of MoS2. The shift of the onset potentials in hydrogen evolution reaction and the evolution of charge-transfer resistances extracted from the impedance measurement also indicate the Fermi level varies with MoS2 film thickness. The tunable Fermi level and the high chemical stability make our MoS2 a potential catalyst. The observed thickness-dependent properties can also be applied to other transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and facilitates the development in the low-dimensional electronic devices and catalysts. PMID:27488185

  7. Thickness-Dependent Binding Energy Shift in Few-Layer MoS2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Chen, Ruei-San; Chou, Tsu-Chin; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2016-08-31

    The thickness-dependent surface states of MoS2 thin films grown by the chemical vapor deposition process on the SiO2-Si substrates are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Raman and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy suggest the thicknesses of MoS2 films to be ranging from 3 to 10 layers. Both the core levels and valence band edges of MoS2 shift downward ∼0.2 eV as the film thickness increases, which can be ascribed to the Fermi level variations resulting from the surface states and bulk defects. Grainy features observed from the atomic force microscopy topographies, and sulfur-vacancy-induced defect states illustrated at the valence band spectra imply the generation of surface states that causes the downward band bending at the n-type MoS2 surface. Bulk defects in thick MoS2 may also influence the Fermi level oppositely compared to the surface states. When Au contacts with our MoS2 thin films, the Fermi level downshifts and the binding energy reduces due to the hole-doping characteristics of Au and easy charge transfer from the surface defect sites of MoS2. The shift of the onset potentials in hydrogen evolution reaction and the evolution of charge-transfer resistances extracted from the impedance measurement also indicate the Fermi level varies with MoS2 film thickness. The tunable Fermi level and the high chemical stability make our MoS2 a potential catalyst. The observed thickness-dependent properties can also be applied to other transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and facilitates the development in the low-dimensional electronic devices and catalysts.

  8. Microscopic structures of ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate in water probed by the relative chemical shift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The relative chemical shifts (△δ) △δwere put forward to investigate the microscopic structure of 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EmimBF4) during the dilution process with water.The concentration-dependent △δ(C2)H-(C4)H,△δ(C2)H-(C5)H and △δ(C4)H-(C5)H were analyzed.The results reveal that the variations of the microscopic structures of three aromatic protons are inconsistent.The strength of the H-bond between water and three aromatic protons follows the order:(C2)H···O > (C4)H···O > (C5)H···O.The concentration-dependent △δ(C6)H-(C7)H and △δ(C6)H-(C8)H indicate the formation of the H-bonds of (Calkyl)H···O is impossible,and more water is located around (C6)H than around (C7)H or (C8)H.The concentration-dependent △δ(C2)H-(C4)H and △δ(C2)H-(C5)H both increase rapidly when xwater > 0.9 or so,suggesting the ionic pairs of EmimBF4 are dissociated rapidly.The turning points of concentration-dependent △δ(C2)H-(C4)H and △δ(C2)H-(C5)H indicate that some physical properties of the EmimBF4/water mixtures also change at the corresponding concentration point.The microscopic structures of EmimBF4 in water could be clearly detected by the relative chemical shifts.

  9. Zero discharge tanning: a shift from chemical to biocatalytic leather processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanikaivelan, Palanisamy; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Ramasami, Thirumalachari

    2002-10-01

    Beam house processes (Beam house processes generally mean liming-reliming processes, which employ beam.) contribute more than 60% of the total pollution from leather processing. The use of lime and sodium sulfide is of environmental concern (1, 2). Recently, the authors have developed an enzyme-based dehairing assisted with a very low amount of sodium sulfide, which completely avoids the use of lime. However, the dehaired pelt requires opening up of fiber bundles for further processing, where lime is employed to achieve this through osmotic swelling. Huge amounts of lime sludge and total solids are the main drawbacks of lime. An alternative bioprocess, based on alpha-amylase for fiber opening, has been attempted after enzymatic unhairing. This totally eliminates the use of lime in leather processing. This method enables subsequent processes and operations in leather making feasible without a deliming process. A control experiment was run in parallel using conventional liming-reliming processes. It has been found that the extent of opening up of fiber bundles using alpha-amylase is comparable to that of the control. This has been substantiated through scanning electron microscopic, stratigraphic chrome distribution analysis, and softness measurements. Performance of the leathers is shown to be on a par with leathers produced by the conventional process through physical and hand evaluation. Importantly, softness of the leathers is numerically proven to be comparable with that of control. The process also demonstrates reduction in chemical oxygen demand load by 45% and total solids load by 20% compared to the conventional process. The total dry sludge from the beam house processes is brought down from 152 to 8 kg for processing 1 ton of raw hides.

  10. Sedimentary records of δ13C, δ15N and organic matter accumulation in lakes receiving nutrient-rich mine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic C and total N concentrations, C/N ratios, δ15N and δ13C values in 210Pb-dated sediment cores were used to reconstruct historical changes in organic matter (OM) accumulation in three Swedish lakes receiving nutrient-rich mine waters. Ammonium-nitrate-based explosives and sodium cyanide (NaCN) used in gold extraction were the major N sources, while lesser amounts of P originated from apatite and flotation chemicals. The software IsoSource was used to model the relative contribution of soil, terrestrial and littoral vegetation, and phytoplankton detritus in the lake sediments. In one lake the IsoSource modelling failed, suggesting the presence of additional, unknown OM sources. In two of the lakes sedimentary detritus of littoral vegetation and phytoplankton had increased by 15–20% and 20–35%, respectively, since ∼ 1950, when N- and P-rich mine waters began to reach the lakes. Today, phytoplankton is the dominating OM component in these lake sediments, which appears to be a eutrophication effect related to mining operations. Changes in the N isotopic composition of biota, lake water, and sediments related to the use of ammonium-nitrate-based explosives and NaCN were evident in the two studied systems. However, N isotope signals in the receiving waters (δ15N ∼ + 9‰ to + 19‰) were clearly shifted from the primary signal in explosives (δ15N–NO3 = + 3.4 ± 0.3‰; δ15N–NH4 = − 8.0 ± 0.3‰) and NaCN (δ15N = + 1.1 ± 0.5‰), and direct tracing of the primary N isotope signals in mining chemicals was not possible in the receiving waters. Systems where mine waters with a well known discharge history are a major point source of N with well-defined isotopic composition should, however, be suitable for further studies of processes controlling N isotope signatures and their transformation in aquatic systems receiving mine waters. - Highlights: • Historical mining-related changes in organic matter accumulation were revealed. • Macrophyte and

  11. Sedimentary records of δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N and organic matter accumulation in lakes receiving nutrient-rich mine waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widerlund, Anders, E-mail: Anders.Widerlund@ltu.se; Chlot, Sara; Öhlander, Björn

    2014-07-01

    Organic C and total N concentrations, C/N ratios, δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 13}C values in {sup 210}Pb-dated sediment cores were used to reconstruct historical changes in organic matter (OM) accumulation in three Swedish lakes receiving nutrient-rich mine waters. Ammonium-nitrate-based explosives and sodium cyanide (NaCN) used in gold extraction were the major N sources, while lesser amounts of P originated from apatite and flotation chemicals. The software IsoSource was used to model the relative contribution of soil, terrestrial and littoral vegetation, and phytoplankton detritus in the lake sediments. In one lake the IsoSource modelling failed, suggesting the presence of additional, unknown OM sources. In two of the lakes sedimentary detritus of littoral vegetation and phytoplankton had increased by 15–20% and 20–35%, respectively, since ∼ 1950, when N- and P-rich mine waters began to reach the lakes. Today, phytoplankton is the dominating OM component in these lake sediments, which appears to be a eutrophication effect related to mining operations. Changes in the N isotopic composition of biota, lake water, and sediments related to the use of ammonium-nitrate-based explosives and NaCN were evident in the two studied systems. However, N isotope signals in the receiving waters (δ{sup 15}N ∼ + 9‰ to + 19‰) were clearly shifted from the primary signal in explosives (δ{sup 15}N–NO{sub 3} = + 3.4 ± 0.3‰; δ{sup 15}N–NH{sub 4} = − 8.0 ± 0.3‰) and NaCN (δ{sup 15}N = + 1.1 ± 0.5‰), and direct tracing of the primary N isotope signals in mining chemicals was not possible in the receiving waters. Systems where mine waters with a well known discharge history are a major point source of N with well-defined isotopic composition should, however, be suitable for further studies of processes controlling N isotope signatures and their transformation in aquatic systems receiving mine waters. - Highlights: • Historical mining-related changes in organic

  12. 1H, 15N and 13C NMR resonance assignment, secondary structure and global fold of the FMN-binding domain of human cytochrome P450

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FMN-binding domain of human NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase,corresponding to exons 3-;7, has been expressed at high level in an active form and labelled with 13C and 15N. Most of the backbone and aliphatic side-chain 1H, 15Nand 13C resonances have been assigned using heteronuclear double- and triple-resonance methods, together with a semiautomatic assignment strategy. The secondary structure as estimated from the chemical shift index and NOE connectivities consists of six α-helices and fiveβ-strands. The global fold was deduced from the long-range NOE sun ambiguously assigned in a 4D 13C-resolved HMQC-NOESY-HMQC spectrum. The fold is of the alternating α/β type, with the fiveβ-strands arranged into a parallel β-sheet. The secondary structure and global fold are very similar to those of the bacterial flavodoxins, but the FMN-binding domain has an extra short helix in place of a loop, and an extra helix at the N-terminus (leading to the membrane anchordomain in the intact P450 reductase). The experimental constraints were combined with homology modelling to obtain a structure of the FMN-bindingdomain satisfying the observed NOE constraints. Chemical shift comparisons showed that the effects of FMN binding and of FMN reduction are largely localised at the binding site

  13. Comparison of experimental and DFT-calculated NMR chemical shifts of 2-amino and 2-hydroxyl substituted phenyl benzimidazoles, benzoxazoles and benzothiazoles in four solvents using the IEF-PCM solvation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierens, Gregory K; Venkatachalam, T K; Reutens, David C

    2016-04-01

    A comparative study of experimental and calculated NMR chemical shifts of six compounds comprising 2-amino and 2-hydroxy phenyl benzoxazoles/benzothiazoles/benzimidazoles in four solvents is reported. The benzimidazoles showed interesting spectral characteristics, which are discussed. The proton and carbon chemical shifts were similar for all solvents. The largest chemical shift deviations were observed in benzene. The chemical shifts were calculated with density functional theory using a suite of four functionals and basis set combinations. The calculated chemical shifts revealed a good match to the experimentally observed values in most of the solvents. The mean absolute error was used as the primary metric. The use of an additional metric is suggested, which is based on the order of chemical shifts. The DP4 probability measures were also used to compare the experimental and calculated chemical shifts for each compound in the four solvents. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Chemical shift measurements of chlorine K X-ray spectra using a high-resolution PIXE system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-efficiency high-resolution wavelength-dispersive spectrograph with a von-Hamos configuration was developed for chemical state identification of elements in environmental samples using PIXE analysis. To evaluate the performance of this system, chlorine K X-ray spectra for NaCl, NH4Cl and polyvinylchloride (PVC) targets were measured and compared. Also, to study the applicability to environmental mixed samples, mixtures of NaCl and NH4Cl with different mixing ratios were measured. Through observation of Cl Kα1 X-ray from NaCl, the energy resolution of the system was determined to be 1.1 eV. For the NaCl sample, a Kβx line was observed at an energy, which is higher than that of the Kβ main peak by 2 eV, whereas no Kβx emission was observed for the NH4Cl sample. The chemical shift of the Kβ main peak for PVC relative to that for NaCl was about 1.2 eV. For NaCl-NH4Cl mixture targets, the relative intensity of Kβx satellite to the Kβ main line provided an indication of mixing ratio. Energies and relative intensity of Cl Kβ X-ray satellites for NaCl and NH4Cl samples calculated by a simple molecular-orbital method agreed only qualitatively with the experimental results

  15. Predictions of the fluorine NMR chemical shifts of perfluorinated carboxylic acids, CnF(2n+1)COOH (n = 6-8).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zizhong; Goddard, John D

    2009-12-17

    Perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) are a class of persistent environmental pollutants. Commercially available PFCAs are mixtures of linear and branched isomers, possibly with impurities. Different isomers have different physical and chemical properties and toxicities. However, little is known about the properties and the finer details of the structures of the individual branched isomers. Full geometry optimizations for the linear n-alkane (C(6)-C(27)) PFCAs indicated that all have helical structures. The helical angle increases slightly with increasing chain length, from 16.3 degrees in C(6)F(13)COOH to 17.0 degrees in C(27)F(55)COOH. This study predicts (19)F NMR parameters for 69 linear and branched isomers of the perfluoro carboxylic acids C(6)F(13)COOH, C(7)F(15)COOH, and C(8)F(17)COOH. B3LYP-GIAO/6-31++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) was used for the NMR calculations with analysis of the chemical shifts by the natural bond orbital method. The predictions of the (19)F chemical shifts revealed the differences among the CF(3), CF(2), and CF groups. In general, the absolute values for the chemical shifts for the CF(3) group are smaller than 90 ppm, for the CF larger than 160 ppm, and for the CF(2) between 110 and 130 ppm. The chemical shifts of the branched isomers are smaller in magnitude than the linear ones. The decrease is correlated with the steric hindrance of the CF(3) groups, the more hindered the CF(3), the greater the decrease in the (19)F chemical shifts. The predicted (19)F chemical shifts are similar to those for analogous perfluoro compounds with other terminal functional groups such as -SO(3)H or -SO(3)NH(2)CH(2)CH(3).

  16. High accuracy NMR chemical shift corrected for bulk magnetization as a tool for structural elucidation of dilutable microemulsions. Part 1 - Proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Roy E; Darmon, Eliezer; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2016-02-01

    In microemulsions, changes in droplet size and shape and possible transformations occur under various conditions. They are difficult to characterize by most analytical tools because of their nano-sized structure and dynamic nature. Several methods are usually combined to obtain reliable information, guiding the scientist in understanding their physical behavior. We felt that there is a need for a technique that complements those in use today in order to provide more information on the microemulsion behavior, mainly as a function of dilution with water. The improvement of NMR chemical shift measurements independent of bulk magnetization effects makes it possible to study the very weak intermolecular chemical shift effects. In the present study, we used NMR high resolution magic angle spinning to measure the chemical shift very accurately, free of bulk magnetization effects. The chemical shift of microemulsion components is measured as a function of the water content in order to validate the method in an interesting and promising, U-type dilutable microemulsion, which had been previously studied by a variety of techniques. Phase transition points of the microemulsion (O/W, bicontinuous, W/O) and changes in droplet shape were successfully detected using high-accuracy chemical shift measurements. We analyzed the results and found them to be compatible with the previous studies, paving the way for high-accuracy chemical shifts to be used for the study of other microemulsion systems. We detected two transition points along the water dilution line of the concentrate (reverse micelles) corresponding to the transition from swollen W/O nano-droplets to bicontinuous to the O/W droplets along with the changes in the droplets' sizes and shapes. The method seems to be in excellent agreement with other previously studied techniques and shows the advantage of this easy and valid technique.

  17. Range expansion of the jumbo squid in the NE Pacific: δ15N decrypts multiple origins, migration and habitat use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio I Ruiz-Cooley

    Full Text Available Coincident with climate shifts and anthropogenic perturbations, the highly voracious jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas reached unprecedented northern latitudes along the NE Pacific margin post 1997-98. The physical or biological drivers of this expansion, as well as its ecological consequences remain unknown. Here, novel analysis from both bulk tissues and individual amino acids (Phenylalanine; Phe and Glutamic acid; Glu in both gladii and muscle of D. gigas captured in the Northern California Current System (NCCS documents for the first time multiple geographic origins and migration. Phe δ(15N values, a proxy for habitat baseline δ(15N values, confirm at least three different geographic origins that were initially detected by highly variable bulk δ(15N values in gladii for squid at small sizes (60 cm converged, indicating feeding in a common ecosystem. The strong latitudinal gradient in Phe δ(15N values from composite muscle samples further confirmed residency at a point in time for large squid in the NCCS. These results contrast with previous ideas, and indicate that small squid are highly migratory, move into the NCCS from two or more distinct geographic origins, and use this ecosystem mainly for feeding. These results represent the first direct information on the origins, immigration and habitat use of this key "invasive" predator in the NCCS, with wide implications for understanding both the mechanisms of periodic D. gigas population range expansions, and effects on ecosystem trophic structure.

  18. Range expansion of the jumbo squid in the NE Pacific: δ15N decrypts multiple origins, migration and habitat use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Cooley, Rocio I; Ballance, Lisa T; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    Coincident with climate shifts and anthropogenic perturbations, the highly voracious jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas reached unprecedented northern latitudes along the NE Pacific margin post 1997-98. The physical or biological drivers of this expansion, as well as its ecological consequences remain unknown. Here, novel analysis from both bulk tissues and individual amino acids (Phenylalanine; Phe and Glutamic acid; Glu) in both gladii and muscle of D. gigas captured in the Northern California Current System (NCCS) documents for the first time multiple geographic origins and migration. Phe δ(15)N values, a proxy for habitat baseline δ(15)N values, confirm at least three different geographic origins that were initially detected by highly variable bulk δ(15)N values in gladii for squid at small sizes (60 cm) converged, indicating feeding in a common ecosystem. The strong latitudinal gradient in Phe δ(15)N values from composite muscle samples further confirmed residency at a point in time for large squid in the NCCS. These results contrast with previous ideas, and indicate that small squid are highly migratory, move into the NCCS from two or more distinct geographic origins, and use this ecosystem mainly for feeding. These results represent the first direct information on the origins, immigration and habitat use of this key "invasive" predator in the NCCS, with wide implications for understanding both the mechanisms of periodic D. gigas population range expansions, and effects on ecosystem trophic structure. PMID:23527242

  19. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Kayler, Z.E.; Kaiser, M; Gessler, A.; Ellerbrock, R. H.; M. Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. Analysis of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of stabilized OM fractions along with soil mineral characteristics may yield important information about OM-mineral associations and their processing history. We anlayzed the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM) fractio...

  20. Ultrafast magnetic-resonance-imaging velocimetry of liquid-liquid systems: overcoming chemical-shift artifacts using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayler, Alexander B; Benning, Martin; Sederman, Andrew J; Holland, Daniel J; Gladden, Lynn F

    2014-06-01

    We present simultaneous measurement of dispersed and continuous phase flow fields for liquid-liquid systems obtained using ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging. Chemical-shift artifacts, which are otherwise highly problematic for this type of measurement, are overcome using a compressed sensing based image reconstruction algorithm that accounts for off-resonant signal components. This scheme is combined with high-temporal-resolution spiral imaging (188 frames per second), which is noted for its robustness to flow. It is demonstrated that both quantitative signal intensity and phase preconditioning are preserved throughout the image reconstruction algorithm. Measurements are acquired of oil droplets of varying viscosity rising through stagnant water. From these data it is apparent that the internal droplet flow fields are heavily influenced by the droplet shape oscillations, and that the accurate modeling of droplet shape is of critical importance in the modeling of droplet-side hydrodynamics. The application of the technique to three-component systems is also demonstrated, as is the measurement of local concentration maps of a mutually soluble species (acetone in polydimethylsiloxane-water).

  1. Effect of spectra recording conditions on the example of chemical shifts calculation in CMR spectra of 1-pentylbenzoylformate

    OpenAIRE

    Mizyuk, Volodymyr; Shibanov, Volodymyr

    2011-01-01

    The concept of "compatible" and "incompatible" CMR spectra has been introduced. Application of compatibility increments (IC) allows to calculate the chemical shifts of C and C3 atoms of pentyloxyl fragment in 1-pentylbenzoylformate with a sufficiently good accuracy. Введено поняття "сумісних " і "несумісних " ЯМР спектрів. Застосування "інкрементів узгодження " дало можливість з достатньою точністю розрахувати хімічні зсуви атомів С2 і С пентилоксильного фрагменту в 1-пентилбензоїлформіаті....

  2. The study on temporal lobe epilepsy with single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of different proton MR spectroscopy techniques including single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS) and chemical shift imaging (CSI) in diagnosing patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods: Sixty cases (40 normal, 20 temporal lobe epilepsy) experienced SVS and CSI. The volume of interest (VOI) of SVS was placed over the anterior hippocampus formation (HF) region, including part of the head and body of the HF. The VOI of CSI encompassed bilateral HF and the head, body and tail of HF. The VOI was divided into 5 voxels from anterior to posterior. The metabolite data of both SVS and CSI were obtained and the ratios of NAA/Cr and NAA/(Cho+Cr) were recorded or calculated. Results: The ipsilateral hippocampus to the seizure of TLE patients had lower ratios of NAA/(Cho+Cr) and NAA/Cr, and the differences compared with those of the normal group and contralateral subgroup were statistically significant (F=41.958, P1HMRS study improved the diagnostic yield of MR evaluation in TLE patients. There was a correlation between the ratio of NAA/(Cho+Cr) and the location of HF. Regional variation must be considered when interpreting proton spectra of the HF. (author)

  3. Fate of orally administered {sup 15}N-labeled polyamines in rats bearing solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Samejima, Keijiro; Goda, Hitomi; Niitsu, Masaru [Josai Univ., Sakado, Saitama (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Xu Yongji [Qingdao Univ. of Science and Technology (China). Inst. of Chemical and Molecular Technology; Takahashi, Masakazu [Sasaki Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Hashimoto, Yoshiyuki [Kyoritsu Coll. of Pharmacy, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    We studied absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) in the gastrointestinal tract using {sup 15}N-labeled polyamines as tracers and ionspray ionization mass spectrometry (IS-MS). The relatively simple protocol using rats bearing solid tumors provided useful information. Three {sup 15}N-labeled polyamines that were simultaneously administered were absorbed equally from gastrointestinal tract, and distributed within tissues at various concentrations. The uptake of {sup 15}N-spermidine seemed preferential to that of {sup 15}N-spermine since the concentrations of {sup 15}N-spermidine in the liver and tumors were higher, whereas those of {sup 15}N-spermine were higher in the kidney, probably due to the excretion of excess extracellular spermine. Most of the absorbed {sup 15}N-putrescine seemed to be lost, suggesting blood and tissue diamine oxidase degradation. Concentrations of {sup 15}N-spermidine and {sup 15}N-spermine in the tumor were low. We also describe the findings from two rats that were administered with {sup 15}N-spermine. The tissue concentrations of {sup 15}N-spermine were unusually high, and significant levels of {sup 15}N-spermidine were derived from {sup 15}N-spermine in these animals. (author)

  4. Investigation of the metabolism of colostomized laying hens with 15N-labelled wheat. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three colostomized laving hens received 40 g 15N-labelled wheat with 20.13 atom-% 15N excess (15N'), 19.18 atom-% 15N'-lysine, 18.17 atom-% 15N'-histidine and 20.43 atom-% 15N'-arginine per day over a period of four days. After having received the same non-labelled feed ration on the following four days, the hens were slaughtered. The incorporation and distribution of 15N' in the total nitrogen and the nitrogen of the basic amino acids was determined in liver, kidneys, muscles, bones and the remaining carcass (excluding blood, digestive tract and genital organs). The quota of nitrogen of natural isotope frequency (14N) of the total 14N of the hens' carcasses was 47% in the muscles, 14% in the bones and 20% in the feathers; the relative 15N' values were 37%, 8% and 1%, resp. The atom-% 15N' in the kidneys was twice as much as in the liver four days after the last 15N' application. The average percentage of the nitrogen in the three basic amino acids of the total nitrogen in the tissues and organs (excluding feathers) is 25% concerning both 14N and 15N'. The 15N' balance revealed that in hen 1 100%, in hen 2 102% and in hen 3 101% of the consumed wheat 15N' were found. (author)

  5. Human baby hair amino acid natural abundance 15N-isotope values are not related to the 15N-isotope values of amino acids in mother's breast milk protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romek, Katarzyna M; Julien, Maxime; Frasquet-Darrieux, Marine; Tea, Illa; Antheaume, Ingrid; Hankard, Régis; Robins, Richard J

    2013-12-01

    Since exclusively breast-suckled infants obtain their nutrient only from their mother's milk, it might be anticipated that a correlation will exist between the (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios of amino acids of protein of young infants and those supplied by their mother. The work presented here aimed to determine whether amino nitrogen transfer from human milk to infant hair protein synthesized within the first month of life conserves the maternal isotopic signature or whether post-ingestion fractionation dominates the nitrogen isotope spectrum. The study was conducted at 1 month post-birth on 100 mother-infant pairs. Isotope ratios (15)N/(14)N and (13)C/(12)C were measured using isotope ratio measurement by Mass Spectrometry (irm-MS) for whole maternal milk, and infant hair and (15)N/(14)N ratios were also measured by GC-irm-MS for the N-pivaloyl-O-isopropyl esters of amino acids obtained from the hydrolysis of milk and hair proteins. The δ(15)N and δ(13)C (‰) were found to be significantly higher in infant hair than in breast milk (δ(15)N, P amino acids in infant hair was also significantly higher than that in maternal milk (P < 0.001). By calculation, the observed shift in isotope ratio was shown not to be accounted for by the amino acid composition of hair and milk proteins, indicating that it is not simply due to differences in the composition in the proteins present. Rather, it would appear that each pool-mother and infant-turns over independently, and that fractionation in infant N-metabolism even in the first month of life dominates over the nutrient N-content.

  6. Probing the solvent shell with 195Pt chemical shifts: density functional theory molecular dynamics study of Pt(II) and Pt(IV) anionic complexes in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truflandier, Lionel A; Autschbach, Jochen

    2010-03-17

    Ab initio molecular dynamics (aiMD) simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed on a set of five anionic platinum complexes in aqueous solution. (195)Pt nuclear magnetic shielding constants were computed with DFT as averages over the aiMD trajectories, using the two-component relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) in order to treat relativistic effects on the Pt shielding tensors. The chemical shifts obtained from the aiMD averages are in good agreement with experimental data. For Pt(II) and Pt(IV) halide complexes we found an intermediate solvent shell interacting with the complexes that causes pronounced solvent effects on the Pt chemical shifts. For these complexes, the magnitude of solvent effects on the Pt shielding constant can be correlated with the surface charge density. For square-planar Pt complexes the aiMD simulations also clearly demonstrate the influence of closely coordinated non-equatorial water molecules on the Pt chemical shift, relating the structure of the solution around the complex to the solvent effects on the metal NMR chemical shift. For the complex [Pt(CN)(4)](2-), the solvent effects on the Pt shielding constant are surprisingly small. PMID:20166712

  7. Determination of 15N nitrates in water samples using mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitrogen element (Z = 7) has two stable isotopes, whose relative quantities are 99.64% for 14N and 0.36% for 15N. Nitrogen is part of many processes and reactions that are important to life and that affect the quality of the water. Within the nitrogen cycle there are kinetic and thermodynamic fractionation processes, which are potentially important for tracing its sources and demands. Water contamination due to nitrates is a serious problem that is affecting large parts of the biosphere. Surface water contamination can be remedied by prevention and control measures, but the problem becomes acute when the contamination penetrates to groundwater water. Contaminated groundwater can remain in the aquifers for centuries, even milleniums, and decontamination is very difficult, if not impossible. Isotopic techniques can help to evaluate how vulnerable the groundwater is to contamination from the surface when its displacement speed and extra load area are determined. Then the sources of surface contamination (natural, industrial, agricultural, domestic) can be identified. Isotopic techniques can also describe an incipient contamination, and they can provide an early alert when chemical or biological indicators do not reveal any signs for concern. The isotopic fractionation of several nitrogen compounds provide the basis for using 15N as a hydrological isotope tool. There are three main sources of nitrogen contamination in water, these are: organic nitrogen in the soil, nitrogenized fertilizers, domestic, industrial and animal wastes. The following technical procedure describes the method for determining the isotopic ration 15N/14N in nitrates in water. The nitrate is separated from the water using ion exchange columns through a resin, which is eluded with HCI and with the addition of silver oxide becomes silver nitrate. This solution is freeze-dried and submitted to combustion at 850 in a sealed quartz tube, using copper/copper oxide for the nitrogen reduction and

  8. Study on Nitrogen Forms in Phenolic Polymers Incorporating Protien by 15N CP—MAS NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENGLILI; WENQIXIAO; 等

    1996-01-01

    Phenolic polymers synthesized by reactions by reactions of p-benzoquinone with 15N-labelled protein or (15NH4)2SO4 were studied by using 15N CP-MAS NMR technique in combination with chemical approaches.Results showed that more than 80% of nitrogen in quinone-protein polymers was in the form of amide with some present as aromatic and /or aliphatic amine and less than 10% of nitrogen occurred as heterocyclic N.The nitrogen distribution in the non-hydrolyzable residue of the quinone-protein polymers was basically similar to that of soil humic acid reported in literature with the exception that a higher proportion of N as heterocyclic N and aromatic amine and a lower proportion of N as amide and aliphatic amine were found in the former than in the latter,More than 70% of total nitrogen in quinone-(NH4)2OS4 polymer was acid resistant ,of which about 53% occurred as pyrrole,nitrile and imion type N.The possible roles of the reactions of phenols or quinones with proteins in the formation of humic acid.especially the non-hydrolyzable nitrogen in humicacid,are discussed.

  9. Metabolic studies in colostomized laying hens using 15N-labelled wheat. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3 colostomized laying hybrids received over 4 days a dosage of 672 mg 15N excess (15N'), 20.3 mg lysine 15N', 23.0 mg histidine 15N' and 66.7 mg arginine 15N' with a ration customary in production. After feeding the same unlabelled ration for another 4 days the hens were killed and the N content of the blood as well as of its fractions (cells, plasma, free amino acids of the plasma) was determined. The 15N' was determined in the total blood, the corpuscles, the plasma, the nonprotein-N (NPN) fraction as well as in the amino acids lysine, histidine and arginine. The average amount of the blood cell N in the total blood N was 58.5% and that of the plasma 40.3%; the corresponding 15N' values amounted to 66.1% and 33.9%, respectively. The sum of the 15N' of the basic amino acids of the blood cells, on an average, amounted to 39.7% of the total cell 15N'; the corresponding average value for the total 15N' in lysine, histidine and arginine of the blood plasma 15N' was 23.6.% and the quota of the three free amino acids of the total NP15N' of the plasma was 6.2%. (author)

  10. Accuracy of chemical shift MR imaging in diagnosing indeterminate bone marrow lesions in the pelvis: review of a single institution's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To re-assess the accuracy of chemical shift imaging in diagnosing indeterminate bone marrow lesions as benign or malignant. We retrospectively reviewed our experience with MR imaging of the pelvis to assess the accuracy of chemical shift imaging in distinguishing benign from malignant bone lesions. Two musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed all osseous lesions biopsied since 2006, when chemical shift imaging was added to our routine pelvic imaging protocol. Study inclusion criteria required (1) MR imaging of an indeterminate bone marrow lesion about the pelvis and (2) subsequent histologic confirmation. The study group included 50 patients (29 male, 21 female) with an average age of 67 years (range, 41-89 years). MR imaging results were evaluated using biopsy results as the ''gold standard.'' There were 27 malignant and 23 benign lesions. Chemical shift imaging using an opposed-phase signal loss criteria of less than 20 % to indicate a malignant lesion, correctly diagnosed 27/27 malignant lesions and 14/23 benign lesions, yielding a 100 % sensitivity, 61 % specificity, 75 % PPV, 100 % NPV, and 82 % accuracy. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.88. The inter-rater and intra-rater agreement K values were both 1.0. Chemical shift imaging is a useful adjunct MR technique to characterize focal and diffuse marrow abnormalities on routine non-contrast pelvic imaging. It is highly sensitive in identifying malignant disease. Despite its lower specificity, the need for biopsy could be eliminated in more than 60 % of patients with benign disease. (orig.)

  11. Accuracy of chemical shift MR imaging in diagnosing indeterminate bone marrow lesions in the pelvis: review of a single institution's experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohl, Chad A. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Radiology Ltd., Tucson, AZ (United States); Chivers, F.S.; Lorans, Roxanne; Roberts, Catherine C.; Kransdorf, Mark J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2014-08-15

    To re-assess the accuracy of chemical shift imaging in diagnosing indeterminate bone marrow lesions as benign or malignant. We retrospectively reviewed our experience with MR imaging of the pelvis to assess the accuracy of chemical shift imaging in distinguishing benign from malignant bone lesions. Two musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed all osseous lesions biopsied since 2006, when chemical shift imaging was added to our routine pelvic imaging protocol. Study inclusion criteria required (1) MR imaging of an indeterminate bone marrow lesion about the pelvis and (2) subsequent histologic confirmation. The study group included 50 patients (29 male, 21 female) with an average age of 67 years (range, 41-89 years). MR imaging results were evaluated using biopsy results as the ''gold standard.'' There were 27 malignant and 23 benign lesions. Chemical shift imaging using an opposed-phase signal loss criteria of less than 20 % to indicate a malignant lesion, correctly diagnosed 27/27 malignant lesions and 14/23 benign lesions, yielding a 100 % sensitivity, 61 % specificity, 75 % PPV, 100 % NPV, and 82 % accuracy. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.88. The inter-rater and intra-rater agreement K values were both 1.0. Chemical shift imaging is a useful adjunct MR technique to characterize focal and diffuse marrow abnormalities on routine non-contrast pelvic imaging. It is highly sensitive in identifying malignant disease. Despite its lower specificity, the need for biopsy could be eliminated in more than 60 % of patients with benign disease. (orig.)

  12. 15N isotope fractionation in an aquatic food chain: Bellamya aeruginosa (Reeve) as an algal control agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shiqun; Yan, Shaohua; Chen, Kaining; Zhang, Zhenhua; Zed, Rengel; Zhang, Jianqiu; Song, Wei; Liu, Haiqin

    2010-01-01

    15N isotope tracer techniques and ecological modeling were adopted to investigate the fractionation of nitrogen, its uptake and transformation in algae and snail (Bellamya aeruginosa Reeve). Different algal species were found to differ in their uptake of nitrogen isotopes. Microcystis aeruginisa Kütz. demonstrated the greatest 15N accumulation capacity, with the natural variation in isotopic ratio (delta 15N) and the isotope fractionation factor (epsilon, % per hundred) being the highest among the species investigated. The transformation and utilization of 15N by snails differed depending on the specific algae consumed (highest for Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick., lowest for M. aeruginisa). When snails was seeded in the experimental pond, the algae population structure changed significantly, and total algal biomass as well as the concentration of all nitrogen species decreased, causing an increase in water transparency. A model, incorporating several chemical and biological parameters, was developed to predict algal biomass in an aquatic system when snails was present. The data collected during this investigation indicated that the gastropods such as snails could significantly impact biological community and water quality of small water bodies, suggesting a role for biological control of noxious algal blooms associated with eutrophication. PMID:20397413

  13. Chemical shift of U L3 edges in different uranium compounds obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Joseph; C Nayak; P Venu Babu; S N Jha; D Bhattacharyya

    2014-05-01

    Uranium L3 X-ray absorption edge was measured in various compounds containing uranium in U4+, U5+ and U6+ oxidation states. The measurements have been carried out at the Energy Dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 synchrotron radiation source at RRCAT, Indore. Energy shifts of ∼ 2–3 eV were observed for U L3 edge in the U-compounds compared to their value in elemental U. The different chemical shifts observed for the compounds having the same oxidation state of the cation but different anions or ligands show the effect of different chemical environments surrounding the cations in determining their X-ray absorption edges in the above compounds. The above chemical effect has been quantitatively described by determining the effective charges on U cation in the above compounds.

  14. FAO/IAEA - interregional training course on the use of 15N in soil science and plant nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This training manual provides an introduction for the basic methodology and principles of application of the stable isotope 15N. After preliminary remarks on stable isotope terminology fundamentals, experimental problems and methods of quantitative nitrogen determination in soil and plant studies are reported in the main part of the manual. An appendix with a compilation of different parameters such as natural abundance of stable isotopes, selected atomic weights and multiples of them conversion factors of chemical compounds, and much more concludes the manual

  15. Utilization of 15N-labelled urea in laying hens. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the utilization of urea in poultry, 3 colostomized laying hybrids were orally supplied with a traditional ration supplemented with 1% 15N'-labelled urea with a 15N excess (15N') of 96.06 atom-% over a period of 6 days. After another 2 days on which the hens received the same ration with unlabelled urea, they were killed. The atom-% 15N' of the blood on an average of the 3 hens was 0.64, of the plasma 1.40 and of the corpuscles 0.47. The TCA-soluble fraction of the blood had an average 15N' of 1.14 atom-%; the 15N amount was 9.7% of the total amount of 15N in the blood. The amount of 15N' in the urea in the blood was 6.8 atom-%. This shows that the absorbed urea is decomposed very slowly. The quota of 15N' in the basic amino acids from the total 15N' of the blood plasma was only 0.3% and that of the corpuscles 2.2%. The average 15N' of the mature follicles was 2.39 atom-% whereas the smallest and the remaining ovary contain 1.12 atom-%. The labelling level of lysine in mature egg cells was, in contrast to this, only 0.08 atom-% 15N' and in infantile follicles 0.04 atom-% 15N'. 1% of the 15N' quota was in the follicles and the remaining ovary. Of the basic amino acids, histidine is most strongly labelled. The lower incorporation of the 15N' from urea into the basic amino acids shows that the nitrogen of this compound can be used for the synthesis of the essential amino acids to a low degree only. (author)

  16. Mimicking floodplain reconnection and disconnection using 15N mesocosm incubations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wanek

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Floodplain restoration changes the nitrate delivery pattern and dissolved organic matter pool in backwaters but other effects are not yet well known. We performed two mesocosm experiments to quantify the nitrate metabolism in two types of floodplains. Rates of denitrification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA and anammox were measured using 15N tracer additions in mesocosms containing undisturbed floodplain sediments originating from (1 restored and (2 disconnected sites in the Alluvial Zone National Park on the Danube River downstream of Vienna, Austria. DNRA rates were an order of magnitude lower than denitrification and neither rate was affected by changes in nitrate delivery pattern or organic matter quality. Anammox was not detected at any of the sites. Denitrification was out-competed by assimilation which was estimated to use up to 70% of the available nitrate. Overall, denitrification was higher in the restored sites, with mean rates of 5.7±2.8 mmol N m−2 h−1 compared to the disconnected site (0.6±0.5 mmol N m−1 h−1. In addition, ratios of N2O : N2 were lower in the restored site indicating a more complete denitrification. Nitrate addition did not have any effect on denitrification, nor on the N2O : N2 ratio. However, DOM quality significantly changed the N2O : N2 ratio in both sites. Addition of riverine derived organic matter lowered the N2O : N2 ratio in the disconnected site, whereas addition of floodplain derived organic matter increased the N2O : N2 ratio in the restored site. These results demonstrate that increasing floodplains hydrological connection to the main river channel increases nitrogen retention and decreases nitrous oxide emissions.

  17. Precision and sensitivity of the measurement of 15N enrichment in D-alanine from bacterial cell walls using positive/negative ion mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunlid, A.; Odham, G.; Findlay, R. H.; White, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Sensitive detection of cellular components from specific groups of microbes can be utilized as 'signatures' in the examination of microbial consortia from soils, sediments or biofilms. Utilizing capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and stereospecific derivatizing agents, D-alanine, a component localized in the prokaryotic (bacterial) cell wall, can be detected reproducibly. Enrichments of D-[15N]alanine determined in E. coli grown with [15N]ammonia can be determined with precision at 1.0 atom%. Chemical ionization with methane gas and the detection of negative ions (M - HF)- and (M - F or M + H - HF)- formed from the heptafluorobutyryl D-2 butanol ester of D-alanine allowed as little as 8 pg (90 fmol) to be detected reproducibly. This method can be utilized to define the metabolic activity in terms of 15N incorporation at the level of 10(3)-10(4) cells, as a function of the 15N-14N ratio.

  18. Multilayer MoS2 prepared by one-time and repeated chemical vapor depositions: anomalous Raman shifts and transistors with high ON/OFF ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chong-Rong; Chang, Xiang-Rui; Chang, Shu-Wei; Chang, Chung-En; Wu, Chao-Hsin; Lin, Shih-Yen

    2015-11-01

    We show that multilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown with the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) may exhibit quite distinct behaviors of Raman shifts from those of exfoliated ones. The anomalous Raman shifts depend on CVD growth modes and are attributed to the modified dielectric screening and interlayer coupling of MoS2 in various growth conditions. With repeated CVD growths, we demonstrated the precise control over the layer number of MoS2. A decently large drain current, high ON/OFF ratio of 105, and enhanced field-effect mobility can be achieved in transistors fabricated on the six-layer MoS2.

  19. 15N/14N Variation in CalCOFI Zooplankton: A 51 year history of Marine Nitrogen Dynamics and Climate Variability off Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, G. H.; Ohman, M. D.; Pierrot-Bults, A.

    2003-12-01

    Long-term variability in marine zooplankton 15N/14N was investigated in two species of calanoid copepods (Calanus pacificus and Eucalanus californicus) and two chaetognaths (Sagitta bierii and Sagitta euneritica) sampled in the spring of selected years from 1951 to 2001 near Monterey Bay, California. No statistically significant trend in 15N/14N was detected for any of the four species, with isotopic ratios in 2001 resembling those in copepods and chaetognaths sampled from the same area five decades earlier. With respect to proposed oceanographic regime shifts in this region, heterogeneity in 15N/14N was detected only for S. bierii when comparing the periods 1951-1975, 1978-1998, and 1999-2001. In this species the 15N/14N in the most recent, brief period (1999-2001) averaged slightly lower than in the previous period. Three of the four species (C. pacificus, S. bierii, and S. euneritica) showed significant increases in 15N/14N during major El Ninos. El Nino-related enrichment in 15N could arise as a consequence of increased nitrate demand/supply at the base of the food web or advection of 15N-enriched nitrate from more southerly waters. While a range of physical and climate indices were evaluated, anomalies of 15N/14N from the long-term mean were found to be significantly related only to; i) the Southern Oscillation Index in the case of both chaetognath species, ii) a regional surface water temperature record (S. bierii only), iii) an index of wind-driven coastal upwelling for the surface-dwelling C. pacificus, and iv) variability in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation for the somewhat deeper-dwelling E. californicus.

  20. Studies with 15N-labelled lysine in colostomized laying hens. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3 colostomized laying hens received, together with a commercial ration of 120 g, 0.2 % 15N-labelled L-lysine with an atom-% 15N excess (15N') of 48 %; subsequently the same ration was fed over a period od 4 days with 0.2 % unlabelled L-lysine. After the end of the experiment the hens were slaughtered. The atom-% 15N' was determined in total, in the lysine, histidine and arginine N of blood cells, plasma, NPN fraction of the blood, stomach, small intestine, cecum and rectum. 15N' in the blood cells was 0.11 atom-% in the blood plasma 0.17 atom-%, in the NPN fraction of the blood 0.09 atom-%, in the tissues of the gastrointestinal tract 0.11 atom-% and in its contents 0.12 atom-%. On the average the blood contained per hen 77.9 % lysine-15N', 16.4 % arginine-15N' and 5.7 % histidine-15N' of the basic amino acid-15N'. For the gastrointestinal tract 78.7 % lysine-15N', 19.0 % arginine-15N' and 2.3 % histidine-15N' of the 15N' of the basic amino acids were ascertained. In comparison to histidine the α-amino-N of lysine is incorporated to a considerably higher degree into arginine. For lysine and arginine the atom-% 15N' in the contents of the gastrointestinal tract is 4 days after the end of the supplementation of labelled lysine 8 to 10 times higher than in the feces of the last day of the experiment. This indicates a considerable secretion of the 2 amino acids in the gastrointestinal tract and their reabsorption to a large extent. (author)

  1. 15N tracer kinetic studies on the validity of various 15N tracer substances for determining whole-body protein parameters in very small preterm infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable 15N tracer substances for tracer kinetic determination of whole-body protein parameters in very small preterm infants are still a matter of intensive research, especially after some doubts have been raised about the validity of [15N]glycine, a commonly used 15N tracer. Protein turnover, synthesis, breakdown, and further protein metabolism data were determined by a paired comparison in four preterm infants. Their post-conceptual age was 32.2 +/- 0.8 weeks, and their body weight was 1670 +/- 181 g. Tracer substances applied in this study were a [15N]amino acid mixture (Ia) and [15N]glycine (Ib). In a second group of three infants with a post conceptual age of 15N-labeled 32.0 +/- 1.0 weeks and a body weight of 1,907 +/- 137 g, yeast protein hydrolysate (II) was used as a tracer substance. A three-pool model was employed for the analysis of the data. This model takes into account renal and fecal 15N losses after a single 15N pulse. Protein turnovers were as follows: 11.9 +/- 3.1 g kg-1 d-1 (Ia), 16.2 +/- 2.5 g kg-1 d-1 (Ib), and 10.8 +/- 3.0 g kg-1 d-1 (II). We were able to demonstrate an overestimation of the protein turnover when Ib was used. There was an expected correspondence in the results obtained from Ia and II. The 15N-labeled yeast protein hydrolysate is a relatively cheap tracer that allows reliable determination of whole-body protein parameters in very small preterm infants

  2. Regulation of [15N]urea synthesis from [5-15N]glutamine. Role of pH, hormones, and pyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, I; Yudkoff, M; Brosnan, J T

    1996-12-01

    We have utilized both [5-15N]glutamine and [3-13C] pyruvate as metabolic tracers in order to: (i) examine the effect of pH, glucagon (GLU), or insulin on the precursor-product relationship between 15NH3, [15N]citrulline, and, thereby, [15N]urea synthesis and (ii) elucidate the mechanism(s) by which pyruvate stimulates [15N] urea synthesis. Hepatocytes isolated from rat were incubated at pH 6.8, 7.4, or 7.6 with 1 mM [5-15N]glutamine and 0.1 mM 14NH4Cl in the presence or the absence of [3-13C] pyruvate (2 mM). A separate series of experiments was performed at pH 7.4 in the presence of insulin or GLU. 15NH3 enrichment exceeded or was equal to that of [15N]citrulline under all conditions except for pH 7.6, when the 15N enrichment in citrulline exceeded that in ammonia. The formation of [15N]citrulline (atom % excess) was increased with higher pH. Flux through phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG) and [15N]urea synthesis were stimulated (p < 0.05) at pH 7.6 or with GLU and decreased (p < 0.05) at pH 6.8. Insulin had no significant effect on flux through PDG or on [15N]urea synthesis. Decreased [15N]urea production at pH 6.8 was associated with depleted aspartate and glutamate levels. Pyruvate attenuated this decrease in the aspartate and glutamate pools and stimulated [15N]urea synthesis. Production of Asp from pyruvate was increased with increasing medium pH. Approximately 80% of Asp was derived from [3-13C]pyruvate regardless of incubation pH or addition of hormone. Furthermore, approximately 20, 40, and 50% of the mitochondrial N-acetylglutamate (NAG) pool was derived from [3-13C]pyruvate at pH 6.8, 7.4, and 7.6, respectively. Both the concentration and formation of [13C]NAG from [3-13C]pyruvate were increased (p < 0.05) with glucagon and decreased (p < 0.05) with insulin or at pH 6.8. The data suggest a correlation between changes in [15N]urea synthesis and alterations in the level and synthesis of [13C]NAG from pyruvate. The current observations suggest that the

  3. Individual protein balance strongly influences δ15N and δ13C values in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaye-Siessegger, Julia; Focken, Ulfert; Abel, Hansjörg; Becker, Klaus

    Although stable isotope ratios in animals have often been used as indicators of the trophic level and for the back-calculation of diets, few experiments have been done under standardized laboratory conditions to investigate factors influencing δ15N and δ13C values. An experiment using Nile tilapia [Oreochromis niloticus (L.)] was therefore carried out to test the effect of different dietary protein contents (35.4, 42.3, and 50.9%) on δ15N and δ13C values of the whole tilapia. The fish were fed the isoenergetic and isolipidic semi-synthetic diets at a relatively low level. δ15N and δ13C values of the lipid-free body did not differ between the fish fed the diets with different protein contents, but the trophic shift for N and C isotopes decreased with increasing protein accretion in the individual fish, for N from 6.5‰ to 4‰ and for C in the lipid-free body from 4‰ to 2.5‰. This is the first study showing the strong influence of the individual protein balance to the degree to which the isotopic signature of dietary protein was modified in tissue protein of fish. The extrapolation of the trophic level or the reconstruction of the diet of an animal from stable isotope ratios without knowledge of the individual physiological condition and the feeding rate may lead to erroneous results.

  4. Individual protein balance strongly influences delta15N and delta13C values in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaye-Siessegger, Julia; Focken, Ulfert; Abel, Hansjörg; Becker, Klaus

    2004-02-01

    Although stable isotope ratios in animals have often been used as indicators of the trophic level and for the back-calculation of diets, few experiments have been done under standardized laboratory conditions to investigate factors influencing delta(15)N and delta(13)C values. An experiment using Nile tilapia [ Oreochromis niloticus (L.)] was therefore carried out to test the effect of different dietary protein contents (35.4, 42.3, and 50.9%) on delta(15)N and delta(13)C values of the whole tilapia. The fish were fed the isoenergetic and isolipidic semi-synthetic diets at a relatively low level. delta(15)N and delta(13)C values of the lipid-free body did not differ between the fish fed the diets with different protein contents, but the trophic shift for N and C isotopes decreased with increasing protein accretion in the individual fish, for N from 6.5 per thousand to 4 per thousand and for C in the lipid-free body from 4 per thousand to 2.5 per thousand. This is the first study showing the strong influence of the individual protein balance to the degree to which the isotopic signature of dietary protein was modified in tissue protein of fish. The extrapolation of the trophic level or the reconstruction of the diet of an animal from stable isotope ratios without knowledge of the individual physiological condition and the feeding rate may lead to erroneous results.

  5. Chemical shifts of K-X-ray absorption edges on copper in different compounds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with Synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, D., E-mail: djoseph@barc.gov.in [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Basu, S.; Jha, S.N.; Bhattacharyya, D. [Applied Spectroscopy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2012-03-01

    Cu K X-ray absorption edges were measured in compounds such as CuO, Cu(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}, Cu(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}, and CuSO{sub 4} where Cu is present in oxidation state of 2+, using the energy dispersive EXAFS beamline at INDUS-2 Synchrotron radiation source at RRCAT, Indore. Energy shifts of {approx}4-7 eV were observed for Cu K X-ray absorption edge in the above compounds compared to its value in elemental copper. The difference in the Cu K edge energy shifts in the different compounds having same oxidation state of Cu shows the effect of different chemical environments surrounding the cation in the above compounds. The above chemical effect has been quantitatively described by determining the effective charges on Cu cations in the above compounds.

  6. Deciphering Noncovalent Interactions Accompanying 7,7,8,8-Tetracyanoquinodimethane Encapsulation within Biphene[n]arenes: Nucleus-Independent Chemical Shifts Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lande, Dipali N; Rao, Soniya S; Gejji, Shridhar P

    2016-07-18

    Binding of novel biphene[n]arene hosts to antiaromatic 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) are investigated by DFT. Biphene[4]arene favors the inclusion complex through noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, π-π stacking, C-H⋅⋅⋅π, and C-H⋅⋅⋅H-C dihydrogen bonding. Donor-acceptor complexation renders aromatic character to the guest through charge transfer. The formation of TCNQ anionic radicals through supramolecular π stacking significantly influences its chemical and photophysical behavior. Electron density reorganization consequent to encapsulation of TCNQ reflects in the shift of characteristic vibrations in the IR spectra. The accompanying aromaticities arising from the induced ring currents are analyzed by employing nucleus-independent chemical shifts based profiles. PMID:27028656

  7. Free magnesium levels in normal human brain and brain tumors: sup 31 P chemical-shift imaging measurements at 1. 5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.S.; Vigneron, D.B.; Murphy-Boesch, J.; Nelson, S.J.; Kessler, H.B.; Coia, L.; Curran, W.; Brown, T.R. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The authors have studied a series of normal subjects and patients with brain tumors, by using {sup 31}P three-dimensional chemical shift imaging to obtain localized {sup 31}P spectra of the brain. A significant proportion of brain cytosolic ATP in normal brain is not complexed to Mg{sup 2+}, as indicated by the chemical shift {delta} of the {beta}-P resonance of ATP. The ATP {beta}P resonance position in brain thus is sensitive to changes in intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} concentration and in the proportion of ATP complexed with Mg because this shift lies on the rising portion of the {delta} vs. Mg{sup 2+} titration curve for ATP. They have measured the ATP {beta}-P shift and compared intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} concentration and fractions of free ATP for normal individuals and a limited series of patients with brain tumors. In four of the five spectra obtained from brain tissue containing a substantial proportion of tumor, intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} was increased, and the fraction of free ATP was decreased, compared with normal brain.

  8. Measurement of sample temperatures under magic-angle spinning from the chemical shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate of 79Br in KBr powder

    OpenAIRE

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Accurate determination of sample temperatures in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with magic-angle spinning (MAS) can be problematic, particularly because frictional heating and heating by radio-frequency irradiation can make the internal sample temperature significantly different from the temperature outside the MAS rotor. This paper demonstrates the use of 79Br chemical shifts and spin-lattice relaxation rates in KBr powder as temperature-dependent parameters for the determinati...

  9. Orientational constraints as three-dimensional structural constraints from chemical shift anisotropy: the polypeptide backbone of gramicidin A in a lipid bilayer.

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, W.; Hu, W; Wang, C; Cross, T A

    1993-01-01

    Chemical shifts observed from samples that are uniformly aligned with respect to the magnetic field can be used as very high-resolution structural constraints. This constraint takes the form of an orientational constraint rather than the more familiar distance constraint. The accuracy of these constraints is dependent upon the quality of the tensor characterization. Both tensor element magnitudes and tensor orientations with respect to the molecular frame need to be considered. Here these con...

  10. Alanine flux in obese and healthy humans as evaluated by 15N- and 2H3-labeled alanines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates of plasma alanine flux as measured in humans using L-[15N]-alanine or L-[3,3,3-2H3]alanine were compared by simultaneous intravenous infusion of both tracers. Plasma isotope enrichments were measured by chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In 16 obese women before and during a hypocaloric diet and in 4 normal men in the postabsorptive and fed states, the fluxes were highly correlated (r2 = 0.93) although plasma alanine flux with the 2H tracer was two to three times greater than that obtained with [15N]alanine. The fluxes decreased with the hypocaloric diet in obese subjects and increased during the fed state in healthy adults. Thus, although the estimates of alanine flux differed according to the tracer used, both appear to give equivalent information about changes in alanine kinetics induced by the nutritional conditions examined

  11. All-atom Molecular Dynamic Simulations Combined with the Chemical Shifts Study on the Weak Interactions of Ethanol-water System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Rong; LUO San-Lai; WU Wen-Juan

    2008-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics(MD)simulation combined with chemical shifts was performed to investigate the interactions over the entire concentration range of the ethanol(EtOH)-water system.The results of the simulation were adopted to explain the NMR experiments by hydrogen bonding analysis.The strong hydrogen bonds and weak C-H…O contacts coexist in the mixtures through the analysis of the radial distribution functions.And the liquid structures in the whole concentration of EtOH-water mixtures can be classified into three regions by the statistic analysis of the hydrogen-bonding network in the MD simulations.Moreover,the chemical shifts of the hydrogen atom are in agreement witb the statistical results of the average number hydrogen bonds in the MD simulations.Interestingly,the excess relative extent Eηrel calculated by the MD simulations and chemical shifts in the EtOH aqueous solutions shows the largest deviation at XEtOH≈0.18.The excess properties present good agreement with the excess enthalpy in the concentration dependence.

  12. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0.

  13. Acetylene inhibition of N2O reduction in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays: evaluation by 15N tracer and 15N site preference of N2O

    OpenAIRE

    Weymann, Daniel; Well, Reinhard; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Rohe, Lena

    2013-01-01

    Acetylene inhibition of N2O reduction in laboratory soil and groundwaterdenitrification assays: evaluation by 15N tracer and 15N site preference ofN2ODaniel Weymann (1), Reinhard Well (2), Dominika Lewicka-Szczebak (2,3), and Rohe Lena (2)(1) Forschungszentrum Juelich, Agrosphere Institute (IBG-3), Juelich, Germany (), (2)Thünen-Institute of Climate-Smart Agriculture, Braunschweig, Germany, (3) University of Wroclaw, PolandThe measurement of denitrification in soils and...

  14. Investigation into endogenous N metabolism in 15N-labelled pigs. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    4 male castrated pigs (55-65 kg) either received a wheat-fish meal diet (1 and 2) or a wheat-horse bean diet (3 and 4) without straw meal supplement (1 and 3) or with a supplement of 20% dry matter (2 and 4). In order to investigate whether a 15N labelling of the pigs is also possible with a protein excess in the ration, the animals received 24.8 g (1 and 2) and 11.6 g crude protein/kg/sup 0.75/ live weight (3 and 4). During a 10-day 15N-labelling 385 mg 15N excess (15N') per kg/sup 0.75/ were applied with 15N labelling the following quotas of the applied 15N amount were incorporated: 1 = 10.2%, 2 = 7.2%, 3 = 18.7%, 4 = 14.4%. 15N excretion in both TCA fractions of feces showed a highly significant positive correlation to the increasing content of crude fibre in the 4 diets. The immediate 15N incorporation into the TCA-precipitable fraction of feces proves that 15N enters the large intestine endogenously and serves bacterial protein synthesis. 3 days after the last 15 application the pigs were killed. The values of atom-% 15N' were determined in the TCA-precipitable blood plasma and in the TCA-precipitable fraction of the liver. The other examined organs and tissues showed smaller differences between the test animals. The results show that the 15N labelling of tissues and organs of pigs is also possible at a high level of protein supply by means of an oral application of [15N] ammonia salts. (author)

  15. Nitrogen (15N) recovery from ammonium and nitrate applied to the soil by sugar cane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment was developed in a field aimed to compare the recovery of the ammonium-15 N and nitrate-15 N by the sugar cane plants harvested mechanically without burning. A rate of 70 kg ha-1 of N was applied as ammonium nitrate, in strip, onto cultural residues. Two lineal meters micropots were used. They received the fertilizer labeled with 15 N. Two treatments were established using labeled ammonium (NH4+-15 N) or nitrate (NO3-15 N). Two months after fertilization, four samples of the aerial part (two lineal meters) for treatment in the portions that did not receive the fertilizer-15 N, were taken in order to evaluated the fitomass production (Mg ha-1) and N-total accumulated (kg ha-1). This evaluation was repeated every two months up to complete five of them. Two leaves (leaves with 3 deg C visible auricle) were collected from plants that were in a middle of the micropots (15 N) and in corresponding positions in the adjacent rows, to evaluated the concentration of 15 N. There was a larger absorption of the nitrate-N (30.5%) than of the ammonium-N (21.2%). On the other hand, in the soil the results showed larger ammonium-15 N residual effect concentration, probably due to microorganism immobilization. (author)

  16. Investigation of the metabolism of colostomized laying hens with 15N-labelled wheat. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an experiment with 3 colostomized laying hybrids each animal received 80 g pelleted mixed feed and 40 g 15N-labelled wheat with 20.13 atom-% 15N excess (15N') over a period of four days. On the following four days the hens received rations composed in the same way with unlabelled wheat, however in the tissues and organs of the slaughtered hens 15N' was determined in the total N and the amino acids lysine, histidine and arginine in both the segments of the gastro intestinal tract and in its content. The amount of 15N' stomach, small intestine and colon was 43.7%, 27.2% and 29.1%, respectively. The tissue of the small intestine contained, on an average, the highest 15N' in lysine of all the basic amino acids. It was 0.82 atom-% 15N' for lysine, 0.55% for histidine and 0.63% for arginine. The percentage of the 15N' of the basic amino acids from the corresponding total 15N' amount of the charges was 20.5% in the contents of the gastrointestinal tract, 28.0% in the stomach tissue and in the tissues of the small intestine 24.4% of the cecum 21.5% and of the rectum 25.7%. (author)

  17. Utilization of 15N-labelled urea in laying hens. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3 colostomized laying hybrids received a normal ration containing 1% 15N-labelled urea with 96.06% atom-% 15N excess (15N') over six days. Subsequently the same ration with unlabelled urea was given over 2 days, after which the animals were butchered. In the kidneys the 15N' amounted to 1.1 atom-% and 1.8 atom-% in the liver. The TCA soluble N fraction and the ammonia were more highly labelled than the total N. Lysine, histidine and arginine were lowly labelled in the kidneys. This also applies to the liver with the exception of histidine. In the branch-chained and aromatic amino acids of the liver the 15N' was between 0.2 and 0.3 atom-%. The highest labelling of non-essential amino acids was found in glutamic acid with 0.9 atom-% 15N' and aspartic acid with 1.1 atom-% 15 N'. The evaluation of the amino acid in the liver showed that the 6 non-essential amino acids account for two thirds of the total amino acid 15N' whereas the 9 essential ones account for one third of the amino acid 15N' only. (author)

  18. Simultaneous acquisition of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}-{sup 15}N and {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N-{sup 15}N sequential correlations in proteins: application of dual receivers in 3D HNN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Swagata; Paul, Subhradip; Hosur, Ramakrishna V., E-mail: hosur@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2012-01-15

    We describe here, adaptation of the HNN pulse sequence for multiple nuclei detection using two independent receivers by utilizing the detectable {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} transverse magnetization which was otherwise dephased out in the conventional HNN experiment. It enables acquisition of 2D {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}-{sup 15}N sequential correlations along with the standard 3D {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N-{sup 1}H correlations, which provides directionality to sequential walk in HNN, on one hand, and enhances the speed of backbone assignment, on the other. We foresee that the implementation of dual direct detection opens up new avenues for a wide variety of modifications that would further enhance the value and applications of the experiment, and enable derivation of hitherto impossible information.

  19. Linking nitrogen dynamics to climate variability off central California: a 51 year record based on 15N/ 14N in CalCOFI zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Greg H.; Ohman, Mark D.; Pierrot-Bults, Annelies

    2003-08-01

    Long-term variability in zooplankton 15N/ 14N was investigated in two species of calanoid copepods ( Calanus pacificus and Eucalanus californicus) and two chaetognaths ( Sagitta bierii and Sagitta euneritica) sampled in the spring of selected years from 1951 to 2001 off the central California coast. No statistically significant trend in 15N/ 14N was detected for any of the four species, with isotopic ratios in 2001 resembling those in copepods and chaetognaths sampled five decades earlier. Zooplankton body lengths also showed no long-term trends. With respect to proposed regime shifts in this region, heterogeneity in 15N/ 14N was detected only for S. bierii when comparing the periods 1951-1975, 1978-1998, and 1999-2001. In this species the 15N/ 14N in the most recent, brief period (1999-2001) averaged slightly lower than in the previous period. Three of the four species ( C. pacificus, S. bierii, and S. euneritica) showed significant increases in 15N/ 14N during major El Niños. El Niño-related enrichment in 15N could arise as a consequence of increased nitrate demand:supply at the base of the food web or advection of 15N-enriched nitrate from more southerly waters. While a range of physical and climate indices were evaluated, anomalies of 15N/ 14N from the long-term mean were found to be significantly related only to: (i) the Southern Oscillation Index in the case of both chaetognath species, (ii) a regional surface water temperature record ( S. bierii only), (iii) an index of wind-driven coastal upwelling for the surface-dwelling C. pacificus, and (iv) variability in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation for the somewhat deeper-dwelling E. californicus. The relationships among each species' 15N/ 14N averaged over the total sampling period was: E. californicus≈C. pacificus≪S. euneritica < S. bierii, consistent with trophic 15N biomagnification and the predatory nature of Sagitta.

  20. Determination of the Optimal Energy Denominator Shift Parameter of KRb Electronic States in Quantum Chemical Computations Using Perturbation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shundalau, M. B.; Minko, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the energy denominator shift (EDS) parameter and the quantitative and qualitative compositions of electronic states included in CASSCF(2,14)/XMCQDPT2 ab initio calculations of the ground state equilibrium internuclear distance and dissociation energy of polar KRb was determined.

  1. Transport-induced shifts in condensate dew-point and composition in multicomponent systems with chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.; Nagarajan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Partial heterogeneous condensation phenomena in multicomponent reacting systems are analyzed taking into consideration the chemical element transport phenomena. It is demonstrated that the dew-point surface temperature in chemically reactive systems is not a purely thermodynamic quantity, but is influenced by the multicomponent diffusion and Soret-mass diffusion phenomena. Several distinct dew-points are shown to exist in such systems and, as a result of transport constraints, the 'sharp' locus between two chemically distinct condensates is systematically moved to a difference mainstream composition.

  2. δ(15) N from soil to wine in bulk samples and proline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, Mauro; Ziller, Luca; Bertoldi, Daniela; Bontempo, Luana; Larcher, Roberto; Nicolini, Giorgio; Camin, Federica

    2016-09-01

    The feasibility of using δ(15) N as an additional isotopic marker able to link wine to its area of origin was investigated. The whole production chain (soil-leaves-grape-wine) was considered. Moreover, the research included evaluation of the effect of the fermentation process, the use of different types of yeast and white and red vinification, the addition of nitrogen adjuvants and ultrasound lysis simulating wine ageing. The δ(15) N of grapes and wine was measured in bulk samples and compounds, specifically in proline, for the first time. Despite isotopic fractionation from soil to wine, the δ(15) N values of leaves, grapes, wine and particularly must and wine proline conserved the variability of δ(15) N in the growing soil. Fermentation and ultrasound treatment did not affect the δ(15) N values of grape must, which was therefore conserved in wine. The addition of inorganic or organic adjuvants was able to influence the δ(15) N of bulk wine, depending on the amount and the difference between the δ(15) N of must and that of the adjuvant. The δ(15) N of wine proline was not influenced by adjuvant addition and is therefore the best marker for tracing the geographical origin of wine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27479606

  3. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15N over long-term forest succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession can promote open N cycling that increases N loss and soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across a topographically complex montane forest landscape influenced by human logging ...

  4. Human dietary δ(15)N intake: representative data for principle food items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsemann, F; Koehler, K; Braun, H; Schaenzer, W; Flenker, U

    2013-09-01

    Dietary analysis using δ(15)N values of human remains such as bone and hair is usually based on general principles and limited data sets. Even for modern humans, the direct ascertainment of dietary δ(15)N is difficult and laborious, due to the complexity of metabolism and nitrogen fractionation, differing dietary habits and variation of δ(15)N values of food items. The objective of this study was to summarize contemporary regional experimental and global literature data to ascertain mean representative δ(15)N values for distinct food categories. A comprehensive data set of more than 12,000 analyzed food samples was summarized from the literature. Data originated from studies dealing with (1) authenticity tracing or origin control of food items, and (2) effects of fertilization or nutrition on δ(15)N values of plants or animals. Regional German food δ(15)N values revealed no major differences compared with the mean global values derived from the literature. We found that, in contrast to other food categories, historical faunal remains of pig and poultry are significantly enriched in (15)N compared to modern samples. This difference may be due to modern industrialized breeding practices. In some food categories variations in agricultural and feeding regimens cause significant differences in δ(15)N values that may lead to misinterpretations when only limited information is available.

  5. δ(15) N from soil to wine in bulk samples and proline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, Mauro; Ziller, Luca; Bertoldi, Daniela; Bontempo, Luana; Larcher, Roberto; Nicolini, Giorgio; Camin, Federica

    2016-09-01

    The feasibility of using δ(15) N as an additional isotopic marker able to link wine to its area of origin was investigated. The whole production chain (soil-leaves-grape-wine) was considered. Moreover, the research included evaluation of the effect of the fermentation process, the use of different types of yeast and white and red vinification, the addition of nitrogen adjuvants and ultrasound lysis simulating wine ageing. The δ(15) N of grapes and wine was measured in bulk samples and compounds, specifically in proline, for the first time. Despite isotopic fractionation from soil to wine, the δ(15) N values of leaves, grapes, wine and particularly must and wine proline conserved the variability of δ(15) N in the growing soil. Fermentation and ultrasound treatment did not affect the δ(15) N values of grape must, which was therefore conserved in wine. The addition of inorganic or organic adjuvants was able to influence the δ(15) N of bulk wine, depending on the amount and the difference between the δ(15) N of must and that of the adjuvant. The δ(15) N of wine proline was not influenced by adjuvant addition and is therefore the best marker for tracing the geographical origin of wine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. A fast method to prepare water samples for 15N analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖化云; 刘丛强

    2001-01-01

    Automatic element analyser is often used to prepare organic matters tor 15N analysis. It is seldom used to prepare water samples. Water samples are conventionally dealt with by Kjeldahl-Rittenberg technique. But it requires tedious and labor-intensive sample preparation. A fast and reliable method is proposed in this paper to prepare water samples for 15N analysis.

  7. Utilization of 15N-labelled urea in laying hens. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3 colostomized laying hybrids received orally with a conventional ration 1% urea with 96.06 atom-% 15N excess (15N') over a period of 6 days. In the period of the experiment every hen consumed 2.87 g 15N'. After another 2 days, on which they received conventional feed urea, the animals were butchered. 15N' was determined in the total N and in 15 amino acids of the oviduct. Of the 15 amino acids the labelling of glutamic acid, glycine and serine was highest and on average amounted to 0.80, 0.66 and 0.67 atom-% 15N', resp. In lysine and arginine only 0.10 and 0.11 atom-% 15N' could be detected. The amino acid N with natural isotopic frequency amounted to a quarter for the basic amino acids, a tenth for the branched chain ones and for the non-essential ones (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, serine, glycine, alanine, proline) a third of the total oviduct 14N. The average quota of 15N' is only 3.6%, that of the branched chain amino acids 4.5 and that of the non-essential ones 21.1%. Consequently, the 15N' of the urea is mainly used for the synthesis of the non-essential amino acids of the oviduct. (author)

  8. Utilization of 15N-labelled urea in laying hens. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an N metabolism experiment 3 colostomized laying hybrids received 2870 mg 15N excess (15N') per animal in 6 days in the form of urea with their conventional feed rations. During the 8-day experiment the 21 eggs laid were separated into egg-shell, white of egg and yolk. Weight, N content and 15N' of the individual fractions of the eggs were determined. On an average 4.6% of the heavy nitrogen was in the egg-shells, 50% in the white of egg and 45.5% in the yolk. 2.8%, 4.5% and 5.5% (hens 1 - 3) of the 15N' consumed were detected in the eggs. The maximum 15N' output in the white of egg was reached on the 6th day, whereas 15N' output in the yolk showed a nearly linear increase in the time of the experiment. The results show that labelled nitrogen from urea is incorporated into the egg to a lower degree than after the feeding of 15N-labelled proteins and that the development of its incorporation into the white of egg and the yolk differ from that after the feeding of 15N-labelled native proteins. (author)

  9. Labelling of sewage with 13C and 15N isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of sewage water varies with the type and level of technology applied. As a result, sewage sludges vary in composition. In Western Europe, a combination of mechanical, biological, and chemical treatments is commonly applied. The biological treatment of sewage water - the activated sludge process - results in removal of carbon and nitrogen through immobilization in microbes. With strong aeration of the wastewater, energy-rich substrates and nutrients are assimilated by aerobic microbes and a large microbial biomass results. The biomass consists mainly of living microbial cells and components of dying and dead cells, but also of colloidal particles and metal ions bound to the surfaces of the microbes. The organic matter produced during aeration - the biological sludge - is removed by settlement. The biological treatment of wastewater was the starting point for the labelling procedure of sewage sludge. Labelling of waste products with stable tracer isotopes can be done in two ways: (i) labelling of the original material from which wastes are generated, e.g. by labelling of the diet fed to animals; and (ii) labelling during the biological turnover through addition of nitrogen or carbon compounds to wastes. In this study, tracers were added to wastewater during biological treatment

  10. 1H and 15N Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Studies of Carbazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Solum, Mark S.; Wind, Robert A.; Nilsson, Brad L.; Peterson, Matt A.; Pugmire, Ronald J.; Grant, David M.

    2000-01-01

    15N NMR experiments, combined with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), are reported on carbazole doped with the stable free radical 1,3 bisdiphenylene-2 phenylally1 (BDPA). Doping shortens the nuclear relaxation times and provides paramagnetic centers that can be used to enhance the nuclear signal by means of DNP so that 15 N NMR experiments can be done in minutes. The factors were measured in a 1.4 T external field, using both unlabeled and 98% 15N labeled carbazole with doping levels varying between 0.65 and 5.0 wt % BDPA. A doping level of approximately 1 wt % produced optimal results. DNP enhancement factors of 35 and 930 were obtained for 1H and 15N, respectively making it possible to perform 15N DNP NMR experiments at the natural abundance level.

  11. Syntheses of 15N-labeled pre-queuosine nucleobase derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Levic

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Pre-queuosine or queuine (preQ1 is a guanine derivative that is involved in the biosynthetic pathway of the hypermodified tRNA nucleoside queuosine (Que. The core structure of preQ1 is represented by 7-(aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine (preQ1 base. Here, we report the synthesis of three preQ1 base derivatives with complementary 15N-labeling patterns, utilizing [15N]-KCN, [15N]-phthalimide, and [15N3]-guanidine as cost-affordable 15N sources. Such derivatives are required to explore the binding process of the preQ1 base to RNA targets using advanced NMR spectroscopic methods. PreQ1 base specifically binds to bacterial mRNA domains and thereby regulates genes that are required for queuosine biosynthesis.

  12. (15)N NMR spectroscopy unambiguously establishes the coordination mode of the diimine linker 2-(2'-pyridyl)pyrimidine-4-carboxylic acid (cppH) in Ru(ii) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistin, Federica; Balducci, Gabriele; Demitri, Nicola; Iengo, Elisabetta; Milani, Barbara; Alessio, Enzo

    2015-09-21

    We investigated the reactivity of three Ru(ii) precursors -trans,cis,cis-[RuCl2(CO)2(dmso-O)2], cis,fac-[RuCl2(dmso-O)(dmso-S)3], and trans-[RuCl2(dmso-S)4] - towards the diimine linker 2-(2'-pyridyl)pyrimidine-4-carboxylic acid (cppH) or its parent compound 4-methyl-2-(2'-pyridyl)pyrimidine ligand (mpp), in which a methyl group replaces the carboxylic group on the pyrimidine ring. In principle, both cppH and mpp can originate linkage isomers, depending on how the pyrimidine ring binds to ruthenium through the nitrogen atom ortho (N(o)) or para (N(p)) to the group in position 4. The principal aim of this work was to establish a spectroscopic fingerprint for distinguishing the coordination mode of cppH/mpp also in the absence of an X-ray structural characterization. By virtue of the new complexes described here, together with the others previously reported by us, we successfully recorded {(1)H,(15)N}-HMBC NMR spectra at natural abundance of the (15)N isotope on a consistent number of fully characterized Ru(ii)-cppH/mpp compounds, most of them being stereoisomers and/or linkage isomers. Thus, we found that (15)N NMR chemical shifts unambiguously establish the binding mode of cppH and mpp - either through N(o) or N(p)- and can be conveniently applied also in the absence of the X-ray structure. In fact, coordination of cppH to Ru(ii) induces a marked upfield shift for the resonance of the N atoms directly bound to the metal, with coordination induced shifts (CIS) ranging from ca.-45 to -75 ppm, depending on the complex, whereas the unbound N atom resonates at a frequency similar to that of the free ligand. Similar results were found for the complexes of mpp. This work confirmed our previous finding that cppH has no binding preference, whereas mpp binds exclusively through N(p). Interestingly, the two cppH linkage isomers trans,cis-[RuCl2(CO)2(cppH-κN(p))] (5) and trans,cis-[RuCl2(CO)2(cppH-κN(o))] (6) were easily obtained in pure form by exploiting their different

  13. Utilization of 15N-labelled urea in laying hens. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For studying the incorporation of the 15N labelled urea into individual organs and tissues 3 colostomized laying hens were butchered after they had received 1% urea (96.06 atom-% 15N excess) with a high quality ration over a period of six days and after receiving conventional urea for another two days. Nitrogen and atom-% 15N excess (15N') were determined in the bones, the feathers and the remaining body (skin, lungs and windpipe, head with comb and wattle, lower leg without bones and with skin, pancreas and fatty tissue). In the remaining body the atom-% 15N' was determined in 15 amino acids. The labelling in the remaining body and the bones was approximately the same and averaged 0.37 atom-% 15N'. A significantly lower relative frequency could be detected in the feathers. The lysine of the remaining body contained only 0.04 atom-% 15N', tyrosine 0.06, histidine and arginine 0.07. The phenylalanine and proline molecules were labelled with 0.11 atom-% 15N'. Most 15N' was incorporated in serine and glutamic acid with over 0.30 atom-%. In the six non-essential amino acids out of the 15 amino acids studied, 48.6 of the non-isotopic nitrogen of the total N of the remaining body and 70.7% of the isotopic nitrogen of total 15N' could be detected. Consequently the urea N is mainly used for the synthesis of the non-essential amino acids, with its utilization being very low. (author)

  14. Pseudo 5D HN(C)N experiment to facilitate the assignment of backbone resonances in proteins exhibiting high backbone shift degeneracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dinesh, E-mail: dineshcbmr@gmail.com [Centre of Biomedical Research (CBMR), SGPGIMS Campus, Raibareli Road, Lucknow 226014 (India); Raikwal, Nisha [Centre of Biomedical Research (CBMR), SGPGIMS Campus, Raibareli Road, Lucknow 226014 (India); Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Pandey, Himanshu; Arora, Ashish [Molecular and Structural Biology Division, CSIR, Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Guleria, Anupam, E-mail: anuguleriaphy@gmail.com [Centre of Biomedical Research (CBMR), SGPGIMS Campus, Raibareli Road, Lucknow 226014 (India)

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A reduced dimensionality experiment – referred as pseudo 5D HN(C)N- is presented. • Encodes highly resolved 5D spectral information in a 3D spectrum. • Superior in terms of peak dispersion. • Facilitates assignment of crowded HSQC spectra of moderately sized proteins. • Modulated {sup 15}N chemical shifts are used to break the amide shift degeneracy. - Abstract: Assignment of protein backbone resonances is most routinely carried out using triple resonance three-dimensional NMR experiments involving amide {sup 1}H/{sup 15}N resonances. However for intrinsically unstructured proteins, alpha-helical proteins or proteins containing several disordered fragments, the assignment becomes problematic because of high-degree of backbone shift degeneracy. In this backdrop, a novel reduced-dimensionality (RD) experiment –(5, 3)D-hNCO-CANH- is presented to facilitate/validate the sequential backbone resonance assignment in such proteins. The proposed 3D NMR experiment makes use of the modulated amide {sup 15}N chemical shifts (resulting from the joint sampling along both its indirect dimensions) to resolve the ambiguity involved in connecting the neighboring amide resonances (i.e. H{sub i}N{sub i} and H{sub i−1}N{sub i−1}) for overlapping amide-NH peaks. The experiment -in combination with routine triple resonance 3D-NMR experiments involving backbone amide ({sup 1}H/{sup 15}N) and carbon ({sup 13}C{sup α}/{sup 13}C′) chemical shifts- will serve as a powerful complementary tool to achieve the nearly complete assignment of protein backbone resonances in a time efficient manner.

  15. Standardized 15N tracer methods for the evaluation of the plasma protein turnover in clinical practice. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for quantitative isolation of plasma proteins or groups of proteins (total plasma or serum proteins, fibrin, total globulines, α, β, γ-globolines, albumin) are described based on combination of chromatography with precipitation and extraction techniques. These methods are adapted to the special requirements of 15N analysis. They can be performed in clinic-chemical standard laboratories without special apparatuses or devices. The described procedures are the biochemico-analytical basis for the quantitative evaluation of tracer kinetics data by means of mathematic modelling. (author)

  16. Prediction of microvascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinomas with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging: Impact of intra-tumoral fat detected on chemical-shift images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Ji Hye [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Kon, E-mail: jmyr@dreamwiz.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sanghyeok [Department of Radiology, Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Choi, Dongil; Lee, Won Jae [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC. • Alfa-fetoprotein, tumor size, and fat component were associated with MVI of HCC. • Chemical shift MRI should be considered for the evaluation of HCC. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the impact of intra-tumoral fat detected by chemical-shift MR imaging in predicting the MVI of HCC. Materials and methods: Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging of 365 surgically proven HCCs from 365 patients (306 men, 59 women; mean age, 55.6 years) were evaluated. HCCs were classified into two groups, fat-containing and non-fat-containing, based on the presence of fat on chemical-shift images. Fat-containing HCCs were subdivided into diffuse or focal fatty change groups. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify clinical and MR findings associated with MVI. Results: Based on MR imaging, 66 tumors were classified as fat-containing HCCs and 299 as non-fat-containing HCCs. Among the 66 fat-containing HCCs, 38 (57.6%) showed diffuse fatty changes and 28 (42.4%) showed focal fatty changes. MVI was present in 18 (27.3%) fat-containing HCCs and in 117 (39.1%) non-fat-containing HCCs (P = 0.07). Univariate analysis revealed that serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and tumor size were significantly associated with MVI (P < 0.001). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that log AFP (odds ratio 1.178, P = 0.0016), tumor size (odds ratio 1.809, P < 0.001), and intra-tumoral fat (odds ratio 0.515, P = 0.0387) were independent variables associated with MVI. Conclusion: Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC and, therefore, a possibly more favorable prognosis, but the clinical value of this finding is uncertain.

  17. Chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging in differentiation of benign from malignant vertebral collapse in a rural tertiary care hospital in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Puneet; Gupta, Ranjana; Mittal, Amit; Joshi, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of the first choice for evaluation of vertebral compression/collapse. Many MRI qualitative features help to differentiate benign from malignant collapse. We conducted this study to look for a quantitative difference in chemical shift values in benign and malignant collapse using dual-echo gradient echo in-phase/out-phase imaging. Materials and Methods: MRI examinations of a total of 38 patients were retrospectively included in the study who had vertebral compression/collapse with marrow edema in which final diagnosis was available at the time of imaging/follow-up. Signal intensity value in the region of abnormal marrow signal and adjacent normal vertebra was measured on in phase/out phase images. Signal intensity ratio (SIR) was measured by dividing signal intensity value on opposite phase images to that on in phase images. SIR was compared in normal vertebrae and benign and malignant vertebral collapse. Results: There were 21 males and 17 females with mean age of 52.4 years (range 28–76 years). Out of total 38 patients, 18 were of benign vertebral collapse and 20 of malignant vertebral collapse. SIR in normal vertebrae was 0.30 ± 0.14, 0.67 ± 0.18 in benign vertebral collapse, and 1.20 ± 0.27 in malignant vertebral collapse with significant difference in SIR of normal vertebrae versus benign collapse (P < 0.01) and in benign collapse versus malignant collapse (P < 0.01). Assuming a cutoff of <0.95 for benign collapse and ≥0.95 for malignant collapse, chemical shift imaging had a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.4%. Conclusion: Chemical shift imaging is a rapid and useful sequence in differentiating benign from malignant vertebral collapse with good specificity and sensitivity.

  18. FIRST MEASUREMENTS OF {sup 15}N FRACTIONATION IN N{sub 2}H{sup +} TOWARD HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING CORES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontani, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, L.go E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Caselli, P.; Bizzocchi, L. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Palau, A. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico); Ceccarelli, C. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-08-01

    We report on the first measurements of the isotopic ratio {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N in N{sub 2}H{sup +} toward a statistically significant sample of high-mass star-forming cores. The sources belong to the three main evolutionary categories of the high-mass star formation process: high-mass starless cores, high-mass protostellar objects, and ultracompact H ii regions. Simultaneous measurements of the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio in CN have been made. The {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios derived from N{sub 2}H{sup +} show a large spread (from ∼180 up to ∼1300), while those derived from CN are in between the value measured in the terrestrial atmosphere (∼270) and that of the proto-solar nebula (∼440) for the large majority of the sources within the errors. However, this different spread might be due to the fact that the sources detected in the N{sub 2}H{sup +} isotopologues are more than those detected in the CN ones. The {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio does not change significantly with the source evolutionary stage, which indicates that time seems to be irrelevant for the fractionation of nitrogen. We also find a possible anticorrelation between the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N (as derived from N{sub 2}H{sup +}) and the H/D isotopic ratios. This suggests that {sup 15}N enrichment could not be linked to the parameters that cause D enrichment, in agreement with the prediction by recent chemical models. These models, however, are not able to reproduce the observed large spread in {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N, pointing out that some important routes of nitrogen fractionation could be still missing in the models.

  19. Other compounds isolated from Simira glaziovii and the {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift assignments of new 1-epi-castanopsol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Marcelo F. de; Vieira, Ivo J. Curcino [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas. Lab. de Ciencias Quimicas; Carvalho, Mario G. de, E-mail: mgeraldo@ufrrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (NPPN/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude. Nucleo de Pesquisa em Produtos Naturais

    2012-07-01

    A new triterpene, 1-epi-castanopsol, besides eleven known compounds: sitosterol, stigmasterol, campesterol, lupeol, lupenone, simirane B, syringaresinol, scopoletin, isofraxidin, 6,7,8-trimethoxycoumarin and harman, were isolated from the wood of Simira glaziovii. The structures of the known compounds were defined by 1D, 2D {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR spectra data analyses and comparison with literature data. The detailed spectral data analyses allowed the definition of the structure of the new 1-epi isomer of castanopsol and performance of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift assignments. (author)

  20. Liver steatosis (LS) evaluated through chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging liver enzymes in morbid obesity; effect of weight loss obtained with intragastric balloon gastric banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folini, Laura; Veronelli, Annamaria; Benetti, Alberto; Pozzato, Carlo; Cappelletti, Marco; Masci, Enzo; Micheletto, Giancarlo; Pontiroli, Antonio E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in morbid obesity clinical and metabolic effects related to weight loss on liver steatosis (LS), measured through chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and liver enzymes. Forty obese subjects (8 M/32 W; BMI 42.8 ± 7.12 kg/m(2), mean ± SD) were evaluated for LS through ultrasound (US-LS), chemical-shift MRI (MRI-LS), liver enzymes [aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP)], anthropometric parameters [weight, BMI, waist circumference (WC)], lipids, insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), oral glucose tolerance test, and body composition [fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) at bio-impedance analysis (BIA)]. Anthropometric measures, MRI-LS, BIA, and biochemical parameters were reevaluated 6 months later in 18 subjects undergoing restrictive bariatric approach, i.e., intragastric balloon (BIB, n = 13) or gastric banding (LAGB, n = 5), and in 13 subjects receiving hypocaloric diet. At baseline, US-LS correlates only with MRI-LS, and the latter correlates with ALT, AST, and GGT. After 6 months, subjects undergoing BIB or LAGB had significant changes of BMI, weight, WC, ALT, AST, GGT, ALP, HbA1c, insulin, HOMA-IR, FM, FFM, and MRI-LS. Diet-treated obese subjects had no significant change of any parameter under study; change of BMI, fat mass, and fat-free mass was significantly greater in LAGB/BIB subjects than in diet-treated subjects. Change of MRI-LS showed a significant correlation with changes in weight, BMI, WC, GGT, ALP, and basal MRI-LS. Significant weight loss after BIB or LAGB is associated with decrease in chemical-shift MRI-LS and with reduction in liver enzymes; chemical-shift MRI and liver enzymes allow monitoring of LS in follow-up studies.

  1. 129Xe-NMR of xenon adsorbed on zeolites: determination of the dimensions of the void space from the chemical shift δ(129Xe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical shift δS of xenon adsorbed on zeolite and extrapolated to zero concentration depends only on the internal void space of the solid. The smaller the channels or cavities, or the more restricted the diffusion, the greater δS becomes. We have calculated the theoretical values of the mean free path l-bar of xenon adsorbed in various zeolites. We deduce from them the dependence of the δS on l-bar. It is now possible to determine the dimensions of any void space in which xenon can be adsorbed. 4 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  2. Assignment of 1HN, 15N, 13Cα, 13CO and 13Cβ resonances in a 67 kDa p53 dimer using 4D-TROSY NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in the activation of genes in response to DNA damage. As a first step towards detailed structural studies of the molecule aimed at understanding its regulation, we have used 4D-TROSY triple resonance NMR spectroscopy to obtain nearly complete 1HN, 15N, 13Cα, 13CO and 13Cβ resonance assignments of a dimeric form of the protein comprising DNA-binding and oligomerization domains (67 kDa). A simple comparison of 4D spectra recorded on p53 molecules consisting of DNA-binding and oligomerization domains with and without the regulatory domain establishes that both constructs have essentially identical chemical shifts. Although the affinity of p53 for target DNA is decreased in constructs containing the regulatory domain, the chemical shift results reported here suggest that this decrease is not due to specific domain interactions involving the regulatory portion of the molecule, or alternatively, that such interactions require the presence of DNA

  3. Variable δ15N Diet-Tissue Discrimination Factors among Sharks: Implications for Trophic Position, Diet and Food Web Models

    OpenAIRE

    Olin, Jill A.; Hussey, Nigel E.; Alice Grgicak-Mannion; Mark W Fritts; Wintner, Sabine P.; Fisk, Aaron T.

    2013-01-01

    The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ(15)N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆(15)N). As ∆(15)N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆(15)N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆(15)N values for lar...

  4. 13C-NMR chemical shift databases as a quick tool to evaluate structural models of humic substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyrop Albers, Christian; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    Models for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on 13C liquid state NMR spectra combined with results from elemental analysis and titration studies. The analysis of NMR spectra is based on a full reconstruction of the NMR spectrum done with help of 13C-NMR data bases by adding up chemical s...

  5. Quantitative and qualitative shifts in defensive metabolites define chemical defense investment during leaf development in Inga, a genus of tropical trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Natasha L; Forrister, Dale L; Endara, María-José; Coley, Phyllis D; Kursar, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Selective pressures imposed by herbivores are often positively correlated with investments that plants make in defense. Research based on the framework of an evolutionary arms race has improved our understanding of why the amount and types of defenses differ between plant species. However, plant species are exposed to different selective pressures during the life of a leaf, such that expanding leaves suffer more damage from herbivores and pathogens than mature leaves. We hypothesize that this differential selective pressure may result in contrasting quantitative and qualitative defense investment in plants exposed to natural selective pressures in the field. To characterize shifts in chemical defenses, we chose six species of Inga, a speciose Neotropical tree genus. Focal species represent diverse chemical, morphological, and developmental defense traits and were collected from a single site in the Amazonian rainforest. Chemical defenses were measured gravimetrically and by characterizing the metabolome of expanding and mature leaves. Quantitative investment in phenolics plus saponins, the major classes of chemical defenses identified in Inga, was greater for expanding than mature leaves (46% and 24% of dry weight, respectively). This supports the theory that, because expanding leaves are under greater selective pressure from herbivores, they rely more upon chemical defense as an antiherbivore strategy than do mature leaves. Qualitatively, mature and expanding leaves were distinct and mature leaves contained more total and unique metabolites. Intraspecific variation was greater for mature leaves than expanding leaves, suggesting that leaf development is canalized. This study provides a snapshot of chemical defense investment in a speciose genus of tropical trees during the short, few-week period of leaf development. Exploring the metabolome through quantitative and qualitative profiling enables a more comprehensive examination of foliar chemical defense investment.

  6. Bromine recovery in residual solutions generated in the 15 N isotopic determination methodology (Rittenberg, 1946)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic determination of 15 N (Rittenberg, 1946) is a methodology used in the Laboratory of Isotope Stable (CENA/USP). In this procedure, in the oxidation of nitrogen species for N2, solution of Li Br O is used, generating as residue 50 L y-1 of solution contends Li Br and Li Br O. Seeking to recover the bromine contained in that residue, very toxic substance, a special line was built composed by reaction balloons (1 and 2 liters), addition funnel, gas flow regulator and connections in glass. In the system proposed, after the acidification (sulfuric acid) of the alkaline residual solution, the liberated bromine (Br2) it was then dragged by flow of nitrogen and reacted with solution of LiOH. That reaction facilitated the production of Li Br O in solution (Efficiency = 82±2%), that was reused later on same analytic procedure. The high cost of the liquid bromine is another attractiveness that corroborates the employment of the developed procedure. They took place isotopic determinations using the recovered solutions and prepared, and the observed values didn't show statistical difference (T test of Student). The presented procedure is part of the Management Program of Chemical Residues of CENA/USP, which seeks to destine the residues of responsibility of the institution appropriately, forming professionals to the practices of environmental management. (author)

  7. Nitrogen fertilizer (15N leaching in a central pivot fertigated coffee crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pivotto Bortolotto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen has a complex dynamics in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. N fertilizers are subject to chemical and microbial transformations in soils that can result in significant losses. Considering the cost of fertilizers, the adoption of good management practices like fertigation could improve the N use efficiency by crops. Water balances (WB were applied to evaluate fertilizer N leaching using 15N labeled urea in west Bahia, Brazil. Three scenarios (2008/2009 were established: i rainfall + irrigation the full year, ii rainfall only; and iii rainfall + irrigation only in the dry season. The water excess was considered equal to the deep drainage for the very flat area (runoff = 0 with a water table located several meters below soil surface (capillary rise = 0. The control volume for water balance calculations was the 0 - 1 m soil layer, considering that it involves the active root system. The water drained below 1 m was used to estimate fertilizer N leaching losses. WB calculations used the mathematic model of Penman-Monteith for evapotranspiration, considering the crop coefficient equal to unity. The high N application rate associated to the high rainfall plus irrigation was found to be the main cause for leaching, which values were 14.7 and 104.5 kg ha-1 for the rates 400 and 800 kg ha-1 of N, corresponding to 3.7 and 13.1 % of the applied fertilizer, respectively.

  8. DFT Studies on Thermal Stabilities,Electronic Structures, and 13C Chemical Shifts of C24O2 Based on Fullerene C24(D6)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhen; ZHANG Jing

    2011-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations on some possible equilibrium geometries of C2402 isomers derived from C24 (D6) and C240 have been performed using density functional theory (DFT) method. The geometric and electronic structures as well as the relative energies and thermal stabilities of various C2402 isomers at the ground state have been calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. And the 1,4,2,5-C2402 isomer was found to be the most stable geometry where two oxygen atoms were added to the longest carbon-carbon bonds in the same pentagon from a thermodynamic point of view. Based on the optimized neutral geometries, the vertical ionization potential and vertical electron affinity have been obtained. Meanwhile, the vibrational frequencies,IR spectrum, and 13C chemical shifts of various C2402 isomers have been calculated and analyzed.

  9. 15N-labeled nitrogen from green manure and ammonium sulfate utilization by the sugarcane ratoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legumes as green manure are alternative sources of nitrogen (N) for crops and can supplement or even replace mineral nitrogen fertilization due to their potential for biological nitrogen fixation (BNF). The utilization of nitrogen by sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) fertilized with sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.) and ammonium sulfate (AS) was evaluated using the 15N tracer technique. N was added at the rate of 196 and 70 kg ha-1 as 15N-labeled sunn hemp green manure (SH) and as ammonium sulfate (AS), respectively. Treatments were: (I) Control; (II) AS15N; (III) SH15N + AS; (IV) SH15N; and (V) AS15N + SH. Sugarcane was cultivated for five years and was harvested three times. 15N recovery was evaluated in the two first harvests. In the sum of the three harvests, the highest stalk yields were obtained with a combination of green manure and inorganic N fertilizer; however, in the second cutting the yields were higher where SH was used than in plots with AS. The recovery of N by the first two consecutive harvests accounted for 19 to 21% of the N applied as leguminous green manure and 46 to 49% of the N applied as AS. The amounts of inorganic N, derived from both N sources, present in the 0-0.4 m layer of soil in the first season after N application and were below 1 kg ha-1. (author)

  10. Steroselective synthesis and application of L-( sup 15 N) amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, C.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Lodwig, S.N. (Centralia Coll., WA (United States). Div. of Science)

    1991-01-01

    We have developed two general approaches to the stereoselective synthesis of {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-labeled amino acids. First, labeled serine, biosynthesized using the methylotrophic bacterium M. extorquens AM1, serves as a chiral precursor for the synthesis of other amino acids. For example, pyridoxal phosphate enzymes can be used for the conversion of L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)serine to L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tyrosine, L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)tryptophan, and L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)cysteine. In the second approach, developed by Oppolzer and Tamura, an electrophilic amination'' reagent, 1-chloro-1-nitrosocyclohexane, was used to convert chiral enolates into L-{alpha}-amino acids. We prepared 1-chloro-1-({sup 15}N) nitrosocyclohexane and used it to aminate chiral enolates to produce L-({alpha}-{sup 15}N)amino acids. The stereoselectivity of this scheme using the Oppolzer sultam chiral auxiliary is remarkable, producing enantiomer ratios of 200 to 1. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Alkaline Hydrolysis/Polymerization of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: Characterization of Products by 13C and 15N NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, K.A.; Thorne, P.G.; Cox, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis has been investigated as a nonbiological procedure for the destruction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in explosives contaminated soils and munitions scrap. Nucleophilic substitutions of the nitro and methyl groups of TNT by hydroxide ion are the initial steps in the alkaline degradation of TNT. Potential applications of the technique include both in situ surface liming and ex situ alkaline treatment of contaminated soils. A number of laboratory studies have reported the formation of an uncharacterized polymeric material upon prolonged treatment of TNT in base. As part of an overall assessment of alkaline hydrolysis as a remediation technique, and to gain a better understanding of the chemical reactions underlying the hydrolysis/polymerization process, the soluble and precipitate fractions of polymeric material produced from the calcium hydroxide hydrolysis of unlabeled and 15N-labeled TNT were analyzed by elemental analysis and 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectra indicated that reactions leading to polymerization included nucleophilic displacement of nitro groups by hydroxide ion, formation of ketone, carboxyl, alcohol, ether, and other aliphatic carbons, conversion of methyl groups to diphenyl methylene carbons, and recondensation of aromatic amines and reduced forms of nitrite, including ammonia and possibly hydroxylamine, into the polymer. Compared to the distribution of carbons in TNT as 14% sp 3- and 86% sp2-hybridized, the precipitate fraction from hydrolysis of unlabeled TNT contained 33% sp3- and 67% sp 2-hybridized carbons. The concentration of nitrogen in the precipitate was 64% of that in TNT. The 15N NMR spectra showed that, in addition to residual nitro groups, forms of nitrogen present in the filtrate and precipitate fractions include aminohydroquinone, primary amide, indole, imine, and azoxy, among others. Unreacted nitrite was recovered in the filtrate fraction. The toxicities and susceptibilities to

  12. Quantitative Proteomics: Measuring Protein Synthesis Using 15N Amino Acids Labeling in Pancreas Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yingchun; Lee, Wai-Nang Paul; Lim, Shu; Go, Vay Liang; Xiao, Jing; Cao, Rui; Zhang, Hengwei; Recker, Robert; Xiao, Gary Guishan

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer MIA PaCa cells were cultured in the presence and absence of 15N amino acids mixture for 72 hours. During protein synthesis, the incorporation of 15N amino acids results in a new mass isotopomer distribution in protein, which is approximated by the concatenation of two binomial distributions of 13C and 15N. Fraction of protein synthesis (FSR) can thus be determined from the relative intensities of the ‘labeled’ (new) and the ‘unlabeled” (old) spectra. Six prominent spots were...

  13. Radiative p 15N Capture in the Region of Astrophysical Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.; Alimov, D. K.

    2016-06-01

    Within the framework of the modified potential cluster model with classification of orbital states according to the Young schemes, the possibility of describing experimental data for the astrophysical S-factor of p 15N radiative capture at energies from 50 to 1500 keV is considered. It is shown that on the basis of M1 and E1 transitions from various p 15N scattering states to the ground state of the 16O nucleus in the p 15N channel it is entirely possible to successfully explain the overall behavior of the S-factor in the considered energy region in the presence of two resonances.

  14. Nitrogen distribution a 15 N fertilizer in different soil fractions of a barley cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A culture of barley in the open fields has been fertilized on 9 m2 with Ca(NO3)2 containing 20,8% 15N excess. At the crop, 15 N distribution shows that half of the fertilized nitrogen which is exported by the crop has become organic in the Ap horizon. The use of different methods of fractionation of the soil, shows the biological character of this reorganization, in which the biomass appears to be the main 15 N nitrogen stock

  15. Final Technical Report: A Paradigm Shift in Chemical Processing: New Sustainable Chemistries for Low-VOC Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kenneth F.

    2006-07-26

    The project employed new processes to make emulsion polymers from reduced levels of petroleum-derived chemical feedstocks. Most waterborne paints contain spherical, emulsion polymer particles that serve as the film-forming binder phase. Our goal was to make emulsion polymer particles containing 30 percent feedstock that would function as effectively as commercial emulsions made from higher level feedstock. The processes developed yielded particles maintained their film formation capability and binding capacity while preserving the structural integrity of the particles after film formation. Rohm and Haas Company (ROH) and Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) worked together to employ novel polymer binders (ROH) and new, non-volatile, biomass-derived coalescing agents (ADM). The University of Minnesota Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science utilized its unique microscopy capabilities to characterize films made from the New Emulsion Polymers (NEP).

  16. Fractional enrichment of proteins using [2-{sup 13}C]-glycerol as the carbon source facilitates measurement of excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts with improved sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlner, Alexandra; Andresen, Cecilia; Khan, Shahid N. [Linköping University, Division of Chemistry, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (Sweden); Kay, Lewis E. [The University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, One King’s College Circle (Canada); Lundström, Patrik, E-mail: patlu@ifm.liu.se [Linköping University, Division of Chemistry, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    A selective isotope labeling scheme based on the utilization of [2-{sup 13}C]-glycerol as the carbon source during protein overexpression has been evaluated for the measurement of excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts using Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments. As expected, the fractional incorporation of label at the Cα positions is increased two-fold relative to labeling schemes based on [2-{sup 13}C]-glucose, effectively doubling the sensitivity of NMR experiments. Applications to a binding reaction involving an SH3 domain from the protein Abp1p and a peptide from the protein Ark1p establish that accurate excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts can be obtained from RD experiments, with errors on the order of 0.06 ppm for exchange rates ranging from 100 to 1000 s{sup −1}, despite the small fraction of {sup 13}Cα–{sup 13}Cβ spin-pairs that are present for many residue types. The labeling approach described here should thus be attractive for studies of exchanging systems using {sup 13}Cα spin probes.

  17. Free variable selection QSPR study to predict 19F chemical shifts of some fluorinated organic compounds using Random Forest and RBF-PLS methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Nasser

    2016-04-01

    In this work, two new and powerful chemometrics methods are applied for the modeling and prediction of the 19F chemical shift values of some fluorinated organic compounds. The radial basis function-partial least square (RBF-PLS) and random forest (RF) are employed to construct the models to predict the 19F chemical shifts. In this study, we didn't used from any variable selection method and RF method can be used as variable selection and modeling technique. Effects of the important parameters affecting the ability of the RF prediction power such as the number of trees (nt) and the number of randomly selected variables to split each node (m) were investigated. The root-mean-square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for the training set and the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 44.70, 23.86, 29.77, and 23.69, respectively. Also, the correlation coefficients of the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 0.8684 and 0.9313, respectively. The results obtained reveal that the RF model can be used as a powerful chemometrics tool for the quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies.

  18. 13C and 15N fractionation of CH4/N2 mixtures during photochemical aerosol formation: Relevance to Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebree, Joshua A.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Mandt, Kathleen E.; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Trainer, Melissa G.

    2016-05-01

    The ratios of the stable isotopes that comprise each chemical species in Titan's atmosphere provide critical information towards understanding the processes taking place within its modern and ancient atmosphere. Several stable isotope pairs, including 12C/13C and 14N/15N, have been measured in situ or probed spectroscopically by Cassini-borne instruments, space telescopes, or through ground-based observations. Current attempts to model the observed isotope ratios incorporate fractionation resulting from atmospheric diffusion, hydrodynamic escape, and primary photochemical processes. However, the effect of a potentially critical pathway for isotopic fractionation - organic aerosol formation and subsequent deposition onto the surface of Titan - has not been considered due to insufficient data regarding fractionation during aerosol formation. To better understand the nature of this process, we have conducted a laboratory study to measure the isotopic fractionation associated with the formation of Titan aerosol analogs, commonly referred to as 'tholins', via far-UV irradiation of several methane (CH4) and dinitrogen (N2) mixtures. Analysis of the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of the photochemical aerosol products using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) show that fractionation direction and magnitude are dependent on the initial bulk composition of the gas mixture. In general, the aerosols showed enrichment in 13C and 14N, and the observed fractionation trends can provide insight into the chemical mechanisms controlling photochemical aerosol formation.

  19. Evaluation of the protein metabolism during hepatic coma evidenced by 15N tracer data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In patients in coma hepaticum as well as in pigs with experimental hepatic coma the protein metabolism was studied under conditions of parenteral application of an amino acid diet using 15N-glycine as tracer

  20. Measurement of marine productivity using 15N and 13C tracers: Some methodological aspects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Naveen Gandhi; Sanjeev Kumar; S Prakash; R Ramesh; M S Sheshshayee

    2011-02-01

    Various experiments involving the measurement of new, regenerated and total productivity using 15N and 13C tracers were carried out in the Bay of Bengal (BOB) and in the Arabian Sea. Results from 15N tracer experiments indicate that nitrate uptake can be underestimated by experiments with incubation time > 4 hours. Indirect evidence suggests pico- and nano-phytoplankton, on their dominance over microphytoplankton, can also influence the f-ratios. Difference in energy requirement for assimilation of different nitrogen compounds decides the preferred nitrogen source during the early hours of incubation. Variation in light intensity during incubation also plays a significant role in the assimilation of nitrogen. Results from time course experiments with both 15N and 13C tracers suggest that photoinhibition appears significant in BOB and the Arabian Sea during noon. A significant correlation has been found in the productivity values obtained using 15N and 13C tracers.

  1. 15N NMR Spectroscopic Study on Nitrogen Formsin1mmHumic Substances of Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Nitrogen forms of humic substances from a subalpine meadow soil, alateritic red soil and a weathered coal and the effect of acidhydrolysis on N structures of soil humic substances were studied byusing {15N cross-polarization magic angle spinning nuclearmagnetic resonance (CPMAS NMR) spectroscopy. Of the detectable15N-signal intensity in the spectra of soil humic substances71%79% may be attributed to amide groups, 10%18%to aromatic/aliphatic amines and 6%11% to indole- andpyrrole-like N. Whereas in the spectrum of the fulvic acid fromweathered coal 46%, at least, of the total 15N-signalintensity might be assigned to pyrrole-like N, 14% toaromatic/aliphatic amines, and the remaining intensities could not beassigned with certainty. Data on nonhydrolyzable residue ofprotein-sugar mixture and a 15N-labelled soil fulvic acidconfirm the formation of nonhydrolyzable heterocyclic N during acidhydrolysis.

  2. Metabolic studies in colostomized laying hens using 15N-labelled wheat. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In colostomized laying hens fed with 15N-labelled wheat protein the atomic percentage 15N excess (15N') was determined in the total, lysine, histidine, and arginine N, respectively, of isolated ovarian follicles of the residual ovary and of the oviduct. The labelling of the basic amino acids became smaller with decreasing size of the follicles. The proportions between the 3 amino acids were inconsistent and typical for the individual hens, whereas in the yolk a constant ratio of the amino acids was found. The 15N' in the 3 amino acids of the residual ovary and of the oviduct revealed greater differences between the individual hens. In the lysine, histidine and arginine 21.2% of the labelled N of the follicles was demonstrated

  3. Nitrogen retention across a gradient of 15N additions to an unpolluted temperate forest soil in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perakis, Steven S.; Compton, J.E.; Hedin, L.O.

    2005-01-01

    Accelerated nitrogen (N) inputs can drive nonlinear changes in N cycling, retention, and loss in forest ecosystems. Nitrogen processing in soils is critical to understanding these changes, since soils typically are the largest N sink in forests. To elucidate soil mechanisms that underlie shifts in N cycling across a wide gradient of N supply, we added 15NH415NO3 at nine treatment levels ranging in geometric sequence from 0.2 kg to 640 kg NA? ha-1A? yr-1 to an unpolluted old-growth temperate forest in southern Chile. We recovered roughly half of tracers in 0-25 cm of soil, primarily in the surface 10 cm. Low to moderate rates of N supply failed to stimulate N leaching, which suggests that most unrecovered 15N was transferred from soils to unmeasured sinks above ground. However, soil solution losses of nitrate increased sharply at inputs > 160 kg NA? ha-1A? yr-1, corresponding to a threshold of elevated soil N availability and declining 15N retention in soil. Soil organic matter (15N in soils at the highest N inputs and may explain a substantial fraction of the 'missing N' often reported in studies of fates of N inputs to forests. Contrary to expectations, N additions did not stimulate gross N cycling, potential nitrification, or ammonium oxidizer populations. Our results indicate that the nonlinearity in N retention and loss resulted directly from excessive N supply relative to sinks, independent of plant-soil-microbial feedbacks. However, N additions did induce a sharp decrease in microbial biomass C:N that is predicted by N saturation theory, and which could increase long-term N storage in soil organic matter by lowering the critical C:N ratio for net N mineralization. All measured sinks accumulated 15N tracers across the full gradient of N supply, suggesting that short-term nonlinearity in N retention resulted from saturation of uptake kinetics, not uptake capacity, in plant, soil, and microbial pools.

  4. Methodical investigation of the endogenous N excretion in feces by 15N-labelled rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wistar rats (approximately 100g live weight, n = 8) received a wheat diet and were labelled over a period of 7 days with 15N-ammonium acetate. From day 1 - 5 of the experiment after the end of the labelling feces and urine were collected and analysed. After the animals were killed (day 5 of the experiment) the atom-% 15N excess (15N') in the contents of the digestive tract as well as in the tissues of stomach wall, intestinal wall, liver, pancreas and blood plasma was determined. The TCA-soluble fraction of the blood plasma showed 0.44 atom-% 15N' on day 5 after the end of 15N labelling. 3 hours before the killing fecal N also showed 0.44 and during the last collection period (24 hours before) an average of 0.51 atom-% 15N'. Urine decreased in the same period from 0.71 to 0.59 atom-% 15N'. The endogenous fecal N is calculated to 88%. As the tissues of the digestive tract are likely to supply the biggest part of the endogenous fecal protein, the values of atom-% 15N' from the TCA-precipitable fraction of the intestinal wall and of the pancreas gland was calculed to an average of 0.526. According to this the calculation endogenous fecal N is 84%. It is probable that the quota of endogenous fecal N in the total amount of fecal N varies in dependence on the fermentable crude fiber in the diet as well as on the age of the test animals and thus the bacterial protein synthesis in the colon. As the N used by the bacteria is likely to come from the TCA-soluble fraction of the blood, the calculation formula suggested, which uses the TCA-soluble fraction of the blood plasma, achieves good approximate values also for higher bacterial protein synthesis in the colon. (author)

  5. The First in Vivo Observation of 13C- 15N Coupling in Mammalian Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.

    2001-12-01

    [5-13C,15N]Glutamine, with 1J(13C-15N) of 16 Hz, was observed in vivo in the brain of spontaneously breathing rats by 13C MRS at 4.7 T. The brain [5-13C]glutamine peak consisted of the doublet from [5-13C,15N]glutamine and the center [5-13C,14N]glutamine peak, resulting in an apparent triplet with a separation of 8 Hz. The time course of formation of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine was monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 20-35 min. This [5-13C,15N]glutamine was formed by glial uptake of released neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate and its reaction with 15NH3 catalyzed by the glia-specific glutamine synthetase. The neurotransmitter glutamate C5 was selectively13C-enriched by intravenous [2,5-13C]glucose infusion to 13C-label whole-brain glutamate C5, followed by [12C]glucose infusion to chase 13C from the small and rapidly turning-over glial glutamate pool, leaving 13C mainly in the neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate pool, which is sequestered in vesicles until release. Hence, the observed [5-13C,15N]glutamine arises from a coupling between 13C of neuronal origin and 15N of glial origin. Measurement of the rate of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine formation provides a novel noninvasive method of studying the kinetics of neurotransmitter uptake into glia in vivo, a process that is crucial for protecting the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity.

  6. Effects of lipid and urea extraction on δ15N values of deep-sea sharks and hagfish: Can mathematical correction factors be generated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Diana A.; Heithaus, Michael R.; Dean Grubbs, R.

    2015-05-01

    Stable isotope analysis is broadly employed to investigate diverse ecological questions. In order to make appropriate comparisons among multiple taxa, however, it is necessary to standardize values to account for interspecific differences in factors that affect isotopic ratios. For example, varying concentrations of soluble nitrogen compounds, such as urea or trimethylamine oxide, can affect the analysis and interpretation of δ15N values of sharks or hagfish. The goal of this study was to assess the effects of a standard chloroform/methanol extraction on the stable isotope values of muscle tissue obtained from 10 species of sharks and three species of hagfish collected from poorly-known deep-water (>200 m) communities. We detected significant differences in δ15N, %N, and C:N values as a result of extractions in 8 of 10 shark and all three hagfish species. We observed increased δ15N values, but shifts in %N and C:N values were not unidirectional. Mathematical normalizations for δ15N values were successfully created for four shark and two hagfish species. However, they were not successful for two shark species. Therefore, performing extractions of all samples is recommended.

  7. Synthesis of methotrexate-1-15N and methotrexate-4-15NH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an application of the pterin synthesis of methotrexate specifically labelled at the N1-ring nitrogen and at the 4-amino group with 99 atom percent 15N. Oximination of ethyl cyanoacetate-15N followed by reduction afforded ethyl 2-aminocyanoacetate-C15N. Condensation with 3-bromopyruvaldoxime and 4-methylamino-benzoic acid afforded 2-amino-3-carbethoxy-5-N-methyl-p-carboxy-anilinomethylpyrazine-1-oxide-2-15NH2. Treatment with ammonium hydroxide at room temperature gave the 3-carboxamide. Reduction of the N-oxide (Pl3), esterification, and dehydration of the amide (POCl3) afforded the 2-amino-3-cyano-pyrazine benzoate ester. Ring closure with guanidine followed by benzoate ester hydrolysis, glutamate coupling and hydrolysis of the glutamate diester yielded methotrexate-1-15N. Animation of the unlabeled 2-amino-3-carbethoxy pyrazine intermediate with 15N-labelled ammonium hydroxide gave the 15N-carboxamide which was carried through the process described above to afford methotrexate-4-15NH2. (author)

  8. Quantifying below-ground nitrogen of legumes: Optimizing procedures for 15N shoot-labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantifying below-ground nitrogen (N) of legumes is fundamental to understanding their effects on soil mineral N fertility and on the N economies of following or companion crops in legume-based rotations. Methodologies based on 15N-labelling of whole plants with subsequent measurement of 15N in recovered plant parts and in the root-zone soil have proved promising. We report four glasshouse experiments with objectives to develop appropriate protocols for in situ 15N labelling of four pulses, faba bean (Vicia faba), chickpea (Cicer arietinum), mung bean (Vigna radiata) and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan). Treatments included 15N-urea concentration, feeding technique, leaflet/petiole position, and frequency of feeding. Nitrogen-15-labelling via the leaf-flap was best for faba bean, mung and pigeon pea, whilst petiole feeding was best for chickpea, in all cases using 0.2-mL volumes of 0.5% urea (98 atom% 15N excess). The implications of uneven enrichment of the nodulated roots because of effects of the 15N-depleted nodules when calculating root-derived N in soil are discussed. (author)

  9. Highly 15N-Enriched Chondritic Clasts in the Isheyevo Meteorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonal, L; Huss, G R; Krot, A N; Nagashima, K; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Hutcheon, I D

    2009-01-14

    The metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites (CB and CH) have the highest whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment ({delta}{sup 15}N up to +1500{per_thousand}), similar to {delta}{sup 15}N values reported in micron-sized regions (hotspots) of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) of possibly cometary origin and fine-grained matrices of unmetamorphosed chondrites. These {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are commonly attributed to low-temperature ion-molecule reactions in the protosolar molecular cloud or in the outer part of the protoplanetary disk. The nature of the whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment of the metal-rich chondrites is not understood. We report a discovery of a unique type of primitive chondritic clasts in the CH/CB-like meteorite Isheyevo, which provides important constraints on the origin of {sup 15}N anomaly in metal-rich chondrites and nitrogen-isotope fractionation in the Solar System. These clasts contain tiny chondrules and refractory inclusions (5-15 {micro}m in size), and abundant ferromagnesian chondrule fragments (1-50 {micro}m in size) embedded in the partly hydrated, fine-grained matrix material composed of olivines, pyroxenes, poorly-organized aromatic organics, phyllosilicates and other hydrous phases. The mineralogy and oxygen isotope compositions of chondrules and refractory inclusions in the clasts are similar to those in the Isheyevo host, suggesting formation at similar heliocentric distances. In contrast to the previously known extraterrestrial samples, the fine-grained material in the clasts is highly and rather uniformly enriched in {sup 15}N, with bulk {delta}{sup 15}N values ranging between +1000 and +1300{per_thousand}; the {delta}{sup 15}N values in rare hotspots range from +1400 to +4000{per_thousand}. Since fine-grained matrices in the lithic clasts are the only component containing thermally unprocessed (during CAI and chondrule formation or during impact melting) materials that accreted into the metal rich chondrite parent body(ies), the {sup 15}N

  10. Seasonal changes in nitrogen availability, and root and microbial uptake of 15N13C9-phenylalanine and 15N-ammonium in situ at a temperate heath

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Louise C.; Michelsen, Anders; Jonasson, Sven Evert;

    2011-01-01

    In the plant biosynthesis of secondary compounds, phenylalanine is a precursor of condensed tannins. Tannins are deposited into the soil in plant root exudates and dead plant material and have been suggested to precipitate some soil nutrients and hence reduce nutrient availability for plants. Free...... amino acid,inorganic and microbial N concentration during the growing season was investigated in an ecosystem with a natural tannin chemosphere. The influence of tannins on the uptake of nitrogen in plants and microbes was followed by injecting tannic acid (TA), ammonium-15N and phenylalanine-15N/13C9....... Plants preferred ammonium over phenylalanine, while microbes had no preference. Soil microbes had a 77% uptake of intact phenylalanine. Phenylalanine was acquired intact by both grasses and Calluna, with 63% and 38% uptake of intact phenylalanine in grass fine roots and Calluna roots, respectively...

  11. Acetylene inhibition of N2O reduction in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays: evaluation by 15N tracer and 15N site preference of N2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weymann, Daniel; Well, Reinhard; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Lena, Rohe

    2013-04-01

    The measurement of denitrification in soils and aquifers is still challenging and often enough associated with considerable experimental effort and high costs. Against this background, the acetylene inhibition technique (AIT) applied in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays is by far the most effective approach. However, this method has been largely criticized, as it is susceptible to underestimate denitrification rates and adds an additional carbon source to the substrates to be investigated. Here we provide evidence that the AIT is not necessarily an inappropriate approach to measure denitrification, that its reliability depends on the drivers governing the process, and that the 15N site preference of N2O (SP) may serve as a tool to assess this reliability. Two laboratory batch experiments were conducted, where sandy aquifer material and a peat soil were incubated as slurries. We established (i) a standard anaerobic treatment by adding KNO3 (10 mg N L-1), (ii) an oxygen treatment by adding KNO3 and O2 (5 mg L-1), and (iii) a glucose treatment by adding KNO3 supplemented with glucose (200 mg C L-1). Both experiments were run under 10 % (v/v) acetylene atmosphere and as 15N tracer treatments using labeled K15NO3 (60 atom % 15N). In the case of the standard anaerobic treatments, we found a very good agreement of denitrification potential obtained by the AIT and 15N tracer methods. SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between -4.8 and 2.6 ‰ which is indicative for N2O production during bacterial denitrification but not for N2O reduction to N2. In contrast, we observed substantial underestimation of denitrification by AIT for the glucose treatments compared to the 15N method, i.e. denitrification was underestimated by 36 % (sandy aquifer material) and 47 % (peat soil). SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between 4.5 and 9.6 ‰, which suggests occurrence of bacterial N2O reduction. In the case of the oxygen

  12. Revision of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction rate and oxygen abundance in H-burning zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caciolli, A.; Mazzocchi, C.; Capogrosso, V.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Corvisiero, P.; Costantini, H.; Elekes, Z.; Formicola, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Lemut, A.; Marta, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Palmerini, S.; Prati, P.; Roca, V.; Rolfs, C.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Somorjai, E.; Straniero, O.; Strieder, F.; Terrasi, F.; Trautvetter, H. P.; Vomiero, A.

    2011-09-01

    Context. The NO cycle takes place in the deepest layer of a H-burning core or shell, when the temperature exceeds T ≃ 30 × 106 K. The O depletion observed in some globular cluster giant stars, always associated with a Na enhancement, may be due to either a deep mixing during the red giant branch (RGB) phase of the star or to the pollution of the primordial gas by an early population of massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, whose chemical composition was modified by the hot bottom burning. In both cases, the NO cycle is responsible for the O depletion. Aims: The activation of this cycle depends on the rate of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction. A precise evaluation of this reaction rate at temperatures as low as experienced in H-burning zones in stellar interiors is mandatory to understand the observed O abundances. Methods: We present a new measurement of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction performed at LUNA covering for the first time the center of mass energy range 70-370 keV, which corresponds to stellar temperatures between 65 × 106 K and 780 × 106 K. This range includes the 15N(p, γ)16O Gamow-peak energy of explosive H-burning taking place in the external layer of a nova and the one of the hot bottom burning (HBB) nucleosynthesis occurring in massive AGB stars. Results: With the present data, we are also able to confirm the result of the previous R-matrix extrapolation. In particular, in the temperature range of astrophysical interest, the new rate is about a factor of 2 smaller than reported in the widely adopted compilation of reaction rates (NACRE or CF88) and the uncertainty is now reduced down to the 10% level.

  13. True cooking aroma or artefact. {sup 15}N gives the answer; Veritable arome de cuisson ou artefact. {sup 15}N fournit la reponse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metro, F.; Boudaud, N.; Dumont, J.P. [INRA, 44 - Nantes (France)

    1994-12-31

    In order to determine the respective contributions of the various nitrous precursor families in aroma preparations, the usually added amino acids were substituted with {sup 15}N isotope labelled homologous components. Results concerning isotope ratios for the volatile fraction nitrous components collected from poultry meat aromatic preparations, are presented. Terminal product labelling appears to allow for a better determination of the substrate and functional additive contributions. 4 figs., 6 refs.

  14. Stickstoffausnutzungseffizienz von 15N-markierter Schafsgülle und 15N-markiertem Mineraldünger in biologisch und konventionell bewirtschafteten Anbausystemen

    OpenAIRE

    Bosshard, Christine; Sorensen, Peter; Frossard, Emmanuel; Mayer, Jochen; Mäder, Paul; Nanzer, Simone; Oberson, Astrid

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) utilisation by crops has to be improved to minimize losses to the environment. We investigated N use efficiency of animal manure and mineral fertiliser and fate of fertiliser N not taken up by crops in a bio-organic (BIOORG) and a conventional (CONMIN) cropping system of a long-term experiment over three vegetation periods (wheat-soybean-maize). Microplots received a single application of 15N-labelled slurries or mineral fertiliser. At the end of each vegetation pe...

  15. Absorption of ammonium sulphate {sup 15}N by coffee plants; Recuperacao do {sup 15}N do sulfato de amonio por plantas de cafe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenilli, Tatiele Anete Bergamo; Reichardt, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny Oliveira Santos [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Fisica do Solo]. E-mail: tatiele@cena.usp.br; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Isotopos Estaveis; Dourado Neto, Durval [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Producao Vegetal

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the absorption of ammonium sulphate {sup 15}N by coffee plants. Treatments consisted of five sub-plots of 9 plants, of which the three central ones received 280 kg ha{sup -1} of {sup 15}N, applied at four times: 1/4 on 01 Set 03; 1/4 on 03 Nov 03; 1/4 on 15 Dec 03 and 1/4 on 30 Jan 04. The isotopic enrichment was 2,072 {+-} 0,001 atom % {sup 15}N. The dry matter of the shoot was evaluated every 60 days, using one plant per replicate, collected outside the sub-plot. They were as similar as possible to the labeled plants, which were used only for isotopic and Total N analysis, after being dried at 65 deg C until constant weight. At harvest, plants had absorbed 42,88% of the fertilizer N. Leaves accumulated the largest amount of fertilizer N, and were also the compartments that received most N from other parts of the plant. The following partition of the fertilizer N was found at harvest: 23.01% in young leaves, 6.23% in old leaves, 4,46% in stem, 3.46% in fruits, 3.10% in young branches and 2.63% in old branches. (author)

  16. 1H chemical shift imaging of the brain in guanidino methyltransferase deficiency, a creatine deficiency syndrome; guanidinoacetate accumulation in the gray matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR spectroscopy results in a mild case of guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency are presented. The approach differs from previous MRS studies in the acquisition of a chemical shift imaging spectral map showing gray and white matter with the corresponding spectra in one overview. MR spectroscopy revealed guanidinoacetate (GAA) in the absence of creatine. New is that GAA signals are more prominent in gray matter than in white. In the prevailing view, that enzyme deficiency is localized in liver and pancreas and that all GAA is transported into the brain from the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid, this would be compatible with a more limited uptake and/or better clearance of GAA from the white matter compared to the grey matter. (orig.)

  17. Barley Benefits from Organic Nitrogen in Plant Residues Applied to Soil using 15N Isotope Dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiment was carried out in pots (sandy soil cultivated with Barley plant) under greenhouse conditions, at Inshas, Egypt. The aim was to evaluate the transformation of nitrogen applied either as mineral form (15NH4)2SO4, or as organic-material-N (plant residues) .Basal recommended doses of P and K were applied. Labeled 15N as(15NH4)2SO4 (5 % a.e) or plant residues (ground leuceana forage, compost, and mixture of them) were applied at a rate of 20 kg N/ ha). 15N technique was used to evaluate N-uptake and fertilizer use efficiency. The treatments were arranged in a completely randomized block design under greenhouse conditions. The obtained results showed that the dry weight of barley shoots was positively affected by reinforcement of mineral- N with organic-N. On the other hand, the highest dry weight was estimated with leuceana either applied alone or reinforced with mineral N. Similar trend was noticed with N uptake but only with organic N, while with treatment received 50% organic-N. plus 50% mineral- N. the best value of N uptake was recorded with mixture of leuceana and compost. The amount of Ndff was lowest where fertilizer 15N was applied alone. Comparing Ndff for the three organic treatments which received a combination of fertilizer-15N+organic-material-N, results showed that the highest Ndff was occurred with mixture of leuceana and compost, whereas the lowest was induced with individual leuceana treatment. 15N recovery in shoots of barley ranged between 22.14 % to 82.16 %. The lowest occurred with application of mineral 15N alone and; the highest occurred where mineral 15N was mixed with compost or leucaena-compost mixture

  18. Examination of anticipated chemical shift and shape distortion effect on materials commonly used in prosthetic socket fabrication when measured using MRI: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mohammad Reza; Rowe, Philip; Buis, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    The quality of lower-limb prosthetic socket fit is influenced by shape and volume consistency during the residual limb shape-capturing process (i.e., casting). Casting can be quantified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. However, chemical shift artifact and image distortion may influence the accuracy of MRI when common socket/casting materials are used. We used a purpose-designed rig to examine seven different materials commonly used in socket fabrication during exposure to MRI. The rig incorporated glass marker tubes filled with water doped with 1 g/L copper sulfate (CS) and 9 plastic sample vials (film containers) to hold the specific material specimens. The specimens were scanned 9 times in different configurations. The absolute mean difference of the glass marker tube length was 1.39 mm (2.98%) (minimum = 0.13 mm [0.30%], maximum = 5.47 mm [14.03%], standard deviation = 0.89 mm). The absolute shift for all materials was <1.7 mm. This was less than the measurement tolerance of +/-2.18 mm based on voxel (three-dimensional pixel) dimensions. The results show that MRI is an accurate and repeatable method for dimensional measurement when using matter containing water. Additionally, silicone and plaster of paris plus 1 g/L CS do not show a significant shape distortion nor do they interfere with the MRI image of the residual limb.

  19. Examination of anticipated chemical shift and shape distortion effect on materials commonly used in prosthetic socket fabrication when measured using MRI: A validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Safari, PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The quality of lower-limb prosthetic socket fit is influenced by shape and volume consistency during the residual limb shape-capturing process (i.e., casting. Casting can be quantified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technology. However, chemical shift artifact and image distortion may influence the accuracy of MRI when common socket/casting materials are used. We used a purpose-designed rig to examine seven different materials commonly used in socket fabrication during exposure to MRI. The rig incorporated glass marker tubes filled with water doped with 1 g/L copper sulfate (CS and 9 plastic sample vials (film containers to hold the specific material specimens. The specimens were scanned 9 times in different configurations. The absolute mean difference of the glass marker tube length was 1.39 mm (2.98% (minimum = 0.13 mm [0.30%], maximum = 5.47 mm [14.03%], standard deviation = 0.89 mm. The absolute shift for all materials was <1.7 mm. This was less than the measurement tolerance of +/–2.18 mm based on voxel (three-dimensional pixel dimensions. The results show that MRI is an accurate and repeatable method for dimensional measurement when using matter containing water. Additionally, silicone and plaster of paris plus 1 g/L CS do not show a significant shape distortion nor do they interfere with the MRI image of the residual limb.

  20. 31P-MR spectroscopy of all regions of the human heart at 1.5 T with acquisition-weighted chemical shift imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Aim of this study was to show whether or not acquisition-weighted chemical shift imaging (AW-CSI) allows the determination of PCr and ATP in the lateral and posterior wall of the human heart at 1.5 T. Methods: 12 healthy volunteers were examined using a conventional chemical shift imaging (CSI) and an AW-CSI. The sequences differed only in the number of repetitions for each point in k space. A hanning function was used as filter function leading to 7 repetitions in the center of the k space and 0 in the corners. Thus, AW-CSI had the same resolution as the CSI sequence. The results for both sequences were analyzed using identically positioned voxels in the septal, anterior, lateral and posterior wall. Results: The determined averaged AW-CSI signal to noise ratios were higher for PCr by a factor of 1.3 and for ATP by 1.4 than those of CSI. The PCr/ATP ratios were higher by a factor of 1.2 - 1.3 and showed a smaller standard deviation in all locations for AW-CSI. The mean PCr/ATP ratios determined by AW-CSI of septal, lateral and posterior wall were almost identical (1.72 - 1.76), while it was higher in the anterior wall (1.9). Conclusions: The reduced contamination in AW-CSI improves the signal to noise ratio and the determination of the PCr/ATP ratio in cardiac 31P spectroscopy compared to CSI with the same resolution. The results in volunteers indicate that AW-CSI renders 31P spectroscopy of the lateral and posterior wall of the human heart feasible for patient studies at 1.5 T. (orig.)

  1. Pseudo 5D HN(C)N Experiment to Facilitate the Assignment of Backbone Resonances in Proteins Exhibiting High Backbone Shift Degeneracy

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh; Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Pandey, Himanshu; Arora, Ashish; Guleria, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    Assignment of protein backbone resonances is most routinely carried out using triple resonance three dimensional NMR experiments involving amide 1H and 15N resonances. However for intrinsically unstructured proteins, alpha-helical proteins or proteins containing several disordered fragments, the assignment becomes problematic because of high degree of backbone shift degeneracy. In this backdrop, a novel reduced dimensionality (RD) experiment -(5,3)D-hNCO-CANH- is presented to facilitate (and/or to validate) the sequential backbone resonance assignment in such proteins. The proposed 3D NMR experiment makes use of the modulated amide 15N chemical shifts (resulting from the joint sampling along both its indirect dimensions) to resolve the ambiguity involved in connecting the neighboring amide resonances (i.e. HiNi and Hi-1Ni-1) for overlapping amide NH peaks. The experiment -encoding 5D spectral information- leads to a conventional 3D spectrum with significantly reduced spectral crowding and complexity. The impr...

  2. Partitioning Residue-derived and Residue-induced Emissions of N2O Using 15N-labelled Crop Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, R. E.; Carverhill, J.; Lemke, R.; Knight, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of N2O emissions in Canada indicate that 17% of all agriculture-based emissions are associated with the decomposition of crop residues. However, research specific to the western Canadian prairies (including Saskatchewan) has shown that the N2O emission factor for N sources in this region typically ranges between 0.2 and 0.6%, which is well below the current IPCC default emission factor of 1.0%. Thus, it stands to reason that emissions from crop residues should also be lower than those calculated using the current IPCC emission factor. Current data indicates that residue decomposition, N mineralization and N2O production are affected by a number of factors such as C:N ratio and chemical composition of the residue, soil type, and soil water content; thus, a bench-scale incubation study was conducted to examine the effects of soil type and water content on N2O emissions associated with the decomposition of different crop residues. The study was carried out using soils from the Black, Dark Brown, Brown, and Gray soil zones and was conducted at both 50% and 70% water-filled pore space (WFPS); the soils were amended with 15N-labeled residues of wheat, pea, canola, and flax, or with an equivalent amount of 15N-labeled urea; 15N2O production was monitored using a Picarro G5101-i isotopic N2O analyzer. Crop residue additions to the soils resulted in both direct and indirect emissions of N2O, with residue derived emissions (RDE; measured as 15N2O) generally exceeding residue-induced emissions (RIE) at 50% WFPS—with RDEs ranging from 42% to 88% (mean = 58%) of the total N2O. Conversely, at 70% WFPS, RDEs were generally lower than RIEs—ranging from 21% to 83% (mean = 48%). Whereas both water content and soil type had an impact on N2O production, there was a clear and consistent trend in the emission factors for the residues; i.e., emissions were always greatest for the canola residue and lowest for the wheat residue and urea fertilizer; and intermediate for pea

  3. Revision of the 15N(p,{\\gamma})16O reaction rate and oxygen abundance in H-burning zones

    CERN Document Server

    Caciolli, A; Capogrosso, V; Bemmerer, D; Broggini, C; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; Elekes, Z; Formicola, A; Fulop, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyurky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Lemut, A; Marta, M; Menegazzo, R; Palmerini, S; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Vomiero, A

    2011-01-01

    The NO cycle takes place in the deepest layer of a H-burning core or shell, when the temperature exceeds T {\\simeq} 30 {\\cdot} 106 K. The O depletion observed in some globular cluster giant stars, always associated with a Na enhancement, may be due to either a deep mixing during the RGB (red giant branch) phase of the star or to the pollution of the primordial gas by an early population of massive AGB (asymptotic giant branch) stars, whose chemical composition was modified by the hot bottom burning. In both cases, the NO cycle is responsible for the O depletion. The activation of this cycle depends on the rate of the 15N(p,{\\gamma})16O reaction. A precise evaluation of this reaction rate at temperatures as low as experienced in H-burning zones in stellar interiors is mandatory to understand the observed O abundances. We present a new measurement of the 15N(p,{\\gamma})16O reaction performed at LUNA covering for the first time the center of mass energy range 70-370 keV, which corresponds to stellar temperatures...

  4. Rivermouth alteration of agricultural impacts on consumer tissue δ(15N.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H Larson

    Full Text Available Terrestrial agricultural activities strongly influence riverine nitrogen (N dynamics, which is reflected in the δ(15N of riverine consumer tissues. However, processes within aquatic ecosystems also influence consumer tissue δ(15N. As aquatic processes become more important terrestrial inputs may become a weaker predictor of consumer tissue δ(15N. In a previous study, this terrestrial-consumer tissue δ(15N connection was very strong at river sites, but was disrupted by processes occurring in rivermouths (the 'rivermouth effect'. This suggested that watershed indicators of N loading might be accurate in riverine settings, but could be inaccurate when considering N loading to the nearshore of large lakes and oceans. In this study, the rivermouth effect was examined on twenty-five sites spread across the Laurentian Great Lakes. Relationships between agriculture and consumer tissue δ(15N occurred in both upstream rivers and at the outlets where rivermouths connect to the nearshore zone, but agriculture explained less variation and had a weaker effect at the outlet. These results suggest that rivermouths may sometimes be significant sources or sinks of N, which would cause N loading estimates to the nearshore zone that are typically made at discharge gages further upstream to be inaccurate. Identifying definitively the controls over the rivermouth effect on N loading (and other nutrients will require integration of biogeochemical and hydrologic models.

  5. The 15N isotope to evaluate fertilizer nitrogen absorption efficiency by the coffee plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenilli, Tatiele A B; Reichart, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny O S; Trivelin, Paulo C O; Dourado-Neto, Durval

    2007-12-01

    The use of the 15N label for agronomic research involving nitrogen (N) cycling and the fate of fertilizer-N is well established, however, in the case of long term experimentation with perennial crops like citrus, coffee and rubber tree, there are still shortcomings mainly due to large plant size, sampling procedures, detection levels and interferences on the system. This report tries to contribute methodologically to the design and development of 15N labeled fertilizer experiments, using as an example a coffee crop fertilized with 15N labeled ammonium sulfate, which was followed for two years. The N of the plant derived from the fertilizer was studied in the different parts of the coffee plant in order to evaluate its distribution within the plant and the agronomic efficiency of the fertilizer application practice. An enrichment of the fertilizer-N of the order of 2% 15N abundance was sufficient to study N absorption rates and to establish fertilizer-N balances after one and two years of coffee cropping. The main source of errors in the estimated values lies in the inherent variability among field replicates and not in the measurements of N contents and 15N enrichments of plant material by mass-spectrometry.

  6. Grafting and carbonated irrigation water in transport of 15N and in the tomato production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of CO2 application through irrigation water, and of grafting in transport of 15N and in the tomato production, were studied. These treatments were arranged in a 2 x 2 factorial scheme (with and without CO2 in irrigation water and grafted and non-grafted tomato), in a completely randomized design, with four replications. The injection of CO2 into the water began at 34 days after transplant of seedlings (DAT) and continued for all irrigations. The application of the sulfate of ammonium with abundance in atoms of 15N of 3.13% in plants destined to analysis was done at 45 DAT when the plants were in the middle of fructification. After 14 days of fertilizer (15N) application the plants were harvested, washed, dried and sent for analysis of 15N in plant tissue. The results demonstrated that CO2 and the grafting did not alter the transport of 15N in the plant. The production of commercial fruits was larger when CO2 was applied in water. (author)

  7. Quantitative Proteomics: Measuring Protein Synthesis Using 15N Amino Acids Labeling in Pancreas Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingchun; Lee, Wai-Nang Paul; Lim, Shu; Go, Vay Liang; Xiao, Jing; Cao, Rui; Zhang, Hengwei; Recker, Robert; Xiao, Gary Guishan

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer MIA PaCa cells were cultured in the presence and absence of 15N amino acids mixture for 72 hours. During protein synthesis, the incorporation of 15N amino acids results in a new mass isotopomer distribution in protein, which is approximated by the concatenation of two binomial distributions of 13C and 15N. Fraction of protein synthesis (FSR) can thus be determined from the relative intensities of the ‘labeled’ (new) and the ‘unlabeled” (old) spectra. Six prominent spots were picked from 2-D gels of proteins from lysates of cells cultured in 0% (control), and 50% and 33% 15N enriched media. These protein spots were digested and analyzed with MALDI-TOF/TOF. The isotopomer distribution of peptides after labeling can be fully accounted for by the labeled (new) and unlabeled (old) peptides. The ratio of the new and old peptide fractions was determined using multiple regression analysis of the observed spectrum as a linear combination of the expected new and the old spectra. The fractional protein synthesis rates calculated from such ratios of same peptide from cells grown in 50% and 33% 15N amino acid enrichments were comparable to each other. The FSR of these six identified proteins ranged between 44–76%. PMID:19072287

  8. The 15N isotope to evaluate fertilizer nitrogen absorption efficiency by the coffee plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the 15N label for agronomic research involving nitrogen (N) cycling and the fate of fertilizer-N is well established, however, in the case of long term experimentation with perennial crops like citrus, coffee and rubber tree, there are still shortcomings mainly due to large plant size, sampling procedures, detection levels and interferences on the system. This report tries to contribute methodologically to the design and development of 15N labeled fertilizer experiments, using as an example a coffee crop fertilized with 15N labeled ammonium sulfate, which was followed for two years. The N of the plant derived from the fertilizer was studied in the different parts of the coffee plant in order to evaluate its distribution within the plant and the agronomic efficiency of the fertilizer application practice. An enrichment of the fertilizer-N of the order of 2% 15N abundance was sufficient to study N absorption rates and to establish fertilizer-N balances after one and two years of coffee cropping. The main source of errors in the estimated values lies in the inherent variability among field replicates and not in the measurements of N contents and 15N enrichments of plant material by mass-spectrometry. (author)

  9. The {sup 15}N isotope to evaluate fertilizer nitrogen absorption efficiency by the coffee plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenilli, Tatiele A.B. [Universidade Regional de Blumenau, (FURB), SC (Brazil); Reichart, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny O.S.; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: klaus@cena.usp.br; Dourado-Neto, Durval [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ)

    2007-12-15

    The use of the {sup 15}N label for agronomic research involving nitrogen (N) cycling and the fate of fertilizer-N is well established, however, in the case of long term experimentation with perennial crops like citrus, coffee and rubber tree, there are still shortcomings mainly due to large plant size, sampling procedures, detection levels and interferences on the system. This report tries to contribute methodologically to the design and development of {sup 15}N labeled fertilizer experiments, using as an example a coffee crop fertilized with {sup 15}N labeled ammonium sulfate, which was followed for two years. The N of the plant derived from the fertilizer was studied in the different parts of the coffee plant in order to evaluate its distribution within the plant and the agronomic efficiency of the fertilizer application practice. An enrichment of the fertilizer-N of the order of 2% {sup 15}N abundance was sufficient to study N absorption rates and to establish fertilizer-N balances after one and two years of coffee cropping. The main source of errors in the estimated values lies in the inherent variability among field replicates and not in the measurements of N contents and {sup 15}N enrichments of plant material by mass-spectrometry. (author)

  10. Utilization of 15N-labelled urea in laying hens. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the series of experiments with labelled urea three colostomized laying hybrids were butchered after a six-day application of 1% urea with 96.06 atom-% 15N excess (15N') in the ration and another 2 days with a supplement of 1% unlabelled urea. Out of the individual samples from crop, gizzard, small intestine, caecum and rectum, the content of the small intestine and the caecum showed the highest labelling with > 1 atom-% 15N'. The TCA soluble fraction of the content of the gizzard was more highly and that of the intestines less labelled than the total nitrogen. The tissue of the gizzard is distinctly less labelled than the 'omasum system' and the small intestine. The atom-% 15N' of the oesophagus with crop and glandular stomach largely showed agreement in the individual hens with that of intestinal tissue and ranged between 0.71 and 0.89 atom-%. 2% of the 15N' supplemented with the urea could be recovered in the content and the tissue of the gastro-intestinal tract. (author)

  11. Fossil Fuel Combustion-Related Emissions Dominate Atmospheric Ammonia Sources during Severe Haze Episodes: Evidence from (15)N-Stable Isotope in Size-Resolved Aerosol Ammonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuepeng; Tian, Shili; Liu, Dongwei; Fang, Yunting; Zhu, Xiaying; Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Bo; Michalski, Greg; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-08-01

    The reduction of ammonia (NH3) emissions is urgently needed due to its role in aerosol nucleation and growth causing haze formation during its conversion into ammonium (NH4(+)). However, the relative contributions of individual NH3 sources are unclear, and debate remains over whether agricultural emissions dominate atmospheric NH3 in urban areas. Based on the chemical and isotopic measurements of size-resolved aerosols in urban Beijing, China, we find that the natural abundance of (15)N (expressed using δ(15)N values) of NH4(+) in fine particles varies with the development of haze episodes, ranging from -37.1‰ to -21.7‰ during clean/dusty days (relative humidity: ∼ 40%), to -13.1‰ to +5.8‰ during hazy days (relative humidity: 70-90%). After accounting for the isotope exchange between NH3 gas and aerosol NH4(+), the δ(15)N value of the initial NH3 during hazy days is found to be -14.5‰ to -1.6‰, which indicates fossil fuel-based emissions. These emissions contribute 90% of the total NH3 during hazy days in urban Beijing. This work demonstrates the analysis of δ(15)N values of aerosol NH4(+) to be a promising new tool for partitioning atmospheric NH3 sources, providing policy makers with insights into NH3 emissions and secondary aerosols for regulation in urban environments. PMID:27359161

  12. Fossil Fuel Combustion-Related Emissions Dominate Atmospheric Ammonia Sources during Severe Haze Episodes: Evidence from (15)N-Stable Isotope in Size-Resolved Aerosol Ammonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuepeng; Tian, Shili; Liu, Dongwei; Fang, Yunting; Zhu, Xiaying; Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Bo; Michalski, Greg; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-08-01

    The reduction of ammonia (NH3) emissions is urgently needed due to its role in aerosol nucleation and growth causing haze formation during its conversion into ammonium (NH4(+)). However, the relative contributions of individual NH3 sources are unclear, and debate remains over whether agricultural emissions dominate atmospheric NH3 in urban areas. Based on the chemical and isotopic measurements of size-resolved aerosols in urban Beijing, China, we find that the natural abundance of (15)N (expressed using δ(15)N values) of NH4(+) in fine particles varies with the development of haze episodes, ranging from -37.1‰ to -21.7‰ during clean/dusty days (relative humidity: ∼ 40%), to -13.1‰ to +5.8‰ during hazy days (relative humidity: 70-90%). After accounting for the isotope exchange between NH3 gas and aerosol NH4(+), the δ(15)N value of the initial NH3 during hazy days is found to be -14.5‰ to -1.6‰, which indicates fossil fuel-based emissions. These emissions contribute 90% of the total NH3 during hazy days in urban Beijing. This work demonstrates the analysis of δ(15)N values of aerosol NH4(+) to be a promising new tool for partitioning atmospheric NH3 sources, providing policy makers with insights into NH3 emissions and secondary aerosols for regulation in urban environments.

  13. Preparation of 15N labelled protein sample by gene engineering technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the advanced multi-dimension heteronuclear pulses and isotope labelled protein technique, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has become an important tool in analysis of the solution conformation of protein. On the basis of the high level expression of a protein-trichosanthin in recombinant E.coli using DNA, 15N was used to label the protein, the 15N labelled trichosanthin was obtained by affinity chromatography on Ni-NTA agarose. Terminating pregnant effect in mice showed that this recombinant protein had the same activity as natural trichosanthin. A 1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC) spectrum was obtained from an AM-500 NMR spectrometer, demonstrating that this method is suitable in preparing labelled protein sample for NMR

  14. Coral skeletal δ15N reveals isotopic traces of an agricultural revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study introduces a new method of tracing the history of nutrient loading in coastal oceans via δ15N analysis of organic nitrogen preserved in the skeleton of the massive Porites coral. Four coral cores were collected in Bali, Indonesia, from reefs exposed to high levels of fertilizers in agricultural run-off, from lagoonal corals impacted by sewage, and from a reef located 30 km offshore. Skeletal δ15N in the agriculturally exposed coral declined from 10.7 ± 0.4 per mille in 1970-1971, when synthetic fertilizers (-0.8 per mille ± 0.2 per mille ) were introduced to Bali, to a depleted 'anthropogenic' baseline of 3.5 per mille ± 0.4% in the mid-1990s. δ15N values were negatively correlated with rainfall, suggesting that marine δ15N lowers during flood-born influxes of waste fertilizers. Reef cores exposed to untreated sewage in terrestrial discharge were enriched (7.8 and 7.3 ± 0.4 per mille ), while the offshore core reflected background oceanic signals (6.2 ± 0.4 per mille). δ15N, N concentration, and C:N systematics indicate that the N isotopic composition of skeletal organic matter was generally well preserved over 30 years. We suggest that skeletal organic δ15N can serve as a recorder of past nitrogen sources. In Bali, this tracer suggests that the intensification of Western style agricultural practices since 1970 are contributing to the degradation of coastal coral reefs

  15. Dynamics-based selective 2D {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H chemical shift correlation spectroscopy under ultrafast MAS conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy, E-mail: ramamoor@umich.edu [Biophysics and Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1055 (United States)

    2015-05-28

    Dynamics plays important roles in determining the physical, chemical, and functional properties of a variety of chemical and biological materials. However, a material (such as a polymer) generally has mobile and rigid regions in order to have high strength and toughness at the same time. Therefore, it is difficult to measure the role of mobile phase without being affected by the rigid components. Herein, we propose a highly sensitive solid-state NMR approach that utilizes a dipolar-coupling based filter (composed of 12 equally spaced 90° RF pulses) to selectively measure the correlation of {sup 1}H chemical shifts from the mobile regions of a material. It is interesting to find that the rotor-synchronized dipolar filter strength decreases with increasing inter-pulse delay between the 90° pulses, whereas the dipolar filter strength increases with increasing inter-pulse delay under static conditions. In this study, we also demonstrate the unique advantages of proton-detection under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning conditions to enhance the spectral resolution and sensitivity for studies on small molecules as well as multi-phase polymers. Our results further demonstrate the use of finite-pulse radio-frequency driven recoupling pulse sequence to efficiently recouple weak proton-proton dipolar couplings in the dynamic regions of a molecule and to facilitate the fast acquisition of {sup 1}H/{sup 1}H correlation spectrum compared to the traditional 2D NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) experiment. We believe that the proposed approach is beneficial to study mobile components in multi-phase systems, such as block copolymers, polymer blends, nanocomposites, heterogeneous amyloid mixture of oligomers and fibers, and other materials.

  16. Optical $\\Lambda$ transitions and quantum computing in the $^{15}$N-V$^{-}$ Center in Diamond

    OpenAIRE

    González, Gabriel; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2009-01-01

    We present a thorough derivation of the excited state energy levels of the negatively charged $^{15}$N-V$^{-}$ center in diamond for the strong applied electric field case. We show that in the $^{15}$N-V$^{-}$ center a spin non-conserving two-photon $\\Lambda$ transition exists that is mediated by the hyperfine interaction, which provides the possibility to write quantum information. Using second order perturbation theory we obtain a $\\Lambda$ transition rate of the order of 10 MHz at room tem...

  17. Compaction stimulates denitrification in an urban park soil using 15N tracing technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shun; Deng, Huan; Rensing, Christopher Günther T;

    2014-01-01

    Soils in urban areas are subjected to compaction with accelerating urbanization. The effects of anthropogenic compaction on urban soil denitrification are largely unknown. We conducted a study on an urban park soil to investigate how compaction impacts denitrification. By using 15N labeling method......, no statistical difference in total N losses and 15N-(N2O+N2) flux between the uncompacted soil and the compacted soil was detected. Compaction promoted soil denitrification and may impact urban N biogeochemical cycling. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg....

  18. Constraints on oceanic N balance/imbalance from sedimentary 15N records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Altabet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available According to current best estimates, the modern ocean's N cycle is in severe deficit. N isotope budgeting provides an independent geochemical constraint in this regard as well as the only means for past reconstruction. Overall, it is the relative proportion of N2 fixation consumed by water column denitrification that sets average oceanic δ15N under steady-state conditions. Several factors (conversion of organic N to N2, Rayleigh closed and open system effects likely reduce the effective fractionation factor (ε for water column denitrification to about half the inherent microbial value for εden. If so, the average oceanic δ15N of ~5‰ is consistent with a canonical contribution from water column denitrification of 50% of the source flux from N2 fixation. If an imbalance in oceanic N sources and sinks changes this proportion then a transient in average oceanic δ15N would occur. Using a simple model, changing water column denitrification by ±30% or N2 fixation by ±15% produces detectable (>1‰ changes in average oceanic δ15N over one residence time period or more with corresponding changes in oceanic N inventory. Changing sedimentary denitrification produces no change in δ15N but does change N inventory. Sediment δ15N records from sites thought to be sensitive to oceanic average δ15N all show no detectible change over the last 3 kyr or so implying a balanced marine N budget over the latest Holocene. A mismatch in time scales is the most likely meaningful interpretation of the apparent conflict with modern flux estimates. Decadal to centennial scale oscillations between net N deficit and net surplus may occur but on the N residence timescale of several thousand years, net balance is achieved in sum. However, sediment δ15N records from the literature covering the period since the last glacial maximum show excursions of up to several ‰ that are consistent with sustained N deficit during the deglaciation followed by readjustment

  19. Constraints on oceanic N balance/imbalance from sedimentary 15N records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Altabet

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available According to current best estimates, the modern ocean's N cycle is in severe deficit. N isotope budgeting provides an independent geochemical constraint in this regard as well as the only means for past reconstruction. Overall, it is the relative proportion of N2 fixation consumed by water column denitrification that sets average oceanic δ15N under steady-state conditions. Several factors (conversion of organic N to N2, Rayleigh closed and open system effects likely reduce the effective fractionation factor (ε for water column denitrification to about half the inherent microbial value for εden. If so, the average oceanic δ15N of ~5 is consistent with a canonical contribution from water column denitrification of 50% of the source flux from N2 fixation. If an imbalance in oceanic N sources and sinks changes this proportion then a transient in average oceanic δ15N would occur. Using a simple model, changing water column denitrification ±30% or N2 fixation by ±15% produces detectable (>1 changes in average oceanic δ15N over one residence time period or more with corresponding changes in oceanic N inventory. Changing sedimentary denitrification produces no change in δ15N but does change N inventory. Sediment δ15N records from sites thought to be sensitive to oceanic average δ15N all show no detectible change over the last 3 kyr or so implying a balanced marine N budget over the latest Holocene. A mismatch in time scales is the most likely meaningful interpretation of the apparent conflict with modern flux estimates. Decadal to centennial scale oscillations between net N deficit and net surplus may occur but on the N residence timescale of several thousand years, net balance is achieved in sum. However, sediment δ15N records from the literature covering the period since the last glacial maximum show excursions of up to several that are consistent with sustained N deficit during the deglaciation followed by readjustment and establishment of

  20. Carbon-rich presolar grains from massive stars. Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios and the mystery of 15N

    CERN Document Server

    Pignatari, M; Hoppe, P; Jordan, C J; Gibson, B K; Trappitsch, R; Herwig, F; Fryer, C; Hirschi, R; Timmes, F X

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C, and low-density graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the SN shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the pu...

  1. Multiple-quantum HCN-CCH-TOCSY experiment for 13C/15N labeled RNA oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Weidong; Jiang Licong [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (United States)

    1999-12-15

    A multiple-quantum 3D HCN-CCH-TOCSY experiment is presented for the assignment of RNA ribose resonances. The experiment makes use of the chemical shift dispersion of N1 of pyrimidine and N9 of purine to distinguish the ribose spin systems. It provides an alternative approach for the assignment of ribose resonances to the currently used COSY- and TOCSY-type experiments in which either {sup 13}C or {sup 1}H is utilized to distinguish the different spin systems. Compared to the single-quantum version, the sensitivity of the multiple-quantum HCN-CCH-TOCSY experiment is enhanced on average by a factor of 2 for a 23-mer RNA aptamer complexed with neomycin.

  2. Structural Determination of Bis-histidinopeptide Zinc Complexes by 15N NMR (HMBC) Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU,Cheng-He; Juan F.Miravet; M.Isabel Burguete; Santiago V.Luis; BAI,Xue; YUAN,Yong

    2004-01-01

    @@ Polynitrogen receptors such as bis-histidine peptides possess strong ability to bind metals, which play much important roles in medicinal, bioinorganic, bioorganic, biomimetic and supramolecular chemistry. In order to investigate the interaction of these hosts with a variety of neutral, cationic and anionic guests, several techniques, for example, NMR,potentiometric tirations and monocrystal X-ray diffraction have been employed. Among them NMR is a powerful technique for unraveling the structure of polynitrogen receptors as long as they are in solution where the rapid tumbling of molecules averages out the anisotropies such as chemical shift and dipole-dipole interactions. General 1H NMR approach has been widely used for the study of host-guest interaction, but it is difficult for the accurate measurement in complexes structures, particularly metal complexes structures in which how the polynitrogen receptors bind metal, and which nitrogen binds metal and so on.

  3. Pathways of nitrogen assimilation in cowpea nodules studied using 15N2 and allopurinol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presence of 0.5 millimolar allopurinol (4-hydroxypyrazolo [3,4-d]pyrimidine), an inhibitor of NAD:xanthine oxidoreductase (EC 1.2.3.2), intact attached nodules of cowpea (vigna unguiculata L. Walp. cv Vita 3) formed [15N]xanthine from 15N2 at rates equivalent to those of ureide synthesis, confirming the direct assimilation of fixed nitrogen into purines. Xanthine accumulated in nodules and was exported in increasing amounts in xylem of allopurinol-treated plants. Other intermediates of purine oxidation, de novo purine synthesis, and ammonia assimilation did not increase and, over the time course of experiments (4 hours), allopurinol had no effect on nitrogenase (EC 1.87.99.2) activity. Negligible 15N -labeling of asparagine from 15N2 was observed, suggesting that the significant pool (up to 14 micromoles per gram of nodule fresh weight) of this amide in cowpea nodules was not formed directly from fixation but may have accumulated as a consequence of phloem delivery

  4. Determination of level widths in 15N using nuclear resonance fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szücs T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Level widths in 15N have been measured with the nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF technique. Solid nitrogen compounds, bremsstrahlung, and HPGe detectors have been used as target, beam, and detectors, respectively. The preliminarily level widths are in agreement with the literature values, but more precise.

  5. An improved method for delta 15N measurements in ice cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Leuenberger

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of isotopic ratios of nitrogen gas (δ15N trapped in ice cores as a paleothermometer to characterise abrupt climate changes is becoming a widespread technique. The versatility of the technique could be enhanced, for instance in quantifying small temperature changes during the last glacial period in Antarctic ice cores, by using high precision methods. In this paper, we outline a method for measuring δ15N to a precision of 0.006permil (1σ, n=9 from replicate ice core samples. The high precision results from removing oxygen, carbon dioxide and water vapour from the air extracted from ice cores. The advantage of the technique is that it does not involve correction for isobaric interference due to CO+ ions. We also highlight the importance of oxygen removal from the sample, and how it influences δ15N measurements. The results show that a small amount of oxygen in the sample can be detrimental to achieving an optimum precision in δ15N measurements of atmospheric nitrogen trapped ice core samples.

  6. δ15N as a proxy for historic anthropogenic nitrogen loading in Charleston Harbor, SC, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, T. N.; Andrus, C. F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Bivalve shell geochemistry can serve as a useful indicator of changes in coastal environments. There is increasing interest in developing paleoenvironmental proxies from mollusk shell organic components. Numerous studies have focused on how the δ15N obtained from bivalve tissues can be used to trace present-day wastewater input into estuaries. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to tracing the impact of anthropogenic nitrogen loading into estuaries over time. By measuring historic levels of δ15N in the organic fraction of oyster shells (Crassostrea virginica) from archaeological sites around Charleston Harbor and comparing those levels to the δ15N content of modern shells, it is possible to assess how nitrogen has fluctuated historically in the area. Whole-shell samples from the Late Archaic Period (~3000-4000 BP, Late Woodland Period (~1400-800 BP), 18th and 19th centuries, and modern controls were measured for %N and d15N. Evidence of increased anthropogenic input of N is expected to begin in the early historic period based on similar analysis in Chesapeake Bay. More ancient samples may give insight into baseline conditions prior to recent population growth and industrialization. This information could help understand how large-scale anthropogenic nitrogen loading has affected coastal ecosystems over time and guide future remediation. Furthermore, this project will help refine and improve this novel proxy of past environmental conditions.

  7. Using a Macroalgal δ15N Bioassay to Detect Cruise Ship Waste Water Effluent Inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen stable isotopes are a powerful tool for tracking sources of N to marine ecosystems. I used green macroalgae as a bioassay organism to evaluate if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in Skagway Harbor, AK. Opportunistic green...

  8. Nitrate Removal in Two Relict Oxbow Urban Wetlands: A 15N Mass-balance Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 15N-tracer method was used to quantify nitrogen (N) removal processes in two relict oxbow wetlands located adjacent to the Minebank Run restored stream reach in Baltimore County (Maryland, USA) during summer 2009 and early spring 2010. A mass-balance approach was used to determ...

  9. Recovery of 15N-urea in soil-plant system of tanzania grass pasture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic attractiveness and negative environmental impact of nitrogen (N) fertilization in pastures depend on the N use efficiency in the soil-plant system. However, the recovery of urea-15N by Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania pastures, one of the most widely used forage species in intensified pastoral systems, is still unknown. This experiment was conducted in a randomized complete block design with four treatments (0, 40, 80 and 120 kg ha-1 of N-urea) and three replications, to determine the recovery of 15N urea by Tanzania grass. Forage production, total N content and N yield were not affected by fertilization (p > 0.05), reflecting the high losses of applied N under the experimental conditions. The recovery of 15N urea (% of applied N) in forage and roots was not affected by fertilization levels (p > 0.05), but decreased exponentially in the soil and soil-plant system (p 15N (kg ha-1) in forage and roots (15 to 30 cm) increased with increasing urea doses (p < 0.05). (author)

  10. 15N NMR Spectroscopic Study on Nitrogen Forms in Humic Substances of Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENQIXAIO; ZHUOSUNENG; 等

    2001-01-01

    Nitrogen forms of humic substances from a subalpine meadow soil,a lateritic red soil and a weathered cola and the effect of acid hydrolysis on N structures of soil humic substances were studied by using 15N cross-polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance(CPMAS NMR) spectroscopy,Of the detectable 15N-signal intensity in the spectra of soil humic substances 71%-79% may be attributed to amide groups ,10%-18% to aromatic/aliphatic amines and 6%-11% to indole-and pyrrole-like N.Whereas in the spectrum of the fulvic acid from weathered coal 46%,at least,of the total 15N-signal intensity might be assigned to pyrrole-like N,14% to aromatic/aliphatic amines,and the reamining intensities could not be assigned with certainty,Data on nonhydrolyzable reside of protein-sugar mixture and a 15N-labelled soil fulvic acid confirm the formation of nonhydrolyzable heterocyclic N during acid hydrolysis.

  11. Studies of the endogeneous N metabolism in 15N-labelled pigs. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    4 pigs were labelled with 15N-ammonium salt over a period of 10 days in the feeding of a fishmeal diet (1), a fishmeal diet + partly hydrolyzed straw meal (2), a field bean diet (3) and a field bean diet + partly hydrolyzed straw meal (4). The 14N-amino acids and the 15N-amino acids excreted in feces showed highly significant correlation coefficient with the increasing content of crude fiber in the diets, which amounted to 3.0, 5.3, 10.0 and 12.1% in the dry matter. The following sequence was established for the growth angle of the essential 14N-amino acids: Leu, Lys, Arg, Thr, Phe, Ile, Val, His and of the 15N-amino acids: Lys, Arg, Val, Leu, Ile, Thr, Phe and His. As Lys, His and Thr cannot incorporate 15N in transamination reactions in the intermediate metabolism, their level of labelling was considerable in case of diet 4. Nevertheless, tan α is highest for 15N-Lys and lowest for 15N-His. This means that His in contrast to Lys, parallel to increased synthesis, is also increasingly decomposed in the large intestine. In contrast to this, proline was not labelled with 15N even with the highest content of crude fiber in the diet. Despite this, 14N-proline excretion, next to glutamic acid, increased most with the growing content of crude fiber in the diet. Due to the hydrophilic character of glutamic acid and the increased water influx in the large intestine and the increased content of crude fiber in the diet, a growing proline transport parallel to the increased influx of crude fiber and water must be assumed. If the growth angle tan α for the excretion of 14N-amino acids is ascertained regressively for a crude fiber content of diet of 10 %, one can prove from the proportion of the amino acids and a comparison from literature for fecal bacteria and ileum digesta that the amino acid composition for this measuring point largely corresponds to that of bacterial protein. (author)

  12. Fertilizer 15N balance in a coffee cropping system: a case study in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge about the fate of fertilizer nitrogen in agricultural systems is essential for the improvement of management practices in order to maximize nitrogen (N) recovery by the crop and reduce N losses from the system to a minimum. This study involves fertilizer management practices using the 15N isotope label applied in a single rate to determine the fertilizer-N balance in a particular soil-coffee-atmosphere system and to deepen the understanding of N plant dynamics. Five replicates consisting of plots of about 120 plants each were randomly defined within a 0.2 ha coffee plantation planted in 2001, in Piracicaba, SP, Brazil. Nine plants of each plot were separated in sub-plots for the 15N balance studies and treated with N rates of 280 and 350 kg ha-1 during 2003/2004 and 2004/ 2005, respectively, both of them as ammonium sulfate enriched to a 15N abundance of 2.072 atom %. Plant shoots were considered as separate parts: the orthotropic central branch, productive branches, leaves of productive branches, vegetative branches, leaves of vegetative branches and fruit. Litter, consisting of dead leaves accumulated below the plant canopy, was measured by the difference between leaves at harvest and at the beginning of the following flowering. Roots and soil were sampled down to a depth of 1.0 at intervals of 0.2 m. Samples from the isotopic sub-plots were used to evaluate total N and 15N, and plants outside sub-plots were used to evaluate dry matter. Volatilization losses of NH3 were estimated using special collectors. Leaching of fertilizer-N was estimated from deep drainage water fluxes and 15N concentrations of the soil solution at 1 m soil depth. At the end of the 2-year evaluation, the recovery of 15N applied as ammonium sulfate was 19.1 % in aerial plant parts, 9.4 % in the roots, 23.8 % in the litter, 26.3 % in the fruit and 12.6 % remaining in the 0-1.0 m soil profile. Annual leaching and volatilization losses were very small (2.0 % and 0.9 %, respectively

  13. Bradyrhizobium strain and the 15N natural abundance quantification of biological N2 fixation in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In commercial plantations of soybean in both the Southern and the Cerrado regions, contributions from biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) are generally proportionately high. When using the 15N natural abundance technique to quantify BNF inputs, it is essential to determine, with accuracy, the 15N abundance of the N derived from BNF (the 'B' value). This study aimed to determine the effect of four recommended strains of Bradyrhizobium spp. (two B. japonicum and two B. elkanii) on the 'B' value of soybean grown in pots in an open field using an equation based on the determination of δ15N natural abundance in a non-labelled soil, and estimate of the contribution of BNF derived from the use of 15N-isotope dilution in soils enriched with 15N. To evaluate N2 fixation by soybean, three non-N2-fixing reference crops were grown under the same conditions. Regardless of Bradyrhizobium strain, no differences were observed in dry matter, nodule weight and total N between labelled and non-labelled soil. The N2 fixation of the soybeans grown in the two soil conditions were similar. The mean 'B' values of the soybeans inoculated with the B. japonicum strains were -1.84 per mille and -0.50 per mille, while those inoculated with B. elkanii were -3.67 per mille and -1.0 per mille, for the shoot tissue and the whole plant, respectively. Finally, the 'B' value for the soybean crop varied considerably in function of the inoculated Bradyrhizobium strain, being most important when only the shoot tissue was utilised to estimate the proportion of N in the plant derived from N2 fixation. (author)

  14. Araucaria cunninghamii Seedling Response to Different Forms and Rates of 15N-Labelled Fertiliser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.J.BLUMFIELD; XU Zhi-Hong

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogenous fertilisers are under consideration for promoting the growth of nursery-reared hoop pine (Araucaria cunninghamii Aiton ex A. Cunn) seedlings in the establishment phase of second rotation (2R) plantations. Using 15Nlabelled fertilisers, we investigated the effect of different forms (ammonium sulphate, ammonium nitrate, potassium nitrate and urea) and rates of application (0, 150 and 300 mg N kg-1 dried soil) of fertilisers on the growth, 15N recovery and carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of hoop pine seedlings in a 12-month glasshouse trial in southeast Queensland,Australia. The 15N-labelled fertilisers were applied to nursery-reared hoop pine seedlings, which were then grown in pots,containing ca. 1.2 kg dried soil, under well watered conditions for 12 months. Four seedlings from each treatment were harvested at 4-month intervals, divided into roots, stem and foliage, with a further subdivision for new and old foliage,and then analysed for 15N, total N, δ13C and total C. There was no significant response in the seedling growth to the form or rate of application of nitrogen (N) fertiliser within the 12-month period, indicating that the seedlings did not experience N deficiency when grown on second rotation hoop pine soils. While the combined 15N recovery from soil and plant remained at around 70% throughout the experiment, the proportion of 15N recovered from the plants increasing steadily over time. Nitrate containing fertilisers at 150 mg N kg-1 soil gradually increased seedling foliage δ13C over the 12-month period, indicating an increase in seedling water use efficiency.

  15. Generation of 15-nJ bunched noise-like pulses with 93-nm bandwidth in an erbium-doped fiber ring laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L. M.; Tang, D. Y.

    2006-06-01

    We report on the generation of high power superbroad spectrum bunched noise-like pulses from a passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser without using the stretched-pulse technique. The maximum 3-dB spectral bandwidth of the noise-like pulses is about 93 nm with an energy of about 15 nJ. We further show numerically that the superbroad spectrum of the pulses is caused by the transform-limited feature of the pulses together with the Raman self-frequency shift effect.

  16. High resolution spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human brain in vivo at 1.5 tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Madhwesha; Stewart, Neil J.; Norquay, Graham; Griffiths, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Upon inhalation, xenon diffuses into the bloodstream and is transported to the brain, where it dissolves in various compartments of the brain. Although up to five chemically distinct peaks have been previously observed in 129Xe rat head spectra, to date only three peaks have been reported in the human head. This study demonstrates high resolution spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging (CSI) of 129Xe dissolved in the human head at 1.5 Tesla. Methods A 129Xe radiofrequency coil was built in‐house and 129Xe gas was polarized using spin‐exchange optical pumping. Following the inhalation of 129Xe gas, NMR spectroscopy was performed with spectral resolution of 0.033 ppm. Two‐dimensional CSI in all three anatomical planes was performed with spectral resolution of 2.1 ppm and voxel size 20 mm × 20 mm. Results Spectra of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human head showed five distinct peaks at 188 ppm, 192 ppm, 196 ppm, 200 ppm, and 217 ppm. Assignment of these peaks was consistent with earlier studies. Conclusion High resolution spectroscopy and CSI of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human head has been demonstrated. For the first time, five distinct NMR peaks have been observed in 129Xe spectra from the human head in vivo. Magn Reson Med 75:2227–2234, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:27080441

  17. Variable δ(15N diet-tissue discrimination factors among sharks: implications for trophic position, diet and food web models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A Olin

    Full Text Available The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ(15N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆(15N. As ∆(15N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆(15N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆(15N values for large and/or endangered species, our objective was to conduct an assessment of a range of reported ∆(15N values that can hypothetically serve as surrogates for describing the predator-prey relationships of four shark species that feed on prey from different trophic levels (i.e., different mean δ(15N dietary values. Overall, the most suitable species-specific ∆(15N values decreased with increasing dietary-δ(15N values based on stable isotope Bayesian ellipse overlap estimates of shark and the principal prey functional groups contributing to the diet determined from stomach content analyses. Thus, a single ∆(15N value was not supported for this speciose group of marine predatory fishes. For example, the ∆(15N value of 3.7‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the bonnethead shark (mean diet δ(15N = 9‰ whereas a ∆(15N value < 2.3‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the white shark (mean diet δ(15N = 15‰. These data corroborate the previously reported inverse ∆(15N-dietary δ(15N relationship when both isotope ellipses of principal prey functional groups and the broader identified diet of each species were considered supporting the adoption of different ∆(15N values that reflect the predators' δ(15N-dietary value. These findings are critical for refining the application of stable isotope modeling approaches as inferences regarding a species

  18. Variable δ(15)N diet-tissue discrimination factors among sharks: implications for trophic position, diet and food web models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olin, Jill A; Hussey, Nigel E; Grgicak-Mannion, Alice; Fritts, Mark W; Wintner, Sabine P; Fisk, Aaron T

    2013-01-01

    The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ(15)N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆(15)N). As ∆(15)N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆(15)N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆(15)N values for large and/or endangered species, our objective was to conduct an assessment of a range of reported ∆(15)N values that can hypothetically serve as surrogates for describing the predator-prey relationships of four shark species that feed on prey from different trophic levels (i.e., different mean δ(15)N dietary values). Overall, the most suitable species-specific ∆(15)N values decreased with increasing dietary-δ(15)N values based on stable isotope Bayesian ellipse overlap estimates of shark and the principal prey functional groups contributing to the diet determined from stomach content analyses. Thus, a single ∆(15)N value was not supported for this speciose group of marine predatory fishes. For example, the ∆(15)N value of 3.7‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the bonnethead shark (mean diet δ(15)N = 9‰) whereas a ∆(15)N value shark (mean diet δ(15)N = 15‰). These data corroborate the previously reported inverse ∆(15)N-dietary δ(15)N relationship when both isotope ellipses of principal prey functional groups and the broader identified diet of each species were considered supporting the adoption of different ∆(15)N values that reflect the predators' δ(15)N-dietary value. These findings are critical for refining the application of stable isotope modeling approaches as inferences regarding a species' ecological role in their community will be influenced with consequences for conservation and

  19. Vertical distribution of mesozooplankton and its δ15N signature at a deep-sea site in the Levantine Sea (eastern Mediterranean) in April 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelmann, Rolf; Weikert, Horst; Lahajnar, Niko

    2003-09-01

    Mesozooplankton samples were collected throughout the water column in the 4270 m deep Ierapetra basin, 30 nm SE off Crete, in April 1999. Information on trophic relationships within mesozooplankton size classes (diet were obtained by measuring the composition of stable nitrogen isotopes of size-fractionated zooplankton and particles collected by sediment traps. Compared to data from the Arabian Sea, the δ15N values of zooplankton were markedly lower in the Levantine Sea. Data from the upper 250 m (2-3‰) suggest that N2 from the atmosphere was used by diazotroph cyanophycea as a nitrogen source for primary production. A loop system is hypothesized by which isotopically light NH4+ is recycled and used by phytoplankton. In the deep mesopelagic zone, an increase in δ15N with increasing depth was observed. In the deep bathypelagic zone, the δ15N values were more or less stable and indicate a trophic level of ˜2.5. A first zooplankton analysis revealed that juveniles of the calanoid copepod Lucicutia longiserrata, one of the rare true deep-sea species in the Levantine basin, were predominant in this zone. The taxonomic composition as well as the vertical distribution of zooplankton in the large habitat zones resembled that in January 1987, before the onset of a hydrological shift in the eastern Mediterranean. We therefore suggest that the situation in April 1999 does not characterize the mode of nitrogen transfer during the EMT.

  20. 13C Magic angle spinning NMR analysis and quantum chemical modeling of the bathochromic shift of astaxanthin in alpha-crustacyanin, the blue carotenoprotein complex in the carapace of the lobster Homarus gammarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weesie, R J; Jansen, F J; Merlin, J C; Lugtenburg, J; Britton, G; de Groot, H J

    1997-06-17

    Selective isotope enrichment, 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR, and semiempirical quantum chemical modeling, have been used to analyze ligand-protein interactions associated with the bathochromic shift of astaxanthin in alpha-crustacyanin, the blue carotenoprotein complex from the carapace of the lobster Homarus gammarus. Spectra of alpha-crustacyanin were obtained after reconstitution with astaxanthins labeled with 13C at positions 4,4', 12,12', 13,13', or 20,20'. The data reveal substantial downfield shifts of 4.9 and 7.0 ppm at positions 12 and 12' in the complex, respectively. In contrast, at the 13 and 13' positions, small upfield shifts of 1.9 ppm were observed upon binding to the protein. These data are in line with previously obtained results for positions 14,14' (3.9 and 6.8 ppm downfield) and 15,15' (0.6 ppm upfield) and confirm the unequal perturbation of both halves after binding of the chromophore. However, these results also show that the main perturbation is of symmetrical origin, since the chemical shift differences exhibit a similar pattern in both halves of the astaxanthin molecule. A small downfield shift of 2.4 ppm was detected for the 4 and 4' positions. Finally, the 20,20' methyl groups are shifted 0.4 ppm upfield by the protein. The full data set provides convincing evidence that charge polarization is of importance for the bathochromic shift. The NMR shifts are compared with calculated charge densities for astaxanthin subjected to variations in protonation states of the ring-functional groups, as models of ligand-protein interactions. Taking into account the color shift and other available optical data, the current model for the mechanisms of interaction with the protein was refined. The results point toward a mechanism in which the astaxanthin is charged and subject to strong electrostatic polarizations originating from both keto groups, most likely a double protonation. PMID:9200677

  1. Influence of open ocean nitrogen supply on the skeletal δ15N of modern shallow-water scleractinian corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingchen T.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Cohen, Anne L.; Sinclair, Daniel J.; Sherrell, Robert M.; Cobb, Kim M.; Erler, Dirk V.; Stolarski, Jarosław; Kitahara, Marcelo V.; Ren, Haojia

    2016-05-01

    The isotopic composition of skeleton-bound organic nitrogen in shallow-water scleractinian corals (hereafter, CS-δ15N) is an emerging tool for studying the marine nitrogen cycle in the past. The CS-δ15N has been shown to reflect the δ15N of nitrogen (N) sources to corals, with most applications to date focusing on the anthropogenic/terrestrial N inputs to reef environments. However, many coral reefs receive their primary N sources from the open ocean, and the CS-δ15N of these corals may provide information on past changes in the open ocean regional and global N cycle. Using a recently developed persulfate/denitrifier-based method, we measured CS-δ15N in modern shallow-water scleractinian corals from 8 sites proximal to the open ocean. At sites with low open ocean surface nitrate concentrations typical of the subtropics and tropics, measured CS-δ15N variation on seasonal and annual timescales is most often less than 2‰. In contrast, a broad range in CS-δ15N (of ∼10‰) is measured across these sites, with a strong correlation between CS-δ15N and the δ15N of the deep nitrate supply to the surface waters near the reefs. While CS-δ15N can be affected by other N sources as well and can vary in response to local reef conditions as well as coral/symbiont physiological changes, this survey indicates that, when considering corals proximal to the open ocean, the δ15N of the subsurface nitrate supply to surface waters drives most of the CS-δ15N variation across the global ocean. Thus, CS-δ15N is a promising proxy for reconstructing the open ocean N cycle in the past.

  2. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations, Part I: Chemical shifts assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Solid-state NMR is an excellent and useful method for analyzing solid-state forms of drugs. In the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the solid dosage forms many of the signals originate from the excipients and should be distinguished from those of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In this work the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in the solid drug formulations: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. Their (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra were recorded and the signals were assigned, employing the results (R(2): 0.948-0.998) of GIPAW calculations and theoretical chemical shifts. The (13)C ssNMR spectra for some of the studied excipients have not been published before while for the other signals in the spectra they were not properly assigned or the assignments were not correct. The results summarize and complement the data on the (13)C ssNMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients and are essential for further NMR studies of API-excipient interactions in the pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:26845204

  3. Measurement of sample temperatures under magic-angle spinning from the chemical shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate of 79Br in KBr powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determination of sample temperatures in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with magic-angle spinning (MAS) can be problematic, particularly because frictional heating and heating by radio-frequency irradiation can make the internal sample temperature significantly different from the temperature outside the MAS rotor. This paper demonstrates the use of 79Br chemical shifts and spin-lattice relaxation rates in KBr powder as temperature-dependent parameters for the determination of internal sample temperatures. Advantages of this method include high signal-to-noise, proximity of the 79Br NMR frequency to that of 13C, applicability from 20 K to 320 K or higher, and simultaneity with adjustment of the MAS axis direction. We show that spin-lattice relaxation in KBr is driven by a quadrupolar mechanism. We demonstrate a simple approach to including KBr powder in hydrated samples, such as biological membrane samples, hydrated amyloid fibrils, and hydrated microcrystalline proteins, that allows direct assessment of the effects of frictional and radio-frequency heating under experimentally relevant conditions. PMID:18930418

  4. Comprehensive signal assignment of 13C-labeled lignocellulose using multidimensional solution NMR and 13C chemical shift comparison with solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Takanori; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-09-17

    A multidimensional solution NMR method has been developed using various pulse programs including HCCH-COSY and (13)C-HSQC-NOESY for the structural characterization of commercially available (13)C labeled lignocellulose from potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), chicory (Cichorium intybus), and corn (Zea mays). This new method allowed for 119 of the signals in the (13)C-HSQC spectrum of lignocelluloses to be assigned and was successfully used to characterize the structures of lignocellulose samples from three plants in terms of their xylan and xyloglucan structures, which are the major hemicelluloses in angiosperm. Furthermore, this new method provided greater insight into fine structures of lignin by providing a high resolution to the aromatic signals of the β-aryl ether and resinol moieties, as well as the diastereomeric signals of the β-aryl ether. Finally, the (13)C chemical shifts assigned in this study were compared with those from solid-state NMR and indicated the presence of heterogeneous dynamics in the polysaccharides where rigid cellulose and mobile hemicelluloses moieties existed together. PMID:24010724

  5. Determination of the Orientation and Dynamics of Ergosterol in Model Membranes Using Uniform 13C Labeling and Dynamically Averaged 13C Chemical Shift Anisotropies as Experimental Restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubias, O.; Jolibois, F.; Massou, S.; Milon, A.; Réat, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new strategy was established to determine the average orientation and dynamics of ergosterol in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes. It is based on the analysis of chemical shift anisotropies (CSAs) averaged by the molecular dynamics. Static 13C CSA tensors were computed by quantum chemistry, using the gauge-including atomic-orbital approach within Hartree-Fock theory. Uniformly 13C-labeled ergosterol was purified from Pichia pastoris cells grown on labeled methanol. After reconstitution into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipids, the complete 1H and 13C assignment of ergosterol's resonances was performed using a combination of magic-angle spinning two-dimensional experiments. Dynamically averaged CSAs were determined by standard side-band intensity analysis for isolated 13C resonances (C3 and ethylenic carbons) and by off-magic-angle spinning experiments for other carbons. A set of 18 constraints was thus obtained, from which the sterol's molecular order parameter and average orientation could be precisely defined. The validity of using computed CSAs in this strategy was verified on cholesterol model systems. This new method allowed us to quantify ergosterol's dynamics at three molar ratios: 16 mol % (Ld phase), 30 mol % (Lo phase), and 23 mol % (mixed phases). Contrary to cholesterol, ergosterol's molecular diffusion axis makes an important angle (14°) with the inertial axis of the rigid four-ring system. PMID:15923221

  6. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations, Part I: Chemical shifts assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Solid-state NMR is an excellent and useful method for analyzing solid-state forms of drugs. In the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the solid dosage forms many of the signals originate from the excipients and should be distinguished from those of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In this work the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in the solid drug formulations: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. Their (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra were recorded and the signals were assigned, employing the results (R(2): 0.948-0.998) of GIPAW calculations and theoretical chemical shifts. The (13)C ssNMR spectra for some of the studied excipients have not been published before while for the other signals in the spectra they were not properly assigned or the assignments were not correct. The results summarize and complement the data on the (13)C ssNMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients and are essential for further NMR studies of API-excipient interactions in the pharmaceutical formulations.

  7. The value of 15-minute delayed contrast-enhanced CT to differentiate hyperattenuating adrenal masses compared with chemical shift MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Hyun Jung; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Cho, Kyoung-Sik [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hwa Jung; Kim, Sun-Ok [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Cancer Center, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of 15-min delayed contrast-enhanced computed tomography (15-DECT) compared with that of chemical shift magnetic resonance (CSMR) imaging in differentiating hyperattenuating adrenal masses and to perform subgroup analysis in underlying malignancy and non-malignancy. This study included 478 adrenal masses in 453 patients examined with 15-DECT and 235 masses in 217 patients examined with CSMR. Relative percentage washout (RPW) and absolute percentage washout (APW) on 15-DECT, and signal intensity index (SII) and adrenal-to-spleen ratio (ASR) on CSMR were measured. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 15-DECT and CSMR were analysed for characterisation of adrenal adenoma. Subgroup analyses were performed in patients with and without underlying malignancy. Attenuation and size of the masses on unenhanced CT correlated with the risk of non-adenoma. RPW calculated from 15-DECT showed the highest diagnostic performance for characterising hyperattenuating adrenal masses regardless of underlying malignancy, and the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 91.7 %, 74.8 % and 88.1 %, respectively in all patients. The risk of non-adenoma increased approximately threefold as mass size increased 1 cm or as its attenuation value increased by 10 Hounsfield units. 15-DECT was more accurate than CSMR in characterising hyperattenuating adrenal masses regardless of underlying malignancy. (orig.)

  8. Determination of NH proton chemical shift anisotropy with 14N-1H heteronuclear decoupling using ultrafast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-12-01

    The extraction of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors of protons either directly bonded to 14N nuclei (I = 1) or lying in their vicinity using rotor-synchronous recoupling pulse sequence is always fraught with difficulty due to simultaneous recoupling of 14N-1H heteronuclear dipolar couplings and the lack of methods to efficiently decouple these interactions. This difficulty mainly arises from the presence of large 14N quadrupolar interactions in comparison to the rf field that can practically be achieved. In the present work it is demonstrated that the application of on-resonance 14N-1H decoupling with rf field strength ∼30 times weaker than the 14N quadrupolar coupling during 1H CSA recoupling under ultrafast MAS (90 kHz) results in CSA lineshapes that are free from any distortions from recoupled 14N-1H interactions. With the use of extensive numerical simulations we have shown the applicability of our proposed method on a naturally abundant L-Histidine HCl·H2O sample.

  9. Scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging using the chemical shift imaging sequence. Evaluation of an iterative reconstruction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingaertner, Sebastian; Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Wetterling, Friedrich [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Dublin Univ. (Ireland) Trinity Inst. of Neuroscience; Fatar, Marc [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Neumaier-Probst, Eva [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate potential scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging with the chemical shift imaging sequence (CSI) using undersampled data of high-quality datasets, reconstructed with an iterative constrained reconstruction, compared to reduced resolution or reduced signal-to-noise ratio. CSI {sup 23}Na-images were retrospectively undersampled and reconstructed with a constrained reconstruction scheme. The results were compared to conventional methods of scan time reduction. The constrained reconstruction scheme used a phase constraint and a finite object support, which was extracted from a spatially registered {sup 1}H-image acquired with a double-tuned coil. The methods were evaluated using numerical simulations, phantom images and in-vivo images of a healthy volunteer and a patient who suffered from cerebral ischemic stroke. The constrained reconstruction scheme showed improved image quality compared to a decreased number of averages, images with decreased resolution or circular undersampling with weighted averaging for any undersampling factor. Brain images of a stroke patient, which were reconstructed from three-fold undersampled k-space data, resulted in only minor differences from the original image (normalized root means square error < 12%) and an almost identical delineation of the stroke region (mismatch < 6%). The acquisition of undersampled {sup 23}Na-CSI images enables up to three-fold scan time reduction with improved image quality compared to conventional methods of scan time saving.

  10. Shifting Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  11. Millennial scale oscillations in bulk δ15N and δ13C over the Mid- to Late Holocene seen in proteinaceous corals from the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, D. S.; Mccarthy, M. D.; McMahon, K.; Guilderson, T. P.

    2014-12-01

    The North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG) is the largest continuous ecosystem on this planet and is an important regulator of biogeochemical cycling and carbon sequestration. With evidence of its expansion in a warming climate, it is necessary to develop a more complete understanding of the variability in productivity and nutrient dynamics in this important ecosystem through time. We constructed a long-term, high resolution record of bulk record of stable nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon isotopes (δ13C) from multiple proteinaceous deep sea corals around Hawaii extending back ~5300 years with few gaps. Our data confirms the decreasing trend in δ15N since the Little Ice Age (1850s), which matches previously published results in part attributed to anthropogenic climate change (e.g. Sherwood et al. 2014). However, while the rate of change since the Little Ice Age (δ15N declines ~1‰ over ~150yrs) remains by far the most rapid throughout the longer record, there also appear to be longer-term (near-millennial scale) climatic oscillations of even greater magnitude (δ15N shifts ~1.5-2‰ over ~1000yrs). After removal of the Seuss Effect, δ13C values also declined ~1.5‰ since the Little Ice Age. Furthermore, there also appear to be oscillations in δ13C of ~1-2‰ over millennial timescales. These results reveal the existence of previously unrecognized long-term oscillations in NPSG biogeochemical cycles, which are likely linked to changes in phytoplankton species composition, food web dynamics, and/or variability in source nutrients and productivity possibly caused by changes in climate. This study provides insight into nutrient dynamics in the NPSG over the past five millennia, and offers a historical baseline to better analyze the effects of current anthropogenic climate forcing.

  12. Simultaneous acquisition of 13Cα–15N and 1H–15N–15N sequential correlations in proteins: application of dual receivers in 3D HNN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe here, adaptation of the HNN pulse sequence for multiple nuclei detection using two independent receivers by utilizing the detectable 13Cα transverse magnetization which was otherwise dephased out in the conventional HNN experiment. It enables acquisition of 2D 13Cα–15N sequential correlations along with the standard 3D 15N–15N–1H correlations, which provides directionality to sequential walk in HNN, on one hand, and enhances the speed of backbone assignment, on the other. We foresee that the implementation of dual direct detection opens up new avenues for a wide variety of modifications that would further enhance the value and applications of the experiment, and enable derivation of hitherto impossible information.

  13. Fertilizer {sup 15}N balance in a coffee cropping system: a case study in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenilli, Tatiele Anete Bergamo [Universidade Regional de Blumenau (URB), SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Florestal]. E-mail: tfenilli@furb.br; Reichardt, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny Oliveira Santos [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Fisica do Solo]. E-mails: klaus@cena.usp.br; osny@cena.usp.br; Favarin, Jose Laercio [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Producao Vegetal; Silva, Adriana Lucia [Centro de Tecnologia Canavieira (CTC), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Fazenda Santo Antonio]. E-mail: adriana.silva@ctc.com.br; Timm, Luis Carlos [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Rural]. E-mail: lcartimm@yahoo.com.br

    2008-07-15

    Knowledge about the fate of fertilizer nitrogen in agricultural systems is essential for the improvement of management practices in order to maximize nitrogen (N) recovery by the crop and reduce N losses from the system to a minimum. This study involves fertilizer management practices using the {sup 15}N isotope label applied in a single rate to determine the fertilizer-N balance in a particular soil-coffee-atmosphere system and to deepen the understanding of N plant dynamics. Five replicates consisting of plots of about 120 plants each were randomly defined within a 0.2 ha coffee plantation planted in 2001, in Piracicaba, SP, Brazil. Nine plants of each plot were separated in sub-plots for the {sup 15}N balance studies and treated with N rates of 280 and 350 kg ha-1 during 2003/2004 and 2004/ 2005, respectively, both of them as ammonium sulfate enriched to a {sup 15}N abundance of 2.072 atom %. Plant shoots were considered as separate parts: the orthotropic central branch, productive branches, leaves of productive branches, vegetative branches, leaves of vegetative branches and fruit. Litter, consisting of dead leaves accumulated below the plant canopy, was measured by the difference between leaves at harvest and at the beginning of the following flowering. Roots and soil were sampled down to a depth of 1.0 at intervals of 0.2 m. Samples from the isotopic sub-plots were used to evaluate total N and {sup 15}N, and plants outside sub-plots were used to evaluate dry matter. Volatilization losses of NH{sub 3} were estimated using special collectors. Leaching of fertilizer-N was estimated from deep drainage water fluxes and {sup 15}N concentrations of the soil solution at 1 m soil depth. At the end of the 2-year evaluation, the recovery of {sup 15}N applied as ammonium sulfate was 19.1 % in aerial plant parts, 9.4 % in the roots, 23.8 % in the litter, 26.3 % in the fruit and 12.6 % remaining in the 0-1.0 m soil profile. Annual leaching and volatilization losses were

  14. Determination of the Tautomeric Equilibria of Pyridoyl Benzoyl -Diketones in the Liquid and Solid State through the use of Deuterium Isotope Effects on 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shifts and Spin Coupling Constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Borisov, Eugeny V.; Lindon, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The tautomeric equilibria for 2-pyridoyl-, 3-pyridoyl-, and 4-pyridoyl-benzoyl methane have been investigated using deuterium isotope effects on 1H and 13C chemical shifts both in the liquid and the solid state. Equilibria are established both in the liquid and the solid state. In addition, in th...

  15. SAFT缔合模型关联含水体系的1H NMR%Correlation of 1H NMR Chemical Shift for Aqueous Solutions by Statistical Associating Fluid Theory Association Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许波; 李浩然; 王从敏; 许映杰; 韩世钧

    2005-01-01

    1H NMR chemical shifts of binary aqueous mixtures of acylamide, alcohol, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), and acetone are correlated by statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT) association model. The comparison between SAFT association model and Wilson equation shows that the former is better for dealing with aqueous solutions. Finally, the specialties of both models are discussed.

  16. Recovery of 15N-Urea under groundnut-sorghum sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2 field experiments conducted at Agricultural Research Station, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University Farm, Bhavanisagar in red loamy soil (Typic Ustropept), the recovery of added 15N-urea was monitored under groundnut-sorghum cropping sequence. Fertilizer 15N was applied as urea at 5, 10 and 15 kg N/ha levels. The highest pod yield (2.18 t/ha) and haulm yield (13.19 t/ha) were recorded at 10 kg N ha-1 level. Out of 10 kg N applied, 51.86 per cent was recovered by the first crop of groundnut and found distributed as 43.13, 1.70 and 8.03 per cent in haulm, shell and kernel, respectively. The residual N recorded by the second crop of sorghum was only 0.63 per cent. (author). 4 refs., 4 tabs

  17. Study of organic N transformation in red soils by 15N tracer method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YeQing-Fu; ZhangQin-Zheng; 等

    1997-01-01

    Uniformly 15N-labelled ryegrass was used to investigate NH4+-production,microbial transformation and humification of organic N in two types of red soils by incubating the soils amended with labelled material.The results showed that there was little significant difference in biomass N transformation in the tested solis between 15N tracer method and conventional method,but the amount of NH4++-N released form the ryegrass in the clayey soil than in the sandy soil at all sampling time .By 120d of incubation,humified N was less than 10% of the amount of the applied N in two types of red soils and the amount of residual N in the clayey red soil was obviously higher than that in the sandy red soil.

  18. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of phenazopyridine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgueño-Tapia, Eleuterio; Mora-Pérez, Yolanda; Morales-Ríos, Martha S; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2005-03-01

    Phenazopyridine hydrochloride (1), a drug in clinical use for many decades, and some derivatives were studied by one- and two-dimensional (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR methodology. The assignments, combined with DFT calculations, reveal that the preferred protonation site of the drug is the pyridine ring nitrogen atom. The chemoselective acetylation of phenazopyridine (2) and its influence on the polarization of the azo nitrogen atoms were evidenced by the (15)N NMR spectra. Molecular calculations of the phenazopyridines 2-4 show that the pyridine and phenyl groups are oriented in an antiperiplanar conformation with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the N-b atom and the C-2 amino group preserving the E-azo stereochemistry. PMID:15625718

  19. Study of the giant dipole resonances of 16O and 15N by means of radiative captures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The giant dipole resonance in 16O and 15N is studied with reactions 14N(d,γ0)16O, 13C(3He,γ0)16O and 11B(α,γ0)15N. The same energy range is observed with transfert reactions as 12C(7Li,αγ)15N. A comparative study of radiative captures leading to 16O and 15N point out the importance of nsub(p)-nsub(t) configurations. Apparatus and experimental techniques developed are also described

  20. δ15N in the turtle grass from the Mexican Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera-Saenz, A.; Sanchez, A.; Ortiz-Hernandez, M.

    2013-05-01

    Nutrient inputs associated with population growth threaten the integrity of coastal ecosystems. To assess the rapid increase in tourism, we compared the δ15N from Thalassia testudinum collected at sites with different levels of tourism development and population to detect the N inputs of wastewater discharge (WD) along the coast of Quintana Roo. The contributions of nitrogen enriched in 15N are directly related to the increase of WD inputs in areas of high tourism development (Nichupte Lagoon in Cancun, >3 million tourists per year from 2007 to 2011 and 0.7 million of resident population) and decreased towards Bahia Akumal and Tulum (>3 million tourists per year from 2007 to 2011 and 0.15 million of resident population). The δ15N from T. testudinum was significantly lower at Mahahual and Puerto Morelos (about 0.4 million tourists per year in 2007 to 2011 and 0.25 million of resident population) than other the sites. In areas of the lowest development and with tourist activity restricted and small population, such as the Yum Balam Reserve and Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve, the δ15N values were in much higher enrichment that Mahahual and Puerto Morelos. Therefore is suggested that Mahahual and Puerto Morelos may be used for baseline isotopic monitoring, over environmental pressure on the reef lagoon ecosystem, where tourist activities and population are growing very slow rate. The anthropogenic N input has the potential to impact, both environmentally and economically, the seagrass meadows and the coral reefs along the coast of Quintana Roo and the Caribbean.

  1. Determination of the δ15N of total nitrogen in solids; RSIL lab code 2893

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revesz, Kinga; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2893 is to determine the δ(15N/14N), abbreviated as δ15N , of total nitrogen in solid samples. A Carlo Erba NC 2500 elemental analyzer (EA) is used to convert total nitrogen in a solid sample into N2 gas. The EA is connected to a continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS), which determines relative difference in the isotope-amount ratios of stable nitrogen isotopes (15N/14N)of the product N2 gas. The combustion is quantitative; no isotopic fractionation is involved. Samples are placed in a tin capsule and loaded into the Costech Zero Blank Autosampler of the EA. Under computer control, samples are dropped into a heated reaction tube that contains an oxidant, where the combustion takes place in a helium atmosphere containing an excess of oxygen gas. Combustion products are transported by a helium carrier through a reduction tube to remove excess oxygen and convert all nitrous oxides into N2 and through a drying tube to remove water. The gas-phase products, mainly CO2 and N2, are separated by a gas chromatograph. The gas is then introduced into the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) through a Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) ConFlo II interface, which also is used to inject N2 reference gas and helium for sample dilution. The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus CF-IRMS. It has a universal triple collector, two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle, capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 28, 29, 30, simultaneously. The ion beams from N2 are as follows: m/z 28 = N2 = 14N14N; m/z 29 = N2 = 14N15N primarily; m/z 30 = NO = 14N16O primarily, which is a sign of contamination or incomplete reduction.

  2. Aqua ammonia 15 N obtaining and application with vainness for sugar-cane fertilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen compounds marked with the isotope 15 N are continuously being used in agronomic studies and, when associated to the isotopic dilution technique, they constitute an important tool in clarifying the N cycle. At the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), it was obtained ( 15 NH4)2SO4 enhanced at 3,5% of 15 N atoms, by means of the ionic exchange chromatography technique, which made possible to produce aqua ammonia (15 NH3aq). Four repetitions were taken to the aqua ammonia production process to use the nitrogen compound in the field experiment. In each process 150g of ammonium sulfate enhanced at 3,5% of 15 N atoms was used, obtaining 31,0 ± 1,6 g of aqua ammonia on the average (80% yield), with the same enhancement. The incidence of isotopic dilution has not been observed during the procedure, what made the use of such methodology possible. After obtaining the aqua ammonia 15 N through this procedure, it was added to the vinasse (an equivalent to 50 m3 ha-1 ) in doses that corresponded to 70 kg ha-1 of N-NH3aq. The mixture was applied to the sugar-cane straw on the soil's surface, aimed to the crop's fertilization. The compound's isotopic composition was analyzed by means of a spectrometer of masses ANCA-SL Europe Scientific, while the total-N volatilized, by the micro-Kjeldahl. Method. In accordance to the low NH3 (6,4 ± 1,9 kg ha-1 ) volatilization results, it could be concluded that the application of vinasse and aqua ammonia mixture to the straw on the soil's surface was efficient, due to the vinasse's acid character, which allowed the NH3, in presence of the ion H+, to stay in the NH4+ form in solution. (author)

  3. Food webs of two intermittently open estuaries receiving 15N-enriched sewage effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadwen, Wade L.; Arthington, Angela H.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures were used to assess the response of food webs to sewage effluent discharged into two small intermittently open estuaries in northern New South Wales, Australia. One of these systems, Tallows Creek, has a history of direct sewage inputs, whilst the other, Belongil Creek, receives wastewater via an extensive wetland treatment system. The food webs of both systems were driven by algal sources of carbon, reflecting high autotrophic productivity in response to the nutrients entering the system from sewage effluent. All aquatic biota collected from Tallows Creek had significantly enriched δ15N signatures relative to their conspecifics from Belongil Creek, indicating that sewage nitrogen had been assimilated and transferred throughout the Tallows Creek food web. These δ15N values were higher than those reported from studies in permanently open estuaries receiving sewage effluent. We suggest that these enriched signatures and the transfer of nitrogen throughout the entire food web reflect differences in hydrology and associated nitrogen cycling processes between permanently open and intermittently open estuaries. Although all organisms in Tallows Creek were generally 15N-enriched, isotopically light (less 15N-enriched) individuals of estuary perchlet ( Ambassis marianus) and sea mullet ( Mugil cephalus) were also collected. These individuals were most likely recent immigrants into Tallows Creek, as this system had only recently been opened to the ocean. This isotopic discrimination between resident (enriched) and immigrant (significantly less enriched) individuals can provide information on fish movement patterns and the role of heavily polluted intermittently open estuaries in supporting commercially and recreationally valuable estuarine species.

  4. The use of chemical shift temperature gradients to establish the paramagnetic susceptibility tensor orientation: Implication for structure determination/refinement in paramagnetic metalloproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Zhicheng; Nguyen, Bao D.; La Mar, Gerd N. [University of California, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2000-06-15

    The use of dipolar shifts as important constraints in refining molecular structure of paramagnetic metalloproteins by solution NMR is now well established. A crucial initial step in this procedure is the determination of the orientation of the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility tensor in the molecular frame which is generated interactively with the structure refinement. The use of dipolar shifts as constraints demands knowledge of the diamagnetic shift, which, however, is very often not directly and easily accessible. We demonstrate that temperature gradients of dipolar shifts can serve as alternative constraints for determining the orientation of the magnetic axes, thereby eliminating the need to estimate the diamagnetic shifts. This approach is tested on low-spin, ferric sperm whale cyanometmyoglobin by determining the orientation, anisotropies and anisotropy temperature gradients by the alternate routes of using dipolar shifts and dipolar shift gradients as constraints. The alternate routes ultimately lead to very similar orientation of the magnetic axes, magnetic anisotropies and magnetic anisotropy temperature gradients which, by inference, would lead to an equally valid description of the molecular structure. It is expected that the use of the dipolar shift temperature gradients, rather than the dipolar shifts directly, as constraints will provide an accurate shortcut in a solution structure determination of a paramagnetic metalloprotein.

  5. 13N,15N isotope and kinetic evidence against hyponitrite as an intermediate in dentrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollocher, T C; Garber, E; Cooper, A J; Reiman, R E

    1980-06-10

    13N- and 15N-labeling experiments were carried out with Paracoccus denitrificans, grown anaerobically on nitrate, to determine whether hyponitrite might be an obligatory intermediate in denitrification and a precursor of nitrous oxide. From experiments designed to trap [13N]- or [15N,15N]hyponitrite by dilution into authentic hyponitrite it was calculated that the intracellular concentration of a presumptive hyponitrite pool must be less than 0.4 mM. In order for a pool of this size to turn over rapidly enough to handle the flux of nitrogen during dentrifucation, the spontaneous rate of hyponitrite dehydration must be enhanced by a factor of several thousand through enzyme catalysis. Cell extracts failed to catalyze this reaction under a variety of conditions. It is concluded that hyponitrite cannot be an intermediate in dentrification. In addition, the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen was studied in P. denitrificans using 13N as tracer. At low concentrations (less than 10(-8) M) of labeled nitrate and nitrite 5 to 10% of the label was assimilated into non-volatile metabolites and 90 to 95% was reduced to N2. Similarly, with 15 mM [13N]nitrate, 5% of the label went into metabolites and 95% to N2. High pressure liquid chromatography analysis of the labeled metabolites indicated that the major pathway for assimilation of inorganic nitrogen in P. denitrificans under these conditions is through ammonia incorporation via the aspartase reaction. PMID:7372623

  6. Plot-size for 15N-fertilizer recovery studies by tanzania-grass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The understanding of the N dynamics in pasture ecosystems can be improved by studies using the 15N tracer technique. However, in these experiments it must be ensured that the lateral movement of the labeled fertilizer does not interfere with the results. In this study the plot-size requirements for 15N-fertilizer recovery experiments with irrigated Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania was determined. Three grazing intensities (light, moderate and intensive grazing) in the winter, spring and summer seasons were considered. A 1 m2 plot-size, with a grass tussock in the center, was adequate, irrespective of the grazing intensity or season of the year. Increasing the distance from the area fertilized with 15N negatively affected the N derived from fertilizer (Npfm) recovered in herbage.The lowest decline in Npfm values were observed for moderate and light grazing intensities. This fact might be explained by the vigorous growth characteristics of these plants. Increasing the grazing intensity decreased the tussock mass and, the smaller the tussock mass, the greater was the dependence on fertilizer nitrogen. (author)

  7. Behavior of 15N-labelled amino acids in germinated corn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By investigating the rise and fall of 15N-labelled amino acids in germinated corns, the behavior of amino radicals in free amino acids, the influence of the hydrolysis products of stored proteins on free amino acids and the change from heterotrophy to autotrophy of seeds were clarified. The amount of amino acid production depending on external nitrogen was very small in the early period of germination. 15N incorporation into proline was not observed in the early period of germination, which suggested that the proline may be nitrogen-storing source. Most of the amino-state nitrogen of asparagine accumulated at the time of germination was internal nitrogen, and this fact suggested that aspartic acid serve as the acceptor of ammonia produced in the early stage of germination. 15N content increased significantly on 9 th day after germination, and decreased on 12 th day. These facts prove that there are always active decomposition and production of protein in plant body. (Kobatake, H.)

  8. Chemical shift changes provide evidence for overlapping single-stranded DNA and XPA binding sites on the 70 kDa subunit of human replication protein A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daughdrill, Gary W.; Buchko, Garry W.; Botuyan, Maria V.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Wold, Marc S.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Lowry, David F.

    2003-07-15

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a heterotrimeric single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein that can form a complex with the xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA). This complex can preferentially recognize UV damaged DNA over undamaged DNA and has been implicated in the stabilization of open complex formation during nucleotide excision repair. In this report, NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the interaction between a fragment of the 70 kDa subunit of human RPA, residues 1-326 (hRPA701-326), and a fragment of the human XPA protein, residues 98-219 (XPA-MBD). Intensity changes were observed for amide resonances in the 1H-15N correlation spectrum of uniformly 15N-labeled hRPA701-326 after the addition of unlabeled XPA-MBD. The intensity changes observed were restricted to an ssDNA binding domain that is between residues 183 and 296 of the hRPA701-326 fragment. The hRPA701-326 residues with the largest resonance intensity reductions were mapped onto the structure of the ssDNA binding domain to identify the binding surface with XPA-MBD. The XPA-MBD binding surface showed significant overlap with an ssDNA binding surface that was previously identified using NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography.

  9. A new organic reference material, L-glutamic acid, USGS41a, for δ13C and δ15N measurements − a replacement for USGS41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Mroczkowski, Stanley J.; Brand, Willi A.; Brandes, Lauren; Geilmann, Heike; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    RationaleThe widely used l-glutamic acid isotopic reference material USGS41, enriched in both 13C and 15N, is nearly exhausted. A new material, USGS41a, has been prepared as a replacement for USGS41.MethodsUSGS41a was prepared by dissolving analytical grade l-glutamic acid enriched in 13C and 15N together with l-glutamic acid of normal isotopic composition. The δ13C and δ15N values of USGS41a were directly or indirectly normalized with the international reference materials NBS 19 calcium carbonate (δ13CVPDB = +1.95 mUr, where milliurey = 0.001 = 1 ‰), LSVEC lithium carbonate (δ13CVPDB = −46.6 mUr), and IAEA-N-1 ammonium sulfate (δ15NAir = +0.43 mUr) and USGS32 potassium nitrate (δ15N = +180 mUr exactly) by on-line combustion, continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry, and off-line dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.ResultsUSGS41a is isotopically homogeneous; the reproducibility of δ13C and δ15N is better than 0.07 mUr and 0.09 mUr, respectively, in 200-μg amounts. It has a δ13C value of +36.55 mUr relative to VPDB and a δ15N value of +47.55 mUr relative to N2 in air. USGS41 was found to be hydroscopic, probably due to the presence of pyroglutamic acid. Experimental results indicate that the chemical purity of USGS41a is substantially better than that of USGS41.ConclusionsThe new isotopic reference material USGS41a can be used with USGS40 (having a δ13CVPDB value of −26.39 mUr and a δ15NAir value of −4.52 mUr) for (i) analyzing local laboratory isotopic reference materials, and (ii) quantifying drift with time, mass-dependent isotopic fractionation, and isotope-ratio-scale contraction for isotopic analysis of biological and organic materials. Published in 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Leaf δ15N as an indicator of arbuscular mycorrhizal nitrogen uptake in a coastal-plain forest (restinga forest) at Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardegan, S. F.; Valadares, R.; Martinelli, L.

    2013-12-01

    Restinga diversity contrasts with a series of adverse environmental conditions that constrain their development, including nutrient limitation. In this sense, the mutualistic symbiosis between plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) may contribute in nutrient acquisition, including nitrogen. However, this association deeply affects plant nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N), since assimilation processes and biochemical reactions within the fungi may reflect in a delivered product with an isotopic composition about 8 to 10 ‰ lower than that observed at the fungal symbiont per se. Here we assessed if the association with AMF affects δ15N values of plant species from a coastal-plain forest (restinga forest) at Southeastern Brazil. Accordingly, we analyzed the nutritional and isotopic compositions from ecosystem key-compartments (soil, litter and leaves), relating plant δ15N with the colonization rates. The study was carried out in a permanent plot (1 ha) at a coastal-plain forest (restinga forest) at the Serra do Mar State Park, SP, Brazil. Sampled vegetation is characterized by the lack of a well-defined stratification and a rather open canopy. It also comprises trees ranging from 10 to 15-m high. Soils are deep and sandy, being characterized by high acidity, nutrient deficiency and a dense litter cover. We randomly collected five samples (250 mg) from topsoil (0-10 cm) and five to ten leaves from individuals belonging to 16 plant species of high relevance within the site (IVI index). We also collected superficial (0-10 cm depth) fine roots (5 g) and 13 samples (100 g) of fine litter next to the individuals sampled. Soil samples were air-dried, sieved, homogenized and used in the physical-chemical characterization. The remainder was ground to a fine powder to determine nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values. Leaves were dried at 50 °C, finely milled and used for the determination of nitrogen concentrations, C/N ratios and δ15N values. Root samples were

  11. The Influence of Seed-borne N in 15N Isotope Dilution Studies with Legumes The Influence of Seed-borne N in 15N Isotope Dilution Studies with Legumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Steen; Andersen, A. J.; Thomsen, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The distriution of seed-borne N in shoot and root of pea and field bean was studied using three methods: 1) determination of the N content in shoot and root of plants grown in sand culture without other N sources. 2) 15N isotope dilution in plants grown in Rhizobium-free medium supplied with 15N-...

  12. Unusually negative nitrogen isotopic compositions (δ15N) of mangroves and lichens in an oligotrophic, microbially-influenced ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, M. L.; Wooller, M. J.; Cheeseman, J.; Smallwood, B. J.; Roberts, Q.; Romero, I.; Meyers, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Extremes in δ15N values in mangrove tissues and lichens (range =+4 to -22‰) were measured from a mangrove forest ecosystem located on Twin Cays, offshore islands in Belize, Central America. The N isotopic compositions and concentrations of NH4+/NH3 in porewater, rainwater, and atmospheric ammonia, and the δ15N of lichens, mangrove leaves, roots, stems, and wood were examined to study the biogeochemical processes important for establishing these unusual N isotopic ratios. Dwarfed Rhizophora mangle trees had the most negative δ15N, whereas fringing Rhizophora trees, the most positive δ15N values. Porewater ammonium concentrations had little relationship to N isotopic fractionation in mangrove tissues. In dwarfed mangroves, the δ15N of fine and coarse roots were 6-9‰ more positive than leaf tissue from the same tree, indicating different sources of N for root and leaf tissues. When P was added to dwarfed mangrove trees without added N, δ15N increased within one year from -12‰ to -2‰, approaching the δ15N of porewater ammonium (δ15N=+4‰). Isotopically depleted ammonia in the atmosphere (δ15N=-19‰) and in rainwater (δ15N=-10‰) were found on Twin Cays. We propose that foliar uptake of these atmospheric sources by P-stressed, dwarfed mangrove trees and lichens can explain their very negative δ15N values. In environments where P is limiting for growth, uptake of atmospheric N by Rhizophora mangle may be an important adaptive strategy.

  13. Unusually negative nitrogen isotopic compositions (δ15N of mangroves and lichens in an oligotrophic, microbially-influenced ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Romero

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Extremes in δ15N values in mangrove tissues and lichens (range =+4 to −22‰ were measured from a mangrove forest ecosystem located on Twin Cays, offshore islands in Belize, Central America. The N isotopic compositions and concentrations of NH4+/NH3 in porewater, rainwater, and atmospheric ammonia, and the δ15N of lichens, mangrove leaves, roots, stems, and wood were examined to study the biogeochemical processes important for establishing these unusual N isotopic ratios. Dwarfed Rhizophora mangle trees had the most negative δ15N, whereas fringing Rhizophora trees, the most positive δ15N values. Porewater ammonium concentrations had little relationship to N isotopic fractionation in mangrove tissues. In dwarfed mangroves, the δ15N of fine and coarse roots were 6–9‰ more positive than leaf tissue from the same tree, indicating different sources of N for root and leaf tissues. When P was added to dwarfed mangrove trees without added N, δ15N increased within one year from −12‰ to −2‰, approaching the δ15N of porewater ammonium (δ15N=+4‰. Isotopically depleted ammonia in the atmosphere (δ15N=−19‰ and in rainwater (δ15N=−10‰ were found on Twin Cays. We propose that foliar uptake of these atmospheric sources by P-stressed, dwarfed mangrove trees and lichens can explain their very negative δ15N values. In environments where P is limiting for growth, uptake of atmospheric N by Rhizophora mangle may be an important adaptive strategy.

  14. Origin of the chemical shift in X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy at the Mn K-Edge in manganese oxide compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, AH; Hozoi, L; Broer, R; Broer-Braam, H.B.

    2003-01-01

    The absorption edge in Mn K-edge X-ray absorption spectra of manganese oxide compounds shows a shift of several electronvolts in going from MnO through LaMnO3 to CaMnO3. On the other hand, in X-ray photoelectron spectra much smaller shifts are observed. To identify the mechanisms that cause the obse

  15. Intestinal renal metabolism of L-citrulline and L-arginine following enteral or parenteral infusion of L-alanyl-L-[2,15N]glutamine or L-[2,15N]glutamine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, Petra G; van Leeuwen, Paul A M; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2005-10-01

    Previously, we observed increased plasma arginine (ARG) concentrations after glutamine (GLN)-enriched diets, in combination with clinical benefits. GLN delivers nitrogen for ARG synthesis, and the present study was designed to quantify the interorgan relationship of exogenous L-GLN or GLN dipeptide, by enteral or parenteral route, contributing to intestinal citrulline (CIT) and renal de novo ARG synthesis in mice. To study this, we used a multicatheterized mouse model with Swiss mice (n = 43) in the postabsorptive state. Stable isotopes were infused into the jugular vein or into the duodenum {per group either free L-[2,(15)N]GLN or dipeptide L-ALA-L-[2,(15)N]GLN, all with L-[ureido-(13)C-(2)H(2)]CIT and L-[guanidino-(15)N(2)-(2)H(2)]ARG} to establish renal and intestinal ARG and CIT metabolism. Blood flow was measured using (14)C-para-aminohippuric acid. Net intestinal CIT release, renal uptake of CIT, and net renal ARG efflux was found, as assessed by arteriovenous flux measurements. Quantitatively, more de novo L-[2,(15)N]CIT was produced when free L-[2,(15)N]GLN was given than when L-ALA-L-[2,(15)N]GLN was given, whereas renal de novo L-[2,(15)N]ARG was similar in all groups. In conclusion, the intestinal-renal axis is hereby proven in mice in that L-[2,(15)N]GLN or dipeptide were both converted into de novo renal L-[2,(15)N]ARG; however, not all was derived from intestinal L-[2,(15)N]CIT production. In this model, the feeding route and form of GLN did not influence de novo renal ARG production derived from GLN.

  16. Unusually negative nitrogen isotopic compositions (δ15N of mangroves and lichens in an oligotrophic, microbially-influenced ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Romero

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Extremes in (δ15N values in mangrove tissues and lichens (range = +4 to −22‰ were measured from a mangrove forest ecosystem located on Twin Cays, offshore islands in Belize, Central America. The N isotopic compositions and concentrations of NH4+/NH3 in porewater, rainwater, atmospheric ammonia, mangrove leaves, roots, stems, and wood, and lichens, were examined to study the biogeochemical processes important for establishing these unusual N isotopic ratios. Porewater ammonium concentrations had little to no relationship to N isotopic fractionation in mangrove tissues. The δ15N of fine and coarse roots was 9‰ more positive than leaf tissue from the same tree. When P was added to dwarfed mangrove trees without added N, δ15N increased within one year to a &delta:15N closer to the &delta:15N of porewater ammonium (δ15N=+4‰. Isotopically negative ammonia in the atmosphere (δ15N=−18‰ and in rainwater (δ15N=−9‰ were found on Twin Cays and may be sources of available N for isotopically depleted mangrove trees and lichens. In highly stressed, severely P limited trees, uptake of atmospheric N by Rhizophora mangle may be an important adaptive strategy.

  17. Macroalgae δ15N values in well-mixed estuaries: Indicator of anthropogenic nitrogen input or macroalgae metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Guillou, Gaël; Mornet, Françoise; Richard, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Although nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) in macroalgae is widely used as a bioindicator of anthropogenic nitrogen inputs to the coastal zone, recent studies suggest the possible role of macroalgae metabolism in δ15N variability. Simultaneous determinations of δ15N of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) along the land-sea continuum, inter-species variability of δ15N and its sensitivity to environmental factors are necessary to confirm the efficiency of macroalgae δ15N in monitoring nitrogen origin in mixed-use watersheds. In this study, δ15N of annual and perennial macroalgae (Ulva sp., Enteromorpha sp., Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus serratus) are compared to δ15N-DIN along the Charente Estuary, after characterizing δ15N of the three main DIN sources (i.e. cultivated area, pasture, sewage treatment plant outlet). During late winter and spring, when human activities produce high DIN inputs, DIN sources exhibit distinct δ15N signals in nitrate (NO) and ammonium (NH): cultivated area (+6.5 ± 0.6‰ and +9.0 ± 11.0‰), pasture (+9.2 ± 1.8‰ and +12.4‰) and sewage treatment plant discharge (+16.9 ± 8.7‰ and +25.4 ± 5.9‰). While sources show distinct δN- in this multiple source catchment, the overall mixture of NO sources - generally >95% DIN - leads to low variations of δN-NO at the mouth of the estuary (+7.7 to +8.4‰). Even if estuarine δN-NO values are not significantly different from pristine continental and oceanic site (+7.3‰ and +7.4‰), macroalgae δ15N values are generally higher at the mouth of the estuary. This highlights high anthropogenic DIN inputs in the estuary, and enhanced contribution of 15N-depleted NH in oceanic waters. Although seasonal variations in δN-NO are low, the same temporal trends in macroalgae δ15N values at estuarine and oceanic sites, and inter-species differences in δ15N values, suggest that macroalgae δ15N values might be modified by the metabolic response of macroalgae to environmental parameters (e

  18. Sinks for nitrogen inputs in terrestrial ecosystems: a meta-analysis of 15N tracer field studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templer, P.H.; Mack, M.C.; Chapin, F. S.; Christenson, L.M.; Compton, J.E.; Crook, H.D.; Currie, W.S.; Curtis, C.J.; Dail, D.B.; D'Antonio, C. M.; Emmett, B.A.; Epstein, H.E.; Goodale, C.L.; Gundersen, P.; Hobbie, S.E.; Holland, K.; Hooper, D.U.; Hungate, B.A.; Lamontagne, S.; Nadelhoffer, K.J.; Osenberg, C.W.; Perakis, S.S.; Schleppi, P.; Schimel, J.; Schmidt, I.K.; Sommerkorn, M.; Spoelstra, J.; Tietema, A.; Wessel, W.W.; Zak, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition and the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to store carbon (C) depend in part on the amount of N retained in the system and its partitioning among plant and soil pools. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies at 48 sites across four continents that used enriched 15N isotope tracers in order to synthesize information about total ecosystem N retention (i.e., total ecosystem 15N recovery in plant and soil pools) across natural systems and N partitioning among ecosystem pools. The greatest recoveries of ecosystem 15N tracer occurred in shrublands (mean, 89.5%) and wetlands (84.8%) followed by forests (74.9%) and grasslands (51.8%). In the short term (15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N recovery was negatively correlated with fine-root and soil 15N natural abundance, and organic soil C and N concentration but was positively correlated with mean annual temperature and mineral soil C:N. In the longer term (3–18 months after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N retention was negatively correlated with foliar natural-abundance 15N but was positively correlated with mineral soil C and N concentration and C: N, showing that plant and soil natural-abundance 15N and soil C:N are good indicators of total ecosystem N retention. Foliar N concentration was not significantly related to ecosystem 15N tracer recovery, suggesting that plant N status is not a good predictor of total ecosystem N retention. Because the largest ecosystem sinks for 15N tracer were below ground in forests, shrublands, and grasslands, we conclude that growth enhancement and potential for increased C storage in aboveground biomass from atmospheric N deposition is likely to be modest in these ecosystems. Total ecosystem 15N recovery decreased with N fertilization, with an apparent threshold fertilization rate of 46 kg N·ha-1·yr-1 above which most ecosystems showed net losses of applied 15N tracer in response to N fertilizer addition.

  19. A 15N-poor isotopic composition for the solar system as shown by Genesis solar wind samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, B; Chaussidon, M; Wiens, R C; Jurewicz, A J G; Burnett, D S

    2011-06-24

    The Genesis mission sampled solar wind ions to document the elemental and isotopic compositions of the Sun and, by inference, of the protosolar nebula. Nitrogen was a key target element because the extent and origin of its isotopic variations in solar system materials remain unknown. Isotopic analysis of a Genesis Solar Wind Concentrator target material shows that implanted solar wind nitrogen has a (15)N/(14)N ratio of 2.18 ± 0.02 × 10(-3) (that is, ≈40% poorer in (15)N relative to terrestrial atmosphere). The (15)N/(14)N ratio of the protosolar nebula was 2.27 ± 0.03 × 10(-3), which is the lowest (15)N/(14)N ratio known for solar system objects. This result demonstrates the extreme nitrogen isotopic heterogeneity of the nascent solar system and accounts for the (15)N-depleted components observed in solar system reservoirs.

  20. A 15N-poor isotopic composition for the solar system as shown by Genesis solar wind samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, B; Chaussidon, M; Wiens, R C; Jurewicz, A J G; Burnett, D S

    2011-06-24

    The Genesis mission sampled solar wind ions to document the elemental and isotopic compositions of the Sun and, by inference, of the protosolar nebula. Nitrogen was a key target element because the extent and origin of its isotopic variations in solar system materials remain unknown. Isotopic analysis of a Genesis Solar Wind Concentrator target material shows that implanted solar wind nitrogen has a (15)N/(14)N ratio of 2.18 ± 0.02 × 10(-3) (that is, ≈40% poorer in (15)N relative to terrestrial atmosphere). The (15)N/(14)N ratio of the protosolar nebula was 2.27 ± 0.03 × 10(-3), which is the lowest (15)N/(14)N ratio known for solar system objects. This result demonstrates the extreme nitrogen isotopic heterogeneity of the nascent solar system and accounts for the (15)N-depleted components observed in solar system reservoirs. PMID:21700869

  1. Rapid mass spectrometric analysis of 15N-Leu incorporation fidelity during preparation of specifically labeled NMR samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truhlar, Stephanie M E; Cervantes, Carla F; Torpey, Justin W;

    2008-01-01

    analyzing the isotopic abundance of the peptides in the mass spectra using the program DEX. This analysis determined that expression with a 10-fold excess of unlabeled amino acids relative to the (15)N-amino acid prevents the scrambling of the (15)N label that is observed when equimolar amounts are used......Advances in NMR spectroscopy have enabled the study of larger proteins that typically have significant overlap in their spectra. Specific (15)N-amino acid incorporation is a powerful tool for reducing spectral overlap and attaining reliable sequential assignments. However, scrambling of the label...... during protein expression is a common problem. We describe a rapid method to evaluate the fidelity of specific (15)N-amino acid incorporation. The selectively labeled protein is proteolyzed, and the resulting peptides are analyzed using MALDI mass spectrometry. The (15)N incorporation is determined by...

  2. Localization of 15N uptake in a Tibetan alpine Kobresia pasture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleuß, Per-Marten; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    The Kobresia Pygmea ecotone covers approximately 450.000 km2 and is of large global and regional importance due several socio-ecological aspects. For instance Kobresia pastures store high amounts of carbon, nitrogen and other nutrients, represent large grazing areas for herbivores, provide a fast regrowth after grazing events and protect against mechanical degradation and soil erosion. However, Kobresia pastures are assumed to be a grazing induced and are accompanied with distinct root mats varying in thickness between 5-30 cm. Yet, less is known about the morphology and the functions of this root mats, especially in the background of a progressing degradation due to changes of climate and management. Thus we aimed to identify the importance of single soil layers for plant nutrition. Accordingly, nitrogen uptake from different soil depths and its remain in above-ground biomass (AGB), belowground biomass (BGB) and soil were determined by using a 15N pulse labeling approach during the vegetation period in summer 2012. 15N urea was injected into six different soil depths (0.5 cm, 2.5 cm, 7.5 cm, 12.5 cm, 17.5 cm, 22.5 cm / for each 4 replicates) and plots were sampled 45 days after the labeling. For soil and BGB samples were taken in strict sample intervals of 0-1 cm, 1-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-15 cm, 15-20 cm, 20-25 cm. Results indicate that total recovery (including AGB, BGB and soil) was highest, if tracer was injected into the top 5 cm and subsequently decreased with decreasing injection depth. This is especially the case for the 15N recovery of BGB, which is clearly attributed to the root density and strongly decreased with soil depth. In contrast, the root activity derived from the 15N content of roots increased with soil depth, which is primary associated to a proportionate increase of living roots related to dead roots. However, most 15N was captured in plant biomass (67.5-85.3 % of total recovery), indicating high 15N uptake efficiency possibly due to N limitation

  3. Dynamics of the amino acid and protein metabolism of laying hens after the application of 15N-labelled wheat protein. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 4 days 12 colostomized laying hens received, together with the ration, 36 g wheat with 14.37 atom-% 15N excess (15N'). The basic amino acids were nearly equally labelled. Three animals each were butchered after 12 h, 36 h, 60 h, and 108 h, resp., after the last 15N' application. Emission spectrometric determination of 15N' in liver and in amino acids was carried out. In addition, atom-% 15N' was determined in free amino acids and peptides. The labelling in the liver 12 h after the last 15N' application amounted to 1.75 atom-% 15N' and decreased after 108 h to 0.81 atom-% 15N'. The average TCA precipitable 15N' quota in the total 15N' amounted to 81.4% and was nearly identical at all four measuring points. The arginine 15N' amount in the liver was twice as high as that of lysine 15N'. In dependence on the period after the last 15N' application the decrease in the labelling of free arginine is considerable in comparison to free lysine. At the first measuring point (12 h) it was 1.69 atom-% 15N' and at the last one (108 h) 0.57 atom-% 15N'. Based on the results of 15N' labelling of peptides in the liver further, more detailed experiments for studies of peptide metabolism in the liver should be carried out. (author)

  4. Nitrogen (15N) accumulation in corn grains as affected by source of nitrogen in red latosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen is the most absorbed mineral nutrient by corn crop and most affects grains yield. It is the unique nutrient absorbed by plants as cation (NH4+) or anion (NO3-). The objectives of this work were to investigate the N accumulation by corn grains applied to the soil as NH4+ or NO3- in the ammonium nitrate form compared to amidic form of the urea, labeled with 15N; to determine the corn growth stage with highest fertilizer N utilization by the grains, and to quantify soil nitrogen exported by corn grains. The study was carried out in the Experimental Station of the Regional Pole of the Sao Paulo Northwestern Agribusiness Development (APTA), in Votuporanga, State of Sao Paulo, Brazil, in a Red Latosol. The experimental design was completely randomized blocks, with 13 treatments and four replications, disposed in factorial outline 6x2 + 1 (control, without N application). A nitrogen rate equivalent to 120 kg N ha-1 as urea-15N or as ammonium nitrate, labeled in the cation NH4+ (15NH4+NO3-) or in the anion NO3- (NH4+15N+O3- ), was applied in six fractions of 20 kg N ha-1 each, in different microplots, from seeding to the growth stage 7 (pasty grains). The forms of nitrogen, NH4+-N and NO3--N, were accumulated equitably by corn grains. The corn grains accumulated more N from urea than from ammonium nitrate. The N applied to corn crop at eight expanded leaves stage promoted largest accumulation of this nutrient in the grains. (author)

  5. Cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism alters with age as studied in 196 healthy males with the help of 31-phosphorus 2-dimensional chemical shift imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Esterhammer

    Full Text Available Recently published studies have elucidated alterations of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism during ageing. The intention of the present study was to evaluate the impact of ageing on cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism and cardiac function in healthy humans. 31-phosphorus 2-dimensional chemical shift imaging (31P 2D CSI and echocardiography were performed in 196 healthy male volunteers divided into groups of 20 to 40 years (I, n = 43, 40 to 60 years (II, n = 123 and >60 years (III, n = 27 of age. Left ventricular PCr/β-ATP ratio, myocardial mass (MM, ejection fraction and E/A ratio were assessed. Mean PCr/β-ATP ratios were significantly different among the three groups of volunteers (I, 2.10 ± 0.37; II, 1.77 ± 0.37; III, 1.45 ± 0.28; all p<0.001. PCr/β-ATP ratios were inversely related to age (r(2  =  -0.25; p<0.001 with a decrease from 2.65 by 0.02 per year of ageing. PCr/β-ATP ratios further correlated with MM (r =  -0.371; p<0.001 and E/A ratios (r = 0.213; p<0.02. Moreover, E/A ratios (r =  -0.502, p<0.001, MM (r = 0.304, p<0.001, glucose-levels (r = 0.157, p<0.05 and systolic blood pressure (r = 0.224, p<0.005 showed significant correlations with age. The ejection fraction did not significantly differ between the groups. This study shows that cardiac PCr/β-ATP ratios decrease moderately with age indicating an impairment of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism due to age. Furthermore, MM increases, and E/A ratio decreases with age. Both correlate with left-ventricular PCr/β-ATP ratios. The findings of the present study confirm numerous experimental studies showing an impairment of cardiac mitochondrial function with age.

  6. Cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism alters with age as studied in 196 healthy males with the help of 31-phosphorus 2-dimensional chemical shift imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterhammer, Regina; Klug, Gert; Wolf, Christian; Mayr, Agnes; Reinstadler, Sebastian; Feistritzer, Hans-Josef; Metzler, Bernhard; Schocke, Michael F H

    2014-01-01

    Recently published studies have elucidated alterations of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism during ageing. The intention of the present study was to evaluate the impact of ageing on cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism and cardiac function in healthy humans. 31-phosphorus 2-dimensional chemical shift imaging (31P 2D CSI) and echocardiography were performed in 196 healthy male volunteers divided into groups of 20 to 40 years (I, n = 43), 40 to 60 years (II, n = 123) and >60 years (III, n = 27) of age. Left ventricular PCr/β-ATP ratio, myocardial mass (MM), ejection fraction and E/A ratio were assessed. Mean PCr/β-ATP ratios were significantly different among the three groups of volunteers (I, 2.10 ± 0.37; II, 1.77 ± 0.37; III, 1.45 ± 0.28; all p<0.001). PCr/β-ATP ratios were inversely related to age (r(2)  =  -0.25; p<0.001) with a decrease from 2.65 by 0.02 per year of ageing. PCr/β-ATP ratios further correlated with MM (r =  -0.371; p<0.001) and E/A ratios (r = 0.213; p<0.02). Moreover, E/A ratios (r =  -0.502, p<0.001), MM (r = 0.304, p<0.001), glucose-levels (r = 0.157, p<0.05) and systolic blood pressure (r = 0.224, p<0.005) showed significant correlations with age. The ejection fraction did not significantly differ between the groups. This study shows that cardiac PCr/β-ATP ratios decrease moderately with age indicating an impairment of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism due to age. Furthermore, MM increases, and E/A ratio decreases with age. Both correlate with left-ventricular PCr/β-ATP ratios. The findings of the present study confirm numerous experimental studies showing an impairment of cardiac mitochondrial function with age. PMID:24940736

  7. Double-echo gradient chemical shift MR imaging fails to differentiate minimal fat renal angiomyolipomas from other homogeneous solid renal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferré, R., E-mail: kn638@yahoo.fr [Department of Radiology, Necker Hospital, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75730 Paris (France); Cornelis, F. [Department of Radiology, Pellegrin Hospital, Place Amélie Raba Léon, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Verkarre, V. [Department of Pathology, Necker Hospital, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75730 Paris (France); Eiss, D.; Correas, J.M. [Department of Radiology, Necker Hospital, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75730 Paris (France); Grenier, N. [Department of Radiology, Pellegrin Hospital, Place Amélie Raba Léon, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Hélénon, O. [Department of Radiology, Necker Hospital, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75730 Paris (France)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Diagnosis of AMLs with minimal fat (mfAMLs) is still challenging with MRI. •Drop of signal on opposed-phase MR imaging is not specific of mfAMLs. •Double-echo gradient-echo sequences cannot accurately differentiate renal mfAMLs from other renal tumors. -- Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of double-echo gradient chemical shift (GRE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the differentiation of angiomyolipomas with minimal fat (mfAML) from other homogeneous solid renal tumors. Methods: Between 2005 and 2010 in two institutions, all histologically proven homogenous solid renal tumors imaged with computed tomography and MR imaging, including GRE sequences, have been retrospectively selected. A total of 118 patients (mean age: 61 years; range: 20–87) with 119 tumors were included. Two readers measured independently the signal intensity (SI) on GRE images and calculated SI index (SII) and tumor-to-spleen ratio (TSR) on in-phase and opposed-phase images. Intra- and interreader agreement was obtained. Cut-off values were derived from the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: Twelve mfAMLs in 11 patients were identified (mean size: 2.8 cm; range: 1.2–3.5), and 107 non-AML tumors (3.2 cm; 1–7.8) in 107 patients. The intraobserver reproducibility of SII and TSR was excellent with an intraclass correlation coefficient equal to 0.99 [0.98–0.99]. The coefficient of correlation between the readers was 0.99. The mean values of TSR for mfAMLs and non-mfAMLs were −7.0 ± 22.8 versus −8.2 ± 21.2 for reader 1 and −6.7 ± 22.8 versus −8.4 ± 20.9 for reader 2 respectively. No significant difference was noticed between the two groups for SII (p = 0.98) and TSR (p = 0.86). Only 1 out of 12 mfAMLs and 11 of 107 non-AML tumors presented with a TSR inferior to −30% (p = 0.83). Conclusion: In a routine practice, GRE sequences cannot be a confident tool to

  8. Effect of estrogens on urinary /sup 15/N balance in girls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachmann, M.; Kempken, B.; Prader, A. (Zurich Univ. (Switzerland))

    1984-08-01

    While the anabolic and growth-promoting effects of testosterone are known to be important for pubertal growth in boys, the role of estrogens (E) in the female spurt is less certain. Adrenal androgens have been considered to be more important than ovarian E. To study the anabolic effects of E, there has been carried out a pilot study in 9 girls aged 11 to 15 years. Before and 6 days after the start of E treatment, urinary /sup 15/N balance studies were performed, using /sup 15/NH/sub 4/Cl.

  9. Search for antiproton-{sup 15}N bound state in PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Dexu [Helmholtz Institut Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Larionov, Alexei; Mishustin, Igor [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); National Research Center ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ma, Yue [RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Maas, Frank [Helmholtz Institut Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, 55099 Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    In order to study the antiproton-nucleus potential (antimatter-mater potential), and prepare a possible experiment for the PANDA spectrometer at FAIR facility, we carried out a calculation with the Giessen-Boltzman-Uehling-Uhlenbeck(GiBUU) model. The calculation was performed for an antiproton beam energy 1.5 GeV and an {sup 16}O target. The interesting events, which provide information about the antiproton-{sup 15}N potential, are required to have one knocked-out proton in forward direction and two or more pions from the antiproton annihilation at rest. Preliminary results of these studies are presented.

  10. Comparison of {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-determined parameters of mobility in melittin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Lingyang [University Indianapolis, Department of Physics, Indiana University Purdue (United States); Prendergast, Franklyn G. [Mayo Foundation, Department of Pharmacology (United States); Kemple, Marvin D. [University Indianapolis, Department of Physics, Indiana University Purdue (United States)

    1998-07-15

    Backbone and tryptophan side-chain mobilities in the 26-residue, cytolytic peptide melittin (MLT) were investigated by {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C NMR. Specifically, inverse-detected {sup 15}N T{sub 1} and steady-state NOE measurements were made at 30 and 51 MHz on MLT at 22 deg. C enriched with {sup 15}N at six amide positions and in the Trp{sup 19} side chain. Both the disordered MLT monomer (1.2 mM peptide at pH 3.6 in neat water) and {alpha}-helical MLT tetramer (4.0 mM peptide at pH 5.2 in 150 mM phosphate buffer) were examined. The relaxation data were analyzed in terms of the Lipari and Szabo model-free formalism with three parameters: {tau}{sub m}, the correlation time for the overall rotation; S{sup 2}, a site-specific order parameter which is a measure of the amplitude of the internal motion; and {tau}{sub e}, a local, effective correlation time of the internal motion. A comparison was made of motional parameters from the {sup 15}N measurements and from {sup 13}C measurements on MLT, the latter having been made here and previously [Kemple et al. (1997) Biochemistry, 36, 1678-1688]. {tau}{sub m} and {tau}{sub e} values were consistent from data on the two nuclei. In the MLT monomer, S{sup 2} values for the backbone N-H and C{alpha}-H vectors in the same residue were similar in value but in the tetramer the N-H order parameters were about 0.2 units larger than the C{alpha}-H order parameters. The Trp side-chain N-H and C-H order parameters, and {tau}{sub e} values were generally similar in both the monomer and tetramer. Implications of these results regarding the dynamics of MLT are examined.

  11. Mineralization of 15N-labelled sheep manure in soils of different texture and water contents

    OpenAIRE

    I. K. Thomsen; Schjønning, P.; B. T. Christensen

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of soil moisture and texture on C and N mineralization of applied organic matter, sheep faeces was sandwiched between two halves of intact soil cores and incubated at 20°C. The soils contained 10.8 (L1), 22.4 (L3) and 33.7% (L5) clay, respectively, and were drained to seven different matric potentials in the range –15 to –1500 hPa. Evolution of CO2-C was determined during four weeks of incubation. Contents of NO3-N, 15N and microbial biomass N were determine...

  12. Determination of the δ15N of nitrate in water; RSIL lab code 2899

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Revesz, Kinga; Casciotti, Karen; Hannon, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2899 is to determine the δ15N of nitrate (NO3-) in water. The δ15N of the dissolved NO3- is analyzed by conversion of the NO3- to nitrous oxide (N2O), which serves as the analyte for mass spectrometry. A culture of denitrifying bacteria is used in the enzymatic conversion of the NO3- to N2O, which follows the pathway shown in equation 1: NO3- → NO2- → NO → 1/2 N2O (1) Because the bacteria Pseudomonas aureofaciens lack N2O reductive activity, the reaction stops at N2O, unlike the typical denitrification reaction that goes to N2. After several hours, the conversion is complete, and the N2O is extracted from the vial, separated from volatile organic vapor and water vapor by an automated -65 °C isopropanol-slush trap, a Nafion drier, a CO2 and water removal unit (Costech #021020 carbon dioxide absorbent with Mg(ClO4)2), and trapped in a small-volume trap immersed in liquid nitrogen with a modified Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) GasBench 2 introduction system. After the N2O is released, it is further purified by gas chromatography before introduction to the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus continuous flow IRMS (CF-IRMS). It has a universal triple collector, consisting of two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of simultaneously measuring mass/charge (m/z) of the N2O molecule 44, 45, and 46. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z = 44 = N2O = 14N14N16O; m/z = 45 = N2O = 14N15N16O or 14N14N17O; m/z = 46 = N2O = 14N14N18O. The 17O contributions to the m/z 44 and m/z 45 ion beams are accounted for before δ15N values are reported.

  13. Determination of the δ15N of nitrate in solids; RSIL lab code 2894

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Revesz, Kinga; Casciotti, Karen; Hannon, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 2894 is to determine the δ15N of nitrate (NO3-) in solids. The nitrate fraction of the nitrogen species is dissolved by water (called leaching) and can be analyzed by the bacterial method covered in RSIL lab code 2899. After leaching, the δ15N of the dissolved NO3- is analyzed by conversion of the NO3- to nitrous oxide (N2O), which serves as the analyte for mass spectrometry. A culture of denitrifying bacteria is used in the enzymatic conversion of NO3- to N2O, which follows the pathway shown in equation 1: NO3- → NO2- → NO → 1/2 N2O (1) Because the bacteria Pseudomonas aureofaciens lack N2O reductive activity, the reaction stops at N2O, unlike the typical denitrification reaction that goes to N2. After several hours, the conversion is complete, and the N2O is extracted from the vial, separated from volatile organic vapor and water vapor by an automated -65 °C isopropanol-slush trap, a Nafion drier, a CO2 and water removal unit (Costech #021020 carbon dioxide absorbent with Mg(ClO4)2), and trapped in a small-volume trap immersed in liquid nitrogen with a modified Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) GasBench 2 introduction system. After the N2O is released, it is further purified by gas chromatography before introduction to the isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V Plus continuous flow IRMS (CF-IRMS). It has a universal triple collector, consisting of two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of simultaneously measuring mass/charge (m/z) of the N2O molecule 44, 45, and 46. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z = 44 = N2O = 14N14N16O; m/z = 45 = N2O = 14N15N16O or 14N14N17O; m/z = 46 = N2O = 14N14N18O. The 17O contributions to the m/z 44 and m/z 45 ion beams are accounted for before δ15N values are reported.

  14. Renal ischemia and reperfusion assessment with three-dimensional hyperpolarized (13) C,(15) N2-urea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Mose; Szocska Hansen, Esben Søvsø; Nørlinger, Thomas Stokholm;

    2016-01-01

    . METHODS: Hyperpolarized three-dimensional balanced steady-state (13) C magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments alongside kidney function parameters and quantitative polymerase chain reaction measurements were performed in rats subjected to unilateral renal ischemia for 60-minute and 24-hour......,(15) N2 urea MRI can be used to successfully detect changes in the intrarenal urea gradient post-IRI, thereby enabling in vivo monitoring of the intrarenal functional status in the rat kidney. Magn Reson Med, 2016. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine....

  15. Uptake of stormwater nitrogen in bioretention systems demonstrated from 15N tracer techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdeshel, D.; Hultine, K. R.; Pomeroy, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Bioretention stormwater management systems are engineered ecosystems that capture urban stormwater in order to reduce the harmful effects of stormwater pollution on receiving waters. Bioretention systems have been shown to be effective at reducing the volume of runoff, and thereby reduce the nutrient loading to receiving waters from urban areas. However, little work has been done to evaluate the treatment processes that are responsible for reductions in effluent nitrogen (N). We hypothesize that the pulses of inorganic nitrogen associated with urban runoff events are captured in the plat tissues within these systems and not adsorbed to the soil media, thus creating a long-term, sustainable treatment approach to reducing the total nutrient loading to receiving waters. Nitrogen treatment performance was tested on two bioretention systems in Salt Lake City, UT: 1) an upland native community that does not require irrigation in semi-arid climates, and 2) a wetland community that requires 250 l of daily irrigation to offset the relatively high evaporative demand in the region. Each cell is sized to treat a 2.5 cm storm from a 140 m2 impervious surface: the area of the bioretention system is 10 m2. To test the N removal performance of each system, runoff events were simulated to represent an average precipitation regime using a synthetic stormwater blend starting in January, 2012. Effluent was collected from an underdrain and analyzed for total nitrogen (TN); mass removal was calculated for each month by subtracting the TN mass added to the garden minus the TN mass that flowed out of the garden. To test the hypothesis that plants assimilate stormwater N, 4 g of 100 atom% 15N NH4NO3 tracer was used as the N source in the synthetic stormwater during the first 2,000 l synthetic storm event in May. This isotopic label was calculated to enrich the total N pool of each garden to 100‰ 15N/14Nair. New growth was harvested from each plant in both cells and analyzed for 15N

  16. Optical Microscopy Characterization for Borehole U-15n#12 in Support of NCNS Source Physics Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Jennifer E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sussman, Aviva Joy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-22

    Optical microscopy characterization of thin sections from corehole U-15n#12 is part of a larger material characterization effort for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE). The SPE program was conducted in Nevada with a series of explosive tests designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves inside Stock quartz monzonite. Optical microscopy analysis includes the following: 1) imaging of full thin sections (scans and mosaic maps); 2) high magnification imaging of petrographic texture (grain size, foliations, fractures, etc.); and 3) measurement of microfracture density.

  17. Feasibility analysis of organic Tea authentication using 15N natural abundance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic agricultural products were always adulterated by pollutant-free agricultural products in market because of lacking of available authentication technique. Organic tea was one of the largest organic agricultural products in China which are facing the same problem and can not be accepted by consumers. In this paper, based on the newest information of δ 15N from soil-plant-fertilizer system, a new method was suggested to identify whether N fertilizer was applied to organic tea in producing processing. Meanwhile, the principle of this new method and its feasibility were discussed. (authors)

  18. The $^{15}$N($\\bm\\alpha$,$\\bm\\gamma$)$^{19}$F reaction and nucleosynthesis of $^{19}$F

    OpenAIRE

    Wilmes, S.; Wilmes, V.; Staudt, G.; Mohr, P; Hammer, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    Several resonances in the $^{15}$N($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{19}$F reaction have been investigated in the energy range between 0.6 MeV and 2.7 MeV. Resonance strengths and branching ratios have been determined. High sensitivity could be obtained by the combination of the {\\sc{dynamitron}} high current accelerator, the windowless gas target system {\\sc{rhinoceros}}, and actively shielded germanium detectors. Two levels of $^{19}$F could be observed for the first time in the ($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$) chan...

  19. Tough Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewer, Robert S.; Verdezoto, Nervo; Holst, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    people to change their behavior at home. Leveraging prior research on encouraging reductions in residential energy use through game play, we introduce ShareBuddy: a casual mobile game intended to encourage players not only to reduce, but also to shift their electricity use. We conducted two field studies...... real-world resource use into a game....

  20. Power Shift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ "We are entering a new era of world history: the end of Western domination and the arrival of the Asian century. The question is: will Washington wake up to this reality?" This is the central premise of Kishore Mahbubani's provocative new book The New Asian Hemisphere: The Irresistible Shift of Global Power to the East.

  1. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  2. Oxygen 17 NMR in the evaluation of oxygen bounding with central ion using hydrolysis products of niobium, tantalum, arsenic, antimony pentafluorides as an example. Symbasis in the change of 17O and 19F chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrolysis products of niobium, tantalum, antimony and arsenic pentafluorides in acetonitrile solution were studied by the methods of 17O and 19F NMR. In 17O NMR spectra of niobium and tantalum pentafluorides hydrolysis products resonance signals of oxo-, hydroxo- and aquafluorocomplexes were defined. Considerable shift of 17O NMR resonance signals towards weak field making up about 300 m.p., may indicate a higher covalency (Π-character) of Nb-O bond compared to Ta-O one. Symbasis in the change of chemical shifts in 17O NMR and 19F NMR of the relevant hexafluorides and hydrolysis products was detected implying similarity of chemical bond nature in oxygen and fluorine

  3. The protein amide {sup 1}H{sup N} chemical shift temperature coefficient reflects thermal expansion of the N-H{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}O=C hydrogen bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong Jingbo; Jing Qingqing; Yao Lishan, E-mail: yaols@qibebt.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Biofuels, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (China)

    2013-01-15

    The protein amide {sup 1}H{sup N} chemical shift temperature coefficient can be determined with high accuracy by recording spectra at different temperatures, but the physical mechanism responsible for this temperature dependence is not well understood. In this work, we find that this coefficient strongly correlates with the temperature coefficient of the through-hydrogen-bond coupling, {sup 3h}J{sub NC Prime }, based on NMR measurements of protein GB3. Parallel tempering molecular dynamics simulation suggests that the hydrogen bond distance variation at different temperatures/replicas is largely responsible for the {sup 1}H{sup N} chemical shift temperature dependence, from which an empirical equation is proposed to predict the hydrogen bond thermal expansion coefficient, revealing responses of individual hydrogen bonds to temperature changes. Different expansion patterns have been observed for various networks formed by {beta} strands.

  4. Stereospecific assignments of glycine in proteins by stereospecific deuteration and {sup 15}N labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, A.P.; Curley, R.W. Jr.; Panigot, M.J.; Fesik, S.W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Stereospecific assignments are important for accurately determining the three-dimensional structures of proteins through the use of multidimensional NMR techniques. It is especially important to stereospecifically assign the glycine {alpha}-protons in proteins because of the potential for different backbone conformations of this residue. These stereospecific assignments are critical for interpreting the {sup 3}J{sub NH,{alpha}H} coupling constants and NOEs involving the glycine {alpha}-protons that determine the conformation of this part of the protein. However, it is often difficult to unambiguously obtain the stereospecific assignments for glycine residues by using only NOE data. In this poster, we present a method for unambiguous, stereospecific assignment of the {alpha}-protons of glycine residues. This method involves synthesis of stereo-specifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gly using a slightly modified procedure originally described by Woodard and coworkers for the stereoselective deuteration of glycine. The stereospecifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gy has been incorporated into recombinant proteins expressed in both bacterial systems (FKBP) and mammalian cells (u-PA). Two- and three-dimensional isotope-filtered and isotope-edited NMR experiments were used to obtain the stereospecific assignments of the glycine {alpha}-protons for these proteins.

  5. Oxygen determination in materials by 18O(p,αγ)15N nuclear reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Sunitha, Y.; Reddy, G. L. N.; Sukumar, A. A.; Ramana, J. V.; Sarkar, A.; Verma, Rakesh

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents a proton induced γ-ray emission method based on 18O(p,αγ)15N nuclear reaction to determine bulk oxygen in materials. The determination involves the measurement of 5.27 MeV γ-rays emitted following the de-excitation of 15N nuclei. A description of the energetics of the reaction is given to provide an insight into the origin of 5.27 MeV γ-rays. In addition, thick target γ-ray yields and the limits of detection are measured to ascertain the analytical potential of the reaction. The thick-target γ-ray yields are measured with a high purity germanium detector and a bismuth germanate detector at 0° as well as 90° angles in 3.0-4.2 MeV proton energy region. The best limit of detection of about 1.3 at.% is achieved at 4.2 MeV proton energy for measurements at 0° as well 90° angles with the bismuth germanate detector while the uncertainty in quantitative analysis is methodology is demonstrated by determining oxygen in several oxide as well as non-oxide materials.

  6. MUSIC in triple-resonance experiments: amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert; Smalla; Schmieder; Oschkinat

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH(2) or XH(3) (X can be (15)N or (13)C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10527741

  7. Constraining the S factor of 15N(p,g)16O at Astrophysical Energies

    CERN Document Server

    LeBlanc, P J; Goerres, J; Junker, M; Azuma, R; Beard, M; Bemmerer, D; Best, A; Broggini, C; Caciolli, A; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; Couder, M; deBoer, R; Elekes, Z; Falahat, S; Formicola, A; Fulop, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyurky, Gy; Kaeppeler, F; Kontos, A; Kuntz, R; Leiste, H; Lemut, A; Li, Q; Limata, B; Marta, M; Mazzocchi, C; Menegazzo, R; O'Brien, S; Palumbo, A; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Stech, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Tan, W; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Uberseder, E; Wiescher, M

    2010-01-01

    The 15N(p,g)16O reaction represents a break out reaction linking the first and second cycle of the CNO cycles redistributing the carbon and nitrogen abundances into the oxygen range. The reaction is dominated by two broad resonances at Ep = 338 keV and 1028 keV and a Direct Capture contribution to the ground state of 16O. Interference effects between these contributions in both the low energy region (Ep < 338 keV) and in between the two resonances (338 15N(p,g)16O reaction has been remeasured covering the energy range from Ep=1800 keV down to 130 keV. The results have been analyzed in the framework of a multi-level R-matrix theory and a S(0) value of 39.6 keV b has been found.

  8. The Origin of Nitrogen on Jupiter and Saturn from the $^{15}$N/$^{14}$N Ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Leigh N; Orton, Glenn S; Irwin, Patrick G J; Mousis, Olivier; Sinclair, James A; Giles, Rohini S

    2014-01-01

    The Texas Echelon cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES), mounted on NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), was used to map mid-infrared ammonia absorption features on both Jupiter and Saturn in February 2013. Ammonia is the principle reservoir of nitrogen on the giant planets, and the ratio of isotopologues ($^{15}$N/$^{14}$N) can reveal insights into the molecular carrier (e.g., as N$_2$ or NH$_3$) of nitrogen to the forming protoplanets, and hence the source reservoirs from which these worlds accreted. We targeted two spectral intervals (900 and 960 cm$^{-1}$) that were relatively clear of terrestrial atmospheric contamination and contained close features of $^{14}$NH$_3$ and $^{15}$NH$_3$, allowing us to derive the ratio from a single spectrum without ambiguity due to radiometric calibration (the primary source of uncertainty in this study). We present the first ground-based determination of Jupiter's $^{15}$N/$^{14}$N ratio (in the range from $1.4\\times10^{-3}$ to $2.5\\times10^{-3}$), which is consistent...

  9. Nutritional status of sugar cane (planted cane) in 15N experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies with stable isotopes are becoming more common due to the increased safety of operation and quality and reliability of results. However, the use of microplots is required to decrease the costs of such studies. Since microplots are small compared to regular plot areas, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether nutritional data based on microplot samples can adequately represent the whole area, in a comparison of the nutritional status of microplot sugar cane plants at their maximum development stage with those of the regular plots in experiments with N rates. Three experiments were set up, with three N rates (40, 80, and 120 kg ha-1 N) and a control, with four repetitions, in a randomized complete block design, in the state of Sao Paulo. Microplots of 3 m2 containing 15N-fertilizer (5.04% atom 15N) were included in the main plots formed by 48 lines of sugar cane spaced 1.5 m apart. At the time of maximum development stage, diagnostic leaves were collected in the main and microplots to evaluate the nutritional status of plants by analyzing the total concentration of macro nutrients. There were no differences in N, P, Ca, Mg, and S concentrations in the diagnostic leaves from the main and microplots, so that the latter can be considered representative of the experimental area. Higher nitrogen fertilizer rates induced increased concentrations of not only N, but also of P, Ca, Mg, and S in the diagnostic leaves. (author)

  10. Growth, development, and fertilizer-15N recovery by the coffee plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between growth and fertilizer nitrogen recovery by perennial crops such as coffee is poorly understood and improved understanding of such relations is important for the establishment of rational crop management practices. In order to characterize the growth of a typical coffee crop in Brazil and quantify the recovery of 15N labeled ammonium sulfate, and improve information for fertilizer management practices this study presents results for two consecutive cropping years, fertilized with 280 and 350 kg ha-1 of N, respectively, applied in four splittings, using five replicates. Shoot dry matter accumulation was evaluated every 60 days, separating plants into branches, leaves and fruits. Labeled sub-plots were used to evaluate N-total and 15N abundance by mass spectrometry. During the first year the aerial part reached a recovery of 71% of the fertilizer N applied up to February, but this value was reduced to 34% at harvest and 19% at the beginning of the next flowering period due to leaf fall and fruit export. For the second year the aerial part absorbed 36% of the fertilizer N up to March, 47% up to harvest and 19% up to the beginning of the next flowering period. The splitting into four applications of the used fertilizer rates was adequate for the requirements of the crop at these growth stages of the coffee crop. (author)

  11. Growth, development, and fertilizer-{sup 15}N recovery by the coffee plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenilli, Tatiele Anete Bergamo [Fundacao Universidade Regional de Blumenau (FURB), Blumenau, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Florestal; Reichardt, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny Oliveira Santos [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Fisica do Solo]. E-mail: klaus@cena.usp.br; Dourado-Neto, Durval; Favarin, Jose Laercio [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Producao Vegetal; Trivelim, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Isotopos Estaveis; Costa, Flavio Murilo Pereira da [Ministerio do Desenvolvimento Agrario, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Secretaria de Assuntos Fundiarios - SEAF

    2007-09-15

    The relationship between growth and fertilizer nitrogen recovery by perennial crops such as coffee is poorly understood and improved understanding of such relations is important for the establishment of rational crop management practices. In order to characterize the growth of a typical coffee crop in Brazil and quantify the recovery of {sup 15}N labeled ammonium sulfate, and improve information for fertilizer management practices this study presents results for two consecutive cropping years, fertilized with 280 and 350 kg ha{sup -1} of N, respectively, applied in four splittings, using five replicates. Shoot dry matter accumulation was evaluated every 60 days, separating plants into branches, leaves and fruits. Labeled sub-plots were used to evaluate N-total and {sup 15}N abundance by mass spectrometry. During the first year the aerial part reached a recovery of 71% of the fertilizer N applied up to February, but this value was reduced to 34% at harvest and 19% at the beginning of the next flowering period due to leaf fall and fruit export. For the second year the aerial part absorbed 36% of the fertilizer N up to March, 47% up to harvest and 19% up to the beginning of the next flowering period. The splitting into four applications of the used fertilizer rates was adequate for the requirements of the crop at these growth stages of the coffee crop. (author)

  12. {delta}{sup 15}N of seagrass leaves for monitoring anthropogenic nutrient increases in coral reef ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamuro, M.; Kayanne, H.; Yamano, H

    2003-04-01

    In a coral reef environment, a slight increase in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN;{>=}1.0 {mu}M) can alter the ecosystem via macroalgal blooms. We collected seagrass leaves from the tropical and subtropical Pacific Ocean in five countries and examined the interactions between nutrient concentrations (C, N, P), molar ratios of nutrients, and {delta}{sup 15}N to find a possible indicator of the DIN conditions. Within most sites, the concentrations of nutrients and their molar ratios showed large variations owing to species-specific values. On the other hand, almost identical {delta}{sup 15}N values were found in seagrass leaves of several species at each site. The correlations between {delta}{sup 15}N and nutrient concentrations and between {delta}{sup 15}N and molar ratios of nutrients suggested that nutrient availability did not affect the {delta}{sup 15}N value of seagrass leaves by altering the physiological condition of the plants. Increases in {delta}{sup 15}N of seagrass leaves mostly matched increases in DIN concentrations in the bottom water. We suggest that {delta}{sup 15}N in seagrass leaves can be a good tool to monitor time-integrated decrease/increase of DIN concentrations at a site, both in the water column and the interstitial water.

  13. {sup 15}N-labeled nitrogen from green manure and ammonium sulfate utilization by the sugarcane ratoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosano, Edmilson Jose; Rossi, Fabricio, E-mail: ambrosano@apta.sp.gov.b [Agencia Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegocios (APTA), Piracicapa, SP (Brazil). Polo Rigional Centro Sul; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Isotopos Estaveis; Cantarella, Heitor [Agencia Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegocios (APTA/IAC), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Instituto Agronomico de Campinas. Centro de Solos e Recursos Agroambientais; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi [Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP/FOP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia de Piracicaba. Dept. de Odontologia Social, Bioestatistica; Schammass, Eliana Aparecida [Agencia Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegocios (APTA/IZ), Nova Odessa, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Zootecnia; Muraoka, Takashi [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Fertilidade do solo

    2011-05-15

    Legumes as green manure are alternative sources of nitrogen (N) for crops and can supplement or even replace mineral nitrogen fertilization due to their potential for biological nitrogen fixation (BNF). The utilization of nitrogen by sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) fertilized with sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.) and ammonium sulfate (AS) was evaluated using the {sup 15}N tracer technique. N was added at the rate of 196 and 70 kg ha{sup -1} as {sup 15}N-labeled sunn hemp green manure (SH) and as ammonium sulfate (AS), respectively. Treatments were: (I) Control; (II) AS{sup 15}N; (III) SH{sup 15}N + AS; (IV) SH{sup 15}N; and (V) AS{sup 15}N + SH. Sugarcane was cultivated for five years and was harvested three times. {sup 15}N recovery was evaluated in the two first harvests. In the sum of the three harvests, the highest stalk yields were obtained with a combination of green manure and inorganic N fertilizer; however, in the second cutting the yields were higher where SH was used than in plots with AS. The recovery of N by the first two consecutive harvests accounted for 19 to 21% of the N applied as leguminous green manure and 46 to 49% of the N applied as AS. The amounts of inorganic N, derived from both N sources, present in the 0-0.4 m layer of soil in the first season after N application and were below 1 kg ha{sup -1}. (author)

  14. Homogeneity of δ15N in needles of Masson pine (Pinus massoniana L.) was altered by air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study investigated the changes of δ15N values in the tip, middle and base section (divided by the proportion to needle length) of current- and previous-year needles of Masson pine (Pinus massoniana L.) from two declining forest stands suffering from air pollution, in comparison with one healthy stand. At the healthy stand, δ15N in the three sections of both current- and previous-year needles were found evenly distributed, while at the polluted stands, δ15N values in the needles were revealed significantly different from the tip to the base sections. The results implied that the distribution of δ15N among different parts or sections in foliages was not always homogeneous and could be affected by air pollution. We suggested that the difference of δ15N values among pine needle sections should be reconsidered and should not be primarily ignored when the needle δ15N values were used to assess plant responses to air pollution. - Values of δ15N in needles of Masson pine (Pinus massoniana L.) were uneven and affected by air pollution.

  15. A Series of Diamagnetic Pyridine Monoimine Rhenium Complexes with Different Degrees of Metal-to-Ligand Charge Transfer: Correlating (13) C NMR Chemical Shifts with Bond Lengths in Redox-Active Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieh, Daniel; Kubiak, Clifford P

    2016-07-18

    A set of pyridine monoimine (PMI) rhenium(I) tricarbonyl chlorido complexes with substituents of different steric and electronic properties was synthesized and fully characterized. Spectroscopic (NMR and IR) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses of these complexes showed that the redox-active PMI ligands are neutral and that the overall electronic structure is little affected by the choices of the substituent at the ligand backbone. One- and two-electron reduction products were prepared from selected starting compounds and could also be characterized by multiple spectroscopic methods and X-ray diffraction. The final product of a one-electron reduction in THF is a diamagnetic metal-metal-bonded dimer after loss of the chlorido ligand. Bond lengths in and NMR chemical shifts of the PMI ligand backbone indicate partial electron transfer to the ligand. Two-electron reduction in THF also leads to the loss of the chlorido ligand and a pentacoordinate complex is obtained. The comparison with reported bond lengths and (13) C NMR chemical shifts of doubly reduced free pyridine monoaldimine ligands indicates that both redox equivalents in the doubly reduced rhenium complex investigated here are located in the PMI ligand. With diamagnetic complexes varying over three formal reduction stages at the PMI ligand we were, for the first time, able to establish correlations of the (13) C NMR chemical shifts with the relevant bond lengths in redox-active ligands over a full redox series. PMID:27319753

  16. Diffusion technique for 15N and inorganic N analysis of low-N aqueous solutions and Kjeldahl digests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui Rui; Dittert, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    Diffusion of ammonia is a common sample preparation method for the stable isotope analysis of inorganic nitrogen in aqueous solution. Classical diffusion methods usually require 6-12 days of diffusion and often focus on (15)N/(14)N analysis only. More recent studies have discussed whether complete N recovery was necessary for the precise analysis of stable N isotope ratios. In this paper we present a newly revised diffusion technique that allows correct and simultaneous determination of total N and (15)N at% from aqueous solutions and Kjeldahl digests, with N concentrations down to sub-0.5-mg N L(-1) levels, and it is tested under different conditions of (15)N isotope labelling. With the modification described, the diffusion time was reduced to 72 h, while the ratios of measured and expected (15)N at% were greater than 99% and the simultaneous recovery of total N was >95%. Analysis of soil microbial biomass N and its (15)N/(14)N ratio is one of the most important applications of this diffusion technique. An experiment with soil extracts spiked with (15)N-labelled yeast showed that predigestion was necessary to prevent serious N loss during Kjeldahl digestion of aqueous samples (i.e. soil extracts). The whole method of soil microbial biomass N preparation for (15)N/(14)N analysis included chloroform fumigation, predigestion, Kjeldahl digestion and diffusion. An experiment with soil spiked with (15)N-labelled yeast was carried out to evaluate the method. Results showed a highly significant correlation of recovered and added N, with the same recovery rate (0.21) of both total N and (15)N. A k(N) value of 0.25 was obtained based on the data. In conclusion, the diffusion method works for soil extracts and microbial biomass N determination and hence could be useful in many types of soil/water studies.

  17. Distribution of /sup 15/N fertilizer in field-lysimeters sown with garlic (Allium sativum) and foxtail millet (Setaria italica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzari, M.A. (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina). Dept. de Ciencas Agrarias)

    1982-01-01

    We examined the distribution of residual /sup 15/N and its uptake by a foxtail millet crop grown in field lysimeters following a previous garlic crop fertilized with either /sup 15/N-urea or /sup 15/N-ammonium sulphate. Garlic apparently removed more N from the lysimeters treated with urea-N than from those treated with (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Fertilizer-N in the lysimeters was similar (ca. 32% of original) following millet harvest. About 16 per cent of both fertilizers in the lysimeters was removed by the millet.

  18. Medium-term effects of poultry manure on pine N uptake in a 15N labelled burnt soil.

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, A; González Prieto, S. J.; T. Carballas

    2008-01-01

    The effects of poultry manure (PM), used for the reclamation of a 15N-labelled burnt soil, on N nutrition of pine seedlings were evaluated during a year in a pot experiment. Six treatments were used: 15N-labelled soil (LS), 15N-labelled burnt soil (BLS) and BLS+PM at doses equivalent to 1, 2, 4 and 8 Mg ha-1 of dry PM (PM1, PM2, PM4 and PM8, respectively). Either in the whole tree or the different organs, N concentration: a) decreased (P # 0.05) in the order LS > BLS, BLS+PM1, BLS...

  19. Distribution of 15N fertilizer in field-lysimeters sown with garlic (Allium sativum) and foxtail millet (Setaria italica)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the distribution of residual 15N and its uptake by a foxtail millet crop grown in field lysimeters following a previous garlic crop fertilized with either 15N-urea or 15N-ammonium sulphate. Garlic apparently removed more N from the lysimeters treated with urea-N than from those treated with (NH4)2SO4. Fertilizer-N in the lysimeters was similar (ca. 32% of original) following millet harvest. About 16 per cent of both fertilizers in the lysimeters was removed by the millet. (orig.)

  20. Dynamics of nitrogen in an oxic paleudalf soil with the incorporation of 15N-tagged organic nitrogen (maize straw) and 15N-tagged mineral nitrogen (ammonium sulphate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment, carried out under field conditions in 12 lysimeters, each containing 3.0 ton of Oxic Paleudalf soil with four replicates, is described. This objective is labelling soil organic N. Nitrogen was incorporated into soil as maize straw, non-labelled and labelled with 15N and ammonium sulphate - 15N. The soil was sampled every 15 days in three different depths. N as NH+4, NO-3, total-N and (%)C and (%) moisture was analysed. (M.A.C.)

  1. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanosecond-to-millisecond (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear ((13)C, (15)N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radiofrequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins have been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely, (1) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) and (2) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e., proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable and that the CCR rate constant depends on ns-ms motions; it can thus provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin diffusion attenuates this CCR due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and this article reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation.

  2. Prediction of (195) Pt NMR chemical shifts of dissolution products of H2 [Pt(OH)6 ] in nitric acid solutions by DFT methods: how important are the counter-ion effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsipis, Athanassios C; Karapetsas, Ioannis N

    2016-08-01

    (195) Pt NMR chemical shifts of octahedral Pt(IV) complexes with general formula [Pt(NO3 )n (OH)6 - n ](2-) , [Pt(NO3 )n (OH2 )6 - n ](4 - n) (n = 1-6), and [Pt(NO3 )6 - n  - m (OH)m (OH2 )n ](-2 + n - m) formed by dissolution of platinic acid, H2 [Pt(OH)6 ], in aqueous nitric acid solutions are calculated employing density functional theory methods. Particularly, the gauge-including atomic orbitals (GIAO)-PBE0/segmented all-electron relativistically contracted-zeroth-order regular approximation (SARC-ZORA)(Pt) ∪ 6-31G(d,p)(E)/Polarizable Continuum Model computational protocol performs the best. Excellent second-order polynomial plots of δcalcd ((195) Pt) versus δexptl ((195) Pt) chemical shifts and δcalcd ((195) Pt) versus the natural atomic charge QPt are obtained. Despite of neglecting relativistic and spin orbit effects the good agreement of the calculated δ (195) Pt chemical shifts with experimental values is probably because of the fact that the contribution of relativistic and spin orbit effects to computed σ(iso) (195) Pt magnetic shielding of Pt(IV) coordination compounds is effectively cancelled in the computed δ (195) Pt chemical shifts, because the relativistic corrections are expected to be similar in the complexes and the proper reference standard used. To probe the counter-ion effects on the (195) Pt NMR chemical shifts of the anionic [Pt(NO3 )n (OH)6 - n ](2-) and cationic [Pt(NO3 )n (OH2 )6 - n ](4 - n) (n = 0-3) complexes we calculated the (195) Pt NMR chemical shifts of the neutral (PyH)2 [Pt(NO3 )n (OH)6 - n ] (n = 1-6; PyH = pyridinium cation, C5 H5 NH(+) ) and [Pt(NO3 )n (H2 O)6 - n ](NO3 )4 - n (n = 0-3) complexes. Counter-anion effects are very important for the accurate prediction of the (195) Pt NMR chemical shifts of the cationic [Pt(NO3 )n (OH2 )6 - n ](4 - n) complexes, while counter-cation effects are less important for the anionic [Pt(NO3 )n (OH)6

  3. Nitrogen use efficiency evaluation of aerobic rice under field capacity water potential using {sup 15}N isotopic tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahid, Ahmad Nazrul Abd, E-mail: a-nazrul@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahim, Sahibin Abd, E-mail: haiyan@ukm.edu.my [Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Harun, Abdul Rahim [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency use of the nitrogen fertilizer on aerobic rice varieties MR219-4 and MR219-9 which were grown aerobically under field capacity water potential at the controlled environment area or shield house. Direct {sup 15}N isotope tracer method was used in this study, whereby the {sup 15}N isotope was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake. {sup 15}N isotope presence in the samples is determined by using emission spectrometer analysis and percentage of total nitrogen is determined by using Kjeldahl method. {sup 15}N