WorldWideScience

Sample records for 15-country collaborative study

  1. The 15-Country Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardis, E; Vrijheid, M; Blettner, M;

    2007-01-01

    A 15-Country collaborative cohort study was conducted to provide direct estimates of cancer risk following protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. Analyses included 407,391 nuclear industry workers monitored individually for external radiation and 5.2 million person-years of follow-up. A sign......A 15-Country collaborative cohort study was conducted to provide direct estimates of cancer risk following protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. Analyses included 407,391 nuclear industry workers monitored individually for external radiation and 5.2 million person-years of follow......-up. A significant association was seen between radiation dose and all-cause mortality [excess relative risk (ERR) 0.42 per Sv, 90% CI 0.07, 0.79; 18,993 deaths]. This was mainly attributable to a dose-related increase in all cancer mortality (ERR/Sv 0.97, 90% CI 0.28, 1.77; 5233 deaths). Among 31 specific types...... of malignancies studied, a significant association was found for lung cancer (ERR/Sv 1.86, 90% CI 0.49, 3.63; 1457 deaths) and a borderline significant (P = 0.06) association for multiple myeloma (ERR/Sv 6.15, 90% CI cancers (ERR/Sv 1.96, 90% CI -0.26, 5.90; 328...

  2. The 15-Country Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk Among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrijheid, M; Cardis, E; Blettner, M;

    2007-01-01

    Radiation protection standards are based mainly on risk estimates from studies of atomic bomb survivors in Japan. The validity of extrapolations from the relatively high-dose acute exposures in this population to the low-dose, protracted or fractionated environmental and occupational exposures...... describes the design, methods and results of descriptive analyses of the study. The main analyses included 407,391 nuclear industry workers employed for at least 1 year in a participating facility who were monitored individually for external radiation exposure and whose doses resulted predominantly from...

  3. Factors Influencing Teachers' Views of Health and Health Education: A Study in 15 Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, D.; Pironom, J.; Berger, D.; Carvalho, G. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To analyse teachers' health views in order to obtain general trends in factors influencing health and health education and to fit them into the negative-positive model of health proposed by Downie and collaborators. Method: This large international study involved 15 countries from Western and Eastern Europe, North and Sub-Saharan…

  4. Incomplete data on the Canadian cohort may have affected the results of the study by the International Agency for Research on Cancer on the radiogenic cancer risk among nuclear industry workers in 15 countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashmore, J Patrick [Ponsonby and Associates, Manotick, ON (Canada); Gentner, Norman E; Osborne, Richard V, E-mail: osborner@magma.c [Ranasara Consultants Inc., PO Box 1116, Deep River, ON (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    In 1995 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) completed a study that involved nuclear workers from facilities in the USA, UK and Canada. The only significant, though weak, dose-related associations found were for leukaemia and multiple myeloma. The results for the Canadian cohort, which comprised workers from the facilities of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), were compatible with those for the other national cohorts. In 2005, IARC completed a further study, involving nuclear workers from 15 countries, including Canada. In these results, the dose-related risk for leukaemia was not significant but the prominent finding was a statistically significant excess relative risk per sievert (ERR Sv{sup -1}) for 'all cancers excluding leukaemia'. Surprisingly, the risk ascribed to the Canadian cohort for all cancers excluding leukaemia, driven by the AECL sub-cohort, was significantly higher than the risk estimate for the 15-country cohort as a whole. We have attempted to identify why the results for the AECL cohort were so discrepant and had such a remarkable influence on the 15-country risk estimate. When considering the issues associated with data on the AECL cohorts and their handling, we noted a striking feature: a major change in outcome of studies that involved Canadian nuclear workers occurred concomitantly with the shift to when data from the National Dose Registry (NDR) of Canada were used directly rather than data from records at AECL. We concluded that an important contributor to the considerable upward shift in apparent risk in the 15-country and other Canadian studies that have been based on the NDR probably relates to pre-1971 data and, in particular, the absence from the NDR of the person-years of workers who had zero doses in the calendar years 1956 to 1970. Our recommendation was for there to be a comprehensive evaluation of the risks from radiation in nuclear industry workers in Canada, organisation by organisation, in

  5. Effects of "Sesame Street": A Meta-Analysis of Children's Learning in 15 Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Marie-Louise; Pan, Zhongdang

    2013-01-01

    "Sesame Street" is broadcast to millions of children globally, including in some of the world's poorest regions. This meta-analysis examines the effects of children's exposure to international co-productions of "Sesame Street", synthesizing the results of 24 studies, conducted with over 10,000 children in 15 countries. The results indicated…

  6. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  7. Messy Collaboration: Learning from a Learning Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Bob; Walker, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Messy collaboration refers to complexity, unpredictability and management dilemmas when educators work together. Such messiness was evident in a Hong Kong English Learning Study, a structured cyclical process in which teachers and researcher-participants from a teacher education institution work collaboratively on effective student learning. This…

  8. Collaborative Assessment: Middle School Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkison, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing a participant observer research model, a case study of the efficacy of a collaborative assessment methodology within a middle school social studies class was conducted. A review of existing research revealed that students' perceptions of assessment, evaluation, and accountability influence their intrinsic motivation to learn. A…

  9. DPHEP: From Study Group to Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Shiers, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    The international study group on data preservation in High Energy Physics, DPHEP, achieved a major milestone in 2012 with the publication of its eagerly anticipated large-scale report [1]. This document contains a description of data preservation activities from all major high energy physics collider-based experiments and laboratories. A central message of the report is that data preservation in HEP is not possible without long term investment in not only hardware but also human resources, and with this in mind DPHEP will evolve to a new collaboration structure in 2013. This paper describes the progress made since the publication of that report – shortly before CHEP 2012 – as well as the future working directions of the new collaboration.

  10. Study on affecting factors of collaborative product development based on collaboration hierarchy model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaodong; LI Yingzi; ZHANG Zhiqiang

    2007-01-01

    Aiming at the levels of collaborative degree in web-based product development,a collaboration hierarchy model of this product development is developed in this paper.Based on the model,the affecting factors on collaboration levels are analyzed systematically from many aspects,such as technology,organization and business.A gap analysis method is studied in detail,and is applied in a real project.The application shows that it can solve the diverse problems of collaborative product development effectively,and help enterprises find out the critical factors that affect the collaboration.

  11. Decomposition of useful work intensity: The EU (European Union)-15 countries from 1960 to 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy intensity measures, defined as the ratio of energy use to gross domestic product of a country, are widely used to study the productivity of energy use in an economy. Unlike conventional primary and/or final energy intensities, useful work intensity (useful work/gross domestic product) addresses the problem of aggregating in a single measure the different energy forms used, and allows for a clear distinction between thermodynamic efficiencies and structural changes in the demand for energy end-uses. Here, our aim is twofold: (1) Disclose the factors that control the useful work intensities across the EU-15 countries over the deindustrialization process, performing a decomposition of the useful work intensities from 1960 to 2009. (2) Describe a methodology for the automatization of useful work accounting, based on a general mapping of energy end-uses from IEA (International Energy Agency) energy balances. We show that, in contrast to the other conventional energy intensity measures, useful work intensity depends only on the intensity of high temperature heat uses and the relative size of residential energy needs. Aggregate thermodynamic efficiencies slightly increased as a consequence of technological improvements, but were negatively affected by deindustrialization, as a consequence of a transition to less efficient and productive energy uses. - Highlights: • We provide an automated useful work accounting methodology from IEA energy balances. • We provide an estimation of 2nd law efficiencies for EU-15 countries since 1960. • This methodology is applied to EU-15 from 1960 to 2009. • Useful work intensity depends only on high temperature heat and residential uses. • Thermodynamic 2nd law efficiencies were negatively affected by deindustrialization

  12. Phenylketonuria in adulthood: a collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, R; Burton, B; Hoganson, G; Peterson, R; Rhead, W; Rouse, B; Scott, R; Wolff, J; Stern, A M; Guttler, F; Nelson, M; de la Cruz, F; Coldwell, J; Erbe, R; Geraghty, M T; Shear, C; Thomas, J; Azen, C

    2002-09-01

    During 1967-1983, the Maternal and Child Health Division of the Public Health Services funded a collaborative study of 211 newborn infants identified on newborn screening as having phenylketonuria (PKU). Subsequently, financial support was provided by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). The infants were treated with a phenylalanine (Phe)-restricted diet to age 6 years and then randomized either to continue the diet or to discontinue dietary treatment altogether. One hundred and twenty-five of the 211 children were then followed until 10 years of age. In 1998, NICHD scheduled a Consensus Development Conference on Phenylketonuria and initiated a study to follow up the participants from the original Collaborative Study to evaluate their present medical, nutritional, psychological, and socioeconomic status. Fourteen of the original clinics (1967-1983) participated in the Follow-up Study effort. Each clinic director was provided with a list of PKU subjects who had completed the original study (1967-1983), and was asked to evaluate as many as possible using a uniform protocol and data collection forms. In a subset of cases, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI/MRS) were performed to study brain Phe concentrations. The medical evaluations revealed that the subjects who maintained a phenylalanine-restricted diet reported fewer problems than the diet discontinuers, who had an increased rate of eczema, asthma, mental disorders, headache, hyperactivity and hypoactivity. Psychological data showed that lower intellectual and achievement test scores were associated with dietary discontinuation and with higher childhood and adult blood Phe concentrations. Abnormal MRI results were associated with higher brain Phe concentrations. Early dietary discontinuation for subjects with PKU is associated with poorer outcomes not only in intellectual ability, but also in achievement test scores and increased rates of medical and behavioural

  13. Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Meme; Pryor, Boori Monty

    2000-01-01

    Describes, in the words of two Australian authors (one Aboriginal and one European-Australian), how they work together when they write books together, and how their collaboration goes beyond the two of them. (SR)

  14. Collaborative environments work: a case study of teacher training

    OpenAIRE

    Meirinhos, Manuel; Osório, António

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, many research projects related to cooperative and collaborative learning, as well as to learning communities based on these practices, have appeared. Numerous authors have recognised the innovative potential of collaborative networked learning, thus allowing for the growth of research in the field of collaboration connected with education and distance learning. In this paper, through a case study in the context of teacher ...

  15. Collaborative Engineering: an Airbus case study

    OpenAIRE

    Mas Morate, Fernando; Menéndez Cuñado, José Luis; Oliva Olvera, Manuel; Ríos Chueco, José

    2013-01-01

    This document introduces the main concepts of Collaborative Engineering as a new methodology, procedures and tools to design and develop an aircraft, as Airbus Military is implementing. Airbus designs and industrializes aircrafts under Concurrent Engineering techniques since decades with success. The introduction of new PLM methodologies, procedures and tools, mainly in the industrialization areas, and the need to reduce time-to-market conducted Airbus Military to push the engineering tea...

  16. Mobile Collaborative Informal Learning Design: Study of collaborative effectiveness using Activity Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasnain Zafar Baloch

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Smart Mobile Devices (SMD are there for many years but using them as learning tools started to emerge as new research area. The trend to merge collaborative learning methodology by using mobile devices in informal context is important for implementation of Learner Centric Learning (LCL. Survey and numerous studies show that more than 95% of students in colleges are users of these smart mobile devices in developed world. Developing counties are also catching up and we can see this percentage is almost same in university level in these countries. Students are using SMDs for learning in some form. Higher education Institutions also try to embark their E-learning to Mobile learning (ML. The aim of this paper is to do propose operational framework for designing Mobile Collaborative Informal learning activities using SMDs. Show results of experimental and case study done to study the Mobile Collaborative Informal learning using Activity Theory (AT. Core Components of framework are Mobile Learning Activities/Objects, Wireless/Mobile Smart devices, Collaborative knowledge and Collaborative learning. The research mention here is its infancy stage.

  17. Collaborative Research: The Alphabetic Braille and Contracted Braille Study as an Example of Collaborative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormsley, Diane P.; Emerson, Robert Wall; Erin, Jane

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the Alphabetic Braille Contracted Braille Study in relation to the dimensions of collaborative research: extent, intensity, substance, heterogeneity, velocity, formality, and productivity. It also discusses the dimensions of financing research and researchers' attitudes. The overall consensus is that the study would not have…

  18. Cognitive Collaboration Found in Cardiac Physiology: Study in Classroom Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonen, Lauri; Cowley, Benjamin; Torniainen, Jari; Ukkonen, Antti; Vihavainen, Arto; Puolamäki, Kai

    2016-01-01

    It is known that periods of intense social interaction result in shared patterns in collaborators' physiological signals. However, applied quantitative research on collaboration is hindered due to scarcity of objective metrics of teamwork effectiveness. Indeed, especially in the domain of productive, ecologically-valid activity such as programming, there is a lack of evidence for the most effective, affordable and reliable measures of collaboration quality. In this study we investigate synchrony in physiological signals between collaborating computer science students performing pair-programming exercises in a class room environment. We recorded electrocardiography over the course of a 60 minute programming session, using lightweight physiological sensors. We employ correlation of heart-rate variability features to study social psychophysiological compliance of the collaborating students. We found evident physiological compliance in collaborating dyads' heart-rate variability signals. Furthermore, dyads' self-reported workload was associated with the physiological compliance. Our results show viability of a novel approach to field measurement using lightweight devices in an uncontrolled environment, and suggest that self-reported collaboration quality can be assessed via physiological signals. PMID:27416036

  19. Cognitive Collaboration Found in Cardiac Physiology: Study in Classroom Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauri Ahonen

    Full Text Available It is known that periods of intense social interaction result in shared patterns in collaborators' physiological signals. However, applied quantitative research on collaboration is hindered due to scarcity of objective metrics of teamwork effectiveness. Indeed, especially in the domain of productive, ecologically-valid activity such as programming, there is a lack of evidence for the most effective, affordable and reliable measures of collaboration quality. In this study we investigate synchrony in physiological signals between collaborating computer science students performing pair-programming exercises in a class room environment. We recorded electrocardiography over the course of a 60 minute programming session, using lightweight physiological sensors. We employ correlation of heart-rate variability features to study social psychophysiological compliance of the collaborating students. We found evident physiological compliance in collaborating dyads' heart-rate variability signals. Furthermore, dyads' self-reported workload was associated with the physiological compliance. Our results show viability of a novel approach to field measurement using lightweight devices in an uncontrolled environment, and suggest that self-reported collaboration quality can be assessed via physiological signals.

  20. Cognitive Collaboration Found in Cardiac Physiology: Study in Classroom Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Benjamin; Torniainen, Jari; Ukkonen, Antti; Vihavainen, Arto; Puolamäki, Kai

    2016-01-01

    It is known that periods of intense social interaction result in shared patterns in collaborators’ physiological signals. However, applied quantitative research on collaboration is hindered due to scarcity of objective metrics of teamwork effectiveness. Indeed, especially in the domain of productive, ecologically-valid activity such as programming, there is a lack of evidence for the most effective, affordable and reliable measures of collaboration quality. In this study we investigate synchrony in physiological signals between collaborating computer science students performing pair-programming exercises in a class room environment. We recorded electrocardiography over the course of a 60 minute programming session, using lightweight physiological sensors. We employ correlation of heart-rate variability features to study social psychophysiological compliance of the collaborating students. We found evident physiological compliance in collaborating dyads’ heart-rate variability signals. Furthermore, dyads’ self-reported workload was associated with the physiological compliance. Our results show viability of a novel approach to field measurement using lightweight devices in an uncontrolled environment, and suggest that self-reported collaboration quality can be assessed via physiological signals. PMID:27416036

  1. Mobile Collaborative Informal Learning Design: Study of collaborative effectiveness using Activity Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Hasnain Zafar Baloch; Azizah Abdul. Rahman; Noorminshah A Ihad

    2012-01-01

    Smart Mobile Devices (SMD) are there for many years but using them as learning tools started to emerge as new research area. The trend to merge collaborative learning methodology by using mobile devices in informal context is important for implementation of Learner Centric Learning (LCL). Survey and numerous studies show that more than 95% of students in colleges are users of these smart mobile devices in developed world. Developing counties are also catching up and we can see this percentage...

  2. Studying collaborative information seeking: Experiences with three methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegård, Jette Seiden; Hertzum, Morten; Hansen, Preben

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative information seeking (CIS) has lately produced interesting empirical studies, describing CIS in real-life settings. While these studies explore how and why CIS manifests itself in different domains, discussions about how to study CIS have been scarce. The research area of CIS may, ho...

  3. Joining Forces: A Collaborative Study of Curricular Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Beth Ann

    2013-01-01

    The collaborative action research reported here strives to extend a prior study that dealt with the effects of integrating a general music course of study with the total curriculum of a first grade class. This second study used a similar plan in which a fifth grade teacher and a music teacher worked cooperatively to provide a curriculum that…

  4. Facilitating Collaborative Work in Tertiary Teaching: A Self-Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verenikina, Irina

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a self-study undertaken by the author to better understand the educational practices of scaffolding in pre-service teachers' collaborative group work. The method included student interviews, conversations with a critical friend, and the researcher's diary. The self-study allowed for fine-tuning theoretical understanding and…

  5. Intercollegiate Collaboration: Connecting Social Studies Preservice Teachers at Two Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburn, Jeremy; Maguth, Brad

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the collaboration between students in two social studies methods courses at different universities. The authors used technology to connect preservice teachers from teacher education programs that differ in terms of geography, size, and type of university. Using archived data from the courses, the authors found…

  6. Extraction of light filth from tofu: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, M J

    1993-01-01

    Results are reported for a collaborative study of a method for the extraction of light filth from tofu. A 100 g test portion is digested in HCl solution with Igepal CO-730 and Igepal DM-710. Hairs and insect fragments are isolated by wet-sieving on a No. 230 sieve, dispersing remaining residual product with Aerosol OT 75%, and filtering. Average recoveries by 9 collaborators for 3 spike levels of rat hairs (5, 10, 15) were 80, 78, and 84%, respectively; for 3 spike levels of insect fragments (5, 15, 30), recoveries were 97, 99, and 99%, respectively. The method was adopted first action by AOAC International. PMID:8448445

  7. Training Teachers for Virtual Collaboration: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the development of teachers' competences when trained in virtual collaboration. In order to do so, we analyse the data gathered from a group of nine in-service teachers who were trained in a forum and a wiki to become future telecollaborative teachers (TTs). During the course, participants worked in small groups and they…

  8. A Collaborative Problem-Solving Process through Environmental Field Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijung; Tan, Hoe Teck

    2013-01-01

    This study explored and documented students' responses to opportunities for collective knowledge building and collaboration in a problem-solving process within complex environmental challenges and pressing issues with various dimensions of knowledge and skills. Middle-school students ("n" =?16; age 14) and high-school students…

  9. E-Government Collaboration in the Swedish Public Sector : Multiple Studies on Collaboration Facilitators and Collaboration Modes

    OpenAIRE

    Lönn, Carl-Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Collaboration in the public sector is imperative to achieve e-government objectives such as improved efficiency and effectiveness of public administration and improved quality of public services. Collaboration across organizational and institutional boundaries requires public organizations to share e-government systems and services through for instance, interoperable information technology and processes. Demands on public organizations to become more open also require that public organization...

  10. Building Collaborative Health Promotion Partnerships: The Jackson Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifton C. Addison

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Building Collaborative Health Promotion Partnerships: The Jackson Heart Study. Background: Building a collaborative health promotion partnership that effectively employs principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR involves many dimensions. To ensure that changes would be long-lasting, it is imperative that partnerships be configured to include groups of diverse community representatives who can develop a vision for long-term change. This project sought to enumerate processes used by the Jackson Heart Study (JHS Community Outreach Center (CORC to create strong, viable partnerships that produce lasting change. Methods: JHS CORC joined with community representatives to initiate programs that evolved into comprehensive strategies for addressing health disparities and the high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD. This collaboration was made possible by first promoting an understanding of the need for combined effort, the desire to interact with other community partners, and the vision to establish an effective governance structure. Results: The partnership between JHS CORC and the community has empowered and inspired community members to provide leadership to other health promotion projects. Conclusion: Academic institutions must reach out to local community groups and together address local health issues that affect the community. When a community understands the need for change to respond to negative health conditions, formalizing this type of collaboration is a step in the right direction.

  11. Exploring residents’ spontaneous collaborative skills in a simulated setting context: an exploratory study on CanMEDS collaborator role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, Kathleen; Sabbagh, Robert; Bergeron, Linda; Mayer, Sandeep Kumar; St-Onge, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Background Collaboration is an important competence to be acquired by residents. Although improving residents’ collaboration via interprofessional education has been investigated in many studies, little is known about the residents’ spontaneous collaborative behavior. The purpose of this exploratory study was to describe how residents spontaneously collaborate. Methods Seven first-year residents (postgraduate year 1; three from family medicine and one each from ear, nose, and throat, obstetrics/gynecology, general surgery, and orthopedic surgery) participated in two collaborative meetings with actors performing the part of other health professionals (ie, occupational therapist, physiotherapist, nurse, or social worker). Both meetings were built around an issue or conflict with the patients’ families reported by one professional. The residents were required to lead the meeting to collect proper information to reach a joint decision. Two team members analyzed the video recordings of the meetings using an emerging-theme qualitative methodology. Results Although the residents spontaneously knew how to successfully communicate with other professionals, they seemed to struggle with the patient-centered approach and the shared decision-making process. Discussion Even if the residents performed communication-wise in their collaborative role, they seemed to have perceived themselves as decision makers instead of collaborators in the joint decision process. The results of this study can inform future studies on learning strategies to improve behaviors that would more likely need attention in interprofessional education. PMID:27524926

  12. A Collaboration Analysis Study of Food Chemistry Journal

    OpenAIRE

    Zan , Burcu Umut; Zan, Nuray

    2014-01-01

    In recent years in Turkey, it is identified that article production has increased in the subject category of “Food Science Technology”. Food Chemistry journal is determined to be the most preferred journal among Turkish authors. As a result of this determination, Food Chemistry journal was examined with bibliometric methods between the period of 2007-2012. This study focused on articles produced with collaboration. The co-authorship rate was found to be around 99% with a decrease in the nu...

  13. Framework for Human-Automation Collaboration: Conclusions from Four Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya L. Le Blanc; John O' Hara; Jeffrey C. Joe; April M. Whaley; Heather Medema

    2013-11-01

    The Human Automation Collaboration (HAC) research project is investigating how advanced technologies that are planned for Advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMR) will affect the performance and the reliability of the plant from a human factors and human performance perspective. The HAC research effort investigates the consequences of allocating functions between the operators and automated systems. More specifically, the research team is addressing how to best design the collaboration between the operators and the automated systems in a manner that has the greatest positive impact on overall plant performance and reliability. Oxstrand et al. (2013 - March) describes the efforts conducted by the researchers to identify the research needs for HAC. The research team reviewed the literature on HAC, developed a model of HAC, and identified gaps in the existing knowledge of human-automation collaboration. As described in Oxstrand et al. (2013 – June), the team then prioritized the research topics identified based on the specific needs in the context of AdvSMR. The prioritization was based on two sources of input: 1) The preliminary functions and tasks, and 2) The model of HAC. As a result, three analytical studies were planned and conduced; 1) Models of Teamwork, 2) Standardized HAC Performance Measurement Battery, and 3) Initiators and Triggering Conditions for Adaptive Automation. Additionally, one field study was also conducted at Idaho Falls Power.

  14. Challenges of Collaborative Governance; An Organizational Disocurse Study of Public Managers' Struggles with Collaboration in the Daycare Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plotnikof, Mie

    2015-01-01

    This doctoral study explores problematics of managing and organizing collaborative governance from an organizational discourse perspective. Collaborative governance is a public management practice developing currently to engage stakeholders in co-creating potential solutions to complex public...... issues of e.g. policy and service innovation. This is seen as a potential shift between new public management and new public governance discourses in the governance literature. But pursuing collaborative governance in practice is not taken to be easy; it involves changes from hierarchical organizing...... discourses, and c) design issues related to social dynamics and power relations. The study shows that public managers are challenged by the ways in which discursive constructions of collaborative governance create more and less (dis-)organized communicative practices concerning a shared problem. Thereby...

  15. QUEST-RA: quantitative clinical assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis seen in standard rheumatology care in 15 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Toloza, Sergio;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a cross-sectional review of non-selected consecutive outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as part of standard clinical care in 15 countries for an overview of the characteristics of patients with RA. METHODS: The review included current disease activity using data from...

  16. Collaborative Learning in a Boundary Zone: A Case Study of Innovative Inter-institutional Collaboration in Israel

    OpenAIRE

    Edith Tabak; Ilana Margolin

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on the collaboration between a school district and a college of education in Israel and aimed to explore how the participants created common understanding in order to promote educational change. The theoretical approach involved analyzing the institutional interconnections based on boundary practices and boundary objects and the ways these interconnections shaped the collaborative learning process, promoted educational change, and fostered educational leadership...

  17. Collaborative studies target volcanic hazards in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluth, Gregg J. S.; Rose, William I.

    Central America is the second-most consistently active volcanic zone on Earth, after Indonesia. Centuries of volcanic activity have produced a spectacular landscape of collapsed calderas, debris flows, and thick blankets of pyroclastic materials. Volcanic activity dominates the history, culture, and daily life of Central American countries.January 2002 marked the third consecutive year in which a diverse group of volcanologists and geophysicists conducted focused field studies in Central America. This type of multi-institutional collaboration reflects the growing involvement of a number of U.S. and non-U.S. universities, and of other organizations, in Guatemala and El Salvador (Table 1).

  18. Study on sawtooth and transport. A report of Japan-TEXTOR collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collaboration programme is initiated, in part of the Japan-TEXTOR collaboration, for the theoretical and experimental study on the sawtooth and anomalous transport. The summary of the workshop in 1994 is reported. (author)

  19. What Makes for Good Collaboration and Communication in Maternity Care? A Scoping Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helmond, L.; Korstjens, I.; Mesman, J.; Nieuwenhuijze, M.; Horstman, K.; Scheepers, H.; Spaanderman, M.; Keulen, J.; de Vries, R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Good communication and collaboration are critical to safe care for mothers and babies. OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with good collaboration and communication among maternity care professionals and between both professionals and parents. METHOD: Scoping study. We searched Pub

  20. Participation, Interaction and Social Presence: An Exploratory Study of Collaboration in Online Peer Review Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huahui; Sullivan, Kirk P. H.; Mellenius, Ingmarie

    2014-01-01

    A key reason for using asynchronous computer conferencing in instruction is its potential for supporting collaborative learning. However, few studies have examined collaboration in computer conferencing. This study examined collaboration in six peer review groups within an asynchronous computer conferencing. Eighteen tertiary students participated…

  1. QUEST-RA: quantitative clinical assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis seen in standard rheumatology care in 15 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Toloza, Sergio;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a cross-sectional review of non-selected consecutive outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as part of standard clinical care in 15 countries for an overview of the characteristics of patients with RA. METHODS: The review included current disease activity using data from......) within and between countries was graphically analysed. A median regression model was applied to analyse differences in disease activity between countries. RESULTS: Between January 2005 and October 2006, the QUEST-RA (Quantitative Patient Questionnaires in Standard Monitoring of Patients with Rheumatoid...... Arthritis) project included 4363 patients from 48 sites in 15 countries; 78% were female, >90% Caucasian, mean age was 57 years and mean disease duration was 11.5 years. More than 80% of patients had been treated with methotrexate in all but three countries. Overall, patients had an active disease...

  2. In EU – 15 countries, elasticity of income at female labors and Turkey: Critics – econometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Çiftçi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available All of the world, female employees earned money less than male. This revenue different between male and female cause to decrease working tendency of them. At an econometric analysis applied for EU – 15 countries, it is concluded that revenue level of difference between male and female effect rate of economic activity at female. Besides, as a result of estimation analysis in basic regression, it is concluded that elasticity of women labours income in Turkey is less than ones.

  3. Exploring Wider Well-Being in the EU-15 Countries: An Empirical Application of the Stiglitz Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonia, G.; Cracolici, M. F.; Cuffaro, M.

    2013-01-01

    We draw on the recommendations of the Stiglitz Report to select a set of economic and social variables that can be used to make cross-country comparisons of wider well-being. Using data for the EU-15 countries for 1999 and 2005, we show how three-way analysis can be used to extract synthetic information from a large data set to determine the main…

  4. Value Production in a Collaborative Environment. Sociophysical Studies of Wikipedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasseri, Taha; Kertész, János

    2013-05-01

    We review some recent endeavors and add some new results to characterize and understand underlying mechanisms in Wikipedia (WP), the paradigmatic example of collaborative value production. We analyzed the statistics of editorial activity in different languages and observed typical circadian and weekly patterns, which enabled us to estimate the geographical origins of contributions to WPs in languages spoken in several time zones. Using a recently introduced measure we showed that the editorial activities have intrinsic dependencies in the burstiness of events. A comparison of the English and Simple English WPs revealed important aspects of language complexity and showed how peer cooperation solved the task of enhancing readability. One of our focus issues was characterizing the conflicts or edit wars in WPs, which helped us to automatically filter out controversial pages. When studying the temporal evolution of the controversiality of such pages we identified typical patterns and classified conflicts accordingly. Our quantitative analysis provides the basis of modeling conflicts and their resolution in collaborative environments and contribute to the understanding of this issue, which becomes increasingly important with the development of information communication technology.

  5. Extraction of light filth from whole peppermint leaves: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boese, J; Nakashima, M; Glaze, L E

    1985-01-01

    Results are reported for a collaborative study of a method for the extraction of light filth from whole peppermint leaves. A 5 g sample is defatted with isopropanol in a simple reflux appartus. Rat hairs, insect fragments, and whole insects are isolated by wet sieving on a No. 230 sieve, a deaerating boil in 40% isopropanol solution, flotation with Tween 80-Na4EDTA (1 + 1) and mineral oil-heptane (85 + 15), and trappings in a Wildman trap flask. Average recoveries obtained by 6 collaborators for 3 spike levels of rat hairs (5, 10, 15) were 83.3, 87.5, and 82.2%, respectively. For whole insects (5, 10, 15) recoveries averaged 85.0, 80.0 and 77.2% respectively; for insect fragments (20, 30, 50) recoveries averaged 79.6, 88.3, and 84.8%, respectively. The average recoveries for the 3 levels of each analyte were not significantly different. The method has been adopted official first action. PMID:4030641

  6. COMMUNICATION SUPPORT FOR MOBILE COLLABORATIVE WORK: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    ROC MESSEGUER; ESUNLY MEDINA; Ochoa, Sergio F.; Pino, José A.; ANDRES NEYEM; LEANDRO NAVARRO; DOLORS ROYO

    2012-01-01

    Advances in mobile computing and wireless communication are easing the evolution from traditional nomadic work to computer-mediated mobile collaborative work. Technology allows efficient and effective interaction among mobile users and also provides access to shared resources available to them. However, the features and capabilities of the communication infrastructure supporting these activities influence the type of coordination and collaboration employed by mobile collaborative applications...

  7. A case study of collaborative facilities use in engineering design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroe, Laura M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe the use of visualization tools and facilities in the collaborative design of a replacement weapons system, the Reliable Replacement Warhead. We used not only standard collaboration methods but also a range of visualization software and facilities to bring together domain specialists from laboratories across the country to collaborate on the design and integrate this disparate input early in the design.

  8. A case study of collaborative facilities in engineering design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroe, Laura M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pugmire, David [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe the use of visualization tools and facilities in the collaborative design of a replacement weapons system, the Reliable Replacement Warhead (RRW). We used not only standard collaboration methods but also a range of visualization software and facilities to bring together domain specialists from laboratories across the country to collaborate on the design and integrate this disparate input early in the design. This was the first time in U.S. weapons history that a weapon had been designed in this collaborative manner. Benefits included projected cost savings, design improvements and increased understanding across the project.

  9. Exploring residents’ spontaneous collaborative skills in a simulated setting context: an exploratory study on CanMEDS collaborator role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouellet K

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen Ouellet,1 Robert Sabbagh,2 Linda Bergeron,3 Sandeep Kumar Mayer,2 Christina St-Onge4 1Center for Health Profession Education, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, 3Research Chair in Medical Education, Paul Grand’Maison of the Société des médecins, Université de Sherbrooke, 4Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada Background: Collaboration is an important competence to be acquired by residents. Although improving residents’ collaboration via interprofessional education has been investigated in many studies, little is known about the residents’ spontaneous collaborative behavior. The purpose of this exploratory study was to describe how residents spontaneously collaborate.Methods: Seven first-year residents (postgraduate year 1; three from family medicine and one each from ear, nose, and throat, obstetrics/gynecology, general surgery, and orthopedic surgery participated in two collaborative meetings with actors performing the part of other health ­professionals (ie, occupational therapist, physiotherapist, nurse, or social worker. Both meetings were built around an issue or conflict with the patients’ families reported by one professional. The residents were required to lead the meeting to collect proper information to reach a joint decision. Two team members analyzed the video recordings of the meetings using an emerging-theme qualitative methodology.Results: Although the residents spontaneously knew how to successfully communicate with other professionals, they seemed to struggle with the patient-centered approach and the shared decision-making process.Discussion: Even if the residents performed communication-wise in their collaborative role, they seemed to have perceived themselves as decision makers instead of

  10. An Interactive Zoo Guide: A Case Study of Collaborative Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Hao

    2010-01-01

    Real Industry Projects and team work can have a great impact on student learning but providing these activities requires significant commitment from academics. It requires several years planning implementing to create a collaborative learning environment that mimics the real world ICT (Information and Communication Technology) industry workplace. In this project, staff from all the three faculties, namely the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science, Faculty of Arts, Education and Human Development, and Faculty of Business and Law in higher education work together to establish a detailed project management plan and to develop the unit guidelines for participating students. The proposed project brings together students from business, multimedia and computer science degrees studying their three project-based units within each faculty to work on a relatively large IT project with our industry partner, Melbourne Zoo. This paper presents one multimedia software project accomplished by one of the multi-discipline...

  11. Extraction of light filth from ground nutmeg: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasher, J J

    1979-05-01

    The official method for extracting light filth from ground nutmeg, 44.116, gives variable recoveries of filth elements and results in large amounts of interfering plant material in the light filth extraction. A new method has been developed using a chloroform pretreatment for heavy filth followed by a water-40% isopropanol-mineral oil flotation of light filth. A comparison of the methods in the collaborative study showed a higher recovery of insect fragments, 90.6 vs. 65.2%, and of rodent hairs, 86.5 vs. 66.5%, for the new method over the present official first action method, 44.116. Frothing, an additional problem with the official method, has been reduced by the new method. The new method has been adopted as official first action to replace the existing method. PMID:573260

  12. Collaborative Learning in a Boundary Zone: A Case Study of Innovative Inter-institutional Collaboration in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Tabak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study focused on the collaboration between a school district and a college of education in Israel and aimed to explore how the participants created common understanding in order to promote educational change. The theoretical approach involved analyzing the institutional interconnections based on boundary practices and boundary objects and the ways these interconnections shaped the collaborative learning process, promoted educational change, and fostered educational leadership in the district and in the college. The study observed the formation of a community of practice within the boundary zone, which was developed over a three-year period by a group of 20 superintendents, the district head, and two teacher educators. Beyond concrete outcomes, such as improvement of pupils' scores on the state-mandated achievement tests, the study showed a transformation in the superintendents' perception of their roles and a cultural change in the district. 


Tabak, E. & Margolin, I. (2013. Collaborative Learning in a Boundary Zone: A Case Study of Innovative Inter-Institutional Collaboration in Israel. International Journal of Education Policy & Leadership 8(4. Retrieved from www.ijepl.org .

  13. The Flipped Classroom as a Tool for Engaging Discipline Faculty in Collaboration: A Case Study in Library-Business Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Madeline E.

    2016-01-01

    This case study focuses on an innovative approach to the flipped classroom as a tool for productive library-discipline faculty collaboration on information literacy instruction. The argument is presented that the flipped classroom can be a pathway into the disciplines that can be used in overcoming the disadvantages of the one-shot and other…

  14. Procedures and Collaborative Information Seeking: A Study of Emergency Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Reddy, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Information seeking is a central and inherently collaborative activity in the emergency department (ED) which is the common entry point to hospitals for nearly all acute patients. In this paper, we investigate how ED clinicians’ collabo-rative information seeking (CIS) is shaped by the procedures...

  15. UK-Russian collaboration high level waste immobilization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent social changes in Russia have opened up many opportunities for business collaboration. To build on this, in 1992 British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL) concluded and signed an agreement with the Russian ministry MINATOM to collaborate on a wide range of topics relevant to the international nuclear industry. These covered the such subjects as developing national regulatory frameworks, sharing operational experiences and practices, and establishing collaborative R and D programmes. One outcome of the agreement with MINATOM has been the setting up of a number of collaborative R and D projects with the V.G. Kholpin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg. This paper presents the results from one of these joint programmes, and describes the mutual benefits that can be obtained from such collaborative work. (authors)

  16. Differences That Make A Difference: A Study in Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchman, Stephanie

    Collaborative learning is a common teaching strategy in classrooms across age groups and content areas. It is important to measure and understand the cognitive process involved during collaboration to improve teaching methods involving interactive activities. This research attempted to answer the question: why do students learn more in collaborative settings? Using three measurement tools, 142 participants from seven different biology courses at a community college and at a university were tested before and after collaborating about the biological process of natural selection. Three factors were analyzed to measure their effect on learning at the individual level and the group level. The three factors were: difference in prior knowledge, sex and religious beliefs. Gender and religious beliefs both had a significant effect on post-test scores.

  17. Enhancing the student experience through effective collaboration: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Machin, Alison; Harding, Anne; Derbyshire, Julie

    2009-01-01

    In the United Kingdom (UK), closer integration of public services is challenging professionals to work more collaboratively within and across their organizational and professional boundaries (Great Britain DOH 2000; Great Britain DFES 2003). Reflecting a move to more significantly include librarians in educational collaboration (Schulte and Sherwill-Navarro 2009), this paper provides insight into the development of an innovative health curriculum in which academic staff, together with library...

  18. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice to Improve Patient Outcomes: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Styron; Catherine Dearman; Sheila Whitworth; Henrietta Brown

    2014-01-01

    This project focused on a pilot project implemented during the 2013-2014 academic year. The overall purpose was to facilitate interprofessional collaborative practice innovations through the development of leadership, core competencies, and the use of technology, especially among nurses. Nursing, medicine, and physician assistant students were educated on the IOM competencies for interprofessional teams and the core competencies identified by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expe...

  19. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice to Improve Patient Outcomes: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Styron

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This project focused on a pilot project implemented during the 2013-2014 academic year. The overall purpose was to facilitate interprofessional collaborative practice innovations through the development of leadership, core competencies, and the use of technology, especially among nurses. Nursing, medicine, and physician assistant students were educated on the IOM competencies for interprofessional teams and the core competencies identified by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel [1] to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to practice in the collaborative practice environments. The project addressed four goals: Develop faculty expertise and leadership in interprofessional collaborative practice to provide a current, high quality education to nursing, physician assistant, and medical students; Implement a culturally responsive and respectful collaborative interprofessional practice curriculum to prepare nurses, physician assistants, and medical students to deliver high quality, efficient, team-based care in a dynamically evolving environment; Focus interprofessional collaborative practice education on models and practices that lead to improvement in patient outcomes; and Evaluate the program and disseminate best practices. Findings from this pilot include strategies to engage different health professions' students and faculty, partnering with community agencies, building an effective interprofessional team to guide the project, and seeking funding for extension and expansion of the offerings.

  20. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice to Improve Patient Outcomes: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Styron

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This project focused on a pilot project implemented during the 2013-2014 academic year. The overall purpose was to facilitate interprofessional collaborative practice innovations through the development of leadership, core competencies, and the use of technology, especially among nurses. Nursing, medicine, and physician assistant students were educated on the IOM competencies for interprofessional teams and the core competencies identified by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel [1] to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to practice in the collaborative practice environments. The project addressed four goals: Develop faculty expertise and leadership in interprofessional collaborative practice to provide a current, high quality education to nursing, physician assistant, and medical students; Implement a culturally responsive and respectful collaborative interprofessional practice curriculum to prepare nurses, physician assistants, and medical students to deliver high quality, efficient, team-based care in a dynamically evolving environment; Focus interprofessional collaborative practice education on models and practices that lead to improvement in patient outcomes; and Evaluate the program and disseminate best practices. Findings from this pilot include strategies to engage different health professions' students and faculty, partnering with community agencies, building an effective interprofessional team to guide the project, and seeking funding for extension and expansion of the offerings.

  1. RF Cavities For The Muon and Neutrino Factory Collaboration Study

    CERN Document Server

    Moretti, A; Jurgens, T G; Qian, Z; Wu, V

    2000-01-01

    A multi-laboratory collaboration is studying the feasibility of building a muon collider, the first phase of which maybe a neutrino factory. The phase space occupied by the muons is very large and needs to be cooled several orders of magnitude for either machine, 100,000 to 1 million for the collider and ten to 100 for the factory. Ionization cooling is the base line method for muon cooling. This scheme uses hydrogen absorbers and rf re-acceleration in a long series of magnetic focusing channels to cool the muons. At Fermilab two rf cavity types are under study to provide the required cooling rf re-acceleration, a 805 MHz high gradient cavity for the collider and a 201 MHz high gradient cavity for the neutrino factory. The 805 MHz cavity currently under going cold testing is a non-periodic pi-mode cavity with the iris openings shaped to follow the contour of the beam. The 201 MHz cavity uses hollow thin metal tubes over the beam aperture to terminate the field in a pill-box type mode to increase its shunt imp...

  2. Learning and Teaching about Social Studies and Science: A Collaborative Self-Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Theodore; Bullock, Shawn Michael

    2014-01-01

    This collaborative self-study article explores experiences teaching a cross-curricular undergraduate course that aimed to integrate social studies and science. The course differs from other compulsory components of the teacher candidates' program of study in that it concentrates on disciplinary structure, as opposed to methods, and it treats…

  3. An Interactive Zoo Guide: A case Study of Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Shi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Real Industry Projects and team work can have a great impact on student learning but providing these activities requires significant commitment from academics. It requires several years planning implementing to create a collaborative learning environment that mimics the real world ICT (Information and Communication Technology industry workplace. In this project, staff from all the three faculties, namely the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science, Faculty of Arts, Education and Human Development, and Faculty of Business and Law in higher education work together to establish a detailed project management plan and to develop the unit guidelines for participating students. The proposed project brings together students from business, multimedia and computer science degrees studying their three project-based units within each faculty to work on a relatively large IT project with our industry partner, Melbourne Zoo. This paper presents one multimedia software project accomplished by one of the multi-discipline student project teams. The project was called ‘Interactive ZooOz Guide’ and developed on a GPS-enabled PDA device in 2007. The developed program allows its users to navigate through the Zoo via an interactive map and provides multimedia information of animals on hotspots at the ‘Big Cats’ section of the Zoo so that it enriches user experience at the Zoo. A recent development in zoo applications is also reviewed. This paper is also intended to encourage academia to break boundaries to enhance students’ learning beyond classroom.

  4. An Interactive Zoo Guide: A Case Study of Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Shi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Real Industry Projects and team work can have a great impact on student learning but providing theseactivities requires significant commitment from academics. It requires several years planningimplementing to create a collaborative learning environment that mimics the real world ICT (Informationand Communication Technology industry workplace. In this project, staff from all the three faculties,namely the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science, Faculty of Arts, Education and HumanDevelopment, and Faculty of Business and Law in higher education work together to establish a detailedproject management plan and to develop the unit guidelines for participating students. The proposedproject brings together students from business, multimedia and computer science degrees studying theirthree project-based units within each faculty to work on a relatively large IT project with our industrypartner, Melbourne Zoo. This paper presents one multimedia software project accomplished by one of themulti-discipline student project teams. The project was called ‘Interactive ZooOz Guide’ and developedon a GPS-enabled PDA device in 2007. The developed program allows its users to navigate through theZoo via an interactive map and provides multimedia information of animals on hotspots at the ‘Big Cats’section of the Zoo so that it enriches user experience at the Zoo. A recent development in zoo applicationsis also reviewed. This paper is also intended to encourage academia to break boundaries to enhancestudents’ learning beyond classroom.

  5. Extraction of light filth from tea: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, F F; Barnett, J; Bright, A; Chaput, M P; Cox, C; Floyd, D M; Gentry, J; Thrasher, J; Washbon, E C

    1981-03-01

    The present AOAC method for determining insect and rodent filth in tea is time-consuming because it produced filter papers which are heavy in plant residue and therefore required long paper-reading times. A new method for the analysis of light filth in tea was developed to remedy existing problems and to improve recoveries. The method consists of the following steps: sample preparation, wet sieving, dilution with 40% isopropanol, flotation with mineral oil-heptane, and trapping off in a Wildman trap flask. In an interlaboratory collaborative study, analysts reported combined insect fragment recoveries of 99.2% for the proposed method and 93.0% for the AOAC method; the same analysts recorded combined rodent hair recoveries of 92.2% for the proposed method and 47.6% for the official method. Average times for reading individual subsamples were 9 min for the proposed method and 27 min for AOAC method. the proposed method has been adopted official first action. PMID:7228825

  6. Labour Market Performance Differentials and Dynamics in EU-15 Countries and Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Perugini

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to contribute to empirical analysis of the differentials, dynamics and determinants of labour market performance in EU-15. One innovation of the paper reflects our decision not to use a single indicator of labour market performance, but to adopt three variables: employment rate, unemployment rate, and long-term unemployment rate. In addition to national data (1997-2006, the use of data at regional NUTS-2 level (1999-2005 is a key characteristic of this study. Empirical analyses are carried out by means of various comparative statistics and econometric approaches. In the latter, a large set of explicative variables is applied to examine the potential determinants of regional (unemployment levels and dynamics.

  7. Study of the ship design process model for collaborative design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The ship design process model is the basis for developing the ship collaborative design system under network environment.According to the characteristics of the ship design, a method for dividing the ship design process into three layers is pat forward, that is project layer, design task layer and design activity layer, then the formalized definitions of the ship design process model, the decomposing principles of the ship design process and the architecture of the ship collaborative design (SDPM) system are presented. This method simplifies the activity network, makes the optimization and adjustment of the design plan convenient and also makes the design process easier to control and change, at last the architecture of the ship collaborative design system is discussed.

  8. STUDY ON CONFLICT MANAGEMENT FOR COLLABORATIVE DESIGN SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Modern-day products are usually designed cooperatively by groups of experts, each with his own areas of expertise. Because of different viewpoint, evaluation standard and domain knowledge of these design groups in collaborative design system, conflict is unavoidable. In this paper, an integration conflict management system (ICMS) was presented from the aspect of all life cycle. A hierarchical constraint network was introduced to detect the conflicts. Three conflict types were classified in ICMS and different type of conflict was submitted to different resolution strategy, constraint relaxation to data conflict and knowlegdge based reasoning to knowledge conflict or schema conflict. To those conflicts hard to be resolved with the above two strategies, an arbitration was used for the conflict resolution. ICMS also provided interface with other collaborative systems such as CAE, CAD to improve the efficiency of collaborative design system.

  9. The study of multi-institutional collaborations in high-energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnow-Blewett, Joan

    1991-01-01

    Since World War II, the organizational framework for scientific research is increasingly the multi-institutional collaboration, especially in high-energy physics. A broad preliminary survey, into the functioning of research collaborations involving three or more institutions is described. The study is designed to identify patterns of collaborations, define the scope of the documentation problems, field-test possible solutions, recommend future actions, and build an archives of oral history interviews and other resources for scholarly use. Once the study is completed, its findings will be used to promote systems to document significant collaborative research.

  10. The study of multi-institutional collaborations in high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since World War II, the organizational framework for scientific research is increasingly the multi-institutional collaboration, especially in high-energy physics. A broad preliminary survey, into the functioning of research collaborations involving three or more institutions is described. The study is designed to identify patterns of collaborations, define the scope of the documentation problems, field-test possible solutions, recommend future actions, and build an archives of oral history interviews and other resources for scholarly use. Once the study is completed, its findings will be used to promote systems to document significant collaborative research

  11. A case study on collaboration within multidisciplinary teamwork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dederichs, Anne; Karlshøj, Jan; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2010-01-01

    . This calls for employees who are experienced in collaborating in interdisciplinary teams. To fulfil this demand a multidisciplinary course in “Advanced building design” has been developed at the Technical University of Denmark. The goal of the course is to provide training in transprofessionalism and...... teamwork at the final stage of the engineering education. The course was held by a multidisciplinary team of teachers for 9 multidisciplinary teams of students. The team of teachers and the student teams had similar working conditions. These teams were subject of investigation on collaboration and...

  12. Global Teamwork: A Study of Design Learning in Collaborative Virtual Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Gül, Leman Figen; Wang, Xiangyu; Bülbül, Tanyel Türkaslan; Çağdaş, Gülen; Tong, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    With the recent developments in communication and information technologies, using Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVEs) in design activity has experienced a remarkable increase. In this paper we present a collaborative learning activity between the University of Sydney (USYD), and the Istanbul Technical University (ITU). This paper shares our teaching experience and discusses the principles of collaborative design learning in virtual environments. Followed by a study on students’ percepti...

  13. A Study of Synchronous versus Asynchronous Collaboration in an Online Business Writing Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrito, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A case study examined the collaborative experiences of students in an online business writing classroom. The purpose was to examine the same groups of students working on collaborative writing assignments in both a synchronous (real-time) and an asynchronous (non-real-time) discussion forum. This study focused on examining the amount, pattern, and…

  14. Case Study: Parramore. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  15. Case Study: Chicago. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  16. Case Study: Nashville. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  17. Case Study: Philadelphia. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  18. Teaching scientific literacy in an introductory women's studies course: a case study in interdisciplinary collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuselier, Linda; Murphy, Claudia; Bender, Anita; Creel Falcón, Kandace

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose:The purpose of this exploratory case study is to describe how scholars negotiated disciplinary divides to develop and communicate to their students an understanding of the basic features of scientific knowledge. Our goals were to examine boundary crossing in interdisciplinary collaboration and to assess the efficacy of adding science content to an introductory Women's Studies course. Sample:We studied a collaboration between faculty in Biology and Women's Studies and evaluated science modules in a Women's Studies course at a regional four-year university in the Midwestern USA. The study included 186 student participants over three semesters and four faculty from Philosophy, Women's Studies and Biology. Design and method:Women's Studies and Biology faculty collaborated to design and implement science content learning modules that included the case of women and science in an introductory Women's Studies course. Qualitative data collected from faculty participants in the form of peer debrief sessions and narrative reflections were used to examine the process of interdisciplinary collaboration. Students exposed to curriculum changes were administered pre- and post-lesson surveys to evaluate their understanding of issues faced by women in science careers, the nature of science, and interest in science studies. Data from collaborators, student journal reflections, and pre-/post-lesson surveys were considered together in an evaluation of how knowledge of science was understood and taught in a Women's Studies course over a longitudinal study of three semesters. Results:We found evidence of discipline-based challenges to interdisciplinarity and disciplinary boundary crossing among collaborators. Three themes emerged from our collaboration: challenges posed by disciplinary differences, creation of a space for interdisciplinary work, and evidence of boundary crossing. Student participants exhibited more prior knowledge of Women's Studies content than

  19. An Experimental Study of Satisfaction Response: Evaluation of Online Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xusen; Wang, Xueyin; Huang, Jianqing; Zarifis, Alex

    2016-01-01

    On the one hand, a growing amount of research discusses support for improving online collaborative learning quality, and many indicators are focused to assess its success. On the other hand, thinkLets for designing reputable and valuable collaborative processes have been developed for more than ten years. However, few studies try to apply…

  20. Promoting College Student Development through Collaborative Learning: A Case Study of "Hevruta"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergom, Inger; Wright, Mary C.; Brown, Marie Kendall; Brooks, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Much has been written about the benefits of collaborative learning in terms of its impact on interpersonal skills and academic achievement. Many education studies suggest that students learn better when they work interactively with others and that retention of material is improved through collaborative learning. Others explain that the development…

  1. Orientations to Academic Development: Lessons from a Collaborative Study at a Research-Led University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, Brenda; Cilliers, Francois; du Plessis, Jacob; Kafaar, Zuhayr; Van der Merwe, Antoinette; Viljoen, Shaun; Young, Gert

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on a collaborative teaching enhancement project at a research-led university, within the context of a focus on the first-year experience. It demonstrates the kind of influence which a combination of managerial and collegial approaches can have on the collaboration. It illustrates the importance of working with a conscious…

  2. University-Industry Collaboration, Knowledge Management and Enterprise Innovation Performance: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Wei, Shiyang

    2008-01-01

    This empirical study is concerned with university-industry collaboration from a knowledge management perspective. The authors introduce the concepts of "enterprise-level core elements" to define the principle status of an enterprise during university-industry collaboration, and "network embeddedness" as an indication of the closeness of the…

  3. An Interactive Zoo Guide: A Case Study of Collaborative Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Shi

    2010-01-01

    Real Industry Projects and team work can have a great impact on student learning but providing these activities requires significant commitment from academics. It requires several years planning implementing to create a collaborative learning environment that mimics the real world ICT (Information and Communication Technology) industry workplace. In this project, staff from all the three faculties, namely the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science, Faculty of Arts, Education and Human ...

  4. Collaboration and E-collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding student’s perception of collaboration and how collaboration is supported by ICT is important for its efficient use in the classroom. This article aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and how they use new technologies in collaborative group work. Furthermore......, it tries to measure the impact of technology on students’ satisfaction with collaboration outcomes. In particular, the study aims to address the following research questions: Which demographic information (e.g. gender and place of origin) is significant for collaboration and ecollaboration? and Which...... are the perceived factors that influence the students’ group performance? The findings of this study emphasize that there are gender and cultural differences with respect to the perception of e-collaboration. Furthermore, the article summarizes in a model the most significant factors influencing group performance....

  5. Collaborative M-Learning Adoption Model: A Case Study for Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Alnabhan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates university students’ acceptance and readiness for adopting collaborative and context-aware mobile learning services. An acceptance evaluation study was conducted to identify challenges affecting successful implementation and adoption of collaborative m-learning system. The acceptance study has focused on learning contextual factors and learners requirements available at developing countries, where Jordan was considered as the case of this research. Results have confirmed that learning style, mobile device capability and perceived ease of use are having the most positive contribution towards learners’ behavior to use collaborative m-learning services. In light of the achieved results, this work provides a new user acceptance model focused toward the adoption of collaborative m-learning services. Finally, this research draws fundamental recommendations allowing for learning context adaptation and successful collaborative m-learning services implementation.

  6. AIP study of multi-institutional collaborations: Phase 1, high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the multi-institutional collaboration is increasingly the organizational framework for scientific research, it has received only incidental attention from scholars. Without a dedicated effort to understand the process of collaborative research, even the records necessary for efficient administration, for historical and: studies, and for posterity, will be largely scattered or destroyed. The Center for History of Physics of the American Institute of Physics (AIP) is working to redress this situation with a multi-stage investigation. The aim is to identify patterns of collaborations, define the scope of the documentation problems, field test possible solutions, and recommend future actions. The first phase of the study addressed high-energy physics. The two-year study of high-energy physics research focused on experiments approved between 1973 and 1984 at five of the world's major accelerator laboratories. A broad-scale picture of changes in the structure of collaborations was obtained by using databases on high energy physics experiments and publications, At a more detailed level, the project conducted interviews on 24 selected experimental collaborations. Still more detailed ''probes'' of some highly significant collaborations featured historical research as well as many additional interviews and work to preserve records. Some 300 interviews were analyzed to identify patterns of collaborative research and records creation, retention, and location. Meanwhile project staff surveyed the records-keeping practices of key physicists and made numerous site visits to accelerator facilities and university archives to discuss archival issues and records policies

  7. A Virtual Collaborative Environment for Mars Surveyor Landing Site Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, V. C.; Deardorff, D. G.; Briggs, G. A.; Hand, K. P.; Sandstrom, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    Over the past year and a half, the Center for Mars Exploration (CMEX) at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) has been working with the Mars Surveyor Project Office at JPL to promote interactions among the planetary community and to coordinate landing site activities for the Mars Surveyor Project Office. To date, CMEX has been responsible for organizing the first two Mars Surveyor Landing Site workshops, web-archiving resulting information from these workshops, aiding in science evaluations of candidate landing sites, and serving as a liaison between the community and the Project. Most recently, CMEX has also been working with information technologists at Ames to develop a state-of-the-art collaborative web site environment to foster interaction of interested members of the planetary community with the Mars Surveyor Program and the Project Office. The web site will continue to evolve over the next several years as new tools and features are added to support the ongoing Mars Surveyor missions.

  8. Interdisciplinary Collaboration through Designing 3D Simulation Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Bai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Interdisciplinary collaboration is essential for the advance of research. As domain subjects become more and more specialized, researchers need to cross disciplines for insights from peers in other areas to have a broader and deeper understand of a topic at micro- and macro-levels. We developed a 3D virtual learning environment that served as a platform for faculty to plan curriculum, share educational beliefs,and conduct cross-discipline research for effective learning. Based upon the scripts designed by facultyfrom five disciplines, virtual doctors, nurses, or patients interact in a 3D virtual hospital. The teaching vignettes were then converted to video clips, allowing users to view, pause, replay, or comment on the videos individually or in groups. Unlike many existing platforms, we anticipated a value-added by adding a social networking capacity to this virtual environment. The focus of this paper is on the cost-efficiency and system design of the virtual learning environment.

  9. Interdisciplinary Collaboration through Designing 3D Simulation Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Bai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Interdisciplinary collaboration is essential for the advance of research. As domain subjects become more and more specialized, researchers need to cross disciplines for insights from peers in other areas to have a broader and deeper understand of a topic at micro- and macro-levels. We developed a 3D virtual learning environment that served as a platform for faculty to plan curriculum, share educational beliefs, and conduct cross-discipline research for effective learning. Based upon the scripts designed by faculty from five disciplines, virtual doctors, nurses, or patients interact in a 3D virtual hospital. The teaching vignettes were then converted to video clips, allowing users to view, pause, replay, or comment on the videos individually or in groups. Unlike many existing platforms, we anticipated a value-added by adding a social networking capacity to this virtual environment. The focus of this paper is on the cost-efficiency and system design of the virtual learning environment.

  10. Extraction of light filth from ground allspice: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, R G

    1980-11-01

    The present official AOAC method (44.120(a)(b), 13th Ed.) for extracting light filth from ground allspice uses flammable solvents and gives poor filth recoveries. An improved method has been developed which uses a single pretreatment with 40% isopropanol and hydrochloric acid followed by wet sieving. After deaeration by boiling, the light filth is extracted from 40% isopropanol-Tween 80-tetrasodium EDTA with light mineral oil. Reports from all 6 collaborators showed that the proposed method resulted in 90 and 89% average recoveries of rodent hairs and insect fragments, respectively. The proposed method is recommended for adoption as official first action to replace AOAC (44.120(a)(b)) for allspice. PMID:7451389

  11. Interdisciplinary Collaboration through Designing 3D Simulation Case Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Xin; 10.5121/ijma.2011.3109

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary collaboration is essential for the advance of research. As domain subjects become more and more specialized, researchers need to cross disciplines for insights from peers in other areas to have a broader and deeper understand of a topic at micro- and macro-levels. We developed a 3D virtual learning environment that served as a platform for faculty to plan curriculum, share educational beliefs, and conduct cross-discipline research for effective learning. Based upon the scripts designed by faculty from five disciplines, virtual doctors, nurses, or patients interact in a 3D virtual hospital. The teaching vignettes were then converted to video clips, allowing users to view, pause, replay, or comment on the videos individually or in groups. Unlike many existing platforms, we anticipated a value-added by adding a social networking capacity to this virtual environment. The focus of this paper is on the cost-efficiency and system design of the virtual learning environment.

  12. Using co-inquiry to study co-inquiry : community-university perspectives on research collaboration.

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, Sarah; Armstrong, Andrea; Booth, Mark; Brown, Greg; Carter, Kathleen; Clarkson, Maurice; Corner, Lynne; Genus, Audley; Gilroy, Rose; Henfrey, Tom; Hudson, Kate; Jenner, Anna; Moss, Robert,; Roddy, Dermot; Russell, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In the context of a rapid development of interest in community-university research partnerships, this article argues for a greater focus on collaborative reflexivity to enhance learning from the research process and contribute toward developing sustainable and ethical research collaborations. Incorporating perspectives of community and university participants, the article offers a case study analysis of a UK-based co-inquiry action research group. This group not only studied examples of commu...

  13. Collaborative M-Learning Adoption Model: A Case Study for Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Alnabhan; Yousef Aljaraideh

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates university students’ acceptance and readiness for adopting collaborative and context-aware mobile learning services. An acceptance evaluation study was conducted to identify challenges affecting successful implementation and adoption of collaborative m-learning system. The acceptance study has focused on learning contextual factors and learners requirements available at developing countries, where Jordan was considered as the case of this research. Results have confirme...

  14. Creating a collaborative ESL classroom through teacher leadership : a case study in Guizhou Province, China

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Li

    2016-01-01

    This research looks into collaborative learning with teacher leadership in the ESL classroom of Guizhou, China. The phenomenon, purpose, research methods, main results and conclusions of the study are provided in the abstract. Under the phenomenon of New High School Curriculum Reform Program in China in 2004, all Chinese schools are trying new teaching methods to improve students’ English level. The purpose of the study is getting a better understanding of collaborative learning with teach...

  15. Study of collaborative management of supply chain in an IT environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Ding

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper identifies collaborative management of supply chain in an IT environment as the object of study. It offers discussion on the current situation and future development of supply chain management, the basic theories of supply chain management, and the comparison between the features of centralized management and collaborative management in an IT environment. It also points out the features and advantages of collaborative management of supply chain in an IT environment. Methodology: By way of analyzing the future development of supply chain management, this paper analyzes the advantages of collaborative management over centralized management. It also explores its implications and its requirements of interaction between onstage and backstage platforms. Findings: This paper lists the seven prominent features of collaborative management of supply chain in an IT environment, including being Internet-based, virtual, interrelated, and so on. In addition, it points out its advantages, such as collaborative decision-making, system-orientation, the establishment of a new cooperative relationship, etc. Application and limitations: This paper is an attempt to call on enterprises to update their current supply management system to collaborative management of supply chain in an IT environment. In this way, they can be more competitive in terms of supply chain. But this paper focuses only on its advantages and does not offer suggestions as to how to establish such a system.

  16. ‘You should collaborate, children’: A study of teachers’ design and facilitation of children’s collaboration around touchscreens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob; Vanderlinde, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Touchscreens are being integrated into classrooms to support collaborative learning, yet little empirical evidence has been presented regarding how children collaborate using touchscreens in classrooms. In particular, minimal research has been directed towards how teachers can design for and guide...... 2nd-grade children and three teachers from two classrooms participated. The cases are based on ethnographic field data and 150 hours of video footage of natural occurring interaction in classroom settings. The ethnographic field data and video footage are examined using a collaboration model...... and embodied interaction analysis. Each case presents features of the subtle processes of children’s collaboration around touchscreens and teachers’ role in designing and guiding such collaboration. Thus, this article illustrates teachers and children’s situated processes of integrating touchscreens...

  17. Binational collaboration to study Gulf of Mexico's harmful algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Inia; Hu, Chuanmin; Steidinger, Karen; Muller-Karger, Frank; Cannizzaro, Jennifer; Wolny, Jennifer; Cerdeira-Estrada, Sergio; Santamaria-del-Angel, Eduardo; Tafoya-del-Angel, Fausto; Alvarez-Torres, Porfirio; Herrera Silveira, Jorge; Allen, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis cause massive fish kills and other public health and economic problems in coastal waters throughout the Gulf of Mexico [Steidinger, 2009]. These harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a gulf-wide problem that require a synoptic observing system for better serving decision-making needs. The major nutrient sources that initiate and maintain these HABs and the possible connectivity of blooms in different locations are important questions being addressed through new collaborations between Mexican and U.S. researchers and government institutions. These efforts were originally organized under the U.S./Mexico binational partnership for the HABs Observing System (HABSOS), led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Gulf of Mexico Program (EPAGMP) and several agencies in Veracruz, Mexico, since 2006. In 2010 these efforts were expanded to include other Mexican states and institutions with the integrated assessment and management of the Gulf of Mexico Large Marine Ecosystem (GoMLME) program sponsored by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), the Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (SEMARNAT), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  18. The MSFC Collaborative Engineering Process for Preliminary Design and Concept Definition Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulqueen, Jack; Jones, David; Hopkins, Randy

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative engineering process developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center's Advanced Concepts Office for performing rapid preliminary design and mission concept definition studies for potential future NASA missions. The process has been developed and demonstrated for a broad range of mission studies including human space exploration missions, space transportation system studies and in-space science missions. The paper will describe the design team structure and specialized analytical tools that have been developed to enable a unique rapid design process. The collaborative engineering process consists of integrated analysis approach for mission definition, vehicle definition and system engineering. The relevance of the collaborative process elements to the standard NASA NPR 7120.1 system engineering process will be demonstrated. The study definition process flow for each study discipline will be will be outlined beginning with the study planning process, followed by definition of ground rules and assumptions, definition of study trades, mission analysis and subsystem analyses leading to a standardized set of mission concept study products. The flexibility of the collaborative engineering design process to accommodate a wide range of study objectives from technology definition and requirements definition to preliminary design studies will be addressed. The paper will also describe the applicability of the collaborative engineering process to include an integrated systems analysis approach for evaluating the functional requirements of evolving system technologies and capabilities needed to meet the needs of future NASA programs.

  19. Applying the ecological Shannon′s diversity index to measure research collaboration based on coauthorship: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Voutilainen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to test the usefulness of a slightly modified Shannon's diversity index (H as a numerical measure of intragroup research collaboration diversity based on coauthorship. Altogether, 527 peer-reviewed scientific papers by two university departments were used as the study material. Nonrandom rationalized sampling was executed to enable the confirmation of the authors' affiliations. The smallest unit of collaboration, i.e., a pair of authors, was created by matching every author with each of the coauthors from the same department he or she collaborated with. H was calculated at the department level and compared with the previously published, coauthorship based measures of research collaboration: The collaborative index (CI, degree of collaboration (DC and collaboration diversity index (CDI. Obviously, H expressed a different aspect of research collaboration than the existing indexes. Compared to CI, DC, and CDI, H revealed novel aspects of collaboration when the abundance of collaboration increased and the distribution of collaborative relations between coauthors moved closer to the uniform distribution at the same time. H can provide additional information about collaborative relationships between researchers based on coauthorship, and it should be considered as a partial indicator of research collaboration.

  20. Impact of Collaboration and Coordination among E-Government: A Case Study of Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mousa Odat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Electronic government (E-Government is massive project uses the information and communication technologies (ICTs to become more efficient and effective of government, facilitate more accessible government services, and make government more accountable to citizens. There are a range of challenges, difficulties, and problems facing the implementation of E-Government project, and to be optimistic, there is a range of opportunities that can be invested and built upon. One of the major challenges facing the implementation of e-government is the issue of collaboration and coordination between the state organizations themselves. This paper aims to highlighting the level of collaboration and coordination between the various government agencies specific in development of computerized systems, in other word, we try to answer the following question; does collaboration between public sector organizations exist? Jordan E-Government our case study, we will discuss in detail the impact of collaboration and coordination between Information Technology Departments/Directorate (ITD among government sector.

  1. Basic model study on efficiency evaluation in collaborative design work process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Qiu; YANG Yu; LI Xiaoli; ZHAO Ningyu

    2007-01-01

    During the efficiency evaluation process of collaborative design work,because of the lack of efficiency evaluation models,a basic analytical model for collaborative design work efficiency evaluation is proposed in this paper.First,the characteristics of the networked collaborative design system work process were studied; then,in accordance with those characteristics,a basic analytical model is created.This model,which is built for centralized collaborative design work,includes an analytical frame,a process view model,a function view model and an information view model.Finally,the application process and steps of this basic analytical model are elaborated when used for efficiency evaluation through an experiment.

  2. Diagnosis of sustainable collaboration in health promotion – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Sar Rosalie

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaborations are important to health promotion in addressing multi-party problems. Interest in collaborative processes in health promotion is rising, but still lacks monitoring instruments. The authors developed the DIagnosis of Sustainable Collaboration (DISC model to enable comprehensive monitoring of public health collaboratives. The model focuses on opportunities and impediments for collaborative change, based on evidence from interorganizational collaboration, organizational behavior and planned organizational change. To illustrate and assess the DISC-model, the 2003/2004 application of the model to the Dutch whole-school health promotion collaboration is described. Methods The study combined quantitative research, using a cross-sectional survey, with qualitative research using the personal interview methodology and document analysis. A DISC-based survey was sent to 55 stakeholders in whole-school health promotion in one Dutch region. The survey consisted of 22 scales with 3 to 8 items. Only scales with a reliability score of 0.60 were accepted. The analysis provided for comparisons between stakeholders from education, public service and public health. The survey was followed by approaching 14 stakeholders for a semi-structured DISC-based interview. As the interviews were timed after the survey, the interviews were used to clarify unexpected and unclear outcomes of the survey as well. Additionally, a DISC-based document analysis was conducted including minutes of meetings, project descriptions and correspondence with schools and municipalities. Results Response of the survey was 77% and of the interviews 86%. Significant differences between respondents of different domains were found for the following scales: organizational characteristics scale, the change strategies, network development, project management, willingness to commit and innovative actions and adaptations. The interviews provided a more specific picture

  3. Assessing Learners' Perceived Readiness for Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL): A Study on Initial Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yao; So, Hyo-Jeong; Toh, Yancy

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to develop an instrument that assesses university students' perceived readiness for computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Assessment in CSCL research had predominantly focused on measuring "after-collaboration" outcomes and "during-collaboration" behaviors while…

  4. Ionizing radiation and risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the 15-country study of nuclear industry workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrijheid, Martine; Cardis, Elisabeth; Ashmore, Patrick;

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to other types of leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has long been regarded as non-radiogenic, i.e. not caused by ionizing radiation. However, the justification for this view has been challenged. We therefore report on the relationship between CLL mortality and external ioni......; an extended follow-up of the cohorts is merited and would ideally include incident cancer cases....

  5. Basic Personal Values Underlie and Give Coherence to Political Values: A Cross National Study in 15 Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, S.H.; Caprara, G. V.; Vecchione, M.; Bain, P.; G. Bianchi; Caprara, M G; Cieciuch, J.; Kirmanoglu, H.; Baslevent, C.; Lönnqvist, J. E.; Mamali, C.; Manzi, J.; Pavlopoulos, V.; Posnova, T.; Schoen, H.

    2013-01-01

    Do the political values of the general public form a coherent system? What might be the source of coherence? We view political values as expressions, in the political domain, of more basic personal values. Basic personal values (e.g., security, achievement, benevolence, hedonism) are organized on a circular continuum that reflects their conflicting and compatible motivations. We theorize that this circular motivational structure also gives coherence to political values. We assess this theoriz...

  6. Implementing Japanese Lesson Study: An Example of Teacher-Researcher Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Susie; Doig, Brian; Widjaja, Wanty; Garner, David; Palmer, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    There is growing worldwide interest in Japanese lesson study as a model for professional learning, with large-scale adaptations of lesson study taking place in many countries. This paper describes how teachers and researchers collaborated in a lesson study project carried out in three Victorian schools. It describes Japanese lesson study and the…

  7. The learning teacher in a collaborative lesson study team within the context of mathematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goei, Sui Lin; Verhoef, Nellie

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises results of two studies on teachers’ learning when participating in a collaborative Lesson Study team within the context of mathematics teaching. In study one, Lesson Study was used in the classic way of preparing, designing, executing and reflecting on the research lesson. Teac

  8. Collaboration with general practitioners: preferences of medical specialists – a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaets Joris PJ

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaboration between general practitioners (GPs and specialists has been the focus of many collaborative care projects during the past decade. Unfortunately, quite a number of these projects failed. This raises the question of what motivates medical specialists to initiate and continue participating with GPs in new collaborative care models. The following question is addressed in this study: What motivates medical specialists to initiate and sustain new models for collaborating with GPs? Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with eighteen medical specialists in the province of Groningen, in the North of The Netherlands. The sampling criteria were age, gender, type of hospital in which they were practicing, and specialty. The interviews were recorded, fully transcribed, and analysed by three researchers working independently. The resulting motivational factors were grouped into categories. Results 'Teaching GPs' and 'regulating patient flow' (referrals appeared to dominate when the motivational factors were considered. In addition, specialists want to develop relationships with the GPs on a more personal level. Most specialists believe that there is not much they can learn from GPs. 'Lack of time', 'no financial compensation', and 'no support from colleagues' were considered to be the main concerns to establishing collaborative care practices. Additionally, projects were often experienced as too complex and time consuming whereas guidelines were experienced as too restrictive. Conclusion Specialists are particularly interested in collaborating because the GP is the gatekeeper for access to secondary health care resources. Specialists feel that they are able to teach the GPs something, but they do not feel that they have anything to learn from the GPs. With respect to professional expertise, therefore, specialists do not consider GPs as equals. Once personal relationships with the GPs have been established, an

  9. Age and cystatin C in healthy adults : a collaborative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odden, Michelle C.; Tager, Ira B.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Katz, Ronit; Fried, Linda F.; Newman, Anne B.; Canada, Robert B.; Harris, Tamara; Sarnak, Mark J.; Siscovick, David; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Methods. The authors pooled individual-level cross-sectional data from 18 253 persons aged 28-100 years in four studies: the Cardiovascular Health Study; the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study; the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-Stage Disease

  10. Collaborative Learning in Multicultural Classrooms: A Case Study of Dutch Senior Secondary Vocational Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielman, Kennedy; den Brok, Perry; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Vallejo, Bertha

    2012-01-01

    This research presents a descriptive study regarding collaborative learning in a multicultural classroom at a vocational education school in The Netherlands. The study bridges two domains of research: research on culturally diverse learning environments--which has mostly concerned primary and general secondary education--and studies on…

  11. Second collaborative study on analysis of bacteriophages in bathing waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooijman KA; Ghameshlou Z; Bahar M; Havelaar AH; MGB

    1999-01-01

    Het tweede internationale ringonderzoek met bacteriofagen in zwemwater werd in maart 1998 georganiseerd. Vijftien Europese laboratoria (inclusief het organiserende laboratorium) namen deel aan de studie. De studie bestond uit twee delen: (1) Analyse van natuurlijk besmette standaard monsters for d

  12. Collaborative study of an anion exchange method for the determination of trace plutonium in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single-laboratory evaluation and an interlaboratory collaborative study were made of a method for determining plutonium in water. The method was written for the analysis of one-liter samples and involves coprecipitation, acid dissolution, anion exchange, electrodeposition, and alpha pulse height analysis. After the single-laboratory evaluation of the selected method, four samples were prepared for the collaborative study: two river-water samples, a substitute ocean water sample, and sample containing sediment. These samples contained plutonium-239 and plutonium-238 at concentrations ranging from 0.42 to 28.9 dis/min/liter. In the collaborative study standard deviations of plutonium concentrations ranged from 5 to 13%. In three cases, standard deviations agreed with those expected from counting statistics. It is believed that hydrolysis occurred in the river water samples resulting in errors greater than those expected from counting statistics

  13. A framework for effective collaboration: a case study of collaboration in nursing education in the Western Cape, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Felicity M; Khanyile, Thembisile D

    2013-09-01

    A fundamental purpose of mergers between higher education institutions (HEIs) in 2002 was to enable sharing of scarce resources between more advanced universities and those historically disadvantaged by the apartheid system of the South African Government. A common teaching platform for undergraduate nursing education in the Western Cape was established in 2005, in line with the transformation of the higher education system, as a collaborative initiative between three universities. In order to evaluate the common teaching platform, Stuffelbeam's context, input, process, product (CIPP) research model was employed. A sample of 108 participants was selected through stratified purposive sampling, and included three deputy vice-chancellors, three deans, three heads of department, 18 lecturers and 81 students. Semi-structured interviews were held with the staff members, whilst the students participated in focus group interviews. Open-ended questions informed by literature and the CIPP evaluation model were developed and used to guide the interviews. This enabled the researcher to obtain a rich description of the participants' experiences. The data were analysed inductively. The results revealed that the main purpose of collaboration was not achieved due to the lack of a common understanding of the concept of collaboration and its purpose; a lack of readiness to collaborate and a lack of sharing of resources. A framework for effective collaboration was developed based on the results. PMID:23196002

  14. S0-study on ICHIRO 9-cell SRF cavities by KEK/Jlab collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2008, KEK and Jlab did the collaboration of S0-study on ICHIRO 9-cell no.5 which has no end groups on beam tubes. In this year, 2010, KEK and Jlab have started new S0-study collaboration on ICHIRO 9cell no.7 which has full end groups on beam tubes. We sent ICHIRO no.7 to Jlab. Surface treatments and vertical tests were repeated on ICHIRO no.7 as tight loop test. In this paper, we will report the results of that. (author)

  15. Business and public health collaboration for emergency preparedness in Georgia: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkelman Ruth L

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Governments may be overwhelmed by a large-scale public health emergency, such as a massive bioterrorist attack or natural disaster, requiring collaboration with businesses and other community partners to respond effectively. In Georgia, public health officials and members of the Business Executives for National Security have successfully collaborated to develop and test procedures for dispensing medications from the Strategic National Stockpile. Lessons learned from this collaboration should be useful to other public health and business leaders interested in developing similar partnerships. Methods The authors conducted a case study based on interviews with 26 government, business, and academic participants in this collaboration. Results The partnership is based on shared objectives to protect public health and assure community cohesion in the wake of a large-scale disaster, on the recognition that acting alone neither public health agencies nor businesses are likely to manage such a response successfully, and on the realization that business and community continuity are intertwined. The partnership has required participants to acknowledge and address multiple challenges, including differences in business and government cultures and operational constraints, such as concerns about the confidentiality of shared information, liability, and the limits of volunteerism. The partnership has been facilitated by a business model based on defining shared objectives, identifying mutual needs and vulnerabilities, developing carefully-defined projects, and evaluating proposed project methods through exercise testing. Through collaborative engagement in progressively more complex projects, increasing trust and understanding have enabled the partners to make significant progress in addressing these challenges. Conclusion As a result of this partnership, essential relationships have been established, substantial private resources and

  16. First collaborative study on bacteriophages in bathing waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooijman KA; Ghameshlou Z; Bahar M; Havelaar AH; MGB

    1998-01-01

    Het eerste internationale ringonderzoek met bacteriofagen in zwemwater werd in mei 1997 georganiseerd. Zestien Europese laboratoria (inclusief het organiserende laboratorium) namen deel aan de studie. Zij analyseerden faag referentiematerialen (RMs) voor de bepaling van somatische colifagen (RMs m

  17. Investigating Factors That Influence Students' Management of Study Environment in Online Collaborative Groupwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianxia; Xu, Jianzhong; Fan, Xitao

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines empirical models of students' management of the learning environment in the context of online collaborative groupwork. Such environment management is an important component of students' overall self-regulated learning strategy for effective learning. Student- and group-level predictors for study environment management in…

  18. An Exploratory Study of the Relationship between Collaboration and Mathematics and Game Outcomes. CRESST Report 797

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschang, Rebecca E.; Chung, Gregory K. W. K.; Kim, Jinok

    2011-01-01

    This study is an exploratory study of the relationship between collaboration and mathematics and game outcomes in a video game aimed at teaching concepts related to rational numbers. The sample included 243 middle school students who played the video game either with one partner or individually for 40 minutes. Results suggest that participants…

  19. A Collaborative Approach to Experiential Learning in University Newswriting and Editing Classes: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Perry

    2015-01-01

    This case study examines a creative approach by two journalism professors to enhance experiential learning in separate skills-based newswriting and editing courses by collaborating to produce a live online news report from campus each week on a four-hour deadline. The study builds on previous research into how innovative classroom structures that…

  20. Creating Collaboration: Exploring the Development of a Baptist Digital Library and Archive. A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Taffey

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the construction of a collaborative Baptist digital library and archive on the Internet. The study investigated how a central electronic location of digitized Baptist primary source materials could look and work on the Internet and how such a project could benefit Baptist history professors, the primary…

  1. A Case Study of Using a Social Annotation Tool to Support Collaboratively Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to understand student interaction and learning supported by a collaboratively social annotation tool--Diigo. The researcher examined through a case study how students participated and interacted when learning an online text with the social annotation tool--Diigo, and how they perceived their experience. The findings…

  2. Teachers Working in Collaborative Structures: A Case Study of a Secondary School in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, David Hagen

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a study that explores collaborative structures of shared decision-making in an urban secondary school in the USA. The data in the study came from unstructured interviews with 20 teachers, the principal, the assistant principal, a counsellor and 10 students. The interviews took place over a three-week period in June of 2001…

  3. Half-embryo test for identification of irradiated citrus fruit: collaborative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collaborative study on the use of the half-embryo test for the detection of irradiated citrus fruit was undertaken. Collaborative samples of seeds removed from citrus fruit, which were irradiated with doses of 0, 0.2 and 0.5 kGy, were examined by 12 participating laboratories. The percentage of correct identifications, whether irradiated or unirradiated, was 92% of 48 samples after 4 days incubation and 98% after 7 days incubation. Only one sample, irradiated with 0.2 kGy, was incorrectly identified. This collaborative study shows that irradiated citrus fruit can be identified using the half-embryo test and that the test can be applied in practice. (author)

  4. Certification of a meat reference material based on a collaborative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Marcela Salazar Arzate

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Through a collaborative project, comparison studies were carried out to improve measurement capabilities of participating laboratories, supporting them to produce, characterize and distribute reference materials in the food sector. The project was planned in four annual stages (milk, water, meat and grains. The third stage aimed specifically to quantify and certify the nutritional content of the parameters (nitrogen, fat, sodium and potassium of a batch candidate as Certified Reference Material (CRM of canned beef. This study was conducted in collaboration between several National Metrology Institutes (NMIs and/or collaborating laboratories, which, once identified the possible causes of variability or bias in the measurements, as well as the opportunities of improvement, achieved the certification of the material beef. The CRM was distributed among the participants to cover the needs of the food industry of meat products and testing laboratories in their respective countries.

  5. Negotiating Diversity: Fostering Collaborative Interpretations of Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shujie; Cockburn-Wootten, Cheryl; Munshi, Debashish

    2014-01-01

    The intercultural divides in values, perceptions, and interpretations of concepts have been studied extensively by international business and intercultural communication scholars. Consequentially, much effort in university classrooms is spent on focusing on the differences between groups and on finding ways to "manage" cultural…

  6. Collaborative Learning in Problem Solving: A Case Study in Metacognitive Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly L. Wismath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Problem solving and collaborative communication are among the key 21st century skills educators want students to develop. This paper presents results from a study of the collaborative work patterns of 133 participants from a university level course designed to develop transferable problem-solving skills. Most of the class time in this course was spent on actually solving puzzles, with minimal direct instruction; students were allowed to work either independently or in small groups of two or more, as they preferred, and to move back and forth between these two modalities as they wished. A distinctive student-driven pattern blending collaborative and independent endeavour was observed, consistently over four course offerings in four years. We discuss a number of factors which appear to be related to this variable pattern of independent and collaborative enterprise, including the thinking and learning styles of the individuals, the preference of the individuals, the types of problems being worked on, and the stage in a given problem at which students were working. We also consider implications of these factors for the teaching of problem solving, arguing that the development of collaborative problem solving abilities is an important metacognitive skill.

  7. Implications of Scientific Collaboration Networks on Studies of Aquatic Vertebrates in the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinero, María Celeste; Michalski, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The quantity of wildlife extracted from the Amazon has increased in the past decades as a consequence of an increase in human population density and income growth. To evaluate the spatial distribution of studies on subsistence and/or commercial hunting conducted in the Brazilian Amazon, we selected eight mid-sized and large-bodied aquatic vertebrate species with a history of human exploitation in the region. We used a combination of searches in the gray and scientific literature from the past 24 years to provide an updated distributional map of studies on the target species. We calculated the distances between the study sites and the locations of the research institutes/universities that the first and last authors of the same study were affiliated to. For the period of 1990 to 2014, we found 105 studies on the subsistence and/or commercial hunting of aquatic vertebrates in the Brazilian Amazon in 271 locations that involved 43 institutions (37 Brazilian and 6 international). The spatial distribution of the studies across the Brazilian Amazon varied, but over 80% took place in the northeast and central Amazon, encompassing three States of the Legal Brazilian Amazon (Amazonas, 51.42%; Pará, 19.05%; and Amapá, 16.19%). Over half of the research study sites (52.91%) were within 500 km of the research institute/university of the first or last authors. Some research institutes/universities did not have any inter-institutional collaborations, while others collaborated with eight or more institutes. Some research institutes/universities conducted many studies, had an extensive collaboration network, and contributed greatly to the network of studies on Amazonian aquatic vertebrates. Our research contributes to the knowledge of studies on the subsistence and/or commercial hunting of the most exploited aquatic vertebrates of the Brazilian Amazon, illustrates the impact that collaboration networks have on research, and highlights potential areas for improvement and the

  8. Implications of Scientific Collaboration Networks on Studies of Aquatic Vertebrates in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinero, María Celeste; Michalski, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The quantity of wildlife extracted from the Amazon has increased in the past decades as a consequence of an increase in human population density and income growth. To evaluate the spatial distribution of studies on subsistence and/or commercial hunting conducted in the Brazilian Amazon, we selected eight mid-sized and large-bodied aquatic vertebrate species with a history of human exploitation in the region. We used a combination of searches in the gray and scientific literature from the past 24 years to provide an updated distributional map of studies on the target species. We calculated the distances between the study sites and the locations of the research institutes/universities that the first and last authors of the same study were affiliated to. For the period of 1990 to 2014, we found 105 studies on the subsistence and/or commercial hunting of aquatic vertebrates in the Brazilian Amazon in 271 locations that involved 43 institutions (37 Brazilian and 6 international). The spatial distribution of the studies across the Brazilian Amazon varied, but over 80% took place in the northeast and central Amazon, encompassing three States of the Legal Brazilian Amazon (Amazonas, 51.42%; Pará, 19.05%; and Amapá, 16.19%). Over half of the research study sites (52.91%) were within 500 km of the research institute/university of the first or last authors. Some research institutes/universities did not have any inter-institutional collaborations, while others collaborated with eight or more institutes. Some research institutes/universities conducted many studies, had an extensive collaboration network, and contributed greatly to the network of studies on Amazonian aquatic vertebrates. Our research contributes to the knowledge of studies on the subsistence and/or commercial hunting of the most exploited aquatic vertebrates of the Brazilian Amazon, illustrates the impact that collaboration networks have on research, and highlights potential areas for improvement and the

  9. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach: The analysis is based on a multiple-­‐‑case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new...... to the new phenomenon of fashion libraries and does not cover other types of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry (Swap-­‐‑parties, etc.). Originality/value: The paper is one of the first attempts to examine new business models of collaborative consumption in general and the fashion library...... concept in particular. The study contributes to the discussions of whether and how fashion sharing and collaboration holds promise as a viable business model and as a means to promote sustainability....

  10. Collaborative Learning with Screen-Based Simulation in Health Care Education: An Empirical Study of Collaborative Patterns and Proficiency Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, L. O.; Soderstrom, T.; Ahlqvist, J.; Nilsson, T.

    2011-01-01

    This article is about collaborative learning with educational computer-assisted simulation (ECAS) in health care education. Previous research on training with a radiological virtual reality simulator has indicated positive effects on learning when compared to a more conventional alternative. Drawing upon the field of Computer-Supported…

  11. The NWMO Study and Process of Collaborative Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) was tasked, through federal legislation, to conduct a study of long term approaches for the management of spent nuclear fuel and recommend a preferred approach to the Government of Canada. The Nuclear Fuel Waste Act requires the NWMO to study at least three approaches, one for each of deep geological disposal in the Canadian Shield, storage at nuclear reactor sites, and centralized storage either above or below ground. It also requires that within three years the NWMO make a recommendation to government on a preferred approach for Canada. One of these approaches - that of deep geological disposal in the Canadian Shield - was the subject of an extensive environmental assessment through much of the 1990s. This assessment concluded that, on balance the concept of deep geological disposal had been adequately demonstrated from a technical perspective, but the same was not true from a social perspective. The environmental assessment panel indicated there was no evidence of broad public support for the concept and that it lacked the required level of public acceptability to be adopted. The lesson taken from this assessment was that to choose the right technical solution, we must first ask what requirements the technology has to live up to. We need to know what social values citizens want to protect. The study process was designed to ask Canadians for the list of values and objectives against which a management approach should be assessed, and then engage Canadians in a dialogue to assess the approaches against that list. Citizens were asked to provide direction on: The questions which ought to be asked and answered in the study, and the key issues to be addressed in the assessment of the management approaches; The range of technical methods which ought to be considered in the NWMO study; The risks, costs and benefits of each management approach; and Design of the overarching management structure and implementation plans

  12. The NWMO Study and Process of Collaborative Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facella, Jo-Ann [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) was tasked, through federal legislation, to conduct a study of long term approaches for the management of spent nuclear fuel and recommend a preferred approach to the Government of Canada. The Nuclear Fuel Waste Act requires the NWMO to study at least three approaches, one for each of deep geological disposal in the Canadian Shield, storage at nuclear reactor sites, and centralized storage either above or below ground. It also requires that within three years the NWMO make a recommendation to government on a preferred approach for Canada. One of these approaches - that of deep geological disposal in the Canadian Shield - was the subject of an extensive environmental assessment through much of the 1990s. This assessment concluded that, on balance the concept of deep geological disposal had been adequately demonstrated from a technical perspective, but the same was not true from a social perspective. The environmental assessment panel indicated there was no evidence of broad public support for the concept and that it lacked the required level of public acceptability to be adopted. The lesson taken from this assessment was that to choose the right technical solution, we must first ask what requirements the technology has to live up to. We need to know what social values citizens want to protect. The study process was designed to ask Canadians for the list of values and objectives against which a management approach should be assessed, and then engage Canadians in a dialogue to assess the approaches against that list. Citizens were asked to provide direction on: The questions which ought to be asked and answered in the study, and the key issues to be addressed in the assessment of the management approaches; The range of technical methods which ought to be considered in the NWMO study; The risks, costs and benefits of each management approach; and Design of the overarching management structure and implementation plans

  13. AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF LECTURERS' VIEWS OF OUT-OF-CLASS ACADEMIC COLLABORATION AMONG STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Crookall

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports an exploratory study of lecturers' perceptions of out-of-class academic collaboration (OCAC among students at a large Singapore university. Two types of OCAC were investigated: collaboration initiated by students, e.g., groups decide on their own to meet to prepare for exams, and collaboration required by teachers, e.g., teachers assign students to do projects in groups. Data were collected via one-on-one interviews with 18 faculty members from four faculties at the university. Findings suggest that OCAC, especially of a teacher-required kind, is fairly common at the university. Faculty members' views on factors affecting the success of OCAC are discussed for the light they might shed on practices to enhance the effectiveness of OCAC.

  14. Oil flotation extraction of light filth from ground capsicums excluding paprika: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasher, J J; Colliflower, E J

    1978-07-01

    A collaborative study has been completed on an improved method for the isolation of light filth from ground capsicums other than paprika. The proposed method involves isopropanol pretreatment, wet-sieving, and extraction from cooled 60% ethanol with a mineral oil-heptane mixture. The collaborative tests by the proposed method showed an approximate 2-fold increase in recoveries of insect fragments and rodent hairs with acceptable coefficients of variation and clean filter papers. The proposed method has been adopted as official first action to replace 44.123. PMID:681260

  15. Signature of a Collaboration Agreement between The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ) and CERN, by Prof. Grzegorz Wrochna, Director and CERN Director-General, concerning Collaboration in the LHC upgrade.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Signature of a Collaboration Agreement between The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ) and CERN, by Prof. Grzegorz Wrochna, Director and CERN Director-General, concerning Collaboration in the LHC upgrade.

  16. Ames collaborative study of cosmic-ray neutrons. II. Low- and mid-latitude flights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuing progress of the Ames Collaborative Study of Cosmic Ray Neutrons is described. Data obtained aboard flights from Hawaii at altitudes of 41,000 and 45,000 feet, and in the range of geomagnetic latitude 170N less than or equal to lambda less than or equal to 210N are reported. Preliminary estimates of neutron spectra were made

  17. Collaborative Learning in Online Study Groups: An Evolutionary Game Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiong, Raymond; Jovanovic, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Educational benefits of online collaborative group work have been confirmed in numerous research studies. Most frequently cited advantages include the development of skills of critical thinking and problem solving as well as skills of self-reflection and co-construction of knowledge and meaning. However, the establishment and maintenance of active…

  18. Promoting Collaboration in Health Care Teams through Interprofessional Education: A Simulation Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, Ozgur

    2013-01-01

    This simulation study explores how the integration of interprofessional components into health care curriculum may impact professional stereotyping and collaborative behavior in care delivery teams comprised of a physician, a registered nurse, a physician's assistant, a physical therapist, and a radiation therapist. As part of the agent-based…

  19. Determination of some individual chlorobiphenyls in eel-fat with capillary gaschromatography: collaborative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinstra, L.G.M.T.; Roos, A.H.; Werdmuller, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    A method for the determination of six individual chlorobiphenyls in eel-fat, based on saponification of the sample and determination with capillary gas chromatography, was studied collaboratively. Eleven laboratories submitted analytical results in duplo of six individual chlorbiphenyls on two sampl

  20. A Case Study in Collaboration: Looking Back at the National Graphic Design Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, R. Roger

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by the 1980s interest in graphic design history, an initially productive, but difficult to sustain, collaboration among three American universities from the late 1980s to the mid-1990s, is the subject of this case study. The ideas behind a much-needed archival consortium, its organization and its difficulties in sustaining collaboration…

  1. Assessing Team Learning in Technology-Mediated Collaboration: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Hayward P.; Akan, Obasi H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of collaboration mode (collocated versus non-collocated videoconferencing-mediated) on team learning and team interaction quality in a team-based problem solving context. Situated learning theory and the theory of affordances are used to provide a framework that describes how technology-mediated collaboration…

  2. Teacher-School Library Media Specialist Collaboration through Social Marketing Strategies: An Information Behavior Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immroth, Barbara; Lukenbill, W. Bernard

    2007-01-01

    This research was supported in part though an IMLS Kent State University Grant supporting Information Literacy. Based on the importance of teacher-school library media specialist collaboration, this study seeks to advance knowledge involving the dynamics of this special relationship. The subjects were a group of student librarians--themselves…

  3. A Study on planning of the international collaboration foundation for the Advanced Nuclear Technology Development Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea has participated in the international collaboration programs for the development of future nuclear energy systems driven by the countries holding advanced nuclear technology and Korea and U.S. have cooperated in the INERI. This study aimed mainly at developing the plan for participation in the collaborative development of the Gen IV, searching the participation strategy for INERI and the INPRO, and the international cooperation in these programs. Contents and scope of the study for successful achievement are as follows; Investigation and analysis of international and domestic trends related to advanced nuclear technologies, Development of the plan for collaborative development of the Gen IV and conducting the international cooperation activities, Support for the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. and conducting the international cooperation, International cooperation activities for the INPRO. This study can be useful for planning the research plan and setting up of the strategy of integrating the results of the international collaboration and the domestic R and D results by combining the Gen IV and the domestic R and D in the field of future nuclear technology. Futhermore, this study can contribute to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities not only with the advanced countries for acquisition of the advanced technologies but also with the developing countries for the export of the domestic nuclear energy systems

  4. A Study on planning of the international collaboration foundation for the Advanced Nuclear Technology Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2005-03-15

    Korea has participated in the international collaboration programs for the development of future nuclear energy systems driven by the countries holding advanced nuclear technology and Korea and U.S. have cooperated in the INERI. This study aimed mainly at developing the plan for participation in the collaborative development of the Gen IV, searching the participation strategy for INERI and the INPRO, and the international cooperation in these programs. Contents and scope of the study for successful achievement are as follows; Investigation and analysis of international and domestic trends related to advanced nuclear technologies, Development of the plan for collaborative development of the Gen IV and conducting the international cooperation activities, Support for the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. and conducting the international cooperation, International cooperation activities for the INPRO. This study can be useful for planning the research plan and setting up of the strategy of integrating the results of the international collaboration and the domestic R and D results by combining the Gen IV and the domestic R and D in the field of future nuclear technology. Futhermore, this study can contribute to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities not only with the advanced countries for acquisition of the advanced technologies but also with the developing countries for the export of the domestic nuclear energy systems.

  5. Telling Our Story: A Case Study of a Collaborative Departmental Blog at Syracuse University Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Anne E.; McReynolds, Stephanie J. H.

    2016-01-01

    This case study will take readers through the planning and publication process of a collaborative departmental library blog at Syracuse University, which is a large private, non-profit research intensive university located in central New York State. It will provide an overview of the history of the project and the mission of the blog. It will…

  6. Exploring the success of an integrated primary care partnership:A longitudinal study of collaboration processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P. Valentijn (Pim P.); H.J.M. Vrijhoef; D. Ruwaard (Dirk); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette); R.Y. Arends (Rosa Y.); M.A. Bruijnzeels (Marc)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Forming partnerships is a prominent strategy used to promote integrated service delivery across health and social service systems. Evidence about the collaboration process upon which partnerships evolve has rarely been addressed in an integrated-care setting. This study explo

  7. Exploring the success of an integrated primary care partnership : A longitudinal study of collaboration processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, P.P.; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.; Ruwaard, D.; de Bont, A.A.; Arends, R.; Bruijnzeels, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Forming partnerships is a prominent strategy used to promote integrated service delivery across health and social service systems. Evidence about the collaboration process upon which partnerships evolve has rarely been addressed in an integrated-care setting. This study explores the longi

  8. Determination of Pesticide Residues in Foods by Acetonitrile Extraction and Partitioning with Magnesium Sulfate: Collaborative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collaborative study was conducted to determine multiple pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables using a quick, simple, inexpensive, and effective sample preparation method followed by concurrent analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass sp...

  9. Exploring the success of an integrated primary care partnership: a longitudinal study of collaboration processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, Pim P.; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J.M.; Ruwaard, Dirk; Bont, de Antoinette; Arends, R.Y.; Bruijnzeels, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Forming partnerships is a prominent strategy used to promote integrated service delivery across health and social service systems. Evidence about the collaboration process upon which partnerships evolve has rarely been addressed in an integrated-care setting. This study explores the longi

  10. The Essence of Using Collaborative Technology for Virtual Team Members: A Study Using Interpretative Phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Christiana L.

    2013-01-01

    This interpretative phenomenological study used semi-structured interviews of 10 participants to gain a deeper understanding of the experience for virtual team members using collaborative technology. The participants were knowledge workers from global software companies working on cross-functional project teams at a distance. There were no…

  11. Networking: a study in planning and developing cross-cultural collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Singh

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a collaboration between the authors at the University of Brighton (UK and the University of Delhi, South Campus. The collaboration came about as a result of the EU-India Cross-Cultural Innovation Network collaboration programme, a project involving several universities and organizations across Europe and India. The authors of this paper both lecture in the area of computer networking. Following meetings in Delhi, they agreed to work together to produce a Web-based networking resource to be generated by the students of both institutions. The first phase of development involved the mounting of Web-based tutorials and documents produced by the students. The second phase will centre on the development of a knowledge base generated by the interaction of the students within an asynchronous forum. Running alongside these phases will be a collaborative bookmarking system, a database in which the students will post URLs of Web-based resources that they find useful in their studies. This system incorporates a form of collaborative filtering, an evolutionary mechanism which seeks to embody the qualities that students value in resources to provide a dynamic set of ratings to assist in the selection of those of most use. The planning of such a system raises some unusual issues, not least in the process of collaboration itself, with concerns as diverse as technical compatibility, institutional and cultural differences, timezones and the reliability of email. Limited bandwidth between our institutions causes special problems with the interactive elements of the resource. We present the methods we are investigating to reduce the impact of this. The fact that the students share an intellectual discipline but are otherwise separated by a cultural and geographical divide is expected to lead to fruitful diversity in thinking and approaches to problem-solving.

  12. "Discrimination", the Main Concern of Iranian Nurses over Inter-Professional Collaboration: an Explorative Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Leila Valizadeh; Vahid Zamanzadeh; Alireza Irajpour; Masoumeh Shohani

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: People in various professions may face discrimination. In the nursing field, discrimination among nurses in the workplace, regardless of race, gender or religion have not been studied; a problem that leads to a reduction in the quality of nursing care and nurse turnover. Discovery of the concerns of nurses about inter-professional collaboration is the purpose of this study. Methods: The present study is conducted by using a qualitative content analysis. The data collection proc...

  13. A Case Study Examining Change in Teacher Beliefs Through Collaborative Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaino, Katrin; Holbrook, Jack; Rannikmäe, Miia

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to explore the role of collaborative action research in eliciting change in teacher beliefs. The beliefs were those of five chemistry teachers in implementing a new teaching approach, geared to enhancing students' scientific and technological literacy (STL). The teacher beliefs were analysed based on Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behaviour (2005) by looking at the teacher's (a) attitude towards implementing STL modules, (b) perceived subjective norms, and (c) behavioural control regarding the new teaching approach. After an introductory year, when teachers familiarised themselves with the new approach, a collaborative action research project was initiated in the second year of the study, helping teachers to minimise or overcome initially perceived constraints when implementing STL modules in their classroom. The processes of teacher change and the course of the project were investigated by teacher interviews, teacher informal commentaries, and meeting records. The formation of positive beliefs towards a STL approach increased continuously, although its extent and character varied depending on the teacher. The close cooperation, in the format of collaborative action research and especially through teacher group reflections and perceived collegial support, did support teacher professional development including change in their beliefs towards the new teaching approach. Additionally, positive feedback gained from other teachers through running a two-day in-service course in year three helped to strengthen all five teachers' existing beliefs towards the new approach. The current research demonstrated that perceived constraints, where identified, can be meaningfully addressed by teachers, through undertaking collaborative action research.

  14. Collaborative ethnography for information systems research Studying knowledge work practices and designing supportive information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Maier

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding knowledge work and supporting it with information systems (ISs are challenging tasks. Knowledge work has changed substantially recently and studies on how knowledge work is currently performed are scarce. Ethnography is the most suitable qualitative research method for studying knowledge work, yet too time-consuming, costly and unfocused for the fast changing IS domain. Moreover, results from qualitative studies need to be transformed into artefacts useful for IS requirements engineering and design. This paper proposes a procedure for collaborative ethnography to study knowledge work practices and inform IS requirements gathering and design illustrated with the case of a collaborative ethnographic study of seven organisations in four European countries performed in a large-scale international IS research and development project. The paper also critically discusses the procedure’s applicability and limitations.

  15. The study of multi-institutional collaborations in high-energy physics. Progress report, January 1989--March 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    Since World War II, the organizational framework for scientific research is increasingly the multi-institutional collaboration, especially in high-energy physics. A broad preliminary survey, into the functioning of research collaborations involving three or more institutions is described. The study is designed to identify patterns of collaborations, define the scope of the documentation problems, field-test possible solutions, recommend future actions, and build an archives of oral history interviews and other resources for scholarly use. Once the study is completed, its findings will be used to promote systems to document significant collaborative research.

  16. The Influence of Game Design on the Collaborative Problem Solving Process: A Cross-Case Study of Multi-Player Collaborative Gameplay Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Nilay

    2013-01-01

    This cross-case study examines the relationships between game design attributes and collaborative problem solving process in the context of multi-player video games. The following game design attributes: sensory stimuli elements, level of challenge, and presentation of game goals and rules were examined to determine their influence on game…

  17. Ethnographic study of ICT-supported collaborative work routines in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myall Michelle

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health informatics research has traditionally been dominated by experimental and quasi-experimental designs. An emerging area of study in organisational sociology is routinisation (how collaborative work practices become business-as-usual. There is growing interest in the use of ethnography and other in-depth qualitative approaches to explore how collaborative work routines are enacted and develop over time, and how electronic patient records (EPRs are used to support collaborative work practices within organisations. Methods/design Following Feldman and Pentland, we will use 'the organisational routine' as our unit of analysis. In a sample of four UK general practices, we will collect narratives, ethnographic observations, multi-modal (video and screen capture data, documents and other artefacts, and analyse these to map and compare the different understandings and enactments of three common routines (repeat prescribing, coding and summarising, and chronic disease surveillance which span clinical and administrative spaces and which, though 'mundane', have an important bearing on quality and safety of care. In a detailed qualitative analysis informed by sociological theory, we aim to generate insights about how complex collaborative work is achieved through the process of routinisation in healthcare organisations. Discussion Our study offers the potential not only to identify potential quality failures (poor performance, errors, failures of coordination in collaborative work routines but also to reveal the hidden work and workarounds by front-line staff which bridge the model-reality gap in EPR technologies and via which "automated" safety features have an impact in practice.

  18. Education Collaboration to Promote School Participation in Northern Ghana: A Case Study of a Complementary Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mfum-Mensah, Obed

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the perceived benefits and challenges of the collaboration model of a complementary education program which operates in marginalized communities in northern Ghana. The scope of the paper includes the background, collaboration as a transformative process, research methodology, findings, and discussion. The study revealed that:…

  19. Cancer in inflammatory bowel disease 15 years after diagnosis in a population-based European Collaborative follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Tatsioni, Athina; Pedersen, Natalia;

    2011-01-01

    To determine the occurrence of intestinal and extraintestinal cancers in the 1993-2009 prospective European Collaborative Inflammatory Bowel Disease (EC-IBD) Study Group cohort.......To determine the occurrence of intestinal and extraintestinal cancers in the 1993-2009 prospective European Collaborative Inflammatory Bowel Disease (EC-IBD) Study Group cohort....

  20. Computer Supported Collaborative Environmental Scanning: Diagnostic Framework and Its Application for a Tunisian Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Souad Kamoun-Chouk

    2014-01-01

    The case study describes how the team members of a Tunisian Environmental Scanning Agriculture Observatory dealt with new ways of communicating introduced by technology. An inter-organizational computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) platform was implemented within the agriculture observatory to ameliorate the communication of information and knowledge between the stakeholders. Our study aims to determine what contextual conditions could impede the adoption of the new ways of communicati...

  1. Some recent results of the silicon detector radiation damage study by the RD2 collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghinolfi, F. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bates, S. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bardos, R. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Bonino, R. [DPNC, Geneva University, Geneva (Switzerland); Chilingarov, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Clark, A.G. [DPNC, Geneva University, Geneva (Switzerland); Feick, H. [1. Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Fretwurst, E. [1. Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Glaser, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Gorfine, G. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Goessling, C. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Dortmund, D-4600 Dortmund (Germany); Jarron, P. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Kambara, H. [DPNC, Geneva University, Geneva (Switzerland); Lindstroem, G. [1. Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Lisowski, B. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Dortmund, D-4600 Dortmund (Germany); Moorhead, G.F. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Munday, D.J. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Cavendish Lab.; Parker, M.A. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Cavendish Lab.; Perrin, E. [DPNC, Geneva University, Geneva (Switzerland); Pilath, S. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Dortmund, D-4600 Dortmund (Germany); Rolf, A. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Dortmund, D-4600 Dortmund (Germany); Schulz, T. [1. Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Taylor, G.N. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Teiger, J. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tovey, S.N. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Uhlmann, T.M. [1. Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    1995-06-01

    Recent results by the RD2 Collaboration of a study of radiation damage of silicon detectors for the ATLAS detector at LHC are presented. The detectors have been irradiated by neutrons with fluences of up to 1.5x10{sup 14} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. The electric field in the detectors before and after type inversion, the depletion voltage and the dark current were studied. (orig.).

  2. Diffusion of a collaborative care model in primary care: a longitudinal qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Vedel Isabelle; Ghadi Veronique; De Stampa Matthieu; Routelous Christelle; Bergman Howard; Ankri Joel; Lapointe Liette

    2013-01-01

    Background Although collaborative team models (CTM) improve care processes and health outcomes, their diffusion poses challenges related to difficulties in securing their adoption by primary care clinicians (PCPs). The objectives of this study are to understand: (1) how the perceived characteristics of a CTM influenced clinicians' decision to adopt -or not- the model; and (2) the model's diffusion process. Methods We conducted a longitudinal case study based on the Diffusion of Innovations Th...

  3. Bi-lateral Scientific Collaboration between Taiwan and Japan: A Bibliometric Study of Coauthored Articles during 2000-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper described a bibliometric study of the scientific collaboration between Taiwan and Japan during 2000-2009 as represented by their co-authored articles indexed in Science Citation Index Expanded. The findings suggested collaboration between Taiwan and Japan had intensified. The subject fields with the most intensive collaboration were medicine and physics. Institution types and combination of institution types participating in collaboration were rather diverse; each was strong in certain subject fields. Universities were the major type of institutions involved in international collaborative research. National Taiwan University and The University of Tokyo were the most productive institutions in the respective country, while the National Chiao Tung University and Osaka University formed the most productive pair in the cross-country collaboration. [Article content in Chinese; Extended abstract in English

  4. Collaboration 'Engineerability'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, Gwendolyn L.; de Vreede, Gert-Jan; Briggs, Robert O.; Sol, Henk G.

    2010-01-01

    Collaboration Engineering is an approach to create sustained collaboration support by designing collaborative work practices for high-value recurring tasks, and transferring those designs to practitioners to execute for themselves without ongoing support from collaboration professionals. A key assum

  5. Collaborative study for the establishment of the 3rd international standard for neomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautmann, G; Daas, A; Buchheit, K-H

    2013-01-01

    An international collaborative study was organised to establish the World Health Organization (WHO) 3(rd) International Standard (IS) for neomycin. Ten laboratories from different countries participated in the collaborative study. The potency of the candidate material, a freeze-dried preparation, was estimated by microbiological assays with sensitive micro-organisms. To ensure continuity between consecutive batches, the 2(nd) IS for neomycin was used as a standard. Based on the results of the study, the 3(rd) IS for neomycin was adopted at the meeting of the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization (ECBS) in 2012 with an assigned potency of 19,050 IU per vial. The 3(rd) IS for neomycin is available from the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM).

  6. Interprofessional Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Prentice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this hermeneutic phenomenological study, we examined the experience of interprofessional collaboration from the perspective of nursing and medical students. Seventeen medical and nursing students from two different universities participated in the study. We used guiding questions in face-to-face, conversational interviews to explore students’ experience and expectations of interprofessional collaboration within learning situations. Three themes emerged from the data: the great divide, learning means content, and breaking the ice. The findings suggest that the experience of interprofessional collaboration within learning events is influenced by the natural clustering of shared interests among students. Furthermore, the carry-forward of impressions about physician–nurse relationships prior to the educational programs and during clinical placements dominate the formation of new relationships and acquisition of new knowledge about roles, which might have implications for future practice.

  7. "Discrimination", the Main Concern of Iranian Nurses over Inter-Professional Collaboration: an Explorative Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Valizadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People in various professions may face discrimination. In the nursing field, discrimination among nurses in the workplace, regardless of race, gender or religion have not been studied; a problem that leads to a reduction in the quality of nursing care and nurse turnover. Discovery of the concerns of nurses about inter-professional collaboration is the purpose of this study. Methods: The present study is conducted by using a qualitative content analysis. The data collection process included 22 unstructured and in-depth interviews with nurses between April 2012 and February 2013 in the medical teaching centers of Iran. A purposive sampling method was used. All interviews were recorded, typed, and analyzed simultaneously. Results: The category obtained from explaining nurses' experiences of inter-professional collaboration was "discrimination" that included two subcategories, namely (1 lack of perspective towards equality in authorities, and (2 professional respect and value deficit.Conclusion: Nurses' experiences are indicating their perception of discrimination that influences the collaboration between nurses, which should be taken into account by managers. The findings of the present study help to managers about decision making on how to deal with staff and can be helpful in preventing nurse turnover and providing better services by nurses.

  8. The Dercum-Muybridge Collaboration and the Study of Pathologic Gaits Using Sequential Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    In the late 1870s and 1880s, prior to the development of movie cameras or projectors, English-American photographer Eadweard Muybridge (1830-1904) photographed sequential images of people and animals in motion, using arrays of sequentially triggered single-image cameras. In 1885, Philadelphia neurologist Francis Dercum (1856-1931) collaborated with Muybridge at the University of Pennsylvania to photograph sequential images of patients with various neurological disorders involving abnormal movements, and particularly various gait disorders, including both the sensory ataxic gait of tabes dorsalis and various spastic gaits. Dercum used tracings of sequential photographic images to plot trajectories of limbs as a way to characterize and distinguish pathologic gaits. The Dercum-Muybridge collaboration produced the first motion-picture sequences of neurological gait disorders ever filmed. These sequences and the trajectory-based studies that derived from them were a milestone in studies of pathologic gaits. PMID:26684421

  9. The Dercum-Muybridge Collaboration and the Study of Pathologic Gaits Using Sequential Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    In the late 1870s and 1880s, prior to the development of movie cameras or projectors, English-American photographer Eadweard Muybridge (1830-1904) photographed sequential images of people and animals in motion, using arrays of sequentially triggered single-image cameras. In 1885, Philadelphia neurologist Francis Dercum (1856-1931) collaborated with Muybridge at the University of Pennsylvania to photograph sequential images of patients with various neurological disorders involving abnormal movements, and particularly various gait disorders, including both the sensory ataxic gait of tabes dorsalis and various spastic gaits. Dercum used tracings of sequential photographic images to plot trajectories of limbs as a way to characterize and distinguish pathologic gaits. The Dercum-Muybridge collaboration produced the first motion-picture sequences of neurological gait disorders ever filmed. These sequences and the trajectory-based studies that derived from them were a milestone in studies of pathologic gaits.

  10. Feasibility Study for Mixes of Different Sales Options for Rural Local Food Collaborators

    OpenAIRE

    Gatzke, Holly; Cowee, Margaret; Harris, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative local food distribution and business enterprise combinations were studied for agriculture producers in remote, low-populated rural communities in Nevada. The research assessed the supply of agricultural products and compared the feasibility of enterprises for local sales and value adding and distribution to Las Vegas. Consumer interests and demand for local food indicated potential demand for a commercial kitchen, café and storefront, a local buying club, Las Vegas product distr...

  11. Is Post-Marketing Drug Surveillance Possible in the Family Practice Setting? A Collaborative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Facklam, David P.; Baker, Myrna I.; Jacqueline S. Gardner; Herbert, Carol; Grava-Gubins, Inese

    1988-01-01

    Post-marketing surveillance is a mechanism to identify and quantify harmful, as well as beneficial, effects of drugs used under conditions different from those in which they were tested. The College of Family Physicians of Canada collaborated with the authors in a pilot, office-based, post-marketing, surveillance study. Target medications were selected from all prescriptions, written or authorized by participating physicians. The participants collected the prescriptions by using duplicate pre...

  12. Purchasing strategy and collaboration with suppliers : (case study: JSC Lebedyansky in Russia)

    OpenAIRE

    Guseynova, Yulia

    2010-01-01

    The significance of purchasing makes it relevant for manufacturing firms to understand which purchasing approaches are effective and efficient, and thus contribute to their overall market success and profitability by cutting hidden costs. Accordingly the importance of the establishment and maintaining of valuable relationships and collaboration with suppliers inevitably increases. The success of the company on the market depends greatly on these factors. The research aims to study how the fac...

  13. Organizational determinants of interprofessional collaboration in integrative health care: systematic review of qualitative studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent C H Chung

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Inteprofessional collaboration (IPC between biomedically trained doctors (BMD and traditional, complementary and alternative medicine practitioners (TCAMP is an essential element in the development of successful integrative healthcare (IHC services. This systematic review aims to identify organizational strategies that would facilitate this process. METHODS: We searched 4 international databases for qualitative studies on the theme of BMD-TCAMP IPC, supplemented with a purposive search of 31 health services and TCAM journals. Methodological quality of included studies was assessed using published checklist. Results of each included study were synthesized using a framework approach, with reference to the Structuration Model of Collaboration. FINDINGS: Thirty-seven studies of acceptable quality were included. The main driver for developing integrative healthcare was the demand for holistic care from patients. Integration can best be led by those trained in both paradigms. Bridge-building activities, positive promotion of partnership and co-location of practices are also beneficial for creating bonding between team members. In order to empower the participation of TCAMP, the perceived power differentials need to be reduced. Also, resources should be committed to supporting team building, collaborative initiatives and greater patient access. Leadership and funding from central authorities are needed to promote the use of condition-specific referral protocols and shared electronic health records. More mature IHC programs usually formalize their evaluation process around outcomes that are recognized both by BMD and TCAMP. CONCLUSIONS: The major themes emerging from our review suggest that successful collaborative relationships between BMD and TCAMP are similar to those between other health professionals, and interventions which improve the effectiveness of joint working in other healthcare teams with may well be transferable to promote better

  14. Sharing emotions during a computer-mediated collaborative task: a dual eye-tracking study

    OpenAIRE

    Cereghetti, Donato; Molinari, Gaëlle; Chanel, Guillaume; Pun, Thierry; Betrancourt, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    With the development of distance learning programs, it is now usual for learners to complete collaborative tasks remotely. Even if audio and video channels are available, the subtle cues that allow to infer the partner's emotional states (e.g., interest, boredom, frustration) are seriously diminished. This study explores the impact of using a group emotion awareness tool on learners' interaction and perception. To achieve this goal, a dual eye-tracking approach was used in combination with an...

  15. A collaborative study of the EDNAP group regarding Y-chromosome binary polymorphism analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brion, María; Dupuy, Berit M; Heinrich, Marielle;

    2005-01-01

    typing. A total of 535 samples from six different European populations were also analysed. In Galicia (NW Spain) and Belgium, the most frequent haplogroup was R1b*(xR1b1,R1b3df). Haplogroup F*(xK) is one of the most frequent in Austria and Denmark, while the lowest frequency appear in Belgium. Haplogroup...... frequencies found in this collaborative study were compared with previously published European Y-chromosome haplogroup data....

  16. A Study on the Impact of ICT on Collaborative Learning Processes in Libyan Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kenan, Thuraya; Elzawi, Abdussalam; Pislaru, Crinela; Restoum, Maysoun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the conclusions of a study on the impact of ICT on collaborative learning processes in Libyan Higher Education (LHE). The quantitative analysis of the answers to a questionnaire (completed by Libyan full-time lecturers at the universities of Tripoli, Garyounis, Gharian and Ezawia) shows the necessity to design and develop more classroom activities and interactive online applications, enabling the development of team-building skills required by employers. The influence of l...

  17. Case Study: pain clinic referral to psychological services best addressed with collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Kathy Sexton-Radek; A. Tony Chami

    2013-01-01

    A case study of a middle aged female with severe musculoskeletal medical conditions causing severe pain is presented. The referral for Psychological services was conducted in concordance with the medical treatments. In this case, the complex nature of the severe musculoskeletal medical conditions necessitated intensive care and the collaborative communications provided this to the patient. A tabulation of representative treatments is provided with an explanation of the nature of the collabora...

  18. North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study: A Collaborative Multisite Approach to Prodromal Schizophrenia Research

    OpenAIRE

    Addington, Jean; Cadenhead, Kristin S.; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Cornblatt, Barbara; McGlashan, Thomas H; Perkins, Diana O.; Seidman, Larry J.; Tsuang, Ming; Walker, Elaine F.; Woods, Scott W.; Heinssen, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the rationale, design, and preliminary findings of the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS), a collaborative, multisite investigation into the earliest phase of psychotic illness. We describe how 8 independently conceived research projects were integrated methodologically, how diagnostic reliability was achieved across sites on the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes, and how baseline and follow-up data were aggregated for 888 at risk and compariso...

  19. Enhancing Science Education Instruction: A Mixed-Methods Study on University and Middle School Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen-Stone, Deborah S.

    The purpose of this concurrent mixed methods study was to examine the collaborative relationship between scientists and science teachers and to incorporate and advocate scientific literacy based on past and current educational theories such as inquiry based teaching. The scope of this study included archived student standardized test scores, semi-structured interviews, and a Likert scale survey to include open-ended comments. The methodology was based on the guiding research question: To what extent and in what ways does the collaboration and inquiry methodology, with GTF and PT teams, serve toward contributing to a more comprehensive and nuanced understanding of this predicting relationship between student PASS scores, inquiry skills, and increased scientific literacy for GTF's, PT's, and students via an integrative mixed methods analysis? The data analysis considerations were derived from the qualitative data collected from the three GTF/PT teams by the use of recorded interviews and text answered survey comments. The quantitative data of archived student Palmetto Assessment of State Standards (PASS) scores on scientific literacy and inquiry tests and the Likert-scale portion of the survey were support data to the aforementioned qualitative data findings. Limitations of the study were (1) the population of only the GK-12 teachers and their students versus the inclusion of participants that did not experience the GK-12 Fellow partnerships within their classrooms, should they be considered as participants, (2) involved the researcher as a participant for two years of the program and objectivity remained through interpretation and well documented personal reflections and experiences to inform accuracy, and (3) cultural diversity contributed to the relationship formed between the research Fellow and science educator and communication and scientific language did form a barrier between the Fellow, educator, and student rapport within the classroom. This study

  20. Collaborative study of a method for the extraction of light filth from crushed red peppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasher, J J

    1975-05-01

    A new method was developed for the extraction of light filth from crushed red peppers. The method utilizes an isoprapanol defatting of the product followed by separation of light filth elements with mineral oil and n-heptane (85+15) in a 2 L trap flask. Collaborative studies resulted in good recoveries of light filth spike elements and clean extration papers. The method has been adopted as official first action. PMID:1170161

  1. Collaboration with the Business Career Services Office: A Case Study at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yoo-Seong

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the collaboration between the Business Career Services Office (BCSO) and the Business and Economics Library (BEL) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The collaboration with BCSO helped BEL to become a strategic partner to both the College of Business and to graduate Business students. A survey…

  2. A Case Study of Collaboration with Multi-Robots and Its Effect on Children's Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Wu, Sheng-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Learning how to carry out collaborative tasks is critical to the development of a student's capacity for social interaction. In this study, a multi-robot system was designed for students. In three different scenarios, students controlled robots in order to move dice; we then examined their collaborative strategies and their behavioral…

  3. Fragmentation and connection of frames in collaborative water governance: a case study of river catchment management in Southern Ecuador

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewulf, A.; Mancero, M.; Cárdenas, G.; Sucozhañay, D.

    2011-01-01

    In collaborative water governance, the variety of frames that actors bring to the discussion constitutes an important challenge. In this study, we analyse the fragmentation and connection of frames in collaborative water governance projects in the Paute catchment and its sub-catchment Tabacay in the

  4. Examining the Process of University-School-Community Collaboration in an Irish Sports Studies and Physical Education Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Susan

    2015-01-01

    University-school-community collaborations are little documented despite being advocated across third-level institutes. Researchers identify the need for quality university-school-community collaborations to tackle a host of social inequalities while also addressing innovative approaches to teaching and learning. This study involved the…

  5. Collaborative Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Horst, Willem

    2014-01-01

    processes. Our analysis reveals two levels of prototyping. Besides the more formal managerial level, we identify the informal designer level, where the actual practice of prototyping takes place. On this level, collaborative prototyping transforms the act of prototyping from an activity belonging...... changes, and it detects emerging usability problems through active engagement and experimentation. As such, the collaborative prototype acts as a boundary object to represent, understand, and transform knowledge across functional, hierarchical, and organizational boundaries. Our study also identifies some...... constraints in involving the appropriate stakeholders at the right time. The paper specifically elaborates on the role of users in collaborative prototyping, which is important in order to cover all phases of the problem-solving cycle but triggers an interesting challenge due to the “reverse empathy...

  6. Generalized collaboration networks in software systems: a case study of Linux kernels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiwen SUN; Chengyi XIA; Zhenhai CHEN; Junqing SUN; Zengqiang CHEN

    2009-01-01

    The collaboration relationships between header files in the source code of Linux kernels are analyzed by constructing a weighted Header File Collaboration Network (HFCN): each node represents a header file; two nodes are connected if corresponding header files are both included in the same source file at least once; also the link weight is assigned to evaluate the intensity of co-inclusion of two header files. Through using appropriate non-weighted and weighted quantities, structural properties of two kinds of HFCN networks(HFCN-Ⅰ and HFCN-Ⅱ) are characterized and analyzed. The study of Linux kernels from the view-point of complex networks can provide a better description of the organizational principles and evolving mechanism of complex software systems.

  7. Innovations in technology and the online learning environment: A case study of inter-university collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen ZANETTA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study of online learning. It is based on the researcher’s participation in an inter-university collaborative module at two higher education institutions in South Africa and the United States from August to December 2001. The paper addresses the advantages and disadvantages of the online learning environment and learning in a Virtual Classroom. It provides a critical interpretation of the virtual classroom experienced in this collaboration between institutions. It finds that there are benefits from applying this technology in educational practices and programs particularly in the African context where a large majority of school-leaving learners have little or no access to higher education. However, it also expounds the NEPAD (New Partnership for Africa’s Development initiative to produce ICT in schools throughout Africa to fulfil the Millennium Development Goals on education in developing countries.

  8. Extraction of light filth from spirulina powders and tablets: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, M J; Angold, S; Beavin, B B; Bradicich, R B; Decker, S J; Dzidowski, G R; Levesque, E; Locatelli, R G; Mably, M; Paredes, A

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported for a collaborative study of a method for the extraction of light filth from spirulina (a blue-green alga) powder and tablets. A 50 g portion of either powder or tablets is dispersed in water, and then boiled with dilute HCI solution. Hairs and insect fragments are isolated by wet sieving on a No. 230 sieve, flotation with mineral oil, and washings of the mineral oil in a percolator. Average recoveries by 12 collaborators for tablets and powders were 70.6 and 70.2%, respectively, for 10 rat hair spikes and 68.3 and 84.4%, respectively, for 20 insect fragment spikes. The method has been approved interim official first action. PMID:2501292

  9. Extraction of light filth from oriental sauces containing soy sauce, thickeners, and spices: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, M J

    1993-01-01

    Results are reported for a collaborative study of a method for the extraction of light filth from oriental sauces containing soy sauce, thickeners, and spices. A 100 g test portion is pretreated in a 2% solution of Tergitol Anionic 4 over a steam bath, and oils are removed by wet-sieving on No. 230 sieve. Filth is isolated from 40% isopropanol by using Na4EDTA and mineral oil. Average recoveries by 9 collaborators for 3 spike levels of rat hairs (5, 10, and 15) were 84, 78, and 79%, respectively; for insect fragments (5, 15, and 30), recoveries were 92, 95, and 96%, respectively. The method was adopted first action by AOAC International. PMID:8448444

  10. Collaborative Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Debora

    2014-01-01

    This practitioner research study investigates the power of multimodal texts within a real-world context and argues that a participatory culture focused on literary arts offers marginalized high school students opportunities for collaborative design and authoring. Additionally, this article invites educators to rethink the at-risk label. This…

  11. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach – The analysis is based on a multiple-case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new, clo...

  12. Perceptions of collaboration between general practitioners and community pharmacists: findings from a qualitative study based in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jové, Anna Maria; Fernández, Ana; Hughes, Carmel; Guillén-Solà, Mireia; Rovira, Marta; Rubio-Valera, Maria

    2014-07-01

    According to the theory of reasoned action (TRA), collaboration is only possible when it is perceived as useful by the participants involved. This paper describes a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews to explore the preceived usefulness of general practitioner (GPs)-community pharmacists (CPs)' collaboration from these professionals' perspectives based in two Spanish regions. Thirty-seven interviews were conducted with GPs and CPs with and without previous experience of collaborating with the other groups of professionals. Analysis of the data indicated that the GPs and CPs considered that collaboration between practitioners and pharmacists to have different forms of usefulness, ranging from positive to negative perceptions of usefulness. Negative and neutral opinions (collaboration generates conflict and/or is not benefitial) could prevent practitioners from initiating collaboration with the other group of professionals, which is explained by the TRA. These perceptions were only found among those participants without experience in collaboration. When collaboration was perceived as advantageous, it could be beneficial on three levels: health system (i.e. provision of integrated care, increased efficiency of the system), GPs and CPs (i.e. increased job satisfaction and patient loyalty) and patients (i.e. improved patient safety). Although GPs and CPs with experience identified benefits using a range of examples, GPs and CPs who had never collaborated also believed that if collaboration was undertaken there would be benefits for the health system, patients and health professionals. These results should be considered when developing strategies to encourage and improve the implementation of collaborative working relationships between GPs and pharmacists in primary care. PMID:24625196

  13. Obesity and liver cancer mortality in Asia: the Asia Pacific Cohort Study Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Batty, G David; Barzi, Federica; Huxley, Rachel; Chang, Charissa Y.; Jee, Sun Ha; Jamrozik, Konrad; WHITLOCK, Gary; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Fang, Xianghua; Lam, Tai H; Woodward, Mark

    2009-01-01

    While obesity is associated with liver cancer in studies from western societies, the paucity of data from Asia limits insights into its aetiological role in this population. We examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and liver cancer using data from the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration. In 309,203 Asian study members, four years of follow-up gave rise to 11,135 deaths from all causes, 420 of which were ascribed to liver cancer. BMI, whether categorised according to cu...

  14. The Phenomenon of Collaboration: A Phenomenologic Study of Collaboration between Family Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology Departments at an Academic Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David R.; Brewster, Cheryl D.; Karides, Marina; Lukas, Lou A.

    2011-01-01

    Collaboration is essential to manage complex real world problems. We used phenomenologic methods to elaborate a description of collaboration between two departments at an academic medical center who considered their relationship to represent a model of effective collaboration. Key collaborative structures included a shared vision and commitment by…

  15. 3M Petrifilm enterobacteriaceae count plate method for enumeration of enterobacteriaceae in selected foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbernagel, Karen M; Lindberg, Kathryn G

    2003-01-01

    The practice of detecting and enumerating all oxidase-negative, glucose-fermenting-Gram-negative rods (i.e., the family Enterobacteriaceae) is used to indicate unsanitary or inadequate food processing conditions. The objective of this interlaboratory collaborative study was to evaluate and compare the methods described in Standard Methods for the Examination of Dairy Products (SMEDP) and the Compendium of Methods for the Microbiological Examination of Foods (Compendium) with a commercial product, the 3M Petrifilm Enterobacteriaceae Count Plate, for the recovery of Enterobacteriaceae in foods. Six foods--cheddar cheese, milk, flour, frozen prepared meals, frozen broccoli, and nut pieces--were analyzed for Enterobacteriaceae by 12 collaborating laboratories. For each food tested, the collaborators received 8 blind test portions consisting of a control test portion and 3 levels of inoculated test portion, each in duplicate. Each test portion was tested by the Petrifilm Enterobacteriaceae Count Plate method as well as the SMEDP or Compendium methods. The precision estimates (repeatability or within-laboratory variation, and reproducibility or between-laboratory variation) were calculated with standard statistical techniques.

  16. Students' experiences of collaboration during and after an interprofessional training ward course: a mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Lachmann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to obtain a deeper understanding of how students experience and perceive interprofessional collaboration connected to their learning activities during and after an interprofessional clinical course. Methods: A sample of 15 healthcare students participating on a two-week interprofessional clinical course was used. A mixed method approach was used for data collection. The students' perceptions were gathered several times a day via mobile phones by using the Contextual Activity Sampling System (CASS and they were also interviewed after the course. Results: The data revealed an interesting discrepancy between the students' learning experiences reported during the course compared to their perceptions after the course. The students were generally more critical during the course, i.e., they tended to report things that did not work well. In the post-course interviews, the students reported that difficulties had been solved during the course. The students emphasized also the importance of structure, interaction, and insights into one's own and other professions' tasks as a base for fruitful interprofessional collaboration. Furthermore, they underlined the benefits of interprofessional team learning with opportunities to contribute to and to acquire new knowledge. Conclusions: The CASS methodology provides possibilities to identify students' and student teams' needs of support to reach the intended learning outcomes of a specific course. Our results might be useful when developing clinical education with a special focus on supporting students in their collaborative practices.

  17. Collaborative study of the colorimetric determination of zirconium in antiperspirant aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A previously published method for determining zirconium in antiperspirant aerosols was collaboratively studied by 7 laboratories. The method consists of 2 procedures: a rapid dilution procedure for soluble zirconium compounds or a lengthier fusion procedure for total zirconium followed by colorimetric determination. The collaborators were asked to perform the following: Spiking materials representing 4 levels of soluble zirconium were added to weighed portions of a zirconium-free cream base concentrate and the portions were assayed by the dilution procedure. Spiking materials representing 4 levels of zirconium in either the soluble or the insoluble form (or as a mixture) were also added to portions of the same concentrate and these portions were assayed by the fusion procedure. They were also asked to concentrate and assay, by both procedures, 2 cans each of 2 commercial aerosol antiperspirants containing zirconyl hydroxychloride. The average percent recoveries and standard deviations for spiked samples were 99.8-100.2 and 1.69-2.71, respectively, for soluble compounds determined by the dilution procedure, and 93.8-97.4 and 3.09-4.78, respectively, for soluble and/or insoluble compounds determined by the fusion procedure. The average perent zirconium found by the dilution procedure in the 2 commercial aerosol products was 0.751 and 0.792. Insufficient collaborative results were received for the fusion procedure for statistical evaluation. The dilution procedure has been adopted as official first action

  18. Agent Behavior-Based Simulation Study on Mass Collaborative Product Development Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass collaborative product development (MCPD benefits people by high innovation products with lower cost and shorter lead time due to quick development of group innovation, Internet-based customization, and prototype manufacturing. Simulation is an effective way to study the evolution process and therefore to guarantee the success of MCPD. In this paper, an agent behavior-based simulation approach of MCPD is developed, which models the MCPD process as the interactive process of design agents and the environment objects based on Complex Adaptive System (CAS theory. Next, the structure model of design agent is proposed, and the modification and collaboration behaviors are described. Third, the agent behavior-based simulation flow of MCPD is designed. At last, simulation experiments are carried out based on an engineering case of mobile phone design. The experiment results show the following: (1 the community scale has significant influence on MCPD process; (2 the simulation process can explicitly represent the modification and collaboration behaviors of design agents; (3 the community evolution process can be observed and analyzed dynamically based on simulation data.

  19. Collaborative study to recalibrate the International Reference Preparation of Anti-D Immunoglobulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Gunson, H H; Bowell, P J; Kirkwood, T B

    1980-01-01

    A collaborative study involving nine independent assays by eight laboratories has recalibrated the anti-D concentration of the International Reference Preparation of Anti-D Immunoglobulin (68/417) in terms of the International Standard for Anti-Rho (anti-D) Incomplete Blood Typing Serum (64/16). This study was carried out when it was found that 68/419 had been calibrated not against 64/16, as originally intended, but inadvertently against another preparation. Based on the results, a revised r...

  20. Effect of Collaborative Studies on Prospective Teachers’ Creative Thinking Skills while Designing Computer Based Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih BİRİŞÇİ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study to examine effect of collaborative studies on prospective teachers‟ creative thinking skills while designing computer based materials. One group pre-test and post-test design of the pre-experimental model was used to achieve the objectives of the study. This experimental study have been applied to 34 prospective teachers who studied at Artvin Coruh University Facult of Education Primary Education Department in 2009-2010 spring term within the context of “Computer-II” course. “Creative Thinking Skill Scale” was applied at two different stages as pre-test and post-test and opinions of students were gathered about the method in research via interview forms. As a result, it was found that there was a significant difference between the prospective teachers‟ creative thinking skills and scores taken from scale were increased in favor of post-test. Collaborative group works have a great importance in occurrence of this increase was revealed from student views.

  1. IPCS COLLABORATIVE STUDY ON PLANT SYSTEMS TO DETECT GENOTOXIC EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS: VICIA FABA CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATION ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collaborative study involving laboratories in six countries was initiated under the auspices of the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the World Health Organization ...

  2. Interprofessional collaborative practice within cancer teams: Translating evidence into action. A mixed methods study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberge Danièle

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A regional integrated cancer network has implemented a program (educational workshops, reflective and mentoring activities designed to support the uptake of evidence-informed interprofessional collaborative practices (referred to in this text as EIPCP within cancer teams. This research project, which relates to the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario (RNAO Best Practice Guidelines and other sources of research evidence, represents a unique opportunity to learn more about the factors and processes involved in the translation of evidence-based recommendations into professional practices. The planned study seeks to address context-specific challenges and the concerns of nurses and other stakeholders regarding the uptake of evidence-based recommendations to effectively promote and support interprofessional collaborative practices. Aim This study aims to examine the uptake of evidence-based recommendations from best practice guidelines intended to enhance interprofessional collaborative practices within cancer teams. Design The planned study constitutes a practical trial, defined as a trial designed to provide comprehensive information that is grounded in real-world healthcare dynamics. An exploratory mixed methods study design will be used. It will involve collecting quantitative data to assess professionals' knowledge and attitudes, as well as practice environment factors associated with effective uptake of evidence-based recommendations. Semi-structured interviews will be conducted concurrently with care providers to gather qualitative data for describing the processes involved in the translation of evidence into action from both the users' (n = 12 and providers' (n = 24 perspectives. The Graham et al. Ottawa Model of Research Use will serve to construct operational definitions of concepts, and to establish the initial coding labels to be used in the thematic analysis of the qualitative data. Quantitative and qualitative

  3. RAZOR EX Anthrax Air Detection System for detection of Bacillus anthracis spores from aerosol collection samples: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Ted; Ryan, Valorie; Spaulding, Usha K; Clemens, Kristine M; Ota, Irene M; Brunelle, Sharon L

    2013-01-01

    The RAZOR EX Anthrax Air Detection System was validated in a collaborative study for the detection of Bacillus anthracis in aerosol collection buffer. Phosphate-buffered saline was charged with 1 mg/mL standardized dust to simulate an authentic aerosol collection sample. The dust-charged buffer was spiked with either B. anthracis Ames at 2000 spores/mL or Bacillus cereus at 20 000 spores/mL. Twelve collaborators participated in the study, with four collaborators at each of three sites. Each collaborator tested 12 replicates of B. anthracis in dust-charged buffer and 12 replicates of B. cereus in dust-charged buffer. All samples sets were randomized and blind-coded. All collaborators produced valid data sets (no collaborators displayed systematic errors) and there was only one invalid data point. After unblinding, the analysis revealed a cross-collaborator probability of detection (CPOD) of 1.00 (144 positive results from 144 replicates, 95% confidence interval 0.975-1.00) for the B. anthracis samples and a CPOD of 0.00 (0 positive results from 143 replicates, 95% confidence interval 0.00-0.0262) for the B. cereus samples. These data meet the requirements of AOAC Standard Method Performance Requirement 2010.003, developed by the Stakeholder Panel on Agent Detection Assays. PMID:23767365

  4. Giving Back: Collaborations with Others in Ecological Studies on the Nevada National Security Site - 13058

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formerly named the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) was the historical site for nuclear weapons testing from the 1950's to the early 1990's. The site was renamed in 2010 to reflect the diversity of nuclear, energy, and homeland security activities now conducted at the site. Biological and ecological programs and research have been conducted on the site for decades to address the impacts of radiation and to take advantage of the relatively undisturbed and isolated lands for gathering basic information on the occurrence and distribution of native plants and animals. Currently, the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) oversees the radiological biota monitoring and ecological compliance programs on the NNSS. The top priority of these programs are compliance with federal and state regulations. They focus on performing radiological dose assessments for the public who reside near the NNSS and for populations of plants and animals on the NNSS and in protecting important species and habitat from direct impacts of mission activities. The NNSS serves as an invaluable outdoor laboratory. The geographic and ecological diversity of the site offers researchers many opportunities to study human influences on ecosystems. NNSA/NSO has pursued collaborations with outside agencies and organizations to be able to conduct programs and studies that enhance radiological biota monitoring and ecosystem preservation when budgets are restrictive, as well as to provide valuable scientific information to the human health and natural resource communities at large. NNSA/NSO is using one current collaborative study to better assess the potential dose to the off-site public from the ingestion of game animals, the most realistic pathway for off-site public exposure at this time from radionuclide contamination on the NNSS. A second

  5. Giving Back: Collaborations with Others in Ecological Studies on the Nevada National Security Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott A. Wade (NFO); Kathryn S. Knapp (NFO); Cathy A. Wills (NSTec)

    2013-02-24

    Formerly named the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) was the historical site for nuclear weapons testing from the 1950s to the early 1990s. The site was renamed in 2010 to reflect the diversity of nuclear, energy, and homeland security activities now conducted at the site. Biological and ecological programs and research have been conducted on the site for decades to address the impacts of radiation and to take advantage of the relatively undisturbed and isolated lands for gathering basic information on the occurrence and distribution of native plants and animals. Currently, the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) oversees the radiological biota monitoring and ecological compliance programs on the NNSS. The top priority of these programs are compliance with federal and state regulations. They focus on performing radiological dose assessments for the public who reside near the NNSS and for populations of plants and animals on the NNSS and in protecting important species and habitat from direct impacts of mission activities. The NNSS serves as an invaluable outdoor laboratory. The geographic and ecological diversity of the site offers researchers many opportunities to study human influences on ecosystems. NNSA/NSO has pursued collaborations with outside agencies and organizations to be able to conduct programs and studies that enhance radiological biota monitoring and ecosystem preservation when budgets are restrictive, as well as to provide valuable scientific information to the human health and natural resource communities at large. NNSA/NSO is using one current collaborative study to better assess the potential dose to the off-site public from the ingestion of game animals, the most realistic pathway for off-site public exposure at this time from radionuclide contamination on the NNSS. A second

  6. Essential features influencing collaboration in team-based non-specific back pain rehabilitation: Findings from a mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Hellman, Therese; Jensen, Irene; Bergström, Gunnar; Brämberg, Elisabeth Björk

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of the study presented in this article was to explore how professionals, without guidelines for implementing interprofessional teamwork, experience the collaboration within team-based rehabilitation for people with back pain and how this collaboration influences their clinical practice. This study employed a mixed methods design. A questionnaire was answered by 383 participants and 17 participants were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using content analysis. The quan...

  7. A Qualitative Case Study of Teachers' Perceptions of Professional Learning through Mandated Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Barbara C.

    2016-01-01

    Teacher collaboration is a school improvement priority that has the potential to positively impact student learning by building the capacity of teachers. In some states, teacher collaboration is mandated by legislation. The literature indicates that policy-driven collaboration in a top-down approach results in unintentional consequences and…

  8. Community and research staff collaboration for development of materials to inform microbicide study participants in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Woodsong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical trials of new vaginal products require careful communication with participants about trial requirements. Most microbicide trials have been multi-site studies conducted among women in sub-Saharan Africa, where literacy levels and understanding of scientific methods differ from those designing and conducting the trials. Microbicide trials require women to insert objects in their vagina and ensure they are present in the vagina during sex. For many women, this is a novel behaviour. These behaviours take place within the context of clinical trial participation, which is an additional novelty. Research teams must develop informational materials to help participants understand the clinical trial and input from local research staff and community members can improve the content and format of these materials. Methods: This paper discusses the development of illustrated materials developed for microbicide trial participants, presenting examples from two studies. In both studies, research staff and community advisory groups collaborated to review and revise materials. Results: Collaborative efforts revealed insights about how to convey information about clinical trial participation and microbicide use. These insights highlighted realities of the local context, details that might be misunderstood, illustrations of a sensitive nature and concerns about blood testing. In particular, information about blood testing and product use instructions required careful consideration. Although the research team anticipated needing advice on how best to convey information on these topics to participants, some aspects of potential participant concerns about these topics were also new to the research team. Community advisors and local research staff suggested better ways to convey this information, and provided guidance on how to use the materials. Conclusions: The collaboration served to develop informational materials for microbicide trial

  9. The Role and Value of Collaboration in the Logistics Industry: An Empirical Study in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Pateman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the role and value of collaboration through telephone interviews with 32 senior managers in the Australian logistics industry. Key findings from this elite sample include collaboration being a significant strategy which has been successfully utilised to grow business over the past three years by the majority of the sample. Their strong commitment to collaboration as a strategy demonstrates its perceived value to their organisations. The interviewees anticipate that the number of collaborations will continue to grow in the industry over the next decade, indicating that managing collaboration's key enablers, such as business facilitation skills, is important to ongoing success. Reinforcing collaboration enablers may benefit organisations collaborating in Australian and Asian logistics systems.

  10. Inter-functional collaboration between marketing and logistic functions : Study of improvement of inter functional collaboration through instruments, based on empirical research at Nivea Seoul ltd

    OpenAIRE

    Dorresteijn, Joop

    2009-01-01

      Introduction The aim of the research is to understand collaboration between marketing and logistics, increasing knowledge about perceived barriers in organizations, in order to addressing functional silos in organizations by inter-functional collaboration as a solution. The author questions the advantages of inter-functional collaboration in the scope of organizational performance. The significance of this research is that collaboration is one of the remaining cost cutting advantages that a...

  11. Learner Engagement in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Environments: A mixed-methods study in postgraduate education

    OpenAIRE

    Piki, Andriani

    2012-01-01

    The thesis draws on a mixed-methods study which empirically and theoretically investigates the ways in which postgraduate students engage in collaborative learning activities facilitated by technology. The research is both significant and distinct in its approach towards understanding how learners engage in real-life computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) settings; what enables or hinders learner engagement; and how engagement shapes the learning outcomes. T...

  12. Investigating the barriers to teaching family physicians' and specialists' collaboration in the training environment: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaulieu Marie-Dominique

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaboration between physicians in different specialties is often taken for granted. However, poor interactions between family physicians and specialists contribute significantly to the observed discontinuity between primary and specialty care. The objective of this study was to explore how collaboration between family physicians and specialists was conceptualised as a competency and experienced in residency training curricula of four faculties of medicine in Canada. Methods This is a multiple-case study based on Abbott's theory of professions. Programs targeted were family medicine, general psychiatry, radiology, and internal medicine. The content of the programs' objectives was analyzed. Associate deans of postgraduate studies, program directors, educators, and residents were interviewed individually or in focus groups (47 residents and 45 faculty members. Results The training objectives related to family physicians-specialists collaboration were phrased in very general terms and lacked specificity. Obstacles to effective collaboration were aggregated under themes of professional responsibility and questioned expertise. Both trainees and trainers reported increasing distances between specialty and general medicine in three key fields of the professional system: the workplace arena, the training setting, and the production of academic knowledge. Conclusion The challenges of developing collaborating skills between generalists and specialist physicians are comparable in many ways to those encountered in inter-professional collaboration and should be given more consideration than they currently receive if we want to improve coordination between primary and specialty care.

  13. Alternative sieving method for extraction of light filth from cheeses: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, M J

    1994-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted on an alternative sieving method for the extraction of light filth from cheeses. The alternative method was developed that is applicable to broad variety of cheeses. A 225 g test portion is dispersed in a solution of 5.7% HCl, Igepal CO-730, and Igepal DM-710. Digested cheese is wet-sieved on a No. 230 sieve. The residue is treated with Tergitol Anionic 4, transferred to 1% sodium lauryl sulfate solution, heated, and maintained at 65 degrees-75 degrees C for 10 min. The residue is washed with these 2 surfactants a maximum of 4 times until it is reduced to an amount that is filterable. The residue is filtered and the filter papers are examined microscopically at a magnification of ca 30x. Average recoveries by 9 collaborators for 3 spike levels of rat hairs (5, 10, and 15) were 80, 68, and 81%, respectively; for insect fragments (5, 15, and 30) recoveries were 97, 90, and 92%, respectively. The alternative sieving method for extraction of light filth from cheeses has been adopted first action by AOAC INTERNATIONAL. PMID:7950417

  14. Collaborative study comparing the spiral plate and aerobic plate count methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, J E; Donnelly, C B; Peeler, J T; Campbell, J E

    1977-07-01

    The spiral plate count method is a semiautomated plating technique that greatly reduces manpower and material costs normally associated with the pour plating technique. In this collaborative study, 8 laboratories compared the spiral and pour plating techniques, using 4 samples each of 3 products: frozen pumpkin pie, frozen chicken pot pie, and shampoo. The results show that 10 of the 12 comparisons of means of the pour and spiral methods were not significantly different; 2 values were significant at alpha = 0.01. Overall, the components of variance were less than that of the current milk standard, and the replicate per cent coefficient of variation was satisfactory. This study indicates that the spiral plate method is an acceptable alternative to the pour plate method; the spiral plate method has been adopted as official first action.

  15. Extraction of light filth from oriental fish products containing spice: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, L E

    1993-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted to validate a new method for the extraction of light filth from oriental fish products containing spice. A 100 g test portion is digested by boiling in a mixture of HCl, Igepal DM-710, and CO-730. Light filth is isolated by wet-sieving on a No. 230 plain-weave sieve with Tergitol, deaeration boiling in 40% isopropanol, and extracting with mineral oil-heptane (85 + 15) and 40% isopropanol in a Wildman trap flask. Three spiking levels for rat hairs and insect fragments were used in the study. For rat hairs, recoveries at the low, medium, and high levels averaged 80.0, 71.6, and 88.0%, respectively. Recoveries of insect fragments for low, medium, and high levels averaged 87.8, 83.7, and 89.4%, respectively. The method was adopted first action by AOAC International. PMID:8448443

  16. Reverse Engineering and Software Products Reuse to Teach Collaborative Web Portals: A Case Study with Final-Year Computer Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Dominguez, Fuensanta; Sanchez-Segura, Maria-Isabel; Mora-Soto, Arturo; Amescua, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The development of collaborative Web applications does not follow a software engineering methodology. This is because when university students study Web applications in general, and collaborative Web portals in particular, they are not being trained in the use of software engineering techniques to develop collaborative Web portals. This paper…

  17. Understanding the Diverse Forms of Nonprofit Collaborations: A Case Study of Communities in Schools of North Texas and its Partner Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Hee Soun Jang; Jesus Valero; JongWook Kim; Kristina Cramb

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand and categorize the diverse forms of collaborations, and explore the challenges of cross sector collaborations. To achieve these purposes, we analyze documentation of 132 collaborative partnerships of Communities in School of North Texas (CISNT), and conduct interviews with select partners of CISNT. Our results suggest that the nature of collaborations vary. Partnerships tend to be informal and resource sharing. The findings further indicate that no...

  18. A Study of Scenic Spot Living Facility Recommendation Based on Collaborative Filtering

    OpenAIRE

    Luo Wenbiao

    2015-01-01

    For the collection of massive complex information, the collaborative filtering system can work as a highly efficient information screening tool. It can recommend reasonable information reserve with multi angles according to the living service facility information of the scenic spots. The collaborative filtering system can collect information and forecast rating results based on users’ preference. According to different recommendation goals, the collaborative filtering system can recommend res...

  19. Civic Education as a Collaborative Dimension of Social Studies Education in Attainment of Political Ethics in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dania, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The paper investigated Civic Education as a collaborative dimension of Social Studies Education in attainment of political ethics in Nigeria. The study adopted the survey research design. The sample for the study consisted of 580 Social Studies teachers selected from thirty secondary schools in the three senatorial districts of Delta State. The…

  20. Trust repertoires for collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Lars

    This case study analyses the role of trust in a public private innovation network that involved a private consultancy company as a facilitator. We know that collaboration is a important for innovation, and that collaboration across organizational boundaries is not a trivial issue. But we know very...... little about how such processes develop and how trust, understood as “confident positive expectations” (Lewicki et al. 1998) to collaborative activities, arises out of collaboration. The paper contributes by showing how trust and collaboration are intertwined. The main finding is that a facilitator can...

  1. Knowledge-to-action processes in SHRTN collaborative communities of practice: A study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chambers Larry

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Seniors Health Research Transfer Network (SHRTN Collaborative is a network of networks that work together to improve the health and health care of Ontario seniors. The collaborative facilitates knowledge exchange through a library service, knowledge brokers (KBs, local implementation teams, collaborative technology, and, most importantly, Communities of Practice (CoPs whose members work together to identify innovations, translate evidence, and help implement changes. This project aims to increase our understanding of knowledge-to-action (KTA processes mobilized through SHRTN CoPs that are working to improve the health of Ontario seniors. For this research, KTA refers to the movement of research and experience-based knowledge between social contexts, and the use of that knowledge to improve practice. We will examine the KTA processes themselves, as well as the role of human agents within those processes. The conceptual framework we have adopted to inform our research is the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS framework. Methods/design This study will use a multiple case study design (minimum of nine cases over three years to investigate how SHRTN CoPs work and pursue knowledge exchange in different situations. Each case will yield a unique narrative, framed around the three PARIHS dimensions: evidence, context, and facilitation. Together, the cases will shed light on how SHRTN CoPs approach their knowledge exchange initiatives, and how they respond to challenges and achieve their objectives. Data will be collected using interviews, document analysis, and ethnographic observation. Discussion This research will generate new knowledge about the defining characteristics of CoPs operating in the health system, on leadership roles in CoPs, and on the nature of interaction processes, relationships, and knowledge exchange mechanisms. Our work will yield a better understanding of the factors that

  2. Patient-Specific Prosthetic Fingers by Remote Collaboration - A Case Study

    CERN Document Server

    Cabibihan, John-John

    2011-01-01

    The concealment of amputation through prosthesis usage can shield an amputee from social stigma and help improve the emotional healing process especially at the early stages of hand or finger loss. However, the traditional techniques in prosthesis fabrication defy this as the patients need numerous visits to the clinics for measurements, fitting and follow-ups. This paper presents a method for constructing a prosthetic finger through online collaboration with the designer. The main input from the amputee comes from the Computer Tomography (CT) data in the region of the affected and the non-affected fingers. These data are sent over the internet and the prosthesis is constructed using visualization, computer-aided design and manufacturing tools. The finished product is then shipped to the patient. A case study with a single patient having an amputated ring finger at the proximal interphalangeal joint shows that the proposed method has a potential to address the patient's psychosocial concerns and minimize the ...

  3. Brine saturation technique for extraction of light filth from rubbed, ground, and whole sage: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, C C

    1985-01-01

    A new approach to the isolation of light filth from the 3 commercial forms of sage was studied collaboratively. It incorporates a simple isopropanol defatting, followed by saturation of the product with brine by alternately heating and cooling, and subsequent trapping of filth from tap water with olive oil. This method circumvents the use of hazardous, expensive solvents and more time-consuming pretreatment procedures. Overall recoveries were 92.1% for rodent hair and 78.7% for insect fragments on clean, easy-to-read papers. An additional blending step was necessary to obtain satisfactory recovery of rodent hair fragments from whole sage. The method has been adopted official first action for light filth in rubbed and ground sage only. PMID:4055634

  4. Study of cognitive and technological prerequisites for virtual laboratories and collaborative virtual environments for radiopharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This academic work explains a general view of virtual laboratories (VL) and collaborative virtual environments (CVE) (called, together, a VL/CVE set), focusing their technological features and analyzing the common cognitive features of their users. Also is presented a detailed description of VL/CVE VirRAD (Virtual Radiopharmacy), created specially to connect and support the international radiopharmacy community around the world, and is explained an analysis of their users' cognitive profile, under the perspective of two of the most important cognitive theories of the 20th century: multiple intelligences, by Howard Gardner, and mindful learning, by Ellen Langer. Conclusions from this study has been incorporated, as feature enhancements, to a software prototype created based upon VirRAD software solution, and the hardcopy of their screens is exposed at the end of this work. It is also an essential idea that the conclusions of this work are relevant to any VL/CVE environment. (author)

  5. Interdisciplinary collaboration experiences in creating an everyday rehabilitation model: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moe A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aud Moe,1,2 Hildfrid V Brataas1,2 1Faculty of Health Science, Nord University, Steinkjer, Nord-Trøndelag, 2Center of Care Research, Mid-Norway, Steinkjer, Nord-Trøndelag, Norway Background: When functional impairment occurs, assistance to achieve self-help can lead to qualitatively more active everyday life for recipients and better use of community resources. Home-based everyday rehabilitation is a new interdisciplinary service for people living at home. Rehabilitation involves meeting the need for interprofessional services, interdisciplinary collaboration, and coordination of services. Everyday rehabilitation is a service that requires close interdisciplinary cooperation. The purpose of this study was to gain knowledge about employees' experiences with establishing a new multidisciplinary team and developing a team-based work model. Method: The study had a qualitative design using two focus group interviews with a newly established rehabilitation team. The sample consisted of an occupational therapist, two care workers with further education in rehabilitation, a nurse, a physiotherapist, and a project leader. Data were analyzed by thematic content analysis. Results: The data highlight three phases: a planning phase (ten meetings over half a year, a startup phase of trials of interdisciplinary everyday rehabilitation in practice (2 months, and a third period specifying and implementing an everyday rehabilitation model (6 months. During these phases, three themes emerged: 1 team creation and design of the service, 2 targeted practical trials, and 3 equality of team members and combining interdisciplinary methods. Conclusion: The team provided information about three processes: developing work routines and a revised team-based flow chart, developing team cooperation with integrated trans- and interdisciplinary collaboration, and working with external exchange. There is more need for secure network solutions. Keywords: everyday rehabilitation

  6. Practicing Accounting Profession Criterial Skills in the Classroom: A Study of Collaborative Testing and the Impact on Final Exam Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderLaan, Ski R.

    2010-01-01

    This mixed methods study (Creswell, 2008) was designed to test the influence of collaborative testing on learning using a quasi-experimental approach. This study used a modified embedded mixed method design in which the qualitative and quantitative data, associated with the secondary questions, provided a supportive role in a study based primarily…

  7. Collaborative Relationships In The Portuguese Automotive Industry: A Case Study Of Mitsubishi Trucks Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Veludo, M; Macbeth, D K

    1999-01-01

    This paper is concerned to investigate the establishment of collaborative relationships between Mitsubishi Trucks Europe, S.A. and its direct suppliers located in Portugal. By drawing on research findings it provides clarification of these collaborative relationships and provides recommendations for future action.

  8. Collaborative Learning Using Wiki Web Sites for Computer Science Undergraduate Education: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, W.-T.; Li, W.; Elston, J.; Chen, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a collaborative approach to enhancing the student learning experience based on Web 2.0 principles. Specifically, wiki Web sites are used by students for collaboration and for publication of course assignments, which are then shared with the class. Web 2.0 principles include: the Web as platform, harnessing collective…

  9. Case Study in the Power of Collaboration: Planning Process for the Kansas Educational Leadership Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devin, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the collaborative efforts undertaken for systematic statewide support for the recruitment, development, and retention of quality leaders in schools and school districts in Kansas, USA. The author presents the case of a strong sense of "collaboration" that made the difference and stimulated movement from vision…

  10. Cross-collaborative supply chains: serious gaming via a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsma, Christiaan; Dalmolen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Collaboration currently is crucial for stakeholders operating in the supply chain. Nevertheless effective and sustainable forms of inter- and intra-supply-chain collaboration are scarce in practice. Often this is caused by the false interpretation of conflicts of interest on sharing benefits or sens

  11. Fostering Collaboration through IT Tools: An Experimental Study of Public Deliberation on Water Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qian

    2011-01-01

    Most of challenges facing today's government cannot be resolved without collaborative efforts from multiple non-state stakeholders, organizations, and active participation from citizens. Collaborative governance has become an important form of management practice. Yet the success of this inclusive management approach depends on whether government…

  12. Social Media, Collaboration and Social Learning--A Case-Study of Foreign Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondahl, Margrethe; Razmerita, Liana

    2014-01-01

    Social media has created new possibilities for digitally native students to engage, interact and collaborate in learning tasks that foster learning processes and the overall learning experience. Using both qualitative and quantitative data, this article discusses experiences and challenges of using a social media-enhanced collaborative learning…

  13. Interdisciplinary Strategy and Collaboration: A Case Study of American Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Institutions face pressure from governmental agencies and industry to support collaborative activity on campus. This research examines two forms of collaboration, interdisciplinary teaching and research, to better understand the strategies and influences fostering such work. Using Kezar and Lester's (2009) model of intra-organizational…

  14. Student-Faculty Collaborative Research: A Qualitative Study of Experiences with the Authorship Determination Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welfare, Laura E.; Sackett, Corrine; Moorefield-Lang, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring students through collaborative research can be an effective method for cultivating student development as scholars; but negotiating the division of responsibilities and recognition may be difficult due to the inherent complexities of the relationship between collaborators and the research process itself. A national sample of 440 students…

  15. Collaborative study for the validation of an improved HPLC assay for recombinant IFN-alfa-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, K H; Daas, A; Buchheit, K H; Terao, E

    2016-01-01

    The current European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) texts for Interferon (IFN)-alfa-2 include a nonspecific photometric protein assay using albumin as calibrator and a highly variable cell-based assay for the potency determination of the protective effects. A request was expressed by the Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) for improved methods for the batch control of recombinant interferon alfa-2 bulk and market surveillance testing of finished products, including those formulated with Human Serum Albumin (HSA). A HPLC method was developed at the Medical Products Agency (MPA, Sweden) for the testing of IFN-alfa-2 products. An initial collaborative study run under the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP; study code BSP039) revealed the need for minor changes to improve linearity of the calibration curves, assay reproducibility and robustness. The goal of the collaborative study, coded BSP071, was to transfer and further validate this improved HPLC method. Ten laboratories participated in the study. Four marketed IFN-alfa-2 preparations (one containing HSA) together with the Ph. Eur. Chemical Reference Substance (CRS) for IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b, and in-house reference standards from two manufacturers were used for the quantitative assay. The modified method was successfully transferred to all laboratories despite local variation in equipment. The resolution between the main and the oxidised forms of IFN-alfa-2 was improved compared to the results from the BSP039 study. The improved method even allowed partial resolution of an extra peak after the principal peak. Symmetry of the main IFN peak was acceptable for all samples in all laboratories. Calibration curves established with the Ph. Eur. IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b CRSs showed excellent linearity with intercepts close to the origin and coefficients of determination greater than 0.9995. Assay repeatability, intermediate precision and reproducibility varied with the tested sample within acceptable

  16. Understanding the Diverse Forms of Nonprofit Collaborations: A Case Study of Communities in Schools of North Texas and its Partner Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Soun Jang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to understand and categorize the diverse forms of collaborations, and explore the challenges of cross sector collaborations. To achieve these purposes, we analyze documentation of 132 collaborative partnerships of Communities in School of North Texas (CISNT, and conduct interviews with select partners of CISNT. Our results suggest that the nature of collaborations vary. Partnerships tend to be informal and resource sharing. The findings further indicate that nonprofits face challenges in the collaborative process including management of accountability and interorganizational communication.

  17. Collaborative study concerning the enzymatic determination of starch in food, feed and raw materials of the starch industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunt, K.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the collaborative study for establishing the repeatability and reproducibility of a recently developed new enzymatic starch determination. The ring test was in accordance to the ISO 5725 requirements for interlaboratory studies. The interlaboratory test resulted in a good relati

  18. Examining the Roles of Blended Learning Approaches in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Environments: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Hyo-Jeong; Bonk, Curtis J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a Delphi method was used to identify and predict the roles of blended learning approaches in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments. The Delphi panel consisted of experts in online learning from different geographic regions of the world. This study discusses findings related to (a) pros and cons of blended…

  19. Body-mass index and cause-specific mortality in 900 000 adults: collaborative analyses of 57 prospective studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whitlock, G.; Lewington, S.; Sherliker, P.; Clarke, R.; Kromhout, D.

    2009-01-01

    Background - The main associations of body-mass index (BMI) with overall and cause-specific mortality can best be assessed by long-term prospective follow-up of large numbers of people. The Prospective Studies Collaboration aimed to investigate these associations by sharing data from many studies. M

  20. Study of Co-Located and Distant Collaboration with Symbolic Support via a Haptics-Enhanced Virtual Reality Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shih-Ching; Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Wang, Jin-Liang; Zhan, Shi-Yi

    2013-01-01

    This study intends to investigate how multi-symbolic representations (text, digits, and colors) could effectively enhance the completion of co-located/distant collaborative work in a virtual reality context. Participants' perceptions and behaviors were also studied. A haptics-enhanced virtual reality task was developed to conduct…

  1. The Challenges of Models-Based Practice in Physical Education Teacher Education: A Collaborative Self-Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Tim; Casey, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    There are two purposes of this study. The first is to examine our experiences as beginning teacher educators who taught using models-based practice (using the example of Cooperative Learning). The second is to consider the benefits of using collaborative self-study to foster deep understandings of teacher education practice. The findings highlight…

  2. Body-mass index and cause-specific mortality in 900 000 adults: collaborative analyses of 57 prospective studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NN, NN; Whitlock, Gary; Lewington, Sarah;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main associations of body-mass index (BMI) with overall and cause-specific mortality can best be assessed by long-term prospective follow-up of large numbers of people. The Prospective Studies Collaboration aimed to investigate these associations by sharing data from many studies....

  3. Utilising a Collaborative Macro-Script to Enhance Student Engagement: A Mixed Method Study in a 3D Virtual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouta, Hara; Retalis, Symeon; Paraskeva, Fotini

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effect of using an online 3D virtual environment in teaching Mathematics in Primary Education. In particular, it explores the extent to which student engagement--behavioral, affective and cognitive--is fostered by such tools in order to enhance collaborative learning. For the study we used a purpose-created 3D virtual…

  4. Collaborative Care for Patients With Severe Personality Disorders: Preliminary Results and Active Ingredients From a Pilot Study (Part I)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stringer, Barbara; Meijel, Berno van; Karman, Pieter; Koekkoek, Bauke; Hoogendoorn, Adriaan; Kerkhof, Ad; Beekman, Aartjan

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test if a collaborative care program (CCP) with nurses in a coordinating position is beneficial for patients with severe personality disorders. DESIGN AND METHODS: A pilot study with a comparative multiple case study design using mixed methods investigating active ingredients and prelimi

  5. Collaboration as a Tool to Improve Career and Technical Education: A Qualitative Study of Successful Collaboration among Extension Agents and Agricultural Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphrey, Theresa Pesl; Miller, Kimberley A.; Harlin, Julie; Rayfield, John

    2011-01-01

    Collaboration among Extension agents and agricultural science teachers has the potential to increase the reach of both organizations to serve clientele in obtaining critical skills and knowledge important to Career and Technical Education. However, successful collaboration requires that barriers be minimized and aspects of facilitation be…

  6. Nurses' views of interprofessional education and collaboration: a comparative study of recent graduates from three universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsson, Margaretha; Svensson, Annemie; Timpka, Toomas; Faresjö, Tomas

    2013-03-01

    Today interprofessional education (IPE) is spread throughout the world. In Sweden only one of the existing nursing programs has an IPE curriculum on several levels during the training. The aim of this study was to examine how nurses who recently graduated from universities with IPE or non-IPE curricula perceive the importance of different educational goals and whether they found themselves prepared for their profession, and especially for collaboration with other professions. Three universities with different commitments to IPE were studied. We used a survey with eight different targets: communication skills, cooperation with other professions, problem-solving capability, self-directed learning skills, whether their education has prepared them to work professionally, to perform research, to take care of acutely ill patients, to work preventively and working as a nurse. The participants were asked whether their undergraduate education had prepared them for these targets and whether they perceived that the targets were important goals for their education. A main result in this study was that nurses who had recently graduated from the IPE university perceived to a greater extent that their undergraduate training had prepared them to work together with other professions in comparison with nursing students from non-IPE universities.

  7. Innovations on a shoestring: a study of a collaborative community-based Aboriginal mental health service model in rural Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Douglas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaborative, culturally safe services that integrate clinical approaches with traditional Aboriginal healing have been hailed as promising approaches to ameliorate the high rates of mental health problems in Aboriginal communities in Canada. Overcoming significant financial and human resources barriers, a mental health team in northern Ontario is beginning to realize this ideal. We studied the strategies, strengths and challenges related to collaborative Aboriginal mental health care. Methods A participatory action research approach was employed to evaluate the Knaw Chi Ge Win services and their place in the broader mental health system. Qualitative methods were used as the primary source of data collection and included document review, ethnographic interviews with 15 providers and 23 clients; and 3 focus groups with community workers and managers. Results The Knaw Chi Ge Win model is an innovative, community-based Aboriginal mental health care model that has led to various improvements in care in a challenging rural, high needs environment. Formal opportunities to share information, shared protocols and ongoing education support this model of collaborative care. Positive outcomes associated with this model include improved quality of care, cultural safety, and integration of traditional Aboriginal healing with clinical approaches. Ongoing challenges include chronic lack of resources, health information and the still cursory understanding of Aboriginal healing and outcomes. Conclusions This model can serve to inform collaborative care in other rural and Indigenous mental health systems. Further research into traditional Aboriginal approaches to mental health is needed to continue advances in collaborative practice in a clinical setting.

  8. Prioritization and Implementation Plan for Collaborative Case Study on RPV Steels During Extended Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    Pathway is designed to help develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting long-term environmental degradation behavior of materials in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess performance of systems, structures, and components essential to safe and sustained operation. The Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization Pathway (RISMC) seeks to merge fundamental scientific understanding of critical phenomenological conditions and deterministic predictions of nuclear power plant performance with risk-informed characterization tools. This will provide an integrated characterization of public safety margins in an optimization of nuclear safety, plant performance, and long-term asset management. Clearly, these two pathways have many synergies in goals and outcomes. The data and mechanisms generated in the Materials Pathway may feed into and mold efforts within the RISMC Pathway. In addition, insights from the characterization tools developed in RISMC tasks may inform materials testing needs and experiments. To demonstrate this potentially powerful interaction, a joint case study has been proposed and initiated. This document describes the initial planning for a coordinated study between the Materials and the RISMC Pathways. A brief description of each Pathway is presented along with a more detailed description of the needs and requirements of this collaborative task. A list of criteria for any case-study candidate are then listed, along with the rationale for choosing pressurized thermal shock as the prime candidate an inter-pathway collaboration. A proposed timeline and organization of future interactions on this subject area is also presented.

  9. Assessing the value of collaboration in tourism networks: A case study of Elkhart County, Indiana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zach, Florian; Racherla, Pradeep

    2011-01-01

    networks. The model was tested using a cross section of tourism organizations operating within Elkhart County, Indiana. The results indicate that a significant positive value of collaboration is achieved from dyadic relationships. Importantly, the results suggest that the positive effect achieved from one......-to-one partnerships decreases once an organization collaborates with several other organizations. The article discusses various implications for managing strategic tourism partnerships....

  10. Final Report, CONTRIBUTIONS TO STUDIES OF CP VIOLATION AND HADRONIC PHYSICS WITH THE BABAR COLLABORATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David Norvil [University of Louisville

    2013-07-25

    The University of Louisville High Energy Physics group has undertaken a long-term effort in understanding baryon production in elementary particle processes in the 10 GeV energy region. We have contributed significantly to the broad program of the BaBar Collaboration, particularly in support of computing, data visualization, and simulation. We report here on progress in the areas of service to the Collaboration and understanding of baryon production via measurement of inclusive hadronic particle spectra.

  11. Distance Education Students Moving Towards Collaborative Learning - A Field Study of Australian Distance Education Students and Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva R Fåhræus

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance education has been offered to young students in Australia for about 100 years. Recently, information and communication technology has been introduced as a means to improve communication, but not all remote students have access to this new technology. This has made it difficult to arrange collaborative learning for distance-education students. In this student-focused study, more than 40 students as well as teachers and other important persons have been interviewed and observed in schools and on remote farms. Using Activity Theory for the analysis, different contradictions were identified. Lack of technology and access were not the only obstacles. The education was built on a tradition of individual learning, and the technology at hand was not supporting collaboration. However, contradictions may result in ‘expansive learning’ among students and teachers, leading to more of a development towards collaborative learning.

  12. The Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study, finding the genes causing Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Andrea; Fernandez, Thomas V; King, Robert A;

    2015-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet to be clarif......Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet......, it is clear that large patient cohorts and open-access repositories will be essential to further advance the field. To that end, the large multicenter Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study was established. The goal of the TIC Genetics study is to undertake a comprehensive gene...... discovery effort, focusing both on familial genetic variants with large effects within multiply affected pedigrees and on de novo mutations ascertained through the analysis of apparently simplex parent-child trios with non-familial tics. The clinical data and biomaterials (DNA, transformed cell lines, RNA...

  13. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: Study of Aerosol Sources and Processing at the GVAX Pantnagar Supersite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Joel A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Worsnop, Douglas [Aerodyne Research, Billerica, MA (United States)

    2016-09-22

    This project was part of a collaborative campaign, including the participation of scientists from seven research groups as part of the Winter Intensive Operating Period (January-February 2012) of the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign at a rural site in Detling, UK, 45 km southeast of central London to study wintertime sources of urban particulate matter. The UW contribution by PI Thornton’s group was to make the first deployment of a chemical ionization mass spectrometer instrument (MOVI-CI-ToFMS) to measure both particle and gas phase organic acids. The new instrument ran nearly continuously during the ClearfLo WINTER IOP at the Detling site, producing a first-ever data set of molecular composition information that can be used for source apportionment and process studies. The UW group published a paper in Environmental Science and Technology and contributed to another (Bohnenstengel et al BAMS 2015) detailing a direct molecular connection between biomass/biofuel burning particles and aerosol light absorption. The ES&T paper (Mohr, et al ES&T 2013) has received 42 citations in just 3 years indicative of its significant impact on the field. These measurements of urban and rural aerosol properties will contribute to improved modeling of regional aerosol emissions, and of atmospheric aging and removal.

  14. AIP study of multi-institutional collaborations: Phase 1, High-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The title of this catalog is to be taken literally. Our coverage is selective. Laboratory archivists at CERN, Fermilab, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and SLAC were generous in providing descriptions of records of particular relevance to experiments in high-energy physics; descriptions of records at Brookhaven were prepared by the AIP. Our catalog of these records in no way reflects the laboratories' holdings of valuable documentation. Most of the records located by the project relate to our ''probes.'' These were in-depth studies of three highly-significant collaborations: the discoveries of the psi at SLAC and the upsilon at Fermilab and the CLEO experiment and the origins of the Cornell Electron Storage Ring at Cornell University. The AIP study conducted a large number of interviews on more than 20 additional experiments; they are covered in this catalog. In the process of interviewing, we located valuable files-especially professional papers in the possession of individual physicists. It will take considerable effort and a number of years before these collections can be secured in appropriate repositories; they are not included here

  15. Some results of NAA collaborative study in white rice performed at Dalat Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White rice is a main food for Asian people. In the framework of Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA), therefore, the eight Asian countries: China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam selected white rice as a common target sample for a collaboration study since 2008. Accordingly, rice samples were purchased and prepared by following a protocol that had been proposed for this study. The groups of elements that were analyzed by using neutron activation analysis in the white rice samples were toxic elements and nutrient elements, including: Al, As, Br, Ca, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb and Zn. The analytical results were compared between the different countries and evaluated by using the Tolerable Intake Level of World Health Organization (WHO) and Recommended Dietary Allowance or Adequate Intake (AI) of the U.S. Institute of Medicine (IOM) guideline values. These data will be very useful in the monitoring of the levels of food contamination and in the evaluation of the nutritional status for people living in Vietnam and other Asian countries. (author)

  16. Drawbacks and benefits associated with inter-organizational collaboration along the discovery-development-delivery continuum: a cancer research network case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Jenine K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The scientific process around cancer research begins with scientific discovery, followed by development of interventions, and finally delivery of needed interventions to people with cancer. Numerous studies have identified substantial gaps between discovery and delivery in health research. Team science has been identified as a possible solution for closing the discovery to delivery gap; however, little is known about effective ways of collaborating within teams and across organizations. The purpose of this study was to determine benefits and drawbacks associated with organizational collaboration across the discovery-development-delivery research continuum. Methods Representatives of organizations working on cancer research across a state answered a survey about how they collaborated with other cancer research organizations in the state and what benefits and drawbacks they experienced while collaborating. We used exponential random graph modeling to determine the association between these benefits and drawbacks and the presence of a collaboration tie between any two network members. Results Different drawbacks and benefits were associated with discovery, development, and delivery collaborations. The only consistent association across all three was with the drawback of difficulty due to geographic differences, which was negatively associated with collaboration, indicating that those organizations that had collaborated were less likely to perceive a barrier related to geography. The benefit, enhanced access to other knowledge, was positive and significant in the development and delivery networks, indicating that collaborating organizations viewed improved knowledge exchange as a benefit of collaboration. ‘Acquisition of additional funding or other resources’ and ‘development of new tools and methods’ were negatively significantly related to collaboration in these networks. So, although improved knowledge access was an

  17. Virtual Teams and E-Collaboration Technology: A Case Study Investigating the Dynamics of Virtual Team Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattison, Theresa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent the use of e-collaboration tools when used as a primary channel of communication affected virtual team members' trust and motivation, in a spatially dispersed environment. Structured interviews were conducted with 18 project managers, who were responsible for leading virtual projects…

  18. Effects of Collaborative Mentoring on the Articulation of Training and Classroom Situations: A Case Study in the French School System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalies, Sebastien; Bertone, Stefano; Flavier, Eric; Durand, Marc

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of a collaborative mentoring sequence on the professional development of a preservice teacher (PT). The analysis of data from observation and self-confrontation interviews identified work rules [Wittgenstein, L. (1996). In G. E. M. Anscomb & G. H. Von Wright (Eds.), "Remarques philosophiques" ["Philosophical…

  19. Maternal age and Alzheimer's disease: a collaborative re-analysis of case-control studies. EURODEM Risk Factors Research Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Rocca; C.M. van Duijn (Cock); D.G. Clayton (David); V. Chandra; L. Fratiglioni (Laura); A.B. Graves; A. Heyman; A.F. Jorm; E. Kokmen (Emre); K. Kondo; J.A. Mortimer; S.L. Shalat; H. Soininen; A. Hofman (Albert)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractTo investigate the possible association between Alzheimer's disease and late maternal age at index birth, we conducted a collaborative re-analysis of existing case-control data sets. Of the 11 studies participating in the EURODEM project, four were included in the analyses regarding mate

  20. Cognitive and Social Structure of the Elite Collaboration Network of Astrophysics: A Case Study on Shifting Network Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidler, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Scientific collaboration can only be understood along the epistemic and cognitive grounding of scientific disciplines. New scientific discoveries in astrophysics led to a major restructuring of the elite network of astrophysics. To study the interplay of the epistemic grounding and the social network structure of a discipline, a mixed-methods…

  1. A Cross-Cultural Study of Teacher Perspectives on Teacher Roles and Adoption of Online Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Valcke, Martin; Schellens, Tammy

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to understand teachers' perspectives on their roles in higher education, their views about the adoption of a social-constructivist approach to teaching and learning and the integration of online collaborative learning in blended learning environments in higher education from a cross cultural perspective. We interviewed 60 Chinese…

  2. The effects of team expert choice on group decision-making in collaborative new product development: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, J.M.; Rossum, van W.; Verkerke, G.J.; Rakhorst, G.

    2000-01-01

    This study analyses the effects of Team Expert Choice on group decision-making in collaborative new product development. We applied Team Expert Choice to support a product evaluation conducted by a new product development group composed of professionally diverse members. The evaluation resulted in v

  3. Collaborative Care for Patients With Severe Personality Disorders: Analyzing the Execution Process in a Pilot Study (Part II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stringer, Barbara; Meijel, Berno van; Karman, Pieter; Koekkoek, Bauke; Kerkhof, Ad J.F.M.; Beekman, Aartjan T.F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the factors that influence the effective execution of a collaborative care program (CCP) for patients with severe personality disorders. Design and Methods A multiple case study using qualitative research methods. Findings Three factors were identified as influencing the executi

  4. Empty Success or Brilliant Failure: An Analysis of Chinese Students' Study Abroad Experience in a Collaborative Master of Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wang; Clarke, Anthony; Wei, Yu

    2016-01-01

    More than at any other time, the importance of internationalization and of establishing global partnerships in education is acknowledged by governments and higher education institutions. As a result, collaboration between institutions resulting in increased study abroad opportunities, now viewed as signifiers of internationalization, have…

  5. Nomograms for predicting survival and recurrence in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma. An international collaborative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganly, Ian; Amit, Moran; Kou, Lei; Palmer, Frank L.; Migliacci, Jocelyn; Katabi, Nora; Yu, Changhong; Kattan, Michael W.; Binenbaum, Yoav; Sharma, Kanika; Naomi, Ramer; Abib, Agbetoba; Miles, Brett; Yang, Xinjie; Lei, Delin; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Godballe, Christian; Mücke, Thomas; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Fliss, Dan; Eckardt, André M.; Chiara, Copelli; Sesenna, Enrico; Ali, Safina; Czerwonka, Lukas; Goldstein, David P.; Gil, Ziv; Patel, Snehal G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the rarity of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), information on outcome is based upon small retrospective case series. The aim of our study was to create a large multiinstitutional international dataset of patients with ACC in order to design predictive nomograms for outcome. Methods ACC patients managed at 10 international centers were identified. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were recorded and an international collaborative dataset created. Multivariable competing risk models were then built to predict the 10 year recurrence free probability (RFP), distant recurrence free probability (DRFP), overall survival (OS) and cancer specific mortality (CSM). All predictors of interest were added in the starting full models before selection, including age, gender, tumor site, clinical T stage, perineural invasion, margin status, pathologic N-status, and M-status. Stepdown method was used in model selection to choose predictive variables. An external dataset of 99 patients from 2 other institutions was used to validate the nomograms. Findings Of 438 ACC patients, 27.2% (119/438) died from ACC and 38.8% (170/438) died of other causes. Median follow-up was 56 months (range 1–306). The nomogram for OS had 7 variables (age, gender, clinical T stage, tumor site, margin status, pathologic N-status and M-status) with a concordance index (CI) of 0.71. The nomogram for CSM had the same variables, except margin status, with a concordance index (CI) of 0.70. The nomogram for RFP had 7 variables (age, gender, clinical T stage, tumor site, margin status, pathologic N status and perineural invasion) (CI 0.66). The nomogram for DRFP had 6 variables (gender, clinical T stage, tumor site, pathologic N-status, perineural invasion and margin status) (CI 0.64). Concordance index for the external validation set were 0.76, 0.72, 0.67 and 0.70 respectively. Interpretation Using an international collaborative database we have created the first nomograms which

  6. Skipping Breakfast and Risk of Mortality from Cancer, Circulatory Diseases and All Causes: Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Yae; Onishi, Kazunari; Hosoda, Takenobu; Amano, Hiroki; Otani, Shinji; KUROZAWA, Youichi; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Breakfast eating habits are a dietary pattern marker and appear to be a useful predictor of a healthy lifestyle. Many studies have reported the unhealthy effects of skipping breakfast. However, there are few studies on the association between skipping breakfast and mortality. In the present study, we examined the association between skipping breakfast and mortality from cancer, circulatory diseases and all causes using data from a large-scale cohort study, the Japan Collaborative C...

  7. Varicella vaccine for immunocompromised children: results of collaborative studies in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRussa, P; Steinberg, S; Gershon, A A

    1996-11-01

    Varicella vaccine in immunocompromised children was clinically evaluated in 575 US and Canadian children with leukemia in remission by the Varicella Vaccine Collaborative Study. Most children had chemotherapy stopped 1 week before and 1 week after immunization. Steroids were stopped for 3 weeks (1 week before to 2 weeks after vaccination). Varicella vaccine was safe, immunogenic, and effective in leukemic children at risk for serious disease or death from chickenpox. The major side effect was mild rash in 50% approximately 1 month after immunization. About 40% of children who developed rash were treated with acyclovir. Vaccine efficacy was judged by the degree of protection after a household exposure to varicella; of 123 exposed children, 17 (14%) developed a mild form of varicella. The vaccine protected completely against severe varicella. Leukemic vaccines were less likely to develop zoster than were comparable children with leukemia who had wild type varicella. Thus, varicella vaccine, administered carefully with close follow-up, is extremely beneficial for leukemic children.

  8. Patient-specific prosthetic fingers by remote collaboration--a case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John-John Cabibihan

    Full Text Available The concealment of amputation through prosthesis usage can shield an amputee from social stigma and help improve the emotional healing process especially at the early stages of hand or finger loss. However, the traditional techniques in prosthesis fabrication defy this as the patients need numerous visits to the clinics for measurements, fitting and follow-ups. This paper presents a method for constructing a prosthetic finger through online collaboration with the designer. The main input from the amputee comes from the Computer Tomography (CT data in the region of the affected and the non-affected fingers. These data are sent over the internet and the prosthesis is constructed using visualization, computer-aided design and manufacturing tools. The finished product is then shipped to the patient. A case study with a single patient having an amputated ring finger at the proximal interphalangeal joint shows that the proposed method has a potential to address the patient's psychosocial concerns and minimize the exposure of the finger loss to the public.

  9. Studies of Vitrification of Ion-Exchange Resins. A Joint USA-Argentina Collaborative Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the Science and Technology Implementing Arrangement for Cooperation on Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management (JCCRM), the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) is helping to transfer waste treatment technology to international atomic energy commissions.As part of the JCCRM, DOE has established a collaborative research agreement with the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Cnea).The Cnea is investigating treatment and disposal options for organic ion exchange resins currently stored at two nuclear power plants in the Republic of Argentina.The major hazards of the ion exchange resins are their organic composition and the contaminants that are present on the resins after purification processes.The principal contaminants are usually the radioactive species that are removed.For these studies, actual non-radioactive resins from Argentina's Embalse and Atucha plants were tested.The glass produced during the runs was durable was measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT).The product had a predictable, mostly amorphous composition throughout the demonstrations; though there was some evidence of the formation of clinopyroxene crystals.The immobilized product represented an approximately 70% volume reduction from the simulated Argentine ion exchange resin (i.e., a reduction from the volume of as-stored wet resin to the volume of the ultimate borosilicate glass product).For all runs, the radioactive surrogate retention was near 100%

  10. Extraction of light filth from whole leaves of alfalfa, lemon balm, papaya, and spearmint: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, M J; Glaze, L E

    1987-01-01

    Results are reported for a collaborative study to extend AOAC method 44.A06-44.A08 to extraction of light filth from whole leaves of alfalfa, lemon balm, papaya, and spearmint. A 5 g (spearmint) or 10 g (alfalfa, lemon balm, papaya) test portion is defatted with isopropanol in a simple reflux apparatus. Rat hairs, insect fragments, and whole insects are isolated by wet sieving on a No. 230 sieve, a deaerating boil in 40% isopropanol, and flotation with mineral oil-heptane (85 + 15) from Tween 80-Na4EDTA (1 + 1) and 40% isopropanol in a Wildman trap flask. Each product was spiked at a different level. For rat hairs, recoveries averaged 82.2% from alfalfa, 88.9% from lemon balm, 80.6% from papaya, and 79.6% from spearmint. Recoveries of whole or equivalent insects from these products averaged 66.1, 218.8, 69.4, and 85.4%, respectively; recoveries of insect fragments from these products averaged 89.6, 94.4, 94.1, and 88.1%, respectively. The method has been adopted official first action for extraction of light filth from whole leaves of alfalfa, papaya, and spearmint. The extension of the method to lemon balm was not recommended because of interferences by intrinsic whole insects, which were the same species as the spike material. PMID:3436916

  11. Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions: November 28, 2006 - March 31, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, J. N.; Khalek, I. A.; Smith, L. R.; Fujita, E.; Zielinska, B.

    2011-10-01

    The Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) project was a pilot investigation of how fuels and crankcase lubricants contribute to the formation of particulate matter (PM) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) in vehicle exhaust. As limited vehicles were tested, results are not representative of the whole on-road fleet. Long-term effects were not investigated. Pairs of vehicles (one normal PM emitting, one high-PM emitting) from four categories were selected: light-duty (LD) gasoline cars, medium-duty (MD) diesel trucks, heavy-duty (HD) natural-gas-fueled buses, and HD diesel buses. HD vehicles procured did not exhibit higher PM emissions, and thus were labeled high mileage (HM). Fuels evaluated were non-ethanol gasoline (E0), 10 percent ethanol (E10), conventional low-sulfur TxLED diesel, 20% biodiesel (B20), and natural gas. Temperature effects (20 degrees F, 72 degrees F) were evaluated on LD and MD vehicles. Lubricating oil vintage effects (fresh and aged) were evaluated on all vehicles. LD and MD vehicles were operated on a dynamometer over the California Unified Driving Cycle, while HD vehicles followed the Heavy Duty Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule. Regulated and unregulated emissions were measured. Chemical markers from the unregulated emissions measurements and a tracer were utilized to estimate the lubricant contribution to PM.

  12. Marsoweb: a collaborative web facility for Mars landing site and global data studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deardorff, D. G.; Gulick, Virginia C.

    2003-05-01

    Marsoweb is a collaborative web environment that has been developed for the Mars research community to better visualize and analyze Mars orbiter data. Its goal is to enable online data discovery by providing an intuitive, interactive interface to data from the Mars Global Surveyor and other orbiters. Recently, it has served a prominent role as a resource center for those involved in landing site selection for the Mars Explorer Rover 2003 missions. In addition to hosting a repository of landing site memoranda and workshop talks, it includes a Java-based interface to a variety of datamaps and images. This interface enables the display and numerical querying of data, and allows data profiles to be rendered from user-drawn cross-sections. High-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images (currently, over 100,000) can be graphically perused; browser-based image processing tools can be used on MOC images of potential landing sites. An automated VRML atlas allows users to construct "flyovers" of their own regions-of-interest in 3D. These capabilities enable Marsoweb to be used for general global data studies, in addition to those specific to landing site selection. As of September 2002, over 70,000 distinct users from NASA, USGS, academia, and the general public have accessed Marsoweb.

  13. Basic study for nonlinear instable phenomena of free surface. Response of free surface to down flow (Report of collaboration study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the result of study performed in Ibaraki University in 1998 as the collaboration with JNC. This year is the last of collaboration period, and then this report is the final report and contains the result of previous year. Oscillation phenomena, which caused by interaction between free surface in a tank and flow that is poured down onto the free surface, is very important for safety of FBR. However, such oscillation phenomena have not been studied well except for the case in open channel flow. Authors focused on a free surface oscillation caused by free jet and performed an experimental study using quasi-two-dimensional rectangular tank. The purpose of the study is to obtain exact knowledge of the nonlinear instable phenomena of free surface, which caused by the interaction between free surface and pouring down flow. In last year, we constructed the experimental apparatus and investigated effects of tank size and flow condition to the free surface oscillation in the tank. This year, experiments in cases, which the jet nozzle was set under the free surface, were performed using the same apparatus. Relationship between the free surface oscillation and internal flow of the tank was investigated based on visualization of internal flow. Then we tried to reveal the mechanism of the free surface oscillation. The results are as followed: Behavior of free surface oscillation depends on the tank width, pouring position, pouring angle and water depth. Larger amplitude oscillation is sloshing-like oscillation or transition among those sloshing-like oscillation. The free surface oscillation holds correlation to the displacement of jet and requires deviation of the jet. (author)

  14. INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION FOR QUALITY: A CASE STUDY OF FOSTERING COLLABORATION ACROSS AN INTERNATIONAL NETWORK OF UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES THROUGH AN ACTIVITY BASED BENCHMARKING PROJECT

    OpenAIRE

    Amos, Howard; Hart, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The risks in collaborating are high, but the rewards can be significant. Like any business investment, collaboration requires considered planning, clear communication and careful relationship management. The reward of working with others outside of traditional boundaries offers great potential for realising innovation beyond what one party can achieve alone. In a climate of competition for local and national resources, sharing on an international level offers great potential for harnessing co...

  15. How Ontologies are Made: Studying the Hidden Social Dynamics Behind Collaborative Ontology Engineering Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmaier, Markus; Walk, Simon; Pöschko, Jan; Lamprecht, Daniel; Tudorache, Tania; Nyulas, Csongor; Musen, Mark A; Noy, Natalya F

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, evaluation methods in the field of semantic technologies have focused on the end result of ontology engineering efforts, mainly, on evaluating ontologies and their corresponding qualities and characteristics. This focus has led to the development of a whole arsenal of ontology-evaluation techniques that investigate the quality of ontologies as a product. In this paper, we aim to shed light on the process of ontology engineering construction by introducing and applying a set of measures to analyze hidden social dynamics. We argue that especially for ontologies which are constructed collaboratively, understanding the social processes that have led to its construction is critical not only in understanding but consequently also in evaluating the ontology. With the work presented in this paper, we aim to expose the texture of collaborative ontology engineering processes that is otherwise left invisible. Using historical change-log data, we unveil qualitative differences and commonalities between different collaborative ontology engineering projects. Explaining and understanding these differences will help us to better comprehend the role and importance of social factors in collaborative ontology engineering projects. We hope that our analysis will spur a new line of evaluation techniques that view ontologies not as the static result of deliberations among domain experts, but as a dynamic, collaborative and iterative process that needs to be understood, evaluated and managed in itself. We believe that advances in this direction would help our community to expand the existing arsenal of ontology evaluation techniques towards more holistic approaches.

  16. Collaborative research between clinicians and researchers: a multiple case study of implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edlund Carrie

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bottom-up, clinician-conceived and directed clinical intervention research, coupled with collaboration from researcher experts, is conceptually endorsed by the participatory research movement. This report presents the findings of an evaluation of a program in the Veterans Health Administration meant to encourage clinician-driven research by providing resources believed to be critical. The evaluation focused on the extent to which funded projects: maintained integrity to their original proposals; were methodologically rigorous; were characterized by collaboration between partners; and resulted in sustained clinical impact. Methods Researchers used quantitative (survey and archival and qualitative (focus group data to evaluate the implementation, evaluation, and sustainability of four clinical demonstration projects at four sites. Fourteen research center mentors and seventeen clinician researchers evaluated the level of collaboration using a six-dimensional model of participatory research. Results Results yielded mixed findings. Qualitative and quantitative data suggested that although the process was collaborative, clinicians' prior research experience was critical to the quality of the projects. Several challenges were common across sites, including subject recruitment, administrative support and logistics, and subsequent dissemination. Only one intervention achieved lasting clinical effect beyond the active project period. Qualitative analyses identified barriers and facilitators and suggested areas to improve sustainability. Conclusions Evaluation results suggest that this participatory research venture was successful in achieving clinician-directed collaboration, but did not produce sustainable interventions due to such implementation problems as lack of resources and administrative support.

  17. A Brief Comparative Study on R and D Collaboration Strategy in US and French nuclear utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So far KHNP's R and D strategy has been evaluated as 2.5th generation R and D management and R and D investments are focused to the key technologies such as Korea's own nuclear reactor design(like APR1400) development, engineering gap lists elimination(plants trouble shooting), construction/operation process enhancement, etc. But when we compare our R and D strategy with US and France utilities, we can find a lot of differences and the need of improvement to accelerate overseas export of nuclear power plants(technologies) and to be a world top class nuclear operator. One of prominent difference is R and D collaboration strategy. The definition of R and D collaboration has evolved over the years, but for this paper I use it to mean the process where multiple parts of an organization or stake holder work together toward a set of common goals. And by co-funding or cost sharing, collaborative R and D can reduces financial and technical risk and encourages knowledge exchange, supply chain development and in return, collaborative R and D can produce more advanced, complex, effective, efficient R and D products in relatively short time with relatively less budget. UK's technology strategy board estimated that Each we invest in collaborative R and D typically returns around in GVA(Gross Value Added)

  18. Interorganizational Collaboration in Transitional Care – A Study of a Post-Discharge Programme for Elderly Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Orvik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and aim: This article reports a study of a post-discharge programme for elderly patients in Norway. It took place in an intermediate ward for transitional care and was based on collaboration between a municipality and a hospital, which was part of a health enterprise. The aim of the study was to analyse the collaboration and its possible effects on the quality of patient care, and the economic efficiency of the project for the organizations involved. Methodology: A mixed-methods approach, consisting of interviews, questionnaires and analyses of official documents and statistics. Results: The collaboration was working well on the top level of the organizations, but was more problematic on the operative level. However, there were clear signs of improvement. The patients who received transitional care were more satisfied with their stay at the ward than their previous stay at the hospital. They were discharged to their homes more often and perceived to have a higher level of functioning than the hospital patients. Average costs per patient were also lower in the ward than in the hospital departments. Conclusion: The collaboration had mainly positive impacts on the quality of patient care and the economic efficiency of elderly care in the municipality. However, the board of the health enterprise decided to close down the intermediate ward.

  19. Towards mHealth Systems for Support of Psychotherapeutic Practice: A Qualitative Study of Researcher-Clinician Collaboration in System Design and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Halje

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined clinicians’ and researchers’ experiences from participation in collaborative research on the introduction of Internet and mobile information systems (mHealth systems in psychotherapeutic routines. The study used grounded theory methodology and was set in a collaboration that aimed to develop and evaluate mHealth support of psychotherapy provided to young people. Soundness of the central objects developed in the design phase (the collaboration contract, the trial protocol, and the system technology was a necessary foundation for successful collaborative mHealth research; neglect of unanticipated organizational influences during the trial phase was a factor in collaboration failure. The experiences gained in this study can be used in settings where collaborative research on mHealth systems in mental health is planned.

  20. Diffusion of a collaborative care model in primary care: a longitudinal qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedel Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Although collaborative team models (CTM improve care processes and health outcomes, their diffusion poses challenges related to difficulties in securing their adoption by primary care clinicians (PCPs. The objectives of this study are to understand: (1 how the perceived characteristics of a CTM influenced clinicians' decision to adopt -or not- the model; and (2 the model's diffusion process. Methods We conducted a longitudinal case study based on the Diffusion of Innovations Theory. First, diffusion curves were developed for all 175 PCPs and 59 nurses practicing in one borough of Paris. Second, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a representative sample of 40 PCPs and 15 nurses to better understand the implementation dynamics. Results Diffusion curves showed that 3.5 years after the start of the implementation, 100% of nurses and over 80% of PCPs had adopted the CTM. The dynamics of the CTM's diffusion were different between the PCPs and the nurses. The slopes of the two curves are also distinctly different. Among the nurses, the critical mass of adopters was attained faster, since they adopted the CTM earlier and more quickly than the PCPs. Results of the semi-structured interviews showed that these differences in diffusion dynamics were mostly founded in differences between the PCPs' and the nurses' perceptions of the CTM's compatibility with norms, values and practices and its relative advantage (impact on patient management and work practices. Opinion leaders played a key role in the diffusion of the CTM among PCPs. Conclusion CTM diffusion is a social phenomenon that requires a major commitment by clinicians and a willingness to take risks; the role of opinion leaders is key. Paying attention to the notion of a critical mass of adopters is essential to developing implementation strategies that will accelerate the adoption process by clinicians.

  1. A case study in the participatory design of a collaborative science-based learning environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, George, Jr.

    Educational technology research studies have found computer and software technologies to be underutilized in U.S. classrooms. In general, many teachers have had difficulty integrating computer and software technologies into learning activities and classroom curriculums because specific technologies are ill-suited to their needs, or they lack the ability to make effective use of these technologies. In the development of commercial and business applications, participatory design approaches have been applied to facilitate the direct participation of users in system analysis and design. Among the benefits of participatory design include mutual learning between users and developers, envisionment of software products and their use contexts, empowerment of users in analysis and design, grounding of design in the practices of users, and growth of users as designers and champions of technology. In the context of educational technology development, these similar consequences of participatory design may lead to more appropriate and effective education systems as well as greater capacities by teachers to apply and integrate educational systems into their teaching and classroom practices. We present a case study of a participatory design project that took place over a period of two and one half years, and in which teachers and developers engaged in the participatory analysis and design of a collaborative science learning environment. A significant aspect of the project was the development methodology we followed---Progressive Design. Progressive Design evolved as an integration of methods for participatory design, ethnography, and scenario-based design. In this dissertation, we describe the Progressive Design approach, how it was used, and its specific impacts and effects on the development of educational systems and the social and cognitive growth of teachers.

  2. NH3 Emission from Fertilizer Application: A Collaborative Study in the Midwestern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, L.; Koloutsou-Vakakis, S.; Bernacchi, C.; Lehmann, C.; Saylor, R. D.; Heuer, M.; Sibble, D.; Caldwell, J. A.; Balasubramanian, S.; Nelson, A. J.; Rood, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) is a precursor for secondary particulate matter and a contributor to soil acidification and eutrophication when deposited to land and surface waters. Fertilizer application is a major source of atmospheric NH3, particularly in intensive agricultural regions such as the Midwestern U.S. Quantification of NH3 emission from fertilized crops remains highly uncertain, which limits the representativeness of NH3 emissions that are used in air quality models. A collaborative study to improve understanding of NH3 emission from fertilizer application focused on [1] measurement of above-canopy NH3 fluxes from a fertilized corn field in Illinois using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) and flux gradient methods and in-canopy fluxes with the inverse Lagrangian dispersion analysis method, [2] estimation of NH3 emissions at the regional scale using a process-based approach with available archived independent variables, and the currently used top-down approach, in order to compare and determine differences in predicted spatial and temporal variability of NH3 emissions, and [3] performance of spatial analysis to determine spatial and temporal patterns of ammonia emissions and relate them to independent variables characteristic of land use, soil, meteorology, and agricultural management practices. NH3 flux was measured over and within a maize canopy from pre-cultivation through senescence (May-September 2014) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) Energy Biosciences Institute Energy Farm, and data from the field study was incorporated into models to facilitate connection of local emissions with the regional scale and to improve understanding of the processes that drive emission and deposition.

  3. Establishment of the first WHO Erythropoietin antibody reference panel: Report of an international collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Meenu; Mytych, Daniel T; Bird, Chris; Barger, Troy; Dougall, Thomas; Han, Hong; Rigsby, Peter; Kromminga, Arno; Thorpe, Robin

    2016-08-01

    A panel of 9 fully human monoclonal antibodies against human erythropoietin (EPO) with defined characteristics (non-neutralizing, neutralizing, various isotypes, affinities) representative of those evident in antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and non-PRCA patients were formulated and lyophilized. The panel was evaluated in a multi-centre international collaborative study comprising eighteen different laboratories using different assay platforms including those in routine use. These included binding assays, some based on use of novel technologies and neutralization assays predominantly employing EPO responsive cell-lines. Results showed that detection and titre varied depending on antibody characteristics and the method used. Only selective assay platforms were capable of detecting the diverse repertoire of EPO antibodies in the panel indicating that some clinically relevant antibodies are likely to be missed in some assays. Importantly, the clinical samples from PRCA patients were distinguished as antibody-positive and the healthy donor serum as antibody negative across all different platforms tested. For neutralization, data was generally consistent across the assays for the different samples regardless of the cell-line and the assay conditions. The heterogeneity in data from the study clearly indicated the need for reference standards for consistency in detecting and measuring EPO antibodies across different assay platforms for monitoring the safety and efficacy of erythropoiesis stimulating agents. Therefore, the WHO ECBS at its meeting in October'15 established the EPO antibody panel, available from NIBSC, to facilitate decision-making on assay selection for testing antibodies against human EPO, for evaluating assay performance of antibody assays for clinical use, for assay validation and for standardization. PMID:27173074

  4. Modification to the AOAC Sporicidal Activity of Disinfectants Test (Method 966.04): collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasino, Stephen F; Hamilton, Martin A

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to improve AOAC Method 966.04, the Sporicidal Activity of Disinfectants Test, selected modifications to the procedure were evaluated in a collaborative study. Method 966.04 is used to generate efficacy data to support the product registration of sporicides and sterilants. The method is a carrier-based test that provides a qualitative measure of product efficacy against spores of Bacillus subtilis and Clostridium sporogenes. The use of garden soil extract and the lack of standard procedures for the enumeration of spores and neutralization of the test chemicals have been considered problematic for many years. The proposed modifications were limited to the B. subtilis and hard surface carrier (porcelain penicylinder) components of the method. The study included the evaluation of a replacement for soil extract nutrient broth and an establishment of a minimum spore titer per carrier, both considered crucial for the improvement and utilization of the method. Additionally, an alternative hard surface material and a neutralization confirmation procedure were evaluated. To determine the equivalence of the proposed alternatives to the standard method, 3 medium/carrier combinations, (1) soil extract nutrient broth/porcelain carrier (current method), (2) nutrient agar amended with 5 microg/mL manganese sulfate/porcelain carrier, and (3) nutrient agar amended with 5 microg/mL manganese sulfate/stainless steel carrier were analyzed for carrier counts, HCI resistance, efficacy, quantitative efficacy, and spore wash-off. The test chemicals used in the study represent 3 chemical classes and are commercially available antimicrobial liquid products: sodium hypochlorite (bleach), glutaraldehyde, and a combination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Four laboratories participated in the study. The results of the spore titer per carrier, HCI resistance, efficacy, and wash-off studies demonstrate that amended nutrient agar in conjunction with the porcelain is comparable

  5. Context-Aware Mobile Collaborative Systems: Conceptual Modeling and Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G. Montané-Jiménez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A Mobile Collaborative System (MCOS enable the cooperation of the members of a team to achieve a common goal by using a combination of mobile and fixed technologies. MCOS can be enhanced if the context of the group of users is considered in the execution of activities. This paper proposes a novel model for Context-Aware Mobile COllaborative Systems (CAMCOS and a functional architecture based on that model. In order to validate both the model and the architecture, a prototype system in the tourism domain was implemented and evaluated.

  6. Studies related to gender and geographic diversity in the ATLAS Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration consists of about 5,300 members, with nationalities from 94 countries. There are about 2,800 scientific authors from 182 member institutions in 38 countries. This note presents data showing aspects of the demographics and diversity of the collaboration, and how the various regions of the world are represented in ATLAS. In particular the relative fraction of women is discussed, both from various demographic perspectives as well as their share of contributions to, and recognition by the ATLAS experiment.

  7. Study on Collaborative SCM of Construction Enterprises Based on Information-Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lianyue

    Economic globalization and the integration process has led to competition among construction enterprises become increasingly fierce, which are adjusting their development strategies and efforts to seek for the knowledge economy and network environment to promote enterprise survival and development, enhancing the competitiveness of enterprises in the new business management models and ideas. This paper first discussed the concept of the supply chain collaboration of the construction enterprise and constituted a information management platform of the general contracting project. At last, the paper puts forward tactics which aims at helping construction enterprises realize supply chain collaboration and enhance the competitiveness of enterprises.

  8. Linguistic, geographic and genetic isolation: a collaborative study of Italian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Bachis, Valeria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Bertoncini, Stefania; Biondi, Gianfranco; Boattini, Alessio; Boschi, Ilaria; Brisighelli, Francesca; Caló, Carla Maria; Carta, Marilisa; Coia, Valentina; Corrias, Laura; Crivellaro, Federica; De Fanti, Sara; Dominici, Valentina; Ferri, Gianmarco; Francalacci, Paolo; Franceschi, Zelda Alice; Luiselli, Donata; Morelli, Laura; Paoli, Giorgio; Rickards, Olga; Robledo, Renato; Sanna, Daria; Sanna, Emanuele; Sarno, Stefania; Sineo, Luca; Taglioli, Luca; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Tofanelli, Sergio; Vona, Giuseppe; Pettener, Davide; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The animal and plant biodiversity of the Italian territory is known to be one of the richest in the Mediterranean basin and Europe as a whole, but does the genetic diversity of extant human populations show a comparable pattern? According to a number of studies, the genetic structure of Italian populations retains the signatures of complex peopling processes which took place from the Paleolithic to modern era. Although the observed patterns highlight a remarkable degree of genetic heterogeneity, they do not, however, take into account an important source of variation. In fact, Italy is home to numerous ethnolinguistic minorities which have yet to be studied systematically. Due to their difference in geographical origin and demographic history, such groups not only signal the cultural and social diversity of our country, but they are also potential contributors to its bio-anthropological heterogeneity. To fill this gap, research groups from four Italian Universities (Bologna, Cagliari, Pisa and Roma Sapienza) started a collaborative study in 2007, which was funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research and received partial support by the Istituto Italiano di Antropologia. In this paper, we present an account of the results obtained in the course of this initiative. Four case-studies relative to linguistic minorities from the Eastern Alps, Sardinia, Apennines and Southern Italy are first described and discussed, focusing on their micro-evolutionary and anthropological implications. Thereafter, we present the results of a systematic analysis of the relations between linguistic, geographic and genetic isolation. Integrating the data obtained in the course of the long-term study with literature and unpublished results on Italian populations, we show that a combination of linguistic and geographic factors is probably responsible for the presence of the most robust signatures of genetic isolation. Finally, we evaluate the magnitude of the diversity

  9. Enabling Innovation and Collaboration Across Geography and Culture: A Case Study of NASA's Systems Engineering Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topousis, Daria E.; Murphy, Keri; Robinson, Greg

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, NASA faced major knowledge sharing challenges due to geographically isolated field centers that inhibited personnel from sharing experiences and ideas. Mission failures and new directions for the agency demanded better collaborative tools. In addition, with the push to send astronauts back to the moon and to Mars, NASA recognized that systems engineering would have to improve across the agency. Of the ten field centers, seven had not built a spacecraft in over 30 years, and had lost systems engineering expertise. The Systems Engineering Community of Practice came together to capture the knowledge of its members using the suite of collaborative tools provided by the NASA Engineering Network (NEN.) The NEN provided a secure collaboration space for over 60 practitioners across the agency to assemble and review a NASA systems engineering handbook. Once the handbook was complete, they used the open community area to disseminate it. This case study explores both the technology and the social networking that made the community possible, describes technological approaches that facilitated rapid setup and low maintenance, provides best practices that other organizations could adopt, and discusses the vision for how this community will continue to collaborate across the field centers to benefit the agency as it continues exploring the solar system.

  10. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    The thesis data have been collected in the EU-sponsored project: Collaborative Improvement Tool for the Extended Manufacturing Enterprise, CO-IMPROVE. In this project four universities (Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and The Netherlands), two software vendors (Greece and Sweden) and three companies...... learn how to improve operations in (hopefully) a win-win like manner through collaboration....

  11. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    Literature review: Collaborative experience has been shown to have a positive effect on the collaborative outcome in general (Anand & Khanna, 2000; Kale, Dyer & Singh, 2002). Furthermore, it has been linked to the ability to exploit the network of the firm for learning (Powell, Koput and Smith...

  12. The Role of Collaborative Learning on Training and Development Practices within the Australian Men's Shed Movement: A Study of Five Men's Sheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Jillian; Southcombe, Amie; Bartram, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the role and impact of collaborative learning on training and development practices in Australian Men's Sheds. We use a case study approach, underpinned by Peters and Armstrong's theoretical framework of collaborative learning in adult education, to investigate five Men's Sheds. Semi-structured interviews were…

  13. Repeat endocarditis: analysis of risk factors based on the International Collaboration on Endocarditis - Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagna, L; Park, L P; Nicholson, B P; Keiger, A J; Strahilevitz, J; Morris, A; Wray, D; Gordon, D; Delahaye, F; Edathodu, J; Miró, J M; Fernández-Hidalgo, N; Nacinovich, F M; Shahid, R; Woods, C W; Joyce, M J; Sexton, D J; Chu, V H

    2014-06-01

    Repeat episodes of infective endocarditis (IE) can occur in patients who survive an initial episode. We analysed risk factors and 1-year mortality of patients with repeat IE. We considered 1874 patients enrolled in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis - Prospective Cohort Study between January 2000 and December 2006 (ICE-PCS) who had definite native or prosthetic valve IE and 1-year follow-up. Multivariable analysis was used to determine risk factors for repeat IE and 1-year mortality. Of 1874 patients, 1783 (95.2%) had single-episode IE and 91 (4.8%) had repeat IE: 74/91 (81%) with new infection and 17/91 (19%) with presumed relapse. On bivariate analysis, repeat IE was associated with haemodialysis (p 0.002), HIV (p 0.009), injection drug use (IDU) (p < 0.001), Staphylococcus aureus IE (p 0.003), healthcare acquisition (p 0.006) and previous IE before ICE enrolment (p 0.001). On adjusted analysis, independent risk factors were haemodialysis (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.2-5.3), IDU (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.6-5.4), previous IE (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.5-5.1) and living in the North American region (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.4). Patients with repeat IE had higher 1-year mortality than those with single-episode IE (p 0.003). Repeat IE is associated with IDU, previous IE and haemodialysis. Clinicians should be aware of these risk factors in order to recognize patients who are at risk of repeat IE.

  14. A Case Study of Collaboration Between A Culturally Responsive Urban High School Teacher and A Haitian Teaching Artist

    OpenAIRE

    Childs-Davis, Faith

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the collaboration between a teaching artist and a 12th grade English teacher in an urban high school. The study was conducted to document the challenges, benefits and processes involved in the creation and implementation of a culturally responsive arts integrated curriculum. The sample consisted of one classroom of 20 12th grade students, their teacher and a Haitian visual artist. I collected data using classroom observation protocols, teacher and artist interviews, studen...

  15. Brand identity absorbance and its effect on marketing collaboration: A case study of a Finnish consumer electronics company

    OpenAIRE

    Lepistö, Kaisa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY The objective of this study is to gain more understanding on the importance of selling the brand to the company's own employees, especially how it has an effect on the internal management matters, and in my case, the marketing management and collaboration of the headquarters and market subsidiaries. My secondary objective is to gain broader understanding on multidisciplinary research by problematizing the shortage that seems to exist in combining main theories of m...

  16. Social Media and Internet Driven Study Recruitment: Evaluating a New Model for Promoting Collaborator Engagement and Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Chetan Khatri; Chapman, Stephen J; James Glasbey; Michael Kelly; Dmitri Nepogodiev; Aneel Bhangu; J Edward Fitzgerald

    2015-01-01

    Aims A substantial challenge facing multicentre audit and research projects is timely recruitment of collaborators and their study centres. Cost-effective strategies are required and fee-free social media has previously been identified as a potential conduit. We investigated and evaluated the effectiveness of a novel multi-format social media and Internet strategy for targeted recruitment to a national multicentre cohort study. Methods Interventions involved a new Twitter account, including w...

  17. Academic Life-Support: The Self Study of a Transnational Collaborative Mentoring Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, Laurette; Adams, Anne E.; Guzman Johannessen, B. Gloria

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we examined the collaborative mentoring processes of a transnational network. A narrative approach was employed to explore the mentoring practices and experiences of 19 women involved in the CURVE-Y-FRiENDs (C-Y-F) network. Their mentoring practices go beyond transnational, ethnic, discipline, and university borders. The processes…

  18. Collaborative study on the determination of natamycin in cheese and cheese rind 1984

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruig, de W.G.; Hollman, P.C.H.

    1985-01-01

    A collaborative test on the determination of natamycin in cheese and cheese rind was carried out. In total 38 laboratorles from 13 countries were participating . Eight samples, consistlog of 4 duplicates we re investigated by a spectrometric and an HPLC method.

  19. Towards collaborative, intermodal hub networks. A case study in the fast moving consumer goods market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothedde, B.; Ruijgrok, C.; Tavasszy, L.

    2005-01-01

    Collaborative hub networks can provide an answer to the need to decrease logistics cost and maintain logistics service levels by shifting consolidated flows to modes that are better suited for handling large volumes (rail, barge, coastal shipping), so economies of scale can be obtained. This necessi

  20. Collaborative Activities Enabled by GroupScribbles (GS): An Exploratory Study of Learning Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looi, Chee-Kit; Chen, Wenli; Ng, Foo-Keong

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the findings of an exploratory cycle of a design-based research project and examines the learning effectiveness of collaborative activities that are supported by the GroupScribbles (GS) software technology in two Singapore primary science classrooms. The students had ten weeks of GS-based lessons in science, which were…

  1. Studies related to gender and geographic diversity in the ATLAS Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Pater, Joleen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This talk presents data showing aspects of the demographics and diversity of the collaboration, and how the various regions of the world are represented in ATLAS. In particular the relative fraction of women is discussed, both from various demographic perspectives as well as their share of contributions to, and recognition by the ATLAS experiment.

  2. Case Study: Cincinnati, Covington, and Newport. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  3. Innovative University-Industry-Government Collaboration. Six Case Studies from the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, R. D.; Erzurumlu, H. C. M.

    1996-01-01

    University-industry-government collaborations face challenges that necessitate a new culture or mindset. Six U.S. case examples demonstrate ways to create a win-win-win scenario and sustain partnerships: Oregon Joint Graduate Schools of Engineering; Network for Engineering and Research in Oregon; Blacksburg Electronic Village; research…

  4. Building Vibrant School-Community Music Collaborations: Three Case Studies from Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartleet, Brydie-Leigh

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between school music and community music in Australia. While many Australian schools and community music activities tend to exist in relative isolation from one another, a range of unique school-community collaborations can be found throughout the country. Drawing on insights from "Sound Links," one of…

  5. Collaborative study of the extraction of light filth from canned crabmeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, R G; Gorham, J R

    1976-07-01

    Canned carbmeat is boiled with mineral oil in a Wildman trap flask. The trappings are transferred to a Corning percolator and cycled at least 3 times. Average recoveries from 7 collaborators were 82.7% for rodent hairs and 98.0% for flies. The proposed method has been adopted as official first action. PMID:939748

  6. A Case Study on Collaboration: Sharing the Responsibility of Economic Development in Juniata Valley, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Shakoor A.; Clark, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to better understand the need and importance of the community college's role in economic development, this article takes a closer look at how collaboration in the Juniata Valley of Pennsylvania between Industrial Development Corporations (IDCs) of Mifflin and Juniata counties, career and technical centers, and other agencies is…

  7. Cross-border data exchange - a case study on international collaboration gone wrong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanko-Hombach, Valentina

    2016-04-01

    The subject of ethics in science has become a hot topic recently (Gleick, 2011). As publication pressure on researchers increases and use of the internet allows faster turn-around, the quality of the peer review process has suffered. This presentation describes one case of scientific ethics violation in which the editors of a high-ranking scientific journal improperly permitted publication of a paper that was based upon unethical acquisition of data and failed to acknowledge scientific collaboration and exchange of intellectual property. We will present "Case description" and "Ethical issues" with a hope that our experience draws attention to important ethical issues in international collaborative research, and prevents such misconduct in the future. Since international research involves cooperation and coordination among many people in different disciplines and institutions across national borders, ethical standards should promote values that are essential to integrity and collaborative work, including trust, accountability, mutual respect, and fairness. One lesson to be learned is not to engage in collaboration without a written agreement stating clearly who is responsible for what and how the results of collaborative research are to be shared. This is especially important in cases of international collaborations, particularly those involving smaller or developing nations who often do not have the high-tech facilities of developed nations. There is also need to establish clear regulations regarding co-authorship on papers in which intellectual property and significant financial investment was made to allow the research to proceed. As such, a system of ethics to guide the practice of science from data collection to publication and beyond is timely and much needed to protect the integrity of scientific collaboration. It will keep science moving forward by validating research findings and confirming or raising questions about results. References Benos, D. J., Fabres

  8. Exploring How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Synchronous Collaborative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hui-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative writing (CW) research has gained prevalence in recent years. However, the ways in which students interact socially to produce written texts through synchronous collaborative writing (SCW) is rarely studied. This study aims to investigate the effects of SCW on students' writing products and how collaborative dialogues facilitate…

  9. International collaborative study for establishment of the 2nd WHO International Standard for Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawas, Fatme; Burkin, Karena; Dougall, Thomas; Saydam, Manolya; Rigsby, Peter; Bolgiano, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    In this report we present the results of a collaborative study for the preparation and calibration of a replacement International Standard (IS) for Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide (polyribosyl ribitol phosphate; 5-d-ribitol-(1 → 1)-β-d-ribose-3-phosphate; PRP). Two candidate preparations were evaluated. Thirteen laboratories from 9 different countries participated in the collaborative study to assess the suitability and determine the PRP content of two candidate standards. On the basis of the results from this study, Candidate 2 (NIBSC code 12/306) has been established as the 2nd WHO IS for PRP by the Expert Committee of Biological Standards of the World Health Organisation with a content of 4.904 ± 0.185mg/ampoule, as determined by the ribose assays carried out by 11 of the participating laboratories. PMID:26298195

  10. Extraction of Crustal Deformation from Seafloor Hydraulic Pressure Gauges: A trial collaboration study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyoshi, Keisuke; Nagano, Akira; Hasegawa, Takuya; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Kido, Motoyuki; Igarashi, Toshihiro; Uchida, Naoki; Nakata, Ryoko; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    , we propose a new interpretation of seismic plate coupling around the Tonankai region along the Nankai Trough, and discuss how to detect it by using the DONET data effectively. In the future, we have to extract the crustal deformation component by separating other components such as instrumental drift and oceanic changes as an integral study collaborated by seismology, geodesy, physical oceanography, and mechanical engineering.

  11. Sickness certification as a complex professional and collaborative activity - a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiessling Anna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians have an important but problematic task to issue sickness certifications. A manifold of studies have identified a wide spectrum of medical and insurance-related problems in sickness certification. Despite educational efforts aiming to improve physicians’ knowledge of social insurance medicine there are no signs of reduction of these problems. We hypothesised that the quality deficits is not only due to lack of knowledge among issuing physicians. The aim of the study was to explore physicians’ challenges when handling sickness certification in relation to their professional roles as physicians and to their interaction with different stakeholders. Methods One hundred seventy-seven physicians in Stockholm County, Sweden, participated in a sick-listing audit program. Participants identified challenges in handling sick-leave issues and formulated action plans for improvement. Challenges and responsible stakeholders were identified in the action plans. To deepen the understanding facilitators of the program were interviewed. A qualitative content analysis was performed exploring challenge categories and categories of stakeholders with responsibility to initiate actions to improve the quality of the sick-listing process. The challenge categories were then related by their content to professional competence roles in accord with the Canadian Medical Education Directions for Specialists (CanMEDS framework and to the stakeholder categories. Results Seven categories of challenges were identified. Practitioner patient interaction, Work capacity assessment, Interaction with the Social Insurance Administration, The patient’s workplace and the labour market, Sick-listing practice, Collaboration and resource allocation within the Health Care System, Leadership and routines at the Health Care Unit. The challenges were related to all seven CanMEDS roles. Five categories of stakeholders were identified and several stakeholders

  12. Comparison of several control standard endotoxins to the National Reference Standard Endotoxin--an HIMA collaborative study.

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, F C; Weary, M E; Sargent, H E; Novitsky, T J; Lin, H.; Lindsay, G.; Berzofsky, R N; Lane, A L; Wilson, J. D.; Cooper, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A collaborative study, initiated under the auspices of the Health Industry Manufacturers Association (HIMA), was designed to establish the relationship of Escherichia coli O55:B5 endotoxin (the control standard endotoxin of HIMA and the Food and Drug Administration's Office of Medical Devices) to the U.S. National Reference Standard Endotoxin and to two internationally used control standard endotoxins. By using two Limulus amoebocyte lysate test systems, it was established that the E. coli O5...

  13. Collaborative study of a method for the extraction of light filth from ground mace and ground caraway seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasher, J J

    1976-07-01

    A new method has been developed for the extraction of light filth from ground mace and ground caraway seed. The method uses a 2-step chloroform-isopropanol pretreatment followed by separation of the light filth from 40% isopropanol with mineral oil. The collaborative study resulted in clean filter papers with more reproducible recoveries of light filth elements than the official first action method, 44.116 (b). The method has been adopted as official first action. PMID:939749

  14. Collaborative study of a method for the isolation of light filth from breading of frozen food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenberg, J E

    1975-05-01

    A method has been developed for the isolation of light filth from food breadings. The method involves a detergent boil, wet sieving, and flotation in an acid-alcohol, mineral oil flotation system in a Corning percolator. Collaborative studies resulted in clean filter papers and acceptable recoveries of added rodent hairs and insect fragments. The method has been adopted as official first action. PMID:1141169

  15. Ethnic comparisons of obesity in the Asia-Pacific region : protocol for a collaborative overview of cross-sectional studies - Obesity in Asia Collaboration (OAC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huxley, R

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity has been rapidly increasing within countries of the Asia-Pacific region, with adverse consequences for health. The Obesity in Asia Collaboration (OAC) was initiated to provide reliable evidence concerning the relationships between anthropometrical markers of

  16. Enriching a Collaborative Teacher Inquiry Discourse: Exploring Teachers' Experiences of a Theory-Framed Discourse in a Singapore Case of Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yuen Sze Michelle

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how a learning theory enriched a collaborative teacher inquiry discourse where lesson study was adopted as the educational action research model to promote teacher professional development. Four Grade 9-10 biology teachers in Singapore drew from variation theory to collaboratively plan and teach new genetics content as part of…

  17. Convenience Matters: A Qualitative Study on the Impact of Use of Social Media and Collaboration Technologies on Learning Experience and Performance in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yeona

    2015-01-01

    Social media and collaboration technologies are viewed as valuable tools for creating a new reality of collaborative learning, particularly in higher education facing millennials growing up with various technologies in their daily lives. Using the example of an undergraduate course taught on-campus, this study examines how millennial students in…

  18. Narrative Approaches to Organizational Development: A Case Study of Implementation of Collaborative Helping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, William C

    2016-06-01

    Across North America, community agencies and state/provincial jurisdictions are embracing family-centered approaches to service delivery that are grounded in strength-based, culturally responsive, accountable partnerships with families. This article details a collaborative consultation process to initiate and sustain organizational change toward this effort. It draws on innovative ideas from narrative theory, organizational development, and implementation science to highlight a three component approach. This approach includes the use of appreciative inquiry focus groups to elicit existing best practices, the provision of clinical training, and ongoing coaching with practice leaders to build on those better moments and develop concrete practice frameworks, and leadership coaching and organizational consultation to develop organizational structures that institutionalize family-centered practice. While the article uses a principle-based practice framework, Collaborative Helping, to illustrate this process, the approach is applicable with a variety of clinical frameworks grounded in family-centered values and principles.

  19. False starts and other dilemmas of a secondary general education collaborative teacher: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, S C

    1998-01-01

    Currently, many special education policymakers, researchers, and practitioners are questioning the efficacy of pull-out programs for students with disabilities and advocating service delivery in inclusive or general education settings at both the elementary and the secondary level. I investigated the implementation of a collaborative teaching model in a suburban high school to determine how this move toward inclusive education benefited teachers and students. Through examination of the "ups and downs" of a U.S. History teacher, I concluded that replicating and sustaining collaborative teaching can be difficult and complex and, without careful consideration of contextual variables, may not lead to improved outcomes for either teachers or students. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  20. A European collaboration research programme to study and test large scale base isolated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improvement of the technology of innovative anti-seismic mechanisms, as those for base isolation and energy dissipation, needs of testing capability for large scale models of structures integrated with these mechanisms. These kind experimental tests are of primary importance for the validation of design rules and the setting up of an advanced earthquake engineering for civil constructions of relevant interest. The Joint Research Centre of the European Commission offers the European Laboratory for Structural Assessment located at Ispra - Italy, as a focal point for an international european collaboration research programme to test large scale models of structure making use of innovative anti-seismic mechanisms. A collaboration contract, opened to other future contributions, has been signed with the national italian working group on seismic isolation (Gruppo di Lavoro sull's Isolamento Sismico GLIS) which includes the national research centre ENEA, the national electricity board ENEL, the industrial research centre ISMES and producer of isolators ALGA. (author). 3 figs

  1. Narrative Approaches to Organizational Development: A Case Study of Implementation of Collaborative Helping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, William C

    2016-06-01

    Across North America, community agencies and state/provincial jurisdictions are embracing family-centered approaches to service delivery that are grounded in strength-based, culturally responsive, accountable partnerships with families. This article details a collaborative consultation process to initiate and sustain organizational change toward this effort. It draws on innovative ideas from narrative theory, organizational development, and implementation science to highlight a three component approach. This approach includes the use of appreciative inquiry focus groups to elicit existing best practices, the provision of clinical training, and ongoing coaching with practice leaders to build on those better moments and develop concrete practice frameworks, and leadership coaching and organizational consultation to develop organizational structures that institutionalize family-centered practice. While the article uses a principle-based practice framework, Collaborative Helping, to illustrate this process, the approach is applicable with a variety of clinical frameworks grounded in family-centered values and principles. PMID:27080245

  2. Collaborative Procurement within Enterprise Networks: A Literature Review, a Reference Framework and a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnazzo, Luca; Taticchi, Paolo; Bidini, Gianni; Sameh, Mohamed

    Collaboration among companies is nowadays a success leverage from those involved, especially for SMEs. The networking advantages are several and among them, reducing costs is a critical one. Costs reduction due to the possibility of Collaborative Procurement (CP) among partners is one of the most important achievements in a network. While the literature available offers good bases for managing single contractor procurement issues, little research addresses the case of CP within Enterprise Networks (ENs). This paper explore the mentioned issue and proposes a general framework for managing CP in ENs, those with the Virtual Development Office (VDO) structure. The findings from the application of the framework proposed in an Italian network are highlighted so as to provide preliminary results and drive future research.

  3. Collaborative development of knowledge-based support systems: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Helena; Winnberg, Patrik J; Yan, Chunli

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a user-driven collaborative knowledge engineering and interaction design process. The outcome is a knowledge-based support application tailored to physicians in the local dementia care community. The activity is organized as a part of a collaborative effort between different organizations to develop their local clinical practice. Six local practitioners used the generic decision-support prototype system DMSS-R developed for the dementia domain during a period and participated in evaluations and re-design. Additional two local domain experts and a domain expert external to the local community modeled the content and design of DMSS-R by using the modeling system ACKTUS. Obstacles and success factors occurring when enabling the end-users to design their own tools are detected and interpreted using a proposed framework for improving care through the use of clinical guidelines. The results are discussed.

  4. How can SMEs and NGOs collaborate -: a case study of critical factors in alliance structures

    OpenAIRE

    Byrkjeland, Ragnhild Helene; Ersdal, Hanne Rentsch

    2013-01-01

    This Thesis search to answer the question: How can small and medium sized enterprises [SMEs] and non governmental organisations [NGOs] build a robust alliance in order to launch a new product in bottom of the pyramid [BOP] markets? With SMEs expanding their business to the global market and NGOs structuring their operations in a business like manner the stage is set for strategic alliances between SMEs and NGOs. Collaboration between the two types of organisations can open up access to resour...

  5. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Collaboration in Water Resources Planning in California: A Case Study of CALFED

    OpenAIRE

    Hudzik, Catherine Marie

    2003-01-01

    This thesis examines the collaborative processes used by the CALFED Operations Group (Ops Group) and the outcomes achieved by these processes. The CALFED Bay Delta Program is a complex partnership of over 20 state and federal agencies that seeks to balance competing needs and interests in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The Ops Group coordinates the operations of the two large water export projects in the south Delta -— the Central Valley Project (CVP) and State Water Project (SWP) -— wit...

  6. A study on evolution of supply chain: from outsourcing to Collaborative Supply Chain; Myth or Reality?

    OpenAIRE

    Kathuria, Divya

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation aims to understand the outsourcing relationships between Indian companies and the world. Outsourcing has evolved over the years from being a mere buyer-seller relationship to a collaborative supply chain partner network. The companies today score an edge over each other on the basis of the agility in their supply chains. The fight over shelf space is getting bigger and better. India as an outsourcing destination, is becoming popular with many new clients due to imp...

  7. Garden Learning: A Study on European Botanic Gardens' Collaborative Learning Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Kapelari, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    "From 2007-2013 the European 7th Framework Program Science in Society (FP7) funded a multitude of formal and informal educational institutions to join forces and engage in alternative ways to teach science—inside and outside the classroom—all over Europe. This book reports on one of these projects named INQUIRE which was developed and implemented to support 14 Botanic Gardens and Natural History Museums in 11 European countries, to establish a collaborative learning network and expand their u...

  8. Collaborative study of a method for the extraction of light filth from ground turmeric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, L E

    1975-05-01

    An improved method has been developed for the extraction of light filth from ground turmeric. The method involves an isopropanol defatting followed by a direct flotation from 40% isopropanol with Tween 80-EDTA (1+1) and hot mineral oil. Collaborative results show that the method is rapid and yields better filth recoveries than the official first action method, 44.118. The method has been adopted as official first action to replace 44.118. PMID:1170163

  9. Parents' experiences of collaboration between welfare professionals regarding children with anxiety or depression - an explorative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Widmark

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Well-functioning collaboration between professionals in the welfare sector has a strong influence on the contact with parents of children and adolescents with mental illness, and it is a precondition for the availability of support for these parents. This paper reports how such parents experience collaboration between professionals in mental health care, social services, and schools.Methods: Data were collected by in-depth interviews with seven parents of children and adolescents diagnosed with anxiety and depression. The families were selected from the Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH patient records kept by the Stockholm County Council (Sweden, and they all lived in a catchment area for CAMH outpatient services in Stockholm.Results and discussion: We conclude that when the encounter between parents and professionals is characterized by structure and trust, it is supportive and serves as a holding environment. Coordination and communication links are needed in the collaboration between the professionals, along with appropriately scheduled and well-performed network meetings to create structure in the parent-professional encounter. Indeed, establishment of trust in this interaction is promoted if individual professionals are available, provide the parents with adequate information, are skilled, and show empathy and commitment. 

  10. Determination of paralytic shellfish toxins in shellfish by receptor binding assay: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dolah, Frances M; Fire, Spencer E; Leighfield, Tod A; Mikulski, Christina M; Doucette, Gregory J

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted on a microplate format receptor binding assay (RBA) for paralytic e shellfish toxins (PST). The assay quantifies the composite PST toxicity in shellfish samples based on the ability of sample extracts to compete with (3)H saxitoxin (STX) diHCl for binding to voltage-gated sodium channels in a rat brain membrane preparation. Quantification of binding can be carried out using either a microplate or traditional scintillation counter; both end points were included in this study. Nine laboratories from six countries completed the study. One laboratory analyzed the samples using the precolumn oxidation HPLC method (AOAC Method 2005.06) to determine the STX congener composition. Three laboratories performed the mouse bioassay (AOAC Method 959.08). The study focused on the ability of the assay to measure the PST toxicity of samples below, near, or slightly above the regulatory limit of 800 (microg STX diHCl equiv./kg). A total of 21 shellfish homogenates were extracted in 0.1 M HCl, and the extracts were analyzed by RBA in three assays on separate days. Samples included naturally contaminated shellfish samples of different species collected from several geographic regions, which contained varying STX congener profiles due to their exposure to different PST-producing dinoflagellate species or differences in toxin metabolism: blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) from the U.S. east and west coasts, California mussel (Mytilus californianus) from the U.S. west coast, chorito mussel (Mytilus chiliensis) from Chile, green mussel (Perna canaliculus) from New Zealand, Atlantic surf clam (Spisula solidissima) from the U.S. east coast, butter clam (Saxidomus gigantea) from the west coast of the United States, almeja clam (Venus antiqua) from Chile, and Atlantic sea scallop (Plactopecten magellanicus) from the U.S. east coast. All samples were provided as whole animal homogenates, except Atlantic sea scallop and green mussel, from which only the

  11. Replicating a study of collaborative use of mobile phones for photo sharing in a different cultural context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandoval, Carolina; Montero, Camila; Jokela, Tero;

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we replicate a study of collaborative mobile phone use to share personal photos in groups of collocated people. The replication study was conducted in a different cultural context to check the generalizability of the findings from the original study in terms of the proposed...... interaction techniques, current photo sharing practices, and privacy. Our results confirm and expand the original findings. We report our main findings by comparing them to the key findings of the original study. Finally, we discuss possible reasons for some variance in the results....

  12. ESIP Federation: A Case Study on Enabling Collaboration Infrastructure to Support Earth Science Informatics Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, E.; Meyer, C. B.; Benedict, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    A critical part of effective Earth science data and information system interoperability involves collaboration across geographically and temporally distributed communities. The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) is a broad-based, distributed community of science, data and information technology practitioners from across science domains, economic sectors and the data lifecycle. ESIP's open, participatory structure provides a melting pot for coordinating around common areas of interest, experimenting on innovative ideas and capturing and finding best practices and lessons learned from across the network. Since much of ESIP's work is distributed, the Foundation for Earth Science was established as a non-profit home for its supportive collaboration infrastructure. The infrastructure leverages the Internet and recent advances in collaboration web services. ESIP provides neutral space for self-governed groups to emerge around common Earth science data and information issues, ebbing and flowing as the need for them arises. As a group emerges, the Foundation quickly equips the virtual workgroup with a set of ';commodity services'. These services include: web meeting technology (Webex), a wiki and an email listserv. WebEx allows the group to work synchronously, dynamically viewing and discussing shared information in real time. The wiki is the group's primary workspace and over time creates organizational memory. The listserv provides an inclusive way to email the group and archive all messages for future reference. These three services lower the startup barrier for collaboration and enable automatic content preservation to allow for future work. While many of ESIP's consensus-building activities are discussion-based, the Foundation supports an ESIP testbed environment for exploring and evaluating prototype standards, services, protocols, and best practices. After community review of testbed proposals, the Foundation provides small seed funding and a

  13. Collaborative Policy Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Boch Waldorff, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    of collaborative policy innovation in the area of mental health care in Denmark indicates that collaboration can contribute to qualify the politicians’ understanding of wicked policy problems, and to fostering new creative policy solutions. The study also shows, however, that the new problem understandings......Governments all over the Western world currently face wicked problems that call for policy innovation. A new strand of research in public innovation points to collaboration between public authorities and relevant and affected stakeholders as an important driver of public innovation. A case study...

  14. Collaborative Policy Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Boch Waldorff, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Governments all over the Western world currently face wicked problems that call for policy innovation. A new strand of research in public innovation points to collaboration between public authorities and relevant and affected stakeholders as an important driver of public innovation. A case study...... of collaborative policy innovation in the area of mental health care in Denmark indicates that collaboration can contribute to qualify the politicians’ understanding of wicked policy problems, and to fostering new creative policy solutions. The study also shows, however, that the new problem understandings...

  15. Collaborative Learning in the Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Kathrin; Razmerita, Liana

    2015-01-01

    This present study aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and identifies associated technologies used to collaborate. In particular we aim to address the following research questions: What are the factors that impact satisfaction with collaboration? How do these factors differ in...

  16. Breakdowns in collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative information seeking is integral to many professional activities. In hospital work, the medication process encompasses continual seeking for information and collaborative grounding of information. This study investigates breakdowns in collaborative information seeking through analyses...... of the use of the electronic medication record adopted in a Danish healthcare region and of the reports of five years of medication incidents at Danish hospitals. The results show that breakdowns in collaborative information seeking is a major source of medication incidents, that most of these breakdowns...

  17. Correlates of Emergency Department Use among Individuals with Bipolar Disorder enrolled in a Collaborative Care Implementation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxmonsky, Jeanette; Verchinina, Lilia; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Lai, Zongshan; Eisenberg, Daniel; Kyle, Julia T.; Nord, Kristina M.; Han, Jenny; Goodrich, David E.; Bauer, Mark; Thomas, Marshall R.; Kilbourne, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The study assessed correlates of emergency department use among individuals with bipolar disorder receiving a collaborative care program. Methods Community-based clinics from two states implemented the evidence-based Life Goals-Collaborative Care Model (LG-CC), which included self-management sessions and care management contacts. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine participant factors associated with 12-month emergency department use after LG-CC implementation. Results Among 219 participants with non-missing baseline and 12-month data, 24.2% (n=53) reported at least one emergency department visit. Participants with homelessness history (OR=3.76; 95% CI=1.39–10.2; p=.01) or 5 or more care management contacts (OR=2.62; 95% CI=.1.00–6.95; p=.05) had higher probability of emergency department visit, adjusting for demographic and clinical factors including physical health and hospitalization history. Conclusions Individuals with bipolar disorder and history of homelessness were more likely to use the emergency department despite enrollment in a Collaborative Care program, suggesting a greater need for more intensive care coordination. PMID:27247174

  18. Determination of isoflavones in soy and selected foods containing soy by extraction, saponification, and liquid chromatography: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, S P; Allred, M C; MacDonald, J L; Ballam, J M

    2001-01-01

    Isoflavones are biologically active compounds occurring naturally in a variety of plants, with relatively high levels found in soybeans. Twelve laboratories participated in a collaborative study to determine the aglycon isoflavone content of 8 test samples of soy and foods containing soy. The analytical method for the determination of isoflavones incorporates a mild saponification step that reduces the number of analytes measured and permits quantitation versus commercially available, stable reference standards. Test samples were extracted at 65 degrees C with methanol-water (80 + 20), saponified with dilute sodium hydroxide solution, and analyzed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with UV detection at 260 nm. Isoflavone results were reported as microg/aglycon/g or microg aglycon equivalents/g. The 8 test samples included 2 blind duplicates and 4 single test samples with total isoflavone concentrations ranging from approximately 50 to 3000 microg/g. Test samples of soy ingredients and products made with soy were distributed to collaborators with appropriate reference standards. Collaborators were asked to analyze test samples in duplicate on 2 separate days. The data were analyzed for individual isoflavone components, subtotals of daidzin-daidzein, glycitin-glycitein, and genistin-genistein, and total isoflavones. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for repeatability was 1.8-7.1%, and the RSD for reproducibility was 3.2-16.1% for total isoflavone values of 47-3099 microg/g.

  19. Collaborative monitoring study of airborne particulate matters among seven Asian countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven Asian countries have been collaborating in collecting airborne particulate matter (APM) in their individual countries and analyzing them by neutron activation analysis as a common analytical tool. APM samples were collected into two fractions of fine and coarse grains (PM2 and PM2- 10, respectively). Analytical data were compared from several viewpoints such as particulate sizes, locality of sampling sites (either urban or rural) and geographical location of participating countries. Chemical composition and their monthly variations as well as mass concentrations appear to be highly characteristic for individual sampling sites, suggesting that NAA data are suitable for evaluating the air quality in each site. (author)

  20. New brine saturation for extraction of light filth from corn meal: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, C C

    1981-01-01

    An improved method has been developed for extracting light filth from corn meal. The proposed method uses only tap water, salt, olive oil, and alcohol, eliminating the need for costly and toxic solvents for the separation. Reports from 8 collaborators showed that recovery was 95.8% for insect fragments and 84.3% for rodent hairs by the proposed method, as compared with 90.6 and 88.6%, respectively, by the official method. The proposed method has been adopted as official first action to replace official method 44.042 for corn meal only. PMID:7204300

  1. Collaborative study of a mineral oil method for the extraction of light filth from ground paprika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasher, J J; Gentry, R

    1977-01-01

    An official first action method for the extraction of light filth from spices, 44.A03--44.A05, was modified for the analyses of ground paprika. The sample is extracted with isopropanol and light filth is isolated from 40% isopropanol with mineral oil. Eight collaborators analyzed 4 paprika samples, 2 by the official method and 2 by the proposed method. Average recoveries of added elytral squares were 97 and 66%, respectively, for the proposed and official methods. Recoveries of added rodent hairs were 94 and 61%, respectively. The method has been adopted as official first action for the extraction of light filth from ground paprika. PMID:833083

  2. Collaboration in experiential therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdondini, Lucia; Elliott, Robert; Shearer, Joan

    2012-02-01

    We offer a view of the nature and role of client-therapist collaboration in experiential psychotherapy, focusing on Gestalt and emotion-focused therapy (EFT). We distinguish between the necessary condition of mutual trust (the emotional bond between client and therapist) and effective collaboration (regarding the goals and tasks of therapy). Using a case study of experiential therapy for social anxiety, we illustrate how the development of collaboration can be both complex and pivotal for therapeutic success, and how it can involve client and therapist encountering one another through taking risks by openly and nonjudgementally disclosing difficult experiences in order to enrich and advance the work. PMID:23616296

  3. China collaborative study on dialysis: a multi-centers cohort study on cardiovascular diseases in patients on maintenance dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Fanfan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the main cause of death in patients on chronic dialysis. The question whether dialysis modality impacts cardiovascular risk remains to be addressed. China Collaborative Study on Dialysis, a multi-centers cohort study, was performed to evaluate cardiovascular morbidity during maintenance hemodialysis (HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD. Method The cohort consisted of chronic dialysis patients from the database of 9 of the largest dialysis facilities around China. The inclusion period was between January 1, 2005, and December 1, 2010. Cardiovascular morbidity was defined as the presence of clinically diagnosed ischemic heart disease, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, and/or stroke. The patients who had cardiovascular morbidity before initiation of dialysis were excluded. Data collection was based on review of medical record. Result A total of 2,388 adult patients (1,775 on HD and 613 on PD were enrolled. Cardiovascular morbidity affected 57% patients and was comparable between HD and PD patients. However, clinically diagnosed ischemic heart disease and stroke was more prevalent in PD than HD patients. When the patients were stratified by age or dialysis vintage, the cardiovascular morbidity was significantly higher in PD than HD among those aged 50 years or older, or those receiving dialysis over 36 months. Multivariate analysis revealed that the risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity had different pattern in PD and HD patients. Hyperglycemia was the strongest risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity in PD, but not in HD patients. Hypertriglyceridemia and hypoalbuminemia were independently associated with CVD only in PD patients. Conclusions Cardiovascular morbidity during chronic dialysis was more prevalent in PD than HD patients among those with old age and long-term dialysis. Metabolic disturbance-related risk factors were independently associated with CVD only in PD patients

  4. Classroom Journal Club: Collaborative Study of Contemporary Primary Literature in the Biomechanics Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuxhaus, Laurel; Corbiere, Nicole C

    2016-07-01

    Current engineering pedagogy primarily focuses on developing technical proficiency and problem solving skills; the peer-review process for sharing new research results is often overlooked. The use of a collaborative classroom journal club can engage students with the excitement of scientific discovery and the process of dissemination of research results, which are also important lifelong learning skills. In this work, a classroom journal club was implemented and a survey of student perceptions spanning three student cohorts was collected. In this collaborative learning activity, students regularly chose and discussed a recent biomechanics journal article, and were assessed based on specific, individual preparation tasks. Most student-chosen journal articles were relevant to topics discussed in the regular class lecture. Surveys assessed student perceptions of the activity. The survey responses show that, across all cohorts, students both enjoyed the classroom journal club and recognized it as an important learning experience. Many reported discussing their journal articles with others outside of the classroom, indicating good engagement. The results demonstrate that student engagement with primary literature can foster both technical knowledge and lifelong learning skills. PMID:26902674

  5. Study on Multi-enterprise Collaborative Resource Planning Based Process-oriented Decision Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jinhua; HE Yingying; LIU Jianming

    2006-01-01

    Aiming to share the information, knowledge and optimizing resource via collaborating with multiple external partners across their supply chains, the concept model and system framework of multi-enterprises collaborative resource planning (MECORP) are put forward. While there is Considerable pressure to improve the operation of MECORP system, their inherent complexity can make modelling a MECORP system a difficult task. Yet there could be considerable benefits in designing MECORP taking into account the operation of the system. In order to address the central research issue of developing of a methodology that can assist a manager in making decisions by modelling the operation of MECORP system. The methodology called process-oriented decision model (PODM) is presented in the paper. This uses an abstracted network to model MECORP system. The MECORP system supported by PODM, can effective optimize the manifold resource, coordinate the relationship of multiple partners and assist decision. Finally, an industry example of MECORP system is described to illustrate the application of PODM.

  6. Collaborating Against AIDS: A Urban Chinese Case Study of World AIDS Day Awareness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周海青; 高省; 王书崎; 隗慧林; 陈强; 陈祥生

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To incorporate students and other local community partners in creating a collaborative Nanjing World AIDS Day exhibition. Background: Stigma and discrimination continue to complicate effective World AIDS Day activities in China. Including foreign students in World AIDS Day campaigns broadens the potential Chinese audience as well as making the government's AIDS policiesmore transparent. Methods: In order to broaden the potential audience, relevant media (television, radio, newspaper) were notified of the 2003 Nanjing World AIDS Day Exhibition. The exhibition represented a unique collaboration between Nanjing University and the Chinese National Center for STD and Leprosy Control, depending on foreign and Chinese students at several levels. In addition, close contacts at the Jiangsu Provincial Health Bureau helped to coordinate local experts and distribution of condoms. Results: This multi-disciplinary cooperative exhibition was successfully completed. Several major media sources covered the event. Conclusions: The success of this campaign suggests that other urban cities with significant foreign student populations could benefit from including foreign and Chinese students in future World AIDS Day campaign activities.

  7. Using Cloud collaboration for writing assignments by students with disabilities: a case study using action research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjrsten Keane

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Though separated by geographical distance, a student with disabilities, his advisor, and his writing coach consorted in the Cloud using Google applications to achieve a writing goal. Our scenario demonstrates how emerging technologies can bridge transactional distance and “virtually” supplant face-to-face conferencing around a college writing assignment. Individual levels of technical acumen with digital technology evolved to bridge the psychological and communication space between the student and his instructors. As a result, the telecollaborators developed an efficient coaching process adaptable for all students who need assistance in revising college writing assignments at a distance. Action research frames our discussion of the Cloud collaboration and provides a scaffold for student autonomy. The advantages as well and disadvantages of Cloud collaboration are outlined with reference to the National Institute of Standards of Technology definition of Cloud Computing and the Seven Principles of Universal Course Design.http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/openpraxis.6.1.79

  8. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.; Chang, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Bae, Y. Y.; Kim, W. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Generation IV International Forum(GIF), where 13 countries including Korea collaborate to develop future nuclear energy systems, put into force 'Generation IV International Forum Project Arrangement' in 2007 for the international research and development of Gen IV Systems, following the entry into force of Framework Agreement in 2005. The International Nuclear Research Initiative(I-NERI) between Korea and United States and the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems and Fuel Cycles(INPRO) of IAEA are continued in this year, produced lots of visible outcomes. These international activities have a common goal of the collaborative development of advanced nuclear system technologies but differ in the main focusing areas and aspects, so Korea needs to establish the integrated strategy based on the distinguished and complementary approach for the participation of each international programs, as examples the GIF for the advanced system technology development, INPRO for the set-up of institution and infra-structure, and I-NERI for the access of the core technologies and acquisition of the transparency of nuclear R and D.

  9. A study for collaborative management for nuclear spent fuel control. Seeking for nuclear non-proliferation in East Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the rapid increase of power generation with nuclear fuel in East Asia area, the management and control of nuclear spent fuel from nuclear reactors has become an essential and urgent issue in this area. This study focused on the possibility of forming an intergovernmental collaborative management system for nuclear spent fuel with an emphasize on nuclear non-proliferation among East Asian countries, i.e. China, Korea, Taiwan and Japan who own and operate nuclear power plants. First, we studied the present situation for nuclear spent fuel, including the storage measures, the future fore- cast on the accumulation and the government measures to deal with these spent fuel. Then, based upon first step studies, we examined the pros and cons when the collaborative management is realized particularly from the viewpoint of prevention of nuclear proliferation. Further, we estimated possible means for management and control of nuclear spent fuel, including its system size and cost. Finally, we extracted some technological tasks to be solved and political issues to be discussed. Our findings are as follows. 1. The total amount of the power generation in three East Asian counties (China, Korea and Taiwan) is about 17 million KW presently. This will be tripled to 51 million KW by the year 2010. When Japan's ability is added it is 62 million KW currently and 121 million by 2010. 2. The nuclear spent fuel in Taiwan and Korea will be saturated for their storage capacity. On the other hand, Japan will start to operate her reprocessing plant in Aomori prefecture in 2003 and her new storage capability is completed in 1999. Also in China, a reprocessing pilot plant is under construction and its operation is scheduled in 2001. 3. As their national policy, China and Japan does reprocess from spent fuel but Korea and Taiwan don't. Instead, they take non-reprocessing and direct geological disposal. 4. If the collaborative management of nuclear wastes is realized Multi

  10. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    -called Extended Manufacturing Enterprises (EMEs). In effect, the battlefield of competition is increasingly moving from the level of individual firms to that of EMEs. Consequently, new approaches must be developed not only to enhance the business performance of EMEs, but also, in particular, the inter-organisational......Many companies have gradually moved from vertically aligned operations to horizontally aligned operations, a change implying that co-ordination is shifting from the hierarchy to the market place with emphasis on collaboration with other companies. One form of collaboration with companies is so...

  11. The influence of power dynamics and trust on multidisciplinary collaboration: a qualitative case study of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonald Julie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ongoing care for chronic conditions such as diabetes is best provided by a range of health professionals working together. There are challenges in achieving this where collaboration crosses organisational and sector boundaries. The aim of this article is to explore the influence of power dynamics and trust on collaboration between health professionals involved in the management of diabetes and their impact on patient experiences. Methods A qualitative case study conducted in a rural city in Australia. Forty five health service providers from nineteen organisations (including fee-for-service practices and block funded public sector services and eight patients from two services were purposively recruited. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews that were audio-taped and transcribed. A thematic analysis approach was used using a two-level coding scheme and cross-case comparisons. Results Three themes emerged in relation to power dynamics between health professionals: their use of power to protect their autonomy, power dynamics between private and public sector providers, and reducing their dependency on other health professionals to maintain their power. Despite the intention of government policies to support more shared decision-making, there is little evidence that this is happening. The major trust themes related to role perceptions, demonstrated competence, and the importance of good communication for the development of trust over time. The interaction between trust and role perceptions went beyond understanding each other's roles and professional identity. The level of trust related to the acceptance of each other's roles. The delivery of primary and community-based health services that crosses organisational boundaries adds a layer of complexity to interprofessional relationships. The roles of and role boundaries between and within professional groups and services are changing. The uncertainty and

  12. Social media and internet driven study recruitment: evaluating a new model for promoting collaborator engagement and participation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Khatri

    Full Text Available A substantial challenge facing multicentre audit and research projects is timely recruitment of collaborators and their study centres. Cost-effective strategies are required and fee-free social media has previously been identified as a potential conduit. We investigated and evaluated the effectiveness of a novel multi-format social media and Internet strategy for targeted recruitment to a national multicentre cohort study.Interventions involved a new Twitter account, including weekly live question-and-answer sessions, a new Facebook group page, online YouTube presentations and an information page on a national association website. Link tracking analysis was undertaken using Google Analytics, which was then related to subsequent registration. Social influence was calculated using the proprietary Klout score.Internet traffic analysis identified a total of 1562 unique registration site views, of which 285 originated from social media (18.2%. Some 528 unique registrations were received, with 96 via social media platforms (18.2%. Traffic source analysis identified a separate national association webpage as resulting in the majority of registration page views (15.8%, followed by Facebook (11.9%, Twitter (4.8% and YouTube (1.5%. A combination of publicity through Facebook, Twitter and the dedicated national association webpage contributed to the greatest rise in registration traffic and accounted for 312 (48% of the total registrations within a 2-week period. A Twitter 'social influence' (Klout score of 42/100 was obtained during this period.Targeted social media substantially aided study dissemination and collaborator recruitment. It acted as an adjunct to traditional methods, accounting for 18.2% of collaborator registration in a short time period with no associated financial costs. We provide a practical model for designing future recruitment campaigns, and recommend Facebook, Twitter and targeted websites as the most effective adjuncts for

  13. Advancing Geospatial Technologies in Science and Social Science: A Case Study in Collaborative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, N. A.; Morris, J. N.; Simms, M. L.; Metoyer, S.

    2007-12-01

    The Advancing Geospatial Skills in Science and Social Sciences (AGSSS) program, funded by NSF, provides middle and high school teacher-partners with access to graduate student scientists for classroom collaboration and curriculum adaptation to incorporate and advance skills in spatial thinking. AGSSS Fellows aid in the delivery of geospatially-enhanced activities utilizing technology such as geographic information systems, remote sensing, and virtual globes. The partnership also provides advanced professional development for both participating teachers and fellows. The AGSSS program is mutually beneficial to all parties involved. This successful collaboration of scientists, teachers, and students results in greater understanding and enthusiasm for the use of spatial thinking strategies and geospatial technologies. In addition, the partnership produces measurable improvements in student efficacy and attitudes toward processes of spatial thinking. The teacher partner training and classroom resources provided by AGSSS will continue the integration of geospatial activities into the curriculum after the project concludes. Time and resources are the main costs in implementing this partnership. Graduate fellows invest considerable time and energy, outside of academic responsibilities, to develop materials for the classroom. Fellows are required to be available during K-12 school hours, which necessitates forethought in scheduling other graduate duties. However, the benefits far outweigh the costs. Graduate fellows gain experience in working in classrooms. In exchange, students gain exposure to working scientists and their research. This affords graduate fellows the opportunity to hone their communication skills, and specifically allows them to address the issue of translating technical information for a novice audience. Teacher-partners and students benefit by having scientific expertise readily available. In summation, these experiences result in changes in teacher

  14. Framing the Collaborative Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Gruszka, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of multiple crises and change, a range of practices discussed under the umbrella term of collaborative (or sharing) economy have been gaining considerable attention. Supporters build an idealistic vision of collaborative societies. Critics have been stripping the concept of its visionary potential, questioning its revolutionary nature. In the study, these debates are brought down to the local level in search for common perceptions among the co-creators of the concept in Vie...

  15. Feasibility Study of Implementing a Mobile Collaborative Information Platform for International Safeguards Inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastelum, Zoe N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gitau, Ernest T. N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Doehle, Joel R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Toomey, Christopher M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In response to the growing pervasiveness of mobile technologies such as tablets and smartphones, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories have been exploring the potential use of these platforms for international safeguards activities. Specifically of interest are information systems (software, and accompanying servers and architecture) deployed on mobile devices to increase the situational awareness and productivity of an IAEA safeguards inspector in the field, while simultaneously reducing paperwork and pack weight of safeguards equipment. Exploratory development in this area has been met with skepticism regarding the ability to overcome technology deployment challenges for IAEA safeguards equipment. This report documents research conducted to identify potential challenges for the deployment of a mobile collaborative information system to the IAEA, and proposes strategies to mitigate those challenges.

  16. Feasibility Study of Implementing a Mobile Collaborative Information Platform for International Safeguards Inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Doehle, Joel R.; Toomey, Christopher M.

    2014-09-30

    In response to the growing pervasiveness of mobile technologies such as tablets and smartphones, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories have been exploring the potential use of these platforms for international safeguards activities. Specifically of interest are information systems (software, and accompanying servers and architecture) deployed on mobile devices to increase the situational awareness and productivity of an IAEA safeguards inspector in the field, while simultaneously reducing paperwork and pack weight of safeguards equipment. Exploratory development in this area has been met with skepticism regarding the ability to overcome technology deployment challenges for IAEA safeguards equipment. This report documents research conducted to identify potential challenges for the deployment of a mobile collaborative information system to the IAEA, and proposes strategies to mitigate those challenges.

  17. The Study on the Architecture of Public knowledge Service Platform Based on Collaborative Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chang Ping; Zhang, Min; Xiang, Fei

    The knowledge service platform is seen as the vital intermediaries in innovation cycle, and for users to locate, exchange and acquire knowledge in a systematic way. It is increasingly recognizing the powerful role that knowledge service platform provide in building a national innovation capacity. The knowledge service platforms in the China's national innovation system, mostly based on the digital libraries, are supported and constructed by diverse departments and systems. These platforms disperse in construction, have respective division and orientation. However, along with the development of information technology and the revolution of innovation model, the requirements for the reconstruction of knowledge service platform in innovation system are brought forward. In this paper, we analyze the resources integration framework of the existing public service platform, and put forward the architecture of the public knowledge service platform based on collaborative innovation; we also discuss its concrete implementation.

  18. Gender differences in an elementary school learning environment: A study on how girls learn science in collaborative learning groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, Yvette Frank

    Girls are marked by low self-confidence manifested through gender discrimination during the early years of socialization and culturalization (AAUW, 1998). The nature of gender bias affects all girls in their studies of science and mathematics, particularly in minority groups, during their school years. It has been found that girls generally do not aspire in either mathematical or science-oriented careers because of such issues as overt and subtle stereotyping, inadequate confidence in ability, and discouragement in scientific competence. Grounded on constructivism, a theoretical framework, this inquiry employs fourth generation evaluation, a twelve-step evaluative process (Guba & Lincoln, 1989). The focus is to discover through qualitative research how fifth grade girls learn science in a co-sexual collaborative learning group, as they engage in hands-on, minds-on experiments. The emphasis is centered on one Hispanic girl in an effort to understand her beliefs, attitudes, and behavior as she becomes a stakeholder with other members of her six person collaborative learning group. The intent is to determine if cultural and social factors impact the learning of scientific concepts based on observations from videotapes, interviews, and student opinion questionnaires. QSR NUD*IST 4, a computer software program is utilized to help categorize and index data. Among the findings, there is evidence that clearly indicates girls' attitudes toward science are altered as they interact with other girls and boys in a collaborative learning group. Observations also indicate that cultural and social factors affect girls' performance as they explore and discover scientific concepts with other girls and boys. Based upon what I have uncovered utilizing qualitative research and confirmed according to current literature, there seems to be an appreciable impact on the way girls appear to learn science. Rooted in the data, the results mirror the conclusions of previous studies, which

  19. Collaborative engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Robert L.; Reames, Joseph M.

    2004-09-01

    A need exists for United States military forces to perform collaborative engagement operations between unmanned systems. This capability has the potential to contribute significant tactical synergy to the Joint Force operating in the battlespace of the future. Collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. Collaborative engagements can also add considerably to force survivability by reducing soldier and equipment exposure during critical operations. This paper will address a multiphase U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC) Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL) program to assess information requirements, Joint Architecure for Unmanned Systems (JAUS), on-going Science and Technology initiatives, and conduct simulation based experiments to identify and resolve technical risks required to conduct collaborative engagements using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGV). The schedule outlines an initial effort to expand, update and exercise JAUS, provide early feedback to support user development of Concept of Operations (CONOPs) and Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTPs), and develop a Multiple Unified Simulation Environment (MUSE) system with JAUS interfaces necessary to support an unmanned system of systems collaboartive engagement.

  20. Species identification of cooked fish by urea isoelectric focusing and sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis : a collaborative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehbein, H.; Kundiger, R.; Yman, I.M.;

    1999-01-01

    The suitability and reliability of urea IEF and SDS-PAGE for the identification of cooked fish flesh was tested by a collaborative study among nine laboratories. Urea IEF was performed with CleanGels as well as with ImmobilineGels, and ExcelGels were used for SDS-PAGE, enabling all three types of...... was incorrect, and with SDS-PAGE a similar result was obtained. It was concluded that methods, as now developed, are suitable for checking the species declaration of fishery products. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved...

  1. QUALITY OF INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEM (IOS) FRAMEWORK FOR SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (SCM): STUDY OF SIX COLLABORATIVE FACTORS FROM SUPPLIER AND CUSTOMER PERSPECTIVES

    OpenAIRE

    Miloš Mihajlović

    2010-01-01

    This paper has identified a research gap to study how organizations collaborate together to adopt Inter- Organizational System (IOS) for Supply Chain Management (SCM). We propose such a framework and then use four theories, namely resource dependency theory, organizational theory, actor-network theory and negotiated order theory, to understand how the framework supports management collaboration and interaction in the adoption of an IOS. This adoption framework is proposed to better study how ...

  2. Promoting research and audit at medical school: evaluating the educational impact of participation in a student-led national collaborative study

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, S. J.; Glasbey, J. C. D.; Khatri, C.; Kelly, M.; Nepogodiev, D.; Bhangu, A; Fitzgerald, J. E. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical students often struggle to engage in extra-curricular research and audit. The Student Audit and Research in Surgery (STARSurg) network is a novel student-led, national research collaborative. Student collaborators contribute data to national, clinical studies while gaining an understanding of audit and research methodology and ethical principles. This study aimed to evaluate the educational impact of participation. Methods Participation in the national, clinical project was...

  3. The role of fairness in governing supply chain collaborations. A case-study in the Dutch floriculture industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, G.R.; Man, A.P. de; Quak, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Supply chain collaboration, in which two or more autonomous firms work together to plan and execute supply chain operations, is becoming ever more important to remain competitive in business. Yet, through collaboration concerns arise about whether the benefits and risks of collaboration are split in

  4. Technology transfer at CERN a study on inter-organizational knowledge transfer within multi-national R&D collaborations

    CERN Document Server

    Huuse, H; Streit-Bianchi, M

    2004-01-01

    This study focus on the knowledge aspect of inter-organizational technology transfer projects. We have studied two large R&D collaborations where CERN is involved as one of several participating organizations, in order to reveal the causalities related to the knowledge transfer processes within these projects. The objective of the study is to understand how knowledge transfer happens, identify influencing factors to the process, and finally investigate the outcome of such processes. The study is founded on a thorough literature review where we examine different aspects of inter-organizational knowledge transfer. Based on the theory, we develop an analytic framework and establish different elements in the knowledge transfer process to study in more detail. This framework illustrates the relation between the different elements in a knowledge transfer process and provides the structure for our empirical foundation. We perform an explanatory embedded multiple case study and analyze our findings in terms of th...

  5. Use of an Interculturally Enriched Collaboration Script in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov, V.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Kuznetsov, A.N.; Mulder, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the authors introduced an interculturally enriched collaboration script (IECS) for working in culturally diverse groups within a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environment and then assessed student online collaborative behaviour, learning performance and

  6. A case study of asthma care in school age children using nurse-coordinated multidisciplinary collaborative practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Procter S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Susan Procter,1 Fiona Brooks,2 Patricia Wilson,3 Carolyn Crouchman,1 Sally Kendall21Faculty of Society and Health, Buckinghamshire New University, High Wycombe, UK; 2Centre for Research in Primary and Community Care (CRIPACC, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK; 3Centre for Health Services Studies, University of Kent, Canterbury, UKAim: To describe the role of school nursing in leading and coordinating a multidisciplinary networked system of support for children with asthma, and to analyze the strengths and challenges of undertaking and supporting multiagency interprofessional practice.Background: The growth of networked and interprofessional collaborations arises from the recognition that a number of the most pressing public health problems cannot be addressed by single-discipline or -agency interventions. This paper identifies the potential of school nursing to provide the vision and multiagency leadership required to coordinate multidisciplinary collaboration.Method: A mixed-method single-case study design using Yin's approach, including focus groups, interviews, and analysis of policy documents and public health reports.Results: A model that explains the integrated population approach to managing school-age asthma is described; the role of the lead school nurse coordinator was seen as critical to the development and sustainability of the model.Conclusion: School nurses can provide strategic multidisciplinary leadership to address pressing public health issues. Health service managers and commissioners need to understand how to support clinicians working across multiagency boundaries and to identify how to develop leadership skills for collaborative interprofessional practice so that the capacity for nursing and other health care professionals to address public health issues does not rely on individual motivation. In England, this will be of particular importance to the commissioning of public health services by local authorities from

  7. Collaborative study for the calibration of replacement batches for the heparin low-molecular-mass for assay biological reference preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, E; Daas, A

    2016-01-01

    The European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) prescribes the control of the activity of low molecular mass heparins by assays for anti-Xa and anti-IIa activities (monograph 0828), using a reference standard calibrated in International Units (IU). An international collaborative study coded BSP133 was launched in the framework of the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP) run under the aegis of the Council of Europe and the European Commission to calibrate replacement batches for the dwindling stocks of the Heparin low-molecular-mass for assay Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) batch 8. Thirteen official medicines control and manufacturers laboratories from European and non-European countries took part in this study to calibrate two freeze-dried candidate batches against the 3rd International Standard (IS) for heparin, low molecular weight (11/176; 3rd IS). The Heparin low-molecular-mass for assay BRP (batch 8) was also included in the test panel to check the continuity between subsequent BRP batches. Taking into account the stability data, the results of this collaborative study and on the basis of the central statistical analysis performed at the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM), the 2 candidate batches were officially adopted by the Commission of the European Pharmacopoeia as Heparin low-molecular-mass for assay BRP batches 9 and 10 with assigned anti-Xa activities of 102 and 100 IU/vial and anti-IIa activities of 34 and 33 IU/vial respectively. PMID:27507705

  8. Efficiency of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation in China: An empirical study based on DEA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaping Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper is an attempt to investigate the current issues and development of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation in China. Design/methodology/approach: DEA is employed to measure the efficiency of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation. Findings: From the results of this research, we can get the conclusion that there are big spaces for improvement for the selected companies in terms of supply chain collaborative technological innovation, especially in the collaborative benefit aspect. The efficiencies of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation in the selected companies vary a lot. Research limitations: More industries are needed to generalize the conclusions. Practical implications: Our practical recommendations for improving supply chain companies in terms of improving their collaborative technological innovation efficiency are: (1 expanding the cooperative scope; (2 optimizing the collaboration operations; (3 improving the compactness in supply chain; (4 increasing the innovation input; and (5 improving the knowledge exchange capacity. Originality/value: The evaluation and the measure of the efficiency of performance of the collaborative technological innovation both in theory and in practice have been proven to be very important and quite complex, and there have been limited researches in the current literature. From observations, however, the efficiency of supply chain collaborative technological innovation is relatively low. This research investigates the current issues and development of the supply chain collaborative technological innovation in China, and provides the guideline in terms of improving the efficiency of supply chain collaborative technological innovation.

  9. Providers’ perspectives on collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bruner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Changes in models of health care are required to better meet the needs of diverse, underserved patient populations. Collaboration among providers is one way to promote accessible, comprehensive and continuous care in healthcare organizations. This paper describes the quantitative findings from two time points that examined providers' views of collaboration among a sample of diverse personnel (e.g. clinical nurses, social workers, dental providers, mental health providers, clerical staff, medical assistants, public health staff, and administrators within a federally qualified nurse managed health care centre in the United States. Methods: The quantitative arm of a mixed-method study is presented in this paper. Two instruments, the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale and the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (comprised of 4 subscales-Communication and Teamwork Scale, Interprofessional Learning Scale, Interprofessional Interaction Scale, and Interprofessional Relationships Scale were administered to providers at baseline and three to eight months following six same discipline focus group discussions on collaboration, in order to evaluate whether participating in the focus group discussions changed providers' views of collaboration. A summary of the focus group data which were published elsewhere is additionally summarized to help provide insight to the quantitative findings. Thirty-nine staff participated. Results: Paired t-tests revealed that only one scale out of the five, Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (33.97 at time one and 37.45 at time two, significantly and positively changed after the focus group discussion (p=0.046. Providers' views on collaboration ranged from positive to moderate views of collaboration; most measures revealed a non-significant improvement after the focus group discussions. Staff with some graduate school reported the greatest

  10. Providers’ perspectives on collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bruner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Changes in models of health care are required to better meet the needs of diverse, underserved patient populations. Collaboration among providers is one way to promote accessible, comprehensive and continuous care in healthcare organizations. This paper describes the quantitative findings from two time points that examined providers' views of collaboration among a sample of diverse personnel (e.g. clinical nurses, social workers, dental providers, mental health providers, clerical staff, medical assistants, public health staff, and administrators within a federally qualified nurse managed health care centre in the United States.Methods: The quantitative arm of a mixed-method study is presented in this paper. Two instruments, the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale and the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (comprised of 4 subscales-Communication and Teamwork Scale, Interprofessional Learning Scale, Interprofessional Interaction Scale, and Interprofessional Relationships Scale were administered to providers at baseline and three to eight months following six same discipline focus group discussions on collaboration, in order to evaluate whether participating in the focus group discussions changed providers' views of collaboration. A summary of the focus group data which were published elsewhere is additionally summarized to help provide insight to the quantitative findings. Thirty-nine staff participated.Results: Paired t-tests revealed that only one scale out of the five, Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (33.97 at time one and 37.45 at time two, significantly and positively changed after the focus group discussion (p=0.046. Providers' views on collaboration ranged from positive to moderate views of collaboration; most measures revealed a non-significant improvement after the focus group discussions. Staff with some graduate school reported the greatest

  11. QUALITY OF INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEM (IOS FRAMEWORK FOR SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (SCM: STUDY OF SIX COLLABORATIVE FACTORS FROM SUPPLIER AND CUSTOMER PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Mihajlović

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper has identified a research gap to study how organizations collaborate together to adopt Inter- Organizational System (IOS for Supply Chain Management (SCM. We propose such a framework and then use four theories, namely resource dependency theory, organizational theory, actor-network theory and negotiated order theory, to understand how the framework supports management collaboration and interaction in the adoption of an IOS. This adoption framework is proposed to better study how senior management staff, from both supplier and customer perspectives, collaborate and interact in the IOS adoption process. The framework has been constructed from the literature identifying six major aspects for consideration namely: inter and intra organizational collaboration; strategic management approaches; supply chain design (SCD; business process redesign/reengineering (BPR; information systems (IS / information technology (IT architecture and external environmental factors. From customer and supplier perspectives the adoption of IOS for SCM, makes a significant contribution to knowledge in this field.

  12. Researching Reflexively With Patients and Families: Two Studies Using Video-Reflexive Ethnography to Collaborate With Patients and Families in Patient Safety Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Aileen; Wyer, Mary

    2016-06-01

    Patient safety research has to date offered few opportunities for patients and families to be actively involved in the research process. This article describes our collaboration with patients and families in two separate studies, involving end-of-life care and infection control in acute care. We used the collaborative methodology of video-reflexive ethnography, which has been primarily used with clinicians, to involve patients and families as active participants and collaborators in our research. The purpose of this article is to share our experiences and findings that iterative researcher reflexivity in the field was critical to the progress and success of each study. We present and analyze the complexities of reflexivity-in-the-field through a framework of multilayered reflexivity. We share our lessons here for other researchers seeking to actively involve patients and families in patient safety research using collaborative visual methods.

  13. The use of collaboration science to define consensus outcome measures: a telemental health case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkind, Matthew C; Doarn, Charles R; Bernard, Jordana; Shore, Jay H

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of a collaboration science process used to develop recommendations for the field of telemental health (TMH) in the selection of outcome measures that best reflect programmatic impacts. A common use of group development techniques in medicine is the development of clinical guidelines, which typically occurs using one of two methods: the nominal group or the Delphi method. Both processes have been faulted for limited transparency, reliability, and sustainability. Recommendations to improve the traditional process include making goals explicit, making disagreements transparent, and publicly displaying levels of agreement. A group of 26 TMH experts convened during the American Telemedicine Association's 2012 Fall Forum in New Orleans, LA to participate in a 1-day, interactive, consensus-building workshop to initiate the development of a shared lexicon of outcomes. The workshop method was designed to improve on traditional methods of guideline development by focusing on clarity of expectations, transparency, and timeliness of group development work. Results suggest that, compared with other traditional methods, the current process involved more people, occurred more rapidly, was more transparent, and resulted in a comparable deliverable. Recommendations for further process development, both within and external to TMH, as well as an initial overview of defined outcome measures are discussed.

  14. FORMING ADAPTED TEAMS ORIENTED TO COLLABORATION: DETAILED DESIGN AND CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA PAULA ARIAS-BÁEZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo colaborativo es cada vez más importante debido al creciente tamaño y complejidad de los problemas. Para realizar trabajo colaborativo existen en el mercado diversas herramientas que potencian la compartición de información, la colaboración en las actividades de los compañeros de equipo y el seguimiento del progreso durante el desarrollo y el cierre del trabajo colaborativo. Una etapa previa al proceso colaborativo consiste en elegir los miembros del equipo que cooperarán con el objetivo de alcanzar las metas establecidas. Trabajos previos presentaron MATEO (acrónimo de Making Adapted TEams Oriented to collaboration, sistema genérico cuyo principal objetivo consiste en adaptar la conformación de equipos de trabajo, teniendo en cuenta características de los candidatos, del contexto (tanto individual como del trabajo colaborativo y otros criterios. El presente trabajo complementa el trabajo anterior, detallando el diseño de MATEO y su validación a través de un caso de estudio en el que se integra a una plataforma de trabajo colaborativo llamada AYLLU.

  15. Improvement during baseline: three case studies encouraging collaborative research when evaluating caregiver training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohlberg, M M; Glang, A; Todis, B

    1998-04-01

    The trend in cognitive rehabilitation toward reduced services, which provide more functionally relevant outcomes and the recognition of limited maintenance and generalization with many existing interventions, challenges current research models. There is a need to develop and evaluate interventions that can be implemented by persons other than rehabilitation professionals and that are well suited to naturalistic settings. The researchers responded to these challenges by designing a series of single subject experiments evaluating the effectiveness of training caregivers to provide appropriate cognitive support to persons with brain injury within their own natural living environments. The goal of the original research project included evaluating a collaborative mode of interaction with the subjects and their support persons (as opposed to traditional directive treatment models) where the caregivers and subjects were instrumental in designing the intervention and collective performance data. This paper presents the data from the initial three subject/caregiver groups all of whom demonstrated improvement in the target behaviours during the baseline period. It appeared that the act of measuring client performance changed the behaviours of the support persons and resulted in positive changes in baseline levels. The research and clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  16. How to improve collaboration between the public health sector and other policy sectors to reduce health inequalities? – A study in sixteen municipalities in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Storm, Ilse; den Hertog, Frank; van Oers, Hans; Schuit, Albertine J

    2016-01-01

    Background The causes of health inequalities are complex. For the reduction of health inequalities, intersectoral collaboration between the public health sector and both social policy sectors (e.g. youth affairs, education) and physical policy sectors (e.g. housing, spatial planning) is essential, but in local practice difficult to realize. The aim of this study was to examine the collaboration between the sectors in question more closely and to identify opportunities for improvement. Method ...

  17. Extreme Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Tony

    2014-01-01

    This talk will focus on collaborations with artists and designers and the new research and commercial applications it has spawned. Serendipity plays a great part in research and I met Helen Storey because of a radio programme called Material World. We worked together on Wonderland, an Art/Science project that argued that drastic new thinking is required to address today's environmental issues with regard to branding and the ethical implications of packaging. Begun in 2005 with ...

  18. Nurse-physician collaboration impacts job satisfaction and turnover among nurses: A hospital-based cross-sectional study in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Huang, Lei; Liu, Meng; Yan, Hong; Li, Xiue

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to explore the impact of physician-nurse collaboration on nurse job satisfaction and turnover in a dental hospital. Physician-nurse collaboration is important for the stability of the entire nursing team. Few studies have shown the impact on job satisfaction and turnover among nurses working in Chinese dental hospitals. This was a prospective, cross-sectional study and investigated nurses from a tertiary dental hospital in Beijing using convenience non-randomized sampling. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data, which included general information, the Index of Work Satisfaction, the Nurse-Physician Collaboration Scale and the Turnover Intention Scale. The scores of physician-nurse collaboration correlated positively with those for job satisfaction and negatively with the stated likelihood of turnover intention. Physician-nurse collaboration scores positively predicted job satisfaction and negatively predicted the likelihood of quitting the current job. In conclusion, improving the level of physician-nurse collaboration is helpful to enhance job satisfaction and reduce turnover among nurses in a dental hospital.

  19. Nurse-physician collaboration impacts job satisfaction and turnover among nurses: A hospital-based cross-sectional study in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Huang, Lei; Liu, Meng; Yan, Hong; Li, Xiue

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to explore the impact of physician-nurse collaboration on nurse job satisfaction and turnover in a dental hospital. Physician-nurse collaboration is important for the stability of the entire nursing team. Few studies have shown the impact on job satisfaction and turnover among nurses working in Chinese dental hospitals. This was a prospective, cross-sectional study and investigated nurses from a tertiary dental hospital in Beijing using convenience non-randomized sampling. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data, which included general information, the Index of Work Satisfaction, the Nurse-Physician Collaboration Scale and the Turnover Intention Scale. The scores of physician-nurse collaboration correlated positively with those for job satisfaction and negatively with the stated likelihood of turnover intention. Physician-nurse collaboration scores positively predicted job satisfaction and negatively predicted the likelihood of quitting the current job. In conclusion, improving the level of physician-nurse collaboration is helpful to enhance job satisfaction and reduce turnover among nurses in a dental hospital. PMID:26952765

  20. Analyzing Collaborative Governance Through Social Network Analysis: A Case Study of River Management Along the Waal River in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliervoet, J M; Geerling, G W; Mostert, E; Smits, A J M

    2016-02-01

    Until recently, governmental organizations played a dominant and decisive role in natural resource management. However, an increasing number of studies indicate that this dominant role is developing towards a more facilitating role as equal partner to improve efficiency and create a leaner state. This approach is characterized by complex collaborative relationships between various actors and sectors on multiple levels. To understand this complexity in the field of environmental management, we conducted a social network analysis of floodplain management in the Dutch Rhine delta. We charted the current interorganizational relationships between 43 organizations involved in flood protection (blue network) and nature management (green network) and explored the consequences of abolishing the central actor in these networks. The discontinuation of this actor will decrease the connectedness of actors within the blue and green network and may therefore have a large impact on the exchange of ideas and decision-making processes. Furthermore, our research shows the dependence of non-governmental actors on the main governmental organizations. It seems that the Dutch governmental organizations still have a dominant and controlling role in floodplain management. This challenges the alleged shift from a dominant government towards collaborative governance and calls for detailed analysis of actual governance.

  1. Analyzing Collaborative Governance Through Social Network Analysis: A Case Study of River Management Along the Waal River in The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliervoet, J. M.; Geerling, G. W.; Mostert, E.; Smits, A. J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Until recently, governmental organizations played a dominant and decisive role in natural resource management. However, an increasing number of studies indicate that this dominant role is developing towards a more facilitating role as equal partner to improve efficiency and create a leaner state. This approach is characterized by complex collaborative relationships between various actors and sectors on multiple levels. To understand this complexity in the field of environmental management, we conducted a social network analysis of floodplain management in the Dutch Rhine delta. We charted the current interorganizational relationships between 43 organizations involved in flood protection (blue network) and nature management (green network) and explored the consequences of abolishing the central actor in these networks. The discontinuation of this actor will decrease the connectedness of actors within the blue and green network and may therefore have a large impact on the exchange of ideas and decision-making processes. Furthermore, our research shows the dependence of non-governmental actors on the main governmental organizations. It seems that the Dutch governmental organizations still have a dominant and controlling role in floodplain management. This challenges the alleged shift from a dominant government towards collaborative governance and calls for detailed analysis of actual governance.

  2. Teaching future K-8 teachers the language of Newton: A case study of collaboration and change in university physics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Carol; Prayaga, Chandra S.

    2004-11-01

    This interpretive case study describes a collaborative project involving a physics professor and a science educator. We report what was learned about factors that influenced the professor's development of teaching strategies, alternative to lecture, that were intended to promote prospective teachers' meaningful learning and their use of canonical ways of communicating physics concepts. We describe how the professor's beliefs influenced the pedagogy that he used to communicate the language of physics and the nature of what was communicated. We also report how our collaboration fostered change as we developed a shared language that allowed us to discuss how students learn and to explicate the referent beliefs that supported the professor's practices. We found that focused reflection on referent beliefs led to a change in the manner in which the professor communicated with the prospective teachers. Traditional lecture pedagogy focused the professor's concern on how he was teaching evolved toward a pedagogy that focused on how students were learning. Classroom interactions were increased with a primary goal of orchestrating a discourse of physics initiated in the language already accessible to the prospective teachers. This change in the manner that classroom interactions occurred provided opportunities for the prospective teachers' language to evolve toward eventually communicating their ideas in canonical physics language.

  3. Trust in interprofessional collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Paul A. M.; Austin, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trust is integral to effective interprofessional collaboration. There has been scant literature characterizing how trust between practitioners is formed, maintained or lost. The objective of this study was to characterize the cognitive model of trust that exists between pharmacists and family physicians working in collaborative primary care settings. Methods: Pharmacists and family physicians who work collaboratively in primary care were participants in this study. Family health teams were excluded from this study because of the distinct nature of these settings. Through a snowball convenience sampling method, a total of 11 pharmacists and 8 family physicians were recruited. A semistructured interview guide was used to guide discussion around trust, relationships and collaboration. Constant-comparative coding was used to identify themes emerging from these data. Results: Pharmacists and family physicians demonstrate different cognitive models of trust in primary care collaboration. For pharmacists, trust appears to be conferred on physicians based on title, degree, status and positional authority. For family physicians, trust appears to be earned based on competency and performance. These differences may lead to interprofessional tension when expectations of reciprocal trust are not met. Conclusions: Further work in characterizing how trust is developed in interprofessional relationships is needed to support effective team formation and functioning.

  4. The Role of Chinese-American Scientists in China-US Scientific Collaboration: A Study in Nanotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xianwen; Xu, Shenmeng; Liu, Di; Liang, Yongxia

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we use bibliometric methods and social network analysis to analyze the pattern of China-US scientific collaboration on individual level in nanotechnology. Results show that Chinese-American scientists have been playing an important role in China-US scientific collaboration. We find that China-US collaboration in nanotechnology mainly occurs between Chinese and Chinese-American scientists. In the co-authorship network, Chinese-American scientists tend to have higher betweenness ...

  5. Collaborative Care for patients with severe borderline and NOS personality disorders: A comparative multiple case study on processes and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koekkoek Bauke

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structured psychotherapy is recommended as the preferred treatment of personality disorders. A substantial group of patients, however, has no access to these therapies or does not benefit. For those patients who have no (longer access to psychotherapy a Collaborative Care Program (CCP is developed. Collaborative Care originated in somatic health care to increase shared decision making and to enhance self management skills of chronic patients. Nurses have a prominent position in CCP's as they are responsible for optimal continuity and coordination of care. The aim of the CCP is to improve quality of life and self management skills, and reduce destructive behaviour and other manifestations of the personality disorder. Methods/design Quantitative and qualitative data are combined in a comparative multiple case study. This makes it possible to test the feasibility of the CCP, and also provides insight into the preliminary outcomes of CCP. Two treatment conditions will be compared, one in which the CCP is provided, the other in which Care as Usual is offered. In both conditions 16 patients will be included. The perspectives of patients, their informal carers and nurses are integrated in this study. Data (questionnaires, documents, and interviews will be collected among these three groups of participants. The process of treatment and care within both research conditions is described with qualitative research methods. Additional quantitative data provide insight in the preliminary results of the CCP compared to CAU. With a stepped analysis plan the 'black box' of the application of the program will be revealed in order to understand which characteristics and influencing factors are indicative for positive or negative outcomes. Discussion The present study is, as to the best of our knowledge, the first to examine Collaborative Care for patients with severe personality disorders receiving outpatient mental health care. With the chosen

  6. A case study of meaningful learning in a collaborative concept mapping strategy as a preparation for a college biology laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Catherine Wilburn Evelyn

    Statement of the problem. The purpose of this research was to add to our understanding of meaningful learning by examining the process of collaborative concept mapping and student interaction during knowledge construction. Laboratory learning has been hampered by inadequacies of students' conceptual understanding and laboratory preparation. Believing that people construct their own knowledge and that collaboration might assist in these constructions, this research examined student dialog and written products related to their college general biology laboratory experiences. The following questions guided the research: (a) What negotiations and other interactions take place between students who jointly construct propositions and concept maps? (b) What thinking and understanding takes place as students are constructing biology concepts? (c) What awareness do students have about their construction of biological concepts and about the use of these concept mapping strategies? Method. This study utilized qualitative and interpretive methodologies and a case study approach with purposeful sampling. Students in college general biology laboratory used an instructional strategy in which they independently constructed propositions from laboratory concepts. While being audio taped, pairs of students negotiated these propositions and used them to form concept maps. The data sets resulting from these methods, solicited personal documents including written proposition lists, concept maps, and examinations, were examined along with tape recorded conversations. Results. Analysis of interaction data revealed that most students paid only moderate attention to each other's comments. Most commonly observed cooperative behaviors were seeking meaning, providing explanations, and completion of partner's statements. The degree of pair symmetry did not consistently influence student interactions or cooperative behaviors. Students used easily memorized, but not necessarily accurate, answers

  7. The Role of Chinese-American Scientists in China-US Scientific Collaboration: A Study in Nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xianwen; Liu, Di; Liang, Yongxia

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we use bibliometric methods and social network analysis to analyze the pattern of China-US scientific collaboration on individual level in nanotechnology. Results show that Chinese-American scientists have been playing an important role in China-US scientific collaboration. We find that China-US collaboration in nanotechnology mainly occurs between Chinese and Chinese-American scientists. In the co-authorship network, Chinese-American scientists tend to have higher betweenness centrality. Moreover, the series of polices implemented by the Chinese government to recruit oversea experts seems to contribute a lot to China-US scientific collaboration.

  8. An introduction to the composition of the Multi-Site University Study of Identity and Culture (MUSIC): a collaborative approach to research and mentorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskirch, Robert S; Zamboanga, Byron L; Ravert, Russell D; Whitbourne, Susan Krauss; Park, Irene J K; Lee, Richard M; Schwartz, Seth J

    2013-04-01

    The Multi-Site University Study of Identity and Culture (MUSIC) is the product of a research collaboration among faculty members from 30 colleges and universities from across the United States. Using Katz and Martin's (1997, p. 7) definition, the MUSIC research collaboration is "the working together of researchers to achieve the common goals of producing new scientific knowledge." The collaboration involved more than just coauthorship; it served "as a strategy to insert more energy, optimism, creativity and hope into the work of [researchers]" (Conoley & Conoley, 2010, p. 77). The philosophy underlying the MUSIC collaborative was intended to foster natural collaborations among researchers, to provide opportunities for scholarship and mentorship for early career and established researchers, and to support exploration of identity, cultural, and ethnic/racial research ideas by tapping the expertise and interests of the broad MUSIC network of collaborators. In this issue, five research articles present innovative findings from the MUSIC datasets. There are two themes across the articles. Research is emerging about broadening the constructs and measures of acculturation and ethnic identity and their relation to health risk behaviors and psychosocial and mental health outcomes. The second theme is about the relationship of perceived discrimination on behavioral and mental health outcomes among immigrant populations.

  9. Creating and Capturing Value in a Regional Innovation Ecosystem: A Study of How Manufacturing SMEs Develop Collaborative Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radziwon, Agnieszka; Bogers, Marcel; Bilberg, Arne

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate how a set of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can engage in business model development within a regional innovation ecosystem. We present a case study, based on an action research project, of how a set of Danish manufacturing SMEs contributed...... to the development of their local ecosystem in collaboration with a number of external partners. We specifically examine how these SMEs interact with both competitors and complementors in an innovative automation project. The findings include key drivers and challenges that these companies have been facing while...... centrally dependent on the value-capture process, which also takes place on the inter-organisational level. This implies a purposive management of knowledge flows on the level of the innovation ecosystem that fits a multi-layered structure of the business model. Through our findings, we link the notions...

  10. Evaluation of benefits to the EU-15 countries resulting from the implementation of the Cohesion Policy in the Visegrad Group countries

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Bartkiewicz; Ewa Cukrowska-Torzewska; Joanna Gebka; Andrzej Regulski; Julian Zawistowski; Malgorzata Zub; Piotr Rosik; Krzysztof Szczygielski; Aleksander Szpor

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to estimate how EU15 economies are affected by the EUR 140 billion (in fixed prices of 2005) spent on the implementation of the Cohesion Policy in the Visegrad Group countries (i.e. Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary and Poland). Our analysis shows that the impulse for development resul ting from the Cohesion Policy in the V4 countries translates into a significant increase in their output and hence their consumer, investment and intermediate demand that to a large extent conce...

  11. Collaborative Environments. Considerations Concerning Some Collaborative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela I. MUNTEAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious, that all collaborative environments (workgroups, communities of practice, collaborative enterprises are based on knowledge and between collaboration and knowledge management there is a strong interdependence. The evolution of information systems in these collaborative environments led to the sudden necessity to adopt, for maintaining the virtual activities and processes, the latest technologies/systems, which are capable to support integrated collaboration in business services. In these environments, portal-based IT platforms will integrate multi-agent collaborative systems, collaborative tools, different enterprise applications and other useful information systems.

  12. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  13. Learning Specific Content in Technology Education: Learning Study as a Collaborative Method in Swedish Preschool Class Using Hands-On Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbrink, Nina; Bjurulf, Veronica; Blomberg, Ingela; Heidkamp, Anja; Hollsten, Ann-Christin

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the process of a learning study conducted in technology education in a Swedish preschool class. The learning study method used in this study is a collaborative method, where researchers and teachers work together as a team concerning teaching and learning about a specific learning object. The object of learning in this study…

  14. Collaboration and Networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husson, O; Manten-Horst, E; van der Graaf, W T A

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the need for collaboration across pediatric and adult cancer to care for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) arose from the recognition of the unique characteristics of AYAs with cancer. Neither pediatric nor adult oncology hospital departments are able to provide age-appropriate care single handedly. The best way to bridge the gap in care of AYA cancer patients is to centralize aspects of their care within dedicated AYA care programs, including the following essential components: provision of developmentally appropriate and multidisciplinary (supportive) care, availability of AYA inpatient and outpatient facilities and healthcare professional AYA expertise as collaboration between adult and pediatric departments. Barriers are related to the slowly emerging evidence of benefit, cultural differences (collaboration between pediatric and adult oncology professionals), administrative and logistic challenges (small number of AYAs makes it difficult to create an AYA program in every hospital) and financial aspects (dependency on philanthropic funds). The sustainable development of an AYA program requires acceptance as a standard of care at the clinical and patient community and at government level. To improve the quality, equity and quantity of research and innovation in AYA cancer care across the world, it is necessary to join forces and collaborate in international networks to study issues such as the features of quality care, collaboration between pediatric and adult clinical teams, trial groups and professional societies, and AYA-specific groups such as Critical Mass, Canteen or European Network for Teenagers and Young Adults with Cancer. PMID:27595356

  15. Information handling in collaborative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Collins

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available UK public policy makers have a growing interest in collaborative research, where academics work with public, private or third sector partners on a joint project which supports the partner’s aims. This paper reports on the findings of five case studies, looking at how information is sourced, managed, used and shared within collaborative research projects. It finds that researchers within collaborative projects have similar information management issues as are known to exist within academia more broadly, but that the specific conditions which govern research collaborations mean that interventions to improve or support information management must be carefully tailored.

  16. Dream vs. reality: seven case-studies on the desirability and feasibility of cross-border hospital collaboration in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinos, Irene A; Baeten, Rita

    2014-09-01

    Despite being a niche phenomenon, cross-border health care collaboration receives a lot of attention in the EU and figures visibly on the policy agenda, in particular since the policy process which eventually led to the adoption of Directive 2011/24/EU. One of the underlying assumptions is that cross-border collaboration is desirable, providing justification to both the European Commission and to border-region stakeholders for promoting it. The purpose of this paper is to question this assumption and to examine the role of actors in pushing (or not) for cross-border collaboration. The analysis takes place in two parts. First, the EU policies to promote cross-border collaboration and the tools employed are examined, namely (a) use of European funds to sponsor concrete border-region collaboration projects, (b) use of European funds to sponsor research which gives visibility to cross-border collaboration, and (c) use of the European Commission's newly acquired legal mandate to encourage "Member States to cooperate in cross-border health care provision in border-regions" (Art. 10) and support "Member States in the development of European reference networks between health care providers and centres of expertise" (Art. 12). Second, evidence gathered in 2011-2013 from seven European border-regions on hospital cross-border collaboration is systematically reviewed to assess the reality of cross-border collaboration - can it work and when, and why do actors engage in cross-border collaboration? The preliminary findings suggest that while the EU plays a prominent role in some border-region initiatives, cross-border collaboration needs such a specific set of circumstances to work that it is questionable whether it can effectively be promoted. Moreover, local actors make use of the EU (as a source of funding, legislation or legitimisation) to serve their needs. PMID:25025866

  17. Designing collaborative policy innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Sørensen, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Recent approaches to enhancing public innovation suffer from two shortcomings: They overemphasize competition as a driver of innovation and overlook the fact that public sector innovation involves policy innovation as well as service innovation. Drawing on governance research and innovation theor...... policy arenas do contribute to policy innovation but also that the degree to which they do so depends on the institutional design of these arenas.......Recent approaches to enhancing public innovation suffer from two shortcomings: They overemphasize competition as a driver of innovation and overlook the fact that public sector innovation involves policy innovation as well as service innovation. Drawing on governance research and innovation theory......, the chapter investigates the extent to which and how collaboration between politicians and relevant stakeholders can spur the formulation, implementation and diffusion of new innovative policies. A case study of a process of collaborative policy innovation in a Danish municipality shows that collaborative...

  18. Indico: A Collaboration Hub

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, P; Bossy, C; Gonzalez, J B; Pugh, M; Resco, A; Trzaskoma, J; Wachter, C

    2012-01-01

    Since 2009, the development of Indico has focused on usability, performance and new features, especially the ones related to meeting collaboration. Usability studies have resulted in the biggest change Indico has experienced up to now, a new web layout that makes user experience better. Performance improvements were also a key goal since 2010; the main features of Indico have been optimized remarkably. Along with usability and performance, new features have been added to Indico such as webchat integration, video services bookings, webcast and recording requests, designed to really reinforce Indico position as the main hub for all CERN collaboration services, and many others which aim is to complete the conference lifecycle management. Indico development is also moving towards a broader collaboration where other institutes, hosting their own Indico instance, can contribute to the project in order make it a better and more complete tool.

  19. Playful Collaboration (or Not)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Sproedt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    also be conducive to deep learning. As such, a game can engage different dimensions of learning and embed elements of active, collaborative, cooperative and problem-based learning. Building on this logic, we present an exploratory case study of the use of a particular board game in a class of a course......This paper explores how games and play, which are deeply rooted in human beings as a way to learn and interact, can be used to teach certain concepts and practices related to open collaborative innovation. We discuss how playing games can be a source of creativity, imagination and fun, while it can...

  20. Playful Collaboration (Or Not)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Sproedt, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how playing games can be used to teach intangible social interaction across boundaries, in particular within open collaborative innovation. We present an exploratory case study of how students learned from playing a board game in a graduate course of the international...... and interdisciplinary Innovation and Business master's program in Denmark. We identify several important themes related to the process of learning through playing and the social dynamics of open collaborative innovation, while we also highlight possible caveats of “playing” and practicing open innovation. Our findings...

  1. Technology collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Jacob [Halliburton (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present Halliburton's Brazilian technology center. Halliburton has technology centers in the United States, Saudi Arabia, India, Singapore and Brazil, all of which aim at delivering accelerated innovation in the oil sector. The technology centers engage in research and development activities with the help of various universities and in collaboration with the customer or supplier. The Halliburton Brazil technology center provides its customers with timely research and development solutions for enhancing recovery and mitigating reservoir uncertainty; they are specialized in finding solutions for pre- and post-salt carbonate drilling and in the enhancement of production from mature fields. This presentation showcased the work carried out by the Halliburton Brazil technology center to help customers develop their deepwater field activities.

  2. Changes in Local Governance--Collaboration through Networks: A Post-16 Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Kathryn

    1997-01-01

    Explores the intent, scope, and nature of emerging networks in (British) education and examines their implications for local governance, drawing on a case study of post-16 education and a public-service management study. Recent legislative change has engendered a movement away from control by single hierarchical organizations (local authorities)…

  3. A Case Study: Writing a Spanish Dictionary as a Collaborative Task among Beginner Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a small-scale study carried out in a beginners' Spanish class of second year undergraduate students. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of a vocabulary task in terms of its impact on vocabulary acquisition, the learners' approach to vocabulary learning and their motivation and engagement. The task…

  4. The Impact of Publishing during PhD Studies on Career Research Publication, Visibility, and Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Hugo; Santos, João M.

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the impact that publishing during the period of PhD study has on researchers' future knowledge production, impact, and co-authorship. The analysis is based on a representative sample of PhDs from all fields of science working in Portugal. For each researcher in the dataset, we compiled a lifetime publication record and…

  5. Whole-Faculty Study Groups: Building the Capacity for Change through Interagency Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBonte, Karen; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Whole-faculty study groups show promise as a vehicle for integrating initiatives and focusing school improvement efforts on increased student learning. The paper describes the San Diego Unified (City) School District's experiences in developing and implementing successful whole-faculty study groups. The groups increased collegiality and improved…

  6. Learning Music from Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, R. Keith

    2008-01-01

    I draw on two traditions of research: the social psychology of collaborative groups, and the ethnographic study of improvisational performance. I outline a general model of group creativity derived from these traditions. I show how the model can be used to better understand musical competence and performance, and I provide recommendations for how…

  7. Triglyceride-mediated pathways and coronary disease: collaborative analysis of 101 studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, Nadeem; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Ricketts, Sally L;

    2010-01-01

    Whether triglyceride-mediated pathways are causally relevant to coronary heart disease is uncertain. We studied a genetic variant that regulates triglyceride concentration to help judge likelihood of causality....

  8. Virginia Tech professor collaborates on study that links walking, cycling to better health

    OpenAIRE

    Micale, Barbara L.

    2010-01-01

    A study conducted by Ralph Buehler, assistant professor, urban affairs and planning, Virginia Tech National Capital Region, and three other researchers, contributes to mounting evidence that active travel has significant health benefits.

  9. Influence of partner diversity on collaborative public R&D project outcomes: a study of application and commercialization of nanotechnologies in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raesfeld Meijer, von A.M.; Geurts, P.A.T.M.; Jansen, M.; Boshuizen, J.; Lüttge, R.

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have indicated the importance of public R&D in the transfer and commercialization of nanotechnology. So far, few have focused on university–industry interaction and collaboration performance. In this study, we investigate the impact of technological diversity and value chain compleme

  10. Psychometric Characteristics and Clinical Correlates of NEO-PI-R Fearless Dominance and Impulsive Antisociality in the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Edward A.; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Morey, Leslie C.; Markowitz, John C.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Grilo, Carlos M.; Sanislow, Charles A.; Shea, M. Tracie; Skodol, Andrew E.; Gunderson, John G.; Donnellan, M. Brent

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the validity of derived measures of the psychopathic personality traits of Fearless Dominance and Impulsive Antisociality from the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R; Costa & McCrae, 1992) using data from the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study (baseline N = 733). These 3 issues were examined: (a)…

  11. Enhancing collaborative learning by means of collaborative serious games:providing requirements to collaborative serious games' design

    OpenAIRE

    Parzhetskaya, L. (Lyana)

    2014-01-01

    The current study is a theoretical overview which aim is to define collaborative serious games, identify the problems arising in using and implementation of these games in learning and education and search of ways of improvement of the collaborative process by means of providing the requirements to collaborative serious games’ design. The study makes connections among the following concepts: collaboration, gaming and technology and shows how they can be combined into a one study in order to i...

  12. Using the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative Data to conduct a genome-wide association study of sleep duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinfeldt, Laura B; Gharani, Neda; Kasper, Rachel S; Schmidlen, Tara J; Gordon, Erynn S; Jarvis, Joseph P; Delaney, Susan; Kronenthal, Courtney J; Gerry, Norman P; Christman, Michael F

    2015-12-01

    Sleep is critical to health and functionality, and several studies have investigated the inherited component of insomnia and other sleep disorders using genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, genome-wide studies focused on sleep duration are less common. Here, we used data from participants in the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative (CPMC) (n = 4,401) to examine putative associations between self-reported sleep duration, demographic and lifestyle variables, and genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data to better understand genetic contributions to variation in sleep duration. We employed stepwise ordered logistic regression to select our model and retained the following predictive variables: age, gender, weight, physical activity, physical activity at work, smoking status, alcohol consumption, ethnicity, and ancestry (as measured by principal components analysis) in our association testing. Several of our strongest candidate genes were previously identified in GWAS related to sleep duration (TSHZ2, ABCC9, FBXO15) and narcolepsy (NFATC2, SALL4). In addition, we have identified novel candidate genes for involvement in sleep duration including SORCS1 and ELOVL2. Our results demonstrate that the self-reported data collected through the CPMC are robust, and our genome-wide association analysis has identified novel candidate genes involved in sleep duration. More generally, this study contributes to a better understanding of the complexity of human sleep. PMID:26333835

  13. Collaborative Research: Fundamental studies of plasma control using surface embedded electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raja, Laxminarayan L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); PanneerChelvam, PremKumar [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Levko, Dimtry [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-02-26

    The proposed study will investigate the effect of active electron injection of from electrode surfaces To the best of our knowledge, no such a study has ever been attempted even though it could lead to the formation of whole new classes of plasma based devices and systems. We are motivated by recent articles and simple theory which gives strong reason to believe that embedded electronic devices can be used to exert control over the SEE coefficient of semiconductor surfaces (and maybe other surface types as well). Furthermore, the research will explore how such sub-surface electronic devices can best be used to exert control over an associated plasma.

  14. The risk and causes of death in childhoodonset epilepsy: A 4-study collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Anne T.; Nickels, K.; Wirrell, E.C.; Rios, C.; Geerts, A.T.; Callenbach, P.M.; Arts, W.F.; Camfield, P.R.; Camfield, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Young people with epilepsy experience high death rates compared to the general population. Understanding the magnitude of risk and the causes of death (CoD) is essential for counseling and for potential prevention. Methods: We combined the mortality experiences of four cohort studies of n

  15. Collaborative Curriculum Design to Increase Science Teaching Self-Efficacy: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velthuis, Chantal; Fisser, Petra; Pieters, Jules

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish whether participation in a teacher design team (TDT) is an effective way to increase the science teaching self-efficacy of primary school teachers who vary in their levels of experience and interest in science. A TDT is a group of at least 2 teachers from the same or related subjects working together to…

  16. Triglyceride-mediated pathways and coronary disease: collaborative analysis of 101 studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Sarwar; M.S. Sandhu; S.L. Ricketts; A.S. Butterworth; E. Di Angelantonio; S.M. Boekholdt; W. Ouwehand; H. Watkins; N.J. Samani; D. Saleheen; D. Lawlor; M.P. Reilly; A.D. Hingorani; P.J. Talmud; J. Danesh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether triglyceride-mediated pathways are causally relevant to coronary heart disease is uncertain. We studied a genetic variant that regulates triglyceride concentration to help judge likelihood of causality. METHODS: We assessed the -1131T>C (rs662799) promoter polymorphism of the apo

  17. Exploring the Capability of Evaluating Technical Solutions: A Collaborative Study into the Primary Technology Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkholm, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Within the field of technology education, evaluating technical solutions is considered as an important topic. Research indicates that pupils have difficulties in evaluating technical solutions in terms of fitness for purpose, i.e. how effective a technical solution supports its intended function. By using the learning study, which is an iterative…

  18. Collaborative Curriculum Design to Increase Science Teaching Self-Efficacy: A Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, Chantal; Fisser, Petra; Pieters, Jules

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish whether participation in a teacher design team (TDT) is an effective way to increase the science teaching self-efficacy of primary school teachers who vary in their levels of experience and interest in science. A TDT is a group of at least 2 teachers from t

  19. COLLABORATIVE PROSPECTIVE-STUDY OF THE FRAGILE-X SYNDROME - ONE-YEAR PROGRESS REPORT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SHERMAN, SL; BARBI, G; BRONDUMNIELSEN, K; BROWN, WT; CARPENTER, NJ; CHUDLEY, AE; FERRAZ, OP; FERREIRA, P; GUSTAVSON, KH; HALLIDAY, J; HOCKEY, A; HOWARDPEEBLES, PN; JENKINS, E; KENNERKNECHT, [No Value; KAHKONEN, M; LADAIQUE, P; LEISTI, J; MADDALENA, A; MAZURCZAK, T; MATTEI, JF; MATTINA, T; MCKINLEY, MJ; MURPHY, P; PELLISSIER, MC; PURVISSMITH, S; ROBINSON, H; SCAPAGNINI, U; SCHAAP, T; SHAPIRO, LR; SMITS, APT; STEINBACH, P; TURNER, G; UCHIDA, IA; VANOOST, BA; VOELCKEL, MA; WEAVER, DD; WEBB, T

    1992-01-01

    A prospective study of the fragile X syndrome [fra(X)] was initiated one year ago to refine the estimates of recurrence risks based on the phenotype of the mother and the family history of the syndrome. The basic unit of data consists of the description of the conceptus of women known to carry the f

  20. Enacting Literacy Pedagogies: A Collaborative Self-Study by Teacher Educators in Physical Education and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Tim; Bullock, Shawn M.

    2012-01-01

    As beginning teacher educators we aimed to examine our pedagogical approaches for engaging teacher candidates in thinking about physical literacy and scientific literacy, respectively. We employed self-study research methodologies to explore our literacy practices and developing pedagogies of teacher education, the similarities and differences in…

  1. An Exploratory Investigation of Online Forum Mediated Collaborative Learning of Speech Writing: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lata, Pushp; Luhach, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Learning Management Systems (LMS) are being integrated in the curriculum by many educational institutions to extend teaching and learning beyond classroom. This paper is based on a case study exploring the integration of LMS Nalanda created on Moodle in Effective Public Speaking (EPS) classroom to give students an additional platform to practice,…

  2. A Qualitative Study of Educator and Counselor Interdisciplinary Collaboration Regarding Adolescent Substance Abusers' Academic Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henegar, LaTrica Y.

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive qualitative study explored the lived perceptions and views of middle school teachers, school counselors, and Licensed Professional Counselors (LPCs) within central Alabama's middle school system. The problem explored is adolescent substance abuse students whose academic attainment may be affected by their drug abuse.…

  3. Contemporary Instructor-Librarian Collaboration: A Case Study of an Online Embedded Librarian Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mary E.; Black, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a case study evaluation of an embedded librarian project at a large, land-grant, research institution. The case is comprised of learners who are full-time academic health care professionals enrolled in an online graduate educational technology program. The mixed methods methodology focused on assessing the…

  4. Lung cancer in pregnancy: Report of nine cases from an international collaborative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boussios, S.; Han, S.N.; Fruscio, R.; Halaska, M.J.; Ottevanger, P.B.; Peccatori, F.A.; Koubkova, L.; Pavlidis, N.; Amant, F.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lung cancer is an uncommon diagnosis during pregnancy. The combination of smoking in young women, increased maternal age during pregnancy, and increasing incidence of lung cancer worldwide may cause an increase of pregnancy associated lung cancer. The aim of this study was to describe all

  5. Nomograms for predicting survival and recurrence in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma. An international collaborative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganly, Ian; Amit, Moran; Kou, Lei;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Due to the rarity of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), information on outcome is based upon small retrospective case series. The aim of our study was to create a large multiinstitutional international dataset of patients with ACC in order to design predictive nomograms for outcome...

  6. SFTG international collaborative study on in vitro micronucleus test. II. Using human lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clare, M.G.; Lorenzon, G.; Akhurst, L.C.; Marzin, D.; Delft, J. van; Montero, R.; Botta, A.; Bertens, A.; Cinelli, S.; Thybaud, V.; Lorge, E.

    2006-01-01

    This study on the in vitro micronucleus assay, comprising 11 laboratories using human lymphocytes, was coordinated by an organizing committee supported by the SFTG (the French branch of the European Environmental Mutagen Society). Nine coded substances were assessed for their ability to induce micro

  7. Obesity and diabetes genes are associated with being born small for gestational age: Results from the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Angharad R

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals born small for gestational age (SGA are at increased risk of rapid postnatal weight gain, later obesity and diseases in adulthood such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Environmental risk factors for SGA are well established and include smoking, low pregnancy weight, maternal short stature, maternal diet, ethnic origin of mother and hypertension. However, in a large proportion of SGA, no underlying cause is evident, and these individuals may have a larger genetic contribution. Methods In this study we tested the association between SGA and polymorphisms in genes that have previously been associated with obesity and/or diabetes. We undertook analysis of 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 546 samples from the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative (ABC study. 227 children were born small for gestational age (SGA and 319 were appropriate for gestational age (AGA. Results and Conclusion The results demonstrated that genetic variation in KCNJ11, BDNF, PFKP, PTER and SEC16B were associated with SGA and support the concept that genetic factors associated with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes are more prevalent in those born SGA compared to those born AGA. We have previously determined that environmental factors are associated with differences in birthweight in the ABC study and now we have demonstrated a significant genetic contribution, suggesting that the interaction between genetics and the environment are important.

  8. Obesity and diabetes genes are associated with being born small for gestational age: Results from the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Individuals born small for gestational age (SGA) are at increased risk of rapid postnatal weight gain, later obesity and diseases in adulthood such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Environmental risk factors for SGA are well established and include smoking, low pregnancy weight, maternal short stature, maternal diet, ethnic origin of mother and hypertension. However, in a large proportion of SGA, no underlying cause is evident, and these individuals may have a larger genetic contribution. Methods In this study we tested the association between SGA and polymorphisms in genes that have previously been associated with obesity and/or diabetes. We undertook analysis of 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 546 samples from the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative (ABC) study. 227 children were born small for gestational age (SGA) and 319 were appropriate for gestational age (AGA). Results and Conclusion The results demonstrated that genetic variation in KCNJ11, BDNF, PFKP, PTER and SEC16B were associated with SGA and support the concept that genetic factors associated with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes are more prevalent in those born SGA compared to those born AGA. We have previously determined that environmental factors are associated with differences in birthweight in the ABC study and now we have demonstrated a significant genetic contribution, suggesting that the interaction between genetics and the environment are important. PMID:20712903

  9. Determination of the total nitrogen content of hard, semihard, and processed cheese by the Kjeldahl method: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Joanna M; Barbano, David M; Fleming, J Richard

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this collaborative study was to determine interlaboratory performance statistics for a modified and optimized version of AOAC Method 920.123 for the determination of the total nitrogen content of hard, semihard, and processed cheese by Kjeldahl analysis. Details included addressing the issues of material homogeneity, test portion size (1 g), quantitative transfer (weighing on to filter paper), ensuring system suitability (nitrogen recoveries), and using AOAC Method 991.20 as the basis for nitrogen analysis. Fifteen laboratories tested 18 pairs of blind duplicate cheese materials with a crude protein content between 18 and 36%. Materials represented hard, semihard, and processed commercial cheeses with a wide range of composition. Statistical performance parameters expressed as crude protein (nitrogen x 6.38), g/100 g, with invalid and outlier data removed were mean = 26.461, repeatability standard deviation (Sr) 0.111, reproducibility standard deviation (S(R)) = 0.153, repeatability relative standard deviation (RSDr) = 0.42%, reproducibility relative standard deviation (RSDR) = 0.58%, repeatability (r) = 0.312, and reproducibility (R) = 0.428. The interlaboratory study results were acceptable and comparable to those for the milk Kjeldahl nitrogen method on a relative nitrogen basis. The Study Directors recommend that this modified method for the determination of total nitrogen in hard, semihard, and processed cheese by Kjeldahl analysis be adopted First Action as an improved method to replace Method 920.123.

  10. Care planning and decision-making in teams in Swedish elderly care: a study of interprofessional collaboration and professional boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duner, Anna

    2013-05-01

    In front-line practice, joint working between different professionals in health/social care and rehabilitation is regarded as a means to reach a comprehensive assessment of the needs of the older care recipients, leading to decisions on appropriate care and services. The aim of this study was to examine professional collaboration and professional boundaries in interprofessional care planning teams. Two different care planning teams were studied, one performing care planning in the homes of older individuals and the other performing care planning for older people in hospital wards. The empirical data consisted of audio-recorded care planning meetings and interviews with the professionals in the teams. The integration between the professionals involved was most noticeable in the investigation and assessment phase, while it was lower in the planning phase and almost non-existent in decision-making. The home care planning team tended to work in a more integrated manner than the discharge planning team. The importance of clarifying the roles of all professions concerned with needs assessment and care planning for older people became evident in this study. PMID:23343434

  11. Multi-agency collaboration in local governace: partnership or pragmatism? An exploratory case study

    OpenAIRE

    Cunneen, Jacinta Mary

    2012-01-01

    peer-reviewed Policy makers everywhere are confronted by complex problems and public agencies strive to find effective solutions in a context of dwindling resources and increased demands. This study examines how a partnership, among Irish public agencies, was used to address anti-social behaviour on some public housing estates in Limerick City. In 2007 the Limerick City Community Safety Partnership Limited was established. This was the first time a multi-agency community ...

  12. Change in body size and mortality: results from the Melbourne collaborative cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Karahalios

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association between change in weight or body mass index, and mortality is widely reported, however, both measures fail to account for fat distribution. Change in waist circumference, a measure of central adiposity, in relation to mortality has not been studied extensively. METHODS: We investigated the association between mortality and changes in directly measured waist circumference, hips circumference and weight from baseline (1990-1994 to wave 2 (2003-2007 in a prospective cohort study of people aged 40-69 years at baseline. Cox regression, with age as the time metric and follow-up starting at wave 2, adjusted for confounding variables, was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for change in body size in relation to mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. RESULTS: There were 1465 deaths (109 cancer, 242 cardiovascular disease identified during an average 7.7 years of follow-up from 21 298 participants. Compared to minimal increase in body size, loss of waist circumference (HR: 1.26; 95% CI: 1.09-1.47, weight (1.80; 1.54-2.11, or hips circumference (1.35; 1.15-1.57 were associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality, particularly for older adults. Weight loss was associated with cardiovascular disease mortality (2.40; 1.57-3.65 but change in body size was not associated with obesity-related cancer mortality. CONCLUSION: This study confirms the association between weight loss and increased mortality from all-causes for older adults. Based on evidence from observational cohort studies, weight stability may be the recommended option for most adults, especially older adults.

  13. Community and research staff collaboration for development of materials to inform microbicide study participants in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Cynthia Woodsong; John Michael Mutsambi; Smangalisa Ntshele; Peggy Modikoe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Clinical trials of new vaginal products require careful communication with participants about trial requirements. Most microbicide trials have been multi-site studies conducted among women in sub-Saharan Africa, where literacy levels and understanding of scientific methods differ from those designing and conducting the trials. Microbicide trials require women to insert objects in their vagina and ensure they are present in the vagina during sex. For many women, this is a novel b...

  14. Traditional anthropology and geographical information systems in the collaborative study of Cassava in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanoff, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Cross-cultural, village-level, and farmer surveys have been used with a geographical information system to describe the distribution and relative importance of cassava (manioc, yuca, Manihot esculenta) in its cultural, economic, and ecological contexts. It presents examples of data management for mapping, sample selection, cross-tabulation of characteristics, combination of data types for indices and hypothesis testing. The methods used are reviewed, and some of the main conclusions of the study are presented.

  15. Collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Since common ground is pivotal to collaboration, this paper proposes to define collaborative information seeking as the combined activity of information seeking and collaborative grounding. While information-seeking activities are necessary for collaborating actors to acquire new information......, the activities involved in information seeking are often performed by varying subgroups of actors. Consequently, collaborative grounding is necessary to share information among collaborating actors and, thereby, establish and maintain the common ground necessary for their collaborative work. By focusing...... on the collaborative level, collaborative information seeking aims to avoid both individual reductionism and group reductionism, while at the same time recognizing that only some information and understanding need be shared....

  16. Approaching Educational Empowerment: Guidelines from a Collaborative Study with the Innu of Labrador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. C. Nesbit

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the journey toward self-managed education for the Innu people of coastal Labrador who, after an arduous struggle, have finally attained autonomy from the Canadian government. While the paper briefly explores the broader context within which Innu education has evolved, particular attention will be given to the role served by a recent research project in both documenting the specific educational needs of the people and presenting a process to guide change. What emerged from that study was a wealth of data including community attitudes to education, as well as indicators of attendance, ability and achievement of the entire population of school-aged children. The study documented significant learning needs among the school-aged population despite average cognitive ability and a desire to achieve well in school. A plethora of policy recommendations was presented to guide the creation of Innu-managed education as well as to establish a template for the creation of a bicultural model of education, one in which traditional culture and native language were prioritized. This paper explores the five-year impact of that study on both policy and practice for Aboriginal education in coastal Labrador. As such, it informs the establishment of policy and pedagogical approaches for educators attempting to balance contemporary educational opportunity with retention of core cultural values.

  17. ACCISS study rationale and design: activating collaborative cancer information service support for cervical cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bullard Emily

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-quality cancer information resources are available but underutilized by the public. Despite greater awareness of the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service among low-income African Americans and Hispanics compared with Caucasians, actual Cancer Information Service usage is lower than expected, paralleling excess cancer-related morbidity and mortality for these subgroups. The proposed research examines how to connect the Cancer Information Service to low-income African-American and Hispanic women and their health care providers. The study will examine whether targeted physician mailing to women scheduled for colposcopy to follow up an abnormal Pap test can increase calls to the Cancer Information Service, enhance appropriate medical follow-up, and improve satisfaction with provider-patient communication. Methods/Design The study will be conducted in two clinics in ethnically diverse low-income communities in Chicago. During the formative phase, patients and providers will provide input regarding materials planned for use in the experimental phase of the study. The experimental phase will use a two-group prospective randomized controlled trial design. African American and Hispanic women with an abnormal Pap test will be randomized to Usual Care (routine colposcopy reminder letter or Intervention (reminder plus provider recommendation to call the Cancer Information Service and sample questions to ask. Primary outcomes will be: 1 calls to the Cancer Information Service; 2 timely medical follow-up, operationalized by whether the patient keeps her colposcopy appointment within six months of the abnormal Pap; and 3 patient satisfaction with provider-patient communication at follow-up. Discussion The study examines the effectiveness of a feasible, sustainable, and culturally sensitive strategy to increase awareness and use of the Cancer Information Service among an underserved population. The goal of linking a

  18. Nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards: A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tove, Lindhardt; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frail elderly people admitted to hospital often receive help from relatives in managing their daily lives. These relatives are likely to continue to feel responsible after admission, and to hold valuable knowledge, which may contribute to decision-making related to care and treatment....... OBJECTIVE: To illuminate nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards, and of the barriers and promoters for collaboration. DESIGN AND SETTING: The design was descriptive. Three acute units in a large Danish university hospital participated...... reflected the nurses' two sets of conflicting attitudes towards collaboration with relatives, one in accordance with professional nursing values, the other reflecting the values of every day practice. The dual attitudes were reflected in two themes The coincidental encounter-the collaboration and Relatives...

  19. Nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards: a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Tommi Bo; Hallberg, I.R.; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frail elderly people admitted to hospital often receive help from relatives in managing their daily lives. These relatives are likely to continue to feel responsible after admission, and to hold valuable knowledge, which may contribute to decision-making related to care and treatment....... OBJECTIVE: To illuminate nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards, and of the barriers and promoters for collaboration. DESIGN AND SETTING: The design was descriptive. Three acute units in a large Danish university hospital participated...... reflected the nurses' two sets of conflicting attitudes towards collaboration with relatives, one in accordance with professional nursing values, the other reflecting the values of every day practice. The dual attitudes were reflected in two themes The coincidental encounter-the collaboration and Relatives...

  20. Marital status and mortality among Japanese men and women: the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimura Takesumi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have indicated a significant association between marital status and mortality risks. However, most of these studies have compared married and unmarried people without differentiating among single, divorced and widowed status. Moreover, gender differences in mortality rates associated with marital status have not been sufficiently clarified. With significant increases in the percentages of divorced and widowed people and a corresponding drop in the marriage rate in Japan during the past two or three decades, it can be expected that these changes will have a significant impact on mortality rates. Methods This investigation used a prospective study of a total of 94,062 Japanese men and women aged 40–79 who completed self-administered questionnaires at baseline and during a followed-up of 9.9-years. Results Compared with married men, never-married men showed higher risks of mortality from cardiovascular disease [relative risk (RR = 3.05, 95% confidence interval (CI 2.03–4.60], respiratory disease (RR = 2.43, 95%CI 1.27–4.63, external causes (RR = 2.18, 95%CI 1.05–4.54 and all causes (RR = 1.91, 95%CI 1.51–2.42 after adjustment for potentially confounding variables. For never-married women, there was a smaller but significantly higher risk of mortality from all causes (RR = 1.46, 95%CI 1.15–1.84. Divorced and widowed men showed moderately higher risks of mortality from cardiovascular disease, external causes and all causes compared with married men, but such a trend was not observed in women. Conclusion Single status was associated with a higher risk of mortality than was married status for both men and women. Divorce and widowhood were associated with elevated risk for men, but not for women. These findings suggest single, divorce and widowhood status constitute potentially adverse health effects.

  1. Linkage disequilibrium between cystic fibrosis and linked DNA polymorphisms in Italian families: A collaborative study

    OpenAIRE

    Estivill, Xavier; Farrall, Martin; Williamson, Robert; Ferrari, Maurizio; Seia, Manuela; Giunta, Anna Maria; Novelli, Giuseppe; Potenza, Lucia; Dallapicolla, Bruno; Borgo, Graziella; Gasparini, Paolo; Pier F. Pignatti; Benedetti, Laura; Vitale, Emilia; Devoto, Marcella

    1988-01-01

    The locus D7S23 includes a CpG-enriched methylation-free island that maps midway between the markers J3.11 and met and is genetically very close to the mutation causing cystic fibrosis (CF). We have studied the linkage disequilibrium between four polymorphic markers from this locus (KM.19, CS.7, XV-2c, and PT-3) and the CF mutation (CF) in 127 Italian families. Strong linkage disequilibrium is found between KM.19, CS.7, and CF, and weaker but significant disequilibrium is found between XV-2c,...

  2. Extraction of light filth from barley, oatmeal, and mixed dry infant cereals: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, R G

    1980-03-01

    A new method has been developed for the extraction of light filth from oatmeal, barley, and mixed dry infant cereals which involves HCl digestion followed by wet sieving. The residue is defatted in a paper cup, using isopropanol, and transferred to a 2 L Wildman trap flask with 40% isopropanol. Filth elements are extracted with light mineral oil. Interlaboratory studies resulted in 92 and 86% average recoveries of rodent hairs and insect fragments, respectively. The proposed method has been adopted as official first action.

  3. Extraction of light filth from barley, oatmeal, and mixed dry infant cereals: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, R G

    1980-03-01

    A new method has been developed for the extraction of light filth from oatmeal, barley, and mixed dry infant cereals which involves HCl digestion followed by wet sieving. The residue is defatted in a paper cup, using isopropanol, and transferred to a 2 L Wildman trap flask with 40% isopropanol. Filth elements are extracted with light mineral oil. Interlaboratory studies resulted in 92 and 86% average recoveries of rodent hairs and insect fragments, respectively. The proposed method has been adopted as official first action. PMID:7053199

  4. Oblivious Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Afek, Yehuda; Feige, Uriel; Gafni, Eli; Linial, Nati; Sudakov, Benny

    2011-01-01

    Communication is a crucial ingredient in every kind of collaborative work. But what is the least possible amount of communication required for a given task? We formalize this question by introducing a new framework for distributed computation, called {\\em oblivious protocols}. We investigate the power of this model by considering two concrete examples, the {\\em musical chairs} task $MC(n,m)$ and the well-known {\\em Renaming} problem. The $MC(n,m)$ game is played by $n$ players (processors) with $m$ chairs. Players can {\\em occupy} chairs, and the game terminates as soon as each player occupies a unique chair. Thus we say that player $P$ is {\\em in conflict} if some other player $Q$ is occupying the same chair, i.e., termination means there are no conflicts. By known results from distributed computing, if $m \\le 2n-2$, no strategy of the players can guarantee termination. However, there is a protocol with $m = 2n-1$ chairs that always terminates. Here we consider an oblivious protocol where in every time step ...

  5. Development of a systematic studies apparatus at NC State for the Neutron Electric Dipole Moment collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K.; Golub, R.; Haase, D.; Hawari, A.; Huffman, P.; Korobkina, E.; Reid, A.; Swank, C.; Young, A. R.; Alarcon, R.; Dipert, R.; Chu, P.-H.; Gao, H.; Zhang, Y.; Bartoszek, L.; Crawford, C.; Korsch, W.

    2013-10-01

    An apparatus is being developed for use at the UCN source at the 1 MW NCSU PULSTAR reactor. The goal is to study several critical aspects of the SNS neutron EDM experiment without the electric field. Detailed studies of the interactions between the 3He and UCNs, measurements of the correlation functions determining the geometric phase systematic effect, optimization of the parameters for critical dressing, and the pseudomagnetic field caused by neutron scattering from polarized 3He will be made. Because of the extremely long turn around times, these would be almost impossible with the SNS apparatus. In this setup, polarized UCNs and 3He will be repeatedly loaded into an acrylic cell coated with deuterated TPB and polystyrene on the inner walls. Scintillation light produced in the superfluid 4He also in the cell after spin-dependent capture of UCNs on 3He will be used to measure the Larmor precession frequency difference between the two species in an external magnetic field. An overview of the experiment will be presented.

  6. Cardiovascular risk assessment in prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus study: International collaboration research overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to develop a screening protocol for the risk of future cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus in people with prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes; and to establish a framework for early identification and intervention of prediabetes including strategies for holistic management and monitoring of progression. The first phase is to identify prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes in volunteers who are ≥18-years-old for 5 years. Point-of-care testing and questionnaire will be used to screen for prediabetes and cardiovascular disease. We anticipate screening more than 2000 individuals of both genders by the end of first phase. The second and third phases which shall run for 5-10 years will be longitudinal study involving participants identified in the first phase as having prediabetes without dyslipidaemia, or clinically established cardiovascular disease. The second phase shall focus on preventive management of risk of progress to diabetes with explicit diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Oxidative stress measurements will be performed cum evaluation of the use of antioxidants, exercise, and nutrition. The third phase will include probing the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Binomial logistic regression would be performed to generate and propose a model chart for the assessment of cardiovascular disease risk in prediabetes.

  7. Mortality in vegetarians and nonvegetarians: detailed findings from a collaborative analysis of 5 prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, T J; Fraser, G E; Thorogood, M; Appleby, P N; Beral, V; Reeves, G; Burr, M L; Chang-Claude, J; Frentzel-Beyme, R; Kuzma, J W; Mann, J; McPherson, K

    1999-09-01

    We combined data from 5 prospective studies to compare the death rates from common diseases of vegetarians with those of nonvegetarians with similar lifestyles. A summary of these results was reported previously; we report here more details of the findings. Data for 76172 men and women were available. Vegetarians were those who did not eat any meat or fish (n = 27808). Death rate ratios at ages 16-89 y were calculated by Poisson regression and all results were adjusted for age, sex, and smoking status. A random-effects model was used to calculate pooled estimates of effect for all studies combined. There were 8330 deaths after a mean of 10.6 y of follow-up. Mortality from ischemic heart disease was 24% lower in vegetarians than in nonvegetarians (death rate ratio: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.62, 0.94; Pvegetarians was greater at younger ages and was restricted to those who had followed their current diet for >5 y. Further categorization of diets showed that, in comparison with regular meat eaters, mortality from ischemic heart disease was 20% lower in occasional meat eaters, 34% lower in people who ate fish but not meat, 34% lower in lactoovovegetarians, and 26% lower in vegans. There were no significant differences between vegetarians and nonvegetarians in mortality from cerebrovascular disease, stomach cancer, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, or all other causes combined. PMID:10479225

  8. Skipping Breakfast and Risk of Mortality from Cancer, Circulatory Diseases and All Causes: Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yae; Onishi, Kazunari; Hosoda, Takenobu; Amano, Hiroki; Otani, Shinji; Kurozawa, Youichi; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Breakfast eating habits are a dietary pattern marker and appear to be a useful predictor of a healthy lifestyle. Many studies have reported the unhealthy effects of skipping breakfast. However, there are few studies on the association between skipping breakfast and mortality. In the present study, we examined the association between skipping breakfast and mortality from cancer, circulatory diseases and all causes using data from a large-scale cohort study, the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study (JACC) Study. Methods A cohort study of 34,128 men and 49,282 women aged 40–79 years was conducted, to explore the association between lifestyle and cancer in Japan. Participants completed a baseline survey during 1988 to 1990 and were followed until the end of 2009. We classified participants into two groups according to dietary habits with respect to eating or skipping breakfast and carried out intergroup comparisons of lifestyle. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results There were 5,768 deaths from cancer and 5,133 cases of death owing to circulatory diseases and 17,112 cases for all causes of mortality during the median 19.4 years follow-up. Skipping breakfast was related to unhealthy lifestyle habits. After adjusting for confounding factors, skipping breakfast significantly increased the risk of mortality from circulatory diseases [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.42] and all causes (HR = 1.43) in men and all causes mortality (HR = 1.34) in women. Conclusion Our findings showed that skipping breakfast is associated with increasing risk of mortality from circulatory diseases and all causes among men and all causes mortality among women in Japan. PMID:27046951

  9. Achieving Collaboration In Distributed Systems Deployed Over Selfish Peers - An Illustrative Case Study With Publish/Subscribe

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Tobias Rene

    2013-01-01

    Up to a few years ago, the typical operation of a distributed architecture was modelled as the enactment of a collaborative protocol by networked nodes. In this context, all nodes were under the system designer’s control, faithfully executing the programmed behaviour. However, today’s networks are often characterized by a free aggregation of nodes. Thus, the possibility increases that a selfish party operates a node, which may violate the collaborative protocol in order to increase a personal...

  10. Interdisciplinary Team Collaboration Within the Incident Command Post: A Case Study of Oslo and South-Eastern Norway

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The Norwegian Emergency Response Service is built on collaboration between public, private and voluntary organizations, with the police, the fire and rescue service and the ambulance service outlining the primary response units. The emergency response work involves interdisciplinary team collaboration between different units and between the operational commanders within the Incident Command Post. A common language and shared understanding of the situation is essential for emergency response t...

  11. Sensemaking in collaborative networks:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peronard, Jean-Paul; Brix, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to advance research on open business models as activity systems (Zott and Amit, 2010) in collaborative networks. We utilize Bradley’s (1995) theory of exchange behavior to discuss how new joint activities can be explored as well as how existing activities can be redesi......The purpose of the study is to advance research on open business models as activity systems (Zott and Amit, 2010) in collaborative networks. We utilize Bradley’s (1995) theory of exchange behavior to discuss how new joint activities can be explored as well as how existing activities can...... be redesigned to strengthen the collaboration between companies. To enable this discussion we delve into the sensemaking literature and theory from loosely coupled systems. Our discussion leads to the development of the Balanced Activity System (BAS) model. The paper’s key contribution is the prescriptive BAS...... model that can be used strategically in collaborative networks to redesign or create new joint activities....

  12. Collaborative Studies for Mercury Characterization in Coal and Coal Combustion Products, Republic of South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, Allan; Senior, Constance L.; van Alphen, Chris

    2014-12-15

    Mercury (Hg) analyses were obtained for 42 samples of feed coal provided by Eskom, the national electric utility of South Africa, representing all 13 coal-fired power stations operated by Eskom in South Africa. This sampling includes results for three older power stations returned to service starting in the late 2000s. These stations were not sampled in the most recent previous study. Mercury concentrations determined in the present study are similar to or slightly lower than those previously reported, and input Hg for the three stations returned to service is comparable to that for the other 10 power stations. Determination of halogen contents of the 42 feed coals confirms that chlorine contents are generally low, and as such, the extent of Hg self-capture by particulate control devices (PCDs) is rather limited. Eight density separates of a South African Highveld (#4) coal were also provided by Eskom, and these show a strong mineralogical association of Hg (and arsenic) with pyrite. The density separates were used to predict Hg and ash contents of coal products used in South Africa or exported. A suite of 48 paired samples of pulverization-mill feed coal and fly ash collected in a previous (2010) United Nations Environment Programme-sponsored study of emissions from the Duvha and Kendal power stations was obtained for further investigation in the present study. These samples show that in each station, Hg capture varies by boiler unit and confirms that units equipped with fabric filters for air pollution control are much more effective in capturing Hg than those equipped with electrostatic precipitators. Apart from tracking the performance of PCDs individually, changes resulting in improved mercury capture of the Eskom fleet are discussed. These include Hg reduction through coal selection and washing, as well as through optimization of equipment and operational parameters. Operational changes leading to increased mercury capture include increasing mercury

  13. Studies Supporting PMT Characterization for the IceCube Collaboration: Precise Photodiode Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Van De Pontseele, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory set-up has been developed to more precisely measure the DOM optical sensitivity as a function of angle and wavelength. DOMs are calibrated in water using a broad beam of light whose intensity is measured with a NIST calibrated photodiode. This study will refine the current knowledge of the IceCube response and lay a foundation for future precision upgrades to the detector. Good understanding of the photodiode readout is indispensable for the DOM calibration. Corrections to the photodiode measurements due to the amplifier circuit were investigated. To accomplish this, a general software structure has been added to the existing framework. Because the set of parameters in the source sector is still growing, modularity and a high level of automation were important objectives. The software features a large array of graphical tools to intercept problems at low level while the analysis can be easily adapted to the needs of foreseeable situations.

  14. Clinical and genetic characterization of pituitary gigantism: an international collaborative study in 208 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Petrossians, Patrick; Nachev, Emil; Lila, Anurag R; Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Lecumberri, Beatriz; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Salvatori, Roberto; Moraitis, Andreas G; Holdaway, Ian; Kranenburg-van Klaveren, Dianne J; Chiara Zatelli, Maria; Palacios, Nuria; Nozieres, Cecile; Zacharin, Margaret; Ebeling, Tapani; Ojaniemi, Marja; Rozhinskaya, Liudmila; Verrua, Elisa; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Filipponi, Silvia; Gusakova, Daria; Pronin, Vyacheslav; Bertherat, Jerome; Belaya, Zhanna; Ilovayskaya, Irena; Sahnoun-Fathallah, Mona; Sievers, Caroline; Stalla, Gunter K; Castermans, Emilie; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Sorkina, Ekaterina; Auriemma, Renata Simona; Mittal, Sachin; Kareva, Maria; Lysy, Philippe A; Emy, Philippe; De Menis, Ernesto; Choong, Catherine S; Mantovani, Giovanna; Bours, Vincent; De Herder, Wouter; Brue, Thierry; Barlier, Anne; Neggers, Sebastian J C M M; Zacharieva, Sabina; Chanson, Philippe; Shah, Nalini Samir; Stratakis, Constantine A; Naves, Luciana A; Beckers, Albert

    2015-10-01

    Despite being a classical growth disorder, pituitary gigantism has not been studied previously in a standardized way. We performed a retrospective, multicenter, international study to characterize a large series of pituitary gigantism patients. We included 208 patients (163 males; 78.4%) with growth hormone excess and a current/previous abnormal growth velocity for age or final height >2 s.d. above country normal means. The median onset of rapid growth was 13 years and occurred significantly earlier in females than in males; pituitary adenomas were diagnosed earlier in females than males (15.8 vs 21.5 years respectively). Adenomas were ≥10 mm (i.e., macroadenomas) in 84%, of which extrasellar extension occurred in 77% and invasion in 54%. GH/IGF1 control was achieved in 39% during long-term follow-up. Final height was greater in younger onset patients, with larger tumors and higher GH levels. Later disease control was associated with a greater difference from mid-parental height (r=0.23, P=0.02). AIP mutations occurred in 29%; microduplication at Xq26.3 - X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) - occurred in two familial isolated pituitary adenoma kindreds and in ten sporadic patients. Tumor size was not different in X-LAG, AIP mutated and genetically negative patient groups. AIP-mutated and X-LAG patients were significantly younger at onset and diagnosis, but disease control was worse in genetically negative cases. Pituitary gigantism patients are characterized by male predominance and large tumors that are difficult to control. Treatment delay increases final height and symptom burden. AIP mutations and X-LAG explain many cases, but no genetic etiology is seen in >50% of cases.

  15. Clinical and genetic characterization of pituitary gigantism: an international collaborative study in 208 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Petrossians, Patrick; Nachev, Emil; Lila, Anurag R; Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Lecumberri, Beatriz; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Salvatori, Roberto; Moraitis, Andreas G; Holdaway, Ian; Kranenburg-van Klaveren, Dianne J; Chiara Zatelli, Maria; Palacios, Nuria; Nozieres, Cecile; Zacharin, Margaret; Ebeling, Tapani; Ojaniemi, Marja; Rozhinskaya, Liudmila; Verrua, Elisa; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Filipponi, Silvia; Gusakova, Daria; Pronin, Vyacheslav; Bertherat, Jerome; Belaya, Zhanna; Ilovayskaya, Irena; Sahnoun-Fathallah, Mona; Sievers, Caroline; Stalla, Gunter K; Castermans, Emilie; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Sorkina, Ekaterina; Auriemma, Renata Simona; Mittal, Sachin; Kareva, Maria; Lysy, Philippe A; Emy, Philippe; De Menis, Ernesto; Choong, Catherine S; Mantovani, Giovanna; Bours, Vincent; De Herder, Wouter; Brue, Thierry; Barlier, Anne; Neggers, Sebastian J C M M; Zacharieva, Sabina; Chanson, Philippe; Shah, Nalini Samir; Stratakis, Constantine A; Naves, Luciana A; Beckers, Albert

    2015-10-01

    Despite being a classical growth disorder, pituitary gigantism has not been studied previously in a standardized way. We performed a retrospective, multicenter, international study to characterize a large series of pituitary gigantism patients. We included 208 patients (163 males; 78.4%) with growth hormone excess and a current/previous abnormal growth velocity for age or final height >2 s.d. above country normal means. The median onset of rapid growth was 13 years and occurred significantly earlier in females than in males; pituitary adenomas were diagnosed earlier in females than males (15.8 vs 21.5 years respectively). Adenomas were ≥10 mm (i.e., macroadenomas) in 84%, of which extrasellar extension occurred in 77% and invasion in 54%. GH/IGF1 control was achieved in 39% during long-term follow-up. Final height was greater in younger onset patients, with larger tumors and higher GH levels. Later disease control was associated with a greater difference from mid-parental height (r=0.23, P=0.02). AIP mutations occurred in 29%; microduplication at Xq26.3 - X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) - occurred in two familial isolated pituitary adenoma kindreds and in ten sporadic patients. Tumor size was not different in X-LAG, AIP mutated and genetically negative patient groups. AIP-mutated and X-LAG patients were significantly younger at onset and diagnosis, but disease control was worse in genetically negative cases. Pituitary gigantism patients are characterized by male predominance and large tumors that are difficult to control. Treatment delay increases final height and symptom burden. AIP mutations and X-LAG explain many cases, but no genetic etiology is seen in >50% of cases. PMID:26187128

  16. A Test-Replicate Approach to Candidate Gene Research on Addiction and Externalizing Disorders: A Collaboration Across Five Longitudinal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samek, Diana R; Bailey, Jennifer; Hill, Karl G; Wilson, Sylia; Lee, Susanne; Keyes, Margaret A; Epstein, Marina; Smolen, Andrew; Miller, Michael; Winters, Ken C; Hawkins, J David; Catalano, Richard F; Iacono, William G; McGue, Matt

    2016-09-01

    This study presents results from a collaboration across five longitudinal studies seeking to test and replicate models of gene-environment interplay in the development of substance use and externalizing disorders (SUDs, EXT). We describe an overview of our conceptual models, plan for gene-environment interplay analyses, and present main effects results evaluating six candidate genes potentially relevant to SUDs and EXT (MAOA, 5-HTTLPR, COMT, DRD2, DAT1, and DRD4). All samples included rich longitudinal and phenotypic measurements from childhood/adolescence (ages 5-13) through early adulthood (ages 25-33); sample sizes ranged from 3487 in the test sample, to ~600-1000 in the replication samples. Phenotypes included lifetime symptom counts of SUDs (nicotine, alcohol and cannabis), adult antisocial behavior, and an aggregate externalizing disorder composite. Covariates included the first 10 ancestral principal components computed using all autosomal markers in subjects across the data sets, and age at the most recent assessment. Sex, ancestry, and exposure effects were thoroughly evaluated. After correcting for multiple testing, only one significant main effect was found in the test sample, but it was not replicated. Implications for subsequent gene-environment interplay analyses are discussed. PMID:27444553

  17. A collaboration on extended INPRO case study of the DUPIC fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. H.; Yang, M. S.; Ko, W. I. (and others)

    2007-05-15

    Since 1992, KAERI, AECL, United States Department of States(USDOS) and IAEA have performed the DUPIC fuel cycle development activities as an international cooperative research program, which has now been chosen as a target nuclear system for an INPRO case study. This study will focus on a further improvement and modification of the basic principles, user requirements and acceptance limits, which are defined in the IAEA-TECDOC-1434 for an evaluation of its proliferation-resistance through a proliferation-resistance assessment of the whole fuel cycle of DUPIC based on the INPRO methodology. In order to further develop an evaluation method for a proliferation-resistance based on the INPRO methodology, the basic principles, user requirements and acceptance limits of a proliferation-resistance was reviewed and quantified. Then the evaluation model (material flow, facility scale, reference fuel, etc.) of the DUPIC fuel cycle was developed and a proliferation-resistance assessment of the DUPIC fuel cycle including the PWR fuel cycle was performed by using the revised INPRO methodology in the area of a proliferation resistance. Also, the recommendations for a further improvement of INPRO methodology were suggested through examining the INPRO methodology for a proliferation resistance assessment. Through the proliferation resistance assessment of the whole fuel cycle of DUPIC including the PWR fuel cycle, the proliferation-resistance methodology was updated and re-established. And based on its experience, The research results can be used not only to evaluate and determine the future domestic proliferation-resistant fuel cycles which were derived from the GEN{sub I}V or INPRO programs but also to improve a system design to enhance its proliferation resistance. The present results will be utilized for the development of an INPRO User's Manual which is being developed as an important issue by IAEA. The credibility of the research results were ensured by the IAEA

  18. Designing Libraries for Research Collaboration in the Network World: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Corrall

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Advances in technology and changes in higher education and research are forcing libraries to rethink the services they offer to researchers and how they are presented. Librarians are moving into “higher end support” and adopting new service models based on “deep collaboration” with academic partners. The internal arrangements that form the design of an organization can determine whether it achieves its mission under particular conditions. The present study explores how libraries in 24 leading UK research universities are organizing resources and services to support the research enterprise. Qualitative data were collected from institutional websites and other public domain sources and were analysed using matrix techniques. The results show a trend away from integrated library and computing service organizations; variety in institutional reporting lines, but predominantly in large professional service groups; consistency in internal library groupings, but variation in portfolio and job titles; expansion of specialist positions, with new functional roles complementing traditional subject liaisons; and dedicated spaces, working groups, and integrated websites promoting boundary-spanning activities. The findings confirm and extend prior work and are being used to design a large scale international survey.

  19. Rationale and design of South Asian Birth Cohort (START: a Canada-India collaborative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Sonia S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People who originate from the Indian subcontinent (South Asians suffer among the highest rates of type 2 diabetes in the world. Prior evidence suggests that metabolic risk factors develop early in life and are influenced by maternal and paternal behaviors, the intrauterine environment, and genetic factors. The South Asian Birth Cohort Study (START will investigate the environmental and genetic basis of adiposity among 750 South Asian offspring recruited from highly divergent environments, namely, rural and urban India and urban Canada. Methods Detailed information on health behaviors including diet and physical activity, and blood samples for metabolic parameters and DNA are collected from pregnant women of South Asian ancestry who are free of significant chronic disease. They also undergo a provocative test to diagnose impaired glucose tolerance and gestational diabetes. At delivery, cord blood and newborn anthropometric indices (i.e. birth weight, length, head circumference and skin fold thickness are collected. The mother and growing offspring are followed prospectively and information on the growth trajectory, adiposity and health behaviors will be collected annually up to age 3 years. Our aim is to recruit a minimum of 750 mother-infant pairs equally divided between three divergent environments: rural India, urban India, and Canada. Summary The START cohort will increase our understanding of the environmental and genetic determinants of adiposity and related metabolic abnormalities among South Asians living in India and Canada.

  20. Virtual patient simulation in psychiatric care - A pilot study of digital support for collaborate learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnqvist, Charlotta; Karlsson, Karin; Lindell, Lisbeth; Fors, Uno

    2016-03-01

    Psychiatric and mental health nursing is built on a trusted nurse and patient relationship. Therefore communication and clinical reasoning are two important issues. Our experiences as teachers in psychiatric educational programmes are that the students feel anxiety and fear before they start their clinical practices in psychiatry. Therefore there is a need for bridging over the fear. Technology enhanced learning might support such activities so we used Virtual patients (VPs), an interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios. The aim of this study was to investigate 4th term nursing students' opinions on the use of Virtual Patients for assessment in a Mental Health and Ill-health course module. We asked 24 volunteering students to practise with five different VP cases during almost 10 weeks before the exam. The participants were gathered together for participating in a written and an oral evaluation. The students were positive to the use of VPs in psychiatry and were very positive to use VPs in their continued nursing education. It seems that Virtual Patients can be an activity producing pedagogic model promoting students' independent knowledge development, critical thinking, reflection and problem solving ability for nurse students in psychiatric care. PMID:27038085

  1. Vigie Ciel a collaborative project to study fireballs and organise meteorite recoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, F.; Zanda, B.; Bouley, S.; Lewin, E.; Vaubaillon, J.; Marmo, C.; Rotaru, M.; Labenne, L.; Julien, J. F.; Linares, M.; Steinhausser, A.; Rault, J. L.; Vernazza, P.

    2015-10-01

    Research on fireballs and meteorites has always been of interest to the public, due to the beauty of shooting stars in the night sky and to the extraterrestrial origin of meteorites. A fireball observation network called FRIPON [1] (Colas et al, 2015) is currently being setup, funded by ANR (Agence Nationale pour la Recherche). It will cover France with 100 cameras and is expected to be operational for the end of 2015. FRIPON will detect fireballs and hence allow us to define meteorite strewn fields within 24h, so that meteorite searches can be launched very early on. Because of the need to search all over France, including in private land, it is important that the general public be aware of our project and be willing to help or participate. Indeed, as the main goal of FRIPON is to recover fresh meteorites (within a few days), our aim is to be able to organize a search with at least 50 persons to scan an area of a few km2 within a week. Help from the public would hence be most helpful but it is also important to have an operational and trained research team. This project thus appears as a unique occasion to involve the public in a scientific project while promoting informal scientific education. This prompted us to set up Vigie-Ciel, a citizen science network centered on meteorite recovery. FRIPON is an open network based on open-source software, it will accept citizenrun cameras. In addition to fireballs, it will allow scientists and Vigie-Ciel participants to study anything that can be observed by all-sky cameras: bird migrations, bats, clouds, lightning, etc. The data will be freely available to all.

  2. Collaborative research. Study of aerosol sources and processing at the GVAX Pantnagar Supersite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsnop, Doug [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Volkamer, Rainer [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-08-13

    The Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) investigated uncertainties in the aerosol direct effect in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. The University of Colorado 2D-MAX-DOAS and LED-CE-DOAS instruments were collocated with DOE’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) during the TCAP-1 campaign at Cape Cod, MA (1 July to 13 August 2012). We have performed atmospheric radiation closure studies to evaluate the use of a novel parameter, i.e., the Raman Scattering Probability (RSP). We have performed first measurements of RSP almucantar scans, and measure RSP in spectra of scattered solar photons at 350nm and 430nm. Radiative Transfer Modelling of RSP demonstrate that the RSP measurement is maximally sensitive to infer even extremely low aerosol optical depth (AOD < 0.01) reliably by DOAS at low solar relative azimuth angles. We further assess the role of elevated aerosol layers on near surface observations of oxygen collision complexes, O 2-O2. Elevated aerosol layers modify the near surface absorption of O2-O2 and RSP. The combination of RSP and O2-O2 holds largely unexplored potential to better constrain elevated aerosol layers and measure column aerosol optical properties such as aerosol effective radius, extinction, aerosol phase functions and refractive indices. The TCAP deployment also provides a time series of reactive trace gas vertical profiles, i.e., nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and glyoxal (C2H2O2), which are measured simultaneously with the aerosol optical properties by DOAS. NO2 is an important precursor for ozone (O3) that modifies oxidative capacity. Glyoxal modifies oxidative capacity and is a source for brown carbon by forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via multiphase reactions in aerosol and cloud water. We have performed field measurements of these gases

  3. Evaluation of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for ampullary adenocarcinoma: the Johns Hopkins Hospital - Mayo Clinic collaborative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for ampullary carcinoma is unknown. Previous literature suggests that certain populations with high risk factors for recurrence may benefit from adjuvant chemoradiation. We combined the experience of two institutions to better delineate which patients may benefit from adjuvant chemoradiation. Patients who underwent curative surgery for ampullary carcinoma at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (n = 290; 1992-2007) and at the Mayo Clinic (n = 130; 1977-2005) were reviewed. Patients with <60 days of follow-up, metastatic disease at surgery, or insufficient pathologic data were excluded. The final combined study consisted of 186 patients (n = 104 Johns Hopkins, n = 82 Mayo). Most patients received 5-FU based chemoradiation with conformal radiation. Cox proportional hazards models were used for survival analysis. Median overall-survival was 39.9 months with 2- and 5-year survival rates of 62.4% and 39.1%. On univariate analysis, adverse prognostic factors for overall survival included T3/T4 stage disease (RR = 1.86, p = 0.002), node positive status (RR = 3.18, p < 0.001), and poor histological grade (RR = 1.69, p = 0.011). Patients who received adjuvant chemoradiation (n = 66) vs. surgery alone (n = 120) showed a higher rate of T3/T4 stage disease (57.6% vs. 30.8%, P < 0.001), lymph node involvement (72.7% vs. 30.0%, P < 0.001), and close or positive margins (4.6% vs. 0.0%, P = 0.019). Five year survival rates among node negative and node positive patients were 58.7% and 18.4% respectively. When compared with surgery alone, use of adjuvant chemoradiation improved survival among node positive patients (mOS 32.1 vs. 15.7 mos, 5 yr OS: 27.5% vs. 5.9%; RR = 0.47, P = 0.004). After adjusting for adverse prognostic factors on multivariate analysis, patients treated with adjuvant chemoradiation demonstrated a significant survival benefit (RR = 0.40, P < 0.001). Disease relapse occurred in 37.1% of all patients, most commonly metastatic

  4. Circles of Culture and Cognition: A Sociocognitive Study of Collaboration within and among Academic Groups of Teachers in a Rural School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Linda L.

    2011-01-01

    This ethnographic case study examined the roles of district and school macro-culture and teacher sub-group micro-culture in influencing the nature and extent of teachers' professional collaboration. Informed by the sociocognitive theory that learning is rooted in social relationships and develops through interpersonal discourse and activity, the…

  5. Normative structures, collaboration and conflict in irrigation; a case study of the Píllaro North Canal Irrigation System, Ecuadorian Highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogesteger van Dijk, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes conflict and collaboration and their relation to normative structures based on a case study of the history and external interventions of the Píllaro North Canal Irrigation System in the Ecuadorian Highlands. It does so by using Ostrom’s framework for analyzing the sustainability

  6. MEDXVIEWER: PROVIDING A WEB-ENABLED WORKSTATION ENVIRONMENT FOR COLLABORATIVE AND REMOTE MEDICAL IMAGING VIEWING, PERCEPTION STUDIES AND READER TRAINING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, P T; Young, K C; Halling-Brown, M D

    2016-06-01

    MedXViewer (Medical eXtensible Viewer) has been developed to address the need for workstation-independent, picture archiving and communication system (PACS)-less viewing and interaction with anonymised medical images. The aim of this paper is to describe the design and features of MedXViewer as well as to introduce the new features available in the latest release (version 1.2). MedXViewer currently supports digital mammography and tomosynthesis. The flexible software design used to develop MedXViewer allows it to be easily extended to support other imaging modalities. Regions of interest can be drawn by a user, and any associated information about a mark, an image or a study can be added. The questions and settings can be easily configured depending on the need of the research allowing both ROC and FROC studies to be performed. Complex tree-like questions can be asked where a given answer presents the user to new questions. The hanging protocol can be specified for each study. Panning, windowing, zooming and moving through slices are all available while modality-specific features can be easily enabled, e.g. quadrant zooming in digital mammography and tomosynthesis studies. MedXViewer can integrate with a web-based image database OPTIMAM Medical Image Database allowing results and images to be stored centrally. The software can, alternatively, run without a network connection where the images and results can be encrypted and stored locally on a machine or external drive. MedXViewer has been used for running remote paper-less observer studies and is capable of providing a training infrastructure and coordinating remote collaborative viewing sessions. PMID:26628613

  7. MEDXVIEWER: PROVIDING A WEB-ENABLED WORKSTATION ENVIRONMENT FOR COLLABORATIVE AND REMOTE MEDICAL IMAGING VIEWING, PERCEPTION STUDIES AND READER TRAINING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, P T; Young, K C; Halling-Brown, M D

    2016-06-01

    MedXViewer (Medical eXtensible Viewer) has been developed to address the need for workstation-independent, picture archiving and communication system (PACS)-less viewing and interaction with anonymised medical images. The aim of this paper is to describe the design and features of MedXViewer as well as to introduce the new features available in the latest release (version 1.2). MedXViewer currently supports digital mammography and tomosynthesis. The flexible software design used to develop MedXViewer allows it to be easily extended to support other imaging modalities. Regions of interest can be drawn by a user, and any associated information about a mark, an image or a study can be added. The questions and settings can be easily configured depending on the need of the research allowing both ROC and FROC studies to be performed. Complex tree-like questions can be asked where a given answer presents the user to new questions. The hanging protocol can be specified for each study. Panning, windowing, zooming and moving through slices are all available while modality-specific features can be easily enabled, e.g. quadrant zooming in digital mammography and tomosynthesis studies. MedXViewer can integrate with a web-based image database OPTIMAM Medical Image Database allowing results and images to be stored centrally. The software can, alternatively, run without a network connection where the images and results can be encrypted and stored locally on a machine or external drive. MedXViewer has been used for running remote paper-less observer studies and is capable of providing a training infrastructure and coordinating remote collaborative viewing sessions.

  8. Collaborative networks: Reference modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Camarinha-Matos; H. Afsarmanesh

    2008-01-01

    Collaborative Networks: Reference Modeling works to establish a theoretical foundation for Collaborative Networks. Particular emphasis is put on modeling multiple facets of collaborative networks and establishing a comprehensive modeling framework that captures and structures diverse perspectives of

  9. Microbial receptor assay for rapid detection and identification of seven families of antimicrobial drugs in milk: collaborative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microbial competitive receptor assay for detecting residues of antibiotic families in milk was studied collaboratively by 13 laboratories. In this method, microbial cells added to a milk sample provide specific binding sites for which 14C or 3H labeled drug competes with drug resides in the sample. The 14C or 3H binding to the specific binding sites is measured in a scintillation counter and compared with a zero standard milk. If the sample is statistically different from the zero standard, it is positive. The assay takes about 15 min. The binding reaction occurs between the receptor site and the drug functional group, so all members of a drug family are detected. In this case, beta-lactams, tetracyclines, macrolides, aminoglycosides, novobiocin, chloramphenicol, and sulfonamides, including p-amino-benzoic acid (PABA) and its other analogs, are detectable. The incidence of false negative determinations among samples is about 1%; the incidence of false positives is about 3%. For negative cases, the relative standard deviations for repeatability ranged from 0 to 5% and for reproducibility from 0 to 6%. For positive cases, relative standard deviations ranged from 0 to 13% for repeatability and from 0 to 14% for reproducibility. The method has been adopted official first action

  10. Green Component Procurement Collaboration for Improving Supply Chain Management in the High Technology Industries: A Case Study from the Systems Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ren Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of high technology industries have been growing increasingly to technological innovations and global economic developments, while the concerns in sustainability are calling for facilitating green materials and cleaner production in the industrial value chains. Today’s manufacturing companies are not striving for individual capacities but for the effective working with green supply chains. However, in addition to environmental and social objectives, cost and economic feasibility has become one of the most critical success factors for improving supply chain management with green component procurement collaboration, especially for the electronics OEM (original equipment manufacturing companies whose procurement costs often make up a very high proportion of final product prices. This paper presents a case study from the systems perspective by using System Dynamics simulation analysis and statistical validations with empirical data. Empirical data were collected from Taiwanese manufacturing chains—among the world’s largest manufacturing clusters of high technology components and products—and their global green suppliers to examine the benefits of green component procurement collaborations in terms of shared costs and improved shipping time performance. Two different supply chain collaboration models, from multi-layer ceramic capacitor (MLCC and universal serial bus 3.0 (USB 3.0 cable procurements, were benchmarked and statistically validated. The results suggest that the practices of collaborative planning for procurement quantity and accurate fulfillment by suppliers are significantly related to cost effectiveness and shipping time efficiency. Although the price negotiation of upstream raw materials for the collaborative suppliers has no statistically significant benefit to the shipping time efficiency, the shared cost reduction of component procurement is significantly positive for supply chain collaboration among green

  11. Technology-Enhanced Science: Using an Online Blog to Share a Collaborative Field Study for Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccann, A. R.; Cardace, D.; Carnevale, D.

    2011-12-01

    The role of technology is an increasingly important resource in preparing students for the future. The Internet is a widely accessible tool. Technology has also made us more connected, allowing constant communication and instantaneous data sharing. Public utilities such as those found on the web, including blogs, are a means to convey scientific research in rapid, useful ways. This tool is ideal for newly emerging fields, allowing up-to-date collaboration and referencing of ongoing studies, as well as bringing students virtually into the field or laboratory through videos, pictures, and records of project work. Astrobiology is a high interest topic, integrating geology, chemistry, biology, and physics. Terrestrial Mars analog environments are compelling in that they shed light on unusual opportunities for diverse life in settings beyond Earth. For this study, the analog site locality is at the University of California-Davis McLaughlin Natural Reserve in the Coast Range Ophiolite, a portion of actively serpentinizing, uplifted oceanic material in northern California (see companion poster, McCann et al., Mineralogy of Surface Serpentinite Outcrops in the Coast Range Ophiolite: Implications for the Deep Biosphere and Astrobiology). Our research objective is to monitor the activity taking place within the subsurface biosphere through an interdisciplinary approach involving biogeochemists, microbiologists, organic geochemists, and geologists. The study of serpentinization with astrobiological ground-truthing is a relatively new and promising field. Scientific field procedures are constantly being modified as they are applied. In order to better collaborate study efforts, a daily field journal is being written, recording ideas, discussions, procedures, problems, solutions, and results. It serves as an informal report, including pictures and video clips of the field activity. The journal is maintained as an online blog for ease of use and accessibility, as well as public

  12. Adaptive Management and Social Learning in Collaborative and Community-Based Monitoring: a Study of Five Community-Based Forestry Organizations in the western USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi L. Ballard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative and community-based monitoring are becoming more frequent, yet few studies have examined the process and outcomes of these monitoring approaches. We studied 18 collaborative or community-based ecological assessment or monitoring projects undertaken by five community-based forestry organizations (CBFs, to investigate the objectives, process, and outcomes of collaborative ecological monitoring by CBF organizations. We found that collaborative monitoring can lead to shared ecological understanding among diverse participants, build trust internally and credibility externally, foster social learning and community-building, and advance adaptive management. The CBFs experienced challenges in recruiting and sustaining community participation in monitoring, building needed technical capacity for monitoring, and communicating monitoring results back to the broader community. Our results suggest that involving diverse and sometimes adversarial interests at key points in the monitoring process can help resolve conflicts and advance social learning, while also strengthening the link between social and ecological systems by improving the information base for management and increasing collective awareness of the interdependence of human and natural forest communities.

  13. Changes in primary care physician’s management of low back pain in a model of interprofessional collaborative care: an uncontrolled before-after study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mior Silvano

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracking how clinicians treat patients provides an opportunity to explore how the clinical management of common musculoskeletal disorders evolves over time. We present an uncontrolled before-after study of a primary care physician’s management of low back pain and describe how his involvement in an interprofessional collaborative practice was associated with a change in the management of patients with low back pain. Method Data from the electronic medical record of one primary care physician who participated in a study of a model of chiropractic-medical collaboration were retrospectively collected. Records of a sample of consecutive patients prior to the start (i.e. pre-study, n = 51 and at the end of the collaborative study (i.e. study, n = 49 were collected. Results Demographics were similar in both groups but median number of physician visits (2.5 and 1.0, average prescriptions per patients (1.24 and 0.47, and total number of narcotic prescriptions (14 and 6 differed between pre-study and study groups, respectively. Separate analysis of only the records of low back pain study patients revealed that 61% were referred for chiropractic care during the study period. Patients who were not referred had more neurological deficits and leg pain but back pain severity and average number of prescriptions was about the same. Referred patients in the study group had about 25% fewer physician visits and imaging requests. Conclusion Based on this study of a single primary care physician, we hypothesize that doctors may change their prescribing behaviours and consultation rate for patients with low back pain when engaged in interprofessional collaborative care. Further research is required to test this observation in the population.

  14. Cross-border collaboration in history among Nordic students: A case study about creating innovative ICT didactic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Spante

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Gränsöverskridande Nordisk Undervisning/Utdanelse (GNU, meaning Cross-Border Nordic Education, the larger Nordic project, under which this case study was carried out, aims at developing innovative, cross-border teaching models in different subject domains in elementary school, including mathematics, language, science, social studies and history. This paper provides an in-depth description and analysis of how four social science and history elementary school teachers and their 70 students (5th–7th grades worked together between November 2011 and December 2012. Previous research regarding the use of information and communication technology (ICT in history education in elementary schools is limited, thus calling for contemporary investigations in this particular subject domain. The Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK model, enhancing the combination of teachers’ pedagogical, content and technical competence, was used as the analytical framework, together with nation-specific curricula and the European Union’s recommendations regarding students’ skills for lifelong learning. A range of empirical materials was analyzed, such as classroom observations, students’ video productions, texts and photos distributed and shared on a mutual blog, real-time interaction and teachers’ communication. The teachers tried out two ICT didactic models. In the asynchronous model, the major focus was on the form and content of the video productions being shared, whereas work with the synchronous model concentrated on the content and quality of the communication. Notwithstanding obstacles, cross-border collaboration provided added value. The nation-specific differences triggered curiosity and motivation to produce digital presentations of history content to be understood by the students in the three nations, facilitating goal fulfillment in communication skills and digital competence. However, achieving subject-specific goals in history

  15. Active Smoking, Passive Smoking, and Breast Cancer Risk: Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yingsong; Kikuchi, Shogo; Tamakoshi, Koji; Wakai, Kenji; Kondo, Takaaki; Niwa, Yoshimitsu; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Nishio, Kazuko; Suzuki, Sadao; Tokudome, Shinkan; Yamamoto, Akio; Toyoshima, Hideaki; Mori, Mitsuru; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence is lacking regarding the relationship between cigarette smoking and breast cancer in Japanese women. We examined the association between breast cancer incidence and active and passive smoking in the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk. Methods Our study comprised 34,401 women aged 40-79 years who had not been diagnosed previously with breast cancer and who provided information on smoking status at baseline (1988-1990). The subjects were followed from enrollment until December 31, 2001. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between breast cancer incidence and tobacco smoke. Results During 271,412 person-years of follow-up, we identified 208 incident cases of breast cancer. Active smoking did not increase the risk of breast cancer, with a HR for current smokers of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.32-1.38). Furthermore, an increased risk of breast cancer was not observed in current smokers who smoked a greater number of cigarettes each day. Overall, passive smoking at home or in public spaces was also not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer among nonsmokers. Women who reported passive smoking during childhood had a statistically insignificant increase in risk (HR: 1.24; 95% CI: 0.84-1.85), compared with those who had not been exposed during this time. Conclusion Smoking may not be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in this cohort of Japanese women. PMID:18403857

  16. Evaluation Framework for Collaborative Educational Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiatsos, Thrasyvoulos; Andreas, Konstantinidis; Pomportsis, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we will focus on a specific category of Collaborative Virtual Environments that aims to support Collaborative Learning. We call these environments Collaborative Educational Virtual Environments. Our aim is to analyze the evaluation process through the study of relevant bibliography and by doing so reveal the existing research gap…

  17. Social Media Collaboration in the Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    (including challenges) that influence the students’ overall satisfaction with collaboration? Does the usage of e-collaboration tools and social media usage influence collaboration satisfaction? The findings of the study are summarized in a model that point towards the main factors influencing student overall...

  18. Study on Economic Regulation of Collaborative Strategies among Container Shipping Companies Following Repeal of European Union Regulation 4056/86

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawindaran Nair

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The European Union removed the block exemption granted under Regulation 4056/86, to liner shipping companies to provide scheduled services on a collaborative basis effective October 2008. This has also been followed by the proposed P3 alliance with participation of Maersk, MSC and CMA CGM. This paper explores, the arguments adopted by the US Federal Maritime Commission, the European Commission and the Ministry of Commerce of China, in rejecting the case proposed by the P3 alliance. The findings of this paper will inform on understanding strategies adopted by major Competition Regulatory authorities in their interpretation of horizontal collaboration in the industry.

  19. Supporting collaboration in multidisciplinary home care teams.

    OpenAIRE

    Pinelle, David; Gutwin, Carl

    2002-01-01

    Collaboration is an important part of healthcare delivery. However, in home care, collaboration is difficult due to the mobility and schedule variability of the workers. In this paper, we investigate the difficulties inherent in home care collaboration. We present the results of a study carried out with home care clinicians in Saskatoon District Health, and identify five areas of collaboration that are difficult for home care workers: scheduling, information dissemination, information retriev...

  20. Collaboration between science teacher educators and science faculty from arts and sciences for the purpose of developing a middle childhood science teacher education program: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gayle A.

    1998-12-01

    The science teacher educators at a midwestern university set a goal to establish a collaborative relationship between themselves and representatives from the College of Arts & Sciences for the purpose of developing a middle childhood science education program. The coming together of these two faculties provided a unique opportunity to explore the issues and experiences that emerge as such a collaborative relationship is formed. In order to gain a holistic perspective of the collaboration, a phenomenological case study design and methods were utilized. The study took a qualitative approach to allow the experiences and issues to emerge in a naturalistic manner. The question, 'What are the issues and experiences that emerge as science teacher educators and science faculty attempt to form a collaborative relationship for the purpose of developing a middle childhood science teacher program?' was answered by gathering a wealth of data. These data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews, observations and written document reviews. An overall picture was painted of the case by means of heuristic, phenomenological, and issues analyses. The researcher followed Moustakas' Phases of Heuristic Research to answer the questions 'What does science mean to me?' and 'What are my beliefs about the issues guiding this case?' prior to completing the phenomenological analysis. The phenomenological analysis followed Moustakas' 'Modification of the Van Kaam Methods of Analysis of Phenomenological Data'. This inquiry showed that the participants in this study came to the collaboration for many different reasons and ideas about the purpose for such a relationship. The participants also had very different ideas about how such a relationship should be conducted. These differences combined to create some issues that affected the development of curriculum and instruction. The issues involved the lack of (a) mutual respect for the work of the partners, (b) understanding about the

  1. Collaboration in scientific practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenknecht, Susann

    2014-01-01

    This monograph investigates the collaborative creation of scientific knowledge in research groups. To do so, I combine philosophical analysis with a first-hand comparative case study of two research groups in experimental science. Qualitative data are gained through observation and interviews......, and I combine empirical insights with existing approaches to knowledge creation in philosophy of science and social epistemology. On the basis of my empirically-grounded analysis I make several conceptual contributions. I study scientific collaboration as the interaction of scientists within research...... groups. Thereby, I argue that research groups and their role in scientific practice deserve more philosophical attention than they have hitherto received. In contemporary natural science, research groups are key to the formulation and corroboration of scientific knowledge claims prior...

  2. 基于ICT的供应链协同管理研究综述%A synthesis of current study on supply chain collaboration management based on ICT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔令夷

    2012-01-01

    Since the arrival of network economy, ICT becomes roll booster for enterprise development. Meanwhile traditional supply chain has been transformed into collaborative supply chain based on ICT for improving members" long-term performance. Based on a literature review since 1997, it depicts supply chain collaboration management research, integration research of ICT and supply chain collaboration management, supply chain collaboration technology research based on ICT, both domestic and abroad. In addition, it implements a structural model including three dimensions and twelve factors to analyze how the passed articles studied supply chain collaboration management based on ICT, recommend systems engineering theory and methodology for relevant research and providesreference to future study.%网络经济时代,信息技术成为企业发展助推器,传统供应链转变为基于ICT的协同供应链,以提高长期绩效。梳理1997年至今基于ICT的供应链协同管理研究的国内外重要文献,统计分析目前的供应链协同管理研究、ICT与供应链协同管理的融合研究、基于ICT的供应链协同技术研究,提出包含3个维度、12个要素的研究框架,评述目前理论及应用研究,提出应用系统工程理论及方法开展相关研究的建议,为未来研究提供借鉴。

  3. Adaptation in Collaborative Governance Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  4. Collaborative Systems Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocatilu, Paul; Ciurea, Cristian

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative systems are widely used today in various activity fields. Their complexity is high and the development involves numerous resources and costs. Testing collaborative systems has a very important role for the systems' success. In this paper we present taxonomy of collaborative systems. The collaborative systems are classified in many…

  5. A Validation Study of Vascular Cognitive Impairment Genetics Meta-Analysis Findings in an Independent Collaborative Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrobot, Olivia Anna; McKnight, Amy Jayne; Passmore, Peter Anthony; Seripa, Davide; Mecocci, Patrizia; Panza, Francesco; Kalaria, Rajesh; Wilcock, Gordon; Munafò, Marcus; Erkinjuntti, Timo; Karhunen, Pekka; Pessi, Tanja; Martiskainen, Mika; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick Gavin

    2016-06-15

    Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), including its severe form, vascular dementia (VaD), is the second most common form of dementia. The genetic etiology of sporadic VCI remains largely unknown. We previously conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of all published genetic association studies of sporadic VCI prior to 6 July 2012, which demonstrated that APOE (ɛ4, ɛ2) and MTHFR (rs1801133) variants were associated with susceptibility for VCI. De novo genotyping was conducted in a new independent relatively large collaborative European cohort of VaD (nmax = 549) and elderly non-demented samples (nmax = 552). Where available, genotype data derived from Illumina's 610-quad array for 1210 GERAD1 control samples were also included in analyses of genes examined. Associations were tested using the Cochran-Armitage trend test: MTHFR rs1801133 (OR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.16-1.58, p = <0.0001), APOE rs7412 (OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.42-0.90, p = 0.01), and APOE rs429358 (OR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.17-2.16, p = 0.003). Association was also observed with APOE epsilon alleles; ɛ4 (OR = 1.85, 95% CI 1.35-2.52, p = <0.0001) and ɛ2 (OR = 0.67, 95% CI 0.46-0.98, p = 0.03). Logistic regression and Bonferroni correction in a subgroup of the cohort adjusted for gender, age, and population maintained the association of APOE rs429358 and ɛ4 allele. PMID:27314523

  6. Temperature-independent pectin gel method for aerobic plate count in dairy and nondairy food products: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J N

    1988-01-01

    Ten laboratories participated in a collaborative study to compare the pectin-based plate count (PC) Redigel method with the aerobic plate count and standard plate count agar-based standard methods for the estimation of total bacterial counts in 9 different nondairy food and dairy food products. The foods were cream, homogenized milk, raw milk, cheese, raw chicken, raw oysters, frozen broccoli, flour, and spices. Each laboratory analyzed 6 samples (3 sample pairs) of each food group. Counts obtained by the pectin-based plate count and agar-based plate count methods differed significantly (P less than 0.05) only for homogenized milk, where the pectin gel method resulted in higher counts. The actual counts were higher in the pectin gel method in 8 of the 9 food groups. The log means for pectin gel and agar-based media, respectively, for the 9 food groups were: cream 8.106 and 7.844; homogenized milk 8.642 and 8.231; raw milk 8.711 and 8.423; chicken 7.654 and 7.645; oysters 7.201 and 7.180; broccoli 7.102 and 6.798; cheese 8.045 and 8.055; flour 4.112 and 3.988; spice 5.379 and 5.314. The repeatability standard deviations favored the pectin gel method in 6 of the 9 foods tested. The reproducibility standard deviations favored the pectin gel method in 7 of the 9 foods tested. These results strongly support the suitability of the pectin gel method as an alternative to agar-based plate count and other methods for total bacterial counts in nondairy and dairy food products. The pectin gel method has been adopted official first action.

  7. Linkage scan for quantitative traits identifies new regions of interest for substance dependence in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Arpana; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Dunn, Gerald; Bertelsen, Sarah; Dick, Danielle M; Saccone, Scott F; Saccone, Nancy L.; Grucza, Richard A.; Wang, Jen C.; Robert Cloninger, C.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Foroud, Tatiana; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Bucholz, Kathleen K.

    2007-01-01

    Dependence on alcohol and illicit drugs frequently co-occur. Results from a number of twin studies suggest that heritable influences on alcohol dependence and drug dependence may substantially overlap. Using large, genetically informative pedigrees from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA), we performed quantitative linkage analyses using a panel of 1717 SNPs. Genome-wide linkage analyses were conducted for quantitative measures of DSM-IV alcohol dependence criteria, c...

  8. Collaborative planning approach to inform the implementation of a healthcare manager intervention for hispanics with serious mental illness: a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Cabassa Leopoldo J; Druss Benjamin; Wang Yuanjia; Lewis-Fernández Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background This study describes a collaborative planning approach that blends principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR) and intervention mapping to modify a healthcare manager intervention to a new patient population and provider group and to assess the feasibility and acceptability of this modified intervention to improve the physical health of Hispanics with serious mental illness (SMI) and at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods The proposed study uses ...

  9. Leadership as Network Catalysts: A Study of Leadership as Enacted by Structures and Processes of Inter-organizational Collaborations in the Singapore Public Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Khiaw Peng celia

    2016-01-01

    This empirical qualitative study based on four inter-organizational collaborations in the Singapore Public Sector contributes to the network management and public sector leadership literatures by examining leadership of the coordinating bodies through the studying of structures and processes within the four cases. Particularly paying attention to how network managers build trust and relationships with network members, partners and external institutions through the balancing of tensions arisin...

  10. Exploring the Mechanisms of Knowledge Transfer in University-Industry Collaborations: A Study of Companies, Students and Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Christian; Cappelen, Katja

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses mechanisms, enablers and barriers for knowledge transfer in university-industry collaboration projects involving companies, students and researchers. Data is collected through 35 qualitative interviews with Danish and Norwegian representatives from the above categories. All respondents have been involved in collaborative…

  11. Taking part in Nordic collaboration; nursing students' experiences and perceptions from a learning perspective: A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elrond*, Malene; Westerbotn, Margareta; Kneck, Åsa;

    2015-01-01

    Background Nordic networking of different kinds has a long tradition aiming to increase collaboration and understanding between citizens in different countries. Cultural competence in relation to health care and nursing is important for clinical nurses and is a central issue in nurse education. O...

  12. Resolving complex research data management issues in biomedical laboratories: Qualitative study of an industry-academia collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L; Bova, G Steven; Wang, Jian; Ackerman, Christopher F; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Chen, Steve H; Lindvall, Mikael; Zack, Donald J

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a distributed collaborative effort between industry and academia to systematize data management in an academic biomedical laboratory. Heterogeneous and voluminous nature of research data created in biomedical laboratories make information management difficult and research unproductive. One such collaborative effort was evaluated over a period of four years using data collection methods including ethnographic observations, semi-structured interviews, web-based surveys, progress reports, conference call summaries, and face-to-face group discussions. Data were analyzed using qualitative methods of data analysis to (1) characterize specific problems faced by biomedical researchers with traditional information management practices, (2) identify intervention areas to introduce a new research information management system called Labmatrix, and finally to (3) evaluate and delineate important general collaboration (intervention) characteristics that can optimize outcomes of an implementation process in biomedical laboratories. Results emphasize the importance of end user perseverance, human-centric interoperability evaluation, and demonstration of return on investment of effort and time of laboratory members and industry personnel for success of implementation process. In addition, there is an intrinsic learning component associated with the implementation process of an information management system. Technology transfer experience in a complex environment such as the biomedical laboratory can be eased with use of information systems that support human and cognitive interoperability. Such informatics features can also contribute to successful collaboration and hopefully to scientific productivity.

  13. Evaluating Multi-Institutional Partnership Sustainability: A Case Study of Collaborative Workforce Development in Renewable Energy Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, John M.; Stallings, Kevin D.; KC, Birendra; Seekamp, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Partnership evaluation typically occurs during the final stages either to assess why a collaborative effort did not work or to identify the indicators of success. Partnerships are rarely evaluated at their incipient stage, which is a critical time to assess their potential for long-term sustainability. In this paper, we present an early-stage…

  14. "Becoming Molecular Girl": Transforming Subjectivities in Collaborative Doctoral Research Studies as Micro-Politics in the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz Taguchi, Hillevi

    2013-01-01

    In the context of Swedish reforms of postgraduate and doctoral education in a global knowledge economy, this article aims to theorise on the documented processes of doing collaborative analysis during elective graduate course-work on deconstructive methodologies in the social sciences, with 10 doctoral students over a period of seven months. I…

  15. Assessing Online Textual Feedback to Support Student Intrinsic Motivation Using a Collaborative Text-Based Dialogue System: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Ronnie H.; Deneen, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This paper assesses textual feedback to support student intrinsic motivation using a collaborative text-based dialogue system. A research model is presented based on research into intrinsic motivation, and the specific construct of feedback provides a framework for the model. A qualitative research methodology is used to validate the model.…

  16. Collaborative study of an enzymatic digestion method for the isolation of light filth from ground beef or hamburger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioto, P; Andreas, M

    1976-01-01

    Collaborative results are presented for a proposed method for light filth extraction from ground beef or hamburger. The method involves enzymatic digestion, wet sieving, and extraction with light mineral oil from 40% isopropanol. Recoveries are good and filter papers are clean. This method has been adopted as official first action. PMID:765321

  17. Collaborative Care for patients with severe borderline and NOS personality disorders : A comparative multiple case study on processes and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stringer, Barbara; Meijel, Berno van; Koekkoek, Bauke; Kerkhof, Ad; Beekman, Aartjan

    2011-01-01

    Structured psychotherapy is recommended as the preferred treatment of personality disorders. A substantial group of patients, however, has no access to these therapies or does not benefit. For those patients who have no (longer) access to psychotherapy a Collaborative Care Program (CCP) is developed

  18. Collaborative research between academia and industry using a large clinical trial database: a case study in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Roy; Wilkinson, David; Lopez, Oscar L;

    2011-01-01

    community because of concerns that commercial, rather than scientific, goals are the primary purpose of such endeavours. Thus, there are few examples of sustained collaboration between leading academic clinical researchers and industry professionals in a large-scale data mining project. We present here...

  19. Multilateral Collaborations in Analog Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, R. l.

    2016-01-01

    International collaborations in studies utilizing ground-based space flight analogs are an effective means for answering research questions common to participating agencies. These collaborations bring together worldwide experts to solve important space research questions. By collaborating unnecessary duplication of science is reduced, and the efficiency of analog use is improved. These studies also share resources among agencies for cost effective solutions to study implementation. Recently, NASA has engaged in collaborations with international partners at a variety of analog sites. The NASA Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) is currently hosting investigator studies from NASA and from the German Space Agency (DLR). These isolation studies will answer questions in the areas of team cohesion, sleep and circadian rhythms, and neurobehavioral correlates to function. Planning for the next HERA campaign is underway as proposal selections are being made from the International Life Sciences Research Announcement (ILSRA). Studies selected from the ILSRA will be conducted across 4 HERA missions in 2017. NASA is planning collaborative studies with DLR at the :envihab facility in Cologne, Germany. Investigations were recently selected to study the effects of 0.5% CO2 exposure over 30 days of bed rest. These studies will help to determine the fidelity of this ground-based analog for studying the visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. NASA is also planning a multilateral collaboration at :envihab with DLR and the European Space Agency (ESA) to examine artificial gravity as a countermeasure to mitigate the effects of 60 days of bed rest. NASA is also considering collaborations with the Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems (IBMP) in studies that will utilize their Ground-based Experimental Facility (NEK). The NEK is comprised of 4 interconnected modules and a Martian surface simulator. This isolation analog can support 3 -10 crew members for long duration

  20. Modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD study and CKD epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI equations for Taiwanese adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-I Chen

    Full Text Available Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD study or the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI equations may not be accurate for Asians; thus, we developed modified eGFR equations for Taiwanese adults.This cross-sectional study compared the Taiwanese eGFR equations, the MDRD study, and the CKD-EPI equations with inulin clearance (Cin. A total of 695 adults including 259 healthy volunteers and 436 CKD patients were recruited. Participants from the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital were used as the development set (N = 556 to develop the Taiwanese eGFR equations, whereas participants from the National Taiwan University Hospital were used as the validation set (N = 139 for external validation.The Taiwanese eGFR equations were developed by using the extended Bland-Altman plot in the development set. The Taiwanese MDRD equation was 1.309 × MDRD0.912, Taiwanese CKD-EPI was 1.262×CKD-EPI0.914 and Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI was 1.205 × four-level CKD-EPI0.914. In the validation set, the Taiwanese equations had the lowest bias, the Taiwanese equations and the Japanese CKD-EPI equation had the lowest RMSE, whereas the Taiwanese and the Japanese equations had the best precision and the highest P30 among all equations. However, the Taiwanese MDRD equation had higher concordance correlation than did the Taiwanese CKD-EPI, the Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI and the Japanese equations. Moreover, only the Taiwanese equations had no proportional bias among all of the equations. Finally, the Taiwanese MDRD equation had the best diagnostic performance in terms of ordinal logistic regression among all of the equations.The Taiwanese MDRD equation is better than the MDRD, CKD-EPI, Japanese, Asian, Thai, Taiwanese CKD-EPI, and Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI equations for Taiwanese adults.