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Sample records for 14-mer cuucgg tetraloop

  1. Free-energy landscape of a hyperstable RNA tetraloop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Jacob C; Chen, Alan A; García, Angel E

    2016-06-14

    We report the characterization of the energy landscape and the folding/unfolding thermodynamics of a hyperstable RNA tetraloop obtained through high-performance molecular dynamics simulations at microsecond timescales. Sampling of the configurational landscape is conducted using temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics over three isochores at high, ambient, and negative pressures to determine the thermodynamic stability and the free-energy landscape of the tetraloop. The simulations reveal reversible folding/unfolding transitions of the tetraloop into the canonical A-RNA conformation and the presence of two alternative configurations, including a left-handed Z-RNA conformation and a compact purine Triplet. Increasing hydrostatic pressure shows a stabilizing effect on the A-RNA conformation and a destabilization of the left-handed Z-RNA. Our results provide a comprehensive description of the folded free-energy landscape of a hyperstable RNA tetraloop and highlight the significant advances of all-atom molecular dynamics in describing the unbiased folding of a simple RNA secondary structure motif.

  2. Free Energy Landscape of GAGA and UUCG RNA Tetraloops

    CERN Document Server

    Bottaro, Sandro; Sponer, Jiri; Bussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    We report the folding thermodynamics of ccUUCGgg and ccGAGAgg RNA tetraloops using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We obtain a previously unreported estimation of the folding free energy using parallel tempering in combination with well-tempered metadynamics. A key ingredient is the use of a recently developed metric distance, eRMSD, as a biased collective variable. We find that the native fold of both tetraloops is not the global free energy minimum using the Amber\\c{hi}OL3 force field. The estimated folding free energies are 30.2kJ/mol for UUCG and 7.5 kJ/mol for GAGA, in striking disagreement with experimental data. We evaluate the viability of all possible one-dimensional backbone force field corrections. We find that disfavoring the gauche+ region of {\\alpha} and {\\zeta} angles consistently improves the existing force field. The level of accuracy achieved with these corrections, however, cannot be considered sufficient by judging on the basis of available thermodynamic data and solution experim...

  3. Tumor imaging and targeting potential of an Hsp70-derived 14-mer peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Gehrmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously used a unique mouse monoclonal antibody cmHsp70.1 to demonstrate the selective presence of a membrane-bound form of Hsp70 (memHsp70 on a variety of leukemia cells and on single cell suspensions derived from solid tumors of different entities, but not on non-transformed cells or cells from corresponding 'healthy' tissue. This antibody can be used to image tumors in vivo and target them for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Tumor-specific expression of memHsp70 therefore has the potential to be exploited for theranostic purposes. Given the advantages of peptides as imaging and targeting agents, this study assessed whether a 14-mer tumor penetrating peptide (TPP; TKDNNLLGRFELSG, the sequence of which is derived from the oligomerization domain of Hsp70 which is expressed on the cell surface of tumor cells, can also be used for targeting membrane Hsp70 positive (memHsp70+ tumor cells, in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The specificity of carboxy-fluorescein (CF- labeled TPP (TPP to Hsp70 was proven in an Hsp70 knockout mammary tumor cell system. TPP specifically binds to different memHsp70+ mouse and human tumor cell lines and is rapidly taken up via endosomes. Two to four-fold higher levels of CF-labeled TPP were detected in MCF7 (82% memHsp70+ and MDA-MB-231 (75% memHsp70+ cells compared to T47D cells (29% memHsp70+ that exhibit a lower Hsp70 membrane positivity. After 90 min incubation, TPP co-localized with mitochondrial membranes in memHsp70+ tumors. Although there was no evidence that any given vesicle population was specifically localized, fluorophore-labeled cmHsp70.1 antibody and TPP preferentially accumulated in the proximity of the adherent surface of cultured cells. These findings suggest a potential association between membrane Hsp70 expression and cytoskeletal elements that are involved in adherence, the establishment of intercellular synapses and/or membrane reorganization. CONCLUSIONS

  4. Computer Folding of RNA Tetraloops: Identification of Key Force Field Deficiencies

    CERN Document Server

    Kührová, Petra; Bottaro, Sandro; Bussi, Giovanni; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The computer-aided folding of biomolecules, particularly RNAs, is one of the most difficult challenges in computational structural biology. RNA tetraloops are fundamental RNA motifs playing key roles in RNA folding and RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions. Although state-of-the-art Molecular Dynamics (MD) force fields correctly describe the native state of these tetraloops as a stable free-energy basin on the microsecond time scale, enhanced sampling techniques reveal that the native state is not the global free energy minimum, suggesting yet unidentified significant imbalances in the force fields. Here, we tested our ability to fold the RNA tetraloops in various force fields and simulation settings. We employed three different enhanced sampling techniques, namely, temperature replica exchange MD (T-REMD), replica exchange with solute tempering (REST2), and well-tempered metadynamics (WT-MetaD). We aimed to separate problems caused by limited sampling from those due to force-field inaccuracies. We found that ...

  5. Structural variation and uniformity among tetraloop-receptor interactions and other loop-helix interactions in RNA crystal structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wu

    Full Text Available Tetraloop-receptor interactions are prevalent structural units in RNAs, and include the GAAA/11-nt and GNRA-minor groove interactions. In this study, we have compiled a set of 78 nonredundant loop-helix interactions from X-ray crystal structures, and examined them for the extent of their sequence and structural variation. Of the 78 interactions in the set, only four were classical GAAA/11-nt motifs, while over half (48 were GNRA-minor groove interactions. The GNRA-minor groove interactions were not a homogeneous set, but were divided into five subclasses. The most predominant subclass is characterized by two triple base pair interactions in the minor groove, flanked by two ribose zipper contacts. This geometry may be considered the "standard" GNRA-minor groove interaction, while the other four subclasses are alternative ways to form interfaces between a minor groove and tetraloop. The remaining 26 structures in the set of 78 have loops interacting with mostly idiosyncratic receptors. Among the entire set, a number of sequence-structure correlations can be identified, which may be used as initial hypotheses in predicting three-dimensional structures from primary sequences. Conversely, other sequence patterns are not predictive; for example, GAAA loop sequences and GG/CC receptors bind to each other with three distinct geometries. Finally, we observe an example of structural evolution in group II introns, in which loop-receptor motifs are substituted for each other while maintaining the larger three-dimensional geometry. Overall, the study gives a more complete view of RNA loop-helix interactions that exist in nature.

  6. Three-dimensional motifs from the SCOR, structural classification of RNA database: extruded strands, base triples, tetraloops and U-turns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterman, Peter S; Hendrix, Donna K; Tamura, Makio; Holbrook, Stephen R; Brenner, Steven E

    2004-01-01

    Release 2.0.1 of the Structural Classification of RNA (SCOR) database, http://scor.lbl.gov, contains a classification of the internal and hairpin loops in a comprehensive collection of 497 NMR and X-ray RNA structures. This report discusses findings of the classification that have not been reported previously. The SCOR database contains multiple examples of a newly described RNA motif, the extruded helical single strand. Internal loop base triples are classified in SCOR according to their three-dimensional context. These internal loop triples contain several examples of a frequently found motif, the minor groove AGC triple. SCOR also presents the predominant and alternate conformations of hairpin loops, as shown in the most well represented tetraloops, with consensus sequences GNRA, UNCG and ANYA. The ubiquity of the GNRA hairpin turn motif is illustrated by its presence in complex internal loops.

  7. Influence of In Vitro IL-2 or IL-15 Alone or in Combination with Hsp 70 Derived 14-Mer Peptide (TKD on the Expression of NK Cell Activatory and Inhibitory Receptors on Peripheral Blood T Cells, B Cells and NKT Cells.

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    Ilona Hromadnikova

    Full Text Available Previous studies from Multhoff and colleagues reported that plasma membrane Hsp70 acts as a tumour-specific recognition structure for activated NK cells, and that the incubation of NK cells with Hsp70 and/or a 14-mer peptide derived from the N-terminal sequence of Hsp70 (TKDNNLLGRFELSG, TKD, aa 450-463 plus a low dose of IL-2 triggers NK cell proliferation and migration, and their capacity to kill cancer cells expressing membrane Hsp70. Herein, we have used flow cytometry to determine the influence of in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals with IL-2 or IL-15, either alone or in combination with TKD peptide on the cell surface expression of CD94, NK cell activatory receptors (CD16, NK2D, NKG2C, NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, NKp80, KIR2DL4, DNAM-1 and LAMP1 and NK cell inhibitory receptors (NKG2A, KIR2DL2/L3, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKR-P1A by CD3+CD56+ (NKT, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD19+ populations. NKG2D, DNAM-1, LAMP1 and NKR-P1A expression was upregulated after the stimulation with IL-2 or IL-15 alone or in combination with TKD in NKT, CD8+ T cells and B cells. CD94 was upregulated in NKT and CD8+ T cells. Concurrently, an increase in a number of CD8+ T cells expressing LIR1/ILT-2 and CD4+ T cells positive for NKR-P1A was observed. The proportion of CD8+ T cells that expressed NKG2D was higher after IL-2/TKD treatment, when compared with IL-2 treatment alone. In comparison with IL-15 alone, IL-15/TKD treatment increased the proportion of NKT cells that were positive for CD94, LAMP1 and NKRP-1A. The more potent effect of IL-15/TKD on cell surface expression of NKG2D, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKRP-1A was observed in B cells compared with IL-15 alone. However, this increase was not of statistical significance. IL-2/TKD induced significant upregulation of LAMP1 in CD8+ T cells compared with IL-2 alone. Besides NK cells, other immunocompetent cells present within the fraction of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were influenced by

  8. High resolution 4D HPCH experiment for sequential assignment of {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs via phosphodiester backbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Saurabh; Stanek, Jan [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre (Poland); Cevec, Mirko; Plavec, Janez [National Institute of Chemistry, Slovenian NMR Centre (Slovenia); Koźmiński, Wiktor, E-mail: kozmin@chem.uw.edu.pl [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre (Poland)

    2015-11-15

    The three-dimensional structure determination of RNAs by NMR spectroscopy requires sequential resonance assignment, often hampered by assignment ambiguities and limited dispersion of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shifts, especially of C4′/H4′. Here we present a novel through-bond 4D HPCH NMR experiment involving phosphate backbone where C4′–H4′ correlations are resolved along the {sup 1}H3′–{sup 31}P spectral planes. The experiment provides high peak resolution and effectively removes ambiguities encountered during assignments. Enhanced peak dispersion is provided by the inclusion of additional {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H3′ dimensions and constant-time evolution of chemical shifts. High spectral resolution is obtained by using non-uniform sampling in three indirect dimensions. The experiment fully utilizes the isotopic {sup 13}C-labeling with evolution of C4′ carbons. Band selective {sup 13}C inversion pulses are used to achieve selectivity and prevent signal dephasing due to the C4′–C3′ and C4′–C5′ homonuclear couplings. Multiple quantum line narrowing is employed to minimize sensitivity loses. The 4D HPCH experiment is verified and successfully applied to a non-coding 34-nt RNA consisting typical structure elements and a 14-nt RNA hairpin capped by cUUCGg tetraloop.

  9. The application of cluster analysis in the intercomparison of loop structures in RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hung-Chung; Nagaswamy, Uma; Fox, George E

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a computational approach for the comparison and classification of RNA loop structures. Hairpin or interior loops identified in atomic resolution RNA structures were intercompared by conformational matching. The root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) values between all pairs of RNA fragments of interest, even if from different molecules, are calculated. Subsequently, cluster analysis is performed on the resulting matrix of RMSD distances using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA). The cluster analysis objectively reveals groups of folds that resemble one another. To demonstrate the utility of the approach, a comprehensive analysis of all the terminal hairpin tetraloops that have been observed in 15 RNA structures that have been determined by X-ray crystallography was undertaken. The method found major clusters corresponding to the well-known GNRA and UNCG types. In addition, two tetraloops with the unusual primary sequence UMAC (M is A or C) were successfully assigned to the GNRA cluster. Larger loop structures were also examined and the clustering results confirmed the occurrence of variations of the GNRA and UNCG tetraloops in these loops and provided a systematic means for locating them. Nineteen examples of larger loops that closely resemble either the GNRA or UNCG tetraloop were found in the large ribosomal RNAs. When the clustering approach was extended to include all structures in the SCOR database, novel relationships were detected including one between the ANYA motif and a less common folding of the GAAA tetraloop sequence.

  10. The stability of triplex DNA is affected by the stability of the underlying duplex

    OpenAIRE

    Rusling, David A.; Rachwal, Phillip A.; Brown, Tom; Fox, Keith R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We have studied the formation of DNA triple helices in different sequence contexts and show that, for the most stable triplexes, their apparent stability is affected by the stability of the underlying duplex. For a 14-mer parallel triplex-forming oligonucleotide (generating C+.GC and T.AT triplets) at pH 5.0 the Tm is more than 10?C lower with an intermolecular 14-mer duplex target, than it is with an intramolecular duplex, or one which is flanked by 6 GC base pairs at eit...

  11. Detecting Ricin: A Sensitive Luminescent Assay for Ricin A-chain Ribosome Depurination Kinetics+

    OpenAIRE

    Sturm, Matthew B.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2009-01-01

    Ricin is a family member of the lethal ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP) found in plants. Ricin toxin A-chain (RTA) from castor beans catalyzes the hydrolytic depurination of a single base from a GAGA tetraloop of eukaryotic ribosomal RNA to release a single adenine from the sarcin-ricin loop (SRL). Protein synthesis is inhibited by loss of elongation factor binding resulting in cell death. We report a sensitive coupled assay for the measurement of adenine released from ribosomes or small ...

  12. Enhancement of TFO Triplex Formation by Conjugation with Pyrene via Click Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yosuke; Tomizaki, Akira; Matsueda, Nozomu; Okamura, Hidenori; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the preparation of 14-mer triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) containing a 2-O-methyl-1-β-phenyl-α-propargyl-ribose unit, which was conjugated with azide-modified molecules via a click reaction. Modification of these TFOs with pyrene assisted triplex formation, improving the stability of the triplex DNA and the anti-proliferative effects against A549 cells. PMID:26521856

  13. Evaluation of The Interaction between Netropsin and Double Stranded DNA by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was applied to study the interaction between netropsin and a 14mer double stranded DNA (dsDNA). The binding constant of this interaction calculated from Scatchard plot was (1.07±0.10)×105 (mol/L)-1. The binding stoichiometry was 1:1. The use of polyacrylamide coated capillary showed better effect in the analysis of DNA than noncoated capillary.

  14. Cationic modified nucleic acids for use in DNA hairpins and parallel triplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomholt, Niels; Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard

    2011-01-01

    Non-nucleosidic DNA monomers comprising partially protonated amines at low pH have been designed and synthesized. The modifications were incorporated into DNA oligonucleotides via standard DNA phosphoramidite synthesis. The ability of cationic modifications to stabilize palindromic DNA hairpins and...... parallel triplexes were evaluated using gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism and thermal denaturation measurements. The non-nucleosidic modifications were found to increase the thermal stability of palindromic hairpins at pH 8.0 as compared with a nucleosidic tetraloop (TCTC). Incorporation of...

  15. LNA nucleotides improve cleavage efficiency of singular and binary hammerhead ribozymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Janne K; Lobedanz, Sune; Arar, Khalil;

    2007-01-01

    concentrations, it was found that insertion of LNA monomers into the substrate binding arms allowed these to be shortened and results in a very active enzyme under both single and multiple turnover conditions. Incorporation of a mix of LNA and DNA residues further increased the multiple turnover cleavage...... activity. At high Mg(2+) concentrations or high substrate and ribozyme concentrations, the enhancing effect of LNA incorporation was even more prominent. Using LNA in the stem of Helix II diminished cleavage activity, but allowed deletion of the tetra-loop and thus separating the ribozyme into two...

  16. Targeting membrane heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) on tumors by cmHsp70.1 antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Stangl, Stefan; Gehrmann, Mathias; Riegger, Julia; Kuhs, Kristin; Riederer, Isabelle; Sievert, Wolfgang; Hube, Kathrin; Mocikat, Ralph; Dressel, Ralf; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pockley, Alan G.; Friedrich, Lars; Vigh, Laszlo; Skerra, Arne; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    Immunization of mice with a 14-mer peptide TKDNNLLGRFELSG, termed “TKD,” comprising amino acids 450–461 (aa450–461) in the C terminus of inducible Hsp70, resulted in the generation of an IgG1 mouse mAb cmHsp70.1. The epitope recognized by cmHsp70.1 mAb, which has been confirmed to be located in the TKD sequence by SPOT analysis, is frequently detectable on the cell surface of human and mouse tumors, but not on isogenic cells and normal tissues, and membrane Hsp70 might thus serve as a tumor-s...

  17. Four small puzzles that Rosetta doesn't solve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiju Das

    Full Text Available A complete macromolecule modeling package must be able to solve the simplest structure prediction problems. Despite recent successes in high resolution structure modeling and design, the Rosetta software suite fares poorly on small protein and RNA puzzles, some as small as four residues. To illustrate these problems, this manuscript presents Rosetta results for four well-defined test cases: the 20-residue mini-protein Trp cage, an even smaller disulfide-stabilized conotoxin, the reactive loop of a serine protease inhibitor, and a UUCG RNA tetraloop. In contrast to previous Rosetta studies, several lines of evidence indicate that conformational sampling is not the major bottleneck in modeling these small systems. Instead, approximations and omissions in the Rosetta all-atom energy function currently preclude discriminating experimentally observed conformations from de novo models at atomic resolution. These molecular "puzzles" should serve as useful model systems for developers wishing to make foundational improvements to this powerful modeling suite.

  18. Bran data of total flavonoid and total phenolic contents, oxygen radical absorbance capacity, and profiles of proanthocyanidins and whole grain physical traits of 32 red and purple rice varieties

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    Ming-Hsuan Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemicals in red and purple bran rice have potential health benefit to humans. We determined the phytochemicals in brans of 32 red and purple global rice varieties. The description of the origin and physical traits of the whole grain (color, length, width, thickness and 100-kernel weight of this germplasm collection are provided along with data of total flavonoid and total phenolic contents, oxygen radical absorbance capacity and total proanthocyanidin contents. The contents and proportions of individual oligomers, from degree of polymerization of monomers to 14-mers, and polymers in bran of these 32 rice varieties are presented (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.04.004 [1].

  19. Study of Interaction between Red-tide Toxin, Domoic Acid and Double -stranded DNA by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da Zhi LI; Xin Ya HE; Hui WANG; Li SUN; Bing Cheng LIN

    2004-01-01

    The interactions between amnesic red-tide toxin, domoic acid (DA) and 14mer double-stranded DNA (dsDNA with three kinds of sequences) were studied by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). For the dsDNA with a sequence of 5'-CCCCCTATACCCGC-3', the amount of free dsDNA decreases with the increase of added DA; and the signal of DA-dsDNA complex was observed. Meanwhile, the other two dsDNAs, 5'-(C)12GC-3' and 5'-(AT)7-3', the existence of DA could not lead to the change of dsDNA signal and indicated that there is no interaction between DA and these two dsDNAs.

  20. Bran data of total flavonoid and total phenolic contents, oxygen radical absorbance capacity, and profiles of proanthocyanidins and whole grain physical traits of 32 red and purple rice varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Hsuan; McClung, Anna M; Bergman, Christine J

    2016-09-01

    Phytochemicals in red and purple bran rice have potential health benefit to humans. We determined the phytochemicals in brans of 32 red and purple global rice varieties. The description of the origin and physical traits of the whole grain (color, length, width, thickness and 100-kernel weight) of this germplasm collection are provided along with data of total flavonoid and total phenolic contents, oxygen radical absorbance capacity and total proanthocyanidin contents. The contents and proportions of individual oligomers, from degree of polymerization of monomers to 14-mers, and polymers in bran of these 32 rice varieties are presented (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.04.004) [1]. PMID:27257615

  1. Biopanning and characterization of peptides with Fe3O4 nanoparticles-binding capability via phage display random peptide library technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Fei; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; Li, Yucan; Hu, Yang; Huang, Zhongbin; Liao, Xiaoming; Yao, Yadong; Chen, Xianchun

    2016-05-01

    Functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in biomedical applications. A proper functionalization of NPs can improve biocompatibility, avoid a loss of bioactivity, and further endow NPs with unique performances. Modification with vairous specific binding biomolecules from random biological libraries has been explored. In this work, two 7-mer peptides with sequences of HYIDFRW and TVNFKLY were selected from a phage display random peptide library by using ferromagnetic NPs as targets, and were verified to display strong binding affinity to Fe3O4 NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, fluorescence microscopy, thermal analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of peptides on the surface of Fe3O4 NPs. Sequence analyses revealed that the probable binding mechanism between the peptide and Fe3O4 NPs might be driven by Pearson hard acid-hard base specific interaction and hydrogen bonds, accompanied with hydrophilic interactions and non-specific electrostatic attractions. The cell viability assay indicated a good cytocompatibility of peptide-bound Fe3O4 NPs. Furthermore, TVNFKLY peptide and an ovarian tumor cell A2780 specific binding peptide (QQTNWSL) were conjugated to afford a liner 14-mer peptide (QQTNWSLTVNFKLY). The binding and targeting studies showed that 14-mer peptide was able to retain both the strong binding ability to Fe3O4 NPs and the specific binding ability to A2780 cells. The results suggested that the Fe3O4-binding peptides would be of great potential in the functionalization of Fe3O4 NPs for the tumor-targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:26896661

  2. Replication Bypass of the trans-4-Hydroxynonenal-Derived (6S,8R,11S)-1,N[superscript 2]-Deoxyguanosine DNA Adduct by the Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Polymerase IV

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    Banerjee, Surajit; Christov, Plamen P.; Kozekova, Albena; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; Egli, Martin; Stone, Michael P. (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    trans-4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) is the major peroxidation product of {omega}-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in vivo. Michael addition of the N{sub 2}-amino group of dGuo to HNE followed by ring closure of N1 onto the aldehyde results in four diastereomeric 1,N{sub 2}-dGuo (1,N{sub 2}-HNE-dGuo) adducts. The (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct was incorporated into the 18-mer templates 5'-d(TCATXGAATCCTTCCCCC)-3' and d(TCACXGAATCCTTCCCCC)-3', where X = (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct. These differed in the identity of the template 5'-neighbor base, which was either Thy or Cyt, respectively. Each of these templates was annealed with either a 13-mer primer 5'-d(GGGGGAAGGATTC)-3' or a 14-mer primer 5'-d(GGGGGAAGGATTCC)-3'. The addition of dNTPs to the 13-mer primer allowed analysis of dNTP insertion opposite to the (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct, whereas the 14-mer primer allowed analysis of dNTP extension past a primed (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo:dCyd pair. The Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA polymerase IV (Dpo4) belongs to the Y-family of error-prone polymerases. Replication bypass studies in vitro reveal that this polymerase inserted dNTPs opposite the (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct in a sequence-specific manner. If the template 5'-neighbor base was dCyt, the polymerase inserted primarily dGTP, whereas if the template 5'-neighbor base was dThy, the polymerase inserted primarily dATP. The latter event would predict low levels of Gua {yields} Thy mutations during replication bypass when the template 5'-neighbor base is dThy. When presented with a primed (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo:dCyd pair, the polymerase conducted full-length primer extension. Structures for ternary (Dpo4-DNA-dNTP) complexes with all four template-primers were obtained. For the 18-mer:13-mer template-primers in which the polymerase was confronted with the (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct, the (6S,8R,11S)-1,N

  3. An RNA-aptamer-based two-color CRISPR labeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyuan; Su, Jun-Han; Zhang, Feng; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The spatial organization and dynamics of chromatin play important roles in essential biological functions. However, direct visualization of endogenous genomic loci in living cells has proven to be laborious until the recent development of CRISPR-Cas9-based chromatin labeling methods. These methods rely on the recognition of specific DNA sequences by CRISPR single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and fluorescent–protein-fused catalytically inactive Cas9 to label specific chromatin loci in cells. Previously, multicolor chromatin labeling has been achieved using orthogonal Cas9 proteins from different bacterial species fused to different fluorescent proteins. Here we report the development of an alternative two-color CRISPR labeling method using only the well-characterized Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9, by incorporating MS2 or PP7 RNA aptamers into the sgRNA. The MS2 or PP7 aptamers then recruit the corresponding MS2 or PP7 coat proteins fused with different fluorescent proteins to the target genomic loci. Here we demonstrate specific and orthogonal two-color labeling of repetitive sequences in living human cells using this method. By attaching the MS2 or PP7 aptamers to different locations on the sgRNA, we found that extending the tetraloop and stem loop 2 of the sgRNA with MS2 or PP7 aptamers enhances the signal-to-background ratio of chromatin imaging. PMID:27229896

  4. Detecting ricin: sensitive luminescent assay for ricin A-chain ribosome depurination kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Matthew B; Schramm, Vern L

    2009-04-15

    Ricin is a family member of the lethal ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP) found in plants. Ricin toxin A-chain (RTA) from castor beans catalyzes the hydrolytic depurination of a single base from a GAGA tetraloop of eukaryotic rRNA to release a single adenine from the sarcin-ricin loop (SRL). Protein synthesis is inhibited by loss of the elongation factor binding site resulting in cell death. We report a sensitive coupled assay for the measurement of adenine released from ribosomes or small stem-loop RNAs by RTA catalysis. Adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (APRTase) and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) convert adenine to ATP for quantitation by firefly luciferase. The resulting AMP is cycled to ATP to give sustained luminescence proportional to adenine concentration. Subpicomole adenine quantitation permits the action of RTA on eukaryotic ribosomes to be followed in continuous, high-throughput assays. Facile analysis of RIP catalytic activity will have applications in plant toxin detection, inhibitor screens, mechanistic analysis of depurinating agents on oligonucleotides and intact ribosomes, and in cancer immunochemotherapy. Kinetic analysis of the catalytic action of RTA on rabbit reticulocyte 80S ribosomes establishes a catalytic efficiency of 2.6 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), a diffusion limited reaction indicating catalytic perfection even with large reactants. PMID:19364139

  5. Modelling transcriptional interference and DNA looping in gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Ian B; Shearwin, Keith E; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-06-22

    We describe a hybrid statistical mechanical and dynamical approach for modelling the formation of closed, open and elongating complexes of RNA polymerase, the interactions of these polymerases to produce transcriptional interference, and the regulation of these processes by a DNA-binding and DNA-looping regulatory protein. As a model system, we have used bacteriophage 186, for which genetic, biochemical and structural studies have suggested that the CI repressor binds as a 14-mer to form alternative DNA-looped complexes, and activates lysogenic transcription indirectly by relieving transcriptional interference caused by the convergent lytic promoter. The modelling showed that the original mechanisms proposed to explain this relief of transcriptional interference are not consistent with the available in vivo reporter data. However, a good fit to the reporter data was given by a revised model that incorporates a novel predicted regulatory mechanism: that RNA polymerase bound at the lysogenic promoter protects itself from transcriptional interference by recruiting CI to the lytic promoter. This mechanism and various estimates of in vivo biochemical parameters for the 186 CI system should be testable. Our results demonstrate the power of mathematical modelling for the extraction of detailed biochemical information from in vivo data. PMID:17498740

  6. Expanding the amino acid repertoire of ribosomal polypeptide synthesis via the artificial division of codon boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwane, Yoshihiko; Hitomi, Azusa; Murakami, Hiroshi; Katoh, Takayuki; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    In ribosomal polypeptide synthesis the library of amino acid building blocks is limited by the manner in which codons are used. Of the proteinogenic amino acids, 18 are coded for by multiple codons and therefore many of the 61 sense codons can be considered redundant. Here we report a method to reduce the redundancy of codons by artificially dividing codon boxes to create vacant codons that can then be reassigned to non-proteinogenic amino acids and thereby expand the library of genetically encoded amino acids. To achieve this, we reconstituted a cell-free translation system with 32 in vitro transcripts of transfer RNASNN (tRNASNN) (S = G or C), assigning the initiator and 20 elongator amino acids. Reassignment of three redundant codons was achieved by replacing redundant tRNASNNs with tRNASNNs pre-charged with non-proteinogenic amino acids. As a demonstration, we expressed a 32-mer linear peptide that consists of 20 proteinogenic and three non-proteinogenic amino acids, and a 14-mer macrocyclic peptide that contains more than four non-proteinogenic amino acids.

  7. Determination of site selectivity of different carcinogens for preferential mutational hot spots in oligonucleotide fragments by ion-pair reversed-phase nano liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vaneet K; Xiong, Wennan; Glick, James; Vouros, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ion-pair reversed-phase nano liquid chromatography coupled with nanospray ion trap mass spectrometry was used to investigate site selectivity of the known carcinogens N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene, N-hydroxy-4-aminobiphenyl and (+/-)-anti-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide with the synthetic double-strand 14-mer long oligonucleotide fragment of the p53 gene containing two mutational hot-spot codons (5'-P-ACC155 CGC156 GTC157 CGC158 GC/5'-GCG CGG ACG CGG GT). The investigation was performed using a monolithic polystyrene divinylbenzene capillary column and triethylammonium bicarbonate as an ion-pair reagent. The exact location of the carcinogen on the modified oligonucleotide backbone was determined using characteristic collision-induced dissociation fragmentation patterns obtained under negative-ion mode ionization. In all these cases, the adducted, isomeric oligonucleotides formed were chromatographically resolved and structural identification was performed without any prior deoxyribonucleic acid cleavage or hydrolysis. The knowledge of the site specificity of a carcinogen, especially at purported mutational hot spots, is of paramount importance (1) in establishing the identity of biomarkers for an early risk assessment of the formed DNA adducts, (2) developing repair mechanisms for the formed carcinogen adducted DNA, and (3) understanding the nature of the covalent bond formed and mapping the frequency of the adduction process. PMID:24881456

  8. Liquid crystal ordering of DNA and RNA oligomers with partially overlapping sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have recently shown that solutions of very short double-stranded B-DNA and A-RNA, down to six base pairs in length, can self-organize into chiral nematic and columnar liquid crystal (LC) phases. These observations were made on fully complementary sequences forming duplexes with blunt ends, where the LC ordering is due to base stacking forces promoting end-to-end aggregation of duplexes into living-polymer-type structures. Here we report LC formation in solutions of DNA and RNA 14mers forming double helices having single-stranded dangling ends that are 'sticky', i.e., mutually complementary with similar ends on other duplexes. This finding widens the conditions for spontaneous long range ordering in oligomeric nucleic acids, thus strengthening the notion that nucleic acids have remarkable self-assembly capability. Quantitative analysis of the phase diagram enables the extraction, within a nearest-neighbor interaction approximation, of the free energy associated with the pairing and stacking of nucleobases.

  9. Quantitative analysis of the ion-dependent folding stability of DNA triplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gengsheng; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2011-12-01

    A DNA triplex is formed through binding of a third strand to the major groove of a duplex. Due to the high charge density of a DNA triplex, metal ions are critical for its stability. We recently developed the tightly bound ion (TBI) model for ion-nucleic acids interactions. The model accounts for the potential correlation and fluctuations of the ion distribution. We now apply the TBI model to analyze the ion dependence of the thermodynamic stability for DNA triplexes. We focus on two experimentally studied systems: a 24-base DNA triplex and a pair of interacting 14-base triplexes. Our theoretical calculations for the number of bound ions indicate that the TBI model provides improved predictions for the number of bound ions than the classical Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. The improvement is more significant for a triplex, which has a higher charge density than a duplex. This is possibly due to the higher ion concentration around the triplex and hence a stronger ion correlation effect for a triplex. In addition, our analysis for the free energy landscape for a pair of 14-mer triplexes immersed in an ionic solution shows that divalent ions could induce an attractive force between the triplexes. Furthermore, we investigate how the protonated cytosines in the triplexes affect the stability of the triplex helices.

  10. Quantitative analysis of the ion-dependent folding stability of DNA triplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A DNA triplex is formed through binding of a third strand to the major groove of a duplex. Due to the high charge density of a DNA triplex, metal ions are critical for its stability. We recently developed the tightly bound ion (TBI) model for ion–nucleic acids interactions. The model accounts for the potential correlation and fluctuations of the ion distribution. We now apply the TBI model to analyze the ion dependence of the thermodynamic stability for DNA triplexes. We focus on two experimentally studied systems: a 24-base DNA triplex and a pair of interacting 14-base triplexes. Our theoretical calculations for the number of bound ions indicate that the TBI model provides improved predictions for the number of bound ions than the classical Poisson–Boltzmann (PB) equation. The improvement is more significant for a triplex, which has a higher charge density than a duplex. This is possibly due to the higher ion concentration around the triplex and hence a stronger ion correlation effect for a triplex. In addition, our analysis for the free energy landscape for a pair of 14-mer triplexes immersed in an ionic solution shows that divalent ions could induce an attractive force between the triplexes. Furthermore, we investigate how the protonated cytosines in the triplexes affect the stability of the triplex helices

  11. A temperature-jump NMR probe setup using rf heating optimized for the analysis of temperature-induced biomacromolecular kinetic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinnenthal, Jörg; Wagner, Dominic; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Krahn, Alexander; Engelke, Frank; Schwalbe, Harald

    2015-02-01

    A novel temperature jump (T-jump) probe operational at B0 fields of 600 MHz (14.1 Tesla) with an integrated cage radio-frequency (rf) coil for rapid (coil" designed for generating rf-electric fields of 190-220 MHz across a lossy dielectric sample and an outer two coil assembly for 1H-, 2H- and 15N-nuclei. High B0 field homogeneities (0.7 Hz at 600 MHz) are combined with high heating rates (20-25 K/s) and only small temperature gradients (coil is under control of a high power rf-amplifier within the NMR console and can therefore easily be accessed by the pulse programmer. Furthermore, implementation of a real-time setup including synchronization of the NMR spectrometer's air flow heater with the rf-heater used to maintain the temperature of the sample is described. Finally, the applicability of the real-time T-jump setup for the investigation of biomolecular kinetic processes in the second-to-minute timescale is demonstrated for samples of a model 14mer DNA hairpin and a 15N-selectively labeled 40nt hsp17-RNA thermometer.

  12. The Runt domain of AML1 (RUNX1) binds a sequence-conserved RNA motif that mimics a DNA element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Junichi; Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Amano, Ryo; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Sakamoto, Taiichi; Kozu, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) is a key transcription factor for hematopoiesis that binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. Aberrations in the AML1 gene are frequently found in human leukemia. To better understand AML1 and its potential utility for diagnosis and therapy, we obtained RNA aptamers that bind specifically to the AML1 Runt domain. Enzymatic probing and NMR analyses revealed that Apt1-S, which is a truncated variant of one of the aptamers, has a CACG tetraloop and two stem regions separated by an internal loop. All the isolated aptamers were found to contain the conserved sequence motif 5′-NNCCAC-3′ and 5′-GCGMGN′N′-3′ (M:A or C; N and N′ form Watson–Crick base pairs). The motif contains one AC mismatch and one base bulged out. Mutational analysis of Apt1-S showed that three guanines of the motif are important for Runt binding as are the three guanines of RDE, which are directly recognized by three arginine residues of the Runt domain. Mutational analyses of the Runt domain revealed that the amino acid residues used for Apt1-S binding were similar to those used for RDE binding. Furthermore, the aptamer competed with RDE for binding to the Runt domain in vitro. These results demonstrated that the Runt domain of the AML1 protein binds to the motif of the aptamer that mimics DNA. Our findings should provide new insights into RNA function and utility in both basic and applied sciences. PMID:23709277

  13. Processing of nuclear viroids in vivo: an interplay between RNA conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Eugenia Gas

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Replication of viroids, small non-protein-coding plant pathogenic RNAs, entails reiterative transcription of their incoming single-stranded circular genomes, to which the (+ polarity is arbitrarily assigned, cleavage of the oligomeric strands of one or both polarities to unit-length, and ligation to circular RNAs. While cleavage in chloroplastic viroids (family Avsunviroidae is mediated by hammerhead ribozymes, where and how cleavage of oligomeric (+ RNAs of nuclear viroids (family Pospiviroidae occurs in vivo remains controversial. Previous in vitro data indicated that a hairpin capped by a GAAA tetraloop is the RNA motif directing cleavage and a loop E motif ligation. Here we have re-examined this question in vivo, taking advantage of earlier findings showing that dimeric viroid (+ RNAs of the family Pospiviroidae transgenically expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana are processed correctly. Using this methodology, we have mapped the processing site of three members of this family at equivalent positions of the hairpin I/double-stranded structure that the upper strand and flanking nucleotides of the central conserved region (CCR can form. More specifically, from the effects of 16 mutations on Citrus exocortis viroid expressed transgenically in A. thaliana, we conclude that the substrate for in vivo cleavage is the conserved double-stranded structure, with hairpin I potentially facilitating the adoption of this structure, whereas ligation is determined by loop E and flanking nucleotides of the two CCR strands. These results have deep implications on the underlying mechanism of both processing reactions, which are most likely catalyzed by enzymes different from those generally assumed: cleavage by a member of the RNase III family, and ligation by an RNA ligase distinct from the only one characterized so far in plants, thus predicting the existence of at least a second plant RNA ligase.

  14. Solution NMR characterization of chemokine CXCL8/IL-8 monomer and dimer binding to glycosaminoglycans: structural plasticity mediates differential binding interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Prem Raj B; Mosier, Philip D; Desai, Umesh R; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2015-11-15

    Chemokine CXCL8/interleukin-8 (IL-8) plays a crucial role in directing neutrophils and oligodendrocytes to combat infection/injury and tumour cells in metastasis development. CXCL8 exists as monomers and dimers and interaction of both forms with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) mediate these diverse cellular processes. However, very little is known regarding the structural basis underlying CXCL8-GAG interactions. There are conflicting reports on the affinities, geometry and whether the monomer or dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand. To resolve these issues, we characterized the binding of a series of heparin-derived oligosaccharides [heparin disaccharide (dp2), heparin tetrasaccharide (dp4), heparin octasaccharide (dp8) and heparin 14-mer (dp14)] to the wild-type (WT) dimer and a designed monomer using solution NMR spectroscopy. The pattern and extent of binding-induced chemical shift perturbation (CSP) varied between dimer and monomer and between longer and shorter oligosaccharides. NMR-based structural models show that different interaction modes coexist and that the nature of interactions varied between monomer and dimer and oligosaccharide length. MD simulations indicate that the binding interface is structurally plastic and provided residue-specific details of the dynamic nature of the binding interface. Binding studies carried out under conditions at which WT CXCL8 exists as monomers and dimers provide unambiguous evidence that the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand. Together, our data indicate that a set of core residues function as the major recognition/binding site, a set of peripheral residues define the various binding geometries and that the structural plasticity of the binding interface allows multiplicity of binding interactions. We conclude that structural plasticity most probably regulates in vivo CXCL8 monomer/dimer-GAG interactions and function.

  15. Solid-Phase Synthesis and Evaluation of Glycopeptide Fragments from Rat Epididymal Cysteine-Rich Secretory Protein-1 (Crisp-1 ‡

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Barany

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Three 18-residue peptides with the sequence Glp-Asp-Thr-Thr-Asp-Glu-Trp-Asp-Arg-Asp-Leu-Glu-Asn-Leu-Ser-Thr-Thr-Lys, taken from the N-terminus of the rat epididymal cysteine-rich secretory protein (Crisp-1 that is important in the fertilization process, were prepared by Fmoc solid-phase synthesis using a convergent strategy. These peptides were the parent sequence, plus two possible α-O-linked TN antigen-containing glycopeptides with a Thr(α-D-GalNAc residue in place of either Thr3 or Thr4. During chain assembly, two deletion peptides [des-Asp2 and des-Thr(Ac3-α-D-GalNAc] and one terminated peptide [N-acetylated 14-mer] arose, as did several peptides in which aspartimide formation had occurred at each of the four possible positions in the sequence. These by-products totaled ~20% of the desired product; they were recognized by HPLC and ESI-MS and removed during the intermediate purifications. Final products, obtained in 15-21% overall yields, were characterized by HPLC purities and ESI-MS. Circular dichroism (CD spectra for all three purified peptides, recorded in pure water and in trifluoroethanol-H2O (1:1, revealed that the presence of a sugar moiety does not significantly impact the sampled conformations. Future biological evaluation could elucidate the nature and locus of sugar modification of Crisp-1, and provide insight as to why Crisp-1 protein E binds sperm irreversibly, in contrast to protein D that lacks a sugar near the N-terminus and only binds sperm loosely.

  16. CENP-B box and pJalpha sequence distribution in human alpha satellite higher-order repeats (HOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosandić, Marija; Paar, Vladimir; Basar, Ivan; Gluncić, Matko; Pavin, Nenad; Pilas, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Using our Key String Algorithm (KSA) to analyze Build 35.1 assembly we determined consensus alpha satellite higher-order repeats (HOR) and consensus distributions of CENP-B box and pJalpha motif in human chromosomes 1, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 17, 19, and X. We determined new suprachromosomal family (SF) assignments: SF5 for 13mer (2211 bp), SF5 for 13mer (2214 bp), SF2 for 11mer (1869 bp), SF1 for 18mer (3058 bp), SF3 for 12mer (2047 bp), SF3 for 14mer (2379 bp), and SF5 for 17mer (2896 bp) in chromosomes 4, 5, 8, 10, 11, 17, and 19, respectively. In chromosome 5 we identified SF5 13mer without any CENP-B box and pJalpha motif, highly homologous (96%) to 13mer in chromosome 19. Additionally, in chromosome 19 we identified new SF5 17mer with one CENP-B box and pJalpha motif, aligned to 13mer by deleting four monomers. In chromosome 11 we identified SF3 12mer, homologous to 12mer in chromosome X. In chromosome 10 we identified new SF1 18mer with eight CENP-B boxes in every other monomer (except one). In chromosome 4 we identified new SF5 13mer with CENP-B box in three consecutive monomers. We found four exceptions to the rule that CENP-B box belongs to type B and pJalpha motif to type A monomers. PMID:17115329

  17. Targeting membrane heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) on tumors by cmHsp70.1 antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangl, Stefan; Gehrmann, Mathias; Riegger, Julia; Kuhs, Kristin; Riederer, Isabelle; Sievert, Wolfgang; Hube, Kathrin; Mocikat, Ralph; Dressel, Ralf; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pockley, Alan G.; Friedrich, Lars; Vigh, Laszlo; Skerra, Arne; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Immunization of mice with a 14-mer peptide TKDNNLLGRFELSG, termed “TKD,” comprising amino acids 450–461 (aa450–461) in the C terminus of inducible Hsp70, resulted in the generation of an IgG1 mouse mAb cmHsp70.1. The epitope recognized by cmHsp70.1 mAb, which has been confirmed to be located in the TKD sequence by SPOT analysis, is frequently detectable on the cell surface of human and mouse tumors, but not on isogenic cells and normal tissues, and membrane Hsp70 might thus serve as a tumor-specific target structure. As shown for human tumors, Hsp70 is associated with cholesterol-rich microdomains in the plasma membrane of mouse tumors. Herein, we show that the cmHsp70.1 mAb can selectively induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of membrane Hsp70+ mouse tumor cells by unstimulated mouse spleen cells. Tumor killing could be further enhanced by activating the effector cells with TKD and IL-2. Three consecutive injections of the cmHsp70.1 mAb into mice bearing CT26 tumors significantly inhibited tumor growth and enhanced the overall survival. These effects were associated with infiltrations of NK cells, macrophages, and granulocytes. The Hsp70 specificity of the ADCC response was confirmed by preventing the antitumor response in tumor-bearing mice by coinjecting the cognate TKD peptide with the cmHsp70.1 mAb, and by blocking the binding of cmHsp70.1 mAb to CT26 tumor cells using either TKD peptide or the C-terminal substrate-binding domain of Hsp70. PMID:21187371

  18. HLA-B27, but not HLA-B7, immunodominance to influenza is ERAP dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Ali; Lin, Aifeng; Gracey, Eric; Streutker, Catherine J; Inman, Robert D

    2014-06-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum-associated aminopeptidase-1 (ERAP1) plays a critical role in the processing of peptides prior to binding to MHC class I molecules. In this article, we show for the first time, to our knowledge, that the HLA-B27 immunodominant influenza nucleoprotein (NP) 383-391 epitope is made as an N-terminally extended 14-mer before it is trimmed by ERAP. In the absence of ERAP, there is a significant reduction in the CTL response to the B27/NP383-391 epitope in influenza A (flu)-infected B27/ERAP(-/-) mice. With the use of tetramer staining, the number of naive CD8(+) T cells expressing TCR Vβ8.1 in B27/ERAP(-/-) transgenic mice is significantly lower than that seen in B27/ERAP(+/+) mice. HLA-B27 surface expression in naive and flu-infected B27/ERAP(-/-) mice is also lower than the expression seen for the same allele in naive and flu-infected B27/ERAP(+/+) mice. In contrast, surface expression of HLA-B7 was unaffected by the absence of ERAP in B7/ERAP(-/-) transgenic mice. The B7-restricted NP418-426 CTL response in flu-infected B7/ERAP(-/-) and B7/ERAP(+/+) mice was also similar. These results provide, to our knowledge, the first in vivo demonstration of ERAP functionally influencing host immune response in an HLA allele-specific manner. This principle has relevance to diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis, in which HLA-B27 and ERAP jointly contribute to disease predisposition. PMID:24835397

  19. Assembly and Structure of alpha-helical Peptide Films on Hydrophobic Fluorocarbon Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidner, T.; Samual, N; McCrea, K; Gamble, L; Ward, R; Castner, D

    2010-01-01

    The structure, orientation, and formation of amphiphilic {alpha}-helix model peptide films on fluorocarbon surfaces has been monitored with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The {alpha}-helix peptide is a 14-mer of hydrophilic lysine and hydrophobic leucine residues with a hydrophobic periodicity of 3.5. This periodicity yields a rigid amphiphilic peptide with leucine and lysine side chains located on opposite sides. XPS composition analysis confirms the formation of a peptide film that covers about 75% of the surface. NEXAFS data are consistent with chemically intact adsorption of the peptides. A weak linear dichroism of the amide {pi}* is likely due to the broad distribution of amide bond orientations inherent to the {alpha}-helical secondary structure. SFG spectra exhibit strong peaks near 2865 and 2935 cm{sup -1} related to aligned leucine side chains interacting with the hydrophobic surface. Water modes near 3200 and 3400 cm{sup -1} indicate ordering of water molecules in the adsorbed-peptide fluorocarbon surface interfacial region. Amide I peaks observed near 1655 cm{sup -1} confirm that the secondary structure is preserved in the adsorbed peptide. A kinetic study of the film formation process using XPS and SFG showed rapid adsorption of the peptides followed by a longer assembly process. Peptide SFG spectra taken at the air-buffer interface showed features related to well-ordered peptide films. Moving samples through the buffer surface led to the transfer of ordered peptide films onto the substrates.

  20. Predicted Coverage and Immuno-Safety of a Recombinant C-Repeat Region Based Streptococcus pyogenes Vaccine Candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeilly, Celia; Cosh, Samantha; Vu, Therese; Nichols, Jemma; Henningham, Anna; Hofmann, Andreas; Fane, Anne; Smeesters, Pierre R; Rush, Catherine M; Hafner, Louise M; Ketheesan, Natkuman; Sriprakash, Kadaba S; McMillan, David J

    2016-01-01

    The C-terminal region of the M-protein of Streptococcus pyogenes is a major target for vaccine development. The major feature is the C-repeat region, consisting of 35-42 amino acid repeat units that display high but not perfect identity. SV1 is a S. pyogenes vaccine candidate that incorporates five 14mer amino acid sequences (called J14i variants) from differing C-repeat units in a single recombinant construct. Here we show that the J14i variants chosen for inclusion in SV1 are the most common variants in a dataset of 176 unique M-proteins. Murine antibodies raised against SV1 were shown to bind to each of the J14i variants present in SV1, as well as variants not present in the vaccine. Antibodies raised to the individual J14i variants were also shown to bind to multiple but different combinations of J14i variants, supporting the underlying rationale for the design of SV1. A Lewis Rat Model of valvulitis was then used to assess the capacity of SV1 to induce deleterious immune response associated with rheumatic heart disease. In this model, both SV1 and the M5 positive control protein were immunogenic. Neither of these antibodies were cross-reactive with cardiac myosin or collagen. Splenic T cells from SV1/CFA and SV1/alum immunized rats did not proliferate in response to cardiac myosin or collagen. Subsequent histological examination of heart tissue showed that 4 of 5 mice from the M5/CFA group had valvulitis and inflammatory cell infiltration into valvular tissue, whereas mice immunised with SV1/CFA, SV1/alum showed no sign of valvulitis. These results suggest that SV1 is a safe vaccine candidate that will elicit antibodies that recognise the vast majority of circulating GAS M-types. PMID:27310707

  1. Cleavage of Model Substrates by Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 Reveals New Insights into Its Substrate Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhishek S.; Kosek, David; Biswas, Pradip K.; Gopalan, Venkat; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2016-01-01

    Two broad classes of RNase P trim the 5' leader of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs): ribonucleoprotein (RNP)- and proteinaceous (PRORP)-variants. These two RNase P types, which use different scaffolds for catalysis, reflect independent evolutionary paths. While the catalytic RNA-based RNP form is present in all three domains of life, the PRORP family is restricted to eukaryotes. To obtain insights on substrate recognition by PRORPs, we examined the 5' processing ability of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 (AtPRORP1) using a panel of pre-tRNASer variants and model hairpin-loop derivatives (pATSer type) that consist of the acceptor-T-stem stack and the T-/D-loop. Our data indicate the importance of the identity of N-1 (the residue immediately 5' to the cleavage site) and the N-1:N+73 base pair for cleavage rate and site selection of pre-tRNASer and pATSer. The nucleobase preferences that we observed mirror the frequency of occurrence in the complete suite of organellar pre-tRNAs in eight algae/plants that we analyzed. The importance of the T-/D-loop in pre-tRNASer for tight binding to AtPRORP1 is indicated by the 200-fold weaker binding of pATSer compared to pre-tRNASer, while the essentiality of the T-loop for cleavage is reflected by the near-complete loss of activity when a GAAA-tetraloop replaced the T-loop in pATSer. Substituting the 2'-OH at N-1 with 2'-H also resulted in no detectable cleavage, hinting at the possible role of this 2'-OH in coordinating Mg2+ ions critical for catalysis. Collectively, our results indicate similarities but also key differences in substrate recognition by the bacterial RNase P RNP and AtPRORP1: while both forms exploit the acceptor-T-stem stack and the elbow region in the pre-tRNA, the RNP form appears to require more recognition determinants for cleavage-site selection. PMID:27494328

  2. Cleavage of Model Substrates by Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 Reveals New Insights into Its Substrate Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Guanzhong; Chen, Tien-Hao; Srivastava, Abhishek S; Kosek, David; Biswas, Pradip K; Gopalan, Venkat; Kirsebom, Leif A

    2016-01-01

    Two broad classes of RNase P trim the 5' leader of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs): ribonucleoprotein (RNP)- and proteinaceous (PRORP)-variants. These two RNase P types, which use different scaffolds for catalysis, reflect independent evolutionary paths. While the catalytic RNA-based RNP form is present in all three domains of life, the PRORP family is restricted to eukaryotes. To obtain insights on substrate recognition by PRORPs, we examined the 5' processing ability of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 (AtPRORP1) using a panel of pre-tRNASer variants and model hairpin-loop derivatives (pATSer type) that consist of the acceptor-T-stem stack and the T-/D-loop. Our data indicate the importance of the identity of N-1 (the residue immediately 5' to the cleavage site) and the N-1:N+73 base pair for cleavage rate and site selection of pre-tRNASer and pATSer. The nucleobase preferences that we observed mirror the frequency of occurrence in the complete suite of organellar pre-tRNAs in eight algae/plants that we analyzed. The importance of the T-/D-loop in pre-tRNASer for tight binding to AtPRORP1 is indicated by the 200-fold weaker binding of pATSer compared to pre-tRNASer, while the essentiality of the T-loop for cleavage is reflected by the near-complete loss of activity when a GAAA-tetraloop replaced the T-loop in pATSer. Substituting the 2'-OH at N-1 with 2'-H also resulted in no detectable cleavage, hinting at the possible role of this 2'-OH in coordinating Mg2+ ions critical for catalysis. Collectively, our results indicate similarities but also key differences in substrate recognition by the bacterial RNase P RNP and AtPRORP1: while both forms exploit the acceptor-T-stem stack and the elbow region in the pre-tRNA, the RNP form appears to require more recognition determinants for cleavage-site selection. PMID:27494328

  3. Probing the Orientation and Conformation of alpha-Helix and beta-Strand Model Peptides on Self-Assembled Monolayers Using Sum Frequency Generation and NEXAFS Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidner, T.; Apte, J; Gamble, L; Castner, D

    2010-01-01

    The structure and orientation of amphiphilic {alpha}-helix and {beta}-strand model peptide films on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been studied with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The {alpha}-helix peptide is a 14-mer, and the {beta}-strand is a 15-mer of hydrophilic lysine and hydrophobic leucine residues with hydrophobic periodicities of 3.5 and 2, respectively. These periodicities result in the leucine side chains located on one side of the peptides and the lysine side chains on the other side. The SAMs were prepared from the assembly of either carboxylic acid- or methyl-terminated alkyl thiols onto gold surfaces. For SFG studies, the deuterated analog of the methyl SAM was used. SFG vibrational spectra in the C-H region of air-dried peptides films on both SAMs exhibit strong peaks near 2965, 2940, and 2875 cm{sup -1} related to ordered leucine side chains. The orientation of the leucine side chains was determined from the phase of these features relative to the nonresonant gold background. The relative phase for both the {alpha}-helix and {beta}-strand peptides showed that the leucine side chains were oriented away from the carboxylic acid SAM surface and oriented toward the methyl SAM surface. Amide I peaks observed near 1656 cm{sup -1} for the {alpha}-helix peptide confirm that the secondary structure is preserved on both SAMs. Strong linear dichroism related to the amide {pi}* orbital at 400.8 eV was observed in the nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS spectra for the adsorbed {beta}-strand peptides, suggesting that the peptide backbones are oriented parallel to the SAM surface with the side chains pointing toward or away from the interface. For the {alpha}-helix the dichroism of the amide {pi}* is significantly weaker, probably because of the broad distribution of amide bond orientations in the {alpha}-helix secondary structure.