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Sample records for 121ins2 heterozygosity reduced

  1. Surfactant Protein-B 121ins2 Heterozygosity, Reduced Pulmonary Function and COPD in Smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækvad-Hansen, Marie; Dahl, Morten; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne;

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE: Hereditary surfactant protein-B deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes fatal respiratory distress syndrome in newborns. Seventy percent of the cases of hereditary surfactant protein-B deficiency are caused by homozygosity for the 121ins2 mutation in the surfactant...... protein-B gene. Individuals heterozygous for this mutation have partial absence of surfactant protein-B and could be at risk of lung disease when exposed to additional risk factors for impaired surfactant function such as tobacco smoking. OBJECTIVES: To test whether individuals heterozygous for the 121ins...... and findings are limited to Danes/Europeans. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We identified 85 individuals heterozygous for the 121ins2 mutation. Smoking interacted statistically with the 121ins2 genotype in predicting FEV1%predicted(p=0.006), FVC%predicted(p=0.02) and FEV1/FVC(p=0.002), indicating...

  2. Reduced meiotic fitness in hybrids with heterozygosity for heterochromatin in the speciating Mus terricolor complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tikaram Sharma; Amit Bardhan; Min Bahadur

    2003-03-01

    Mus terricolor I, II and III are the three chromosomal species which differ in stable autosomal short-arm heterochromatin variations established in homozygous condition. Analysis of meiosis in the laboratorygenerated F1 male hybrids from crosses (both ways) between M. terricolor I and II and between M. terricolor I and III shows high frequencies of pairing abnormalities at pachytene. The backcross (N3 generation) male hybrids between M. terricolor I and II have meiotic abnormalities as in the F1 male hybrids, though to a lesser extent. They show difference in pairing abnormalities in the different karyotypic forms; the backcross hybrids heterozygous for the heterochromatic short arms have more anomalies compared to the homokaryotypic hybrids. This suggests a negative influence of the heterochromatin heterozygosity in meiotic pairing. The results indicate a role for heterochromatin variations in the development of a reproductive barrier in the speciating M. terricolor complex.

  3. Heterozygosity and extra-pair paternity: biased tests result from the use of shared markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Daniel P; Westneat, David F

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies of extra-pair paternity have found support for the idea that heterozygous males have an advantage in siring offspring. Most studies use DNA microsatellite loci to determine paternity and then use the same loci to estimate individual heterozygosity. However, because the likelihood of detecting extra-pair offspring depends on the combinations of parental alleles, it is possible that biases arise from particular allele combinations. This might produce false support for the influence of heterozygosity on mating behaviour. We used a simulation model to assess how large this bias might be. We found two sources of bias. First, we found a bias in the null hypothesis of a simple statistical test commonly used to test several predictions of the heterozygosity hypothesis. The use of randomization tests could eliminate this bias. Second, we found that using the same loci for both paternity and heterozygosity can cause an increase in results supporting the heterozygosity hypothesis when no effect of heterozygosity actually exists. This bias is reduced through the use of more markers with higher levels of polymorphism and heterozygosity, but can be eliminated entirely by using a separate set of markers to determine paternity and assess heterozygosity. The two sources of bias reduce evidence favouring the heterozygosity hypothesis, but do not negate all of the studies that support it. We suggest that further studies of heterozygosity and extra-pair paternity are important and likely to be informative, but our recommendations should be incorporated by researchers to improve the reliability of their conclusions.

  4. Imprinted survival genes preclude loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 7 in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Arnoud; Oosting, Jan; de Miranda, Noel Fcc; Zhang, Yinghui; Corver, Willem E; van de Water, Bob; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2016-09-01

    The genomes of a wide range of cancers, including colon, breast, and thyroid cancers, frequently show copy number gains of chromosome 7 and rarely show loss of heterozygosity. The molecular basis for this phenomenon is unknown. Strikingly, oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinomas can display an extreme genomic profile, with homozygosity of all chromosomes except for chromosome 7. The observation that homozygosity of chromosome 7 is never observed suggests that retention of heterozygosity is essential for cells. We hypothesized that cell survival genes are genetically imprinted on either of two copies of chromosome 7, which thwarts loss of heterozygosity at this chromosome in cancer cells. By employing a DNA methylation screen and gene expression analysis, we identified six imprinted genes that force retention of heterozygosity on chromosome 7. Subsequent knockdown of gene expression showed that CALCR, COPG2, GRB10, KLF14, MEST, and PEG10 were essential for cancer cell survival, resulting in reduced cell proliferation, G1 -phase arrest, and increased apoptosis. We propose that imprinted cell survival genes provide a genetic basis for retention of chromosome 7 heterozygosity in cancer cells. The monoallelically expressed cell survival genes identified in this study, and the cellular pathways that they are involved in, offer new therapeutic targets for the treatment of tumours showing retention of heterozygosity on chromosome 7. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27265324

  5. Heterozygosity is linked to the costs of immunity in nestling great tits (Parus major).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegeli, Beatrice; Saladin, Verena; Wegmann, Michèle; Richner, Heinz

    2013-11-01

    There is growing evidence that heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) are more pronounced under harsh conditions. Empirical evidence suggests a mediating effect of parasite infestation on the occurrence of HFCs. Parasites have the potential to mediate HFCs not only by generally causing high stress levels but also by inducing resource allocation tradeoffs between the necessary investments in immunity and other costly functions. To investigate the relative importance of these two mechanisms, we manipulated growth conditions of great tit nestlings by brood size manipulation, which modifies nestling competition, and simultaneously infested broods with ectoparasites. We investigated under which treatment conditions HFCs arise and, second, whether heterozygosity is linked to tradeoff decisions between immunity and growth. We classified microsatellites as neutral or presumed functional and analyzed these effects separately. Neutral heterozygosity was positively related to the immune response to a novel antigen in parasite-free nests, but not in infested nests. For nestlings with lower heterozygosity levels, the investments in immunity under parasite pressure came at the expenses of reduced feather growth, survival, and female body condition. Functional heterozygosity was negatively related to nestling immune response regardless of the growth conditions. These contrasting effects of functional and neutral markers might indicate different underlying mechanisms causing the HFCs. Our results confirm the importance of considering marker functionality in HFC studies and indicate that parasites mediate HFCs by influencing the costs of immune defense rather than by a general increase in environmental harshness levels.

  6. A new method to detect loss of heterozygosity using cohort heterozygosity comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is an important marker for one of the 'two-hits' required for tumor suppressor gene inactivation. Traditional methods for mapping LOH regions require the comparison of both tumor and patient-matched normal DNA samples. However, for many archival samples, patient-matched normal DNA is not available leading to the under-utilization of this important resource in LOH studies. Here we describe a new method for LOH analysis that relies on the genome-wide comparison of heterozygosity of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between cohorts of cases and un-matched healthy control samples. Regions of LOH are defined by consistent decreases in heterozygosity across a genetic region in the case cohort compared to the control cohort. DNA was collected from 20 Follicular Lymphoma (FL) tumor samples, 20 Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) tumor samples, neoplastic B-cells of 10 B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (B-CLL) patients and Buccal cell samples matched to 4 of these B-CLL patients. The cohort heterozygosity comparison method was developed and validated using LOH derived in a small cohort of B-CLL by traditional comparisons of tumor and normal DNA samples, and compared to the only alternative method for LOH analysis without patient matched controls. LOH candidate regions were then generated for enlarged cohorts of B-CLL, FL and DLBCL samples using our cohort heterozygosity comparison method in order to evaluate potential LOH candidate regions in these non-Hodgkin's lymphoma tumor subtypes. Using a small cohort of B-CLL samples with patient-matched normal DNA we have validated the utility of this method and shown that it displays more accuracy and sensitivity in detecting LOH candidate regions compared to the only alternative method, the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) method. Subsequently, using B-CLL, FL and DLBCL tumor samples we have utilised cohort heterozygosity comparisons to localise LOH candidate regions in these subtypes

  7. Effect of lead pollution on fitness and its dependence on heterozygosity in Drosophila subobscura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaskovic, Marija; Novicic, Zorana Kurbalija; Kenig, Bojan; Stamenkovic-Radak, Marina; Andjelkovic, Marko

    2015-12-01

    Lead is one of the most present contaminants in the environment, and different species respond differently to this type of polution. If combined with genomic stress, lead may act synergistically, causing significant decrease of fitness components. We used two genetically diverse Drosophila subobscura populations (regarding both putatively adaptive inversion and microsatellite loci polymorphisms) originating from two ecologically distinct habitats. To establish different levels of genome heterozygosity, series of intraline, intrapopulation and interpopulation crosses were made. The progeny were reared on a standard medium and a medium with 200 μg/mL of lead acetate. Development time was significantly extended to all groups reared on lead. The progeny of intraline crosses showed significantly extended development time compared to all other groups. The obtained results suggest that genome heterozygosity reduces the effect of lead pollution. PMID:26690519

  8. Genetic susceptibility to infectious disease in East African Shorthorn Zebu: a genome-wide analysis of the effect of heterozygosity and exotic introgression

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Gemma GR; Woolhouse, Mark EJ; Tapio, Miika; Mary N Mbole-Kariuki; Tad S. Sonstegard; Thumbi, Samuel M; Jennings, Amy E.; VAN WYK, ILANA CONRADIE; Chase-Topping, Margo; Kiara, Henry; TOYE, PHIL; Coetzer, Koos; deC Bronsvoort, Barend M; Hanotte, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Background Positive multi-locus heterozygosity-fitness correlations have been observed in a number of natural populations. They have been explained by the correlation between heterozygosity and inbreeding, and the negative effect of inbreeding on fitness (inbreeding depression). Exotic introgression in a locally adapted population has also been found to reduce fitness (outbreeding depression) through the breaking-up of co-adapted genes, or the introduction of non-locally adapted gene variants...

  9. Genetic susceptibility to infectious disease in East African Shorthorn Zebu: a genome-wide analysis of the effect of heterozygosity and exotic introgression

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Gemma G. R.; Woolhouse, Mark; Tapio, Miika; Mbole-Kariuki, Mary Ndila; Thumbi, Samuel Mwangi; Jennings, Amy; Conradie van Wyk, Ilana; Kiara, Henry; Toye, Philip G.; Coetzer, J.A.W.; Bronsvoort, Mark; Hanotte, Olivier; Sonstegard, Tad; Chase-Topping, Margo

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundPositive multi-locus heterozygosity-fitness correlations have been observed in a number of natural populations. They have been explained by the correlation between heterozygosity and inbreeding, and the negative effect of inbreeding on fitness (inbreeding depression). Exotic introgression in a locally adapted population has also been found to reduce fitness (outbreeding depression) through the breaking-up of co-adapted genes, or the introduction of non-locally adapted gene variants....

  10. Heterozygosity and Fixation Index for ABO Gene in Barak Valley Populations vis-a-vis a Few Exotic Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyo CHAKRABORTY

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In a genetic study of 26 human populations including 2 major endogamous populations (Hindus and Muslims of Barak Valley in Assam and 24 exotic populations, observed heterozygosity (Ho, fixation index (F and Panmictic index (P for ABO gene were estimated from gene frequency data to reveal the extent of inbreeding that has taken place in each population during evolution. Observed heterozygosity, a measure of genetic variation, ranged from 0.3254 to 0.6086 in these populations. Expected Hardy-Weinberg heterozygosity of ABO gene was estimated as 0.6666 assuming the occurrence of all the three alleles in equal frequency. Fixation index was the highest in the population of Sudan (51.18% followed by Australia (48.51% and Iceland (38.28% indicating the occurrence of high inbreeding and the presence of more homozygosity in these populations during evolution. But the fixation index was the lowest in the population of South China (8.70% followed by Central Asia (11.82% and Russia (12.96%. It suggested the occurrence of low inbreeding and hence more outbreeding in these populations resulting in the existence of more heterozygosity (high genetic variation in these populations. Panmictic index, a measure of outbreeding, is the opposite of fixation index and it varied from 48.82 (Sudan to 91.30% (South China. The population showing the highest fixation index recorded the lowest panmictic index and vice-versa. In evolutionary context, outbreeding in human populations would be more desirable to reduce the incidence of genetic diseases caused by recessive genes and to enhance heterozygosity for those loci for better adaptation of future generations, possibly at the cost of gradually increasing genetic load in the population.

  11. Inferring relationships between pairs of individuals from locus heterozygosities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spinetti Isabella

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The traditional exact method for inferring relationships between individuals from genetic data is not easily applicable in all situations that may be encountered in several fields of applied genetics. This study describes an approach that gives affordable results and is easily applicable; it is based on the probabilities that two individuals share 0, 1 or both alleles at a locus identical by state. Results We show that these probabilities (zi depend on locus heterozygosity (H, and are scarcely affected by variation of the distribution of allele frequencies. This allows us to obtain empirical curves relating zi's to H for a series of common relationships, so that the likelihood ratio of a pair of relationships between any two individuals, given their genotypes at a locus, is a function of a single parameter, H. Application to large samples of mother-child and full-sib pairs shows that the statistical power of this method to infer the correct relationship is not much lower than the exact method. Analysis of a large database of STR data proves that locus heterozygosity does not vary significantly among Caucasian populations, apart from special cases, so that the likelihood ratio of the more common relationships between pairs of individuals may be obtained by looking at tabulated zi values. Conclusions A simple method is provided, which may be used by any scientist with the help of a calculator or a spreadsheet to compute the likelihood ratios of common alternative relationships between pairs of individuals.

  12. Heterozygosity for a Bub1 mutation causes female-specific germ cell aneuploidy in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leland, Shawn; Nagarajan, Prabakaran; Polyzos, Aris; Thomas, Sharon; Samaan, George; Donnell, Robert; Marchetti, Francesco; Venkatachalam, Sundaresan

    2009-06-24

    Aneuploidy, the most common chromosomal abnormality at birth and the main ascertained cause of pregnancy loss in humans, originates primarily from chromosome segregation errors during oogenesis. Here we report that heterozygosity for a mutation in the mitotic checkpoint kinase gene, Bub1, induces aneuploidy in female germ cells of mice, and that the effect increases with advancing maternal age. Analysis of Bub1 heterozygous oocytes showed that aneuploidy occurred primarily during the first meiotic division and involved premature sister chromatid separation. Furthermore, aneuploidy was inherited in zygotes and resulted in the loss of embryos after implantation. The incidence of aneuploidy in zygotes was sufficient to explain the reduced litter size in matings with Bub1 heterozygous females. No effects were seen in germ cells from heterozygous males. These findings show that Bub1 dysfunction is linked to inherited aneuploidy in female germ cells and may contribute to the maternal age-related increase in aneuploidy and pregnancy loss.

  13. Heterozygosity-fitness correlations in a wild mammal population: accounting for parental and environmental effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annavi, Geetha; Newman, Christopher; Buesching, Christina D.; Macdonald, David W.; Burke, Terry; Dugdale, Hannah L.

    2014-01-01

    HFCs (heterozygosity-fitness correlations) measure the direct relationship between an individual's genetic diversity and fitness. The effects of parental heterozygosity and the environment on HFCs are currently under-researched. We investigated these in a high-density U. K. population of European ba

  14. Heterozygosity and orange coloration are associated in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdegen, M; Dudka, K; Radwan, J

    2014-01-01

    The good-genes-as-heterozygosity hypothesis predicts that more elaborate male sexual ornaments are associated with higher levels of heterozygosity. Recent theoretical work suggests that such associations are likely to arise in finite, structured populations. We investigated the correlation between multilocus heterozygosity (MLH), which was estimated using 13 microsatellite loci, and male coloration in a wild population of guppies (Poecilia reticulata), a model species in sexual selection research. We found that MLH was a significant predictor of the relative area of orange spots, a trait that is subject to strong female preference in this species. Neither the relative area of black spots nor the number of black or orange spots was significantly correlated with MLH. We found no statistical support for local effects (i.e. strong effects of heterozygosity at specific markers), which suggests that relative orange spots area reflects genome-wide heterozygosity.

  15. Heterozygosity for the classical galactosemia mutation does not affect ovarian reserve and menopausal age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knauff, Erik A. H.; Richardus, Renate; Eijkemans, Marinus J.; Broekinans, Frank J.; de Jong, Frank J.; Fauser, Bart C. J. M.; Bosch, Annet M.

    2007-01-01

    Female patients with classical galactosemia (galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase [GALT] deficiency) frequently suffer from premature ovarian failure, despite treatment with a galactose-restricted diet. Earlier research has suggested an association between heterozygosity for GALT mutations and ea

  16. Male heterozygosity predicts territory size, song structure and reproductive success in a cooperatively breeding bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Nathalie; Amos, William; Mulder, Raoul A; Tobias, Joseph A

    2004-09-01

    Recent studies of non-social animals have shown that sexually selected traits signal at least one measure of genetic quality: heterozygosity. To determine whether similar cues reveal group quality in more complex social systems, we examined the relationship between territory size, song structure and heterozygosity in the subdesert mesite (Monias benschi), a group-living bird endemic to Madagascar. Using nine polymorphic microsatellite loci, we found that heterozygosity predicted both the size of territories and the structure of songs used to defend them: more heterozygous groups had larger territories, and more heterozygous males used longer, lower-pitched trills in their songs. Heterozygosity was linked to territory size and song structure in males, but not in females, implying that these traits are sexually selected by female choice and/or male-male competition. To our knowledge, this study provides the first direct evidence in any animal that territory size is related to genetic diversity. We also found a positive association between seasonal reproductive success and heterozygosity, suggesting that this heritable characteristic is a reliable indicator of group quality and fitness. Given that heterozygosity predicts song structure in males, and can therefore be determined by listening to acoustic cues, we identify a mechanism by which social animals may assess rival groups, prospective partners and group mates, information of potential importance in guiding decisions related to conflict, breeding and dispersal.

  17. Mechanisms of increased risk of tumorigenesis in Atm and Brca1 double heterozygosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jufang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that heterozygosity for a single gene is linked with tumorigenesis and heterozygosity for two genes increases the risk of tumor incidence. Our previous work has demonstrated that Atm/Brca1 double heterozygosity leads to higher cell transformation rate than single heterozygosity. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully understood yet. In the present study, a series of pathways were investigated to clarify the possible mechanisms of increased risk of tumorigenesis in Atm and Brca1 heterozygosity. Methods Wild type cells, Atm or Brca1 single heterozygous cells, and Atm/Brca1 double heterozygous cells were used to investigate DNA damage and repair, cell cycle, micronuclei, and cell transformation after photon irradiation. Results Remarkable high transformation frequency was confirmed in Atm/Brca1 double heterozygous cells compared to wild type cells. It was observed that delayed DNA damage recognition, disturbed cell cycle checkpoint, incomplete DNA repair, and increased genomic instability were involved in the biological networks. Haploinsufficiency of either ATM or BRCA1 negatively impacts these pathways. Conclusions The quantity of critical proteins such as ATM and BRCA1 plays an important role in determination of the fate of cells exposed to ionizing radiation and double heterozygosity increases the risk of tumorigenesis. These findings also benefit understanding of the individual susceptibility to tumor initiation.

  18. Loss of heterozygosity: An independent prognostic factor of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shih-Ching Chang; Jen-Kou Lin; Tzu-Chen Lin; Wen-Yih Liang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Colorectal cancers result from the accumulation of several distinct genetic alterations. This study was to investigate the frequency and prognostic value of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI) at 14 genetic loci located near or within regions containing important genes implicated in colorectal tumorigenesis.METHODS: We studied colorectal cancers with corresponding normal mucosae in 207 patients (139 males and 68 females,mean age at the time of tumor resection 66.2±12.4 years,range 22-88 years). There were 37 right-sided colonic tumors, 85 left-sided colonic tumors and 85 rectal tumors.The distribution of tumor staging was stage Ⅰ in 25, stage Ⅱ in 73, stage Ⅲ in 68, and stage Ⅳ in 41. We analyzed the LOH and MSI of HPC1, hMSH2, hMLH1, APC, MET,P53, NH23-H1, DCC, BAT25, BAT26, D17S250, MYCL1 and D8S254 with fluorescent polymerase chain reaction and denatured gel electrophoresis. High-frequency LOH was determined to be greater than three, or more than 50%of the informative marker with LOH. High-frequency MSI (MSI-H) was determined as more than four markers with instability (>30%). Correlations of LOH and MSI with clinical outcomes and pathological features were analyzed and compared.RESULTS: The occurrence of MSI-H was 7.25%, located predominantly in the right colons (7/15) and had a higher frequency of poor differentiation (6/15) and mucin production (7/15). LOH in at least one genetic locus occurred in 78.7% of the tumors and was significantly associated with disease progression. Of the 166 potentially cured patients, 45 developed tumor recurrence within 36 mo of follow-up. Clinicopathological factors affecting 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) were TNM staging, grade of differentiation, preoperative CEA level, and high LOH status. Patients with high LOH tumors had a significantly lower DFS (50%) compared with patients with low LOH tumors (84%). Of the patients developing subsequent tumor recurrence, the number and

  19. Analysis of APC allelic imbalance/loss of heterozygosity and APC protein expression in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gray, Sarah E

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene is a tumor suppressor gene which is mutated in the hereditary disease, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Somatic mutations of the APC gene have also been identified in the majority of sporadic colorectal carcinomas, and mutation of the APC gene appears to be an early step in the initiation of colon cancer. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of APC has been described in a variety of other cancer types, including renal cell carcinoma, gastric cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, endometrial cancer and oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). AIM: To determine the role played by APC gene in the genesis of cutaneous SCC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Allelic imbalance\\/loss of heterozygosity (AI\\/LOH) was examined in twenty-two histologically confirmed cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) using microsatellite markers, proximal to the APC gene. Immunohistochemical analysis of APC protein expression was also examined in the cutaneous SCC. RESULTS: AI\\/LOH was detected in 60% of the SCC samples using D5S346 marker (proximal to the APC gene). Ninty-five percent of the SCC samples showed positive reduced APC expression, however the localization of the APC protein was abnormal. CONCLUSION: The abnormal expression of APC suggests that APC gene may play a role in cutaneous SCC development.

  20. Determining the contribution of NPM1 heterozygosity to NPM-ALK-induced lymphomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mduff, Fiona K E; Hook, C Elizabeth; Tooze, Reuben M; Huntly, Brian J; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Turner, Suzanne D

    2011-09-01

    Heterozygous expression of Nucleophosmin (NPM1) predisposes to hematological malignancies in the mouse and cooperates with Myc in lymphomagenesis. NPM1 is therefore regarded as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor. Heterozygous loss of NPM1 occurs as a result of the t(2;5), which generates the oncogenic fusion tyrosine kinase, NPM-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a molecule underlying the pathogenesis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Given the aforementioned role of NPM1 as a tumor suppressor, we hypothesized that NPM1 heterozygosity would cooperate with NPM-ALK in lymphomagenesis. In the event, we observed no difference in tumor latency, incidence or phenotype in NPM-ALK-transgenic mice heterozygous for NPM1 relative to transgenic mice expressing both NPM1 alleles. We propose that although the t(2;5) simultaneously reduces NPM1 allelic dosage and creates the NPM-ALK fusion protein, the two events do not cooperate in the pathogenesis of ALCL in our mouse model. These data indicate that a tumor-suppressive role for NPM1 may depend on cellular and/or genetic context.

  1. Heterozygosity for fibrinogen results in efficient resolution of kidney ischemia reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrendra Kumar Ajay

    Full Text Available Fibrinogen (Fg has been recognized to play a central role in coagulation, inflammation and tissue regeneration. Several studies have used Fg deficient mice (Fg(-/- in comparison with heterozygous mice (Fg(+/- to point the proinflammatory role of Fg in diverse pathological conditions and disease states. Although Fg(+/- mice are considered 'normal', plasma Fg is reduced to ~75% of the normal circulating levels present in wild type mice (Fg(+/+. We report that this reduction in Fg protein production in the Fg(+/- mice is enough to protect them from kidney ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI as assessed by tubular injury, kidney dysfunction, necrosis, apoptosis and inflammatory immune cell infiltration. Mechanistically, we observed binding of Fg to ICAM-1 in kidney tissues of Fg(+/+ mice at 24 h following IRI as compared to a complete absence of binding observed in the Fg(+/- and Fg(-/- mice. Raf-1 and ERK were highly activated as evident by significantly higher phosphorylation in the Fg(+/+ kidneys at 24 h following IRI as compared to Fg(+/- and Fg(-/- mice kidneys. On the other hand Cyclin D1 and pRb, indicating higher cell proliferation, were significantly increased in the Fg(+/- and Fg(-/- as compared to Fg(+/+ kidneys. These data suggest that Fg heterozygosity allows maintenance of a critical balance of Fg that enables regression of initial injury and promotes faster resolution of kidney damage.

  2. Correlation of Individual Heterozygosity of Microsatellite Marker Loci with Heterosis of Growth Traits in Pig Populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-hu; XIONG Yuan-zhu; DENG Chang-yan; JIANG Si-wen; LEI Ming-gang; LI Jia-lian; LI Feng-e; ZHENG Rong

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the correlation of individual heterozygosity and heterosis of three traits in crossbred F1 pig populations,the F1 populations were built by random mating Yorkshire × Meishan (YM, n = 82), and its reciprocal (MY, n = 47) and two straightbred populations (Yorkshire = 34, Meishan = 55) were used as control groups. The heterosis of birth weight (BWT),average daily gain (ADG), and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were acquired as well. In the research, the significant marker loci for the heterosis of the three traits were observed by one-way ANOVA (P<0.01) in a total of 39 marker loci on SSC4,S SC6, SSC7, SSC8, and S SC 13, and the numbers of the significant marker loci were 12 (BWT), 18 (ADG), and 17 (FCR),respectively, based on which the general heterozygosity (GH) was divided into significant marker loci heterozygosity (SH) and insignificant marker loci heterozygosity (IH). Furthermore, the trends of alteration in heterosis with the stepwise increase in heterozygosity by 0.05 were explored. This was done by the regression analysis of the three kinds of heterozygosity against heterosis of the three traits. The results showed that, for BWT, the heterosis increased with the increase in GH (r=0.9337, P=0.0021) and SH (r=0.9165, P=0.0102); for ADG, the heterosis increased with the increase in IH (r = 0.7012, P= 0.0353) and GH (r= 0.7470, P= 0.0537, near significant); for FCR, the heterosis of feed efficiency increased with the increase in IH (r = 0.8721, P = 0.0022). The results indicated that the correlation was not always higher or more significant for SH with heterosis than it was for IH or GH with heterosis, and it might be because of the reciprocal cancellation of the positive effect and negative effect of QTL linked to the significant marker loci.

  3. Multilocus Heterozygosity and Coronary Heart Disease: Nested Case-Control Studies in Men and Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Jensen, Majken K.; Pers, Tune Hannes;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Generalized allelic heterozygosity has been proposed to improve reproductive fitness and has been associated with higher blood pressure, but its association with chronic disease is not well characterized. Methods: Using the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human 6.0 array, we performed whole...... with 931 matched controls. We examined the relationship of genome-wide heterozygosity with risk of incident of CHD and with baseline levels of cardiovascular risk factors. Results: In both cohorts, approximately 227650 (SD 2000) SNPs were heterozygous. The number of heterozygous SNPs was not related...

  4. Very CIN-ful: whole chromosome instability promotes tumor suppressor loss of heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotillo, Rocio; Schvartzman, Juan-Manuel; Benezra, Robert

    2009-12-01

    Mechanisms by which whole chromosome instability lead to tumorigenesis have eluded the cancer research field. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Baker et al. show that CIN induced by a defective mitotic checkpoint, under certain genetic and tissue contexts, leads to accelerated loss of heterozygosity of a tumor suppressor gene.

  5. Local effects drive heterozygosity-fitness correlations in an outcrossing long-lived tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Quilón, Isabel; Santos-del-Blanco, Luis; Grivet, Delphine; Jaramillo-Correa, Juan Pablo; Majada, Juan; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Alía, Ricardo; González-Martínez, Santiago C

    2015-12-01

    Heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) have been used to understand the complex interactions between inbreeding, genetic diversity and evolution. Although frequently reported for decades, evidence for HFCs was often based on underpowered studies or inappropriate methods, and hence their underlying mechanisms are still under debate. Here, we used 6100 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to test for general and local effect HFCs in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), an iconic Mediterranean forest tree. Survival was used as a fitness proxy, and HFCs were assessed at a four-site common garden under contrasting environmental conditions (total of 16 288 trees). We found no significant correlations between genome-wide heterozygosity and fitness at any location, despite variation in inbreeding explaining a substantial proportion of the total variance for survival. However, four SNPs (including two non-synonymous mutations) were involved in significant associations with survival, in particular in the common gardens with higher environmental stress, as shown by a novel heterozygosity-fitness association test at the species-wide level. Fitness effects of SNPs involved in significant HFCs were stable across maritime pine gene pools naturally growing in distinct environments. These results led us to dismiss the general effect hypothesis and suggested a significant role of heterozygosity in specific candidate genes for increasing fitness in maritime pine. Our study highlights the importance of considering the species evolutionary and demographic history and different spatial scales and testing environments when assessing and interpreting HFCs. PMID:26631567

  6. The Adaptive Response in p53 Cancer Prone Mice: Loss of heterozygosity and Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josee, Lavoie [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences; Dolling, Jo-Anna [Credit Valley Hospital, Missassauga, ON (Canada); Mitchel, Ron E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL), Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Boreham, Douglas R. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences

    2004-09-28

    mice, only numerical aberrations were observed in 5 to 20% of the cells. There seem to be an age related increase in numerical aberrations as mice grow old. The results indicate that the presence of a defective copy of the Trp53 gene does not seem to affect spontaneous chromosomal instability or in response to chronic low dose exposure to g-radiation. In previous studies it was speculated that low dose and low dose rate in vivo exposure to g-radiation induces an adaptive response, which reduces the risk of cancer death generated by subsequent DNA damage from either spontaneous or radiation induced events due to enhanced recombinational repair. Induced recombination could result from reversion to homozygosity at Trp53 gene locus (Trp53 +/- to +/+) or loss of heterozygosity in unexposed mice (Trp53 +/- to -/-). This hypothesis was investigated using the quantitative real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (QRT-PCR) quantification method and the novel Rolling Circle Amplification technique (RCA). For these purposes, spleenocytes and bone marrow cells from all the mice were isolated for cell fixation and DNA extraction. The defective Trp53 allele is generated by integration of a portion of the cloning vector pKONEO DNA into the coding sequence. Therefore, the genotypic changes are monitored based on the detection of the NEO allele and the normal Trp53 allele in the cells. To evaluate loss of heterozygosity at the Trp53 gene locus in a cell, detection of the NEO allele and the normal Trp53 allele using the dual color RCA was utilized. In our hands, this protocol did not give the required sensitivity. The gene signal enumeration was inconsistent and not reproducible. The protocol was modified and could not be optimized. Therefore, the QRT-PCR method was selected to evaluate the loss of heterozygosity with greater sensitivity and efficiency. A set of 4 primers was designed to target the NEO allele and the normal Trp53 allele in a PCR experiment using the LightCycler instrument

  7. Females prefer the scent of outbred males: good-genes-as-heterozygosity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoß Michaela

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest to determine the relative importance of non-additive genetic benefits as opposed to additive ones for the evolution of mating preferences and maintenance of genetic variation in sexual ornaments. The 'good-genes-as-heterozygosity' hypothesis predicts that females should prefer to mate with more heterozygous males to gain more heterozygous (and less inbred offspring. Heterozygosity increases males' sexual ornamentation, mating success and reproduction success, yet few experiments have tested whether females are preferentially attracted to heterozygous males, and none have tested whether females' own heterozygosity influences their preferences. Outbred females might have the luxury of being more choosey, but on the other hand, inbred females might have more to gain by mating with heterozygous males. We manipulated heterozygosity in wild-derived house mice (Mus musculus musculus through inbreeding and tested whether the females are more attracted to the scent of outbred versus inbred males, and whether females' own inbreeding status affects their preferences. We also tested whether infecting both inbred and outbred males with Salmonella would magnify females' preferences for outbred males. Results Females showed a significant preference for outbred males, and this preference was more pronounced among inbred females. We found no evidence that Salmonella infection increased the relative attractiveness of outbred versus inbred males; however, we found no evidence that inbreeding affected males' disease resistance in this study. Conclusion Our findings support the idea that females are more attracted to outbred males, and they suggest that such preferences may be stronger among inbred than outbred females, which is consistent with the 'good-genes-as-heterozygosity' hypothesis. It is unclear whether this odour preference reflects females' actual mating preferences, though it suggests that future studies

  8. A Successful Mother and Neonate Outcome for a Woman with Essential Thrombocytosis and FV Leiden Heterozygosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Politou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential thrombocytosis (ET and FV Leiden heterozygosity represent an acquired and hereditable hypercoagulable state, respectively. An uncommon case of coexistence of ET and FV Leiden heterozygosity in a 36-year-old pregnant woman and her successful pregnancy outcome is described. She was considered to be at high risk of thrombosis during her pregnancy and she was treated with both prophylactic dose of LMWH and aspirin daily throughout her pregnancy and for a 6-week period postpartum. The efficacy of the anticoagulation treatment was monitored in various time points not only by measuring anti-Xa levels and D-Dimers but also with new coagulation methods such as rotation thromboelastometry and multiplate. Global assessment of coagulation using additional newer laboratory tests might prove useful in monitoring coagulation pregnancies at high risk for thrombosis.

  9. Resolution of genetic map expansion caused by excess heterozygosity in plant recombinant inbred populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Sandra K; McCormick, Ryan F; Morishige, Daryl T; Mullet, John E

    2014-10-01

    Recombinant inbred populations of many plant species exhibit more heterozygosity than expected under the Mendelian model of segregation. This segregation distortion causes the overestimation of recombination frequencies and consequent genetic map expansion. Here we build upon existing genetic models of differential zygotic viability to model a heterozygote fitness term and calculate expected genotypic proportions in recombinant inbred populations propagated by selfing. We implement this model using the existing open-source genetic map construction code base for R/qtl to estimate recombination fractions. Finally, we show that accounting for excess heterozygosity in a sorghum recombinant inbred mapping population shrinks the genetic map by 213 cM (a 13% decrease corresponding to 4.26 fewer recombinations per meiosis). More accurate estimates of linkage benefit linkage-based analyses used in the identification and utilization of causal genetic variation. PMID:25128435

  10. Developmental Stability Covaries with Genome-Wide and Single-Locus Heterozygosity in House Sparrows

    OpenAIRE

    Carl Vangestel; Joachim Mergeay; Deborah A Dawson; Viki Vandomme; Luc Lens

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA), a measure of developmental instability, has been hypothesized to increase with genetic stress. Despite numerous studies providing empirical evidence for associations between FA and genome-wide properties such as multi-locus heterozygosity, support for single-locus effects remains scant. Here we test if, and to what extent, FA co-varies with single- and multilocus markers of genetic diversity in house sparrow (Passer domesticus) populations along an urban gradient. ...

  11. Excess heterozygosity contributes to genetic map expansion in pea recombinant inbred populations.

    OpenAIRE

    Knox, M.R.; Ellis, T. H. N.

    2002-01-01

    Several plant genetic maps presented in the literature are longer than expected from cytogenetic data. Here we compare F(2) and RI maps derived from a cross between the same two parental lines and show that excess heterozygosity contributes to map inflation. These maps have been constructed using a common set of dominant markers. Although not generally regarded as informative for F(2) mapping, these allowed rapid map construction, and the resulting data analysis has provided information not o...

  12. Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mudge, Joanne [NCGR

    2012-06-01

    Joanne Mudge on "Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Mutation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  13. Heterozygosity in an isolated population of a large mammal founded by four individuals is predicted by an individual-based genetic model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana Kekkonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Within-population genetic diversity is expected to be dramatically reduced if a population is founded by a low number of individuals. Three females and one male white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus, a North American species, were successfully introduced in Finland in 1934 and the population has since been growing rapidly, but remained in complete isolation from other populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on 14 microsatellite loci, the expected heterozygosity H was 0.692 with a mean allelic richness (AR of 5.36, which was significantly lower than what was found in Oklahoma, U.S.A. (H = 0.742; AR = 9.07, demonstrating that a bottleneck occurred. Observed H was in line with predictions from an individual-based model where the genealogy of the males and females in the population were tracked and the population's demography was included. CONCLUSION: Our findings provide a rare within-population empirical test of the founder effect and suggest that founding a population by a small number of individuals need not have a dramatic impact on heterozygosity in an iteroparous species.

  14. Oligonucleotide fingerprinting of free-ranging and captive rhesus macaques from Cayo Santiago: paternity assignment and comparison of heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nürnberg, P; Berard, J D; Bercovitch, F; Epplen, J T; Schmidtke, J; Krawczak, M

    1993-01-01

    Multilocus DNA fingerprinting with oligonucleotide probes (GTG)5, (GATA)4, and (CA)8 was applied in order to determine paternity in one birth cohort (15 infants) of social group (S) from the free-ranging colony of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) on Cayo Santiago. While sires could be identified in 11 cases, all males tested (N = 19) could be excluded from paternity for the remaining four infants. Data revealed marked discrepancies between actual paternity and paternity as inferred from the observation of copulation behavior. Thus, a dominant social rank does not appear to be strongly associated with reproductive success. Furthermore, alternative reproductive strategies were found to yield comparable net benefits in reproduction. A second group of animals (M) was translocated from Cayo Santiago to the Sabana Seca Field Station in 1984. They have continuously resided together in a large outdoor enclosure since then. Here paternity assessment was seriously impeded by a reduced number of discriminating bands, i.e. offspring bands which were unequivocally derived from the sires. This was initially held to be indicative of a smaller degree of heterozygosity in Group M, and was attributed to inbreeding due to a lack of male immigration or extra-group fertilizations. However, a comparison of the DNA fingerprint patterns obtained in Group S and Group M lends only partial support to this idea. PMID:8400713

  15. Loss of heterozygosity analyzed by single nucleotide polymorphisrn array in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HaiTao Zheng; ZhiHai Peng; Sheng Li; Lin He

    2005-01-01

    Neoplastic progression is generally characterized by the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations including loss of tumor suppression gene function.Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) has been used to identify genomic regions that harbor tumor suppressor genes and to characterize different tumor types, pathological stages and progression. LOH pattern has been detected by allelotyping using restriction fragment length polymorphism, and later by simple sequence length polymorphisms (SSLPs or microsatellite) for 10 years.This paper reviews the detection of LOH by recently developed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays (all analyzed by Affymetrix array); furthermore, its advantage and disadvantage were analyzed in several kinds of cancer.

  16. Loss of heterozygosity and carrier identification in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a familiar case with recombination event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca-Mendoza Dora Janeth

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne/Becker Muscular Dystrophy (DMD/BMD is an X-linked recessive disease characterizedby muscular weakness. It is caused by mutations on the dystrophin gen. Loss of heterozygosityallows us to identify female carriers of deletions on the dystrophin gen. Objective: identifyfemale carriers in a family with a patient affected by DMD. Material and methods: nine familymembers and the affected child were analyzed using DNA extraction and posterior amplificationof ten STRs on the dystrophin gen. Haplotypes were constructed and the carrier status determinedin two of the six women analyzed due to loss of heterozygosity in three STRs. Additionally, weobserved a recombination event. Conclusions: loss of heterozygosity allows us to establish witha certainty of 100% the carrier status of females with deletions on the dystrophin gen. By theconstruction of haplotypes we were able to identify the X chromosome with the deletion in twoof the six women analyzed. We also determined a recombination event in one of the sisters of theaffected child. These are described with a high frequency (12%. A possible origin for the mutationis a gonadal mosaicism in the maternal grandfather or in the mother of the affected childin a very early stage in embryogensis. This can be concluded using the analysis of haplotypes.

  17. Excess heterozygosity contributes to genetic map expansion in pea recombinant inbred populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, M R; Ellis, T H N

    2002-10-01

    Several plant genetic maps presented in the literature are longer than expected from cytogenetic data. Here we compare F(2) and RI maps derived from a cross between the same two parental lines and show that excess heterozygosity contributes to map inflation. These maps have been constructed using a common set of dominant markers. Although not generally regarded as informative for F(2) mapping, these allowed rapid map construction, and the resulting data analysis has provided information not otherwise obvious when examining a population from only one generation. Segregation distortion, a common feature of most populations and marker systems, found in the F(2) but not the RI, has identified excess heterozygosity. A few markers with a deficiency of heterozygotes were found to map to linkage group V (chromosome 3), which is known to form rod bivalents in this cross. Although the final map length was longer for the F(2) population, the mapped order of markers was generally the same in the F(2) and RI maps. The data presented in this analysis reconcile much of the inconsistency between map length estimates from chiasma counts and genetic data. PMID:12399396

  18. Effect of CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity on HIV-1 susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijie Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: So far, many studies have investigated the distribution of CCR5 genotype between HIV-1 infected patients and uninfected people. However, no definite results have been put forward about whether heterozygosity for a 32-basepair deletion in CCR5 gene (CCR5-Δ32 can affect HIV-1 susceptibility. METHODS: We performed a meta-analysis of 18 studies including more than 12000 subjects for whom the CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism was genotyped. Odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence interval (CI were employed to assess the association of CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism with HIV-1 susceptibility. RESULTS: Compared with the wild-type CCR5 homozygotes, the pooled OR for CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes was 1.02 (95%CI, 0.88-1.19 for healthy controls (HC and 0.95 (95%CI, 0.71-1.26 for exposed uninfected (EU controls. Similar results were found in stratified analysis by ethnicity, sample size and method of CCR5-Δ32 genotyping. CONCLUSIONS: The meta-analysis indicated that HIV-1 susceptibility is not significantly affected by heterozygosity for CCR5-Δ32.

  19. Exploring heterozygosity-survival correlations in a wild songbird population: contrasting effects between juvenile and adult stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Canal

    Full Text Available The relationship between genetic diversity and fitness, a major issue in evolutionary and conservation biology, is expected to be stronger in traits affected by many loci and those directly influencing fitness. Here we explore the influence of heterozygosity measured at 15 neutral markers on individual survival, one of the most important parameters determining individual fitness. We followed individual survival up to recruitment and during subsequent adult life of 863 fledgling pied flycatchers born in two consecutive breeding seasons. Mark-recapture analyses showed that individual heterozygosity did not influence juvenile or adult survival. In contrast, the genetic relatedness of parents was negatively associated with the offspring's survival during the adult life, but this effect was not apparent in the juvenile (from fledgling to recruitment stage. Stochastic factors experienced during the first year of life in this long-distance migratory species may have swamped a relationship between heterozygosity and survival up to recruitment.

  20. The imprecision of heterozygosity-fitness correlations hinders the detection of inbreeding and inbreeding depression in a threatened species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueber, Catherine E; Waters, Jonathan M; Jamieson, Ian G

    2011-01-01

    In nonpedigreed wild populations, inbreeding depression is often quantified through the use of heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs), based on molecular estimates of relatedness. Although such correlations are typically interpreted as evidence of inbreeding depression, by assuming that the marker heterozygosity is a proxy for genome-wide heterozygosity, theory predicts that these relationships should be difficult to detect. Until now, the vast majority of empirical research in this area has been performed on generally outbred, nonbottlenecked populations, but differences in population genetic processes may limit extrapolation of results to threatened populations. Here, we present an analysis of HFCs, and their implications for the interpretation of inbreeding, in a free-ranging pedigreed population of a bottlenecked species: the endangered takahe (Porphyrio hochstetteri). Pedigree-based inbreeding depression has already been detected in this species. Using 23 microsatellite loci, we observed only weak evidence of the expected relationship between multilocus heterozygosity and fitness at individual life-history stages (such as survival to hatching and fledging), and parameter estimates were imprecise (had high error). Furthermore, our molecular data set could not accurately predict the inbreeding status of individuals (as 'inbred' or 'outbred', determined from pedigrees), nor could we show that the observed HFCs were the result of genome-wide identity disequilibrium. These results may be attributed to high variance in heterozygosity within inbreeding classes. This study is an empirical example from a free-ranging endangered species, suggesting that even relatively large numbers (>20) of microsatellites may give poor precision for estimating individual genome-wide heterozygosity. We argue that pedigree methods remain the most effective method of quantifying inbreeding in wild populations, particularly those that have gone through severe bottlenecks. PMID

  1. Frequent loss of heterozygosity at 8p22 chromosomal region in diffuse type of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hedayat Allah Hosseini; Ali Ahani; Hamid Galehdari; Ali Mohammad Froughmand; Masoud Hosseini; Abdolrahim Masjedizadeh; Mohammad Reza Zali

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 8p21-23 locus in diffuse gastric cancer.METHODS: To evaluate the involvement of this region in gastric cancer, we used eight microsatellite markers covering two Mb of mentioned region, to perform a high-resolution analysis of allele loss in 42 cases of late diffuse gastric adenocarcinoma.RESULTS: Six of these STS makers: D8S1149, D8S1645,D8S1643, D8S1508, D8S1591, and D8S1145 showed 36%, 28%, 37%, 41%, 44% and 53% LOH, respectively.CONCLUSION: A critical region of loss, close to the NAT2 locus and relatively far from FEZ1 gene currently postulated as tumor suppressor gene in this region.

  2. Rapid mechanisms for generating genome diversity: whole ploidy shifts, aneuploidy, and loss of heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Richard J; Forche, Anja; Berman, Judith

    2014-10-01

    Human fungal pathogens can exist in a variety of ploidy states, including euploid and aneuploid forms. Ploidy change has a major impact on phenotypic properties, including the regulation of interactions with the human host. In addition, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant isolates is often associated with the formation of specific supernumerary chromosomes. Pathogens such as Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans appear particularly well adapted for propagation in multiple ploidy states with novel pathways driving ploidy variation. In both species, heterozygous cells also readily undergo loss of heterozygosity (LOH), leading to additional phenotypic changes such as altered drug resistance. Here, we examine the sexual and parasexual cycles that drive ploidy variation in human fungal pathogens and discuss ploidy and LOH events with respect to their far-reaching roles in fungal adaptation and pathogenesis. PMID:25081629

  3. LOSS OF HETEROZYGOSITY FOR MARKERS ON 22CHROMOSOME IN SPORADIC SCHWANNOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To analyze the loss of heterozygosity ( LOH) for markers on chromosome 22 ( CHR 22 ) and its significance with their clinical behaviors. Methods The frequency of CHR22 LOH in 36 schwannomas was observed by dena tured polyacrylamide gels and silver staining, and the proliferative index of schwannoma was calculated by Ki-67 and PCNA im munohistochemistry. Results 15 schwannomas (41.6%) showed allele loss. The proliferative index of schwannomas with LOH were significantly higher than those without LOH (P<0.05). In acoustic neuromas, patients with LOH were younger at the age of diagnosis, larger size of tumor, shorter history and higher growth rate than those without LOH, but with no signifi cance. Conclusion CHR22 LOH was the frequent event in the tumorigenesis of sporadic schwannoma. There were some links between CHR22 LOH and clinical behavior.

  4. Cytological evidence for assortment mitosis leading to loss of heterozygosity in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Richard R-C; Li, Xiaomei; Chatterton, N Jerry

    2006-05-01

    In the root meristem cells of the rice line AMR, which causes loss of heterozygosity in its hybrids, both normal and assortment mitoses were observed. During normal mitosis, chromosomes did not form homologous pairs at metaphase; all chromosomes lined up at the equatorial plate and 2 chromatids of each chromosome disjoined at the centromere and moved toward opposite poles. During assortment mitosis, varying numbers of paired homologues were observed at mitotic metaphase. Two groups of 12 chromosomes separated and moved towards the opposite poles of daughter cells with few chromosomes having their chromatids separated at anaphase. These observations support the proposed mechanism that is responsible for early genotype fixation in rice hybrids involving AMR.

  5. LOSS OF HETEROZYGOSITY ON CHROMOSOME 17p13.3 IN OVARIAN CANCER AND CERVICAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Guoling; Yang Huijian; Xu Kaili; Zhou Jin; Qin Ruidi; Lu Minghua

    1998-01-01

    Objective:To identify the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 17p13.3 in ovarian cancer and cervical cancer. Methods: The frequency of LOH on chromosome 17p13.3 in DNA samples from 24 ovarian cancers, 9 cervical cancers, and 13 non-malignant gynecological diseases were determined respectively, using Southern blot method with probe PYNZ.22. Results:LOH on 17p13.3 was found in 12 of 24 (50.0%) ovarian cancers (including a borderline mucinous cystadenoma), 4of 9 (44.4%) cervical carcinomas, and 1 of 13 (7.7%) nonmalignant gynecological diseases, which was cervical intraepithelial neoplasm HI (CIN Ⅲ) (P<0.01).Conclusion: These results show that LOH on 17p13.3 is associated with ovarian cancer and cervical cancer,suggesting that detection of LOH on 17p13.3 may be helpful to understand the molecular pathogenesis of ovarian cancer and cervical cancer.

  6. Loss of imprinting and loss of heterozygosity on 11p15.5 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainho, C A; Kowalski, L P; Rogatto, S R

    2001-01-01

    on chromosome 11p15.5, a common site of loss of heterozygosity in human cancers. METHODS: We performed an allelic-typing assay using a PCR-RFLP-based method for identification of heterozygous informative cases in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Tumoral total RNA was extracted from each...

  7. Developmental stability covaries with genome-wide and single-locus heterozygosity in house sparrows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Vangestel

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry (FA, a measure of developmental instability, has been hypothesized to increase with genetic stress. Despite numerous studies providing empirical evidence for associations between FA and genome-wide properties such as multi-locus heterozygosity, support for single-locus effects remains scant. Here we test if, and to what extent, FA co-varies with single- and multilocus markers of genetic diversity in house sparrow (Passer domesticus populations along an urban gradient. In line with theoretical expectations, FA was inversely correlated with genetic diversity estimated at genome level. However, this relationship was largely driven by variation at a single key locus. Contrary to our expectations, relationships between FA and genetic diversity were not stronger in individuals from urban populations that experience higher nutritional stress. We conclude that loss of genetic diversity adversely affects developmental stability in P. domesticus, and more generally, that the molecular basis of developmental stability may involve complex interactions between local and genome-wide effects. Further study on the relative effects of single-locus and genome-wide effects on the developmental stability of populations with different genetic properties is therefore needed.

  8. Loss of heterozygosity and its correlation with expression profiles in subclasses of invasive breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhigang C; Lin, Ming; Wei, Lee-Jen; Li, Cheng; Miron, Alexander; Lodeiro, Gabriella; Harris, Lyndsay; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Tanenbaum, David M; Meyerson, Matthew; Iglehart, James D; Richardson, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    Gene expression array profiles identify subclasses of breast cancers with different clinical outcomes and different molecular features. The present study attempted to correlate genomic alterations (loss of heterozygosity; LOH) with subclasses of breast cancers having distinct gene expression signatures. Hierarchical clustering of expression array data from 89 invasive breast cancers identified four major expression subclasses. Thirty-four of these cases representative of the four subclasses were microdissected and allelotyped using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism detection arrays (Affymetrix, Inc.). LOH was determined by comparing tumor and normal single nucleotide polymorphism allelotypes. A newly developed statistical tool was used to determine the chromosomal regions of frequent LOH. We found that breast cancers were highly heterogeneous, with the proportion of LOH ranging widely from 0.3% to >60% of heterozygous markers. The most common sites of LOH were on 17p, 17q, 16q, 11q, and 14q, sites reported in previous LOH studies. Signature LOH events were discovered in certain expression subclasses. Unique regions of LOH on 5q and 4p marked a subclass of breast cancers with "basal-like" expression profiles, distinct from other subclasses. LOH on 1p and 16q occurred preferentially in a subclass of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers. Finding unique LOH patterns in different groups of breast cancer, in part defined by expression signatures, adds confidence to newer schemes of molecular classification. Furthermore, exclusive association between biological subclasses and restricted LOH events provides rationale to search for targeted genes.

  9. Loss of heterozygosity drives clonal diversity of Phytophthora capsici in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hu

    Full Text Available Phytophthora capsici causes significant loss to pepper (Capsicum annum in China and our goal was to develop single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers for P. capsici and characterize genetic diversity nationwide. Eighteen isolates of P. capsici from locations worldwide were re-sequenced and candidate nuclear and mitochondrial SNPs identified. From 2006 to 2012, 276 isolates of P. capsici were recovered from 136 locations in 27 provinces and genotyped using 45 nuclear and 2 mitochondrial SNPs. There were two main mitochondrial haplotypes and 95 multi-locus genotypes (MLGs identified. Genetic diversity was geographically structured with a high level of genotypic diversity in the north and on Hainan Island in the south, suggesting outcrossing contributes to diversity in these areas. The remaining areas of China are dominated by four clonal lineages that share mitochondrial haplotypes, are almost exclusively the A1 or A2 mating type and appear to exhibit extensive diversity based on loss of heterozygosity (LOH. Analysis of SNPs directly from infected peppers confirmed LOH in field populations. One clonal lineage is dominant throughout much of the country. The overall implications for long-lived genetically diverse clonal lineages amidst a widely dispersed sexual population are discussed.

  10. Inheritance and variation of Cytosine methylation in three populus allotriploid populations with different heterozygosity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujing Suo

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism with the potential to regulate gene expression and affect plant phenotypes. Both hybridization and genome doubling may affect the DNA methylation status of newly formed allopolyploid plants. Previous studies demonstrated that changes in cytosine methylation levels and patterns were different among individual hybrid plant, therefore, studies investigating the characteristics of variation in cytosine methylation status must be conducted at the population level to avoid sampling error. In the present study, an F1 hybrid diploid population and three allotriploid populations with different heterozygosity [originating from first-division restitution (FDR, second-division restitution (SDR, and post-meiotic restitution (PMR 2n eggs of the same female parent] were used to investigate cytosine methylation inheritance and variation relative to their common parents using methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP. The variation in cytosine methylation in individuals in each population exhibited substantial differences, confirming the necessity of population epigenetics. The total methylation levels of the diploid population were significantly higher than in the parents, but those of the three allotriploid populations were significantly lower than in the parents, indicating that both hybridization and polyploidization contributed to cytosine methylation variation. The vast majority of methylated status could be inherited from the parents, and the average percentages of non-additive variation were 6.29, 3.27, 5.49 and 5.07% in the diploid, FDR, SDR and PMR progeny populations, respectively. This study lays a foundation for further research on population epigenetics in allopolyploids.

  11. LOSS OF HETEROZYGOSITY ON CHROMOSOME 13 IN SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMAS OF THE LARYNX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Sujuan; Zhang Xue; Wang Jun; Sun Kailai; Fei Shengzhong

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To locate lost region of tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 13q in squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx (LSCC) and to provide clues and evidence for discovering and locating new suppressor gene.Methods: Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 13q was analyzed in 58 LSCC patients by microsatellite polymorphic sequences in loci D13S765 (13q13), RB1.20(13q14.2), D13S133 (13q14.3) and D13S318 (13q21) on chromosome 13 by PCR. Results: There weren't any LOH on chromosome 13q in 3 cases with preinvasive LSCC. Forty-five percentage (24/53) of the 53 invasive LSCC cases showed LOH at one or more loci on chromosome 13q region. The highest percentage of LOH on chromosome 13q was 52% (22/53) at D13S765locus. Conclusion: The deletion region on chromosome 13q was located near by D13S765 locus which is centromeric to RB1. In this region there is suppressor gene, which is related to the genesis and development of LSCC, possibly including RB1. The inactivation of these suppressor genes may be related to the genesis and development of invasive LSCC.

  12. Clinicopathological significance of loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability in hepatocellular carcinoma in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Hui Zhang; Wen-Ming Cong; Zhi-Hong Xian; Meng-Chao Wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the features of microsatellite alterations and their association with clinicopathological characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI) of 55 microsatellite loci were detected with PCR-based microsatellite polymorphism analyses in tumors and corresponding noncancerous liver tissues of 56 surgically resected HCCs using the MegaBACE 500 automatic DNA analysis system.RESULTS: LOH was found in 44 of 56 HCCs (78.6%) at one or several loci. Frequencies of LOH on 1p, 4q, 8p,16q, and 17p were 69.6% (39/56), 71.4% (40/56), 66.1% (37/56), 66.1% (37/56), and 64.3% (36/56), respectively. MSI was found in 18 of 56 HCCs (32.1%) at one or several loci. Ten of fifty-six (17.9%) HCCs had MSI-H. Serum HBV infection, alpha-fetoprotein concentration, tumor size, cirrhosis, histological grade, tumor capsule, as well as tumor intrahepatic metastasis, might be correlated with LOH on certain chromosome regions. CONCLUSION: Frequent microsatellite alterations exist in HCC. LOH, which represents a tumor suppressor gene pathway, plays a more important role in hepatocarcinogenesis. MSI, which represents a mismatch repair genepathway, is a rare event during liver carcinogenesis. Furthermore, LOH on certain chromosome regions may be correlated with clinicopathological characteristics in HCC.

  13. LOSS OF HETEROZYGOSITY OF ER GENE IN BREAST CANCER AND ITS CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑唯强; 郑建明; 卢建; 胡凤仙

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Clinically, the reason of resistance for breast cancer to endocrine therapy has not been well known. The current study attempted to examine loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on the estrogen receptor (ER) gene in breast cancer and its relationship to clinicopathologic findings. Methods: DNAs of tumor tissues and blood lymphocytes were collected from 40 cases of primary breast cancer patients and LOH were detected using the microsatellite repeat assay and combined with other ER immunohistochemical assays. Results: ER-positive staining was observed in 65% of breast cancer. Heterogeneity of ER expression was found. Seven of the patients (17.5%) showed LOH. In three of the seven cases, there was total loss, and there was a marked reduction in the intensity of signal in the other four cases. LOH was associated with histologic grade, occurring more frequently in ER-negative and lymph node metastasis group, but not with tumor size and patient ages. Conclusion: This result implied that LOH of the ER gene may have an important role in the progression of breast cancer. It was postulated that the lack of ER function induced by LOH may contributed to endocrine therapy resistance of breast cancer since the tumor clone would escape from the ER regulation, obtain growth predisposition and finally lost response to therapy.

  14. Exploring Heterozygosity-Survival Correlations in a Wild Songbird Population: Contrasting Effects between Juvenile and Adult Stages

    OpenAIRE

    David Canal; David Serrano; Jaime Potti

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between genetic diversity and fitness, a major issue in evolutionary and conservation biology, is expected to be stronger in traits affected by many loci and those directly influencing fitness. Here we explore the influence of heterozygosity measured at 15 neutral markers on individual survival, one of the most important parameters determining individual fitness. We followed individual survival up to recruitment and during subsequent adult life of 863 fledgling pied flycatche...

  15. PCR-based microsatellite polymorphisms in the detection of loss of heterozygosity in fresh and archival tumour tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Gruis, N A; Abeln, E. C.; Bardoel, A. F.; Devilee, P.; Frants, R. R.; Cornelisse, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    PCR-based microsatellite polymorphisms have proved their power in genetic linkage analysis and other identification methods, due to their high information content and even distribution over the chromosomes. In the present study we applied microsatellite polymorphisms to detect loss of heterozygosity in fresh (snap-frozen) and in archival ovarian tumour tissue. Clear allele losses were found in fresh and paraffin embedded tumour samples. Conventional Southern analysis of flanking markers on th...

  16. Copy number and loss of heterozygosity detected by SNP array of formalin-fixed tissues using whole-genome amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Angela; Drozdov, Ignat; Guerra, Eliete; Ouzounis, Christos A; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Gleeson, Michael J; McGurk, Mark; Tavassoli, Mahvash; Odell, Edward W

    2011-01-01

    The requirement for large amounts of good quality DNA for whole-genome applications prohibits their use for small, laser capture micro-dissected (LCM), and/or rare clinical samples, which are also often formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE). Whole-genome amplification of DNA from these samples could, potentially, overcome these limitations. However, little is known about the artefacts introduced by amplification of FFPE-derived DNA with regard to genotyping, and subsequent copy number and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analyses. Using a ligation adaptor amplification method, we present data from a total of 22 Affymetrix SNP 6.0 experiments, using matched paired amplified and non-amplified DNA from 10 LCM FFPE normal and dysplastic oral epithelial tissues, and an internal method control. An average of 76.5% of SNPs were called in both matched amplified and non-amplified DNA samples, and concordance was a promising 82.4%. Paired analysis for copy number, LOH, and both combined, showed that copy number changes were reduced in amplified DNA, but were 99.5% concordant when detected, amplifications were the changes most likely to be 'missed', only 30% of non-amplified LOH changes were identified in amplified pairs, and when copy number and LOH are combined ∼50% of gene changes detected in the unamplified DNA were also detected in the amplified DNA and within these changes, 86.5% were concordant for both copy number and LOH status. However, there are also changes introduced as ∼20% of changes in the amplified DNA are not detected in the non-amplified DNA. An integrative network biology approach revealed that changes in amplified DNA of dysplastic oral epithelium localize to topologically critical regions of the human protein-protein interaction network, suggesting their functional implication in the pathobiology of this disease. Taken together, our results support the use of amplification of FFPE-derived DNA, provided sufficient samples are used to increase power

  17. Copy number and loss of heterozygosity detected by SNP array of formalin-fixed tissues using whole-genome amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Stokes

    Full Text Available The requirement for large amounts of good quality DNA for whole-genome applications prohibits their use for small, laser capture micro-dissected (LCM, and/or rare clinical samples, which are also often formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE. Whole-genome amplification of DNA from these samples could, potentially, overcome these limitations. However, little is known about the artefacts introduced by amplification of FFPE-derived DNA with regard to genotyping, and subsequent copy number and loss of heterozygosity (LOH analyses. Using a ligation adaptor amplification method, we present data from a total of 22 Affymetrix SNP 6.0 experiments, using matched paired amplified and non-amplified DNA from 10 LCM FFPE normal and dysplastic oral epithelial tissues, and an internal method control. An average of 76.5% of SNPs were called in both matched amplified and non-amplified DNA samples, and concordance was a promising 82.4%. Paired analysis for copy number, LOH, and both combined, showed that copy number changes were reduced in amplified DNA, but were 99.5% concordant when detected, amplifications were the changes most likely to be 'missed', only 30% of non-amplified LOH changes were identified in amplified pairs, and when copy number and LOH are combined ∼50% of gene changes detected in the unamplified DNA were also detected in the amplified DNA and within these changes, 86.5% were concordant for both copy number and LOH status. However, there are also changes introduced as ∼20% of changes in the amplified DNA are not detected in the non-amplified DNA. An integrative network biology approach revealed that changes in amplified DNA of dysplastic oral epithelium localize to topologically critical regions of the human protein-protein interaction network, suggesting their functional implication in the pathobiology of this disease. Taken together, our results support the use of amplification of FFPE-derived DNA, provided sufficient samples are used

  18. No correlation between neonatal fitness and heterozygosity in a reintroduced population of Père David's deer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan ZENG; Chunwang LI; Linyuan ZHANG; Zhenyu ZHONG; Zhigang JIANG

    2013-01-01

    Considering the severe impacts of genetic bottlenecks and small numbers of founders in populations of reintroduced animals,it is necessary to study inbreeding and its effect on fitness in species of conservation concern.Père David's deer is one of few large mammal species extinct in the wild but safely preserved in captivity.Its specific background gives us the opportunity to study the relationships between heterozygosity and neonatal fitness in relocated populations.We employed five microsatellite loci to explore heterozygosity-fitness correlations in a population of Père David's deer at the Beijing Milu Ecological Research Center.We observed associations between microsatellite-based variables sMLH,IR,MD2 and HL,and two components of fitness expressed early in life (birth weight and the neonatal mortality of 123 Père David's deer calves born over six consecutive years).We found that neonatal mortality was 19.1% ± 7.6%,not higher than the 19% or 18% reported in other ungulates.The heterozygosity of calves was not associated with neonatal mortality,nor birth weight.Our study implies that low genetic variability of microsatellite loci has no overt effect on birth weight and neonatal mortality in reintroduced populations of Père David's deer.

  19. No correlation between neonatal fitness and heterozygosity in a reintroduced population of Père David's deer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan ZENG, Chunwang LI, Linyuan ZHANG, Zhenyu ZHONG, Zhigang JIANG

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering the severe impacts of genetic bottlenecks and small numbers of founders in populations of reintroduced animals, it is necessary to study inbreeding and its effect on fitness in species of conservation concern. Père David’s deer is one of few large mammal species extinct in the wild but safely preserved in captivity. Its specific background gives us the opportunity to study the relationships between heterozygosity and neonatal fitness in relocated populations. We employed five microsatellite loci to explore heterozygosity-fitness correlations in a population of Père David’s deer at the Beijing Milu Ecological Research Center. We observed associations between microsatellite-based variables sMLH, IR, MD2 and HL, and two components of fitness expressed early in life (birth weight and the neonatal mortality of 123 Père David’s deer calves born over six consecutive years. We found that neonatal mortality was 19.1 ± 7.6%, not higher than the 19% or 18% reported in other ungulates. The heterozygosity of calves was not associated with neonatal mortality, nor birth weight. Our study implies that low genetic variability of microsatellite loci has no overt effect on birth weight and neonatal mortality in reintroduced populations of Père David’s deer [Current Zoology 59 (2: 249–256, 2013].

  20. TP53 Codon 72 Heterozygosity May Promote MicrosatelliteInstability in Sporadic Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Nikbahkt Dastjerdi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The polymorphic variants at codon 72 of the p53 gene, encoding prolineor arginine at residue 72, produce marked changes in the p53 structure. From theevidence that the DNA mismatch repair system and p53 interact to maintain genomicintegrity, we hypothesized that codon 72 variations may influence the prevalence ofmicrosatellite instability (MSI, a feature of malignancies associated with mismatchrepair deficiency in sporadic colorectal cancer.Materials and Methods: We investigated the frequency of MSI in three P53 codon72 genotypes using genomic DNAs from 144 paraffin blocks of sporadic colorectaladenocarcinomas by testing the BAT-26 poly(A marker. We used PCR-SSCP analysisto detect tumor sample MSI for the nonisotopic detection of deletions in the BAT-26 poly (A mononucleotide repeat. Associations between qualitative variables wereevaluated using the χ2-test. Statistical significance level was set to p ≤ 0.05.Results: MSI analysis revealed that 24.3% of the tumors (n=35 were MSI-positiveand 75.7% (n=109 were MSI-negative. The frequency of microsatellite instability inthe arginine/arginine, arginine/proline and proline/proline genotypes were 11 (16.9%,22 (36.1% and 2 (11.1% respectively. A significant difference in distribution of MSIwas found for the arginine/proline genotype compared with the grouped arginine/arginineand proline/proline genotypes (p=0.05.Conclusion: Our findings suggested that colorectal adenocarcinomas arising in individualswith the p53 codon 72 arginine/proline heterozygosity are more prone tomicrosatellite instability than those with other p53 genotypes. In our study, MSI wasimportant in the carcinogenesis of sporadic colorectal cancer arising in pro/arg heterozygotes.

  1. HbD Punjab/HbQ India compound heterozygosity: An unusual association.

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    Stacy Colaco

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Haemoglobinopathies are the commonest hereditary disorders in India and pose a major health problem. Both beta thalassaemia and structural haemoglobin variants are relatively common in north western India. Here we report a 29 year old Sindhi female who was referred to us for a haemoglobinopathy work up and genetic counseling since her spouse was a classical beta thalassaemia carrier. Method: A complete blood count was done on an automated cell counter. Haemoglobin analysis was carried out using HPLC Variant Haemoglobin Testing System.  The cellulose acetate electrophoresis was carried out [pH 8.9]. Confirmation of mutations was done by automated DNA sequencing. Results: HPLC analysis showed four major peaks, HbA0, a peak in the HbD window, an unknown peak [retention time 4.74 minutes] and a peak in the HbC window. The HbA2 level was 2.2% and the HbF level was 0.7%.Cellulose acetate electrophoresis at alkaline pH, a slow moving band was seen at the HbS/D position along with a prominent band at the HbA2 position. DNA sequencing of the β and α genes showed presence of the 2 hemoglobin variants :Hb D [b 121GAA à CAA] and Hb Q [a 64 AAG à GAG]. The δ globin gene was normal. The additional peak in the HbC window was due to the formation of a heterodimer hybrid. Conclusion: Both HbD Punjab and HbQ India are relatively common in India but their co-inheritance has not been described in the country. This is the second report of compound heterozygosity for HbQ India/HbD Punjab haemoglobinopathy globally, and the first one from India.

  2. Heterozygosity, gender, and the growth-defense trade-off in quaking aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Christopher T; Stevens, Michael T; Anderson, Jon E; Lindroth, Richard L

    2016-06-01

    Although plant growth is generally recognized to be influenced by allocation to defense, genetic background (e.g., inbreeding), and gender, rarely have those factors been addressed collectively. In quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), phenolic glycosides (PGs) and condensed tannins (CTs) constitute up to 30 % of leaf dry weight. To quantify the allocation cost of this chemical defense, we measured growth, defense chemistry, and individual heterozygosity (H obs at 16 microsatellite loci) for male and female trees in both controlled and natural environments. The controlled environment consisted of 12 juvenile genets grown for 3 years in a common garden, with replication. The natural environment consisted of 51 mature genets in wild populations, from which we sampled multiple ramets (trees) per genet. Concentrations of PGs and CTs were negatively correlated. PGs were uncorrelated with growth, but CT production represented a major cost. Across the range of CT levels found in wild-grown trees, growth rates varied by 2.6-fold, such that a 10 % increase in CT concentration occurred with a 38.5 % decrease in growth. H obs had a marked effect on aspen growth: for wild trees, a 10 % increase in H obs corresponded to a 12.5 % increase in growth. In wild trees, this CT effect was significant only in females, in which reproduction seems to exacerbate the cost of defense, while the H obs effect was significant only in males. Despite the lower growth rate of low-H obs trees, their higher CT levels may improve survival, which could account for the deficit of heterozygotes repeatedly found in natural aspen populations. PMID:26886130

  3. Loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instabilities of fragile histidine triad gene in gastric carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Ping Xiao; Dong-Ying Wu; Lei Xu; Yan Xin

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instabilities (MSI) of fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene in gastric carcinoma and to study their association with the clinical pathological characteristics of gastric carcinoma.METHODS: LOH and MSI of FHIT gene were detected at four microsaterllite loci D3S13H, D3S4103, D3S1481 and D3S1234 using PCR in matched normal and cancerous tissues from 50 patients with primary gastric cancer.RESULTS: The average frequency of LOH and MSI of FHIT gene in gastric cancer was 32.4% and 26.4%respectively. LOH and MSI of FHIT gene in gastric cancer had no association with histological, Borrmann,and Lauren's classification. LOH of FHIT gene in gastric cancer was related to invasive depth. The frequency of FHIT LOH in gastric cancer with serosa-penetration was obviously higher than that in gastric cancer without serosa-penetration (73.5% vs 37.5%, P<0.05). MSI of FHIT gene in gastric cancer was associated with the lymph node metastasis. The frequency of MSI in gastric cancer without lymph node metastasis was significantly higher than that in gastric cancer with lymph node metastasis (66.7% vs 34.3%, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: LOH of FHIT gene is correlated with invasive depth of gastric carcinoma. MSI of FHIT gene is correlated with lymph node metastases. LOH and MSI of FHIT gene play an important role in carcinogenesis of gastric cancer.

  4. Heterozygosity, gender, and the growth-defense trade-off in quaking aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Christopher T; Stevens, Michael T; Anderson, Jon E; Lindroth, Richard L

    2016-06-01

    Although plant growth is generally recognized to be influenced by allocation to defense, genetic background (e.g., inbreeding), and gender, rarely have those factors been addressed collectively. In quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), phenolic glycosides (PGs) and condensed tannins (CTs) constitute up to 30 % of leaf dry weight. To quantify the allocation cost of this chemical defense, we measured growth, defense chemistry, and individual heterozygosity (H obs at 16 microsatellite loci) for male and female trees in both controlled and natural environments. The controlled environment consisted of 12 juvenile genets grown for 3 years in a common garden, with replication. The natural environment consisted of 51 mature genets in wild populations, from which we sampled multiple ramets (trees) per genet. Concentrations of PGs and CTs were negatively correlated. PGs were uncorrelated with growth, but CT production represented a major cost. Across the range of CT levels found in wild-grown trees, growth rates varied by 2.6-fold, such that a 10 % increase in CT concentration occurred with a 38.5 % decrease in growth. H obs had a marked effect on aspen growth: for wild trees, a 10 % increase in H obs corresponded to a 12.5 % increase in growth. In wild trees, this CT effect was significant only in females, in which reproduction seems to exacerbate the cost of defense, while the H obs effect was significant only in males. Despite the lower growth rate of low-H obs trees, their higher CT levels may improve survival, which could account for the deficit of heterozygotes repeatedly found in natural aspen populations.

  5. Telomere erosion is independent of microsatellite instability but related to loss of heterozygosity in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dian-Chun Fang; Shi-Ming Yang; Xiao-Dong Zhou; Dong-Xu Wang; Yuan-Hui Luo

    2001-01-01

    AIM To correlate the length of the telomere to microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of APC, MCC and DCC genes in gastric carcinomas. METHODS Telomeric restriction fragment (TRF) length of gastric cancer was measured with Southern blot. LOH of APC, MCC and DCC genes, microsatellite instability (MSI) and frameshift mutation of hMSH6, TGF-βR Ⅱ and BAX genes were analyzed by PCR-based methods. RESULTS Sixty-eight cases of sporadic gastric carcinoma were studied for MSI using five microsatellite markers. MSI in at least one locus was detected in 17 (25%) of 68 tumors analyzed. Frameshift mutations of hMSH6, TGF-βR Ⅱ and BAX were detected in 2,6 and 3 of gastric carcinomas respectively showing high MSI (≥ 2 loci, n = 8), but none was found in those showing Iow MSI (only one locus, n = 9) or MSS (tumor lacking MSI or stable, n = 51). Thirty-five cases, including all high MSI and Iow MSl, were studied for TRF. The mean TRF length was not correlated with clinicopathological parameters.No association was observed between TRF length and MSI or frameshift mutation. On the contrary, LOH at the DCC locus was related to telomere shortening (P< 0.01). This tendency was also observed in APC and MCC genes,although there was no statistical significance. CONCLUSION The development of gastric cancer can arise through two different genetic pathways. In high MSI gastric cancers, defective mismatch repair allows mutations to accumulate and generate the high MSI phenotype. In gastric cancers showing either Iow MSI or MSS, multiple deletions may represent the LOH pathway.Telomere erosion is independent of high MSI phenotype but related to the LOH pathway in gastric cancer.

  6. SNP array analysis reveals novel genomic abnormalities including copy neutral loss of heterozygosity in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Idbaih

    Full Text Available Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOD are rare glial tumors in adults with relative homogeneous clinical, radiological and histological features at the time of diagnosis but dramatically various clinical courses. Studies have identified several molecular abnormalities with clinical or biological relevance to AOD (e.g. t(1;19(q10;p10, IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1 mutations.To better characterize the clinical and biological behavior of this tumor type, the creation of a national multicentric network, named "Prise en charge des OLigodendrogliomes Anaplasiques (POLA," has been supported by the Institut National du Cancer (InCA. Newly diagnosed and centrally validated AOD patients and their related biological material (tumor and blood samples were prospectively included in the POLA clinical database and tissue bank, respectively.At the molecular level, we have conducted a high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, which included 83 patients. Despite a careful central pathological review, AOD have been found to exhibit heterogeneous genomic features. A total of 82% of the tumors exhibited a 1p/19q-co-deletion, while 18% harbor a distinct chromosome pattern. Novel focal abnormalities, including homozygously deleted, amplified and disrupted regions, have been identified. Recurring copy neutral losses of heterozygosity (CNLOH inducing the modulation of gene expression have also been discovered. CNLOH in the CDKN2A locus was associated with protein silencing in 1/3 of the cases. In addition, FUBP1 homozygous deletion was detected in one case suggesting a putative tumor suppressor role of FUBP1 in AOD.Our study showed that the genomic and pathological analyses of AOD are synergistic in detecting relevant clinical and biological subgroups of AOD.

  7. The contribution of recombination to heterozygosity differs among plant evolutionary lineages and life-forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verdú Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its role as a generator of haplotypic variation, little is known about how the rates of recombination evolve across taxa. Recombination is a very labile force, susceptible to evolutionary and life trait related processes, which have also been correlated with general levels of genetic diversity. For example, in plants, it has been shown that long-lived outcrossing taxa, such as trees, have higher heterozygosity (He at SSRs and allozymes than selfing or annual species. However, some of these tree taxa have surprisingly low levels of nucleotide diversity at the DNA sequence level, which points to recombination as a potential generator of genetic diversity in these organisms. In this study, we examine how genome-wide and within-gene rates of recombination evolve across plant taxa, determine whether such rates are influenced by the life-form adopted by species, and evaluate if higher genome-wide rates of recombination translate into higher He values, especially in trees. Results Estimates of genome-wide (cM/Mb recombination rates from 81 higher plants showed a significant phylogenetic signal. The use of different comparative phylogenetic models demonstrated that there is a positive correlation between recombination rate and He (0.83 ± 0.29, and that trees have higher rates of genome-wide recombination than short-lived herbs and shrubs. A significant taxonomic component was further made evident by our models, as conifers exhibited lower recombination rates than angiosperms. This trend was also found at the within-gene level. Conclusions Altogether, our results illustrate how both common ancestry and life-history traits have to be taken into account for understanding the evolution of genetic diversity and genomic rates of recombination across plant species, and highlight the relevance of species life forms to explain general levels of diversity and recombination.

  8. Detailed deletion mapping of loss of heterozygosity on 22q13 in sporadic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Tao Zheng; Zhi-Hai Peng; Chong-Zhi Zhou; Da-Peng Li; Zhao-Wen Wang; Guo-Qiang Qiu; Lin He

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Both development and progression of malignancies occur as a multistep process, requiring the activation of oncogenes and the inactivation of several tumor suppressor genes. The loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of tumor suppressor genes is believed to play a key role in carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC).In this study, we analyzed the LOH of seven loci on chromosome 22q13 in an effort to identify candidate tumor suppressor genes involved in colorectal carcinogenesis.METHODS: Matched tumor and normal tissue DNA were analyzed by PCR using fluorescence-labeled polymorphic microsatellite markers in 83 CRC patients. PCR products were eletrophoresed and LOH was determined by calculating the peak height acquired through computer software. Comparisons between LOH frequency and clinicopathological features Were performed by χ2 test.P<0.05 was considered as statistical significance.RESULTS: The average LOH frequency of chromosome 22q13 was 28.38%. The highest LOH frequency was 64.71% on D22S1160 locus, and the lowest was 21.43%on D22S1141 locus. We detected two obvious minimal deletion regions: one between markers D22S1171 and D22S274, the other flanked by markers D22S1160 and D22S1149, each about 2.7 and 1.8 cm, respectively. None had lost in all informative loci. LOH frequency on D22S1171is 50% on distal colon, which was higher than that on proximal one (P = 0.020); on D22S114 locus, none LOH event occurred in patients with liver metastasis, whilst 46.94% occurred in patients without liver metastasis (P= 0.008); on D22S1160 locus, LOH frequency in lymph nodes metastasis patients was 83.33%, which was much higher than 43.75% without lymph nodes metastasis ones (P = 0.016). There was no statistical significance between clinicopathological features and other loci.CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence of two minimal deletion regions, which may harbor putative tumor suppressor genes related to progression and metastasis in sporadic colorectal carcinoma on

  9. Analysis of APC allelic imbalance/loss of heterozygosity and APC protein expression in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gray, Sarah E

    2011-05-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene is a tumor suppressor gene which is mutated in the hereditary disease, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Somatic mutations of the APC gene have also been identified in the majority of sporadic colorectal carcinomas, and mutation of the APC gene appears to be an early step in the initiation of colon cancer. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of APC has been described in a variety of other cancer types, including renal cell carcinoma, gastric cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, endometrial cancer and oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC).

  10. Combination of Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity and Relative Fluorescent Quantification of HLA Length Polymorphisms Facilitates the Detection of a Loss of Heterozygosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Witter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of heterozygosity (LOH is a common event in malignant cells. In this work we introduce a new approach to identify patients with loss of heterozygosity in the HLA region either at first diagnosis or after HLA mismatched allogeneic HSCT. Diagnosis of LOH requires a high purity of recipient target cells. FACS is time consuming and also frequently prevented by rather nonspecific or unknown immune phenotype. The approach for recipient cell enrichment is based on HLA targeted complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC. Relative fluorescent quantification (RFQ analysis of HLA intron length polymorphisms then allows analysis of HLA heterozygosity. The approach is exemplified in recent clinical cases illustrating the detection of an acquired allele loss. As illustrated in one case with DPB1, distinct HLA loci in donor and patient were sufficient for both proof of donor cell removal and evaluation of allele loss in the patient's leukemic cells. Results were confirmed using HLA-B RFQ analysis and leukemia-associated aberrant immunophenotype (LAIP based cell sort. Both results confirmed suspected loss of HLA heterozygosity. Our approach complements or substitutes for FACS-based cell enrichment; hence it may be further developed as novel routine diagnostic tool. This allows rapid recipient cell purification and testing for loss of HLA heterozygosity before and after allogeneic HSCT in easily accessible peripheral blood samples.

  11. The 5'-end transitional CpGs between the CpG islands and retroelements are hypomethylated in association with loss of heterozygosity in gastric cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Eun-Joo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A loss of heterozygosity (LOH represents a unilateral chromosomal loss that reduces the dose of highly repetitive Alu, L1, and LTR retroelements. The aim of this study was to determine if the LOH events can affect the spread of retroelement methylation in the 5'-end transitional area between the CpG islands and their nearest retroelements. Methods The 5'-transitional area of all human genes (22,297 was measured according to the nearest retroelements to the transcription start sites. For 50 gastric cancer specimens, the level of LOH events on eight cancer-associated chromosomes was estimated using the microsatellite markers, and the 5'-transitional CpGs of 20 selected genes were examined by methylation analysis using the bisulfite-modified DNA. Results The extent of the transitional area was significantly shorter with the nearest Alu elements than with the nearest L1 and LTR elements, as well as in the extragenic regions containing a higher density of retroelements than in the intragenic regions. The CpG islands neighbouring a high density of Alu elements were consistently hypomethylated in both normal and tumor tissues. The 5'-transitional methylated CpG sites bordered by a low density of Alu elements or the L1 and LTR elements were hypomethylated more frequently in the high-level LOH cases than in the low-level LOH cases. Conclusion The 5'-transitional methylated CpG sites not completely protected by the Alu elements were hypomethylated in association with LOH events in gastric cancers. This suggests that an irreversible unbalanced decrease in the genomic dose reduces the spread of L1 methylation in the 5'-end regions of genes.

  12. E-cadherin and loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 16 in breast carcinogenesis: different genetic pathways in ductal and lobular breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss of heterozygosity at the long arm of chromosome 16 is one of the most frequent genetic events in breast cancer. In the search for tumour suppressor genes that are the target of loss of heterozygosity at 16q, the E-cadherin gene CDH1 was unveiled by the identification of truncating mutations in the retained copy. However, only lobular tumours showed E-cadherin mutations. Whereas investigations are still devoted to finding the target genes in the more frequent ductal breast cancers, other studies suspect the E-cadherin gene to also be the target in this tumour type. The present article discusses the plausibility of those two lines of thought

  13. Influence of breed, heterozygosity, and disease incidence on estimates of variance components of respiratory disease in preweaned beef calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowder, G D; Van Vleck, L D; Cundiff, L V; Bennett, G L

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize genetic and environmental factors influencing bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef cattle. Records from nine purebred and three composite breeds and a variety of F1 and three-way crosses, including the progeny of 12 additional different sire breeds produced over a 20-yr period (1983 to 2002), were evaluated for breed and heterozygosity effects on the observed incidence of BRD. Heterozygosity fractions for calves and dams were defined by generalized breed origins: British, Continental, and tropically adapted. Variance components were estimated for each pure and composite breed, and across all breeds and crossbreeds. The effect of incidence of observed BRD was determined by comparing groups of low and high years of incidence. Respiratory disease in this herd followed a standard epidemiological pattern of initial introduction, reaching an epidemic stage at 70 to 170 d of age, followed by a period of rapid decrease to weaning. Estimates of heritability of incidence of BRD were low, ranging from 0.00 to 0.26, with overall estimates of 0.07 and 0.19 depending on the data set analyzed. The highest incidence of BRD in preweaned calves occurred in the Braunvieh breed (18.8%). The genetic correlation between the direct and maternal genetic effects was generally large and negative, suggesting dams genetically superior for resisting BRD raise calves that are more susceptible. Perhaps maternally superior dams provide passive immunity to their calves, which delays the development of the calves' direct immune system, making them more prone to BRD during the preweaning period. Heterozygosity of calves decreased the incidence of BRD compared with purebred cattle. Calves that were Continental x British or tropically adapted x British breeds had a lower incidence of BRD than did calves of British x British breeds. As the annual incidence of BRD increased, there was an associated increase in the heritability estimate. The estimated

  14. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP)-Based Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) Testing by Real Time PCR in Patients Suspect of Myeloproliferative Disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijsmans, C.J.; Poodt, J.; Damen, J.; Linden, J.C. van der; Savelkoul, P.H.; Pruijt, J.F.M.; Hilbink, M.; Hermans, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    During tumor development, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) often occurs. When LOH is preceded by an oncogene activating mutation, the mutant allele may be further potentiated if the wild-type allele is lost or inactivated. In myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) somatic acquisition of JAK2V617F may be fol

  15. Start of reproduction and allozyme heterozygosity in Pinus sibirica under different techniques of artificial forest stand establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Velisevich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Siberian stone pine (Pinus sibirica Du Tour is one of the main forest-forming tree species in boreal forests of Eurasia. Large edibleseeds of this species have an important resource value because of their high nutritious properties. Development of approaches toestablishment of early cone producing Siberian stone pine stands including utilization of corresponding genetic background is one of the priorities of forest resource management. The goal of our study was to evaluate the effect of stand density on the differentiation of trees bythe age of first reproduction and the relationship of allozyme heterozygosity and morphological traits variability in Siberian stone pine.Morphological and allozyme variability in artificial Pinus sibirica stands with high and low density was investigated. In the high-densitystand the distance between trees was 0.7 and 3 meters (4080 trees per ha while in the lowdensity stand it was 8 and 8 meters (144 treesper ha. Age of formation of first male and female cones was evaluated by retrospective method based on analysis of tracks of cones ona shoot bark. Tree height, diameter and number of male, female and vegetative shoots in a crown of model trees were measured.Genotypes of the trees were determined by 29 isozyme loci coding for 16 enzymes (ADH, FDH, FEST, GDH, GOT, IDH, LAP, MDH, MNR, PEPCA, 6-PGD, PGI, PGM, SDH, SKDH, SOD. In the low-density stand, the portion of generative trees was higher and differentiation of trees by age of reproduction starting was lower in spite of the smaller age of trees as compared to the high-density stand. Inboth samples, the age of formation of first generative organs was related negatively with stem height, stem diameter and number offemale shoots. In the high-density stand, positive relation of age of first reproduction with total number of shoots and number ofmale shoots was found. In both samples nonreproductive trees were less heterozygous at

  16. Mutations in PTCH and XPA heterozygosity in x-irradiated subjects with high multiplicity of basal cell carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.; Zhao, P.; Roy, N.; Shore, R.; Loomis, C. [NYU, New York, NY (United States). School of Medicine

    2000-07-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) were obtained from subjects who had been treated with x-ray for tinea capitis at mean age 8 yr (average dose 3.0 Gy) and who have developed multiple (>5) skin cancers 35-40 years later. By allelic loss analysis, 9/10 tumors from 3 patients exhibited loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in one or more microsatellite markers in chromosome location 9q22.3. The xeroderma pigmentosum A (XPA) and PTCH (nevoid BCC syndrome (NBCCS)) genes are located in region 9q22.3, and often LOH in the region means that alleles of both genes are lost. Mutations were found in the undeleted PTCH allele in 2/9 BCCs, which is consistent with the two-allele inactivation model. A similar analysis for the XPA gene showed 5/9 BCCs with probable inactivating mutations. In 1 patient 5/5 cancers and normal blood showed the same 14 base deletion in codon 256-260 indicating this person was an XPA heterozygote. The same 5 cancers exhibited LOH in region 9q22.3 making it likely that 1 allele of both PTCH and XPA were lost. These results suggest how 2 genes could combine to produce an increase in susceptibility to X-ray-induced carcinogenesis in connection with UV as a second exogenous carcinogen (Supported by NIEHS and NCI). (author)

  17. Loss-of-heterozygosity on chromosome 19q in early-stage serous ovarian cancer is associated with recurrent disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skirnisdottir Ingiridur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease and prognosis for apparently similar cases of ovarian cancer varies. Recurrence of the disease in early stage (FIGO-stages I-II serous ovarian cancer results in survival that is comparable to those with recurrent advanced-stage disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if there are specific genomic aberrations that may explain recurrence and clinical outcome. Methods Fifty-one women with early stage serous ovarian cancer were included in the study. DNA was extracted from formalin fixed samples containing tumor cells from ovarian tumors. Tumor samples from thirty-seven patients were analysed for allele-specific copy numbers using OncoScan single nucleotide polymorphism arrays from Affymetrix and the bioinformatic tool Tumor Aberration Prediction Suite. Genomic gains, losses, and loss-of-heterozygosity that associated with recurrent disease were identified. Results The most significant differences (p  Conclusions The results of our study indicate that presence of two aberrations in TP53 on 17p and LOH on 19q in early stage serous ovarian cancer is associated with recurrent disease. Further studies related to the findings of chromosomes 17 and 19 are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism behind the recurring genomic aberrations and the poor clinical outcome.

  18. Genome Sequencing and Mapping Reveal Loss of Heterozygosity as a Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation in the Vegetable Pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finely, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Sotrey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2012-02-07

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic or genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in diverse isolates. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30percent of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single-nucleotide variant sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici.

  19. Testing the influence of family structure and outbreeding depression on heterozygosity-fitness correlations in small populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan-Pineau, Helene; Folly, Joy; Crochet, Pierre-Andre; David, Patrice

    2012-11-01

    Theory predicts that positive heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) arise as a consequence of inbreeding, which is often assumed to have a strong impact in small, fragmented populations. Yet according to empirical data, HFC in such populations seem highly variable and unpredictable. We here discuss two overlooked phenomena that may contribute to this variation. First, in a small population, each generation may consist of a few families. This generates random correlations between particular alleles and fitness (AFCs, allele-fitness correlations) and results in too liberal tests for HFC. Second, in some contexts, small populations receiving immigrants may be more impacted by outbreeding depression than by inbreeding depression, resulting in negative rather than positive HFC. We investigated these processes through a case study in tadpole cohorts of Pelodytes punctatus living in small ponds. We provide evidence for a strong family structure and significant AFC in this system, as well as an example of negative HFC. By simulations, we show that this negative HFC cannot be a spurious effect of family structure, and therefore reflects outbreeding depression in the studied population. Our example suggests that a detailed examination of AFC and HFC patterns can provide valuable insights into the internal genetic structure and sources of fitness variation in small populations.

  20. Comparative genomic hybridization in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: correlation with interphase cytogenetics and loss of heterozygosity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, I; Popp, S; Granzow, M; Schoell, B; Holtgreve-Grez, H; Takeuchi, S; Schrappe, M; Harbott, J; Teigler-Schlegel, A; Zimmermann, M; Fischer, C; Koeffler, H P; Bartram, C R; Jauch, A

    2001-01-15

    We used comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to study DNA copy number changes in 71 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) including 50 B-lineage and 21 T-ALLs. Forty-two patients (59%) showed genomic imbalances whereby gains were more frequently observed than losses (127 vs. 29). Gains most commonly affected the entire chromosomes 21 and 10 (19.7% each), 6, 14, 18, X (15.5% each), 17 (14.1%) and 4 (11.3%). Highly hyperdiploid karyotypes (chromosome number >50) occurred more frequently in B-lineage than in T-lineage ALL (24% vs. 4.8%). In both cell lineages deletions were mainly detected on 9p (14.1%) and 12p (8.4%), and on 6q in T-lineage ALL (4.2%). These findings were compared with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 6q, 9p, 11q, and 12p previously performed in 56 of the 71 patients. Among 54 sites of LOH, CGH revealed losses of the respective chromosome arms in 17 LOH-positive regions (31.5%). G-banding analysis and interphase cytogenetics with subregional probes for 14 loci confirmed the presence of genomic imbalances as detected by CGH. We, therefore, conclude that, in the absence of cytogenetic data, CGH represents a suitable method for identifying hyperdiploid karyotypes as well as prognostically relevant deletions in ALL patients. PMID:11172898

  1. Immune escape from NY-ESO-1-specific T-cell therapy via loss of heterozygosity in the MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klippel, Z K; Chou, J; Towlerton, A M; Voong, L N; Robbins, P; Bensinger, W I; Warren, E H

    2014-03-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy of tumors with T cells specific for the cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 has shown great promise in preclinical models and in early stage clinical trials. Tumor persistence or recurrence after NY-ESO-1-specific therapy occurs, however, and the mechanisms of recurrence remain poorly defined. In a murine xenograft model of NY-ESO-1(+) multiple myeloma, we observed tumor recurrence after adoptive transfer of CD8(+) T cells genetically redirected to the prototypic NY-ESO-1157-165 peptide presented by HLA-A*02:01. Analysis of the myeloma cells that had escaped from T-cell control revealed intact expression of NY-ESO-1 and B2M, but selective, complete loss of HLA-A*02:01 expression from the cell surface. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) involving the HLA-A locus was identified in the tumor cells, and further analysis revealed selective loss of the allele encoding HLA-A*02:01. Although LOH involving the MHC has not been described in myeloma patients with persistent or recurrent disease after immune therapies such as allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), it has been described in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia who relapsed after allogeneic HCT. These results suggest that MHC loss should be evaluated in patients with myeloma and other cancers who relapse after adoptive NY-ESO-1-specific T-cell therapy.

  2. CCR5-Δ32 Heterozygosity, HIV-1 Reservoir Size, and Lymphocyte Activation in Individuals Receiving Long-term Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Timothy J; Hanhauser, Emily; Harrison, Linda J; Palmer, Christine D; Romero-Tejeda, Marisol; Jost, Stephanie; Bosch, Ronald J; Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a case-controlled study of the associations of CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reservoir size, lymphocyte activation, and CCR5 expression in 114 CCR5(Δ32/WT) and 177 wild-type CCR5 AIDS Clinical Trials Group participants receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Overall, no significant differences were found between groups for any of these parameters. However, higher levels of CCR5 expression correlated with lower amounts of cell-associated HIV-1 RNA. The relationship between CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity, CCR5 expression, and markers of HIV-1 persistence is likely to be complex and may be influenced by factors such as the duration of ART.

  3. Compound heterozygosity for a novel and a recurrent MFRP gene mutation in a family with the nanophthalmos-retinitis pigmentosa complex

    OpenAIRE

    Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Quiroz-González, Miguel A.; Quiroz-Reyes, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To report a new familial case of the recently described autosomal recessive syndrome of nanophthalmos-retinitis pigmentosa-foveoschisis-optic disc drusen, which arises from compound heterozygosity for Membrane Frizzled-Related Protein (MFRP) mutations in a sibling pair of Mexican origin. Methods Ophthalmological assessment included slit-lamp and dilated fundus examination, applanation tonometry, fundus photography, A-mode and B-mode ultrasound examination, electroretinogram, fluoresce...

  4. Using heterozygosity-fitness correlations to study inbreeding depression in an isolated population of white-tailed deer founded by few individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommer, Jon E; Kekkonen, Jaana; Wikström, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    A heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) may reflect inbreeding depression, but the extent to which they do so is debated. HFCs are particularly likely to occur after demographic disturbances such as population bottleneck or admixture. We here study HFC in an introduced and isolated ungulate population of white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus in Finland founded in 1934 by four individuals. A total of 422 ≥ 1-year-old white-tailed deer were collected in the 2012 hunting season in southern Finland and genotyped for 14 microsatellite loci. We find significant identity disequilibrium as estimated by g 2. Heterozygosity was positively associated with size- and age-corrected body mass, but not with jaw size or (in males) antler score. Because of the relatively high identity disequilibrium, heterozygosity of the marker panel explained 51% of variation in inbreeding. Inbreeding explained approximately 4% of the variation in body mass and is thus a minor, although significant source of variation in body mass in this population. The study of HFC is attractive for game- and conservation-oriented wildlife management because it presents an affordable and readily used approach for genetic monitoring that allowing identification of fitness costs associated with genetic substructuring in what may seem like a homogeneous population. PMID:25691963

  5. Diagnostic ramifications of ocular vascular occlusion as a first thrombotic event associated with factor V Leiden and prothrombin gene heterozygosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schockman, Samantha; Glueck, Charles J; Hutchins, Robert K; Patel, Jaykumar; Shah, Parth; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to assess the diagnostic ramifications of vascular occlusion of the ocular vein and artery as a first thrombotic event associated with factor V Leiden (FVL) and/or prothrombin gene (PTG) heterozygosity. Methods Patients with ocular vein (n=191) and artery (n=74) occlusion, free of cardioembolic etiologies, were sequentially referred from vitreoretinal specialists for measurement of thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis and compared to 110 healthy normal controls. Results Of the 265 patients, 29 (11%; 17 women, 12 men) of all referred ocular vascular occlusion (OVO) cases were found to be heterozygous for FVL and/or PTG, including 16 with FVL, 12 with PTG, and 1 with both. Of the 29 cases, 16 had central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), 2 branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO), 5 nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NA-AION), 3 retinal artery occlusion (RAO), 2 amaurosis fugax (AF), and 1 had both CRVO and RAO. Of the 16 FVL cases, 15 (94%) had OVO as a first thrombotic event without prior deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE); 6 (38%) also had other thrombotic events, including recurrent miscarriage, osteonecrosis, ischemic stroke, and/or ischemic colitis; and 5 (31%) had immediate family members with previous venous thromboembolism (VTE). Of the 12 PTG cases, 9 (75%) had OVO as a first thrombotic event, 5 (42%) experienced VTE other than DVT or PE, and 6 (50%) had immediate family members with VTE. In one patient with both FVL and PTG, DVT occurred before BRVO. Of the 17 women with FVL and/or PTG mutations, 7 (41%) experienced ≥1 miscarriage, 6 (35%) were on estrogen therapy, and 1 (6%) was on clomiphene. Conclusion Of the 265 patients with OVO, 29 (11%) had FVL and/or PTG, and 83% of these 29 cases presented with OVO as their first thrombotic event. By diagnosing thrombophilia as an etiology for OVO, the ophthalmologist opens a window to family screening and preventive therapy. PMID:25897198

  6. [Early loss of heterozygosity on chromosome arm 16q in flat epithelial atypia of the breast. Detection by microsatellite analyses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H; Dahrenmöller, C; Agelepoulos, K; Hungermann, D; Böcker, W

    2008-11-01

    With the improvement of breast carcinoma screening, pre-malignant cell lesions such as flat epithelial atypia (FEA) are detected more frequently. Several studies have demonstrated that FEA show features of a ductal neoplasia, but is it really a precursor lesion? We have started a comparative genetic analysis of a panel of nine microsatellite markers on six different chromosomal regions to investigate whether FEAs show the same characteristic genetic alterations as ductal carcinomas in situ (DCISs) and invasive carcinoma of the breast. FEAs, DCISs and invasive carcinomas of the same patients were microdissected using PALM micro laser technology. DNA was isolated using the QIAamp DNA Micro Kit (QIAGEN). We have investigated a set of the polymorphic microsatellite markers D7S522, D8S522, NEFL, D10S541 (PTEN), D13S153 (RB1), D16S400, D16S402, D16S422 and D17S855 (BRCA1) using multiplex PCR for the detection of allelic imbalances. Most of the investigated FEAs showed a lower frequency of loss of heterozygosity than associated DCISs or invasive carcinomas. However, we were able to detect the same alterations in FEAs as in DCISs or invasive carcinomas in a number of cases. Notably, the microsatellite marker on 16q showed more prevalent allelic imbalances in FEAs than the other investigated markers. One of the hallmarks in the pathogenesis of a large subgroup of invasive breast carcinomas is the early loss of chromosome arm 16q. In this study, we were able to detect frequent genetic alterations on chromosome 16q in FEAs, associated DCISs and invasive carcinomas. This suggests that FEA is a precursor lesion in the low-grade pathway.

  7. Identifying selected regions from heterozygosity and divergence using a light-coverage genomic dataset from two human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taras K Oleksyk

    Full Text Available When a selective sweep occurs in the chromosomal region around a target gene in two populations that have recently separated, it produces three dramatic genomic consequences: 1 decreased multi-locus heterozygosity in the region; 2 elevated or diminished genetic divergence (F(ST of multiple polymorphic variants adjacent to the selected locus between the divergent populations, due to the alternative fixation of alleles; and 3 a consequent regional increase in the variance of F(ST (S(2F(ST for the same clustered variants, due to the increased alternative fixation of alleles in the loci surrounding the selection target. In the first part of our study, to search for potential targets of directional selection, we developed and validated a resampling-based computational approach; we then scanned an array of 31 different-sized moving windows of SNP variants (5-65 SNPs across the human genome in a set of European and African American population samples with 183,997 SNP loci after correcting for the recombination rate variation. The analysis revealed 180 regions of recent selection with very strong evidence in either population or both. In the second part of our study, we compared the newly discovered putative regions to those sites previously postulated in the literature, using methods based on inspecting patterns of linkage disequilibrium, population divergence and other methodologies. The newly found regions were cross-validated with those found in nine other studies that have searched for selection signals. Our study was replicated especially well in those regions confirmed by three or more studies. These validated regions were independently verified, using a combination of different methods and different databases in other studies, and should include fewer false positives. The main strength of our analysis method compared to others is that it does not require dense genotyping and therefore can be used with data from population-based genome SNP scans

  8. Frequent loss of heterozygosity in two distinct regions,8p23.1 and 8p22,in hepatocelluar carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomoe Lu; Hiroshi Hano; Chenxi Meng; Keisuke Nagatsuma; Satoru Chiba; Masahiro Ikegami

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To identify the precise location of putative tumor suppressor genes(TSGs)on the short arm of chromosome 8 in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC).METHODS:We used 16 microsatellite markers informative in Japanese patients,which were selected from 61 published markers,on 8p,to analyze the frequency of loss of heterozygosity(LOH)in each region in 33 cases(56 lesions)of HCC.RESULTS:The frequency of LOH at 8p23.2-21 with at least one marker was 63%(20/32)in the informative cases.More specifically,the frequency of LOH at 8p23.2,8p23.1,8p22,and 8p21 was 6%,52%,47%,and 13% in HCC cases.The LOH was significantly more frequent at 8p23.1 and 8p22 than the average(52% vs 22%,P = 0.0008;and 47% vs 22%,P = 0.004,respectively)or others sites,such as 8p23.2(52% vs 6%,P = 0.003;47% vs 22%,P = 0.004)and 8p21(52% vs 13%,P = 0.001;47% vs 13%,P = 0.005)in liver cancer on the basis of cases.Notably,LOH frequency was significantly higher at D8S277,D8S503,D8S1130,D8S552,D8S254 and D8S258 than at the other sites.However,no allelic loss was detected at any marker on 8p in the lesions of nontumor liver tissues.CONCLUSION:Deletion of 8p,especially the loss of 8p23.1-22,is an important event in the initiation or promotion of HCC.Our results should be useful in identifying critical genes that might lie at 8p23.1-22.

  9. Partial protective effect of CCR5-Delta 32 heterozygosity in a cohort of heterosexual Italian HIV-1 exposed uninfected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cauda Roberto

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite multiple sexual exposure to HIV-1 virus, some individuals remain HIV-1 seronegative (exposed seronegative, ESN. The mechanisms underlying this resistance remain still unclear, although a multifactorial pathogenesis can be hypothesised. Although several genetic factors have been related to HIV-1 resistance, the homozigosity for a mutation in CCR5 gene (the 32 bp deletion, i.e. CCR5-Delta32 allele is presently considered the most relevant one. In the present study we analysed the genotype at CCR5 locus of 30 Italian ESN individuals (case group who referred multiple unprotected heterosexual intercourse with HIV-1 seropositive partner(s, for at least two years. One hundred and twenty HIV-1 infected patients and 120 individuals representative of the general population were included as control groups. Twenty percent of ESN individuals had heterozygous CCR5-Delta 32 genotype, compared to 7.5% of HIV-1 seropositive and 10% of individuals from the general population, respectively. None of the analysed individuals had CCR5-Delta 32 homozygous genotype. Sequence analysis of the entire open reading frame of CCR5 was performed in all ESN subjects and no polymorphisms or mutations were identified. Moreover, we determined the distribution of C77G variant in CD45 gene, which has been previously related to HIV-1 infection susceptibility. The frequency of the C77G variant showed no significant difference between ESN subjects and the two control groups. In conclusion, our data show a significantly higher frequency of CCR5-Delta 32 heterozygous genotype (p = 0.04 among the Italian heterosexual ESN individuals compared to HIV-1 seropositive patients, suggesting a partial protective role of CCR5-Delta 32 heterozygosity in this cohort.

  10. Loss of heterozygosity of Kras2 gene on 12p12-13 in Chinese colon carcinoma patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Wan; Hong Li; Yuan Li; Mei-Ling Zhu; Po Zhao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on 12p12-13 in Chinese colon carcinoma patients.METHODS: DNA was extracted from 10 specimens of cancer tissue, 10 specimens of adjacent tissue and 10specimens of normal tissue, respectively. LOH of Kras2gene was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using 11 microsatellite markers on 12p-12-13.RESULTS: LOH of Kras gene was detected at least on one marker of 12p-12-13 in 30% (3/10) of adjacent tissue specimens. The highest frequency of LOH was identified on D12S1034 in 28.57% (2/7) of adjacent tissue specimens. LOH was detected at least on one marker of 12p12-13 in 60% (6/10) of carcinoma tissue specimens, the most frequent LOH was found on D12S1034 and D12S1591 in 42.86% (3/7) of carcinoma tissue specimens. LOH was detected in 30% (3/10) of carcinoma tissue specimens, 30% (3/10) of adjacent tissue specimens, and no signal in 1% (1/0) carcinoma tissue specimen. The occurrence of LOH did not correlate with sex, age, tumor size and lymph node metastasis.CONCLUSION: Genomic instability may occur on 12p-12-13 of Kras2 gene in the development and progression of colon carcinoma. The high LOH of Kras2 gene may directly influence the transcription and translation of wild type Kras2 gene.

  11. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 22 in sporadic schwannoma and its relation to the proliferation of tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Liu-guan; SUN Qing-fang; Tirakotai Wuttipong; ZHAO Wei-guo; SHEN Jian-kang; LUO Qi-zhong; Bertalanffy Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Background Schwannoma is the tumor arising mainly from the cranial and spinal nerves. Bilateral vestibular schwannoma is the hallmark of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). The NF2 gene has been cloned with comprehensive analysis of its mutations in schwannoma. However, most studies focused on vestibular schwannoma. There are differences in proliferation of tumor cell and ultrastructure between vestibular and spinal schwannomas. It is unknown whether genetic alterations in vestibular schwannoma are different from those in non-vestibular schwannoma. We analyzed the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 22 in patients with sporadic schwannoma including vestibular and spinal schwannomas and correlated this genetic alteration with tumor proliferation. Methods In 54 unrelated patients without clinical NF1 or NF2, 36 patients had sporadic vestibular schwannoma, and 18 dorsal spinal root schwannoma. Four highly polymorphic linkage to NF2 gene microsatellite DNA markers (D22S264, D22S268, D22S280, CRYB2) were used to analyze LOH. The proliferative index was evaluated by Ki-67 and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunostaining. Student's t test was used to analyze the difference of the proliferative index between schwannoma with LOH and that without LOH. The difference of the frequency of LOH in vestibular and spinal schwannomas was investigated by the chi-square test. Results Twenty-three schwannomas (42.6%, 23/54) showed allele loss. The frequency of LOH in vestibular schwannoma was significantly higher than that in spinal schwannoma (χ2=5.14, P<0.05). The proliferative index of schwannoma with LOH was significantly higher than that without LOH (tki-67=2.97, P=0.0045; tPCNA=2.93, P=0.0051). Conclusions LOH on chromosome 22 is a frequent event in the tumorigenesis of sporadic schwannoma. And, there is a correlation between LOH on chromosome 22 and proliferative activity in schwannoma. The frequency of LOH in vestibular schwannoma is significantly different from

  12. Heterozygosity for Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases in non-Jewish Americans with ancestry from Ireland, Great Britain, or Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branda, Kelly Johnston; Tomczak, Jerzy; Natowicz, Marvin R

    2004-01-01

    Previous reports have found that non-Jewish Americans with ancestry from Ireland have an increased frequency of heterozygosity for Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), although frequency estimates are substantially different. Our goal in this study was to determine the frequency of heterozygosity for TSD and Sandhoff diseases (SD) among Irish Americans, as well as in persons of English, Scottish, and/or Welsh ancestry and in individuals with Italian heritage, who were referred for determination of their heterozygosity status and who had no known family history of TSD or SD or of heterozygosity for these conditions. Of 610 nonpregnant subjects with Irish background, 24 TSD heterozygotes were identified by biochemical testing, corresponding to a heterozygote frequency of 1 in 25 (4%; 95% CI, 1/39-1/17). In comparison, of 322 nonpregnant individuals with ancestry from England, Scotland, or Wales, two TSD heterozygotes were identified (1 in 161 or 0.62%; 95% CI, 1/328-1/45), and three TSD heterozygotes were ascertained from 436 nonpregnant individuals with Italian heritage (1 in 145 or 0.69%; 95% CI, 1/714-1/50). Samples from 21 Irish heterozygotes were analyzed for HEXA gene mutations. Two (9.5%) Irish heterozygotes had the lethal + 1 IVS-9 G --> A mutation, whereas 9 (42.8%) had a benign pseudodeficiency mutation. No mutation was found in 10 (47.6%) heterozygotes. These data allow for a frequency estimate of deleterious alleles for TSD among Irish Americans of 1 in 305 (95% CI, 1/2517-1/85) to 1 in 41 (95% CI, 1/72-1/35), depending on whether one, respectively, excludes or includes enzyme-defined heterozygotes lacking a defined deleterious mutation. Pseudodeficiency mutations were identified in both of the heterozygotes with ancestry from other countries in the British Isles, suggesting that individuals with ancestry from these countries do not have an increased rate of TSD heterozygosity. Four SD heterozygotes were found among individuals of Italian descent, a frequency of 1 in

  13. Loss of Heterozygosity

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: Molecular Profiling Initiative, NCI *This method was successful in our lab using prostate tissue and for our specific objectives. Investigators must be aware that they will need to tailor the following protocol for their own research objectives and tissue under study*. This method is used to detect genomic DNA deletions in tumor cells. For a more detailed discussion of applying this approach to microdissected samples, see [Allelic Loss Studies](http://cgap-mf.nih.gov/ProstateE...

  14. Integrated analysis of copy number and loss of heterozygosity in primary breast carcinomas using high-density SNP array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Ho Ching; Naidu, Rakesh; Seong, Mun Kein; Har, Yip Cheng; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd

    2011-09-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, marked by extensive chromosomal aberrations. In this study, we aimed to explicate the underlying chromosomal copy number (CN) alterations and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) implicated in a cohort of Malaysian hospital-based primary breast carcinoma samples using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array platform. The analysis was conducted by hybridizing the extracted DNA of 70 primary breast carcinomas and 37 normal peripheral blood samples to the Affymetrix 250K Sty SNP arrays. Locus-specific CN aberrations and LOH were statistically summarized using the binary segmentation algorithm and hidden Markov model. Selected genes from the SNP array analysis were also validated using quantitative real-time PCR. The merging of CN and LOH data fabricated distinctive integrated alteration profiles, which were comprised of finely demarcated minimal sites of aberrations. The most prevalent gains (≥ 30%) were detected at the 8q arm: 8q23.1, 8q23.3, 8q24.11, 8q24.13, 8q24.21, 8q24.22, 8q24.23 and 8q24.3, whilst the most ubiquitous losses (≥ 20%) were noted at the 8p12, 8p21.1, 8p21.2, 8p21.1-p21.2, 8p21.3, 8p22, 8p23.1, 8p23.1‑p23.2, 8p23.3, 17p11.2, 17p12, 17p11.2-p12, 17p13.1 and 17p13.2 regions. Copy-neutral LOH was characterized as the most prevailing LOH event, in which the most frequent distributions (≥ 30%) were revealed at 3p21.31, 5q33.2, 12q24.12, 12q24.12‑q24.13 and 14q23.1. These findings offer compre-hensive genome-wide views on breast cancer genomic changes, where the most recurrent gain, loss and copy-neutral LOH events were harboured within the 8q24.21, 8p21.1 and 14q23.1 loci, respectively. This will facilitate the uncovering of true driver genes pertinent to breast cancer biology and the develop-ment of prospective therapeutics. PMID:21687935

  15. Diagnostic ramifications of ocular vascular occlusion as a first thrombotic event associated with factor V Leiden and prothrombin gene heterozygosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schockman S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Samantha Schockman,1 Charles J Glueck,2,3 Robert K Hutchins,4,5 Jaykumar Patel,2 Parth Shah,2 Ping Wang2 1Internal Medicine Residency Program, The Jewish Hospital-Mercy Health, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; 2Cholesterol, Metabolism, and Thrombosis Center, The Jewish Hospital-Mercy Health, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; 3Mercy Health Physicians, Mercy Health, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; 4Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; 5Cincinnati Eye Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA Aim: This study aimed to assess the diagnostic ramifications of vascular occlusion of the ocular vein and artery as a first thrombotic event associated with factor V Leiden (FVL and/or prothrombin gene (PTG heterozygosity. Methods: Patients with ocular vein (n=191 and artery (n=74 occlusion, free of cardioembolic etiologies, were sequentially referred from vitreoretinal specialists for measurement of thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis and compared to 110 healthy normal controls. Results: Of the 265 patients, 29 (11%; 17 women, 12 men of all referred ocular vascular occlusion (OVO cases were found to be heterozygous for FVL and/or PTG, including 16 with FVL, 12 with PTG, and 1 with both. Of the 29 cases, 16 had central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO, 2 branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO, 5 nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NA-AION, 3 retinal artery occlusion (RAO, 2 amaurosis fugax (AF, and 1 had both CRVO and RAO. Of the 16 FVL cases, 15 (94% had OVO as a first thrombotic event without prior deep venous thrombosis (DVT or pulmonary embolism (PE; 6 (38% also had other thrombotic events, including recurrent miscarriage, osteonecrosis, ischemic stroke, and/or ischemic colitis; and 5 (31% had immediate family members with previous venous thromboembolism (VTE. Of the 12 PTG cases, 9 (75% had OVO as a first thrombotic event, 5 (42% experienced VTE other than DVT or PE, and 6 (50% had immediate family members with VTE. In one patient

  16. Analysis of loss of heterozygosity of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarial carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luković Ljiljana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/aim: Among the genes involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, there has been increased interest in tumor-suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1. Both of the genes make control of cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. The p53 is a "genome guardian" inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, while BRCA1 mutations are found mostly in breast and ovarian cancer. The aim of this investigation was to establish the frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH in the regions of the genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarian carcinomas, and to analyze the association of LOH with the disease stage and prognosis. Methods. We analyzed 20 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of epithelilal ovarian carcinoma. DNA for molecular-genetic analysis was extracted from the tumor tissue and blood as normal tissue of each person. Microsatellite markers of the regions of genes p53 and BRCA1 were amplified by PCR method. The determination of allelic status of microsatellites and detection of LOH was performed after PAA gel electroforesis. Results. Both of the analyzed microsatellite markers were informative in 13/20 (65% cases. In the region of gene p53, LOH was established in 4/13 (30.7% tumors. One of them had histological gradus G1, one had gradus G2, and two of them had gradus G3, while all were with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO IIIc stage. In the region of gene BRCA1, LOH was detected in 5/13 (38.5% tumors. Four of them had histological gradus G2, and one had gradus G3, while by the (FIGO classification one was with stage Ib, one was with stage IIIb, while the three were with stage IIIc. LOH in both of the analyzed regions was detected in one tumor (7.7%, with histological gradus G3 and the FIGO IIIc stage. Conclusion. The frequency of LOH in epthelial ovarian carcinomas was 30.7% and 38.5% for p53 and BRCA1 gene regions, respectively. Most of tumors with LOH had histological gradus G2 or G3, and the clinical FIGO stage IIIc, suggesting the

  17. Heterozygosity of mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) genotypes predicts advantage (heterosis) in relation to fatal outcome in intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellemann, Dorthe; Larsson, Lars Anders Sune; Madsen, Hans O;

    2007-01-01

    .0045) at completion. No difference in MBL2 frequency was observed between patients and controls at baseline, and between patients classified as having sepsis or not. However, patients with the MBL2 O/O genotype had an increased frequency of Gram-positive bacterial infection (P = 0.01). Heterozygosity for MBL2 alleles...... by a PCR-based assay. Homozygosity for MBL2 variant alleles (O/O) causing MBL structural defects was associated with the highest adjusted mortality rate followed by homozygosity for the normal MBL2 allele (A/A) encoding high MBL levels, whereas heterozygous A/O patients had the most favourable outcome (P...

  18. β-Thalassaemia Major in a Spanish Patient due to a Compound Heterozygosity for CD39 C→T/−28 A→C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Gamarra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A Spanish male patient with β-thalassaemia major was studied. Compound heterozygosity was found for one of the most common β-globin gene mutations in the Spanish population (codon 39 C→T and for a mutation in the TATA box element of the β-globin gene promoter (−28 A→C mutation. To our knowledge this is the first report of a CD39 C→T and −28 A→C change association and the first report of the −28 A→C substitution in a Spanish patient.

  19. Heterozygosity of Knob-Associated Tandem Repeats and Knob Instability in Mitotic Chromosomes of Zea (Zea mays L. and Z. diploperennis Iltis Doebley)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Yong XIONG; Yong LIU; Yong-Gang HE; Yun-Chun SONG; Ke-Xiu LI; Guan-Yuan HE

    2005-01-01

    Knobs are blocks of heterochromatin present on chromosomes of maize (Zea mays L.) and its relatives that have effects on the frequency of genetic recombination, as well as on chromosome behavior.Knob heterozygosity and instability in six maize inbred lines and one Z. diploperennis Iltis Doebley line were investigated using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with knob-associated tandem repeats (180 bp and 350 bp (TR-1)) as probes. Signals of seven heterozygous knobs containing 180-bp repeats and of one heterozygous knob containing TR- 1 were captured in chromosomes of all materials tested according to the results of FISH, which demonstrates that the 180-bp repeat is the main contributor to knob heterozygosity compared with the TR-1 element. In addition, one target cell with two TR-1 signals on one homolog of chromosome 2L, which was different from the normal cells in the maize inbred line GB57,was observed, suggesting knob duplication and an instability phenomenon in the maize genome.

  20. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 11q13 in two families with acromegaly/gigantism is independent of mutations of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type I gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelha, M R; Prezant, T R; Une, K N; Glick, R P; Moskal, S F; Vaisman, M; Melmed, S; Kineman, R D; Frohman, L A

    1999-01-01

    Familial acromegaly/gigantism occurring in the absence of multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN-1) or the Carney complex has been reported in 18 families since the biochemical diagnosis of GH excess became available, and the genetic defect is unknown. In the present study we examined 2 unrelated families with isolated acromegaly/gigantism. In family A, 3 of 4 siblings were affected, with ages at diagnosis of 19, 21, and 23 yr. In family B, 5 of 13 siblings exhibited the phenotype and were diagnosed at 13, 15, 17, 17, and 24 yr of age. All 8 affected patients had elevated basal GH levels associated with high insulin-like growth factor I levels and/or nonsuppressible serum GH levels during an oral glucose tolerance test. GHRH levels were normal in affected members of family A. An invasive macroadenoma was found in 6 subjects, and a microadenoma was found in 1 subject from family B. The sequence of the GHRH receptor complementary DNA in 1 tumor from family A was normal. There was no history of consanguinity in either family, and the past medical history and laboratory results excluded MEN-1 and the Carney complex in all affected and unaffected screened subjects. Five of 8 subjects have undergone pituitary surgery to date, and paraffin-embedded pituitary blocks were available for analysis. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 11q13 was studied by comparing microsatellite polymorphisms of leukocyte and tumor DNA using PYGM (centromeric) and D11S527 (telomeric), markers closely linked to the MEN-1 tumor suppressor gene. All tumors exhibited a loss of heterozygosity at both markers. Sequencing of the MEN-1 gene revealed no germline mutations in either family, nor was a somatic mutation found in tumor DNA from one subject in family A. The integrity of the MEN-1 gene in this subject was further supported by demonstration of the presence of MEN-1 messenger ribonucleic acid, as assessed by RT-PCR. These data indicate that loss of heterozygosity in these affected family

  1. The role of proteases, endoplasmic reticulum stress and SERPINA1 heterozygosity in lung disease and alpha-1 anti-trypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2012-02-01

    The serine proteinase inhibitor alpha-1 anti-trypsin (AAT) provides an antiprotease protective screen throughout the body. Mutations in the AAT gene (SERPINA1) that lead to deficiency in AAT are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. The Z mutation encodes a misfolded variant of AAT that is not secreted effectively and accumulates intracellularly in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes and other AAT-producing cells. Until recently, it was thought that loss of antiprotease function was the major cause of ZAAT-related lung disease. However, the contribution of gain-of-function effects is now being recognized. Here we describe how both loss- and gain-of-function effects can contribute to ZAAT-related lung disease. In addition, we explore how SERPINA1 heterozygosity could contribute to smoking-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases and consider the consequences.

  2. Mitotic crossover promotes leukemogenesis in children born with TEL-AML1 via the generation of loss of heterozygosity at 12p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovski

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available TEL-AML1 (ETV6-RUNX1 fusion gene which is formed prenatally in 1% of the newborns, is a common genetic abnormality in childhood Bcell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. But only one child out of a hundred children born with this fusion gene develops leukemia (bottleneck phenomenon later in its life, if contracts the second mutation. In other words, out of a hundred children born with TEL-AML1 only one child is at risk for leukemia development, which means that TEL-AML1 fusion gene is not sufficient for overt leukemia. There is a stringent requirement for a second genetic abnormality for leukemia development and this is the real or the ultimate cause of the leukemia bottleneck phenomenon. In most cases of TEL-AML1+ leukemia, the translocation t(12;21 is complemented with the loss of the normal TEL gene, not involved in the translocation, on the contralateral 12p. The loss of the normal TEL gene, i.e. loss of heterozygosity at 12p, occurs postnatally during the mitotic proliferation of TEL-AML1+ cell in the mitotic crossing over process. Mitotic crossing over is a very rare event with a frequency rate of 10–6 in a 10 kb region. The exploration and identification of the environmental exposure(s that cause(s proliferation of the TELAML1+ cell in which approximately 106 mitoses are generated to cause 12p loss of heterozygosity, i.e. TEL gene deletion, may contribute to the introduction of preventive measures for leukemia.

  3. DNA studies are necessary for accurate patient diagnosis in compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana (HBA2:c.179>A) with deletional or nondeletional α-thalassaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Kho, Siew Leng; Ngim, Chin Fang; Chua, Kek Heng; Goh, Ai Sim; Yeoh, Seoh Leng; George, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) Adana (HBA2:c.179>A) interacts with deletional and nondeletional α-thalassaemia mutations to produce HbH disorders with varying clinical manifestations from asymptomatic to severe anaemia with significant hepatosplenomegaly. Hb Adana carriers are generally asymptomatic and haemoglobin subtyping is unable to detect this highly unstable α-haemoglobin variant. This study identified 13 patients with compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana with either the 3.7 kb gene deletion (-α(3.7)), Hb Constant Spring (HbCS) (HBA2:c.427T>C) or Hb Paksé (HBA2:429A>T). Multiplex Amplification Refractory Mutation System was used for the detection of five deletional and six nondeletional α-thalassaemia mutations. Duplex-PCR was used to confirm Hb Paksé and HbCS. Results showed 84.6% of the Hb Adana patients were Malays. Using DNA studies, compound heterozygosity for Hb Adana and HbCS (α(codon 59)α/α(CS)α) was confirmed in 11 patients. A novel point in this investigation was that DNA studies confirmed Hb Paksé for the first time in a Malaysian patient (α(codon 59)α/α(Paksé)α) after nine years of being misdiagnosis with Hb Adana and HbCS (α(codon 59)α/α(CS)α). Thus, the reliance on haematology studies and Hb subtyping to detect Hb variants is inadequate in countries where thalassaemia is prevalent and caused by a wide spectrum of mutations. PMID:27271331

  4. Loss of heterozygosity on 10q and microsatellite instability in advanced stages of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and possible association with homozygous deletion of PTEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarisbrick, J J; Woolford, A J; Russell-Jones, R; Whittaker, S J

    2000-05-01

    Previous cytogenetic studies of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) were based on limited numbers of patients and seldom showed consistent nonrandom chromosomal abnormalities. In this study, 54 tumor DNA samples from patients with CTCL were analyzed for loss of heterozygosity on 10q. Allelic loss was identified in 10 samples, all of which were from the 44 patients with mycosis fungoides (10/44 patients; 23%). Of the patients with allelic loss, 3 were among the 29 patients with early-stage myosis fungoides (T(1) or T(2)) (3/29 patients; 10%), whereas the other 7 were among the 15 patients with advanced cutaneous disease (T(3) or T(4)) (7/15 patients; 47%). The overlapping region of deletion was between 10q23 and 10q24. In addition, microsatellite instability (MSI) was present in 13 of the 54 samples (24%), 12 from patients with mycosis fungoides and 1 from a patient with Sezary syndrome. There was also an association between MSI and disease progression in patients with mycosis fungoides, with 6 of 15 (40%) patients with MSI having advanced cutaneous disease and only 6 of 29 (21%) having early-stage disease. Samples with allelic loss on 10q were analyzed for abnormalities of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (10q23.3). No tumor-specific mutations were detected, but homozygous deletion was found in 2 patients. Thus, we found loss of heterozygosity on 10q and MSI in advanced cutaneous stages of mycosis fungoides. These findings indicate that a tumor suppressor gene or genes in this region may be associated with disease progression. Furthermore, abnormalities of PTEN may be important in the pathogenesis of mycosis fungoides, but our data imply that this gene is rarely inactivated by small deletions or point mutations. (Blood. 2000;95:2937-2942)

  5. α₁-Antitrypsin protease inhibitor MZ heterozygosity is associated with airflow obstruction in two large cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørheim, Inga-Cecilie; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund;

    2010-01-01

    Severe a1-antitrypsin deficiency is a known genetic risk factor for COPD. Heterozygous (protease inhibitor [PI] MZ) individuals have moderately reduced serum levels of a1-antitrypsin, but whether they have an increased risk of COPD is uncertain....

  6. Major role for a 3p21 region and lack of involvement of the t(3;8) breakpoint region in the development of renal cell carcinoma suggested by loss of heterozygosity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anke; Hulsbeek, MMF; deJong, D; Kok, K; Veldhuis, PMJF; Roche, J; Buys, CHCM

    1996-01-01

    In a loss of heterozygosity analysis of 3p, we examined 44 sporadic cases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and matched normal tissue with 18 markers distributed over the whole p-arm. The majority of these markers clustered in three regions that have been suggested to be involved in the development of R

  7. α₁-Antitrypsin protease inhibitor MZ heterozygosity is associated with airflow obstruction in two large cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørheim, Inga-Cecilie; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund;

    2010-01-01

    Severe α₁-antitrypsin deficiency is a known genetic risk factor for COPD. Heterozygous (protease inhibitor [PI] MZ) individuals have moderately reduced serum levels of α₁-antitrypsin, but whether they have an increased risk of COPD is uncertain....

  8. Neurofibromatosis-1 heterozygosity increases microglia in a spatially and temporally restricted pattern relevant to mouse optic glioma formation and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Grant W; Pong, Winnie W; Emnett, Ryan J; White, Crystal R; Gianino, Scott M; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Gutmann, David H

    2011-01-01

    Whereas carcinogenesis requires the acquisition of driver mutations in progenitor cells, tumor growth and progression are heavily influenced by the local microenvironment. Previous studies from our laboratory have used Neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1) genetically engineered mice to characterize the role of stromal cells and signals to optic glioma formation and growth. Previously, we have shown that Nf1+/- microglia in the tumor microenvironment are critical cellular determinants of optic glioma proliferation. To define the role of microglia in tumor formation and maintenance further, we used CD11b-TK mice, in which resident brain microglia (CD11b+, CD68+, Iba1+, CD45low cells) can be ablated at specific times after ganciclovir administration. Ganciclovir-mediated microglia reduction reduced Nf1 optic glioma proliferation during both tumor maintenance and tumor development. We identified the developmental window during which microglia are increased in the Nf1+/- optic nerve and demonstrated that this accumulation reflected delayed microglia dispersion. The increase in microglia in the Nf1+/- optic nerve was associated with reduced expression of the chemokine receptor, CX3CR1, such that reduced Cx3cr1 expression in Cx3cr1-GFP heterozygous knockout mice led to a similar increase in optic nerve microglia. These results establish a critical role for microglia in the development and maintenance of Nf1 optic glioma.

  9. Loss of heterozygosity on 10q23.3 and mutation of tumor suppressor gene PTEN in gastric cancer and precancerous lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ling Li; Zhong Tian; Dong-Ying Wu; Bao-Yu Fu; Yan Xin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and mutation of tumor suppressor gene PTEN in gastric cancer and precancerous lesions.METHODS: Thirty cases of normal gastric mucosa, advanced and early stage gastric cancer, intestinal metaplasia, atrophic gastritis, and atypical hyperplasia were analyzed for PTEN LOH and mutations within the entire coding region of PTEN gene by PCR-SSCP denaturing PAGE gel electrophoresis,and PTEN mutation was detected by PCR-SSCP sequencing followed by silver staining.RESULTS: LOH rate found in respectively atrophic gastritis was 10% (3/30), intestinal metaplasia 10% (3/30), atypical hyperpiasia 13.3% (4/30), early stage gastric cancer 20%(6/30), and advanced stage gastric cancer 33.3% (9/30),None of the precancerous lesions and early stage gastric cancer showed PTEN mutations, but 10% (3/30) of the advanced stage gastric cancers, which were all positive for LOH, showed PTEN mutation.CONCLUSION: LOH of PTEN gene appears in precancerous lesions, and PTEN mutations are restricted to advanced gastric cancer, LOH and mutation of PTEN gene are closely related to the infiltration and metastasis of gastric cancer.

  10. A map of nuclear matrix attachment regions within the breast cancer loss-of-heterozygosity region on human chromosome 16q22.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaposhnikov, Sergey A; Akopov, Sergey B; Chernov, Igor P; Thomsen, Preben D; Joergensen, Claus; Collins, Andrew R; Frengen, Eirik; Nikolaev, Lev G

    2007-03-01

    There is abundant evidence that the DNA in eukaryotic cells is organized into loop domains that represent basic structural and functional units of chromatin packaging. To explore the DNA domain organization of the breast cancer loss-of-heterozygosity region on human chromosome 16q22.1, we have identified a significant portion of the scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs) within this region. Forty independent putative S/MAR elements were assigned within the 16q22.1 locus. More than 90% of these S/MARs are AT rich, with GC contents as low as 27% in 2 cases. Thirty-nine (98%) of the S/MARs are located within genes and 36 (90%) in gene introns, of which 15 are in first introns of different genes. The clear tendency of S/MARs from this region to be located within the introns suggests their regulatory role. The S/MAR resource constructed may contribute to an understanding of how the genes in the region are regulated and of how the structural architecture and functional organization of the DNA are related. PMID:17188460

  11. Analysis of two single nucleotide polymorphisms and loss of heterozygosity detection in the VHL gene in Chinese patients with sporadic renal cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ning; GONG Kan; NA Xi; WU Guan; NA Yan-qun

    2005-01-01

    @@ Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common malignant tumour in the adult kidney.Recent studies have shown that inactivation of the tumour suppressor gene VHL located in chromosome 3p25-26 region is responsible for sporadic RCCs.1 According to Kundson's two hit theory,the mechanism of inactivation of a tumour suppressor gene involves mutation,hyper-methylation and loss of heterozygosity (LOH).Mutations and hypermethylation of the VHL gene have been well analysed in RCC,but due to the deficiency of specific gene markers in the VHL region,the exact LOH frequency of the VHL gene in RCC is still unknown.Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are regarded as the third generation of human gene markers and are appropriate for LOH analysis.We searched the SNP database in the National Centre for Biotechnology Information,and selected two SNP sites located within the VHL gene region as gene markers.We analysed these two SNP sites in 79 Chinese sporadic RCC patients by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) to detect LOH frequency of the VHL gene and analyse the relationship between VHL LOH and the pathological parameters of RCC.

  12. Genome-Wide Loss of Heterozygosity and DNA Copy Number Aberration in HPV-Negative Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Their Associations with Disease-Specific Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Loomis, Melissa M; Upton, Melissa P; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Houck, John R; Doody, David R; Mendez, Eduardo; Futran, Neal; Schwartz, Stephen M; Wang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx (OSCC) is associated with high case-fatality. For reasons that are largely unknown, patients with the same clinical and pathologic staging have heterogeneous response to treatment and different probability of recurrence and survival, with patients with Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal tumors having the most favorable survival. To gain insight into the complexity of OSCC and to identify potential chromosomal changes that may be associated with OSCC mortality, we used Affymtrix 6.0 SNP arrays to examine paired DNA from peripheral blood and tumor cell populations isolated by laser capture microdissection to assess genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and DNA copy number aberration (CNA) and their associations with risk factors, tumor characteristics, and oral cancer-specific mortality among 75 patients with HPV-negative OSCC. We found a highly heterogeneous and complex genomic landscape of HPV-negative tumors, and identified regions in 4q, 8p, 9p and 11q that seem to play an important role in oral cancer biology and survival from this disease. If confirmed, these findings could assist in designing personalized treatment or in the creation of models to predict survival in patients with HPV-negative OSCC.

  13. Mapping of chromosome 20 for loss of heterozygosity in childhood ALL reveals a 1,000-kb deletion in one patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couque, N; Chambon-Pautas, C; Cavé, H; Bardet, V; Duval, M; Vilmer, E; Grandchamp, B

    1999-12-01

    The long arm of chromosome 20 displays recurrent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for microsatellite markers in blast cells from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. To further characterize the region of deletion and to precisely establish its frequency, we searched for LOH in 103 children with ALL using polymorphic markers in the previously described region of interest, namely between D20S101 and D20S887. LOH was detected in nine patients (ie with a frequency of 8.7%). Interestingly, in one patient, a small deletion was found, flanked proximally by D20S850 and distally by M201, a dinucleotide repeat identified from chromosome 20 sequences. The distance between these two markers is approximately 1000 kb. The occurrence of non-random deletions of the long arm of chromosome 20 has previously been observed in myeloid malignancies (myeloproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes) in 5-10% of patients. The small deletion in our patient is located within the common region of deletion of myeloproliferative disorders suggesting that a tumor suppressor gene may be the common target of the deletions in various types of hematological malignancies.

  14. Genome-wide loss of heterozygosity and copy number alteration in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma using the Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping 10 K array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldstein Alisa M

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is a common malignancy worldwide. Comprehensive genomic characterization of ESCC will further our understanding of the carcinogenesis process in this disease. Results Genome-wide detection of chromosomal changes was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip 10 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array, including loss of heterozygosity (LOH and copy number alterations (CNA, for 26 pairs of matched germ-line and micro-dissected tumor DNA samples. LOH regions were identified by two methods – using Affymetrix's genotype call software and using Affymetrix's copy number alteration tool (CNAT software – and both approaches yielded similar results. Non-random LOH regions were found on 10 chromosomal arms (in decreasing order of frequency: 17p, 9p, 9q, 13q, 17q, 4q, 4p, 3p, 15q, and 5q, including 20 novel LOH regions (10 kb to 4.26 Mb. Fifteen CNA-loss regions (200 kb to 4.3 Mb and 36 CNA-gain regions (200 kb to 9.3 Mb were also identified. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that the Affymetrix 10 K SNP chip is a valid platform to integrate analyses of LOH and CNA. The comprehensive knowledge gained from this analysis will enable improved strategies to prevent, diagnose, and treat ESCC.

  15. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 10q23 and mutation of the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 tumor suppressor gene in Korean hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jei-Jun; Rho, Jin-Woo; Lee, Tae-Jin; Yun, Sung-Su; Kim, Hong-Jin; Choi, Joon-Hyuk; Jeong, Daewon; Jang, Byeong-Churl; Lee, Tae-Yoon

    2007-10-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the 10q23 chromosomal region was analyzed in 18 tissue samples from Korean hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. LOH at the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) region (D10S215, AFMa086wg9 and D10S541) was found in 8 of the 18 (44.4%) HCCs. LOH (20%) and microsatellite instability (26.7%) were also frequently found at the D10S2177 locus, which is located on the telomere side of the PTEN region. LOH was found in other loci, such as AFM280we1 and D10S2281. The presence of LOH in regions other than the PTEN region on chromosome 10q23 suggested the presence of additional tumor suppressor gene(s). PTEN mutation was found in only a subset of HCCs: A single base insertion at the end of the 5'-end splice signal (AG-GUAAGUU) in intron 5 and a silent mutation in exon 6 (codon 188, CTG-Val to CTA). Our data collectively suggest that the genetic alterations of chromosome 10q23, including the PTEN gene, could be important in hepatocarcinogenesis in the Korean population. PMID:17786367

  16. A hypothesis on the origin of genetic heterozygosity in diploids and triploids in Japanese Cayratia japonica species complex (Vitaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Ishikawa, Naoko; Okada, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    We previously reported the occurrence of triploid strains in Japanese populations of Cayratia japonica (Thunb.) Gagnep. Interestingly, the triploid and most diploid strains had variably reduced pollen fertility. Two questions emerged from this earlier work: (1) How do triploids arise, and are they allotriploids or autotriploids? and (2) Why is there low pollen fertility in some diploid plants? We used a molecular genetic approach to determine the phylogenetic origins of triploids in C. japonica and the closely related species Cayratia tenuifolia (Wight & Arn.) Gagnep. In our analysis, we compared the sequences of the nuclear single-copy genes LEAFY and ASYMMETRIC LEAVES1. As a result, most triploids and diploids were heterozygous for the loci examined; the triploid genome shared an allele with the diploid genome, but other alleles differed between the ploidies. Therefore, Japanese populations of C. japonica and C. tenuifolia almost certainly arose from repeated hybridization events among genetically differentiated strains. Using our sequence data, we discuss possible scenarios accounting for the occurrence of triploids in the two species of Cayratia. PMID:22200910

  17. Conjunctival scarring in trachoma is associated with the HLA-C ligand of KIR and is exacerbated by heterozygosity at KIR2DL2/KIR2DL3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrissy H Roberts

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis is globally the predominant infectious cause of blindness and one of the most common bacterial causes of sexually transmitted infection. Infections of the conjunctiva cause the blinding disease trachoma, an immuno-pathological disease that is characterised by chronic conjunctival inflammation and fibrosis. The polymorphic Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR are found on Natural Killer cells and have co-evolved with the Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA class I system. Certain genetic constellations of KIR and HLA class I polymorphisms are associated with a number of diseases in which modulation of the innate responses to viral and intracellular bacterial pathogens is central.A sample of 134 Gambian pedigrees selected to contain at least one individual with conjunctival scarring in the F1 generation was used. Individuals (n = 830 were genotyped for HLA class I and KIR gene families. Family Based Association Tests and Case Pseudo-control tests were used to extend tests for transmission disequilibrium to take full advantage of the family design, genetic model and phenotype.We found that the odds of trachomatous scarring increased with the number of genome copies of HLA-C2 (C1/C2 OR = 2.29 BHP-value = 0.006; C2/C2 OR = 3.97 BHP-value = 0.0004 and further increased when both KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 (C2/C2 OR = 5.95 BHP-value = 0.006 were present.To explain the observations in the context of chlamydial infection and trachoma we propose a two-stage model of response and disease that balances the cytolytic response of KIR expressing NK cells with the ability to secrete interferon gamma, a combination that may cause pathology. The data presented indicate that HLA-C genotypes are important determinants of conjunctival scarring in trachoma and that KIR2DL2/KIR2DL3 heterozygosity further increases risk of conjunctival scarring in individuals carrying HLA-C2.

  18. Detailed deletion mapping of loss of heterozygosity on 9p13-23 in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma by microsatellite analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐先发; 高燕宁; 程书鈞

    2004-01-01

    Background This study was designed to investigate the hot spots of microsatellite loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on 9p13-23 in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and to find out the correlation between the incidence of microsatellite LOH and the clinicopathological parameters.Methods Tumor tissues were obtained from paraffin embedded sections with microdissection. Genomic DNA was extracted from tumor tissues and peripheral blood lymphocytes with the phenol-chloroform. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and denaturing gel electrophoresis were carried out in a set of 42 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of larynx and corresponding peripheral blood lymphocytes using 13 highly polymorphic microsatellite markers on 9p13-23. The correlation was analyzed between microsatellite LOH at the high frequency on 9p13-23 and clinicopathological parameters in the patients with squamous cell carcinoma of larynx.Results Of the 42 laryngeal cancers, 41 (97.6%) showed LOH in at least one of the microsatellite markers tested on 9p13-23. The most frequently deleted marker was D9S162 in 17 of the 19 (89.5%) informative samples. The marker D9S171, which is located on 9p21, had LOH detected in 12 of the 15 informative cases (80.0%). LOH at the D9S1748 marker (closest to the p16 gene locus) was detected in 18 of the 36 informative cases (50.0%). Allelic deletion mapping revealed two minimal regions of LOH encompassing markers D9S161-D9S171 on 9p21 and IFNA-D9S162 on 9p22-23. Multiple LOH (≥4) on 9p21-23 was found more frequently in the patients under 60 years, with supraglottic SCC or cervical lymph node metastasis than those over 60 years, with glottic SCC or without cervical lymph node metastasis (P<0.01 or 0.01, 0.05, respectively). On the contrary, there was no correlation between T stages or pathologic classification and the frequency of LOH on 9p21-23 in 42 SCC of Larynx.Conclusions These findings imply the presence of at least two putative tumor suppressor genes on 9p13-23 in

  19. delta beta-Thalassaemia in Sicily: report of a case of double heterozygosity for A gamma delta beta-thalassaemia and A gamma G gamma delta beta-thalassaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Musumeci,S; Romeo, M A; Pizzarelli, G.; Schilirò, G; Russo, G.

    1983-01-01

    A case of double heterozygosity for A gamma delta beta-thalassaemia and A gamma G gamma delta beta-thalassaemia was found during a screening programme in Sicily. The proband, a 4-year-old girl, showed a clinical picture of thalassaemia intermedia. Hb F (85.12% by the Singer method) was G gamma A gamma type. The parents and the brother were delta beta-thalassaemia carriers. Structural analysis of Hb F showed both G gamma and A gamma chains in the father, but only A gamma chains in the mother.

  20. A Non-Invasive Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) Assay to Detect Paternal CFTR Mutations in the Cell-Free Fetal DNA (cffDNA) of Three Pregnancies at Risk of Cystic Fibrosis via Compound Heterozygosity

    OpenAIRE

    Debrand, Emmanuel; Lykoudi, Alexandra; Bradshaw, Elizabeth; Allen, Stephanie K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) makes use of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in the mother’s bloodstream as an alternative to invasive sampling methods such as amniocentesis or CVS, which carry a 0.5–1% risk of fetal loss. We describe a droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay designed to inform the testing options for couples whose offspring are at risk of suffering from cystic fibrosis via compound heterozygosity. By detecting the presence or absence of the paternal mutation in th...

  1. Reducing costs by reducing size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper discusses briefly the many factors, including capital cost, which have to be taken into account in determining whether a series of power stations based on a small nuclear plant can be competitive with a series based on traditional large unit sizes giving the guaranteed level of supply. The 320 MWe UK/US Safe Integral Reactor is described as a good example of how the factors discussed can be beneficially incorporated into a design using proven technology. Finally it goes on to illustrate how the overall costs of a generating system can indeed by reduced by use of the 320 MWe Safe Integral Reactor rather than conventional units of around 1200 MWe. (author). 9 figs

  2. Loss of Heterozygosity on Chromosome 1q in Human Colon Carcinoma%人结肠癌染色体1q杂合性缺失分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄幼生; 解娜; 邓晓佳; 宋伟伟; 罗志飞

    2011-01-01

    Objective To define the minimally lost regions(MLR) on chromosome lq, and further to explore the molecular genetics alteration during the malignant progression of human colon mucosa. Methods Fifteen microsatellite markers were used and combined with PCR to detect the frequencies of LOH of every selected microsatellite site on chromosome 1q in colon carcinoma. Results Chromosome 1q LOH was identified in 69 of 93 colon carcinoma (74. 2%). The LOH values in the D1S413 (34. 62%) and D1S305 (43. 75) were higher than that in other microsatellite markers. Through analyzing allelic loss mapping on chromosome 1q in colon carcinoma, we found that the common lost regions are between D1S2878 ~D1S2346(1q21.3~1q23. 2) as well as D1S413~D1S249(1q31.3 ~1q32. 1). The MLR was in D1S249~D1S413, which was about 7. 1cM. A significant association was found between chromosome 1q LOH and histopathological grade, and the frequencies of LOH is the highest in poor differentiated colon carcinoma (P<0. 05). Conclusion There are high LOH frequency on the chromosome 1q31.3 ~1q32. 1 and 1q21.3~1q23. 2 in colon carcinoma. The result suggests these regions perhaps harbor putative tumor suppressor gene(s) contributing to tumorigenesis and differentiation in human colon carcinoma. The high frequency allelic loss on 1q is associated with colon carcinoma cell differentiation.%目的 揭示人结肠癌1q杂合性缺失与临床病理特征的关系.方法 应用15对微卫星标志结合PCR、聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳等技术检测人结肠癌染色体1q杂合性缺失.结果 检测发现人结肠癌染色体1q至少1个位点存在杂合性缺失的占74.2%(69/93);平均缺失频率为17.7%,缺失频率较高的微卫星有D1S413、D1S305等,分别为34.62%、43.75%;缺失图谱分析显示常见缺失区域位于D1S2878~D1S2346(1q21.3~1q23.2)及D1S413~D1S249(1q31.3~1q32.1)之间.最小缺失区域为D1S413~D1S249,大约7.1cM的遗传距离.1q LOH(loss of heterozygosity

  3. Genetic aberration in primary hepatocellular carcinoma: correlation between p53 gene mutation and loss-of-heterozygosity on chromosome 16q21-q23 and 9p21-p23

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular pathology underlying the deve lopment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we used 41 highly polymorphic microsatellite markers to examine 55 HCC and cor responding non-tumor liver tissues on chromosome 9, 16 and 17. Loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) is observed with high fre quency on chromosomal region 17p13 (36/55, 65%), 9p21-p23(28/55, 51%), 16q21-q23 (27/55, 49%) in tumors. Meanwhile,microsatellite instability is rarely found in these microsatellite loci. Direct sequencing was performed to detect the tenta-tive mutation of tumor suppressor genes in these regions: p53,MTS1/p16, and CDH1/E-cadherin. Within exon 5-9 of p53gene, 14 out of 55 HCC specimens (24%) have somatic mutations, and nucleotide deletion of this gene is reported in HCC for the first time. Mutation in MTS1/p16 is found only in one tumor case. We do not find mutations in CDH1/E-cadherin.Furthermore, a statistically significant correlation is present between p53 gene mutation and loss of chromosome region 16q21q23 and 9p21-p23, which indicates that synergism between p53 inactivation and deletion of 16q21-q23 and 9p21-p23 may play a role in the pathogenesis of HCC.

  4. First Spanish case of thalassemia major due to a compound heterozygosity for the IVS-II-848 (C --> A) and codon 39 (C --> T) mutations of the beta-globin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropero, Paloma; Villegas, Ana; Muñoz, Juan; Briceño, Olga; Mora, Asunción; Salvador, María; Polo, Marta; González, Fernando A

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the first case in Spain of a severe form of beta-thalassemia (thal) due to a compound heterozygosity for the IVS-II-848 (C --> A) and the nonsense codon 39 (C --> T) mutations. Five members of a family from Cadiz (southern Spain) were studied. The proband was an 8-year-old girl diagnosed as anemic at the age of 13 months. Her father had the codon 39 (C --> T) mutation and her mother the C --> A change at nucleotide (nt) 848 of IVS-II. Haplotype analysis showed that the proband was a compound heterozygote for haplotypes I [+ --> + +] and VII [+ --> +]. This is the first description in Spain of the IVS-II-848 (C --> A) mutation. It appears, from restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, that this mutation has a different origin in the various populations, where it was found. This observation shows that in this case the association of a beta(0)- and a beta(+)-thal mutation does not lead to a thalassemia intermedia but to a severe thalassemia with very low hemoglobin (Hb) levels. From a therapeutic point of view, early introduction of a transfusion regimen may improve the clinical picture of these children, allowing for better development and growth. PMID:16540410

  5. Heterozygosity loss at FHIT, SLIT2 and EDNRB gene in endometrical carcinoma%子宫内膜癌患者FHIT、SLIT2、EDNRB基因杂合性丢失

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解敏; 魏德娥; 王波; 卢爱英

    2007-01-01

    目的:探讨子宫内膜癌患者FHT、SLrr2、EDNRB基因3个微卫星位点D3S1287、D4S1593、D13S160杂合性丢失(loss of heterozygosity,LOH),以确定侯选的抑癌基因.方法:应用PCR-变性PAGE-银染方法分别对35例子宫内膜癌患者癌组织及相对应的正常子宫内膜组织在FHIT、SLIT2、EDNRB基因3个微卫星位点D3S1287、D4S1593、D13S160行LOH检测.结果:LOH总检出率为54.3%,D3S1287、ID4S1593、D13S160位点分别为34.5%、20.5%、19.3%.FHIT、SLIT2、EDNRB基因的3个微卫星位点发生LOH率与子宫内膜癌手术-病理分期无明显相关性.结论:子宫内膜癌患者肿瘤组织在FHIT、SLIT2、及EDNRB基因的微卫星位点D3S1287、D4S1593、D13S160均有LOH.FHIT、SLIT2及EDNRB基因为抑癌基因,其失活可能与子宫内膜癌的发生有关.

  6. A Non-Invasive Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR Assay to Detect Paternal CFTR Mutations in the Cell-Free Fetal DNA (cffDNA of Three Pregnancies at Risk of Cystic Fibrosis via Compound Heterozygosity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Debrand

    Full Text Available Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD makes use of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA in the mother's bloodstream as an alternative to invasive sampling methods such as amniocentesis or CVS, which carry a 0.5-1% risk of fetal loss. We describe a droplet digital PCR (ddPCR assay designed to inform the testing options for couples whose offspring are at risk of suffering from cystic fibrosis via compound heterozygosity. By detecting the presence or absence of the paternal mutation in the cffDNA, it is possible to predict whether the fetus will be an unaffected carrier (absence or whether further invasive testing is indicated (presence.We selected a family in which the parents were known to carry different mutated CFTR alleles as our test system. NIPD was performed for three of their pregnancies during the first trimester (at around 11-12 weeks of gestation. Taqman probes were designed against an amplicon in exon 11 of the CFTR gene, to quantify the proportion of mutant (ΔF508-MUT; FAM and normal (ΔF508-NOR; VIC alleles at position c.1521_1523 of the CFTR gene.The assay correctly and unambiguously recognized the ΔF508-MUT CFTR allele in the cffDNA of all three proband fetuses and none of the six unaffected control fetuses. In conclusion, the Bio-Rad QX100 was found to be a cost-effective and technically undemanding platform for designing bespoke NIPD assays.

  7. A Non-Invasive Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) Assay to Detect Paternal CFTR Mutations in the Cell-Free Fetal DNA (cffDNA) of Three Pregnancies at Risk of Cystic Fibrosis via Compound Heterozygosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrand, Emmanuel; Lykoudi, Alexandra; Bradshaw, Elizabeth; Allen, Stephanie K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) makes use of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in the mother’s bloodstream as an alternative to invasive sampling methods such as amniocentesis or CVS, which carry a 0.5–1% risk of fetal loss. We describe a droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay designed to inform the testing options for couples whose offspring are at risk of suffering from cystic fibrosis via compound heterozygosity. By detecting the presence or absence of the paternal mutation in the cffDNA, it is possible to predict whether the fetus will be an unaffected carrier (absence) or whether further invasive testing is indicated (presence). Methods We selected a family in which the parents were known to carry different mutated CFTR alleles as our test system. NIPD was performed for three of their pregnancies during the first trimester (at around 11–12 weeks of gestation). Taqman probes were designed against an amplicon in exon 11 of the CFTR gene, to quantify the proportion of mutant (ΔF508-MUT; FAM) and normal (ΔF508-NOR; VIC) alleles at position c.1521_1523 of the CFTR gene. Discussion The assay correctly and unambiguously recognized the ΔF508-MUT CFTR allele in the cffDNA of all three proband fetuses and none of the six unaffected control fetuses. In conclusion, the Bio-Rad QX100 was found to be a cost-effective and technically undemanding platform for designing bespoke NIPD assays. PMID:26561302

  8. Loss of heterozygosity in the chromosomal region 12p12-13 is very common in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and permits the precise localization of a tumor-suppressor gene distinct from p27KIP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavé, H; Gérard, B; Martin, E; Guidal, C; Devaux, I; Weissenbach, J; Elion, J; Vilmer, E; Grandchamp, B

    1995-11-15

    Abnormalities of the short arm of chromosome 12 are relatively common in hematologic malignancies and deletions of the region. 12p12-13 are found in approximately 5% of the patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). As a potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, p27KIP1 prevents the progression of the cell cycle and the gene encoding p27KIP1 represents a potential tumor-suppressor gene. Its recent assignment to the chromosomal region (12p12.3) prompted us to study the p27KIP1 gene in a series of 61 children with ALL. Microsatellite polymorphic markers flanking the p27KIP1 gene were analyzed to detect losses of heterozygosity (LOH). Eleven patients displayed LOH for at least one of the markers. The deleted are encompassed the p27KIP1 gene locus in 10 cases, but inactivation of the remaining allele by deletion, translocation, or mutation was never observed. In addition, in 1 patient, the p27KIP1 gene was situated outside of the region of LOH. Thus, p27KIP1 does not seem to be the target gene of 12p12-13 alterations. However, this study indicates that 12p12-13 alterations at the molecular level, which are present in about 27% of the children with B-lineage ALL, are much more common than had previously been reported by usual chromosome analysis. Moreover, LOH mapping allowed us to better define the location of a putative tumor-suppressor gene implicated in these malignancies and should therefore help in identifying this gene.

  9. 甲状腺肿瘤3号染色体短臂杂合性缺失的研究%Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 3p in thyroid tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡孟钧; 徐航娣; 周韧; 郦秀芳; 张海勇

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨甲状腺肿瘤中3号染色体短臂(3p)杂合性缺失(LOH)状态及其临床意义.方法 收集74例甲状腺肿瘤标本,包括20例甲状腺腺瘤(FA)、24例滤泡性甲状腺癌(FTC)和30例乳头状甲状腺癌(Prc).通过PCR扩增和银染分析其3p上11个微卫星位点的杂合性缺失状态.结果 FFC的LOH频率达到71%(17/24),PTC中30%(9/30),FA中10%(2/20).FFC的3p LOH频率显著高于FA和PTC(P<0.01).FTC中存在两个最小共同缺失区,分别位于3p26-pter和3p14.2-3p22.PTC上存在一个最小共同缺失区,位于3p 25.2-26.1.结论 FTC的3p LOH频率显著高于FA和PTC.3p的3个最小缺失区上可能存在着与FTC和PTC发生发展相关的肿瘤抑制基因.%Objective To study the loss of heterozygosity(LOH)on chromosome 3p in thyroid tumors. Methods LOH at 11 microsatellite loci Wag analyzed in 74 cases of thyroid tumors(including 20 follicular adenomas, 24 follicular thyroid carcinomas and 30 papillary thyroid carcinomas)by polymerase chain reaction and silver stain. Results LOH on chromosome 3p Wag detected in 71% of follicular thyroid carcinoma(17/24), 30%of the papillary thyroid carcinoma(9/30) and 10%of the follicular adenoma (2/20)case. Two minimal common deleted regions(CDR)(3p26-pter and 3p14. 2-3p22)involving significant sites of LOH has identified in follicular thyroid carcinoma. There Was also one CDR(3p25. 2-26. 1)in papilhry thyroid careinoma. Conclusions LOH is more frequently identified in follicular thyroid careinoma than in papillary thyroid carcinoma and follicular adenoma. The 3 CDR on chromosome 3p may harbor tumor suppressor genes involved in the pathogenesis of follicular thyroid carcinoma and papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  10. β-Thalassemia major resulting from compound heterozygosity for HBB: c.92+2T>C [formerly known as IVS-I-2 (T>C)] and a novel β(0)-thalassemia frameshift mutation: HBB: c.209delG; p.Gly70Valfs*20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Michelle L; Hoyer, James D; Swanson, Kenneth C; Oliveira, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    A novel β(0)-thalassemia (β-thal) frameshift mutation, HBB: c.209delG; p.Gly70Valfs*20, is described in a 21-year-old African American female with β-thalassemia major (β-TM) due to compound heterozygosity for the β(0)-thal mutation HBB: c.92+2T>C [formerly known as IVS-I-2 (T>C)] and HBB: c.209delG. The combination of these mutations demonstrates a complete lack of β-globin chain synthesis, evidenced by the proband having no Hb A present.

  11. Reducing Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Reducing Childhood Obesity Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... Ga. were the first three We Can! cities. Obesity Research: A New Approach The percentage of children ...

  12. Reducing Erosion and Runoff

    OpenAIRE

    Relf, Diane

    2009-01-01

    By caring for and improving your soil, you will help it absorb water more readily, reducing runoff and erosion as well as improving plant health. This publication gives the homeowner tips to help prevent runoff and erosion on their property.

  13. Reducing workers' compensation costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, M J

    1994-01-01

    Employers can reduce their workers' compensation costs by encouraging internal communication and education before and after injuries occur. Comprehensive workers' compensation programs can be developed by integrating the management of employee benefits and workers' compensation claims. PMID:10133659

  14. Reduced Extended MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, P. J.; Abdelhamid, H. M.; Grasso, D.; Hazeltine, R. D.; Lingam, M.; Tassi, E.

    2015-11-01

    Over the years various reduced fluid models have been obtained for modeling plasmas, with the goal of capturing important physics while maintaining computability. Such models have included the physics contained in various generalizations of Ohm's law, including Hall drift and electron inertia. In a recent publication it was shown that full 3D extended MHD is a Hamiltonian system by finding its noncanonical Poisson bracket. Subsequently, this bracket was shown to be derivable from that for Hall MHD by a series of remarkable transformations, which greatly simplifies the proof of the Jacobi identity and allows one to immediately obtain generalizations of the helicity and cross helicity. In this poster we use this structure to obtain exact reduced fluid models with the effects of full two-fluid theory. Results of numerical computations of collisionless reconnection using an exact reduced 4-field model will be presented and analytical comparisons of mode structure of previous reduced models will be made.

  15. Variants of the inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase gene are associated with reduced relapse risk following treatment for HCV genotype 2/3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rembeck, Karolina; Waldenström, Jesper; Hellstrand, Kristoffer;

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the impact of variations in the inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPase) gene (ITPA) on treatment outcome in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2/3 infection receiving peginterferon-α2a and lower, conventional 800 mg daily dose of ribavirin. Previous...... naïve HCV genotype 2/3 infected patients, enrolled in a phase III trial (NORDynamIC), were genotyped for ITPA (rs1127354 and rs7270101). Homo- or heterozygosity at Ars1127354 or Crs7270101, entailing reduced ITPase activity, was observed in 37% of patients and was associated with increased likelihood...... duration arms, HCV genotype, fibrosis stage and IL28B genotype, and was not secondary to improved adherence to therapy or less pronounced anemia. Gene variants predicting reduced predicted ITPase activity also were associated with decreased risk of anemia (P

  16. Reducible functional differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Shah

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first part of a survey on analytic solutions of functional differential equations (FDE. Some classes of FDE that can be reduced to ordinary differential equations are considered since they often provide an insight into the structure of analytic solutions to equations with more general argument deviations. Reducible FDE also find important applications in the study of stability of differential-difference equations and arise in a number of biological models.

  17. Reduced shear power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Northwestern U.; Shapiro, Charles; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  18. Association between the impulsive aggressive behaviors and the heterozygosity of 1 7 short tandem repeats loci%17个短串联重复序列基因座杂合度与冲动攻击行为的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何益民; 巴华杰; 杨春; 余海鹰; 赵汉清; 张书友

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨短串联重复序列( STR )基因座杂合度与冲动攻击行为的关系。方法运用 PowerPlex 18 D System 荧光标记复合扩增试剂盒对249例冲动攻击行为军人个体与313例非攻击行为对照个体样本进行 PCR 复合扩增,然后应用 ABI3130 XL 型基因分析系统对扩增产物进行基因检测。比较两个群体中杂合子比率及17个 STR 基因座杂度性的差异。结果17个 STR 基因座在两个群体均符合 Hardy-Weinberg 平衡;两个群体中的杂合子比率差异无统计学意义( P =0.533);在 CSF 1 PO 基因座冲动攻击行为组的杂合度显著低于对照组(P =0.035);其余 STR 基因座两组的杂合度无统计学意义(P >0.05)。结论 CSF1PO 基因座杂合性降低可能与冲动攻击行为的发生相关。%Objective To investigate the relationship of the impulsive aggressive behavior and the heterozygosity of 1 7 short tandem repeats ( STRs ) loci .Methods The biological samples of 2 4 9 army-men with impulsive aggressive behavior and 3 1 3 healthy armymen without aggressive behavior were collect-ed .Then all of the sample were amplified by PowerPlex 1 8 D System and separated by electrophoresis to obtain the heterozygosity of 1 7 STRs loci in both groups .Results All the 1 7 STRs loci in both groups were found to coincide with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; The ratios of heterozygotes with in the 1 7 STR loci in both groups were not different ( P =0.5 3 3 );The heterozygosity of CSF 1 PO locus within armymen with impulsive aggressive behavior was lower than control group ( P =0.0 3 5 ); The heterozygosity of both groups was not different in the other STR loci ( P >0.0 5 ) .Conclusion The reduction in heterozygosity of CSF 1 PO might associated with impulsive aggressive behavior .

  19. Reducible chiral metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Ciattoni, Alessandro; Rizza, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the concept of 3D reducible metamaterials whose constituent permittivity can be modelled by a factorized profile. The separated cartesian coordinates dependence, easily achieved in all-optical reconfigurable materials, allows to physically regard a reducible metamaterial as a superposition of three fictitious 1D generating media. We prove that, in the long-wavelength limit, the electromagnetic response of reducible metamaterials can be reconstructed from the properties of the 1D generating media whose interplay provides large freedom to control the electromagnetic chirality. Our approach introduces an unprecedented decomposition strategy in metamaterial science which allows the full ab-initio and flexible design of a complex 3D bianisotropic response by using 1D metamaterials as basic building blocks.

  20. Tank closure reducing grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-04-18

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

  1. Reducing rotor weight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheney, M.C. [PS Enterprises, Inc., Glastonbury, CT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The cost of energy for renewables has gained greater significance in recent years due to the drop in price in some competing energy sources, particularly natural gas. In pursuit of lower manufacturing costs for wind turbine systems, work was conducted to explore an innovative rotor designed to reduce weight and cost over conventional rotor systems. Trade-off studies were conducted to measure the influence of number of blades, stiffness, and manufacturing method on COE. The study showed that increasing number of blades at constant solidity significantly reduced rotor weight and that manufacturing the blades using pultrusion technology produced the lowest cost per pound. Under contracts with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Energy Commission, a 400 kW (33m diameter) turbine was designed employing this technology. The project included tests of an 80 kW (15.5m diameter) dynamically scaled rotor which demonstrated the viability of the design.

  2. Risk-reducing mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Federica; Sacchini, Virgilio S

    2016-10-01

    Mastectomy rates have significantly increased over the last decades, likely due to the rising trend of risk-reducing mastectomies (RRM) in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Growing evidence suggests that aggressive risk-reducing surgical strategies are only justified in high-risk breast cancer situations. Notably, in this selected cohort of women, prophylactic mastectomies offer evident benefit for local and contralateral disease control, and may also provide a survival benefit. Nevertheless, the extent of the increasing frequency of this operation is not explained by the broadening of the medical indications alone. Here we analyze the current evidence regarding RRM, its clinical practice, and possible explanations for the rising phenomenon of aggressive surgical locoregional control strategies. PMID:26785281

  3. Reduced Multiplication Modules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Karim Samei

    2011-05-01

    An -module is called a multiplication module if for each submodule of , = for some ideal of . As defined for a commutative ring , an -module is said to be reduced if the intersection of prime submodules of is zero. The prime spectrum and minimal prime submodules of the reduced module are studied. Essential submodules of are characterized via a topological property. It is shown that the Goldie dimension of is equal to the Souslin number of Spec (). Also a finitely generated module is a Baer module if and only if Spec () is an extremally disconnected space; if and only if it is a -module. It is proved that a prime submodule is minimal in if and only if for each $x\\in N,\\mathrm{Ann}(x)\

  4. Coupling Reduces Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Kia, Behnam; Kia, Sarvenaz; Lindner, John. F.; Sinha, Sudeshna; Ditto, William L.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate how coupling nonlinear dynamical systems can reduce the effects of noise. For simplicity we investigate noisy coupled map lattices. Noise from different lattice nodes can diffuse across the lattice and lower the noise level of individual nodes. We develop a theoretical model that explains this observed noise evolution and show how the coupled dynamics can naturally function as an averaging filter. Our numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with the model predictions.

  5. Does democracy reduce corruption?

    OpenAIRE

    Ivar Kolstad; Arne Wiig

    2011-01-01

    While democracy is commonly believed to reduce corruption, there are obvious endogeneity problems in measuring the impact of democracy on corruption. This paper addresses the endogeneity of democracy by exploiting the common observation that democracies seldom go to war against each other. We instrument for democracy using a dummy variable reflecting whether a country has been at war with a democracy in the period 1946-2009, while controlling for the extent to which countries have been at war...

  6. Awareness Reduces Racial Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Pope, Devin G.; Price, Joseph; Wolfers, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Can raising awareness of racial bias subsequently reduce that bias? We address this question by exploiting the widespread media attention highlighting racial bias among professional basketball referees that occurred in May 2007 following the release of an academic study. Using new data, we confirm that racial bias persisted in the years after the study's original sample, but prior to the media coverage. Subsequent to the media coverage though, the bias completely disappeared. We examine poten...

  7. Quantum Reduced Loop Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Alesci, Emanuele; Cianfrani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Reduced Loop Gravity provides a promising framework for a consistent characterization of the early Universe dynamics. Inspired by BKL conjecture, a flat Universe is described as a collection of Bianchi I homogeneous patches. The resulting quantum dynamics is described by the scalar constraint operator, whose matrix elements can be analytically computed. The effective semiclassical dynamics is discussed, and the differences with Loop Quantum Cosmology are emphasized.

  8. Reducing volcanic risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, R.; Decker, B.

    1991-01-01

    The last two decades have brought major advances in research on how volcanoes work and how to monitor their changing habits. Geologic mapping as well as studies of earthquake patterns and surface deformation associated with underground movement of magma have given scientists a better view of the inner structure and dynamics of active volcanoes. With the next decade, the time has come to focuses more on applying this knowledge toward reducing the risk from volcanic activity on a worldwide basis. 

  9. Gradual extinction reduces Reinstatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef eShiban

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated whether gradually reducing the frequency of aversive stimuli during extinction can prevent the return of fear. Thirty-one participants of a three-stage procedure (acquisition, extinction and a reinstatement test on day two were randomly assigned to a standard extinction (SE and gradual extinction (GE procedure. The two groups differed only in the extinction procedure. While the SE group ran through a regular extinction process without any negative events, the frequency of the aversive stimuli during the extinction phase was gradually reduced for the GE group. The unconditioned stimulus was an air blast (5 bar, 10 ms. A spider and a scorpion were used as conditioned stimuli. The outcome variables were contingency ratings and physiological measures (skin conductance response and startle response. There were no differences found between the two groups for the acquisition and extinction phases concerning contingency ratings, SCR, or startle response. Gradual extinction compared to standard extinction significantly reduced the return of fear in the reinstatement test for the startle response but not for skin conductance response or contingency ratings. This study was successful in translating the findings in rodent to humans. The results suggest that the gradual extinction process is suitable for increasing the efficacy of fear extinction.

  10. Reducing Iatrogenic Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, E. Wesley; Speroff, Theodore; Pun, Brenda T.; Boehm, Leanne; Dittus, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    ICUs are experiencing an epidemic of patients with acute brain dysfunction (delirium) and weakness, both associated with increased mortality and long-term disability. These conditions are commonly acquired in the ICU and are often initiated or exacerbated by sedation and ventilation decisions and management. Despite > 10 years of evidence revealing the hazards of delirium, the quality chasm between current and ideal processes of care continues to exist. Monitoring of delirium and sedation levels remains inconsistent. In addition, sedation, ventilation, and physical therapy practices proven successful at reducing the frequency and severity of adverse outcomes are not routinely practiced. In this article, we advocate for the adoption and implementation of a standard bundle of ICU measures with great potential to reduce the burden of ICU-acquired delirium and weakness. Individual components of this bundle are evidence based and can help standardize communication, improve interdisciplinary care, reduce mortality, and improve cognitive and functional outcomes. We refer to this as the “ABCDE bundle,” for awakening and breathing coordination, delirium monitoring, and exercise/early mobility. This evidence-based bundle of practices will build a bridge across the current quality chasm from the “front end” to the “back end” of critical care and toward improved cognitive and functional outcomes for ICU survivors. PMID:21051398

  11. Reduced Google matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Frahm, K M

    2016-01-01

    Using parallels with the quantum scattering theory, developed for processes in nuclear and mesoscopic physics and quantum chaos, we construct a reduced Google matrix $G_R$ which describes the properties and interactions of a certain subset of selected nodes belonging to a much larger directed network. The matrix $G_R$ takes into account effective interactions between subset nodes by all their indirect links via the whole network. We argue that this approach gives new possibilities to analyze effective interactions in a group of nodes embedded in a large directed networks. Possible efficient numerical methods for the practical computation of $G_R$ are also described.

  12. Reducing Outdoor Advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice de Rendinger

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental concept is that public space is not a private property. So, a facade (the outer skin, the last millimeter belongs to the town, not to the owner of the building. Changing the rendering, a window, adding or removing anything from a facade requires a permission delivered by the town's authority.In places like Paris, Bordeaux, Marseilles, Lyon, Strasbourg… everywhere one can find a registrated building such as a cathedral, a castle, or a group of ancient buildings, a national administration is controlling this permission. This administration is called «historical monuments administration» and is locally lead by a specialized architect.In the late seventies, French government decided to reduce advertising on the roads and on the city walls. Advertising on the road was leading to a confusion reducing the efficacy of the roadsigns and direction signs, which is dangerous. The reduction was under control of a national administration: the ministry of equipment in charge of the roads design. Advertising on the walls with publicity boards was under control of the cities. Every city has a townplanning regulation. Many cities included forbidding advertisement boards on the walls in this regulation.A couple of firms, but mainly once (Decaux found clever to give a hand to the cities to control advertising. Decaux developed a line of bus stop shelters including advertisements and advertising panels and paid the cities the right to put rather smaller publicities on the public domain.Now Decaux is no more alone on this market and the cities are comparing offers.Marseille turned to a foreign advertising firm who pays three times the price Decaux paid… for half of the advertising surface. Freiburg erased totally the public domain advertisements, selling the tramways and bus coachwork as advertising spaces. Paris is reopening the advertising market before the end of Deacaux's contract and will pay Deacaux a huge amount

  13. Reduced Order Podolsky Model

    CERN Document Server

    Thibes, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    We perform the canonical and path integral quantizations of a lower-order derivatives model describing Podolsky's generalized electrodynamics. The physical content of the model shows an auxiliary massive vector field coupled to the usual electromagnetic field. The equivalence with Podolsky's original model is studied at classical and quantum levels. Concerning the dynamical time evolution we obtain a theory with two first-class and two second-class constraints in phase space. We calculate explicitly the corresponding Dirac brackets involving both vector fields. We use the Senjanovic procedure to implement the second-class constraints and the Batalin-Fradkin-Vilkovisky path integral quantization scheme to deal with the symmetries generated by the first-class constraints. The physical interpretation of the results turns out to be simpler due to the reduced derivatives order permeating the equations of motion, Dirac brackets and effective action.

  14. KCTD11 tumor suppressor gene expression is reduced in prostate adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzeroni, Francesca; Nicosia, Daniela; Tessitore, Alessandra; Gallo, Rita; Verzella, Daniela; Fischietti, Mariafausta; Vecchiotti, Davide; Ventura, Luca; Capece, Daria; Gulino, Alberto; Alesse, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer among men in the United States. A genetic contribution to prostate cancer risk has been documented, but knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in prostate cancer initiation is still not well understood. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosomal regions is crucial in tumor progression. In human prostate cancer, several chromosomal regions demonstrating a high frequency of LOH have been previously identified. KCTD11 (REN) is a tumor suppressor gene mapping on human chromosome 17p13.2, whose expression is frequently lost in human medulloblastoma and in several other cancer types. KCTD11 acts as a negative regulator of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Here, we demonstrated that KCTD11 LOH is a common genetic lesion in human prostate adenocarcinoma. Indeed, nuclear KCTD11 protein expression is strongly reduced in primary prostate cancer, and this event correlated with overexpression of proteins acting into the Hedgehog pathway. Low levels of KCTD11 mRNA have been also observed in prostatic cancer cells, and ectopic overexpression of KCTD11 led to growth arrest. Our study demonstrates and supports that KCTD11, as well as negatively regulated downstream effectors belonging to Hh signaling, plays a role in prostate cancer pathogenesis. This could be suitable to characterize new diagnostic and therapeutic markers. PMID:25045667

  15. A genome-wide survey of genetic variation in gorillas using reduced representation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylwyn Scally

    Full Text Available All non-human great apes are endangered in the wild, and it is therefore important to gain an understanding of their demography and genetic diversity. Whole genome assembly projects have provided an invaluable foundation for understanding genetics in all four genera, but to date genetic studies of multiple individuals within great ape species have largely been confined to mitochondrial DNA and a small number of other loci. Here, we present a genome-wide survey of genetic variation in gorillas using a reduced representation sequencing approach, focusing on the two lowland subspecies. We identify 3,006,670 polymorphic sites in 14 individuals: 12 western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla and 2 eastern lowland gorillas (Gorilla beringei graueri. We find that the two species are genetically distinct, based on levels of heterozygosity and patterns of allele sharing. Focusing on the western lowland population, we observe evidence for population substructure, and a deficit of rare genetic variants suggesting a recent episode of population contraction. In western lowland gorillas, there is an elevation of variation towards telomeres and centromeres on the chromosomal scale. On a finer scale, we find substantial variation in genetic diversity, including a marked reduction close to the major histocompatibility locus, perhaps indicative of recent strong selection there. These findings suggest that despite their maintaining an overall level of genetic diversity equal to or greater than that of humans, population decline, perhaps associated with disease, has been a significant factor in recent and long-term pressures on wild gorilla populations.

  16. KCTD11 Tumor Suppressor Gene Expression Is Reduced in Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Zazzeroni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer among men in the United States. A genetic contribution to prostate cancer risk has been documented, but knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in prostate cancer initiation is still not well understood. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH of chromosomal regions is crucial in tumor progression. In human prostate cancer, several chromosomal regions demonstrating a high frequency of LOH have been previously identified. KCTD11 (REN is a tumor suppressor gene mapping on human chromosome 17p13.2, whose expression is frequently lost in human medulloblastoma and in several other cancer types. KCTD11 acts as a negative regulator of the Hedgehog (Hh signaling. Here, we demonstrated that KCTD11 LOH is a common genetic lesion in human prostate adenocarcinoma. Indeed, nuclear KCTD11 protein expression is strongly reduced in primary prostate cancer, and this event correlated with overexpression of proteins acting into the Hedgehog pathway. Low levels of KCTD11 mRNA have been also observed in prostatic cancer cells, and ectopic overexpression of KCTD11 led to growth arrest. Our study demonstrates and supports that KCTD11, as well as negatively regulated downstream effectors belonging to Hh signaling, plays a role in prostate cancer pathogenesis. This could be suitable to characterize new diagnostic and therapeutic markers.

  17. Reducing client waiting time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This first issues of Family Planning (FP) Manager focuses on how to analyze client waiting time and reduce long waits easily and inexpensively. Client flow analysis can be used by managers and staff to identify organizational factors affecting waiting time. Symptoms of long waiting times are overcrowded waiting rooms, clients not returning for services, staff complaints about rushing and waiting, and hurried counseling sessions. Client satisfaction is very important in order to retain FP users. Simple procedures such as routing return visits differently can make a difference in program effectiveness. Assessment of the number of first visits, the number of revisits, and types of methods and services that the clinic provides is a first step. Client flow analysis involves assigning a number to each client on registration, attaching the client flow form to the medical chart, entering the FP method and type of visit, asking staff to note the time at each station, and summarizing data in a master chart. The staff should be involved in plotting data for each client to show waiting versus staff contact time through the use of color coding for each type of staff contact. Bottlenecks become very visible when charted. The amount of time spent at each station can be measured, and gaps in client's contact with staff can be identified. An accurate measure of total waiting time can be obtained. A quick assessment can be made by recording arrival and departure times for each client in one morning or afternoon of a peak day. The procedure is to count the number of clients waiting at 15-minute intervals. The process should be repeated every 3-6 months to observe changes. If waiting times appear long, a more thorough assessment is needed on both a peak and a typical day. An example is given of a completed chart and graph of results with sample data. Managers need to set goals for client flow, streamline client routes, and utilize waiting time wisely by providing educational talks

  18. Reducing maintenance costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasingly more expensive maintenance measures, cuts in the cost budget, and the loss of know-how on the part of vendors all require a change of policy with respect to maintenance concepts of the part of operators. This also applies to the existing valve concepts, the drives included. Under these aspects, the current drive, which is self-actuated and actuated by outside media, for a parallel-plate valve of a nomial width of 700 was reconsidered. The effort served to reduce maintenance costs and, at the same time, simplify the drive concept as well as cut back on the number of in-service inspections. Moreover, the number of active components were to be minimized and installation conditions in the plant were to be improved. When the boundary conditions to be observed with respect to process technology had been laid down, the competent technical department developed a concept of modification of the drive. A major constituent part was the demonstration of the functioning capability of the new drive under accident conditions. It was achieved mainly by an analytical approach. In the resultant drive concept, the same control valves are employed to actuate a driving cylinder by means of self-actuation or by an outside medium as a function of pressure. (orig.)

  19. Stewarding a Reduced Stockpile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, B T; Mara, G

    2008-04-18

    The future of the US nuclear arsenal continues to be guided by two distinct drivers: the preservation of world peace and the prevention of further proliferation through our extended deterrent umbrella. Timely implementation of US nuclear policy decisions depends, in part, on the current state of stockpile weapons, their delivery systems, and the supporting infrastructure within the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In turn, the present is a product of past choices and world events. Now more than ever, the nuclear weapons program must respond to the changing global security environment and to increasing budget pressures with innovation and sound investments. As the nation transitions to a reduced stockpile, the successes of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) present options to transition to a sustainable complex better suited to stockpile size, national strategic goals and budgetary realities. Under any stockpile size, we must maintain essential human capital, forefront capabilities, and have a right-sized effective production capacity. We present new concepts for maintaining high confidence at low stockpile numbers and to effectively eliminate the reserve weapons within an optimized complex. We, as a nation, have choices to make on how we will achieve a credible 21st century deterrent.

  20. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; Yang, Ruizhi; Easton, E. Bradley; Dahn, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, David G.

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  1. THz spectrum of reduced glutathione

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Weining; YAN; Haitao; YUE; Weiwei; ZHAO; Guozhong; Z

    2005-01-01

    The optical characteristics of reduced glutathione molecules between 0.2 THz and 2.4 THz have been investigated by THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The absorption characteristics and optical parameters of the reduced glutathione purged with Nitrogen at room temperature were obtained experimentally. The measured results were fitted well with the theoretical results computed by using Density Functional Theory (DFT) in far-infrared range. Also the conformation of the reduced glutathione molecule was simulated by Gaussian 03. This work has demonstrated significantly that THz-TDS spectroscopy can further be used to study other biological molecules in biological and biomedical engineering.

  2. The heterozygosity in the 5 ' regulatory region and exon 13 ofPRKAG3 gene in five goat breeds%5个山羊品种PRKAG3基因5’调控区和外显子13杂合度分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    靳海; 陈公伟; 储明星; 陈宏权; 黄生强; 秦婕; 任春环; 朱银剑; 焦明慧; 潘中婷; 谢亚男

    2012-01-01

    The three Chinese indigenous goat breeds, Anhui white goat (Anbai), Xiangdong black goat (Xiangdong) and Matou, and two imported goat breeds, Boer and Sanen, were selected. The polymorphisms in the 5' regulatory region and exon 13 of PRKAG3 gene were detected using PCR-RFLP and estimated via heterozy gosity and polymorphism information content (PIC). The results showed that four polymorphic loci, C-525A and C-225T in the 5' regulatory region and T90C and C102T in the exon 13, were found in five goat breeds. The C-525A, C-225T and C102T were low-grade polymorphic loci, but the T90C was moderate polymorphic locus (0.25heterozygosity in Boer was 0.3750 while that in Xiangdong was 0.2366. The linkage analysis results showed that the average heterozygosities of Anbai (0.2208) and Boer (0.2085) were higher than that of other goat breeds, while that of Matou, Xiangdong and Sanen were from 0.12 to 0.14. From the gene diversity, 5 goat breeds may be divided into three types: Sanen, Boer and Chinese indigenous goat breeds.%以3个中国地方山羊品种和2个引入山羊品种为研究对象,采用PCR-RFLP方法检测山羊PRKAG3基因5,调控区和外显子13的多态性.结果在5个山羊品种PRKAG3基因的5’调控区发现C-525A和C-225T多态位点,在外显子13发现T90C和C102T多态位点,分别存在一对等位基因.5个山羊品种在C-525A、C-225T和C102T位点均为低度多态,但在T90C位点存在中度多态(0.25<PIC<0.5),其中波尔山羊的杂合度最高(0.3750),湘东黑山羊最低( 0.2366).4个联合位点变异分析显示,安徽白山羊(0.220 8)和波尔山羊(0.208 5)在各位点上的平均杂合度要比其它山羊高,而马头山羊、湘东黑山羊和萨能奶山羊的平均杂合度为0.12~0.14.根据品种之间的基因多样度可以将5个山羊品种分成3类:波尔山羊、萨能奶山羊和中国地方山羊.

  3. Reduced-Dimension Multiuser Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Yao; Goldsmith, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    We explore several reduced-dimension multiuser detection (RD-MUD) structures that significantly decrease the number of required correlation branches at the receiver front-end, while still achieving performance similar to that of the conventional matched-filter (MF) bank. RD-MUD exploits the fact that the number of active users is typically small relative to the total number of users in the system and relies on ideas of analog compressed sensing to reduce the number of correlators. We first develop a general framework for both linear and nonlinear RD-MUD detectors. We then present theoretical performance analysis for two specific detectors: the linear reduced-dimension decorrelating (RDD) detector, which combines subspace projection and thresholding to determine active users and sign detection for data recovery, and the nonlinear reduced-dimension decision-feedback (RDDF) detector, which combines decision-feedback orthogonal matching pursuit for active user detection and sign detection for data recovery. The t...

  4. Determining Reduced Order Models for Optimal Stochastic Reduced Order Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonney, Matthew S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Brake, Matthew R.W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The use of parameterized reduced order models(PROMs) within the stochastic reduced order model (SROM) framework is a logical progression for both methods. In this report, five different parameterized reduced order models are selected and critiqued against the other models along with truth model for the example of the Brake-Reuss beam. The models are: a Taylor series using finite difference, a proper orthogonal decomposition of the the output, a Craig-Bampton representation of the model, a method that uses Hyper-Dual numbers to determine the sensitivities, and a Meta-Model method that uses the Hyper-Dual results and constructs a polynomial curve to better represent the output data. The methods are compared against a parameter sweep and a distribution propagation where the first four statistical moments are used as a comparison. Each method produces very accurate results with the Craig-Bampton reduction having the least accurate results. The models are also compared based on time requirements for the evaluation of each model where the Meta- Model requires the least amount of time for computation by a significant amount. Each of the five models provided accurate results in a reasonable time frame. The determination of which model to use is dependent on the availability of the high-fidelity model and how many evaluations can be performed. Analysis of the output distribution is examined by using a large Monte-Carlo simulation along with a reduced simulation using Latin Hypercube and the stochastic reduced order model sampling technique. Both techniques produced accurate results. The stochastic reduced order modeling technique produced less error when compared to an exhaustive sampling for the majority of methods.

  5. Municipal actions to reduce mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-03-15

    This paper presented proper management practices for products containing mercury. The measures can help reduce mercury releases, occupational exposure and mercury spills, thereby preventing impacts on human health and the environment. Despite mercury's toxic nature, many common products that contain mercury are commercially available. These include thermostats, thermometers, fluorescent lamps, pressure measuring devices, electrical switches and relays, and dental amalgam. Mercury emissions are also associated with base metal smelting, waste incineration and coal-fired power generation. Mercury in the environment is a global issue, because it can travel in the atmosphere on wind currents. The actions taken by municipalities to address the issue include reducing or eliminating mercury releases from internal municipal operations and sources within the community. This document provided guidance on how to develop a Municipal Mercury Elimination Policy and Plan that will help reduce mercury releases. It presented information and case studies that will help municipalities manage mercury-containing products found in municipal buildings and street lighting. Information on sources of mercury from within the community was presented along with case studies that can help municipalities determine where community action is needed to reduce mercury releases. The 5 modules of this document were intended to help municipalities identify priorities, timelines and budget requirements for mercury initiatives. It was emphasized that municipalities that adopt a Municipal Mercury Elimination Policy and Plan formally commit to reducing and eliminating mercury from the environment. tabs., figs.

  6. Reduce air, reduce compliance cost new patented spray booth technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinnis, F. [JBI, Inc., Osseo, WI (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A New Paint Spray Booth System that dramatically reduces air volumes normally required for capturing and controlling paint overspray that contains either Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) or Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP), or both. In turn, a substantial reduction in capital equipment expenditures for air abatement systems and air make-up heaters as well as related annual operating expenses is realized.

  7. Power and reduced temporal discounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Priyanka D; Fast, Nathanael J

    2013-04-01

    Decision makers generally feel disconnected from their future selves, an experience that leads them to prefer smaller immediate gains to larger future gains. This pervasive tendency is known as temporal discounting, and researchers across disciplines are interested in understanding how to overcome it. Following recent advances in the power literature, we suggest that the experience of power enhances one's connection with the future self, which in turn results in reduced temporal discounting. In Study 1, we found that participants assigned to high-power roles were less likely than participants assigned to low-power roles to display temporal discounting. In Studies 2 and 3, priming power reduced temporal discounting in monetary and nonmonetary tasks, and, further, connection with the future self mediated the relation between power and reduced discounting. In Study 4, experiencing a general sense of power in the workplace predicted actual lifetime savings. These results have important implications for future research.

  8. Reducing ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    2011-01-01

    The NEC directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries with the largest reductions since 1990...... to the high expectations at the outset. Despite this, the paper concludes that Denmark is likely to reduce emission by 50% from 1990 to 2020 and reach the likely 2020 NEC ceiling....

  9. National compacts to reduce deforestation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santilli, M. [Instituto Socioambiental ISA., Brasilia DF (Brazil); Moutinho, P.; Nepstad, D. [Instituto de Pesquisa Ambiental da Amazonia IPAM, Belem (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Finding ways for developing countries with tropical forests to participate more effectively in international efforts to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions has become central to the success of any future international agreement. The most obvious means would be the reduction of tropical deforestation and the emissions associated with it. Unless tropical deforestation is reduced it will not be possible to avoid 'dangerous anthropogenic interference' in the planet's climate. In this chapter the necessary conditions for these countries to use reduced deforestation, in the context of 'compensated reduction of deforestation', as an internationally recognized, valid form of mitigation of global climate change and, in return, receive compensation for demonstrated reductions. The proposal for compensated reduction suggests that countries that reduce their emissions from tropical deforestation during a Kyoto Protocol commitment period, in relation to an agreed baseline in accordance with historical deforestation rates, be remunerated with credits equivalent to the volume of emissions avoided, tradable in subsequent commitment periods. As we know, under the current terms of the Kyoto Protocol, covering the first commitment period, there are no means to offer incentives for reducing deforestation, which are a recognized factor in global emissions (25%). Eligible forestry projects in the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) include only carbon sequestration. Since tropical deforestation is a problem occurring in non-Annex 1 developing countries, and is associated with development strategies historically linked to global markets, international instruments to encourage reduction of deforestation emissions should consider the objective conditions of these countries in a manner consistent with the principle of mutual, but differentiated responsibilities. The compensated reduction proposal emerges in this context: more effective participation of these

  10. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  11. Reducing Smoking among Pregnant Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Joanne; Coates, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes psychosocial intervention designed to reduce smoking in a group of pregnant teenagers. Five modules are presented, each being designed to heighten awareness of the issue; provide motivational messages; enhance the adolescent's social skills; and teach specific smoking-cessation skills. (Author/NB)

  12. Reduced False Memory after Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Kimberly M.; Gallo, David A.; Margoliash, Daniel; Roediger, Henry L., III; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have shown that sleep contributes to the successful maintenance of previously encoded information. This research has focused exclusively on memory for studied events, as opposed to false memories. Here we report three experiments showing that sleep reduces false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) memory illusion. False…

  13. Solitons reduced from Heterotic fivebranes

    CERN Document Server

    La, H S

    1992-01-01

    In view of the expectation that the solitonic sector of the lower dimensional world may be originated from the solitonic sector of string theory, various solitonic solutions are reduced from the heterotic fivebrane solutions in the ten-dimensional heterotic string theory. These solitons in principle can appear after proper compactifications, {\\it e.g.} toroidal compactifications.

  14. Does Microfinance Reduce Income Inequality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, Niels

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the question whether participation of the poor in microfinance contributes to reducing a country’s level of income inequality. Using data from 70 developing countries, we show that higher levels of microfinance participation are indeed associated with a reduction of the income g

  15. Reducing Poverty through Preschool Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Greg J.; Ludwig, Jens; Magnuson, Katherine A.

    2007-01-01

    Greg Duncan, Jens Ludwig, and Katherine Magnuson explain how providing high-quality care to disadvantaged preschool children can help reduce poverty. In early childhood, they note, children's cognitive and socioemotional skills develop rapidly and are sensitive to "inputs" from parents, home learning environments, child care settings, and the…

  16. A reduced-turbulence, reduced-entrainment electrostatic precipitator

    OpenAIRE

    Bahner, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis describes testing of an electrostatic precipitator that has a portion of the main precipitator flow drawn through a porous (fabric) collecting surface. Tests investigated effects of flow through the collecting surface (side flow) on precipitator turbulence and particulate removal efficiency. Particulate removal tests were conducted at both ambient temperature and boiler slipstream conditions. Side flow was shown to reduce turbulence in the boundary layers of the collecting plat...

  17. Reduced modified Chaplygin gas cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianbo; Geng, Danhua; Xu, Lixin; Wu, Yabo; Liu, Molin

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we study cosmologies containing the reduced modified Chaplygin gas (RMCG) fluid which is reduced from the modified Chaplygin gas p = Aρ - Bρ -α for the value of α = -1 /2. In this special case, dark cosmological models can be realized for different values of model parameter A. We investigate the viabilities of these dark cosmological models by discussing the evolutions of cosmological quantities and using the currently available cosmic observations. It is shown that the special RMCG model ( A = 0 or A = 1) which unifies the dark matter and dark energy should be abandoned. For A = 1 /3, RMCG which unifies the dark energy and dark radiation is the favorite model according to the objective Akaike information criteria. In the case of A , RMCG can achieve the features of the dynamical quintessence and phantom models, where the evolution of the universe is not sensitive to the variation of model parameters.

  18. Ferroelectric capacitor with reduced imprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T. (13609 Verbena Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112); Warren, William L. (7716 Wm. Moyers Ave., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Tuttle, Bruce A. (12808 Lillian Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Dimos, Duane B. (6105 Innsbrook Ct., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Pike, Gordon E. (1609 Cedar Ridge, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112)

    1997-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric capacitor exhibiting reduced imprint effects in comparison to prior art capacitors. A capacitor according to the present invention includes top and bottom electrodes and a ferroelectric layer sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes, the ferroelectric layer comprising a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B-site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4. The concentration of the dopant is sufficient to reduce shifts in the coercive voltage of the capacitor with time. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the ferroelectric element comprises Pb in the A-site, and the first and second elements are Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred dopant is chosen from the group consisting of Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the dopant occupies between 1 and 8% of the B-sites.

  19. Medical waste: reducing its generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, N L

    1993-01-01

    1. Materials that can be recycled have yet to be proven to be a more cost-effective means of reducing medical waste. The literature indicates that the efficacy of reusable textiles is at least equal to that of some disposables--and reusable items reduce the generation of blood-contaminated waste. 2. The perioperative nursing community should consider replacing single-use items with materials intended for multiple uses. 3. "Source reduction" entails the replacement of single-use items with reusable items. Successful source-reduction programs require changes in individual and collective behavior patterns. 4. Recycling of materials renders them suitable for another use in a product similar to that in which they were originally used. On the other hand, reprocessing is an all-descriptive term of what must be done to an item to render it suitable for another identical use.

  20. Breastfeeding reduces postpartum weight retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer Lyn; Gamborg, Michael; Heitmann, Berit L;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Weight gained during pregnancy and not lost postpartum may contribute to obesity in women of childbearing age. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine whether breastfeeding reduces postpartum weight retention (PPWR) in a population among which full breastfeeding is common and breastfeeding...... duration is long. DESIGN: We selected women from the Danish National Birth Cohort who ever breastfed (>98%), and we conducted the interviews at 6 (n = 36 030) and 18 (n = 26 846) mo postpartum. We used regression analyses to investigate whether breastfeeding (scored to account for duration and intensity......) reduced PPWR at 6 and 18 mo after adjustment for maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG). RESULTS: GWG was positively (P Breastfeeding was negatively associated with PPWR in all women but those...

  1. Alcohol reduces aversion to ambiguity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz eTyszka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several years ago, Cohen, Dearnaley, and Hansel [1] demonstrated that under the influence of alcohol drivers became more risk prone, although their risk perception remained unchanged. Research shows that ambiguity aversion is to some extent positively correlated with risk aversion, though not very highly [2]. The question addressed by the present research is whether alcohol reduces ambiguity aversion. Our research was conducted in a natural setting (a restaurant bar, where customers with differing levels of alcohol intoxication were offered a choice between a risky and an ambiguous lottery. We found that alcohol reduced ambiguity aversion and that the effect occurred in men but not women. We interpret these findings in terms of the risk-as-value hypothesis, according to which, people in Western culture tend to value risk, and suggest that alcohol consumption triggers adherence to socially and culturally valued patterns of conduct different for men and women.

  2. Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonesteel, Nicholas E [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes the work accomplished under the support of US DOE grant # DE-FG02-97ER45639, "Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions." The underlying hypothesis of the research supported by this grant has been that studying the unique behavior of correlated electrons in reduced dimensions can lead to new ways of understanding how matter can order and how it can potentially be used. The systems under study have included i) fractional quantum Hall matter, which is realized when electrons are confined to two-dimensions and placed in a strong magnetic field at low temperature, ii) one-dimensional chains of spins and exotic quasiparticle excitations of topologically ordered matter, and iii) electrons confined in effectively ``zero-dimensional" semiconductor quantum dots.

  3. Reduced Deforestation and Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Doupe

    2014-01-01

    The clearing of forests for agricultural land and other marketable purposes is a well-trodden path of economic development. With these private benefits from deforestation come external costs: emissions from deforestation currently account for 12 per cent of global carbon emissions. A widespread intervention in reducing emissions from deforestation will affect the paths of agricultural expansion and economic growth of lower income nations. To investigate these processes, this paper presents a ...

  4. Numbers for reducible cubic scrolls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Vainsencher

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We show how to compute the number of reducible cubic scrolls of codimension 2 in (math blackboard symbol Pn incident to the appropriate number of linear spaces.Mostramos como calcular o número de rolos cúbicos redutíveis de codimensão 2 em (math blackboard symbol Pn incidentes a espaços lineares apropriados.

  5. Combined Reduced-Rank Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoli Torokhti

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose and justify a new approach to constructing optimal nonlinear transforms of random vectors. We show that the proposed transform improves such characteristics of {rank-reduced} transforms as compression ratio, accuracy of decompression and reduces required computational work. The proposed transform ${mathcal T}_p$ is presented in the form of a sum with $p$ terms where each term is interpreted as a particular rank-reduced transform. Moreover, terms in ${mathcal T}_p$ are represented as a combination of three operations ${mathcal F}_k$, ${mathcal Q}_k$ and ${oldsymbol{varphi}}_k$ with $k=1,ldots,p$. The prime idea is to determine ${mathcal F}_k$ separately, for each $k=1,ldots,p$, from an associated rank-constrained minimization problem similar to that used in the Karhunen--Lo`{e}ve transform. The operations ${mathcal Q}_k$ and ${oldsymbol{varphi}}_k$ are auxiliary for f/inding ${mathcal F}_k$. The contribution of each term in ${mathcal T}_p$ improves the entire transform performance. A corresponding unconstrained nonlinear optimal transform is also considered. Such a transform is important in its own right because it is treated as an optimal filter without signal compression. A rigorous analysis of errors associated with the proposed transforms is given.

  6. Reducing consumption through communal living

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, Horace [The Open Univ., Milton Keynes (United Kingdom). Energy and Environment Research Unit

    2003-07-01

    This paper examines ways consumers and communities can voluntarily adopt a low consumption (or low carbon) lifestyle, often termed 'voluntary simplicity' or a policy of 'sufficiency'. There is an increasing academic literature within Europe in the last five years on the whole question of 'sustainable consumption', and the relationship between income levels and consumption particularly at the household. This debate has moved beyond 'green consumerism' to look at building 'new concepts of prosperity' through local community actions, or reducing working time to allow more time for the creation of social capital. The paper will concentrate on one aspect of the quest for sustainable communities, the relevance of communal living to reducing consumption through examining energy consumption (both direct and indirect) in one such community in the UK. The results from this preliminary study reveal that it is not the sharing of resources that reduces consumption but the mutual reinforcement of attitudes towards a low consumption lifestyle. Thus it is the creation of social capital in a community that is its key to its ecological lifestyle.

  7. Does Income Inequality Reduce Growth? Does Income Inequality Reduce Growth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Serra

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effects of inequality on the rate of growth of an economy. We assume that it is easier for an individual to achieve a given level of human capiral the higher society's average level of human capiral. Agents with above average human capital find it relatively more costly to acquire additional human capital, while agents with below average human capital find it relatively cheaper to acquire additional human capital. The existence of such an externality implies that even when where is no income inequality agents will behave inefficiently. In order to achieve the optimal growth rate, a lump sum tax must be combined with a subsidy to investment in education. When incomes are heterogenous, we show that income convergence is attained in the long run. We also show that the effect of inequality on the growth rate of an economy depends on the functional form of the externality. When the externality junction is concave, income dispersion reduces the rate of growth. On the other hand, when the externality function is convex, the effect is ambiguous. Does Income Inequality Reduce Growth?

  8. Welfare-Reducing Trade Liberalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Jørgensen, Jan G.

    Recent literature on the workhorse model of intra-industry trade has explored heterogeneous cost structures at the firm level. These approaches have proven to add realism and predictive power. This note shows, however, that this added realism also implies that there may exist a positive bilateral...... tariff that maximizes national and world welfare. Applying one of the simplest specifications possible, namely a symmetric two-country intra-industry trade model with fixed export costs that are heterogeneous across firms, we find that the reciprocal reduction of small tariffs reduces welfare. We explore...

  9. On nonlinear reduced order modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When applied to a model that receives n input parameters and predicts m output responses, a reduced order model estimates the variations in the m outputs of the original model resulting from variations in its n inputs. While direct execution of the forward model could provide these variations, reduced order modeling plays an indispensable role for most real-world complex models. This follows because the solutions of complex models are expensive in terms of required computational overhead, thus rendering their repeated execution computationally infeasible. To overcome this problem, reduced order modeling determines a relationship (often referred to as a surrogate model) between the input and output variations that is much cheaper to evaluate than the original model. While it is desirable to seek highly accurate surrogates, the computational overhead becomes quickly intractable especially for high dimensional model, n ≫ 10. In this manuscript, we demonstrate a novel reduced order modeling method for building a surrogate model that employs only 'local first-order' derivatives and a new tensor-free expansion to efficiently identify all the important features of the original model to reach a predetermined level of accuracy. This is achieved via a hybrid approach in which local first-order derivatives (i.e., gradient) of a pseudo response (a pseudo response represents a random linear combination of original model’s responses) are randomly sampled utilizing a tensor-free expansion around some reference point, with the resulting gradient information aggregated in a subspace (denoted by the active subspace) of dimension much less than the dimension of the input parameters space. The active subspace is then sampled employing the state-of-the-art techniques for global sampling methods. The proposed method hybridizes the use of global sampling methods for uncertainty quantification and local variational methods for sensitivity analysis. In a similar manner to

  10. Challenging and Reducing Cultural Stereotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄鸣

    2011-01-01

    Abstract:Anyplace where differences are found leaves room for stereotypes.Each of us hears or makes stereotypical comments every day,and although sometimes it is necessary to make stereotypes in foreign language teaching and learning,we should always be aware of the negative effects of stereotyping people from other cultures when we use them to interpret behavior.This paper defines stereotypes,discusses how they impede communication and then focuses on some ways to challenge and reduce stereotypes in cross-cultural communication.

  11. Welfare-Reducing Trade Liberalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Jørgensen, Jan G.

    Recent literature on the workhorse model of intra-industry trade has explored heterogeneous cost structures at the firm level. These approaches have proven to add realism and predictive power. This paper shows, however, that this added realism also implies that there may exist a positive bilateral...... tariff that maximizes national and world welfare. Applying one of the simplest specifications possible, namely a symmetric two-country intra-industry trade model with fixed export costs that are heterogeneous across firms, we find that the reciprocal reduction of small tariffs reduces welfare....

  12. FIREhose: Reducing Data from FIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fica, Haley Diane; Lambrides, Erini; Faherty, Jackie; Cruz, Kelle L.; BDNYC

    2016-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are stellar objects that do not have enough mass to ignite hydrogen fusion in their core. Their mass is between 0.08 solar masses and the mass of our sun. Brown dwarfs are very bright in the near-infrared wavelength band (0.8- 2.5 microns). We reduced data from the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) instrument on the Magellan Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory. FIRE is a medium-resolution echelle spectrometer, whose data reduction results in a spectrum of a star. When reducing FIRE data, it is important to account for inconsistencies in the data, such as bad pixels, cosmic rays, and the effects of our atmosphere. Using the FIREhose pipeline, these inconsistencies can be accounted for and corrected using a A0 telluric with a known spectrum. After telluric correcting, the data reduction results in a primed spectrum for an object, which can then be used to determine an object's physical properties, such as atmospheric composition, radial velocity, effective temperature and surface gravity.

  13. Soldering Tested in Reduced Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struk, Peter M.; Pettegrew, Richard D.; Watson, J. Kevin; Down, Robert S.; Haylett, Daniel R.

    2005-01-01

    Whether used occasionally for contingency repair or routinely in nominal repair operations, soldering will become increasingly important to the success of future long-duration human space missions. As a result, it will be critical to have a thorough understanding of the service characteristics of solder joints produced in reduced-gravity environments. The National Center for Space Exploration Research (via the Research for Design program), the NASA Glenn Research Center, and the NASA Johnson Space Center are conducting an experimental program to explore the influence of reduced gravity environments on the soldering process. Solder joint characteristics that are being considered include solder fillet geometry, porosity, and microstructural features. Both through-hole (see the drawing and image on the preceding figure) and surface-mounted devices are being investigated. This effort (the low-gravity portion being conducted on NASA s KC-135 research aircraft) uses the soldering hardware currently available on the International Space Station. The experiment involves manual soldering by a contingent of test operators, including both highly skilled technicians and less skilled individuals to provide a skill mix that might be encountered in space mission crews. The experiment uses both flux-cored solder and solid-core solder with an externally applied flux. Other experimental parameters include the type of flux, gravitational level (nominally zero,

  14. Reduced pallidal output causes dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eNambu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Dystonia is a neurological disorder characterized by sustained or repetitive involuntary muscle contractions and abnormal postures. In the present article, we will introduce our recent electrophysiological studies in hyperkinetic transgenic mice generated as a model of DYT1 dystonia and in a human cervical dystonia patient, and discuss the pathophysiology of dystonia on the basis of these electrophysiological findings. Recording of neuronal activity in the awake state of DYT1 dystonia model mice revealed reduced spontaneous activity with bursts and pauses in both internal (GPi and external (GPe segments of the globus pallidus. Electrical stimulation of the primary motor cortex evoked responses composed of excitation and subsequent long-lasting inhibition, the latter of which was never observed in normal mice. In addition, somatotopic arrangements were disorganized in the GPi and GPe of dystonia model mice. In a human cervical dystonia patient, electrical stimulation of the primary motor cortex evoked similar long-lasting inhibition in the GPi and GPe. Thus, reduced GPi output may cause increased thalamic and cortical activity, resulting in the involuntary movements observed in dystonia.

  15. Reduced discretization error in HZETRN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tweed, John

    2013-02-01

    The deterministic particle transport code HZETRN is an efficient analysis tool for studying the effects of space radiation on humans, electronics, and shielding materials. In a previous work, numerical methods in the code were reviewed, and new methods were developed that further improved efficiency and reduced overall discretization error. It was also shown that the remaining discretization error could be attributed to low energy light ions (A astronaut radiation exposure. In this work, modifications to the light particle transport formalism are presented that accurately resolve the spectrum of low energy light ion target fragments. The modified formalism is shown to significantly reduce overall discretization error and allows a physical approximation to be removed. For typical step-sizes and energy grids used in HZETRN, discretization errors for the revised light particle transport algorithms are shown to be less than 4% for aluminum and water shielding thicknesses as large as 100 g/cm2 exposed to both solar particle event and galactic cosmic ray environments.

  16. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B; Ariely, Dan

    2014-07-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that "moral disgust" influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior.

  17. Variational Integrators for Reduced Magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, Michael; Grasso, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws are described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify...

  18. Reducing catalytic converter pressure loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This article examines why approximately 30--40% of total exhaust-system pressure loss occurs in the catalytic converter and what can be done to reduce pressure loss. High exhaust-system backpressure is of concern in the design of power trains for passenger cars and trucks because it penalizes fuel economy and limits peak power. Pressure losses occur due to fluid shear and turning during turbulent flow in the converter headers and in entry separation and developing laminar-flow boundary layers within the substrate flow passages. Some of the loss mechanisms are coupled. For example, losses in the inlet header are influenced by the presence of the flow resistance of a downstream substrate. Conversely, the flow maldistribution and pressure loss of the substrate(s) depend on the design of the inlet header.

  19. Does the Internet Reduce Corruption?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Bentzen, Jeanet Sinding; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars;

    2011-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that the Internet is a useful technology for controlling corruption. In order to do so, we develop a novel identification strategy for Internet diffusion. Power disruptions damage digital equipment, which increases the user cost of IT capital, and thus lowers the speed...... of Internet diffusion. A natural phenomenon causing power disruptions is lightning activity, which makes lightning a viable instrument for Internet diffusion. Using ground-based lightning detection censors as well as global satellite data, we construct lightning density data for the contiguous U.S. states...... and a large cross section of countries. Empirically, lightning density is a strong instrument for Internet diffusion and our IV estimates suggest that the emergence of the Internet has served to reduce the extent of corruption across U.S. states and across the world....

  20. Reduced domestic satellite orbit spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, G. L.

    The demand for services provided by communications satellites in geostationary orbit is growing, and problems arise with respect to the required increase in capacity. One approach for providing such an increase involves the employment of more satellites operating at smaller orbital spacings. The present investigation is concerned with the results of technical studies conducted by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to determine the feasibility of reducing orbital spacings between U.S. 'domestic fixed satellites' (domsats). Attention is given to details regarding the usable orbital arc, an adjacent satellite interference model, antenna sidelobe patterns, a single entry analysis, a 4/6 GHz aggregate analysis, results for the 4/6 GHz bands, results for the 12/14 GHz bands, data services, voice services, video reception, and high power spot beams.

  1. Periocular Recognition Using Reduced Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambika D R,

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biometrics is science of measuring and statistically analyzing biological data. Biometric system establishes identity of a person based on unique physical or behavioural characteristic possessed by an individual. Behavioural biometrics measures characteristics which are acquired naturally over time. Physical biometrics measures inherent physical characteristics on a n individual. Over the last few decades enormous attention is drawn towards ocular biometrics. Cues provided by ocular region have led to exploration of newer traits. Feasibility of periocular region as a useful biometric trait has been explored recently. With the promising results of preliminary examination, research towards periocular region is currently gaining lot of prominence. Researchers have analyzed various techniques of feature extraction and classification in the periocular region. The current paper investigates the effect of using Lower Central Periocular Region (LCPR for identification. The results obtained are comparable with those acquired for the entire periocular region with an advantage of reduced periocular area.

  2. Interventions to reduce school bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter K; Ananiadou, Katerina; Cowie, Helen

    2003-10-01

    In the last 2 decades, school bullying has become a topic of public concern and research around the world. This has led to action to reduce the problem. We review interventions targeted at the school level (for example, whole school policy, classroom climate, peer support, school tribunal, and playground improvement), at the class level (for example, curriculum work), and at the individual level (for example, working with specific pupils). Effectiveness of interventions has been sporadically assessed. We review several systematically evaluated, large-scale, school-based intervention programs. Their effectiveness has varied, and we consider reasons for this. We suggest ways to improve the evaluation and comparability of studies, as well as the effectiveness of future interventions. PMID:14631879

  3. Neuromuscular Adaptations to Reduced Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the studies done to reduce neuromuscular strength loss during unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS). Since there are animals that undergo fairly long periods of muscular disuse without any or minimal muscular atrophy, there is an answer to that might be applicable to human in situations that require no muscular use to diminish the effects of muscular atrophy. Three sets of ULLS studies were reviewed indicated that muscle strength decreased more than the muscle mass. The study reviewed exercise countermeasures to combat the atrophy, including: ischemia maintained during Compound muscle action potential (CMAP), ischemia and low load exercise, Japanese kaatsu, and the potential for rehabilitation or situations where heavy loading is undesirable. Two forms of countermeasures to unloading have been successful, (1) high-load resistance training has maintained muscle mass and strength, and low load resistance training with blood flow restriction (LL(sub BFR)). The LL(sub BFR) has been shown to increase muscle mass and strength. There has been significant interest in Tourniquet training. An increase in Growth Hormone(GH) has been noted for LL(sub BFR) exercise. An experimental study with 16 subjects 8 of whom performed ULLS, and 8 of whom performed ULLS and LL(sub BFR) exercise three times per week during the ULLS. Charts show the results of the two groups, showing that performing LL(sub BFR) exercise during 30 days of ULLS can maintain muscle size and strength and even improve muscular endurance.

  4. The benefits of reduced morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morbidity benefits refer to increases in utility arising from reductions in incidents of acute health impairments and from increases in the probability of developing chronic diseases. The impairments would run the gamut from a cough-day to a bed-disability-day, while the chronic diseases include classic pollution-related diseases, such as cancer, to in utero effects and learning disabilities. As with mortality benefits, there could be benefits to oneself and family and friends as well as benefits based on altruism. A major difference between the mortality and morbidity valuation literatures is that while estimates of the former are always based on risk (one is never trying to obtain values for avoiding certain death), estimates of the latter generally are not. That is, most of the theory and empirical estimates are based on models where the effect to be avoided is certain. This assumption holds reasonably well for estimating common acute effects, for example, the willingness to pay (WTP) for one less cough-day. It works less well, if at all, for chronic illness endpoints, where benefits seem to be appropriately expressed in terms of reduced risk of developing a disease or impairment

  5. Variational integrators for reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Michael; Tassi, Emanuele; Grasso, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws is described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify the favourable properties of the variational integrator in particular with respect to the preservation of the invariants of the models under consideration and compare with results from the literature and those of a pseudo-spectral code.

  6. Reduced surround inhibition in musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hae-Won; Kang, Suk Y; Hallett, Mark; Sohn, Young H

    2012-06-01

    To investigate whether surround inhibition (SI) in the motor system is altered in professional musicians, we performed a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study in 10 professional musicians and 15 age-matched healthy non-musicians. TMS was set to be triggered by self-initiated flexion of the index finger at different intervals ranging from 3 to 1,000 ms. Average motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes obtained from self-triggered TMS were normalized to average MEPs of the control TMS at rest and expressed as a percentage. Normalized MEP amplitudes of the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles were compared between the musicians and non-musicians with the primary analysis being the intervals between 3 and 80 ms (during the movement). A mixed-design ANOVA revealed a significant difference in normalized ADM MEPs during the index finger flexion between groups, with less SI in the musicians. This study demonstrated that the functional operation of SI is less strong in musicians than non-musicians, perhaps due to practice of movement synergies involving both muscles. Reduced SI, however, could lead susceptible musicians to be prone to develop task-specific dystonia.

  7. Hamiltonian formulation of reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) has become a principal tool for understanding nonlinear processes, including disruptions, in tokamak plasmas. Although analytical studies of RMHD turbulence have been useful, the model's impressive ability to simulate tokamak fluid behavior has been revealed primarily by numerical solution. The present work describes a new analytical approach, not restricted to turbulent regimes, based on Hamiltonian field theory. It is shown that the nonlinear (ideal) RMHD system, in both its high-beta and low-beta versions, can be expressed in Hanmiltonian form. Thus a Poisson bracket, [ , ], is constructed such that each RMHD field quantitity, xi/sub i/, evolves according to xi/sub i/ = [xi/sub i/,H], where H is the total field energy. The new formulation makes RMHD accessible to the methodology of Hamiltonian mechanics; it has lead, in particular, to the recognition of new RMHD invariants and even exact, nonlinear RMHD solutions. A canonical version of the Poisson bracket, which requires the introduction of additional fields, leads to a nonlinear variational principle for time-dependent RMHD

  8. Yolk androgens reduce offspring survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockman, K W; Schwabl, H

    2000-07-22

    Females may favour some offspring over others by differential deposition of yolk hormones. In American kestrels (Falco sparverius), we found that yolks of eggs laid late in the sequence of a clutch had more testosterone (T) and androstenedione (A4) than yolks of first-laid eggs. To investigate the effects of these yolk androgens on nestling 'fitness', we injected both T and A4 into the yolks of first-laid eggs and compared their hatching time, nestling growth and nestling survival with those of first-laid eggs in which we injected vehicle as a control. Compared to controls, injection of T and A4 at a dose intended to increase their levels to those of later-laid eggs delayed hatching and reduced nestling growth and survival rates. Yolk androgen treatment of egg 1 had no effect on survival of siblings hatching from subsequently laid eggs. The adverse actions of yolk androgen treatment in the kestrel are in contrast to the favourable actions of yolk T treatment found previously in canaries (Serinus canaria). Additional studies are necessary in order to determine whether the deposition of yolk androgens is an adaptive form of parental favouritism or an adverse by-product of endocrine processes during egg formation. Despite its adaptive significance, such 'transgenerational' effects of steroid hormones may have helped to evolutionarily shape the hormonal mechanisms regulating reproduction. PMID:10983830

  9. Observation of HPV infection and loss of heterozygosity, micro satellite instabilityon FHIT gene in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma tissue%外阴鳞癌组织中HPV检测及FHIT基因杂合性缺失、微卫星不稳定性观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范余娟; 蒙亚晴; 杨开选; 徐红

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察外阴鳞癌( VSCC)组织中HPV感染情况及脆性组氨酸三联体(FHIT)基因的杂合性缺失(LOH)、微卫星不稳定性(MSI),并探讨其意义.方法 选取VSCC组织24例、外阴尖锐湿疣(VCA)42例、正常外阴组织20例,用PCR法检测上述组织中的HPV6、11、16、18、31、33亚型,用PCR-单链构像多态性分析(PCR-SSCP)法检测FHIT基因D3S1300位点的LOH和MSI.结果 在正常外阴、VCA、VSCC组织中低危型HPV( HPV6/11)阳性分别为2、38、21例,高危型HPV(HPV16/18/31/33)阳性分别为0、13、10例;VCA、VSCC组织与正常外阴组织比较,P均<0.05.在正常外阴、VCA、VSCC组织中,FHIT基因D3S1300位点上LOH、MSI阳性分别为0、9、13例,VSCC与VCA、正常外阴组织比较,P均<0.05.VSCC组织中HR-HPV感染与FHIT基因D3 S1300位点LOH/MSI相关(r =0.438,P<0.05).结论 VSCC组织中存在较高的低危型、高危型HPV复合感染及FHIT基因LOH和(或)MSI;二者在VSCC的发生发展中发挥重要作用.%Objective To observe HPV infection and loss of heterozygosity ( LOH) , micro satellite instability (MSI) on FHIT gene in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma tissue, and explore its significance. Methods HPV DNA 6,11,16,18,31, 33 were detected by PCR in VSCC(24 cases) ,VCA(42 cases) and normal vulva(20 cases). PCR-SSCP was used to detect the LOH, MSI for amplification with D3S1300 on FHIT gene. Results In normal vulva,VCA and VSCC groups,the number of patients with LR-HPV (HPV6/11) were 2,38 and 21 cases,and HR-HPV( HPV16,18 ,31,33) infection were 0,13 and 10 cases, there were statistics significant differences between normal vulva and VCA, normal vulva and VSCC(all P<0. 05). In normal vulva, VCA and VSCC groups, the number of LOH andMSI positive on D3S1300 were 0,9,13 cases respectively, there were statistics significant differences between VSCC and VCA, VSCC and normal vulva (all P<0.05). HR-HPV infections were possibly relevant to the LOH and/or MSI on FHIT gene (the related

  10. KCTD11 Tumor Suppressor Gene Expression Is Reduced in Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Zazzeroni; Daniela Nicosia; Alessandra Tessitore; Rita Gallo; Daniela Verzella; Mariafausta Fischietti; Davide Vecchiotti; Luca Ventura; Daria Capece; Alberto Gulino; Edoardo Alesse

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer among men in the United States. A genetic contribution to prostate cancer risk has been documented, but knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in prostate cancer initiation is still not well understood. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosomal regions is crucial in tumor progression. In human prostate cancer, several chromosomal regions demonstrating a high frequency of LOH have been previously identified. KCTD11 (REN) is a tum...

  11. Reducing carbon-in-ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigel S. Dong [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    High levels of carbon-in-ash lead to reduced power plant efficiency and higher fuel costs, degrade the performance of electrostatic precipitators and increase emissions of particulates. Increased carbon levels in the fly ash can lead to problems with ash use in cement/concrete production. This report reviews current measures and technologies that can be used to prevent excessive carbon-in-ash in pulverised coal combustion (PCC) power plants. These include coal cleaning, coal fineness improvement, reduction of distribution imbalance of coal among burners, increasing coal-air mixing rates at both burner and OFA levels and optimising excess air ratios. A plasma-assisted combustion enhancement technology can help achieve better ignition and more stable flame for coals that are normally difficult to burn. Computer-based combustion optimisation using expert systems, neural network systems and coal combustion simulation is becoming an invaluable means to tackle the carbon-in-ash issue. This report also reviews the regulations in nine major coal-consuming countries, which stipulate the maximum unburnt carbon levels permitted for fly ash for use in concrete/cement production. The Loss on Ignition (LOI) parameter is used in all national standards, although it is considered inadequate and may exclude some usable fly ash from being utilised. Performance-based regulations are more appropriate and have been adopted by Canada and USA. The EU and Canada now permit the use of fly ash produced from co-combustion of coal and biomass. China and Russia allow very high LOI levels for certain fly ash but the other countries require similar LOI limits for fly ash for use in concrete. Finally, this report discusses measures and technologies for reduction of carbon-in-ash, including classification, froth flotation, triboelectrostatic separators, thermal processes and carbon surface modification. 146 refs., 19 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. Meditation Helps Reduce Hardened Arteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sue; Pleming; 林兆佩

    2000-01-01

    沉思冥想可以减少人体冠状动脉内壁的厚度、降低心脏病和中风的危险。这话听上去有点玄乎,可是,这是事实。而且,这不是崇尚气功的国人的结论,而是美国医生的实验所证实的事实。 简称为TM(由Transcendental[超然的;超验的]Meditation的首字母所组成)的方法每日进行两次,每次20分钟。同时还得使用所谓a specific sound or“mental vehicle”(精神媒介物)。其目的是:…enabled the person to experiencequieter states of thinking.其背后的原因是:…heart disease was associated withpsychological stress and that meditating could reduce this。以下一句间接告诉我们:所谓TM,并非一两句话就能交代明白: The meditation group was given five to eight hours of tuition on TM tech—niques… 美国的研究人员常运用“对比法”来作下结论。本文也不例外。 本文给我们的重要启示是:…heart disease was associated with psychologicalstress.而quieter states of thinking是强身健体之关键。

  13. Would Weaker Beer Help Reduce Alcohol's Harms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160387.html Would Weaker Beer Help Reduce Alcohol's Harms? Researchers say drinkers wouldn' ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Lowering the alcohol content in beer and other drinks may help reduce their harmful ...

  14. Generalized Reduced Order Model Generation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — M4 Engineering proposes to develop a generalized reduced order model generation method. This method will allow for creation of reduced order aeroservoelastic state...

  15. Clinicopathologic significance of β-catenin protein and loss of heterozygosity on 10q in medulloblastoma%髓母细胞瘤β-catenin蛋白表达与10q杂合性缺失检测及其临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊芝; 王成辉; 周福安; 苗娜; 古丽那尔·阿布拉江; 张巍

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨髓母细胞瘤β-catenin蛋白的表达及10q杂合性缺失与临床病理特征的关系.方法 选择新疆医科大学第一附属医院2002至2011年间,经病理组织学诊断为不同类型的髓母细胞瘤合计50例,包括经典型髓母细胞瘤32例,促纤维增生型13例,结节型5例,采用免疫组织化学EnVision法对50例髓母细胞瘤石蜡切片β-catenin蛋白进行半定量分析,荧光原位杂交技术检测10q杂合性缺失,Kaplan-Meien和Cox回归分析β-catenin蛋白、10q杂合性缺失与临床病理特征及预后关系.结果 β-catenin蛋白在经典型髓母细胞瘤胞质中阳性率为53.1% (17/32),促纤维增生型为4/13,广泛结节型为1/5;经典髓母细胞瘤10q杂合性缺失率为33.3%(8/24),促纤维增生型为2/11,结节型未见10q杂合性缺失(0/5);三种类型间比较,差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).单因素分析β-catenin蛋白阳性表达者(P=0.022)、无10q杂合性缺失(P=0.020)、肿瘤切除范围(P<0.01)、放疗(P =0.002)、化疗(P<0.01)与髓母细胞瘤患者预后相关.结论 β-catenin蛋白阳性表达者、无10q杂合性缺失者预后较好.检测髓母细胞瘤染色体β-catenin蛋白表达和10q杂合性缺失,有助于预后判断.%Objective To study the expression of β-catenin protein and the status of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromsome 10q in medulloblastoma,with clinical correlation.Methods Immunohistochemical study for β-catenin protein was carried out in 50 cases of medulloblastoma encountered in the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University during the period from 2002 to 2011,including 32 cases of classic medulloblastoma,13 cases of desmoplastic medulloblastoma and 5 cases of medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity.The status of LOH on 10q was also detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization.The clinicopathologic characteristics and prognostic parameters were studied by Kaplan-Meien and Cox analysis.Results The

  16. 染色体1p/19q杂合性缺失与少突胶质细胞肿瘤临床病理特征的关系%Relationship between the loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 1p/19q and clinicopathologic feature in oligodendroglial tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐姗; 梅金红; 王淳良; 杨玄勇; 王珊珊

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨染色体1p/19q杂合性缺失与少突胶质细胞肿瘤临床病理特征的关系.方法 采用荧光免疫原位杂交技术检测73例少突胶质细胞肿瘤1p/19q杂合性缺失,并随访观察预后.结果 少突胶质细胞肿瘤年轻患者(< 60岁)1p/19q缺失高于老年患者(>60岁,P<0.01);好发部位(额、顶、枕叶)的少突胶质细胞肿瘤1p/19q缺失与其他部位比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),与性别及肿瘤级别均无明显相关(P>0.05);少突胶质细胞肿瘤患者存在1p/19q联合缺失的中位生存时间为74个月,5年总生存率为72%;仅存在1p缺失者中位生存时间为43个月,5年总生存率为29%;而不存在1p/19q缺失者中位生存时间39个月,5年总生存率为18%.1p/19q联合缺失者中位生存时间长于仅存在1p缺失组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);且1p/19q缺失组中位生存时间也长于1 p/19q未缺失组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).仅存在1p缺失组中位生存时间虽然长于不存在1p/19q缺失组,但差异无统计学意义(Pp>0.05).结论 少突胶质细胞肿瘤1p/19q缺失与患者年龄明显相关,与患者性别、肿瘤发生部位及肿瘤级别无明显相关;少突胶质细胞肿瘤中染色体1p/19q杂合性缺失对患者的化疗敏感性及预后有关,可以作为分子分型的标准.%Objective To investigate the relationship between the loss of heterozygosity (LOH)on chromosome 1p/19q and clinicopathologic feature in oligodendroglial tumors.Methods The LOH on chromosome 1 p/19q was detected with fluorescence in situ hybridization in 73 patients with oligodendroglial tumors,and the prognosis was followed up.Results The positive rate of the LOH on chromosome 1p/19q in oligodendroglioma in younger patients (< 60 years old) was higher than in older patients (> 60 years old),(P < 0.01).There was no statistically significant difference in the LOH on chromosome 1 p/19q betwcen the oligodendroglial tumors at

  17. Loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 1p/19q and p53 protein expression in oligodendroglioma%少突胶质细胞瘤染色体1p/19 q杂合性缺失与p53蛋白表达的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊佶; 刘颖; 李超; 朱静静; 叶诸榕; 毛颖; 汪寅

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the status of loss of heterozygosity ( LOH) of chromosome lp/19q and p53 protein expression in oligodendroglioma,as compared to astrocytoma.Methods One hundred and ninety-one cases of glioma of different histologic types and grades,including 116 cases of low-grade of oligodendroglioma ( 86 paraffin-embedded and 30 fresh tissues) ,45 cases of anaplastic oligodendroglioma (all paraffin-embedded tissues) and 30 cases of astrocytoma of various grades ( all paraffin-embedded tissues),were enrolled into the study.The LOH of chromosome lp/19q was investigated by polymerase chain reaction ( PCR) -based microsatellite analysis.The p53 protein expression was demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining.Results The rates of lp loss, 19q loss and lp/19q loss were 69.8% ,64%,and 57.0% respectively in the 86 paraffin-embedded low-grade oligodendroglioma samples,as compared to 71.1%,60.0% and 55.6% respectively in the 45 paraffin-embedded anaplastic oligodendroglioma samples.There was no difference of LOH of lp/19q between low-grade oligodendroglioma and anaplastic oligodendroglioma (P > 0.05).In the 30 cases of low-grade oligodendroglioma with fresh tissues available,the rates of lp loss,19q loss and lp/19q loss were 70.0%,63.3% and 60.0% respectively.The LOH of lp/19q between paraffin-embedded and fresh samples was not statistically significant (P >0.05).In the 30 cases of astrocytoma,the rates of lp loss,19q loss and lp/19q loss were 23.3%,33.3% and 20.0% respectively,which were significantly less than those in oligodendroglioma (P 0.05).30例WHO Ⅱ级少突胶质细胞瘤新鲜标本染色体1p缺失率为70.0%(21/30)、19q缺失率为63.3%(19/30)、1p/19q联合缺失率为60.0%(18/30),与石蜡标本的缺失率比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).30例星形细胞起源的肿瘤染色体对应三种缺失率分别为23.3%(7/30)、33.3%(10/30)及20.0%(6/30),与少突胶质细胞瘤差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).86例WHO Ⅱ

  18. Microprocessor Protection of Power Reducing Transformers

    OpenAIRE

    F. A. Romanuk; Korolev, S. P.; M. S. Loman

    2011-01-01

    The paper contains analysis of advantages and disadvantages of existing differential protection terminals of power reducing transformers. The paper shows that there are good reasons to develop microprocessor protection of power reducing transformer which contains required functions and settings and which is based on Belarusian principles of relay protection system construction. The paper presents functional structure of microprocessor terminal of power reducing transformer which is developed. 

  19. Microprocessor Protection of Power Reducing Transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Romanuk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains analysis of advantages and disadvantages of existing differential protection terminals of power reducing transformers. The paper shows that there are good reasons to develop microprocessor protection of power reducing transformer which contains required functions and settings and which is based on Belarusian principles of relay protection system construction. The paper presents functional structure of microprocessor terminal of power reducing transformer which is developed. 

  20. Parallel Processing of cluster by Map Reduce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavi Vaidya

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available MapReduce is a parallel programming model and an associated implementation introduced by Google. In the programming model, a user specifies the computation by two functions, Map and Reduce. The underlying MapReduce library automatically parallelizes the computation, and handles complicated issues like data distribution, load balancing and fault tolerance. Massive input, spread across many machines, need to parallelize. Moves the data, and provides scheduling, fault tolerance. The original MapReduce implementation by Google, as well as its open-source counterpart, Hadoop, is aimed for parallelizing computing in large clusters of commodity machines. Map Reduce has gained a great popularity as it gracefully and automatically achieves fault tolerance. It automatically handles the gathering of results across the multiple nodes and returns a single result or set. This paper gives an overview of MapReduce programming model and its applications. The author has described here the workflow of MapReduce process. Some important issues, like fault tolerance, arestudied in more detail. Even the illustration of working of Map Reduce is given. The data locality issue in heterogeneous environments can noticeably reduce the Map Reduce performance. In this paper, the author has addressed the illustration of data across nodes in a way that each node has a balanced data processing load stored in a parallel manner. Given a data intensive application running on a Hadoop Map Reduce cluster, the auhor has exemplified how data placement is done in Hadoop architecture and the role of Map Reduce in the Hadoop Architecture. The amount of data stored in each node to achieve improved data-processing performance is explained here.

  1. Interpretation of the reduced density gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Boto, Roberto A.; Contreras-García, Julia; Tierny, Julien; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2015-01-01

    An interpretation of the reduced density gradient in terms of the bosonic kinetic energy density is presented. Contrary to other bonding indicators based on the kinetic energy density such as the localised orbital locator (LOL) or the electron localization function (ELF), the reduced density gradient is not only able to identify covalent bondings, but also ionic and non-covalent interactions. This study reveals that the critical points of the reduced density gradient are closely connected wit...

  2. Reducing energy costs in nursing homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The handbook presents ideas and techniques for energy conservation in nursing homes. Case studies were developed of nursing homes located in different parts of the US. The typical nursing home assessed was proprietary, of intermediate-care level, medicaid-certified, and had less than 200 beds. Specific energy conservation measures were analyzed to determine the energy and dollar savings that could be realized. These include reducing heat loss through the building shell; reducing hot water costs; recovering the heat generated by dryers; reducing lighting costs; reducing heating and cooling costs, and analyzing fuels and fuel rates. A case for converting electric clothes dryers to gas was analyzed. (MCW)

  3. Reduced, tame and exotic fusion systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K.K.S.; Oliver, Bob; Ventura, Joana

    We define here two new classes of saturated fusion systems, reduced fusion systems and tame fusion systems. These are motivated by our attempts to better understand and search for exotic fusion systems: fusion systems which are not the fusion systems of any finite group. Our main theorems say...... that every saturated fusion system reduces to a reduced fusion system which is tame only if the original one is realizable, and that every reduced fusion system which is not tame is the reduction of some exotic (nonrealizable) fusion system....

  4. Reducing pawing in horses using positive reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Adam E; Belding, Devon L

    2015-12-01

    Aversive control is a common method to reduce undesirable behavior in horses. However, it often results in unintended negative side effects, including potential abuse of the animal. Procedures based on positive reinforcement, such as differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO), may reduce undesirable behaviors with fewer negative consequences. The current study used DRO schedules to reduce pawing using a multiple baseline design across 3 horses. Results indicated that DRO schedules were effective at reducing pawing. However, individual differences in sensitivity to DRO and reinforcer efficacy may be important considerations.

  5. Reduced, tame and exotic fusion systems

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Kasper K. S.; Oliver, Bob; Ventura, Joana

    2010-01-01

    We define here two new classes of saturated fusion systems, reduced fusion systems and tame fusion systems. These are motivated by our attempts to better understand and search for exotic fusion systems: fusion systems which are not the fusion systems of any finite group. Our main theorems say that every saturated fusion system reduces to a reduced fusion system which is tame only if the original one is realizable, and that every reduced fusion system which is not tame is the reduction of some...

  6. Simple Potentiometric Determination of Reducing Sugars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresco, Henry; Sanson, Pedro; Seoane, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    In this article a potentiometric method for reducing sugar quantification is described. Copper(II) ion reacts with the reducing sugar (glucose, fructose, and others), and the excess is quantified using a copper wire indicator electrode. In order to accelerate the kinetics of the reaction, working conditions such as pH and temperature must be…

  7. An intervention to reduce playground equipment hazards

    OpenAIRE

    Roseveare, C.; Brown, J.; McIntosh, J.; Chalmers, D

    1999-01-01

    Objectives—A community intervention trial was carried out to evaluate the relative effectiveness of two methods of reducing playground hazards in schools. The study hypotheses were: (1) a health promotion programme addressing barriers to implementing the New Zealand Playground Safety Standard will reduce playground hazards and (2) the intervention programme will be more successful than providing information alone.

  8. Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in river floodplains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miletto, M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis constitutes a pioneer attempt at elucidating the ecology of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in river floodplains. These are non-typical sulfate-reducing environmental settings, given the generally low sulfate concentration that characterize freshwater habitats, and river flow regulation tha

  9. Tools to Reduce Waste in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This guide was produced to help schools and school districts reduce the amount of waste they generate It shows how to start a waste reduction program or expand an existing one. The booklet shows how such programs can benefit schools, communities, and the environment by reducing, reusing, and recycling waste. Each section--schools, school…

  10. Biplots in Reduced-Rank Regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, ter C.J.F.; Looman, C.W.N.

    1994-01-01

    Regression problems with a number of related response variables are typically analyzed by separate multiple regressions. This paper shows how these regressions can be visualized jointly in a biplot based on reduced-rank regression. Reduced-rank regression combines multiple regression and principal c

  11. Conformally reducible 1+3 spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Carot, Jaume; Tupper, Brian O J

    2013-01-01

    Spacetimes which are conformally related to reducible 1+3 spacetimes are considered. We classify these spacetimes according to the conformal algebra of the underlying reducible spacetime, giving in each case canonical expressions for the metric and conformal Killing vectors, and provide physically meaningful examples.

  12. Conformally reducible 1+3 spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carot, Jaume [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Cra. Valldemossa km 7.5, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Keane, Aidan J [87 Carlton Place, Glasgow G5 9TD, Scotland (United Kingdom); Tupper, Brian O J [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB E3B 5A3 (Canada)], E-mail: jcarot@uib.es, E-mail: aidan@countingthoughts.com, E-mail: bt32@rogers.com

    2008-03-07

    Spacetimes which are conformally related to reducible 1+3 spacetimes are considered. We classify these spacetimes according to the conformal algebra of the underlying reducible spacetime, giving in each case canonical expressions for the metric and conformal Killing vectors, and providing physically meaningful examples.

  13. The Consumer's Handbook for Reducing Solid Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This profusely illustrated and informally written booklet describes how people can help solve a growing problem--garbage. The following 12 tips are presented: (1) Reduce the amount of unnecessary packaging; (2) Adopt practices that reduce waste toxicity; (3) Consider reusable products; (4) Maintain and repair durable products; (5) Reuse bags,…

  14. Chitosan-supported Borohydride Reducing Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new chitosan-supported borohydride reducing reagent (CBER) was prepared by treatment of KBH4 with the resin of chitosan derivative, which was first synthesized fiom the reaction of cross-linked chitosan microsphere with glycidyl trimethylammonium chloride. CBER could reduce aromatic carbonyl compound to corresponding alcohol.

  15. DYNAMICAL BALANCE STUDY OF RING REDUCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The basic structure of epicyclical gear transmission with inner teeth of single-ring, double-ring, three-ring and four-ring reducer are analyzed. The force analysis model of ring reducer is built. Following this, it is concluded that the present ring reducers have the problem that the inertia force or the inertia moment is lopsided. On the base of analysis and calculation the balanced ring reducer which can realize the balance of inertia force and inertia moment is brought forward, and so is its concrete realizing step. The specimen of the balanced ring reducer is designed and manufactured; the experiment is carried out on the gear transmission test bench. Compared with other ring reducer of the same power, the balanced ring reducer has many advantages, such as low vibration noise, low cost and less production difficulty and less heat. It is the substitute of other ring reducer of the same kind. Therefore, it has important theoretic significance and highly practical engineering value.

  16. Multiclass Reduced-Set Support Vector Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Benyang; Mazzoni, Dominic

    2006-01-01

    There are well-established methods for reducing the number of support vectors in a trained binary support vector machine, often with minimal impact on accuracy. We show how reduced-set methods can be applied to multiclass SVMs made up of several binary SVMs, with significantly better results than reducing each binary SVM independently. Our approach is based on Burges' approach that constructs each reduced-set vector as the pre-image of a vector in kernel space, but we extend this by recomputing the SVM weights and bias optimally using the original SVM objective function. This leads to greater accuracy for a binary reduced-set SVM, and also allows vectors to be 'shared' between multiple binary SVMs for greater multiclass accuracy with fewer reduced-set vectors. We also propose computing pre-images using differential evolution, which we have found to be more robust than gradient descent alone. We show experimental results on a variety of problems and find that this new approach is consistently better than previous multiclass reduced-set methods, sometimes with a dramatic difference.

  17. Systematic hybrid LOH: a new method to reduce false positives and negatives during screening of yeast gene deletion libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvaro, D.; Sunjevaric, I.; Reid, R. J.;

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new method, systematic hybrid loss of heterozygosity, to facilitate genomic screens utilizing the yeast gene deletion library. Screening is performed using hybrid diploid strains produced through mating the library haploids with strains from a different genetic background......, to minimize the contribution of unpredicted recessive genetic factors present in the individual library strains. We utilize a set of strains where each contains a conditional centromere construct on one of the 16 yeast chromosomes that allows the destabilization and selectable loss of that chromosome. After...... mating a library gene deletion haploid to such a conditional centromere strain, which corresponds to the chromosome carrying the gene deletion, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the gene deletion locus can be generated in these otherwise hybrid diploids. The use of hybrid diploid strains permits...

  18. Novel Reduced Parts Online Uninterruptible Power Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Ashrafi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents design consideration and performance analysis of novel reduced parts online three-phase uninterruptible power supply (UPS system. The proposed UPS system is based on reduced switch count dual bridge matrix converter. It employs only six power switches and results in reducing the cost of the system compared to conventional online UPS topologies, while achieving excellent performance. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated through simulation in terms of input/output waveforms quality and shows the viability of topology.

  19. Reduced Baroclinicity During Martian Global Dust Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battalio, Joseph; Szunyogh, Istvan; Lemmon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    The eddy kinetic energy equation is applied to the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset during the pre-winter solstice period for the northern hemisphere of Mars. Traveling waves are triggered by geopotential flux convergence, grow baroclinically, and decay barotropically. Higher optical depth increases the static stability, which reduces vertical and meridional heat fluxes. Traveling waves during a global dust storm year develop a mixed baroclinic/barotropic growth phase before decaying barotropically. Baroclinic energy conversion is reduced during the global dust storm, but eddy intensity is undiminished. Instead, the frequency of storms is reduced due to a stabilized vertical profile.

  20. Reducing urinary tract infections in catheterised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Pam; Adams, John

    2015-01-20

    Urinary tract infections in catheterised patients continue to present a challenge in reducing healthcare-associated infection. In this article, an infection prevention and control team in one NHS trust reports on using audit results to focus attention on measures to reduce bacterial infections. Educational initiatives have an important role in reducing infection, but there is no single solution to the problem. Practice can be improved using a multi-targeted approach, peer review and clinical audit to allow for shared learning and experiences. These, along with informal education in the clinical area and more formal classroom lectures, can ultimately lead to improved patient outcomes. PMID:25585767

  1. Electronic states in systems of reduced dimensionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report briefly discusses the following research: magnetically modulated systems, inelastic magnetotunneling, ballistic transport review, screening in reduced dimensions, raman and electron energy loss spectroscopy; and ballistic quantum interference effects. (LSP)

  2. REDUCING TOXICITY CHEMICALS PLANT PROTECTION PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    Litvishko, Valery; Myaskovskaya, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    The samples of microencapsulated pesticide have been investigated in acute experiments on laboratory animals. The results of the research have determined that microencapsulation can reduce toxicity of plant protection chemicals.

  3. Spontaneously reduced isolated orbital roof fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itinteang, Tinte; Lambe, Gerald Francis; MacKinnon, Craig; Agir, Hakan

    2012-07-01

    We report a case of a spontaneously reduced isolated orbital roof blow-in fracture with resolution of associated diplopia and blepharoptosis highlighting the need for a low threshold for reimaging this cohort of facial fracture patients. PMID:22801127

  4. Cogeneration, renewables and reducing greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MENSA model is used to assess the potential role of cogeneration and selected new renewable energy technologies in cost-effectively reducing Greenhouse gas emissions. The model framework for analyzing these issues is introduced, together with an account of relevant aspects of its application. In the discussion of selected new renewable energy technologies, it is shown how microeconomic reform may encourage these technologies and fuels, and thereby reduce sector wide carbon dioxide emissions. Policy scenarios modelled are described and the simulation results are presented. Certain interventions in microeconomic reform may result in economic benefits while also reducing emissions: no regrets' opportunities. Some renewable energy technologies are also shown to be cost-effective in the event that targets and timetables for reducing Greenhouse gas emissions are imposed. However, ad hoc interventions in support of particular renewables options are unlikely to be consistent with a least cost approach to achieving environmental objectives. (author). 5 tabs., 5 figs., 21 refs

  5. Conformally reducible 2+2 spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carot, Jaume [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Cra. Valldemossa km 7.5, E-07071 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Tupper, Brian O J [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2002-08-07

    Spacetimes which are conformal to 2+2 reducible spacetimes are considered. We classify them according to their conformal algebra, giving in each case explicit expressions for the metric and conformal Killing vectors, and providing physically meaningful examples.

  6. Conformally reducible 2+2 spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Carot, J

    2002-01-01

    Spacetimes which are conformal to 2+2 reducible spacetimes are considered. We classify them according to their conformal algebra, giving in each case explicit expressions for the metric and conformal Killing vectors, and providing physically meaningful examples.

  7. Vaccine Reduces HPV Infections in Young Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    An international randomized clinical trial has shown that the vaccine Gardasil can reduce the incidence of anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in young men 16 to 26 years of age at the time of vaccination.

  8. Do conditional benefits reduce equilibrium unemployment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. van der Ploeg

    2006-01-01

    Although unconditional unemployment benefits destroy jobs in competitive and noncompetitive labor markets, conditional benefits can spur job growth in noncompetitive labor markets. Unconditional benefits reduce the penalty of shirking and misconduct, while conditional benefits increase this penalty.

  9. Reduced sulfur compound oxidation by Thiobacillus caldus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hallberg, K. B.; Dopson, M; Lindström, E B

    1996-01-01

    The oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds was studied by using resting cells of the moderate thermophile Thiobacillus caldus strain KU. The oxygen consumption rate and total oxygen consumed were determined for the reduced sulfur compounds thiosulfate, tetrathionate, sulfur, sulfide, and sulfite in the absence and in the presence of inhibitors and uncouplers. The uncouplers 2,4-dinitrophenol and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone had no affect on the oxidation of thiosulfate, ...

  10. Programming MapReduce with Scalding

    CERN Document Server

    Chalkiopoulos, Antonios

    2014-01-01

    This book is an easy-to-understand, practical guide to designing, testing, and implementing complex MapReduce applications in Scala using the Scalding framework. It is packed with examples featuring log-processing, ad-targeting, and machine learning. This book is for developers who are willing to discover how to effectively develop MapReduce applications. Prior knowledge of Hadoop or Scala is not required; however, investing some time on those topics would certainly be beneficial.

  11. Evaluating Active Interventions to Reduce Student Procrastination

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Joshua Deckert

    2015-01-01

    Procrastination is a pervasive problem in education. In computer science, procrastination and lack of necessary time management skills to complete programming projects are viewed as primary causes of student attrition. The most effective techniques known to reduce procrastination are resource-intensive and do not scale well to large classrooms. In this thesis, we examine three course interventions designed to both reduce procrastination and be scalable for large classrooms. Reflective writ...

  12. IHadoop: Asynchronous iterations for MapReduce

    KAUST Repository

    Elnikety, Eslam Mohamed Ibrahim

    2011-11-01

    MapReduce is a distributed programming frame-work designed to ease the development of scalable data-intensive applications for large clusters of commodity machines. Most machine learning and data mining applications involve iterative computations over large datasets, such as the Web hyperlink structures and social network graphs. Yet, the MapReduce model does not efficiently support this important class of applications. The architecture of MapReduce, most critically its dataflow techniques and task scheduling, is completely unaware of the nature of iterative applications; tasks are scheduled according to a policy that optimizes the execution for a single iteration which wastes bandwidth, I/O, and CPU cycles when compared with an optimal execution for a consecutive set of iterations. This work presents iHadoop, a modified MapReduce model, and an associated implementation, optimized for iterative computations. The iHadoop model schedules iterations asynchronously. It connects the output of one iteration to the next, allowing both to process their data concurrently. iHadoop\\'s task scheduler exploits inter-iteration data locality by scheduling tasks that exhibit a producer/consumer relation on the same physical machine allowing a fast local data transfer. For those iterative applications that require satisfying certain criteria before termination, iHadoop runs the check concurrently during the execution of the subsequent iteration to further reduce the application\\'s latency. This paper also describes our implementation of the iHadoop model, and evaluates its performance against Hadoop, the widely used open source implementation of MapReduce. Experiments using different data analysis applications over real-world and synthetic datasets show that iHadoop performs better than Hadoop for iterative algorithms, reducing execution time of iterative applications by 25% on average. Furthermore, integrating iHadoop with HaLoop, a variant Hadoop implementation that caches

  13. New approaches to reduce radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kevin D; Einstein, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is associated with a long-term risk of health effects, including cancer. Radiation exposure to the U.S. population from cardiac imaging has increased markedly over the past three decades. Initiatives to reduce radiation exposure have focused on the tenets of appropriate study "justification" and "optimization" of imaging protocols. This article reviews ways to optimally reduce radiation dose across the spectrum of cardiac imaging.

  14. Reduced span spray – Part 1: Retention

    OpenAIRE

    Massinon, Mathieu; De Cock, Nicolas; Ouled Taleb Salah, Sofiene; Lebeau, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Maximising treatment efficiency for a given target lies mainly on depositing a maximum part of the spray volume within an optimal droplet size range, which has to be as narrow as possible to reduce retention variability and drift issues. The present work focuses on exploring the effect of span factor of the droplet size distribution on the final retention by a 3D target plant using a modelling approach with the final aim of guiding the development of a reduced span nozzle (Redu...

  15. Acetate reduces microglia inflammatory signaling in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Soliman, Mahmoud L; Puig, Kendra L.; Combs, Colin K.; Rosenberger, Thad A.

    2012-01-01

    Acetate supplementation increases brain acetyl-CoA and histone acetylation and reduces lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroglial activation and interleukin (IL)-1β expression in vivo. To determine how acetate imparts these properties, we tested the hypothesis that acetate metabolism reduces inflammatory signaling in microglia. To test this, we measured the effect acetate treatment had on cytokine expression, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, histone H3 at lysine 9 acetylati...

  16. Laser welding in a reduced gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results on the effects of reduced gravity on laser welding of stainless steel and other materials are reported. Laser welding experiments using a low power (10-18 watts) Nd-YAG laser have been performed on the NASA KC-135, which flies parabolic maneuvers to simulate reduced gravity conditions. Experiments on 0.005-0.010 inch thick stainless steel samples displayed a pronounced change in weld bead width, depth of penetration and surface ripple with changes in gravity level.

  17. Boiler burden reduced at Bedford site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, Chris

    2011-10-01

    With the NHS aiming to reduce its 2007 carbon footprint by 10% by 2015, Chris Horsley, managing director of Babcock Wanson UK, a provider of industrial boilers and burners, thermal oxidisers, air treatment, water treatment, and associated services, looks at how one NHS Trust has approached the challenge, and considerably reduced its carbon emissions, by refurbishing its boiler house and moving from oil to gas-fired steam generation. PMID:22049674

  18. Contralateral Risk-Reducing Mastectomy: Review of Risk Factors and Risk-Reducing Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, N. N.; Barr, L; Ross, G. L.; Evans, D. G.

    2015-01-01

    Rates of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy have increased substantially over the last decade. Surgical oncologists are often in the frontline, dealing with requests for this procedure. This paper reviews the current evidence base regarding contralateral breast cancer, assesses the various risk-reducing strategies, and evaluates the cost-effectiveness of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy.

  19. Evolution of technetium speciation in reducing grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, Wayne W.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Shuh, David K.; Edelstein,Norman M.

    2003-11-24

    Cementitious waste forms (CWFs) are an important component of the strategy to immobilize high-level nuclear waste resulting from plutonium production by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant fission product of particular concern in CWFs due to the high solubility and mobility of pertechnetate, TcO4-, the stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. CWFs can more effectively immobilize 99Tc if they contain additives that reduce mobile TcO4- to immobile Tc(IV) species. Leaching of 99Tc from reducing CWFs that contain Tc(IV) is much slower than for CWFs containing TcO4-. Previous X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies showed that the Tc(IV) species were oxidized to TcO4- in reducing grout samples prepared on a laboratory scale. Whether the oxidizer was atmospheric O2 or NO3- in the waste simulant was not determined. In actual CWFs, rapid oxidation of Tc(IV) by NO3- would be a concern, whereas oxidation by atmospheric O2 would be of less concern due to the slow diffusion and reaction of O2 with the reducing CWF. To address this uncertainty, two series of reducing grouts were prepared using TcO4- containing waste simulants with and without NO3-. In the first series of samples, the TcO4- was completely reduced using Na2S, and the samples were placed in containers that permitted O2 diffusion. In these samples, all of the technetium was initially present as aTc(IV) sulfide compound, TcSx, which was characterized using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and is likely Tc2S7. The TcSx initially present in the grout samples was steadily oxidized over 4 years. In the second series of samples, all of the TcO4- was not initially reduced, and the grout samples were placed in airtight containers. In these samples, the remaining TcO4- continued to be reduced as the samples aged, presumably due to the presence of reducing blast furnace slag. When samples in the second series were exposed to atmosphere, the

  20. Bioremediation: Effectiveness in reducing the ecological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioremediation becomes an important technique in oil spill combat programmes. The purpose is to shorten the exposure time of biota to oil compounds, in order to reduce long term environmental effects. Although bioremediation products have the advantage of stimulating the natural capacity to degrade oil, there are some limitations to be considered. Application as a technique for first emergency actions following an oil spill is not effective, and can therefore be no alternative for dispersion or mechanical removal of floating or freshly stranded oil slicks. Acute toxic effects are related to the short term exposure to unweathered oils. An immediate removal of oil is necessary to reduce the extent of the environmental impact of an oil spill. Physical processes (transport, dilution and evaporation) are determining the initial fate of environmentally released oil. Biodegradation only becomes important as a process of removing oil in the next phase. It is the only effective way to further reduce the concentration of oil that is left in (intertidal) coastal areas. Bioremediation thus reduces the duration of the environmental impact of an oil spill. This is especially important in ecosystems with a low recovery potential (e.g., salt marshes, rocky shores). The experimental evaluation of bioremediation products is mainly based on the capacity to reduce fresh oil and the acute toxicity of the product itself, rather than on the capacity to enhance the further reduction of weathered oil and the toxicological consequences of higher release rates of intermediate metabolites produced during the biotransformation processes

  1. Moral elevation reduces prejudice against gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Calvin K; Haidt, Jonathan; Nosek, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Disgust is linked to social evaluation. People with higher disgust sensitivity exhibit more sexual prejudice, and inducing disgust increases sexual prejudice. We tested whether inducing moral elevation, the theoretical opposite of disgust, would reduce sexual prejudice. In four studies (N = 3622), we induced elevation with inspiring videos and then measured sexual prejudice with implicit and explicit measures. Compared to control videos that elicited no particular affective state, we found that elevation reduced implicit and explicit sexual prejudice, albeit very slightly. No effect was observed when the target of social evaluation was changed to race (Black-White). Inducing amusement, another positive emotion, did not significantly affect sexual prejudice. We conclude that elevation weakly but reliably reduces prejudice towards gay men.

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizas reduce nitrogen loss via leaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R Asghari

    Full Text Available The capacity of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal root systems to reduce nitrate (NO₃⁻ and ammonium (NH₄⁺ loss from soils via leaching was investigated in a microcosm-based study. A mycorrhiza defective tomato mutant and its mycorrhizal wildtype progenitor were used in this experiment in order to avoid the indirect effects of establishing non-mycorrhizal control treatments on soil nitrogen cycling and the wider soil biota. Mycorrhizal root systems dramatically reduced nitrate loss (almost 40 times less via leaching, compared to their non-mycorrhizal counterparts, following a pulse application of ammonium nitrate to experimental microcosms. The capacity of AM to reduce nutrient loss via leaching has received relatively little attention, but as demonstrated here, can be significant. Taken together, these data highlight the need to consider the potential benefits of AM beyond improvements in plant nutrition alone.

  3. Reduced herbicide rates: present and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudsk, Per

    2014-01-01

    rates will result in maximum effects, 2) that the conditions at and around the time of application, e.g. growth stage of weeds, crop vigour and climatic condition are optimum promoting the activity of the herbicide and thus allows for the use of reduced herbicides rates, or 3) that less than maximum......Applying herbicides at rates lower than the label recommendation has been the rule rather than the exception in Denmark since the late 1980’s. Justifications for reducing herbicide rates can be 1) that the dominant weed species in the field are very susceptible to the herbicide, i.e. even reduced...... effects are accepted because the weed flora is not considered to have a significant effect on crop yield. “Crop Protection Online-Weed” (CPO-Weed) is a web-based decision support system that was developed to support farmers in their choice of herbicide and herbicide rate. CPOWeed will, based...

  4. Active structures to reduce torsional vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, M.; Schlote, D.; Atzrodt, H.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development of different active measures to reduce torsional vibrations in power trains. The measures are based on concepts developed for active mounts to reduce the transmission of structure-borne sound. To show the potential of these active measures and investigate their mode of operation to influence torsional vibrations, numerical simulations of powertrains with different active measures were done. First experimental results from tests on an experimental (reduced size) power train were used to align the numerical models. The work was done within the project 'LOEWE-Zentrum AdRIA: Adaptronik - Research, Innovation, Application' funded by the German federal state of Hessen, and the Project AKTos: 'Active control of torsional vibrations by coupling elements' placed in the research Framework program 'Navigation and Maritime Technology for the 21st Century' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

  5. Manager's guide to reducing dental hygiene turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiacono, C

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of dental hygiene turnover and provide managers with strategies for preventing and reducing turnover. Employee turnover is a problem which affects dental health care delivery and the health of the public. Employee turnover is costly to work settings and creates a stressful working environment which has an impact on professional-client relationships. To reduce or prevent turnover in a private practice setting, office managers must be informed about the causes and effects of this problem and be able to implement solutions. Some strategies managers can use to reduce turnover are hiring employees who have the same goals as the organization; improving the working climate; rewarding longevity; encouraging the active participation of all staff members in office management; improving office communication; and providing opportunities for self-growth, recognition, and greater responsibilities.

  6. Reducing the convective losses of cavity receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Robert; Grobbel, Johannes; Stadler, Hannes; Uhlig, Ralf; Hoffschmidt, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    Convective losses reduce the efficiency of cavity receivers used in solar power towers especially under windy conditions. Therefore, measures should be taken to reduce these losses. In this paper two different measures are analyzed: an air curtain and a partial window which covers one third of the aperture opening. The cavity without modifications and the usage of a partial window were analyzed in a cryogenic wind tunnel at -173°C. The cryogenic environment allows transforming the results from the small model cavity to a large scale receiver with Gr≈3.9.1010. The cavity with the two modifications in the wind tunnel environment was analyzed with a CFD model as well. By comparing the numerical and experimental results the model was validated. Both modifications are capable of reducing the convection losses. In the best case a reduction of about 50 % was achieved.

  7. Nature of Reduced Carbon in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; White, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorites provide important information on the nature of reduced carbon components present on Mars throughout its history. The first in situ analyses for carbon on the surface of Mars by the Viking landers yielded disappointing results. With the recognition of Martian meteorites on Earth, investigations have shown carbon-bearing phases exist on Mars. Studies have yielded presence of reduced carbon, carbonates and inferred graphitic carbon phases. Samples ranging in age from the first approximately 4 Ga of Mars history [e.g. ALH84001] to nakhlites with a crystallization age of 1.3 Ga [e.g. Nakhla] with aqueous alteration processes occurring 0.5-0.7 Ga after crystallizaton. Shergottites demonstrate formation ages around 165-500 Ma with younger aqueous alterations events. Only a limited number of the Martian meteorites do not show evidence of significance terrestrial alterations. Selected areas within ALH84001, Nakhla, Yamato 000593 and possibly Tissint are suitable for study of their indigenous reduced carbon bearing phases. Nakhla possesses discrete, well-defined carbonaceous phases present within iddingsite alteration zones. Based upon both isotopic measurements and analysis of Nakhla's organic phases the presence of pre-terrestrial organics is now recognized. The reduced carbon-bearing phases appear to have been deposited during preterrestrial aqueous alteration events that produced clays. In addition, the microcrystalline layers of Nakhla's iddingsite have discrete units of salt crystals suggestive of evaporation processes. While we can only speculate on the origin of these unique carbonaceous structures, we note that the significance of such observations is that it may allow us to understand the role of Martian carbon as seen in the Martian meteorites with obvious implications for astrobiology and the pre-biotic evolution of Mars. In any case, our observations strongly suggest that reduced organic carbon exists as micrometer- size, discrete structures

  8. Reducing Transmitted Vibration Using Delayed Hysteretic Suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahcen Mokni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous numerical and experimental works show that time delay technique is efficient to reduce transmissibility of vibration in a single pneumatic chamber by controlling the pressure in the chamber. The present work develops an analytical study to demonstrate the effectiveness of such a technique in reducing transmitted vibrations. A quarter-car model is considered and delayed hysteretic suspension is introduced in the system. Analytical predictions based on perturbation analysis show that a delayed hysteretic suspension enhances vibration isolation comparing to the case where the nonlinear damping is delay-independent.

  9. Reduced Basis Method for Nanodevices Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pau, George Shu Heng

    2008-05-23

    Ballistic transport simulation in nanodevices, which involves self-consistently solving a coupled Schrodinger-Poisson system of equations, is usually computationally intensive. Here, we propose coupling the reduced basis method with the subband decomposition method to improve the overall efficiency of the simulation. By exploiting a posteriori error estimation procedure and greedy sampling algorithm, we are able to design an algorithm where the computational cost is reduced significantly. In addition, the computational cost only grows marginally with the number of grid points in the confined direction.

  10. Reduced Multiplicative Tolerance Ranking and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Sitarz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a reduced multiplicative tolerance - a measure of sensitivity analysis in multi-objective linear programming (MOLP is presented. By using this new measure a method for ranking the set of efficient extreme solutions is proposed. The idea is to rank these solutions by values of the reduced tolerance. This approach can be applied to many MOLP problems, where sensitivity analysis is important for a decision maker. In the paper, applications of the presented methodology are shown in the market model and the transportation problem.

  11. Comments on the height reducing property

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Shigeki

    2012-01-01

    A complex number alpha is said to satisfy the height reducing property if there is a finite subset F of the ring Z of the rational integers such that Z[alpha]=F[alpha]. This problem of finding F has been considered by several authors, especially in contexts related to self affine tilings, and expansions of real numbers in non-integer bases. We continue, in this note, the description of the numbers satisfying the height reducing property, and we specify a related characterization of the roots of integer polynomials with dominant term.

  12. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, Ido

    2016-01-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in inertial confinement fusion. However, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of $5$. A general, fluid-model based, analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations.

  13. Experimental knee pain reduces muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Mortensen, Sara Rosager; Aaboe, Jens;

    2011-01-01

    experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and if these changes were associated with the pain intensities. In a crossover study, 18 healthy subjects were tested on 2 different days. Using an isokinetic dynamometer, maximal muscle strength in knee extension and flexion was measured at angular velocities 0....... Knee pain reduced the muscle strength by 5 to 15% compared to the control conditions (P <.001) in both knee extension and flexion at all angular velocities. The reduction in muscle strength was positively correlated to the pain intensity. Experimental knee pain significantly reduced knee extension and...

  14. The Assignment Game : The Reduced Game

    OpenAIRE

    Owen, Guillermo

    1992-01-01

    Let v be an assignment game. For a given reference payoff vector (x; y), and a coalition S, bargaining within the coalition can be represented by either the reduced game or the derived game. It is known that the reduced game need not be an assignment game (in fact, it need not be super additive) while the derived game is another assignment game, with modified reservation prices. We prove that, when the reference vector is in the core of the game, the derived game is the super additive cover o...

  15. Restricted fish feeding reduces cod otolith opacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høie, H.; Folkvord, A.; Mosegaard, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to examine the effect of reduced feeding and constant temperature on cod otolith opacity. Three groups of juvenile cod were given restricted food rations at different times for 4 months, resulting in depressed somatic growth. Otolith opacity was measured on pictures...... in otolith opacity were found between individual fish both within groups and between groups. In two of the three groups significantly more translucent otolith material was deposited in response to reduced feeding. Our results show that variations in feeding and hence fish growth resulted in variation...

  16. Device and Method for Reducing Aircraft Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streett, Craig L. (Inventor); Lin, John C. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A noise abatement device that is positioned adjacent to a body. The noise abatement device generally includes tabs or cavities which thicken the shear layer created by fluid flow over, around, or near the body, by creating horseshoe-shaped vortices; this thickening of the shear layer reduces the strength of fluctuations in the flow which produce noise.

  17. 77 FR 47328 - Reducing Regulatory Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... health and safety, and other advantages; distributive impacts; and equity). The regulatory process... businesses and the public. Agencies consider low-cost approaches that reduce burdens and maintain flexibility...-regulatory-system . The Department is committed to maintaining a consistent culture of retrospective...

  18. 77 FR 28518 - Reducing Regulatory Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ..., and other advantages; distributive impacts; and equity). The regulatory process encourages public..., simplify, and harmonize regulations to reduce costs and promote certainty for businesses and the public... culture of retrospective review and analysis. DOE will continually engage in review of its rules...

  19. Chemicals Reduce Need To Mow Grass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrys, Brooks; Farley, Max; Gast, Larry J.

    1993-01-01

    Brief report discusses use of herbicides Roundup(R), Campaign(R), and Oust(R) to retard growth of Argentine bahia grass. Herbicide applied by use of spraying apparatus pulled by tractor. "Chemical mowing" keeps grass at "freshly mowed" height with less mechanical mowing. Applied to grass on shoulders of roads, reducing time spent on mowing.

  20. Scientist Researches Way to Reduce Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the last four years, scientists at the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Northern Plains Agricultural Research Laboratory have been searching for alternative soil and crop management practices to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase carbon and nitrogen sequestration. “If we can redu...

  1. Reducing the Risk of Methadone Overdose

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-03

    This podcast is based on the July 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Approximately 14 people die every day of overdoses related to methadone. Listen to learn how to reduce your risk of an overdose.  Created: 7/3/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/3/2012.

  2. QUIESST Guidebook to Noise Reducing Devices optimisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clairbois, J.P.; Roo, F. de; Garai, M.; Conter, M.; Defrance, J.; Oltean-Dumbrava, C.A.; Durso, C.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this guidebook is to become a reference tool for noise mitigation through a better use of Noise Reducing Devices (NRD) (e.g.: Noise Barriers or sound Absorptive Claddings). It targets all the stakeholders involved in NRD projects (designers, manufacturers, authorities, construction compan

  3. Reducing consumption by way of energy recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, K.

    1983-01-01

    The article deals with the recovery of the consumed energy from waste air. Schematical presentations of the cooling systems at printing machines in connection with the heat flow of machine-air-water-heat pump-heating are shown. There are preconditions of integrated cooling systems and modules for rational energy utilization. Energy costs and ways of reducing operational costs are also touched.

  4. Sodium Valproate Withdrawal Correlates with Reduced Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Duncan; Hoerger, Marguerite; Dyer, Tim; Graham, Nicola; Penney, Heather; Mace, F. Charles

    2014-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are sometimes prescribed psychotropic medication to help manage their challenging behaviour. This case study describes how a multicomponent behavioural intervention in conjunction with the systematic withdrawal of sodium valproate was strongly correlated with reduced aggression. No symptoms of bipolar disorder or…

  5. Sexual Harassment at Camp: Reducing Liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakleaf, Linda; Grube, Angela Johnson

    2003-01-01

    Employers are responsible for sexual harassment perpetrated by a supervisor. Camps may be responsible for sexual harassment between campers. Steps to reduce liability include providing multiple channels for reporting sexual harassment; having written policies prohibiting sexual harassment and procedures for reporting it; posting these policies and…

  6. Reduced Voltage Scaling in Clock Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khader Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel circuit technique to generate a reduced voltage swing (RVS signals for active power reduction on main buses and clocks. This is achieved without performance degradation, without extra power supply requirement, and with minimum area overhead. The technique stops the discharge path on the net that is swinging low at a certain voltage value. It reduces active power on the target net by as much as 33% compared to traditional full swing signaling. The logic 0 voltage value is programmable through control bits. If desired, the reduced-swing mode can also be disabled. The approach assumes that the logic 0 voltage value is always less than the threshold voltage of the nMOS receivers, which eliminate the need of the low to high voltage translation. The reduced noise margin and the increased leakage on the receiver transistors using this approach have been addressed through the selective usage of multithreshold voltage (MTV devices and the programmability of the low voltage value.

  7. How Does Distinctive Processing Reduce False Recall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, R. Reed; Smith, Rebekah E.; Dunlap, Kathryn R.

    2011-01-01

    False memories arising from associatively related lists are a robust phenomenon that resists many efforts to prevent it. However, a few variables have been shown to reduce this form of false memory. Explanations for how the reduction is accomplished have focused on either output monitoring processes or constraints on access, but neither idea alone…

  8. Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic Equations in Toroidal Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Shen-Ming; YU Guo-Yang

    2001-01-01

    By applying a new assumption of density, I.e. R2 p = const, the continuity equation is satisfied to the order ofe2`+with e being the inverse aspect ratio. In the case of large aspect ratio, a set of reduced magnetohydrodynamicequations in toroidal geometry are obtained. The new assumption about the density is supported by experimentalobservation to some extent.

  9. Reducing Dogmatism among Undergraduate Counselor Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkay, Forrest W.

    Previous research has emphasized the significant negative correlation between counselor effectiveness and dogmatism, or closemindedness. To reduce levels of dogmatism in counselor trainees, a program was developed and tested at Southwest Texas State University. The new course, "Guidance to Meet the Needs of Multicultural Students," gave counseling…

  10. Reducing Depression in Pregnancy: Designing Multimodel Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Maddy; Zayas, Luis H.

    2002-01-01

    High levels of stress on low-income, inner-city women from ethnic minority groups often causes both poor maternal functioning and infant development outcomes. This article reviews literature that proposes using several social work treatment options instead a single approach to reduce maternal depression, expand mothers' social networks, and…

  11. Strategies for Reducing Text Book Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the price of college textbooks has become a growing concern for students and others who care about keeping college costs affordable. As policymakers and higher education systems explore the issue further, there are actions that can be taken immediately on college campuses to reduce the cost of textbooks. This brief presents…

  12. Ultrametric fixed points in reduced axiomatic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Turinici, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    The Brezis-Browder ordering principle [Advances Math., 21 (1976), 355-364] is used to get a proof, in the reduced axiomatic system (ZF-AC+DC), of a fixed point result [in the complete axiomatic system (ZF)] over Cantor complete ultrametric spaces due to Petalas and Vidalis [Proc. Amer. Math. Soc., 118 (1993), 819-821].

  13. Reducing Research Anxiety among MSW Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einbinder, Susan Dana

    2014-01-01

    Research anxiety significantly declined in a diverse sample of 59 MSW students in their first-year hybrid online research course in which the instructor used an array of innovative educational techniques empirically proven to reduce this phenomenon. The pretest/posttest study, the standardized survey instruments used, and a summary of these…

  14. Legislation analysis on reducing GHG in Australia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiqi Mao; Li Chen

    2014-01-01

    ‘Greenhouse Effect’ derived from human activities has caused many concerns. This dissertation mainly analysis existing GHG reduction regulations in Australia, the relationship between those regulations, and the effectiveness of the regulatory framework to see whether the CPR Scheme and other complementary strategies can effectively improve the regulatory outcomes, namely reduces GHG emissions.

  15. Reduced-dimension clustering for vegetation segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steward, B.L.; Tian, L.F.; Nettleton, D.; Tang, L.

    2004-01-01

    Segmentation of vegetation is a critical step in using machine vision for field automation tasks. A new method called reduced-dimensionclustering (RDC) was developed based on theoretical considerations about the color distribution of field images. RDC performed unsupervised classification of pixels

  16. Reducing Alcohol Consumption through Television Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, James G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed impact of television commercial based on controlled-drinking principles. Measures were taken 12 months prior to start of campaign and 3 weeks after campaign from regular drinkers of general public whose drinking behavior was known to be unaffected by previous antidrug advertising campaign. Found that advertisement reduced intake provided…

  17. Detecting reduced renal function in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Trine Borup; Jødal, Lars; Erlandsen, Erland J;

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the ability of renal indicators [serum creatinine (SCr), cystatin C (SCysC)] and glomerular filtration rate (GFR)-models to discriminate normal and reduced renal function. As a single cut-off level will always lead to false classifications, we propose...

  18. Ways to reduce contamination of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocesium is one of the most important radionuclides released into the environment. Possibilities of study of reducing the content of radionuclides directly in food have been analysed less. However, a significant reduction of content such as radiocesium we can achieve by leaching, marinating, steeping and cooking to allow in selected foods reach acceptable values. Observation was mainly focused on the mushrooms and meat. (author)

  19. Reduced Component Count RGB LED Driver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Pedro, I.; Ackermann, B.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this master thesis is to develop new drive and contrololutions, for creating white light from mixing the light of different-color LEDs, aiming at a reduced component count resulting in less space required by the electronics and lower cost. It evaluates the LED driver concept proposed in

  20. Reduced local energy surface profiles for hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three dimensional molecular reduced local energy error surface profiles are reported. The calculations are carried out for the hydrogen molecule using the Hartree-Fock wavefunctions of Coulson, Goodisman and Kolos and Roothaan. These surfaces provide both a complete and a simple way to interpret local errors in these wavefunctions. (author)

  1. A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot has been constructed for simple fluids which is suitable for engineering computations in heat transfer. Volumetric expansion factors have been found useful in correlating heat transfer data over a wide range of operating conditions including liquids, gases and the near critical region.

  2. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...

  3. Reducing Heating In High-Speed Cinematography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Howard A.

    1989-01-01

    Infrared-absorbing and infrared-reflecting glass filters simple and effective means for reducing rise in temperature during high-speed motion-picture photography. "Hot-mirror" and "cold-mirror" configurations, employed in projection of images, helps prevent excessive heating of scenes by powerful lamps used in high-speed photography.

  4. Reducing Cholesterol Intake: Are the recommendations valid?

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Joanna K.; McDonald, Bruce E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors question dietary recommendations for the general public calling for reduced cholesterol intake. Metabolic studies have shown that dietary cholesterol normally induces only small increases in blood cholesterol level. There is evidence that only a portion of the population responds to a change in cholesterol intake; hence lowering dietary cholesterol will be effective for only some.

  5. Reducing methane emissions from ruminant animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathison, G.W.; Okine, E.K.; McAllister, T.A.; Dong, Y.; Galbraith, J.; Dmytruk, O.I.N. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Science

    1998-09-01

    In 1992 it was estimated that 30 x 10{sup 12}g more methane was emitted into the atmosphere than was removed, with animals being considered the largest single anthropogenic source. Ruminants produce 97% of the methane generated in enteric fermentation by animals. Estimates for methane emissions from animal wastes vary between 6 and 31% of that produced directly by the animal, with the most likely value being between 5 and 10% globally. Methane inhibitors can reduce methane emissions to zero in the short term but due to microbial adaptation the effects of these compounds are quickly neutralized and feed intake is often depressed. Methane emissions per unit of feed consumed from sheep and cattle fed hay diets appear to be quite similar but differences between other ruminants have been measured. The most practical way of influencing methane emissions per unit product is to increase productivity level since the proportion of feed energy required to just maintain the animal will be reduced, methane production falls with increased intake level, and the animal may go to market sooner. The most promising avenues for future research for reducing methanogenesis are the development of new products for reducing protozoal numbers in the rumen and the use of bacterocins or other compounds which specifically target methanogenic bacteria.

  6. Reducing the diameters of computer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

    1986-01-01

    Three methods of reducing the diameters of computer networks by adding additional processor to processor links under the constraint that no more than one I/O port be added to each processor are discussed. This is equivalent to adding edges to a given graph under the constraint that the degree of any node be increased, at most, by one.

  7. Reducing Radon in Schools: A Team Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligman, Bryan K.; Fisher, Eugene J.

    This document presents the process of radon diagnostics and mitigation in schools to help educators determine the best way to reduce elevated radon levels found in a school. The guidebook is designed to guide school leaders through the process of measuring radon levels, selecting the best mitigation strategy, and directing the efforts of a…

  8. Finding Strategic Solutions to Reduce Truancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Ken

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on recent developments to find strategic solutions to the problem of truancy. It considers issues related to defining truancy and why reducing truancy matters before considering what causes truancy. The article concentrates upon seven areas where further work is needed: the role of parents (and carers); early intervention,…

  9. The LMNA mutation p.Arg321Ter associated with dilated cardiomyopathy leads to reduced expression and a skewed ratio of lamin A and lamin C proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saaidi, Rasha [Research Unit for Molecular Medicine, Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Rasmussen, Torsten B. [Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Palmfeldt, Johan [Research Unit for Molecular Medicine, Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Nissen, Peter H. [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Beqqali, Abdelaziz [Heart Failure Research Center, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hansen, Jakob [Department of Forensic Medicine, Bioanalytical Unit, University of Aarhus (Denmark); Pinto, Yigal M. [Heart Failure Research Center, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boesen, Thomas [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, University of Aarhus (Denmark); Mogensen, Jens [Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Bross, Peter, E-mail: peter.bross@ki.au.dk [Research Unit for Molecular Medicine, Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2013-11-15

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the heart muscle characterized by cardiac chamber enlargement and reduced systolic function of the left ventricle. Mutations in the LMNA gene represent the most frequent known genetic cause of DCM associated with disease of the conduction systems. The LMNA gene generates two major transcripts encoding the nuclear lamina major components lamin A and lamin C by alternative splicing. Both haploinsuffiency and dominant negative effects have been proposed as disease mechanism for premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in LMNA. These mechanisms however are still not clearly established. In this study, we used a representative LMNA nonsense mutation, p.Arg321Ter, to shed light on the molecular disease mechanisms. Cultured fibroblasts from three DCM patients carrying this mutation were analyzed. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and sequencing of these PCR products indicated that transcripts from the mutant allele were degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) mechanism. The fact that no truncated mutant protein was detectable in western blot (WB) analysis strengthens the notion that the mutant transcript is efficiently degraded. Furthermore, WB analysis showed that the expression of lamin C protein was reduced by the expected approximately 50%. Clearly decreased lamin A and lamin C levels were also observed by immunofluorescence microscopy analysis. However, results from both WB and nano-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry demonstrated that the levels of lamin A protein were more reduced suggesting an effect on expression of lamin A from the wild type allele. PCR analysis of the ratio of lamin A to lamin C transcripts showed unchanged relative amounts of lamin A transcript suggesting that the effect on the wild type allele was operative at the protein level. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis showed no abnormal nuclear morphology of patient fibroblast cells. Based on these data, we propose that

  10. The status of pathogen-reduced plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, S Gerald

    2010-12-01

    Efforts to reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted infectious diseases began more than 4 decades ago with testing donated blood for syphilis. During the subsequent 4 decades, the number of recognized blood-borne transmissible agents and new laboratory tests has proliferated to a logistical breaking point. Further, the number of "emerging agents" which might enter the donor population is increasing continuously. In the search for an alternative to the laboratory testing strategy, pathogen-reduction technologies have emerged as the most promising. The model for this paradigm is pasteurization of a bottle of cow's milk. No matter what infective agent may be present in freshly collected cow's milk, pasteurization, i.e., a generic purification process can eliminate all potential infectivity, while preserving its essential biological properties--and an affordable cost. Several manufacturers have undertaken the challenge of developing a pathogen-reduction technology for blood components. Some novel technologies have proven successful for pooled plasma derivatives such as immune globulins, coagulation factor concentrate concentrates and albumin. The greatest challenge is finding a technology that is suitable for red blood cell and platelet components, whereas significant progress has been made already for pathogen-reduced plasma products. The present review addresses the status of implementation of pathogen-reduced plasma products in the global market. Some blood centers and hospital blood banks in Europe and the Middle East have begun to distribute pathogen-reduced plasma, but no pathogen-reduced plasma product is presently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. While many observers in the United States focus on the regulatory process as the impediment to widespread implementation, the real challenge will be paying the surcharge for the pathogen-reduction process - an as yet unspecified figure - but likely to add a very substantial amount to the annual

  11. Phenylthiourea specifically reduces zebrafish eye size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeran Li

    Full Text Available Phenylthiourea (PTU is commonly used for inhibiting melanization of zebrafish embryos. In this study, the standard treatment with 0.2 mM PTU was demonstrated to specifically reduce eye size in larval fish starting at three days post-fertilization. This effect is likely the result of a reduction in retinal and lens size of PTU-treated eyes and is not related to melanization inhibition. This is because the eye size of tyr, a genetic mutant of tyrosinase whose activity is inhibited in PTU treatment, was not reduced. As PTU contains a thiocarbamide group which is presented in many goitrogens, suppressing thyroid hormone production is a possible mechanism by which PTU treatment may reduce eye size. Despite the fact that thyroxine level was found to be reduced in PTU-treated larvae, thyroid hormone supplements did not rescue the eye size reduction. Instead, treating embryos with six goitrogens, including inhibitors of thyroid peroxidase (TPO and sodium-iodide symporter (NIS, suggested an alternative possibility. Specifically, three TPO inhibitors, including those that do not possess thiocarbamide, specifically reduced eye size; whereas none of the NIS inhibitors could elicit this effect. These observations indicate that TPO inhibition rather than a general suppression of thyroid hormone synthesis is likely the underlying cause of PTU-induced eye size reduction. Furthermore, the tissue-specific effect of PTU treatment might be mediated by an eye-specific TPO expression. Compared with treatment with other tyrosinase inhibitors or bleaching to remove melanization, PTU treatment remains the most effective approach. Thus, one should use caution when interpreting results that are obtained from PTU-treated embryos.

  12. Human Performance in Simulated Reduced Gravity Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently designing a new space suit capable of working in deep space and on Mars. Designing a suit is very difficult and often requires trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. Our current understanding of human performance in reduced gravity in a planetary environment (the moon or Mars) is limited to lunar observations, studies from the Apollo program, and recent suit tests conducted at JSC using reduced gravity simulators. This study will look at our most recent reduced gravity simulations performed on the new Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) compared to the C-9 reduced gravity plane. Methods: Subjects ambulated in reduced gravity analogs to obtain a baseline for human performance. Subjects were tested in lunar gravity (1.6 m/sq s) and Earth gravity (9.8 m/sq s) in shirt-sleeves. Subjects ambulated over ground at prescribed speeds on the ARGOS, but ambulated at a self-selected speed on the C-9 due to time limitations. Subjects on the ARGOS were given over 3 minutes to acclimate to the different conditions before data was collected. Nine healthy subjects were tested in the ARGOS (6 males, 3 females, 79.5 +/- 15.7 kg), while six subjects were tested on the C-9 (6 males, 78.8 +/- 11.2 kg). Data was collected with an optical motion capture system (Vicon, Oxford, UK) and was analyzed using customized analysis scripts in BodyBuilder (Vicon, Oxford, UK) and MATLAB (MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA). Results: In all offloaded conditions, variation between subjects increased compared to 1-g. Kinematics in the ARGOS at lunar gravity resembled earth gravity ambulation more closely than the C-9 ambulation. Toe-off occurred 10% earlier in both reduced gravity environments compared to earth gravity, shortening the stance phase. Likewise, ankle, knee, and hip angles remained consistently flexed and had reduced peaks compared to earth gravity. Ground reaction forces in lunar gravity (normalized to Earth body weight) were 0.4 +/- 0.2 on

  13. Reducing NOx emissions with Group IIIB compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes improvement in a process for the catalytic cracking of a heavy hydrocarbon feed containing nitrogen compounds by contact with a circulating inventory of catalytic cracking catalyst to produce catalytically cracked products and spent catalyst containing coke comprising nitrogen compounds. The spent catalyst is regenerated by contact with oxygen or an oxygen-containing gas in a catalyst regeneration zone operating at catalyst regeneration conditions to produce hot regenerated catalyst which is recycled to catalytically crack the heavy feed and the catalyst regeneration zone produces a flue gas comprising CO, CO2 and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). The improvement comprises: reducing the NOx content of the flue gas by adding to the circulating catalyst inventory an additive comprising discrete particles comprising oxides of Group IIIB elements, exclusive of Group III elements which are ion exchanged or impregnated into the cracking catalyst, the additive being added in an amount sufficient to reduce the production of NOx relative to operation without the additive

  14. Behavioral Simulations in MapReduce

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Guozhang; Sowell, Benjamin; Wang, Xun; Cao, Tuan; Demers, Alan; Gehrke, Johannes; White, Walker

    2010-01-01

    In many scientific domains, researchers are turning to large-scale behavioral simulations to better understand important real-world phenomena. While there has been a great deal of work on simulation tools from the high-performance computing community, behavioral simulations remain challenging to program and automatically scale in parallel environments. In this paper we present BRACE (Big Red Agent-based Computation Engine), which extends the MapReduce framework to process these simulations efficiently across a cluster. We can leverage spatial locality to treat behavioral simulations as iterated spatial joins and greatly reduce the communication between nodes. In our experiments we achieve nearly linear scale-up on several realistic simulations. Though processing behavioral simulations in parallel as iterated spatial joins can be very efficient, it can be much simpler for the domain scientists to program the behavior of a single agent. Furthermore, many simulations include a considerable amount of complex comp...

  15. FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruether, J.A.

    1998-02-01

    Mark Twain once quipped that everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. With interest in global climate change on the rise, researchers in the fossil-energy sector are feeling the heat to provide new technology to permit continued use of fossil fuels but with reduced emissions of so-called `greenhouse gases.` Three important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, are released to the atmosphere in the course of recovering and combusting fossil fuels. Their importance for trapping radiation, called forcing, is in the order given. In this report, we briefly review how greenhouse gases cause forcing and why this has a warming effect on the Earth`s atmosphere. Then we discuss programs underway at FETC that are aimed at reducing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide.

  16. Continuous flash suppression reduces negative afterimages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Naotsugu; Koch, Christof

    2005-08-01

    Illusions that produce perceptual suppression despite constant retinal input are used to manipulate visual consciousness. Here we report on a powerful variant of existing techniques, continuous flash suppression. Distinct images flashed successively at approximately 10 Hz into one eye reliably suppress an image presented to the other eye. The duration of perceptual suppression is at least ten times greater than that produced by binocular rivalry. Using this tool we show that the strength of the negative afterimage of an adaptor was reduced by half when it was perceptually suppressed by input from the other eye. The more completely the adaptor was suppressed, the more strongly the afterimage intensity was reduced. Paradoxically, trial-to-trial visibility of the adaptor did not correlate with the degree of reduction. Our results imply that formation of afterimages involves neuronal structures that access input from both eyes but that do not correspond directly to the neuronal correlates of perceptual awareness. PMID:15995700

  17. Sulfate inhibition effect on sulfate reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Al Zuhair

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing interest in the potential of bacterial sulfate reduction as an alternative method for sulfate removal from wastewater. Under anaerobic conditions, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB utilize sulfate to oxidize organic compounds and generate sulfide (S2-. SRB were successfully isolated from sludge samples obtained from a local petroleum refinery, and used for sulfate removal. The effects of initial sulfate concentration, temperature and pH on the rate of bacterial growth and anaerobic sulfate removal were investigated and the optimum conditions were identified. The experimental data were used to determine the parameters of two proposed kinetic model, which take into consideration substrate inhibition effect. Keywords: Sulfate Reducing Bacteria, Sulfate, Kinetic Model, Biotreatement, Inhibition Received: 31 August 2008 / Received in revised form: 18 September 2008, Accepted: 18 September 2008 Published online: 28 September 2008

  18. Reducing stillbirths in low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Robert L; Saleem, Sarah; Pasha, Omrana; Harrison, Margo S; Mcclure, Elizabeth M

    2016-02-01

    Worldwide, 98% of stillbirths occur in low-income countries (LIC), where stillbirth rates are ten-fold higher than in high-income countries (HIC). Although most HIC stillbirths occur prenatally, in LIC most stillbirths occur at term and during labor/delivery. Conditions causing stillbirths include those of maternal origin (obstructed labor, trauma, antepartum hemorrhage, preeclampsia/eclampsia, infection, diabetes, other maternal diseases), and fetal origin (fetal growth restriction, fetal distress, cord prolapse, multiples, malpresentations, congenital anomalies). In LIC, aside from infectious origins, most stillbirths are caused by fetal asphyxia. Stillbirth prevention requires recognition of maternal conditions, and care in a facility where fetal monitoring and expeditious delivery are possible, usually by cesarean section (CS). Of major causes, only syphilis and malaria can be managed prenatally. Targeting single conditions or interventions is unlikely to substantially reduce stillbirth. To reduce stillbirth rates, LIC must implement effective modern antepartum and intrapartum care, including fetal monitoring and CS. PMID:26577070

  19. Brief mindfulness induction reduces inattentional blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Timothy P; Creswell, J David; Denson, Thomas F

    2015-12-01

    Prior research has linked mindfulness to improvements in attention, and suggested that the effects of mindfulness are particularly pronounced when individuals are cognitively depleted or stressed. Yet, no studies have tested whether mindfulness improves declarative awareness of unexpected stimuli in goal-directed tasks. Participants (N=794) were either depleted (or not) and subsequently underwent a brief mindfulness induction (or not). They then completed an inattentional blindness task during which an unexpected distractor appeared on the computer monitor. This task was used to assess declarative conscious awareness of the unexpected distractor's presence and the extent to which its perceptual properties were encoded. Mindfulness increased awareness of the unexpected distractor (i.e., reduced rates of inattentional blindness). Contrary to predictions, no mindfulness×depletion interaction emerged. Depletion however, increased perceptual encoding of the distractor. These results suggest that mindfulness may foster awareness of unexpected stimuli (i.e., reduce inattentional blindness).

  20. Reduced accommodation in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leat, S J

    1996-09-01

    Accommodation in 43 subjects with cerebral palsy was measured objectively using a dynamic retinoscopy technique, which has already been shown to be reliable and repeatable. The subject's ages ranged from 3 to 35 years. Of these, 42% were found to have an accommodative response pattern which was different from the normal control group for his/her age. Nearly 29% had an estimated amplitude of accommodation of 4 D or less. The presence of reduced accommodation was found to be associated with reduced visual acuity, but was not associated with cognitive or communication ability, refractive error or age. The prevalence of other ocular disorders in this group is also high. These findings have developmental and educational implications.

  1. A New Reducing Regent: Dichloroindium Hydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. BABA; I. SHIBATA; N. HAYASHI

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Among the hydride derivatives of group 13 elements, various types of aluminum hydrides and boron hydrides have been employed as powerful reduction tools. Indium hydrides have not received much attention,whereas the synthesis of indium trihydride (InH3) was reported several decades ago[1]. There have been no precedents for monometallic indium hydrides having practical reactivity, while activated hydrides such as an ate complex LiPhn InH4-n (n = 0- 2) and phosphine-coordinated indium hydrides readily reduce carbonyl compounds. In view of this background, we focused on the development of dichloroindium hydrides (Cl2InH) as novel reducing agents that bear characteristic features in both ionic and radical reactions.

  2. ECONOMIC GROWTH AND EQUALITY IN REDUCING POVERTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaenal Muttaqin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In some developing countries, the instrument to alleviate the poverty is by using the economic growth. So, the increasing in investment, infrastructure development, and macroeconomics stability always be priority from developing countries. In this article explain that economic growth is not the important factor to alleviate the poverty, because equality sometimes is more important rather than the economic growth. In this context, its measure by inequality growth trade off index (IGTI. This method is to measure the influence of economic growth to reducing the inequality, with this method every country can measure which one is better to reducing the poverty whether the economic growth or equality. With this method, Laos in 2000 show that economic growth is more important than equality, but in the same year in Thailand show that equality is more important than economic growth.DOI: 10.15408/sjie.v1i1.2592

  3. COMPUTER SIMULATION SYSTEM OF STRETCH REDUCING MILL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Y. Sun; S.J. Yuan

    2007-01-01

    The principle of the stretch reducing process is analyzed and three models of pass design areestablished. The simulations are done about variables, such as, stress, strain, the stretches betweenthe stands, the size parameters of the steel tube, and the roll force parameters. According to itsproduct catalogs the system can automatically divide the pass series, formulate the rolling table,and simulate the basic technological parameters in the stretch reducing process. All modules areintegrated based on the developing environment of VB6. The system can draw simulation curvesand pass pictures. Three kinds of database including the material database, pass design database,and product database are devised using Microsoft Access, which can be directly edited, corrected,and searched.

  4. Gratitude: a tool for reducing economic impatience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSteno, David; Li, Ye; Dickens, Leah; Lerner, Jennifer S

    2014-06-01

    The human mind tends to excessively discount the value of delayed rewards relative to immediate ones, and it is thought that "hot" affective processes drive desires for short-term gratification. Supporting this view, recent findings demonstrate that sadness exacerbates financial impatience even when the sadness is unrelated to the economic decision at hand. Such findings might reinforce the view that emotions must always be suppressed to combat impatience. But if emotions serve adaptive functions, then certain emotions might be capable of reducing excessive impatience for delayed rewards. We found evidence supporting this alternative view. Specifically, we found that (a) the emotion gratitude reduces impatience even when real money is at stake, and (b) the effects of gratitude are differentiable from those of the more general positive state of happiness. These findings challenge the view that individuals must tamp down affective responses through effortful self-regulation to reach more patient and adaptive economic decisions. PMID:24760144

  5. Costs of reducing nutrient losses in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.; Abildtrup, Jens; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård;

    The economic calculations carried out prior to the Plan for the Aquatic Environment III included a comparison of regulation systems aimed at reducing nitrogen leaching, analyses of measures for reducing phosphorus losses and estimation of administrative costs. The conclusions were that taxation...... of the N-surplus introduced at the sector level was the most cost effective regulation when compared with administrative regulation and set a side. For phosphorus a balance between incoming and outgoing phosphorus is very costly as this requires that much slurry is transported from the western...... to the eastern part of Denmark. The final plan for the Aquatic Environment III from 2004 included a 13% reduction of N-leaching until 2015 based on cost effective administrative measures like wetlands and catch crops. Also a tax on mineral phosphorus in feedstuffs was included in order to half the phosphorus...

  6. Advanced technology development reducing CO2 emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Sup

    2010-09-15

    Responding to Korean government policies on green growth and global energy/ environmental challenges, SK energy has been developing new technologies to reduce CO2 emissions by 1) CO2 capture and utilization, 2) efficiency improvement, and 3) Li-ion batteries. The paper introduces three advanced technologies developed by SK energy; GreenPol, ACO, and Li-ion battery. Contributing to company vision, a more energy and less CO2, the three technologies are characterized as follows. GreenPol utilizes CO2 as a feedstock for making polymer. Advanced Catalytic Olefin (ACO) reduces CO2 emission by 20% and increase olefin production by 17%. Li-ion Batteries for automotive industries improves CO2 emission.

  7. Activity of Reducing Steel Slag of EAF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Chinhsiang; HWANG Chaolung; LIN Tingyi

    2011-01-01

    Reducing steel slag (RSS) was mainly acquired from five electric-arc furnace (EAF)steelmaking plants (among them, the products of two plants were carbon steel and those of other plants were stainless steel) for research tests. The chemical properties, compound compositions, activities and contents of main expansive compounds were tested. The results showed that the field sampled RSS had a very high crystallinity and hydraulicity with main chemical compositions close to those of Portland cement. It can be known from the study that in case of C/S ratio higher than 2.0, the main compound compositions are C2S, C3S, C2F and f-CaO. However, after the RSS was stored for six months, an obvious variation occurred with potential pre-hydration in RSS, where the SO3 content was slightly reduced and the compressive activity index was obviously higher than that at the 28th day.

  8. Reduced TCA Flux in Diabetic Myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael

    2012-01-01

    production in isolated mitochondria from substrates entering the TCA cycle at various points. ATP production was measured by luminescence with or without concomitant ATP utilisation by hexokinase in mitochondria isolated from myotubes established from eight lean and eight type 2 diabetic subjects. The ATP...... production of investigated substrate combinations was significantly reduced in mitochondria isolated from type 2 diabetic subjects compared to lean. However, when ATP synthesis rates at different substrate combinations were normalized to the corresponding individual pyruvate-malate rate, there was no......The diabetic phenotype is complex, requiring elucidation of key initiating defects. Diabetic myotubes express a primary reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux but at present it is unclear in which part of the TCA cycle the defect is localised. In order to localise the defect we studied ATP...

  9. Reduced central blood volume in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Bendtsen, Flemming; Sørensen, T I;

    1989-01-01

    was inversely correlated to the systemic vascular resistance (r = -0.49, p less than 0.001), the latter being significantly reduced in the patient group. Patients with cirrhosis apparently are unable to maintain a normal central blood volume. This may be due to arteriolar vasodilation, portosystemic collateral......The pathogenesis of ascites formation in cirrhosis is uncertain. It is still under debate whether the effective blood volume is reduced (underfilling theory) or whether the intravascular compartment is expanded (overflow theory). This problem has not yet been solved because of insufficient tools...... for measuring the central blood volume. We have developed a method that enables us to determine directly the central blood volume, i.e., the blood volume in the heart cavities, lungs, and central arterial tree. In 60 patients with cirrhosis and 16 control subjects the central blood volume was assessed according...

  10. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  11. Designing reduced beacon trajectory for sensor localization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Localization is one of the substantial issues in wireless sensor networks. The key problem for the mobile beacon localization is how to choose the appropriate beacon trajectory. However, little research has been done on it. In this paper, firstly,we deduce the number of positions for a beacon to send a packet according to the acreage of ROI (region of interest); and next we present a novel method based on virtual force to arrange the positions in arbitrary ROI; then we apply TSP (travelling salesman problem) algorithm to the positions sequence to obtain the optimal touring path, i.e. the reduced beacon trajectory. When a mobile beacon moves along the touring path, sending RF signals at every position, the sensors in ROI can work out their position with trilateration. Experimental results demonstrate that the localization method, based on the beacon reduced path, is efficient and has flexible accuracy.

  12. Climatology: Contrails reduce daily temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, David J.; Carleton, Andrew M.; Lauritsen, Ryan G.

    2002-08-01

    The potential of condensation trails (contrails) from jet aircraft to affect regional-scale surface temperatures has been debated for years, but was difficult to verify until an opportunity arose as a result of the three-day grounding of all commercial aircraft in the United States in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001. Here we show that there was an anomalous increase in the average diurnal temperature range (that is, the difference between the daytime maximum and night-time minimum temperatures) for the period 11-14 September 2001. Because persisting contrails can reduce the transfer of both incoming solar and outgoing infrared radiation and so reduce the daily temperature range, we attribute at least a portion of this anomaly to the absence of contrails over this period.

  13. Evolution of technetium speciation in reducing grout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukens, Wayne W; Bucher, Jerome I; Shuh, David K; Edelstein, Norman M

    2005-10-15

    Cementitious waste forms (CWFs) are an important component of the strategy to stabilize nuclear waste resulting from plutonium production by the U. S. Department of Energy. Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant fission product of particular concern in CWFs because of the high solubility and mobility of Tc(VII), pertechnetate (TcO4-), the stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. CWFs can more effectively stabilize 99Tc if they contain additives that chemically reduce mobile TcO4- to immobile Tc(IV) species. The 99Tc leach rate of reducing CWFs that contain Tc(IV) is much lower than that for CWFs that contain TcO4-. Previous X-ray absorption fine structure studies showed that Tc(IV) species were oxidized to TcO4- in reducing grout samples prepared on a laboratory scale. Whether the oxidizer was atmospheric O2 or NO3- in the waste simulant was not determined. In actual CWFs, rapid oxidation of Tc(IV) by NO3- would be of concern, whereas oxidation by atmospheric O2 would be of less concern due to the slow diffusion and reaction of O2 with the reducing CWF. To address this uncertainty, two series of reducing grouts were prepared using TcO4- containing waste simulants with and without NO3-. In the first series of samples, referred to as "permeable samples", the TcO4- was completely reduced using Na2S, and the samples were sealed in cuvettes made of polystyrene, which has a relatively large O2 diffusion coefficient. In these samples, all of the technetium was initially present as a Tc(IV) sulfide compound, TcSx, which was characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The EXAFS data is consistent with a structure consisting of triangular clusters of Tc(IV) centers linked together through a combination of disulfide and sulfide bridges as in MoS3. From the EXAFS model, the stoichiometry of TcSx is TC3S10, which is presumably the compound generally referred to as "Tc2S7". The TcSX initially present in the permeable samples was steadily

  14. Deciding for Others Reduces Loss Aversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ola; Holm, Håkan J.; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl;

    2014-01-01

    We study risk taking on behalf of others, both when choices involve losses and when they do not. A large-scale incentivized experiment with subjects randomly drawn from the Danish population is conducted. We find that deciding for others reduces loss aversion. When choosing between risky prospect...... others when losses loom. This finding is consistent with an interpretation of loss aversion as a bias in decision making driven by emotions and that these emotions are reduced when making decisions for others....... for which losses are ruled out by design, subjects make the same choices for themselves as for others. In contrast, when losses are possible, we find that the two types of choices differ. In particular, we find that subjects who make choices for themselves take less risk than those who decide for...

  15. Activating Attachments Reduces Memories of Traumatic Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Richard A; Foord, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Emotional memories, and especially intrusive memories, are a common feature of many psychological disorders, and are overconsolidated by stress. Attachment theory posits that activation of mental representations of attachment figures can reduce stress and boost coping. This study tested the proposition that attachment activation would reduce consolidation of emotional and intrusive memories. Sixty-seven undergraduate students viewed subliminal presentations of traumatic and neutral images, which were preceded by subliminal presentations of either attachment-related images or non-attachment-related images; free recall and intrusive memories were assessed two days later. Participants with low avoidant attachment tendencies who received the attachment primes recalled fewer memories and reported fewer intrusions than those who received the non-attachment primes. Unexpectedly, those with high anxious attachment tendencies reported fewer memories. These findings generally accord with attachment theory, and suggest that consolidation of emotional memories can be moderated by activation of attachment representations. PMID:27631498

  16. Metabolic Flexibility of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Plugge, Caroline M.; Zhang, Weiwen; Scholten, Johannes C. M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRB) are a very diverse group of anaerobic bacteria that are omnipresent in nature and play an imperative role in the global cycling of carbon and sulfur. In anoxic marine sediments sulfate reduction accounts for up to 50% of the entire organic mineralization in coastal and shelf ecosystems where sulfate diffuses several meters deep into the sediment. As a consequence, SRB would be expected in the sulfate-containing upper sediment layers, whereas me...

  17. Reducing stigma and discrimination: Candidate interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Kassam Aliya; Brohan Elaine; Thornicroft Graham; Lewis-Holmes Elanor

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This paper proposes that stigma in relation to people with mental illness can be understood as a combination of problems of knowledge (ignorance), attitudes (prejudice) and behaviour (discrimination). From a literature review, a series of candidate interventions are identified which may be effective in reducing stigmatisation and discrimination at the following levels: individuals with mental illness and their family members; the workplace; and local, national and international. The ...

  18. BF topological theories and infinitely reducible systems

    CERN Document Server

    Caicedo, M I; Bol, S; Bol, Simon

    1996-01-01

    We present a rigurous disscusion for abelian BF theories in which the base manifold of the U(1) bundle is homeomorphic to a Hilbert space. The theory has an infinte number of stages of reducibility. We specify conditions on the base manifold under which the covarinat quantization of the system can be performed unambiguously. Applications of the formulation to the superparticle and the supertstring are also discussed.

  19. Leveraging Technology to Reduce Patient Transaction Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlow, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    Medical practices are under significant pressure to provide superior customer service in an environment of declining or flat reimbursement. The solution for many practices involves the integration of a variety of third-party technologies that conveniently interface with one's electronic practice management and medical records systems. Typically, the applications allow the practice to reduce the cost of each patient interaction. Drilling down to quantify the cost of each individual patient interaction helps to determine the practicality of implementation. PMID:26665478

  20. Role of Insurance in Reducing Flood Risk

    OpenAIRE

    David Crichton

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the problems of flood risk management in the context of public and private insurance. It demonstrates the important role of insurance in reducing flood risk with examples from the U.K. and France. It includes a brief description of the summer 2007 floods in England. The Geneva Papers (2008) 33, 117–132. doi:10.1057/palgrave.gpp.2510151

  1. Reducing mother-to-child HIV transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In developing countries,mother-to-child trans mission of human immune deficiency virus (HIV)is responsible for 5 to 10 percen t o f all new HIV infections.Most children born to HIV-positive mothers are not HIV positive,but one quarter to one third are.The following instert looks at the p o ssibilities for reducing mother-to-child HIV transmission,and discusses some of the questions that are still unanswered.

  2. Testosterone therapy for reduced libido in women

    OpenAIRE

    Basson, Rosemary

    2010-01-01

    Modest benefit has been shown from transdermal testosterone therapy given to postmenopausal women with reduced sexual desire. An increased frequency of satisfying sexual encounters and intensity of sexual desire and response has been shown in medically and psychiatrically healthy women able to have 2–3 satisfying sexual experiences each month before therapy commences. Women more clearly sexually dysfunctional in keeping with currently proposed definitions of sexual disorder have not been stud...

  3. Incentives for reducing emissions in Krakow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This effort is identifying, specific incentives that may be used by Krakow city officials to encourage, residents to change the way they heat their homes and businesses in order to reduce pollution. This paper describes the incentives study for converting small coal or coke-fired boilers to gas in the Old Town area. A similar study looked at incentives for expanding the district heating system and future analyses will be performed for home stove options

  4. Improved regularization from Quantum Reduced Loop Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Alesci, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    The choice of the regularization scheme in Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) is crucial for the predicted phenomenology. We outline how the improved scheme can be naturally realized in Quantum Reduced Loop Gravity, describing the Universe as an ensemble of microstates labeled by different graphs. The new effective dynamics presents corrections to LQC, which do not significantly affect the bouncing scenario for the most relevant kinds of matter fields in cosmology $(w \\leq 1)$.

  5. Reducing murder to manslaughter: whose job?

    OpenAIRE

    Griew, E

    1986-01-01

    This paper compares two versions of the diminished responsibility defence, which reduces murder to manslaughter: the present statutory formulation and a proposed reformulation. The comparison confirms that evidence such as psychiatrists are commonly invited to give in murder cases takes them beyond their proper role. Paradoxically, although the two formulations mean essentially the same thing, the proposed change of wording must have the practical effect of subduing the psychiatrist's evidenc...

  6. Nonuniform Banking for Reducing Memory Energy Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Ozturk, Ozcan; Kandemir, Mahmut

    2005-01-01

    Submitted on behalf of EDAA (http://www.edaa.com/) International audience Main memories can consume a large percentage of overall energy in many data-intensive embedded applications. The past research proposed and evaluated memory banking as a possible approach for reducing memory energy consumption. One of the common characteristics/assumptions made by most of the past work on banking is that all the banks are of the same size. While this makes the formulation of the problem easy, it a...

  7. Thermosyphon Flooding in Reduced Gravity Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Marc Andrew

    2013-01-01

    An innovative experiment to study the thermosyphon flooding limits was designed and flown on aparabolic flight campaign to achieve the Reduced Gravity Environments (RGE) needed to obtainempirical data for analysis. Current correlation models of Faghri and Tien and Chung do not agreewith the data. A new model is presented that predicts the flooding limits for thermosyphons inearths gravity and lunar gravity with a 95 confidence level of +- 5W.

  8. Forewarning reduces fraud susceptibility in vulnerable consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Scheibe, Susanne; Notthoff, Nanna; Menkin, Josephine; Ross, Lee; Shadel, Doug; Deevy, Martha; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Telemarketing fraud is pervasive and older consumers are disproportionally targeted. Given laboratory research showing that forewarning can effectively counter influence appeals, we conducted a field experiment to test whether forewarning could protect people who had been victimized in the past. A research assistant with prior experience as a telemarketer pitched a mock scam two or four weeks after participants were warned about the same scam or an entirely different scam. Both warnings reduc...

  9. Reducing the surface deviation of stereolithography components

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, Philip E.

    1998-01-01

    The Stereolithography (SL) process has developed into an accurate method of replicating 3D CAD images into tactile objects used for functions such as product evaluation, preproduction testing or as patterns around which tool cavities can be formed. One of the main limitations with the SL process is the surface roughness of parts resulting from the layer manufacturing process. To-date surface roughness has only been reduced using techniques such as additive coating or abrasive finishing. Resea...

  10. Reduced Palm Intensity for Track Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Bozdogan, Ali Onder; Streit, Roy; EFE, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The pair correlation function is introduced to target tracking filters that use a finite point process target model as a means to investigate interactions in the Bayes posterior target process. It is shown that the Bayes posterior target point process of the probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter-before using the Poisson point process approximation to close the recursion-is a spatially correlated process with weakly repulsive pair interactions. The reduced Palm target point process is in...

  11. Phenelzine reduces plasma vitamin B6.

    OpenAIRE

    Malcolm, D E; Yu, P H; Bowen, R.C.; O'Donovan, C.; Hawkes, J; Hussein, M

    1994-01-01

    Plasma levels of the active form of vitamin B6 (pyridoxal phosphate) in 19 patients taking phenelzine were found to be reduced on the average to approximately 54% of the value in a control group. There was no correlation of pyridoxal phosphate level with phenelzine daily dosage over the range of 30 mg to 90 mg. No symptoms of vitamin B6 deficiency peripheral neuropathy were found.

  12. Quantum-Reduced Loop Gravity: Cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Alesci, Emanuele; Cianfrani, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new framework for loop quantum gravity: mimicking the spinfoam quantization procedure we propose to study the symmetric sectors of the theory imposing the reduction weakly on the full kinematical Hilbert space of the canonical theory. As a first application of Quantum-Reduced Loop Gravity we study the inhomogeneous Bianchi I model. The emerging quantum cosmological model represents a simplified arena on which the complete canonical quantization program can be tested. The achiev...

  13. Reduced energy conservation law for magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A global energy conservation law for a magnetized plasma is studied within the context of a quasiparticle description. A reduced energy conservation law is derived for low-frequency, as compared to the gyromagnetic frequency, plasma motions with regard to both non-uniform mean flows and fluctuations in the plasma. The mean value of plasma energy is calculated and sufficient stability conditions for non-equilibrium plasmas are derived. (orig.)

  14. Reduce Demand Rather than Increase Supply

    OpenAIRE

    Shoup, Donald C.

    2006-01-01

    The logic behind off-street parking requirements is simple: development increases the demand for parking, so cities require enough off-street spaces to satisfy this new demand. Off-street parking requirements thus ensure that cars will not spill over onto the neighborhood streets. This logic suggests another potential reform within the existing system of off-street parking requirements: if developers reduce parking demand, cities should allow them to provide fewer parking spaces; that is, cit...

  15. Personalized music to reduce patient anxiety (abstract)

    OpenAIRE

    Zwaag, M. van der; Tijs, T.J.W.; Westerink, J.H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Patient anxiety is a frequently occurring concern as it decreases patient satisfaction, increases consultation duration, and can influence successful medical outcome. To illustrate, for some diagnosis methods as PET scans patients need to be relaxed for successful medicaloutcome. Music can possibly reduce patients stress. However, hospital selected music has not always shown its effectiveness, and patient selected music has shown it could be arousing instead of relaxing.In two experiments the...

  16. Reducing ICT project failure with scope management

    OpenAIRE

    Acquah, Ato

    2011-01-01

    Over the years, Information Communications and Technology projects have had a high rate of failure according to previous research findings. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the various factors causing project failure and to show how the problem can be eliminated or reduced by effectively managing the scope of projects. The research approach used was a qualitative method with an empirical investigation. The thesis was divided into two parts, the Theoretical part and Empirical p...

  17. Causal transmission in reduced-form models

    OpenAIRE

    Vassili Bazinas; Bent Nielsen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to explore the causal transmission of a catalyst variable through two endogenous variables of interest. The method is based on the reduced-form system formed from the conditional distribution of the two endogenous variables given the catalyst. The method combines elements from instru- mental variable analysis and Cholesky decomposition of structural vector autoregressions. We give conditions for uniqueness of the causal transmission.

  18. Whole Grain Intake Reduces Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Qiucheng; Zheng, Huazhen; Bi, Jingcheng; Wang, Xinying; Jiang, Tingting; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Xu, Min; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Li; Ning LI; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mounting evidence from epidemiology studies suggests that whole grain intake may reduce pancreatic cancer risk, but convincing evidence is scarce. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the association between whole grain intake and pancreatic cancer risk. Relevant observational studies were identified by searching PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Cochrane library databases for the period from January 1980 to July 2015, with no restrictions. We calculated the summary odds ratios (ORs) for...

  19. Reducing hazards for animals from humans

    OpenAIRE

    Paul-Pierre Pastoret

    2012-01-01

    If animals may be a source of hazards for humans, the reverse is equally true. The main sources of hazards from humans to animals, are the impact of human introduction of transboundary animal diseases, climate change, globalisation, introduction of invasive species and reduction of biodiversity.There is also a trend toward reducing genetic diversity in domestic animals, such as cattle; there are presently around 700 different breeds of cattle many of which at the verge of extinction (less tha...

  20. European Community Measures to Reduce Nitrate Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Al-hedny, Suhad

    2010-01-01

    Water protection proves to be a difficult task, whether it is dealt with through legislation or the implementation of a process to reduce further pollution. This study considers how the issue of water pollution from nitrates in agricultural practices has become better understood through the reforms of the common agriculture policy (CAP) and the enactment of various regulations and directives by EU. The implementation of the EC Nitrate Directive is a main focus of this study because it was a m...

  1. Reducing or enhancing chaos using periodic orbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, R; Chandre, C; Leoncini, X

    2006-06-01

    A method to reduce or enhance chaos in Hamiltonian flows with two degrees of freedom is discussed. This method is based on finding a suitable perturbation of the system such that the stability of a set of periodic orbits changes (local bifurcations). Depending on the values of the residues, reflecting their linear stability properties, a set of invariant tori is destroyed or created in the neighborhood of the chosen periodic orbits. An application on a paradigmatic system, a forced pendulum, illustrates the method.

  2. Swimming Motility Reduces Deposition to Silica Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Nanxi [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Massoudieh, Arash [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Liang, Xiaomeng [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Hu, Dehong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kamai, Tamir [Agricultural Research Organization, Bet Dagan (Israel); Ginn, Timothy R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Zilles, Julie L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Nguyen, Thanh H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The role of swimming motility on bacterial transport and fate in porous media was evaluated. We present microscopic evidence showing that strong swimming motility reduces attachment of Azotobacter vinelandii cells to silica surfaces. Applying global and cluster statistical analyses to microscopic videos taken under non-flow conditions, wild type, flagellated A. vinelandii strain DJ showed strong swimming ability with an average speed of 13.1 μm/s, DJ77 showed impaired swimming averaged at 8.7 μm/s, and both the non-flagellated JZ52 and chemically treated DJ cells were non-motile. Quantitative analyses of trajectories observed at different distances above the collector of a radial stagnation point flow cell (RSPF) revealed that both swimming and non-swimming cells moved with the flow when at a distance of at least 20 μm from the collector surface. Near the surface, DJ cells showed both horizontal and vertical movement diverging them from reaching surfaces, while chemically treated DJ cells moved with the flow to reach surfaces, suggesting that strong swimming reduced attachment. In agreement with the RSPF results, the deposition rates obtained for two-dimensional multiple-collector micromodels were also lowest for DJ, while DJ77 and JZ52 showed similar values. Strong swimming specifically reduced deposition on the upstream surfaces of the micromodel collectors.

  3. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  4. Reduced barrier efficiency in axillary stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkinson, A; Lee, R S; Moore, A E; Pudney, P D A; Paterson, S E; Rawlings, A V

    2002-06-01

    The skin of the axilla is cosmetically important with millions of consumers daily applying antiperspirant/deodorant products. Despite this, we know virtually nothing about axillary skin or how antiperspirant (AP) use impacts upon it. To characterize the axillary stratum corneum and determine whether this is a unique skin type, we have looked at stratum corneum composition and function, particularly its barrier properties, and compared it with other body sites. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and corneosurfametry (CSM) revealed a reduced barrier function in the axilla. HPTLC analysis of the stratum corneum lipids demonstrated statistically elevated levels of fatty acids, ceramides, and particularly cholesterol in the axilla. Both ceramide and cholesterol did not appear to change with depth, indicating that they were predominantly of stratum corneum origin. On the other hand, at least some of the fatty acid had a sebaceous origin. We hypothesized that the reduced barrier function might be owing to the changes in the crucial ceramide : cholesterol ratio. To address this, we used a combination of attenuated total reflectance-Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) with cyanoacrylate sampling. These results demonstrated more ordered lipid-lamellae phase behaviour in the axilla, suggesting that the elevated cholesterol might form crystal microdomains within the lipid lamellae, allowing an increase in water flux. Since an exaggerated application of antiperspirant had no effect upon the axilla barrier properties, it is concluded that this region of skin physiologically has a reduced barrier function.

  5. Fungal Aflatoxins Reduce Respiratory Mucosal Ciliary Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert J; Workman, Alan D; Carey, Ryan M; Chen, Bei; Rosen, Phillip L; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D; Palmer, James N; Kennedy, David W; Cohen, Noam A

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus flavus, which can colonize the respiratory tract and cause fungal rhinosinusitis or bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A. flavus is the second leading cause of invasive aspergillosis worldwide. Because many respiratory pathogens secrete toxins to impair mucociliary immunity, we examined the effects of acute exposure to aflatoxins on airway cell physiology. Using air-liquid interface cultures of primary human sinonasal and bronchial cells, we imaged ciliary beat frequency (CBF), intracellular calcium, and nitric oxide (NO). Exposure to aflatoxins (0.1 to 10 μM; 5 to 10 minutes) reduced baseline (~6-12%) and agonist-stimulated CBF. Conditioned media (CM) from A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. flavus cultures also reduced CBF by ~10% after 60 min exposure, but effects were blocked by an anti-aflatoxin antibody only with A. flavus CM. CBF reduction required protein kinase C but was not associated with changes in calcium or NO. However, AFB2 reduced NO production by ~50% during stimulation of the ciliary-localized T2R38 receptor. Using a fluorescent reporter construct expressed in A549 cells, we directly observed activation of PKC activity by AFB2. Aflatoxins secreted by respiratory A. flavus may impair motile and chemosensory functions of airway cilia, contributing to pathogenesis of fungal airway diseases. PMID:27623953

  6. Reduced particle settling speed in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Fornari, Walter; Sardina, Gaetano; Brandt, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We study the settling of finite-size rigid spheres in sustained homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT) using Direct Numerical Simulations. In particular, an immersed boundary method is used to account for the dispersed solid phase. We study semi-dilute suspensions of spheres at different Galileo numbers, Ga. The Galileo number is the ratio between buoyancy and viscous forces, and is here varied via the solid-to-fluid density ratio. The focus is on particles that are slightly heavier than the fluid. We find that in HIT, the mean settling speed is less than in quiescent fluid and it reduces by 6 to 60\\% with respect to the terminal velocity of an isolated sphere in quiescent fluid "Vt", as the ratio between "Vt" and the turbulent velocity fluctuations u' is decreased. Analysing the fluid-particle relative motion, we find that the mean settling speed is progressively reduced while reducing due to the increase of the vertical drag induced by the particle cross-flow velocity. Unsteady effects contribute to the mea...

  7. Analytic thinking reduces belief in conspiracy theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Voracek, Martin; Stieger, Stefan; Tran, Ulrich S; Furnham, Adrian

    2014-12-01

    Belief in conspiracy theories has been associated with a range of negative health, civic, and social outcomes, requiring reliable methods of reducing such belief. Thinking dispositions have been highlighted as one possible factor associated with belief in conspiracy theories, but actual relationships have only been infrequently studied. In Study 1, we examined associations between belief in conspiracy theories and a range of measures of thinking dispositions in a British sample (N=990). Results indicated that a stronger belief in conspiracy theories was significantly associated with lower analytic thinking and open-mindedness and greater intuitive thinking. In Studies 2-4, we examined the causational role played by analytic thinking in relation to conspiracist ideation. In Study 2 (N=112), we showed that a verbal fluency task that elicited analytic thinking reduced belief in conspiracy theories. In Study 3 (N=189), we found that an alternative method of eliciting analytic thinking, which related to cognitive disfluency, was effective at reducing conspiracist ideation in a student sample. In Study 4, we replicated the results of Study 3 among a general population sample (N=140) in relation to generic conspiracist ideation and belief in conspiracy theories about the July 7, 2005, bombings in London. Our results highlight the potential utility of supporting attempts to promote analytic thinking as a means of countering the widespread acceptance of conspiracy theories.

  8. Analytic thinking reduces belief in conspiracy theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Voracek, Martin; Stieger, Stefan; Tran, Ulrich S; Furnham, Adrian

    2014-12-01

    Belief in conspiracy theories has been associated with a range of negative health, civic, and social outcomes, requiring reliable methods of reducing such belief. Thinking dispositions have been highlighted as one possible factor associated with belief in conspiracy theories, but actual relationships have only been infrequently studied. In Study 1, we examined associations between belief in conspiracy theories and a range of measures of thinking dispositions in a British sample (N=990). Results indicated that a stronger belief in conspiracy theories was significantly associated with lower analytic thinking and open-mindedness and greater intuitive thinking. In Studies 2-4, we examined the causational role played by analytic thinking in relation to conspiracist ideation. In Study 2 (N=112), we showed that a verbal fluency task that elicited analytic thinking reduced belief in conspiracy theories. In Study 3 (N=189), we found that an alternative method of eliciting analytic thinking, which related to cognitive disfluency, was effective at reducing conspiracist ideation in a student sample. In Study 4, we replicated the results of Study 3 among a general population sample (N=140) in relation to generic conspiracist ideation and belief in conspiracy theories about the July 7, 2005, bombings in London. Our results highlight the potential utility of supporting attempts to promote analytic thinking as a means of countering the widespread acceptance of conspiracy theories. PMID:25217762

  9. Does Metformin Reduce Cancer Risks? Methodologic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golozar, Asieh; Liu, Shuiqing; Lin, Joeseph A; Peairs, Kimberly; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    The substantial burden of cancer and diabetes and the association between the two conditions has been a motivation for researchers to look for targeted strategies that can simultaneously affect both diseases and reduce their overlapping burden. In the absence of randomized clinical trials, researchers have taken advantage of the availability and richness of administrative databases and electronic medical records to investigate the effects of drugs on cancer risk among diabetic individuals. The majority of these studies suggest that metformin could potentially reduce cancer risk. However, the validity of this purported reduction in cancer risk is limited by several methodological flaws either in the study design or in the analysis. Whether metformin use decreases cancer risk relies heavily on the availability of valid data sources with complete information on confounders, accurate assessment of drug use, appropriate study design, and robust analytical techniques. The majority of the observational studies assessing the association between metformin and cancer risk suffer from methodological shortcomings and efforts to address these issues have been incomplete. Future investigations on the association between metformin and cancer risk should clearly address the methodological issues due to confounding by indication, prevalent user bias, and time-related biases. Although the proposed strategies do not guarantee a bias-free estimate for the association between metformin and cancer, they will reduce synthesis of and reporting of erroneous results.

  10. Fungal Aflatoxins Reduce Respiratory Mucosal Ciliary Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert J.; Workman, Alan D.; Carey, Ryan M.; Chen, Bei; Rosen, Phillip L.; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D.; Palmer, James N.; Kennedy, David W.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus flavus, which can colonize the respiratory tract and cause fungal rhinosinusitis or bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A. flavus is the second leading cause of invasive aspergillosis worldwide. Because many respiratory pathogens secrete toxins to impair mucociliary immunity, we examined the effects of acute exposure to aflatoxins on airway cell physiology. Using air-liquid interface cultures of primary human sinonasal and bronchial cells, we imaged ciliary beat frequency (CBF), intracellular calcium, and nitric oxide (NO). Exposure to aflatoxins (0.1 to 10 μM; 5 to 10 minutes) reduced baseline (~6–12%) and agonist-stimulated CBF. Conditioned media (CM) from A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. flavus cultures also reduced CBF by ~10% after 60 min exposure, but effects were blocked by an anti-aflatoxin antibody only with A. flavus CM. CBF reduction required protein kinase C but was not associated with changes in calcium or NO. However, AFB2 reduced NO production by ~50% during stimulation of the ciliary-localized T2R38 receptor. Using a fluorescent reporter construct expressed in A549 cells, we directly observed activation of PKC activity by AFB2. Aflatoxins secreted by respiratory A. flavus may impair motile and chemosensory functions of airway cilia, contributing to pathogenesis of fungal airway diseases. PMID:27623953

  11. Microhabitats reduce animal's exposure to climate extremes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffers, Brett R; Edwards, David P; Diesmos, Arvin; Williams, Stephen E; Evans, Theodore A

    2014-02-01

    Extreme weather events, such as unusually hot or dry conditions, can cause death by exceeding physiological limits, and so cause loss of population. Survival will depend on whether or not susceptible organisms can find refuges that buffer extreme conditions. Microhabitats offer different microclimates to those found within the wider ecosystem, but do these microhabitats effectively buffer extreme climate events relative to the physiological requirements of the animals that frequent them? We collected temperature data from four common microhabitats (soil, tree holes, epiphytes, and vegetation) located from the ground to canopy in primary rainforests in the Philippines. Ambient temperatures were monitored from outside of each microhabitat and from the upper forest canopy, which represent our macrohabitat controls. We measured the critical thermal maxima (CTmax ) of frog and lizard species, which are thermally sensitive and inhabit our microhabitats. Microhabitats reduced mean temperature by 1-2 °C and reduced the duration of extreme temperature exposure by 14-31 times. Microhabitat temperatures were below the CTmax of inhabitant frogs and lizards, whereas macrohabitats consistently contained lethal temperatures. Microhabitat temperatures increased by 0.11-0.66 °C for every 1 °C increase in macrohabitat temperature, and this nonuniformity in temperature change influenced our forecasts of vulnerability for animal communities under climate change. Assuming uniform increases of 6 °C, microhabitats decreased the vulnerability of communities by up to 32-fold, whereas under nonuniform increases of 0.66 to 3.96 °C, microhabitats decreased the vulnerability of communities by up to 108-fold. Microhabitats have extraordinary potential to buffer climate and likely reduce mortality during extreme climate events. These results suggest that predicted changes in distribution due to mortality and habitat shifts that are derived from macroclimatic samples and that assume

  12. Uranium Immobilization by Sulfate-reducing Biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] was immobilized using biofilms of the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20. The biofilms were grown in flat-plate continuous-flow reactors using lactate as the electron donor and sulfate as the electron acceptor. U(VI) was continuously fed into the reactor for 32 weeks at a concentration of 126 ?M. During this time, the soluble U(VI) was removed (between 88 and 96% of feed) from solution and immobilized in the biofilms. The dynamics of U immobilization in the sulfate-reducing biofilms were quantified by estimating: (1) microbial activity in the SRB biofilm, defined as the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production rate and estimated from the H2S concentration profiles measured using microelectrodes across the biofilms; (2) concentration of dissolved U in the solution; and (3) the mass of U precipitated in the biofilm. Results suggest that U was immobilized in the biofilms as a result of two processes: (1) enzymatically and (2) chemically, by reacting with microbially generated H2S. Visual inspection showed that the dissolved sulfide species reacted with U(VI) to produce a black precipitate. Synchrotron-based U L3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy analysis of U precipitated abiotically by sodium sulfide indicated that U(VI) had been reduced to U(IV). Selected-area electron diffraction pattern and crystallographic analysis of transmission electron microscope lattice-fringe images confirmed the structure of precipitated U as being that of uraninite

  13. Reduce proton energy spread by target ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Shuan; Chen, Jiaer; Yan, Xueqing

    2015-01-01

    It's shown that, with strong target ablation monoenergetic protons along the laser direction is available during the laser aluminum foil interaction, which is different from the classic TNSA theory. When the laser pre-pulse is too strong that the whole target is vaporized, the energetic electrons generated in the gas preplasma will play an important role for the ion acceleration because the sheath field will not be available. These electrons beam, which is highly directional, will setup triangle envelope acceleration field along the laser direction at the target rear, reducing the ion energy spread.

  14. Lubrication System with Tolerance for Reduced Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portlock, Lawrence E. (Inventor); McCune, Michael E. (Inventor); Dobek, Louis J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A lubrication system includes an auxiliary lubricant tank 48, a supply conduit 58 extending from a source of lubricant 26 to the auxiliary lubricant tank. A reduced-G bypass line 108 branches from the conduit and enters the auxiliary tank at a first elevation E.sub.1. The system also includes an auxiliary tank discharge conduit 116, a portion of which resides within the tank. The resident portion has an opening 122 at least partially at a second elevation E.sub.2 higher than the first elevation.

  15. Spectroscopic Speciation of Plutonium Reduced by Electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation state of plutonium should be carefully controlled to understand the chemical behaviors of plutonium. Pu(III) is not stable in aqueous solutions and easily oxidized in the atmosphere. In deep geological environments excluded oxygen, reducing condition is expected and will lead to rather stable Pu(III), which is very soluble compared to Pu(IV). Pu(III) ions are expected to form hydrolysis complexes in neutral and basic solutions similar to Am(III), Cm(III) and Eu(III). The reported formation constants of Pu(OH)n3-n (n=1-4) had been critically discussed, and only the first hydrolysis constant (log*β011 = -6.9 ± 0.3) was selected in a review. The main reason for the large discrepancy of the formation constants for Pu(OH)n3-n (n=2-4) is the high tendency of oxidation of Pu(III). In the present study, the reduction condition of Pu(III) was controlled by electrolysis. The electrolysis reactor was specially designed to investigate hydrolysis, colloid formation, and solubility of Pu(III) at different pHs. Pu(III) was reduced from higher oxidation states at acidic conditions, and the H+ ion concentration in solutions was simultaneously decreased without the addition of alkaline solution by electrolysis. The soluble species was investigated using spectrophotometry adopting a capillary cell (LWCC, Liquid Waveguide Capillary Cell, WPI) and the formation of plutonium colloid and solubility was determined using LIBD (Laser Induced Breakdown Detection). In this study, an electrolysis system for the reduction of plutonium and H+ ions in a solution with small volume (> 2 mL) was installed in a glove box to investigate the hydrolysis, colloid formation and solubility of Pu(III) under a reducing condition. Pu(III) was reduced from the mixed plutonium oxidation states without the generation of Pu(IV) colloidal particles or precipitates under weak acidic conditions. A coulometric titration method was applied to adjust the pH without the addition of NaOH. The change of

  16. Environment, Renewable Energy and Reduced Carbon Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, S.; Khazanov, G.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Increased energy security and reduced carbon emissions pose significant challenges for science and technology. However, they also create substantial opportunities for innovative research and development. In this review paper, we highlight some of the key opportunities and mention public policies that are needed to enable the efforts and to maximize the probability of their success. Climate is among the uttermost nonlinear behaviors found around us. As recent studies showed the possible effect of cosmic rays on the Earth's climate, we investigate how complex interactions between the planet and its environment can be responsible for climate anomalies.

  17. Reduced Quantum General Relativity in Higher Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Glinka, Lukasz Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The higher dimensional Quantum General Relativity of a Riemannian manifold being an embedded space in a space-time being a Lorentzian manifold is investigated. The model of quantum geometrodynamics, based on the Wheeler-DeWitt equation reduced to a first order functional quantum evolution supplemented through an additional eigenequation for the scalar curvature, is formulated. Furthermore, making use of the objective quantum gravity and global one-dimensional conjecture, the general wave function beyond the Feynman path integral technique is derived. The resulting quantum gravity model creates the opportunity of potentially new theoretical and phenomenological applications for astrophysics, cosmology, and physics.

  18. Novel Reduced-Feedback Wireless Communication Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Shaqfeh, Mohammad Obaidah

    2011-11-20

    Modern communication systems apply channel-aware adaptive transmission techniques and dynamic resource allocation in order to exploit the peak conditions of the fading wireless links and to enable significant performance gains. However, conveying the channel state information among the users’ mobile terminals into the access points of the network consumes a significant portion of the scarce air-link resources and depletes the battery resources of the mobile terminals rapidly. Despite its evident drawbacks, the channel information feedback cannot be eliminated in modern wireless networks because blind communication technologies cannot support the ever-increasing transmission rates and high quality of experience demands of current ubiquitous services. Developing new transmission technologies with reduced-feedback requirements is sought. Network operators will benefit from releasing the bandwidth resources reserved for the feedback communications and the clients will enjoy the extended battery life of their mobile devices. The main technical challenge is to preserve the prospected transmission rates over the network despite decreasing the channel information feedback significantly. This is a noteworthy research theme especially that there is no mature theory for feedback communication in the existing literature despite the growing number of publications about the topic in the last few years. More research efforts are needed to characterize the trade-off between the achievable rate and the required channel information and to design new reduced-feedback schemes that can be flexibly controlled based on the operator preferences. Such schemes can be then introduced into the standardization bodies for consideration in next generation broadband systems. We have recently contributed to this field and published several journal and conference papers. We are the pioneers to propose a novel reduced-feedback opportunistic scheduling scheme that combines many desired features

  19. Reducing gain shifts in photomultiplier tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Charles E.

    1976-01-01

    A means is provided for reducing gain shifts in multiplier tubes due to varying event count rates. It includes means for limiting the number of cascaded, active dynodes of the multiplier tube to a predetermined number with the last of predetermined number of dynodes being the output terminal of the tube. This output is applied to an amplifier to make up for the gain sacrificed by not totally utilizing all available active stages of the tube. Further reduction is obtained by illuminating the predetermined number of dynodes with a light source of such intensity that noise appearing at the output dynode associated with the illumination is negligible.

  20. Hydrodynamic approaches to reducing membrane fouling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.H. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Membranes are gaining increasing use in a wide variety of liquid and gas separations. A pervasive problem is membrane fouling due to material depositing on the membrane surface and within the membrane pore structure. Professor Georges Belfort has made significant contributions to reducing membrane fouling by hydrodynamic approaches for ultrafiltration and microfiltration. I will review some of his work, as well as related work by myself and others, in this area. Topics which will be discussed include particle migration during crossflow filtration, curved channels which promote centrifugal instabilities, and rapid backpulsing.

  1. Complete reconstruction of reduced density matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazziotti, David A.

    2000-08-01

    Different from traditional electronic structure methods, the contracted Schrödinger equation with reduced-density-matrix (RDM) reconstruction may be exact when only the 2-particle RDM is employed as the fundamental parameter. Although Rosina's theorem indicates that the 3 and the 4-RDMs are functionals of the 2-RDM, cumulant theory generates only those terms expressible as antisymmetrized products of lower RDMs. We present a formal solution for reconstruction where the approximate cumulant formulas are systematically corrected through contraction conditions. Using a part of the formal 3-RDM reconstruction, the CSE is compared with other methods through a quasi-spin model containing as many as eight-hundred fermions.

  2. Reducible gauge theories in very special relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker [Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Department of Physics, Kanpur (India)

    2015-12-15

    In this paper we analyze the tensor field (reducible gauge) theories in the context of very special relativity (VSR). Particularly, we study the VSR gauge symmetry as well as VSR BRST symmetry of Kalb-Ramond and Abelian 3-form fields involving a fixed null vector. We observe that the Kalb-Ramond and Abelian 3-form fields and corresponding ghosts get masses in the VSR framework. The effective action in VSR-type axial gauge is greatly simplified compared with the VSR-type Lorenz gauge. Further, we quantize these models using a Batalin-Vilkovisy (BV) formulation in VSR. (orig.)

  3. Reducing the spectral index in supernatural inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supernatural inflation is an attractive model based on just a flat direction with soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms in the framework of supersymmetry. The beauty of the model is that it needs no fine-tuning. However, the prediction of the spectral index is ns > or approx. 1, in contrast to experimental data. In this paper, we discuss supernatural inflation with the spectral index reduced to ns=0.96 without any fine-tuning, considering the general feature that a flat direction is lifted by a nonrenormalizable term with an A-term.

  4. Improving Realism in Reduced Gravity Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Matthew; Harvil, Lauren; Clowers, Kurt; Clark, Timothy; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2010-01-01

    Since man was first determined to walk on the moon, simulating the lunar environment became a priority. Providing an accurate reduced gravity environment is crucial for astronaut training and hardware testing. This presentation will follow the development of reduced gravity simulators to a final comparison of environments between the currently used systems. During the Apollo program era, multiple systems were built and tested, with several NASA centers having their own unique device. These systems ranged from marionette-like suspension devices where the subject laid on his side, to pneumatically driven offloading harnesses, to parabolic flights. However, only token comparisons, if any, were made between systems. Parabolic flight allows the entire body to fall at the same rate, giving an excellent simulation of reduced gravity as far as the biomechanics and physical perceptions are concerned. While the effects are accurate, there is limited workspace, limited time, and high cost associated with these tests. With all mechanical offload systems only the parts of the body that are actively offloaded feel any reduced gravity effects. The rest of the body still feels the full effect of gravity. The Partial Gravity System (Pogo) is the current ground-based offload system used to training and testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Pogo is a pneumatic type system that allows for offloaded motion in the z-axis and free movement in the x-axis, but has limited motion in the y-axis. The pneumatic system itself is limited by cylinder stroke length and response time. The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) is a next generation groundbased offload system, currently in development, that is based on modern robotic manufacturing lines. This system is projected to provide more z-axis travel and full freedom in both the x and y-axes. Current characterization tests are underway to determine how the ground-based offloading systems perform, how they compare to parabolic

  5. Reducing the Spectral Index in Supernatural Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Chia-Min

    2009-01-01

    Supernatural inflation is an attractive model based just on a flat direction with soft SUSY breaking mass terms in the framework of supersymmetry. The beauty of the model is inferred from its name that the model needs no fine-tuning. However, the prediction of the spectral index is $n_s \\gae 1$, in contrast to experimental data. In this paper, we show that the beauty of supernatural inflation with the spectral index reduced to $n_s=0.96$ without any fine-tuning, by considering the general feature that a flat direction is lifted by a non-renormalizable term with an A-term.

  6. Reducing the spectral index in supernatural inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Min; Cheung, Kingman

    2009-04-01

    Supernatural inflation is an attractive model based on just a flat direction with soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms in the framework of supersymmetry. The beauty of the model is that it needs no fine-tuning. However, the prediction of the spectral index is ns≳1, in contrast to experimental data. In this paper, we discuss supernatural inflation with the spectral index reduced to ns=0.96 without any fine-tuning, considering the general feature that a flat direction is lifted by a nonrenormalizable term with an A-term.

  7. Hadoop MapReduce v2 cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gunarathne, Thilina

    2015-01-01

    If you are a Big Data enthusiast and wish to use Hadoop v2 to solve your problems, then this book is for you. This book is for Java programmers with little to moderate knowledge of Hadoop MapReduce. This is also a one-stop reference for developers and system admins who want to quickly get up to speed with using Hadoop v2. It would be helpful to have a basic knowledge of software development using Java and a basic working knowledge of Linux.

  8. Meteorological data analysis using MapReduce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei; Sheng, V S; Wen, XueZhi; Pan, Wubin

    2014-01-01

    In the atmospheric science, the scale of meteorological data is massive and growing rapidly. K-means is a fast and available cluster algorithm which has been used in many fields. However, for the large-scale meteorological data, the traditional K-means algorithm is not capable enough to satisfy the actual application needs efficiently. This paper proposes an improved MK-means algorithm (MK-means) based on MapReduce according to characteristics of large meteorological datasets. The experimental results show that MK-means has more computing ability and scalability.

  9. Automatic differentiation for reduced sequential quadratic programming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao Liangcai; Li Jin; Tan Yuejin

    2007-01-01

    In order to slove the large-scale nonlinear programming (NLP) problems efficiently, an efficient optimization algorithm based on reduced sequential quadratic programming (rSQP) and automatic differentiation (AD) is presented in this paper. With the characteristics of sparseness, relatively low degrees of freedom and equality constraints utilized, the nonlinear programming problem is solved by improved rSQP solver. In the solving process, AD technology is used to obtain accurate gradient information. The numerical results show that the combined algorithm, which is suitable for large-scale process optimization problems, can calculate more efficiently than rSQP itself.

  10. Importance of reducing medical radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical exposure primarily refers to intentional irradiation of patients for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Among the man-made sources, diagnostic radiology is the major contributor of radiation dose to the public. This article (1) reviews the recommendations of International Commission of Radiological Protection pertaining to medical exposures, (2) stresses the importance of reducing exposure, (3) deals with the present status of medical exposure in India and (4) discusses the methodology for achieving reduction of medical exposure. Awareness, good equipment, safe work practices, discipline, trained personnel and continuing education will go a long way in achieving the goal of reduction of medical exposure. (author)

  11. Rationale for reduced tornado design bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a rationale for relaxing the present NRC tornado design requirements, which are based on a design basis tornado (DBT) whose frequency of exceedance is 10-7 per year. It is proposed that a reduced DBT frequency of 10-5 to 10-6 per year is acceptable. This change in the tornado design bases for LMFBRs (and possibly all types of nuclear plants) is justified based on (1) existing NRC regulations and guidelines, (2) probabilistic arguments, (3) consistency with NRC trial safety goals, and (4) cost-benefit analysis

  12. How writing records reduces clinical knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels

    2009-01-01

    drew on data from an extended fieldwork on two Danish "special observation" wards. The results indicated that the nurses' recording produced "stereotyping" representations of the patients and reduced the nurses' clinical knowledge but that this particular way of recording made good sense in relation......Through the practices of recording, psychiatric nurses produce clinical knowledge about the patients in their care. The objective of this study was to examine the conventionalized practices of recording among psychiatric nurses and the typical linguistic organization of their records. The study...

  13. Reducing stigma and discrimination: Candidate interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassam Aliya

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper proposes that stigma in relation to people with mental illness can be understood as a combination of problems of knowledge (ignorance, attitudes (prejudice and behaviour (discrimination. From a literature review, a series of candidate interventions are identified which may be effective in reducing stigmatisation and discrimination at the following levels: individuals with mental illness and their family members; the workplace; and local, national and international. The strongest evidence for effective interventions at present is for (i direct social contact with people with mental illness at the individual level, and (ii social marketing at the population level.

  14. Suspensions with reduced violin string modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B H; Ju, L; Blair, D G [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, WA (Australia)

    2006-03-02

    We discuss the possibility of significantly reducing the number and Q-factor of violin string modes in the mirror suspension. Simulations of a bar-flexure suspension and an orthogonal ribbon have shown a reduction in the number of violin string modes when compared to a normal ribbon suspension. By calculating the expected suspension thermal noise, we find that the orthogonal ribbon provides a promising suspension alternative. A lower number of violin modes oscillating in the direction of the laser and a reduction in violin mode peak values of at least 23dB can be achieved with a slight increase in thermal noise above 40Hz.

  15. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.;

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations and...... experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  16. Evolution of technetium speciation in reducing grout

    OpenAIRE

    Lukens, Wayne W.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Shuh, David K.; Edelstein, Norman M.

    2003-01-01

    Cementitious waste forms (CWFs) are an important component of the strategy to immobilize high-level nuclear waste resulting from plutonium production by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant fission product of particular concern in CWFs due to the high solubility and mobility of pertechnetate, TcO4-, the stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. CWFs can more effectively immobilize 99Tc if they contain additives that reduce mobile TcO4- to immobil...

  17. Electroactive biofilms of sulphate reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordas, Cristina M.; Guerra, L. Tiago; Xavier, Catarina [Requimte-CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Moura, Jose J.G. [Requimte-CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)], E-mail: jose.moura@dq.fct.unl.pt

    2008-12-01

    Biofilms formed from a pure strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans 27774 on stainless steel and graphite polarised surfaces were studied. The polarisation conditions applied were -0.4 V vs. SCE for different times. A cathodic current related with the biofilms growth was observed with a maximum intensity of -270 mA m{sup -2} that remained stable for several days using graphite electrodes. These sulphate reducing bacteria biofilms present electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen and oxygen reduction reactions. Electrode polarisation has a selective effect on the catalytic activity. The biofilms were also observed by scanning electronic microscopy revealing the formation of homogeneous films on the surfaces.

  18. Reduced MHD and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arter, Wayne

    2011-08-01

    Recent work has shown a relationship between between the equations of Reduced Magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD), used to model magnetic fusion laboratory experiments, and incompressible magnetoconvection (IMC), employed in the simulation of astrophysical fluid dynamics (AFD), which means that the two systems are mathematically equivalent in certain geometries. Limitations on the modelling of RMHD, which were found over twenty years ago, are reviewed for an AFD audience, together with hitherto unpublished material on the role of finite-time singularities in the discrete equations used to model fluid dynamical systems. Possible implications for turbulence modelling are mentioned.

  19. Reducible gauge theories in very special relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker, E-mail: sudhakerupadhyay@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, 208016, Kanpur (India)

    2015-12-14

    In this paper we analyze the tensor field (reducible gauge) theories in the context of very special relativity (VSR). Particularly, we study the VSR gauge symmetry as well as VSR BRST symmetry of Kalb–Ramond and Abelian 3-form fields involving a fixed null vector. We observe that the Kalb–Ramond and Abelian 3-form fields and corresponding ghosts get masses in the VSR framework. The effective action in VSR-type axial gauge is greatly simplified compared with the VSR-type Lorenz gauge. Further, we quantize these models using a Batalin–Vilkovisy (BV) formulation in VSR.

  20. Reducing hazards for animals from humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul-Pierre Pastoret

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available If animals may be a source of hazards for humans, the reverse is equally true. The main sources of hazards from humans to animals, are the impact of human introduction of transboundary animal diseases, climate change, globalisation, introduction of invasive species and reduction of biodiversity.There is also a trend toward reducing genetic diversity in domestic animals, such as cattle; there are presently around 700 different breeds of cattle many of which at the verge of extinction (less than 100 reproductive females. The impact of humans is also indirect through detrimental effects on the environment. It is therefore urgent to implement the new concept of “one health"....

  1. Approaches to reduce bullying in schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Kristine; Fisker, Tine Basse

    2015-01-01

    In this article, recent research literature on bullying in schools is discussed. The authors approach the discussion from a critical angle, distinguishing between first-order perspectives (bullying as part of individuals’ dysfunction) and second-order perspectives (bullying as part of social...... processes) to embrace the different understandings of bullying and to discuss these critically. The purpose is to present important knowledge to reduce bullying and to engage in a discussion of different perspectives on bullying. This article contributes to the existing knowledge of the field by discussing...

  2. Active compressor engine silencer reduces exhaust noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An active industrial silencer on a compressor engine at a Tenneco Gas station has reduced low-frequency 'rumbling' noise by 8 dB during trials while lowering backpressure about 90$. This 8 dB reduction of the piston firing frequency corresponds to a more than 80% decrease in emitted acoustic power. The silencing unit, installed on one of six engines at the station near Eden, N.Y., continues in operation. Based on the results, the manufacturer is identifying additional compressor sites for further tests. This paper reviews this project

  3. MIREX: MapReduce Information Retrieval Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2010-01-01

    We propose to use MapReduce to quickly test new retrieval approaches on a cluster of machines by sequentially scanning all documents. We present a small case study in which we use a cluster of 15 low cost ma- chines to search a web crawl of 0.5 billion pages showing that sequential scanning is a viable approach to running large-scale information retrieval experiments with little effort. The code is available to other researchers at: http://mirex.sourceforge.net

  4. Iterative reconstruction reduces abdominal CT dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: In medical imaging, lowering radiation dose from computed tomography scanning, without reducing diagnostic performance is a desired achievement. Iterative image reconstruction may be one tool to achieve dose reduction. This study reports the diagnostic performance using a blending of 50% statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and filtered back projection reconstruction (FBP) compared to standard FBP image reconstruction at different dose levels for liver phantom examinations. Methods: An anthropomorphic liver phantom was scanned at 250, 185, 155, 140, 120 and 100 mA s, on a 64-slice GE Lightspeed VCT scanner. All scans were reconstructed with ASIR and FBP. Four readers evaluated independently on a 5-point scale 21 images, each containing 32 test sectors. In total 672 areas were assessed. ROC analysis was used to evaluate the differences. Results: There was a difference in AUC between the 250 mA s FBP images and the 120 and 100 mA s FBP images. ASIR reconstruction gave a significantly higher diagnostic performance compared to standard reconstruction at 100 mA s. Conclusion: A blending of 50–90% ASIR and FBP may improve image quality of low dose CT examinations of the liver, and thus give a potential for reducing radiation dose.

  5. How Damage Diversification Can Reduce Systemic Risk

    CERN Document Server

    Burkholz, Rebekka; Schweitzer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of risk diversification in complex networks. Nodes represent e.g. financial actors, whereas weighted links represent e.g. financial obligations (credits/debts). Each node has a risk to fail because of losses resulting from defaulting neighbors, which may lead to large failure cascades. Classical risk diversification strategies usually neglect network effects and therefore suggest that risk can be reduced if possible losses (i.e., exposures) are split among many neighbors (exposure diversification, ED). But from a complex networks perspective diversification implies higher connectivity of the system as a whole which can also lead to increasing failure risk of a node. To cope with this, we propose a different strategy (damage diversification, DD), i.e. the diversification of losses that are imposed on neighboring nodes as opposed to losses incurred by the node itself. Here, we quantify the potential of DD to reduce systemic risk in comparison to ED. For this, we develop a branching proce...

  6. Calibration of options on a reduced basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pironneau, Olivier

    2009-10-01

    Calibration of models is an important step in financial engineering. However it can be costly, especially in view of the increasing complexity of the models. In this paper we explore the use of reduced basis as is done in fluid mechanics for the Navier-Stokes equations or as proposed by Maday, Patera and Turinici [Y. Maday et al., A priori convergence theory for reduced-basis approximations of single-parameter elliptic partial differential equations, J. Sci. Comput. 17 (1-4) (2002) 437-446]. It is shown that the method works well if we use convex combination of the basis functions instead of the more general linear combination; however, while this idea makes sense in view of the properties of the Black-Scholes equation, we have no proof to general linear combination; however, while this idea makes sense in view of the properties of the Black-Scholes equation, we have no proof to justify it mathematically. The paper presents a numerical investigation of the problem posed.

  7. Explicit information reduces discounting behavior in monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John ePearson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Animals are notoriously impulsive in common laboratory experiments, preferring smaller, sooner rewards to larger, delayed rewards even when this reduces average reward rates. By contrast, the same animals often engage in natural behaviors that require extreme patience, such as food caching, stalking prey, and traveling long distances to high quality food sites. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is that standard laboratory delay discounting tasks artificially inflate impulsivity by subverting animals’ common learning strategies. To test this idea, we examined choices made by rhesus macaques in two variants of a standard delay discounting task. In the conventional variant, post-reward delays were uncued and adjusted to render total trial length constant; in the second, all delays were cued explicitly. We found that measured discounting was significantly reduced in the cued task, with discount rates well below those reported in studies using the standard uncued design. When monkeys had complete information, their decisions were more consistent with a strategy of reward rate maximization. These results indicate that monkeys, and perhaps other animals, are more patient than is normally assumed, and that laboratory measures of delay discounting may overstate impulsivity.

  8. Sensitivity analysis via reduced order adjoint method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notwithstanding the voluminous literature on adjoint sensitivity analysis, it has been generally dismissed by practitioners as cumbersome with limited value in realistic engineering models. This perception reflects two limitations about adjoint sensitivity analysis: a) its most effective application is limited to calculation of first-order variations; when higher order derivatives are required, it quickly becomes computationally inefficient; and b) the number of adjoint model evaluations depends on the number of responses, which renders it ineffective for multi-physics model where entire distributions, such as flux and power distribution, are often transferred between the various physics models. To overcome these challenges, this manuscript employs recent advances in reduced order modeling to re-cast the adjoint model equations into a form that renders its application to real reactor models practical. Past work applied reduced order modeling techniques to render reduction for general nonlinear high dimensional models by identifying mathematical subspaces, called active subspaces, that capture all dominant features of the model, including both linear and nonlinear variations. We demonstrate the application of these techniques to the calculation of first-order derivatives, or as commonly known sensitivity coefficients, for a fuel assembly model with many responses. We show that the computational cost becomes dependent on the physics model itself, via the so-called rank of the active subspace, rather than the number of responses or parameters. (author)

  9. Recommendations for reducing ambiguity in written procedures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzen, Laura E.

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies in the nuclear weapons complex have shown that ambiguous work instructions (WIs) and operating procedures (OPs) can lead to human error, which is a major cause for concern. This report outlines some of the sources of ambiguity in written English and describes three recommendations for reducing ambiguity in WIs and OPs. The recommendations are based on commonly used research techniques in the fields of linguistics and cognitive psychology. The first recommendation is to gather empirical data that can be used to improve the recommended word lists that are provided to technical writers. The second recommendation is to have a review in which new WIs and OPs and checked for ambiguities and clarity. The third recommendation is to use self-paced reading time studies to identify any remaining ambiguities before the new WIs and OPs are put into use. If these three steps are followed for new WIs and OPs, the likelihood of human errors related to ambiguity could be greatly reduced.

  10. Balancing Opposing Views to Reduce Controversy

    CERN Document Server

    Garimella, Kiran; Gionis, Aristides; Mathioudakis, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Society is often polarized by controversial issues, that split the population into groups of opposing views. When such issues emerge on social media, we often observe the creation of 'echo chambers', i.e., situations where like-minded people reinforce each other's opinion, but do not get exposed to the views of the opposing side. In this paper we study algorithmic techniques for bridging these chambers, and thus, reducing controversy. Specifically, we represent the discussion on a controversial issue with an endorsement graph, and cast our problem as an edge-recommendation problem on this graph. The goal of the recommendation is to reduce the controversy score of the graph, which is measured by a recently-developed metric based on random walks. At the same time, we take into account the acceptance probability of the recommended edge, which represents how likely the edge is to materialize in the endorsement graph. We propose a simple model based on a recently-developed user-level controversy score, that is com...

  11. Simvastatin Reduces Capsular Fibrosis around Silicone Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyu Jin; Park, Ki Rin; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Tae Gon; Kim, Yong-Ha

    2016-08-01

    Capsular fibrosis and contracture occurs in most breast reconstruction patients who undergo radiotherapy, and there is no definitive solution for its prevention. Simvastatin was effective at reducing fibrosis in various models. Peri-implant capsular formation is the result of tissue fibrosis development in irradiated breasts. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on peri-implant fibrosis in rats. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to an experimental group (9 rats, 18 implants) or a control group (9 rats, 18 implants). Two hemispherical silicone implants, 10 mm in diameter, were inserted in subpanniculus pockets in each rat. The next day, 10-Gy of radiation from a clinical accelerator was targeted at the implants. Simvastatin (15 mg/kg/day) was administered by oral gavage in the experimental group, while animals in the control group received water. At 12 weeks post-implantation, peri-implant capsules were harvested and examined histologically and by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The average capsular thickness was 371.2 μm in the simvastatin group and 491.2 μm in the control group. The fibrosis ratio was significantly different, with 32.33% in the simvastatin group and 58.44% in the control group (P silicone implants in rats. This finding offers an alternative therapeutic strategy for reducing capsular fibrosis and contracture after implant-based breast reconstruction. PMID:27478339

  12. How damage diversification can reduce systemic risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholz, Rebekka; Garas, Antonios; Schweitzer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    We study the influence of risk diversification on cascading failures in weighted complex networks, where weighted directed links represent exposures between nodes. These weights result from different diversification strategies and their adjustment allows us to reduce systemic risk significantly by topological means. As an example, we contrast a classical exposure diversification (ED) approach with a damage diversification (DD) variant. The latter reduces the loss that the failure of high degree nodes generally inflict to their network neighbors and thus hampers the cascade amplification. To quantify the final cascade size and obtain our results, we develop a branching process approximation taking into account that inflicted losses cannot only depend on properties of the exposed, but also of the failing node. This analytic extension is a natural consequence of the paradigm shift from individual to system safety. To deepen our understanding of the cascade process, we complement this systemic perspective by a mesoscopic one: an analysis of the failure risk of nodes dependent on their degree. Additionally, we ask for the role of these failures in the cascade amplification.

  13. A probabilistic model for reducing medication errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phung Anh Nguyen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Medication errors are common, life threatening, costly but preventable. Information technology and automated systems are highly efficient for preventing medication errors and therefore widely employed in hospital settings. The aim of this study was to construct a probabilistic model that can reduce medication errors by identifying uncommon or rare associations between medications and diseases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Association rules of mining techniques are utilized for 103.5 million prescriptions from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database. The dataset included 204.5 million diagnoses with ICD9-CM codes and 347.7 million medications by using ATC codes. Disease-Medication (DM and Medication-Medication (MM associations were computed by their co-occurrence and associations' strength were measured by the interestingness or lift values which were being referred as Q values. The DMQs and MMQs were used to develop the AOP model to predict the appropriateness of a given prescription. Validation of this model was done by comparing the results of evaluation performed by the AOP model and verified by human experts. The results showed 96% accuracy for appropriate and 45% accuracy for inappropriate prescriptions, with a sensitivity and specificity of 75.9% and 89.5%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We successfully developed the AOP model as an efficient tool for automatic identification of uncommon or rare associations between disease-medication and medication-medication in prescriptions. The AOP model helps to reduce medication errors by alerting physicians, improving the patients' safety and the overall quality of care.

  14. Does Measles Immunization Reduce Diarrhoeal Morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddaiah V.P

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: 1. Will measles vaccination reduce the incidence and during of diarrhoeal episodes in children? 2. Will measles vaccination reduce the morbidity load because of diarrhoea? Objectives: 1. To provide measles immunization to rural children 9 to 24 months of age. 2. to study the occurrence of diarrhoeal episodes by domicillary visits every month for a period of 1 year. Design: Longitudinal study. Setting: Rural area in the state of Haryana. Participants: Children between the ages of 9 and 24 months with parental informed consent. Study variables: diarrhoeal episodes per child/year, duration of diarrhoea. Outcome Variable: the difference between the two groups (immunized and non- immunized of attack rate and duration of diarrhoeal episodes. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test. Results: immunization coverage was 75%. Attack rates of diarrhoea in immunized children (1.6/child/year was no different to that in the non- immunized (1.5/child/year. The mean duration of diarrhoea in both groups was 2.3 days. The prevalence diarrhoea in immunized and non-immunized was 3.85 and 3.67 respectively. Conclusion: Measles vaccination has no impact on diarrhoeal morbidity.

  15. Reducing violent injuries: priorities for pediatrician advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolins, J C; Christoffel, K K

    1994-10-01

    A basic framework for developing an advocacy plan must systematically break down the large task of policy development implementation into manageable components. The basic framework described in detail in this paper includes three steps: Setting policy objectives by narrowing the scope of policy, by reviewing policy options, and by examining options against selected criteria. Developing strategies for educating the public and for approaching legislative/regulatory bodies. Evaluating the effectiveness of the advocacy action plan as a process and as an agent for change. To illustrate the variety of ways in which pediatricians can be involved in the policy process to reduce violent injuries among children and adolescents, we apply this systematic approach to three priority areas. Prohibiting the use of corporal punishment in schools is intended to curb the institutionalized legitimacy of violence that has been associated with future use of violence. Efforts to remove handguns from the environments of children and adolescents are aimed at reducing the numbers of firearm injuries inflicted upon and by minors. Comprehensive treatment of adolescent victims of assault is intended to decrease the reoccurrence of violent injuries.

  16. Robust Optical Richness Estimation with Reduced Scatter

    CERN Document Server

    Rykoff, E S; Rozo, E; Annis, J; Evrard, A E; Hansen, S M; Hao, J; Johnston, D E; McKay, T A; Wechsler, R H

    2011-01-01

    Reducing the scatter between cluster mass and optical richness is a key goal for cluster cosmology from photometric catalogs. We consider various modifications to the red-sequence matched filter richness estimator of Rozo et al. (2009), and evaluate their impact on the scatter in X-ray luminosity at fixed richness. Most significantly, we find that deeper luminosity cuts can reduce the recovered scatter, finding that sigma_lnLX|lambda=0.63+/-0.02 for clusters with M_500c >~ 1.6e14 h_70^-1 M_sun. The corresponding scatter in mass at fixed richness is sigma_lnM|lambda ~ 0.2-0.3 depending on the richness, comparable to that for total X-ray luminosity. We find that including blue galaxies in the richness estimate increases the scatter, as does weighting galaxies by their optical luminosity. We further demonstrate that our richness estimator is very robust. Specifically, the filter employed when estimating richness can be calibrated directly from the data, without requiring a-priori calibrations of the red-sequence...

  17. Lubricin reduces cartilage--cartilage integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Dirk B; Wendt, David; Moretti, Matteo; Jakob, Marcel; Jay, Gregory D; Heberer, Michael; Martin, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Cartilage integration in vivo does not occur, such that even cartilage fissures do not heal. This could be due not only to the limited access of chondrocytes to the wound, but also to exogenous factors. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that lubricin, a lubricating protein physiologically present in the synovial fluid, reduces the integrative cartilage repair capacity. Disk/ring composites of bovine articular cartilage were prepared using concentric circular blades and cultured for 6 weeks with or without treatment with 250 microg/ml lubricin applied three times per week. Following culture, the percentage of contact area between the disks and the rings, as assessed by light microscopy, were equal in both groups. The adhesive strength of the integration interface, as assessed by push-out mechanical tests, was markedly and significantly lower in lubricin-treated specimens (2.5 kPa) than in the controls (28.7 kPa). Histological observation of Safranin-O stained cross-sections confirmed the reduced integration in the lubricin treated composites. Our findings suggest that the synovial milieu, by providing lubrication of cartilage surfaces, impairs cartilage--cartilage integration. PMID:15299281

  18. Reducing human nitrogen use for food production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junguo; Ma, Kun; Ciais, Philippe; Polasky, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    Reactive nitrogen (N) is created in order to sustain food production, but only a small fraction of this N ends up being consumed as food, the rest being lost to the environment. We calculated that the total N input (TN) of global food production was 171 Tg N yr‑1 in 2000. The production of animal products accounted for over 50% of the TN, against 17% for global calories production. Under current TN per unit of food production and assuming no change in agricultural practices and waste-to-food ratios, we estimate that an additional TN of 100 Tg N yr‑1 will be needed by 2030 for a baseline scenario that would meet hunger alleviation targets for over 9 billion people. Increased animal production will have the largest impact on increasing TN, which calls for new food production systems with better N-recycling, such as cooperation between crop and livestock producing farms. Increased N-use efficiency, healthier diet and decreased food waste could mitigate this increase and even reduce TN in 2030 by 8% relative to the 2000 level. Achieving a worldwide reduction of TN is a major challenge that requires sustained actions to improve nitrogen management practices and reduce nitrogen losses into the environment.

  19. Reducing human nitrogen use for food production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junguo; Ma, Kun; Ciais, Philippe; Polasky, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    Reactive nitrogen (N) is created in order to sustain food production, but only a small fraction of this N ends up being consumed as food, the rest being lost to the environment. We calculated that the total N input (TN) of global food production was 171 Tg N yr-1 in 2000. The production of animal products accounted for over 50% of the TN, against 17% for global calories production. Under current TN per unit of food production and assuming no change in agricultural practices and waste-to-food ratios, we estimate that an additional TN of 100 Tg N yr-1 will be needed by 2030 for a baseline scenario that would meet hunger alleviation targets for over 9 billion people. Increased animal production will have the largest impact on increasing TN, which calls for new food production systems with better N-recycling, such as cooperation between crop and livestock producing farms. Increased N-use efficiency, healthier diet and decreased food waste could mitigate this increase and even reduce TN in 2030 by 8% relative to the 2000 level. Achieving a worldwide reduction of TN is a major challenge that requires sustained actions to improve nitrogen management practices and reduce nitrogen losses into the environment.

  20. How damage diversification can reduce systemic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholz, Rebekka; Garas, Antonios; Schweitzer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    We study the influence of risk diversification on cascading failures in weighted complex networks, where weighted directed links represent exposures between nodes. These weights result from different diversification strategies and their adjustment allows us to reduce systemic risk significantly by topological means. As an example, we contrast a classical exposure diversification (ED) approach with a damage diversification (DD) variant. The latter reduces the loss that the failure of high degree nodes generally inflict to their network neighbors and thus hampers the cascade amplification. To quantify the final cascade size and obtain our results, we develop a branching process approximation taking into account that inflicted losses cannot only depend on properties of the exposed, but also of the failing node. This analytic extension is a natural consequence of the paradigm shift from individual to system safety. To deepen our understanding of the cascade process, we complement this systemic perspective by a mesoscopic one: an analysis of the failure risk of nodes dependent on their degree. Additionally, we ask for the role of these failures in the cascade amplification.

  1. A Fast Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wan-Yu; Ong, Yew-Soon; Zheng, Qing-Hua

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a fast and accurate kernel-based supervised algorithm referred to as the Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine (RKELM). In contrast to the work on Support Vector Machine (SVM) or Least Square SVM (LS-SVM), which identifies the support vectors or weight vectors iteratively, the proposed RKELM randomly selects a subset of the available data samples as support vectors (or mapping samples). By avoiding the iterative steps of SVM, significant cost savings in the training process can be readily attained, especially on Big datasets. RKELM is established based on the rigorous proof of universal learning involving reduced kernel-based SLFN. In particular, we prove that RKELM can approximate any nonlinear functions accurately under the condition of support vectors sufficiency. Experimental results on a wide variety of real world small instance size and large instance size applications in the context of binary classification, multi-class problem and regression are then reported to show that RKELM can perform at competitive level of generalized performance as the SVM/LS-SVM at only a fraction of the computational effort incurred.

  2. Energy conservation by reducing process variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wising, Ulrika; Lafourcade, Sebastien [Pepite S.A., Liege (Belgium); Mack, Philippe [Pepite Technologies Inc., Montreal (Canada)

    2011-12-21

    Energy conservation is becoming an increasingly important instrument to stay competitive in today is increasingly global market. Important investments have been made in infrastructure and personnel in order to improve the management of energy such as increased metering, energy dashboards, energy managers, etc. Despite these investments, the results have not materialized and there is still a significant potential to further reduce energy consumption. In this paper a new methodology will be presented that helps industry better operate existing assets in order to reduce energy consumption, without having to make capital investments. The methodology uses a combination of advanced data analysis tools and a specific implementation scheme that has lead to significant savings in industry. The advanced data analysis tools are used to analyze the variability of the process in order to assess when the plant has been operated well or not so well in the past. By finding the root causes of these variations and the key variables that can explain them, improved operating guidelines and models can be developed and implemented. The specific implementation scheme is an important part of the methodology as it involves the people operating the plant. Several user cases will be presented showing an energy conservation of between 10%-20% without capital investments necessary. (author)

  3. Reducing Ethical Hazards in Knowledge Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottey, Alan

    2016-04-01

    This article discusses the ethics of knowledge production (KP) from a cultural point of view, in contrast with the more usual emphasis on the ethical issues facing individuals involved in KP. Here, the emphasis is on the cultural environment within which individuals, groups and institutions perform KP. A principal purpose is to suggest ways in which reliable scientific knowledge could be produced more efficiently. The distinction between ethical hazard and (un)ethical behaviour is noted. Ethical hazards cannot be eliminated but they can be reduced if the cultural ambience is suitable. The main suggestions for reducing ethical hazards in KP relate to the review process. It is argued that some defects of the current, largely anonymous, review process could be ameliorated by a process of comprehensive, open and ongoing review (COOR). This includes partial professionalisation of the work of reviewing. Review at several stages is a vital part of the long filtering that incorporates some claims into the canon of reliable knowledge. The review process would be an acknowledged and explicit part of KP--a respected, public and rewarded activity. COOR would be expensive but cost-effective. The costs should be built explicitly into research culture. Finally, the considerations about a more 'KP friendly' culture lead to advocacy of a 'long-term, short-term' synthesis; that is, of the synthesis of long-term vision, such as a more cooperative and less competitive culture, with incremental changes which may be implemented in the short term.

  4. Reducing human nitrogen use for food production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junguo; Ma, Kun; Ciais, Philippe; Polasky, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen (N) is created in order to sustain food production, but only a small fraction of this N ends up being consumed as food, the rest being lost to the environment. We calculated that the total N input (TN) of global food production was 171 Tg N yr−1 in 2000. The production of animal products accounted for over 50% of the TN, against 17% for global calories production. Under current TN per unit of food production and assuming no change in agricultural practices and waste-to-food ratios, we estimate that an additional TN of 100 Tg N yr−1 will be needed by 2030 for a baseline scenario that would meet hunger alleviation targets for over 9 billion people. Increased animal production will have the largest impact on increasing TN, which calls for new food production systems with better N-recycling, such as cooperation between crop and livestock producing farms. Increased N-use efficiency, healthier diet and decreased food waste could mitigate this increase and even reduce TN in 2030 by 8% relative to the 2000 level. Achieving a worldwide reduction of TN is a major challenge that requires sustained actions to improve nitrogen management practices and reduce nitrogen losses into the environment. PMID:27445108

  5. Computing partial traces and reduced density matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Maziero, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Taking partial traces for computing reduced density matrices, or related functions, is a ubiquitous procedure in the quantum mechanics of composite systems. In this article, we present a thorough description of this function and analyze the number of elementary operations (ops) needed, under some possible alternative implementations, to compute it on a classical computer. As we notice, it is worthwhile doing some analytical developments in order to avoid making null multiplications and sums, what can considerably reduce the ops. For instance, for a bipartite system $\\mathcal{H}_{a}\\otimes\\mathcal{H}_{b}$ with dimensions $d_{a}=\\dim\\mathcal{H}_{a}$ and $d_{b}=\\dim\\mathcal{H}_{b}$ and for $d_{a},d_{b}\\gg1$, while a direct use of partial trace definition applied to $\\mathcal{H}_{b}$ requires $\\mathcal{O}(d_{a}^{6}d_{b}^{6})$ ops, its optimized implementation entails $\\mathcal{O}(d_{a}^{2}d_{b})$ ops. In the sequence, we regard the computation of partial traces for general multipartite systems and describe Fortra...

  6. Kinetics for a membrane reactor reducing perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhye, Lokesh; Rainwater, Ken; Jackson, W Andrew; Morse, Audra

    2007-02-01

    The major objectives of this work were to operate and construct an autohydrogenotrophic reactor and estimate perchlorate degradation kinetics. The results show that autohydrogenotrophic bacteria were cultured in the reactor and capable of removing 3.6 mg/d of perchlorate in the presence of excess hydrogen (99% removal). The reactor was successful in treating the average influent perchlorate concentration of 532 microg/L to the level of 3 microg/L. A first-order relationship was obtained between the concentration of active biomass in the reactor and the hydraulic retention time for the given amount of substrate. During the kinetic loading study, perchlorate removal ranged from 100 to 50%. The kinetic rate of perchlorate degradation observed in this study was 1.62 hr(-1). The significant degradation of perchlorate in these samples indicates the ubiquity of perchlorate-reducing organisms. Additionally, nitrate was simultaneously removed during water treatment (greater than 90% removal). Because of the excess levels of hydrogen, simultaneous removal of nitrate was not believed to significantly affect perchlorate removal. The area of concern was the lack of complete control over biological treatment. The growth of sulfate-reducing organisms in the reactor negatively affected perchlorate removal efficiency. There were no significant effects observed on the dissolved organic carbon and total suspended solids concentration of the effluent, suggesting that the treatment did not produce a large amount of biomass washout.

  7. Effect of reducing system on capacitive behavior of reduced graphene oxide film: Application for supercapacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the best chemical reduction of graphene oxide film with hydriodic acid that gives maximum energy and power density, we studied the effect of two reducing systems, hydriodic acid/water and hydriodic acid/acetic acid, on the morphology and electrochemical features of reduced graphene oxide film. Using acetic acid as solvent results in high electrical conductivity (5195 S m−1), excellent specific capacitance (384 F g−1) and good cyclic stability (about 98% of its initial response after 4000 cycles). Using water as a solvent, results in an ideal capacitive behavior and excellent cyclic stability (about 6% increase of its initial response after 2100 cycles). - Graphical abstract: The choice of reducing system determines the morphology and structure of the chemically reduced graphene film and, as a result, affects largely the capacitive behavior. - Highlights: • The structure of the graphene film has a pronounced effect on capacitive behavior. • The use of water/HI as reducing system results in an ideal capacitive behavior. • The use of acetic acid/HI as reducing system results in a high specific capacitance

  8. Reducing Financing Costs for Federal ESPCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, P.J.

    2005-01-28

    This report documents the recommendations of a working group commissioned by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) in 2002 to identify ways to reduce financing costs in federal energy savings performance contract (ESPC) projects. The working group is part of continuing efforts launched by FEMP since the award of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Super ESPCs in 1998 and 1999 to ensure that practical, flexible, and cost-effective alternative financing for energy-efficiency improvements is available to all federal agencies. During FY 2002-2004, the working group pursued extensive fact finding, consulted with government and private-sector finance experts, and analyzed data from federal and local government ESPC programs. The working group observed that both competition and transparency were lacking in federal ESPCs. The working group also found that the government often falls short of full compliance with certain provisions of the final rule that codifies the federal ESPC authority into regulation (10 CFR 436), which speak to due diligence in determining fair and reasonable pricing. Based on these findings, the working group formulated their short-term recommendations of actions that agencies can take immediately to reduce ESPC financing costs. The working group recommended requiring competitive solicitation of offers from prospective financiers of ESPC projects, standardization of processes to keep the playing field level and reduce energy service companies (ESCOs) project development costs, and assuring transparency by specifying that the government will see and review all bids. The reforms are intended to enable the government to determine quickly and reliably whether the portion of price related to financing is fair and reasonable and to provide auditable records of the transaction. The working group's recommendations were incorporated into modifications to the Super ESPCs and requirements to be included in the Super ESPC delivery order

  9. The European Procedure on Reduced Value Claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandrina Zaharia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining and developing the area of freedom, security and justice is a major objective of theEuropean Community, which guarantees the free movement of persons. As a result of litigations regardingthe applications with a reduced value arising among physical or legal persons, it was felt the need for acommunity legislation that would guarantee identical conditions, both for creditors and debtors throughoutthe entire European Union territory. The European procedure regarding the debts recovery of reducedvalue facilitates the access to justice and it is characterized by simplifying and expediting the settling of thetransboundary litigations, reducing costs, the recognition and execution of the court order in a MemberState given in another Member State. This procedure is available to litigants as an alternative to theprocedures provided by the laws of Member States. The Regulation (EC no. 861/2007 establishing aEuropean procedure regarding the applications with reduced value applies in civil and commercial matters inthe transboundary cases, regardless the nature of the court when the application value, without taking intoaccount the interest, expenditures and other costs, does not exceed 2000 Euro at the time of receiving theapplication form by the competent court. This procedure does not apply to revenue, customs oradministrative matters or in regard to state responsibility for acts or omissions in exercising the publicauthority, and other matters specifically referred to in the Regulation. A cause is transboundary in naturewhen one of the parties has its habitual residence in a Member State, other than the one where the courtreceives such application. The proper procedure of application resolution for the recovery of debts withreduced value is governed by the rules of procedural law of the Member State in which the proceedings areconducted, and the execution of court of law is made by state legislation in which it takes place. The

  10. Imagining intergroup contact reduces implicit prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Rhiannon N; Crisp, Richard J

    2010-03-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that imagining intergroup contact can be sufficient to reduce explicit prejudice directed towards out-groups. In this research, we examined the impact of contact-related mental imagery on implicit prejudice as measured by the implicit association test. We found that, relative to a control condition, young participants who imagined talking to an elderly stranger subsequently showed more positive implicit attitudes towards elderly people in general. In a second study, we demonstrated that, relative to a control condition, non-Muslim participants who imagined talking to a Muslim stranger subsequently showed more positive implicit attitudes towards Muslims in general. We discuss the implications of these findings for furthering the application of indirect contact strategies aimed at improving intergroup relations.

  11. Forewarning reduces fraud susceptibility in vulnerable consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, Susanne; Notthoff, Nanna; Menkin, Josephine; Ross, Lee; Shadel, Doug; Deevy, Martha; Carstensen, Laura L

    2014-01-01

    Telemarketing fraud is pervasive and older consumers are disproportionally targeted. Given laboratory research showing that forewarning can effectively counter influence appeals, we conducted a field experiment to test whether forewarning could protect people who had been victimized in the past. A research assistant with prior experience as a telemarketer pitched a mock scam two or four weeks after participants were warned about the same scam or an entirely different scam. Both warnings reduced unequivocal acceptance of the mock scam although outright refusals (as opposed to expressions of skepticism) were more frequent with the same scam warning than the different scam warning. The same scam warning, but not the different scam warning, lost effectiveness over time. Findings demonstrate that social psychological research can inform effective protection strategies against telemarketing fraud. PMID:25328263

  12. Reduced Comparator Flash ADC for ECG Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan. V. A

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A CMOS based low power 4-bit Flash Analog to Digital Converter (ADC design with reduced number of comparators than the conventional Flash Analog to Digital Converter and multiplexer based architecture is proposed. For improving the conversion rate, both the analog and digital parts of the ADC are fully modified and the architecture uses only 4 comparators instead of 15 as used in conventional flash ADC, thus saving considerable amount of power. The proposed 4-bit ADC is designed and simulated in TANNER tools with 1.2 V supply voltage using TSpice simulation. The proposed design consumes low power of 2.15mW and operates at a faster rate hence it is suitable for ECG applications.

  13. Reducing outage times: a FROG perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1992, the Framatome Owners Group (FROG) was set up. It provides a forum for the members, who are all users of Framatome nuclear steam supply systems, to share and benefit from each others experience. Joint activities have been focused on safety and economic performance. Through effective control of outage duration, the average capability factor for the 60 plus nuclear units operated by the members rose from 74% in 1992 to 81.5% in 1993, while the average unplanned capability loss factor reduced from 9% to 3.5%. The specific measures now being taken by three FROG members to improve these results still further are described. The members concerned are Electrabel of Belgium, Electrite de France and the Korea Electric Power Co. (UK)

  14. Autonomous Droop Scheme With Reduced Generation Cost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nutkani, Inam Ullah; Loh, Poh Chiang; Wang, Peng;

    2014-01-01

    Droop schemes have traditionally been applied to the control of parallel synchronous generators in power systems. It has subsequently been brought over to the control of distributed generators (DGs) in microgrids with the same retained objective of proportional power sharing based on ratings....... This objective might, however, not suit microgrids well since DGs are usually of different types, unlike synchronous generators. Other factors like cost, efficiency, and emission penalty of each DG at different loading must be considered since they contribute directly to the total generation cost (TGC......) of the microgrid. To reduce this TGC without relying on fast communication links, an autonomous droop scheme is proposed here, whose resulting power sharing is decided by the individual DG generation costs. Comparing it with the traditional scheme, the proposed scheme retains its simplicity and it is hence more...

  15. Maintained intentional weight loss reduces cardiovascular outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caterson, I D; Finer, N; Coutinho, W;

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The Sibutramine Cardiovascular OUTcomes trial showed that sibutramine produced greater mean weight loss than placebo but increased cardiovascular morbidity but not mortality. The relationship between 12-month weight loss and subsequent cardiovascular outcomes is explored. Methods: Overweight...... change to Month 12 was -4.18 kg (sibutramine) or -1.87 kg (placebo). Degree of weight loss during Lead-in Period or through Month 12 was associated with a progressive reduction in risk for the total population in primary outcome events and cardiovascular mortality over the 5-year assessment. Although...... more events occurred in the randomized sibutramine group, on an average, a modest weight loss of approximately 3 kg achieved in the Lead-in Period appeared to offset this increased event rate. Moderate weight loss (3-10 kg) reduced cardiovascular deaths in those with severe, moderate or mild...

  16. Reduced energy consumption for melting in foundries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skov-Hansen, S.

    2007-09-15

    By improving the gating technology in traditional gating systems it is possible to reduce the amount of metal to be re-melted, and hence reduce the energy consumption for melting in foundries. Traditional gating systems are known for a straight tapered down runner a well base and 90 deg. bends in the runner system. In the streamlined gating systems there are no sharp changes in direction and a large effort is done to confine and control the flow of the molten metal during mould filling. Experiments in real production lines have proven that using streamlined gating systems improves yield by decreasing the poured weight compared to traditional layouts. In a layout for casting of valve housings in a vertically parted mould the weight of the gating system was reduced by 1,1kg which is a 20% weight reduction for the gating system. In a layout for horizontally parted moulds the weight of the gating system has been reduced by 3,7kg which is a weight reduction of 60% for the gating system. The experiments casting valve housings in ductile iron also proved that it is possible to lower the pouring temperature from 1400 deg. C to 1300 deg. C without the risk of cold runs. Glass plate fronted moulds have been used to study the flow of melt during mould filling. These experiments have also been used for studying the flow pattern when ceramic filters are used. The thorough study of the use of filters revealed that the metal passing through the filter is divided into a number of small jets. This proves that filters do not have the claimed positive effect on the flow of metal. The volumes necessary on either side of the filter is not filled till a backpressure is build up and results in formation of pressure shocks when backfilled. These pressure shocks result in more turbulence inside the casting than the same gating system with no filter. Not using filters can mean a reduction in poured weight of 0,6kg. To examine if the experiments using glass plate fronted moulds give

  17. Reducing the harms associated with risk assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk assessments are the intellectual products of dedicated public health and environmental professionals. Like many other products, risk assessments carry with them the potential for both good and harm. This paper briefly examines some of the harms to which risk assessments have contributed, and then suggests that the legal 'duty to warn' doctrine offers a logical and practical way to reduce some of these harms. The paper suggests concepts that could be incorporated into warnings accompanying every formal risk assessment as routine 'boiler plate' addenda, just as other potentially harmful products, such as lawn mowers and cook stoves, are accompanied by warnings. Finally, the paper briefly examines the 'Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice for Environmental Professionals' (promulgated by the National Association of Environmental Professionals) and shows that the suggested warnings are consistent with recommended practices for environmental professionals

  18. Composite binders for concrete with reduced permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fediuk, R.; Yushin, A.

    2016-02-01

    Composite binder consisting of cement (55%), acid fly ash (40%) and limestone (5%) has been designed. It is obtained by co-milling to a specific surface of 550 kg/m2, it has an activity of 77.3 MPa and can produce a more dense cement stone structure. Integrated study revealed that the concrete on the composite binder basis provides an effective diffusion coefficient D. So we can conclude that the concrete layer protects buildings from toxic effects of expanded polystyrene. Low water absorption of the material (2.5% by weight) is due to the structure of its cement stone pore space. Besides lime powder prevents the penetration of moisture, reduces water saturation of the coverage that has a positive effect on useful life period. It also explains rather low water vapor permeability of the material - 0.021 mg/(m- hour-Pa).

  19. Spot Spraying Reduces Herbicide Concentrations in Runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland, Alice R; Silburn, D Mark; McHugh, Allen D; Fillols, Emilie; Rojas-Ponce, Samuel; Baillie, Craig; Lewis, Stephen

    2016-05-25

    Rainfall simulator trials were conducted on sugar cane paddocks across dry-tropical and subtropical Queensland, Australia, to examine the potential for spot spraying to reduce herbicide losses in runoff. Recommended rates of the herbicides glyphosate, 2,4-D, fluoroxypyr, atrazine, and diuron were sprayed onto 0, 20, 40, 50, 70, or 100% of the area of runoff plots. Simulated rainfall was applied 2 days after spraying to induce runoff at one plant cane and three ratoon crop sites. Over 50% of all herbicides were transported in the dissolved phase of runoff, regardless of the herbicide's sediment-water partition coefficient. For most sites and herbicides, runoff herbicide concentrations decreased with decreasing spray coverage and with decreasing herbicide load in the soil and cane residues. Importantly, sites with higher infiltration prior to runoff and lower total runoff had lower runoff herbicide concentrations.

  20. Reducing the cost of administrative justice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In virtually every sector of government regulation, the complaint has been lodged that the costs of administrative justice are too high. These costs in time, money, resources, and productivity can have a profound effect on the individual consumer. When applied to an energy technology such as nuclear power, costs of administrative justice can transcent time and money to have even more profound and pervasive soeietal effects. Societal costs can be expressed in terms of their impact on important national concerns, that is, the standard of living, technological superiority, and the national energy equation. Some views are presented on the interests involved in the regulation of nuclear power and what can be done to bring those interests into better balance so as to reduce the cost of administrative justice

  1. Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

    2001-12-31

    Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

  2. Spot Spraying Reduces Herbicide Concentrations in Runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland, Alice R; Silburn, D Mark; McHugh, Allen D; Fillols, Emilie; Rojas-Ponce, Samuel; Baillie, Craig; Lewis, Stephen

    2016-05-25

    Rainfall simulator trials were conducted on sugar cane paddocks across dry-tropical and subtropical Queensland, Australia, to examine the potential for spot spraying to reduce herbicide losses in runoff. Recommended rates of the herbicides glyphosate, 2,4-D, fluoroxypyr, atrazine, and diuron were sprayed onto 0, 20, 40, 50, 70, or 100% of the area of runoff plots. Simulated rainfall was applied 2 days after spraying to induce runoff at one plant cane and three ratoon crop sites. Over 50% of all herbicides were transported in the dissolved phase of runoff, regardless of the herbicide's sediment-water partition coefficient. For most sites and herbicides, runoff herbicide concentrations decreased with decreasing spray coverage and with decreasing herbicide load in the soil and cane residues. Importantly, sites with higher infiltration prior to runoff and lower total runoff had lower runoff herbicide concentrations. PMID:26479195

  3. BWR stability using a reduced dynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical struct-ure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations in non-linear. Simple parametric calculat-ion of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author). 7 refs

  4. Metal radomes for reduced RCS performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, M.; Morris, S. B.

    A frequency selective surface (FSS) comprising a square grid and a hexagonal array of disks is proposed as a means of reducing the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of a radar bay over a wide (2 GHz to 14.6 GHz) frequency bandwidth. Results are presented in terms of transmission loss for an 'A'-type sandwich radome consisting of two FSS layers for normal and non-normal incidence. A single FSS layer on a GRP flat panel is also considered. Good agreement is found between the predicted and measured results. The proposed FSS shows good performance and is relatively insensitive to angle of incidence between 3.8 GHz and 10.1 GHz. Predicted Insertion Phase Delay (IPD) and cross-polar performances are also given. Parametric studies have indicated the versatility of the proposed structure.

  5. Reduced central blood volume in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, F; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Sørensen, T I;

    1989-01-01

    The pathogenesis of ascites formation in cirrhosis is uncertain. It is still under debate whether the effective blood volume is reduced (underfilling theory) or whether the intravascular compartment is expanded (overflow theory). This problem has not yet been solved because of insufficient tools...... for measuring the central blood volume. We have developed a method that enables us to determine directly the central blood volume, i.e., the blood volume in the heart cavities, lungs, and central arterial tree. In 60 patients with cirrhosis and 16 control subjects the central blood volume was assessed according...... to the kinetic theory as the product of cardiac output and mean transit time of the central vascular bed. Central blood volume was significantly smaller in patients with cirrhosis than in controls (mean 21 vs. 27 ml/kg estimated ideal body weight, p less than 0.001; 25% vs. 33% of the total blood volume, p less...

  6. Reduced attentional scope in cocaine polydrug users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza S Colzato

    Full Text Available Cocaine is Europe's second preferred recreational drug after cannabis but very little is known about possible cognitive impairments in the upcoming type of recreational cocaine user (monthly consumption. We asked whether recreational use of cocaine impacts early attentional selection processes. Cocaine-free polydrug controls (n = 18 and cocaine polydrug users (n = 18 were matched on sex, age, alcohol consumption, and IQ (using the Raven's progressive matrices, and were tested by using the Global-Local task to measure the scope of attention. Cocaine polydrug users attended significantly more to local aspects of attended events, which fits with the idea that a reduced scope of attention may be associated with the perpetuation of the use of the drug.

  7. Reducing Emergency Department Crowding: Evidence Based Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Mohamed; Zabani, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding has become a major barrier to receiving timely care. King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Saudi Arabia worked on identifying evidence based strategies for reducing the ED crowding by improving the intake. In addition to a review of literature, qualitative survey methods were used to identify strategies, which were classified into 10 suggested procedures categorized into three types of changes. Physical improvements include using physician cubicles, creating a team triage area and an internal waiting area for less acute patients instead of occupying beds. Technology improvements; include using informatics to update the electronic emergency record with information, using palmar scanning to instantly identify patients and using radio communication devices. Process improvements; include a scribe program to decrease clerical documentation tasks, switching between low flow and high flow processes, placing a physician in triage and using patient segmentation methods. PMID:27350468

  8. Maximizing competition : reducing barriers for new players

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This session included highlights from four guest speakers who commented on ways to reduce barriers to competition in Ontario's electric power industry. Topics of discussion included intertie transaction failures, the lack of overall investment in the market, the government's inaction which is preventing investment, the continued underwriting of Ontario Power Generation's activities by the government which discourages investment in the private sector, and indecisiveness regarding policy on coal plants. It was emphasized that investors need to know for certain that they can get a reasonable rate of return on their investments, that the market will be transparent and there will be no shift in policy. The need to promote new, efficient power generation by means of nuclear, coal, natural gas, and hydro energy was also emphasized. Charts depicting total energy production by source were presented for 2001 with projections to 2012. figs

  9. Sexual aggression toward women: reducing the prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Gwendolyn L; Cherneski, Lindsay

    2006-11-01

    Date rape or acquaintance rape is far more common than rape by strangers and can lead to serious health and adjustment problems for girls and women. Research has found women and men to be similar in many of their views about sexual assault. However, studies on attribution of blame have highlighted differences in the ways in which men and women attribute blame in sexual assault. Men attribute less blame to perpetrators of sexual assault than do women, regardless of whether the perpetrator is female or male. This suggests that men identify with the power associated with the role of perpetrator. Ways of reducing the prevalence of men's sexual aggressiveness toward women are addressed. PMID:17189496

  10. Producing Knowledge to Reduce Rhetorical Distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    Producing Knowledge to Reduce Rhetorical Distance: Extending Identity and Engaging Mainstream Ideology via the Web Constance Kampf, Department of Research Knowledge Communication, Aarhus School of Business, Denmark McLuhan describes technologies as extensions -the wheel being an extension...... of the foot, the radio an extension of the ear, the television an extension of the eye. From this perspective, exploring the internet as an extension of identity produces fruitful questions about the role of on-line writing in Web presences. The Web changes writing as a knowledge-making practice by offering...... perceptions. This paper theorizes about ways in which the Internet can change the act of producing knowledge through the characteristics of speed and reach, allowing minorities to access a widespread audience much more easily than before the Internet. Access to a widespread audience, in turn, offers...

  11. Plasma gelsolin is reduced in trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, B; Schiødt, F V; Ott, P;

    1999-01-01

    in the circulation can lead to a condition resembling multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), and we have previously demonstrated that the level of Gc-globulin is decreased after severe trauma. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the plasma levels of gelsolin were altered in the early phase...... after trauma. Twenty-three consecutive trauma patients were studied. Plasma samples were assayed for gelsolin by immunonephelometry with polyclonal rabbit antihuman gelsolin prepared in our own laboratory. The median time from injury until the time the first blood sample was taken was 52 min (range 20......-110) and the median Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 20 (range 4-50). The gelsolin level on admission was reduced significantly in the trauma patients compared with normal controls. The median level was 51 mg/L (7-967) vs. 207 mg/L (151-621), P

  12. Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-07-30

    An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

  13. Principal Component Pursuit with Reduced Linear Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Ganesh, Arvind; Wright, John; Ma, Yi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the problem of decomposing a superposition of a low-rank matrix and a sparse matrix when a relatively few linear measurements are available. This problem arises in many data processing tasks such as aligning multiple images or rectifying regular texture, where the goal is to recover a low-rank matrix with a large fraction of corrupted entries in the presence of nonlinear domain transformation. We consider a natural convex heuristic to this problem which is a variant to the recently proposed Principal Component Pursuit. We prove that under suitable conditions, this convex program guarantees to recover the correct low-rank and sparse components despite reduced measurements. Our analysis covers both random and deterministic measurement models.

  14. Using LEDs to reduce energy consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eweni, Chukwuebuka E.

    The most popularly used light bulb in homes is the incandescent. It is also the least energy efficient. The filament in the bulb is so thin that it causes resistance in the electricity, which in turn causes the electricity's energy to form heat. This causes the incandescent to waste a lot of energy forming heat rather than forming the light. It uses 15 lumens per watt of input power. A recorded MATLAB demonstration showcased LED versatility and how it can be used by an Arduino UNO board. The objective of this thesis is to showcase how LEDs can reduce energy consumption through the use of an Arduino UNO board and MATLAB and to discuss the applications of LED. LED will be the future of lighting homes and will eventually completely incandescent bulbs when companies begin to make the necessary improvements to the LED.

  15. Forewarning reduces fraud susceptibility in vulnerable consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, Susanne; Notthoff, Nanna; Menkin, Josephine; Ross, Lee; Shadel, Doug; Deevy, Martha; Carstensen, Laura L

    2014-01-01

    Telemarketing fraud is pervasive and older consumers are disproportionally targeted. Given laboratory research showing that forewarning can effectively counter influence appeals, we conducted a field experiment to test whether forewarning could protect people who had been victimized in the past. A research assistant with prior experience as a telemarketer pitched a mock scam two or four weeks after participants were warned about the same scam or an entirely different scam. Both warnings reduced unequivocal acceptance of the mock scam although outright refusals (as opposed to expressions of skepticism) were more frequent with the same scam warning than the different scam warning. The same scam warning, but not the different scam warning, lost effectiveness over time. Findings demonstrate that social psychological research can inform effective protection strategies against telemarketing fraud.

  16. Multiple hearth furnace for reducing iron oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Mark M.; True, Bradford G.

    2012-03-13

    A multiple moving hearth furnace (10) having a furnace housing (11) with at least two moving hearths (20) positioned laterally within the furnace housing, the hearths moving in opposite directions and each moving hearth (20) capable of being charged with at least one layer of iron oxide and carbon bearing material at one end, and being capable of discharging reduced material at the other end. A heat insulating partition (92) is positioned between adjacent moving hearths of at least portions of the conversion zones (13), and is capable of communicating gases between the atmospheres of the conversion zones of adjacent moving hearths. A drying/preheat zone (12), a conversion zone (13), and optionally a cooling zone (15) are sequentially positioned along each moving hearth (30) in the furnace housing (11).

  17. Shrinkage Reducing Measures for Engineering Cementitious Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yingzi; YAO Yan; GAO Xiaojian; DENG Hongwei; YU Pengzhan

    2008-01-01

    Inhibition measurement of shrinkage of engineering cementitious composites(ECC) was investigated due to typical ECC with higher free drying shrinkage.The effects of expanded admixture (EA),shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA),coarse sand+stone powder (CS+SP)and superabsorbent polymer (SAP) on drying shrinkage and mechanical properties were studied.The experimental results show that ECC incorporating EA,SRA and coarse sand can retain around 60% of the typical ECC's free drying shrinkage.Superabsorbent polymerl(SAP) can delay the development of free drying shrinkage of ECC at different ages,and the effect of SAP is not distinct like the actions of EA,superabsorbent polymer(SRA) and coarse sand.Significantly,SAP may act as artificial flaw to form a more homogeneous defect system that increases the potential of saturated multiple cracking,hence the ductility of ECC will be improved greatly.

  18. Caffeine reduces myocardial blood flow during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, John P; Babu, Kavita M

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine consumption has been receiving increased interest from both the medical and lay press, especially given the increased amounts now available in energy products. Acute ingestion of caffeine usually increases cardiac work; however, caffeine impairs the expected proportional increase in myocardial blood flow to match this increased work of the heart, most notably during exercise. This appears to be mainly due to caffeine's effect on blocking adenosine-induced vasodilatation in the coronary arteries in normal healthy subjects. This review summarizes the available medical literature specifically relating to pure caffeine tablet ingestion and reduced exercise coronary blood flow, and suggests possible mechanisms. Further studies are needed to evaluate this effect for other common caffeine-delivery systems, including coffee, energy beverages, and energy gels, which are often used for exercise performance enhancement, especially in teenagers and young athletes. PMID:23764265

  19. Ligand-Stabilized Reduced-Dimensionality Perovskites

    KAUST Repository

    Quan, Li Na

    2016-02-03

    Metal halide perovskites have rapidly advanced thin film photovoltaic performance; as a result, the materials’ observed instabilities urgently require a solution. Using density functional theory (DFT), we show that a low energy of formation, exacerbated in the presence of humidity, explains the propensity of perovskites to decompose back into their precursors. We find, also using DFT, that intercalation of phenylethylammonium between perovskite layers introduces quantitatively appreciable van der Waals interactions; and these drive an increased formation energy and should therefore improve material stability. Here we report the reduced-dimensionality (quasi-2D) perovskite films that exhibit improved stability while retaining the high performance of conventional three-dimensional perovskites. Continuous tuning of the dimensionality, as assessed using photophysical studies, is achieved by the choice of stoichiometry in materials synthesis. We achieved the first certified hysteresis-free solar power conversion in a planar perovskite solar cell, obtaining a 15.3% certified PCE, and observe greatly improved performance longevity.

  20. Quantum reduced loop gravity: Semiclassical limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alesci, Emanuele; Cianfrani, Francesco

    2014-07-01

    We discuss the semiclassical limit of quantum reduced loop gravity, a recently proposed model to address the quantum dynamics of the early Universe. We apply loop quantum gravity (LQG) techniques in order to define the semiclassical states in the kinematical Hilbert space and we demonstrate that the expectation value of the euclidean scalar constraint coincides with the classical expression, i.e., one of the local Bianchi I dynamics. The result holds as a leading order expansion in the scale factors of the Universe and opens the way to study the subleading corrections to the semiclassical dynamics. We outline how by retaining a suitable finite coordinate length for holonomies that our effective Hamiltonian at the leading order coincides with the one expected from loop quantum cosmology (LQC). This result is an important step in fixing the correspondence between LQG and LQC.

  1. Can compression reduce forensic image time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Cusack

    Full Text Available Creating a forensic copy (image of a hard disk drive is one of the fundamental tasks a computer forensic analyst must perform. Time is often critical, and there is a need to consider a trade-off between a number of factors to achieve best results. This paper reports the results from an exploratory study into the impact of using disk drive compression on the time needed to image (and verify a hard disk drive. It was found that time reduction may be achieved once the trade-off of contributing variables was properly estimated. The findings led the investigators to suggest a step-by-step decision making process for analysts when considering disk compression as a means for reducing total image processing time.

  2. The value of reducing HIV stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Robert J

    2016-02-01

    HIV-stigma is a major reason why HIV continues to be a global epidemic. Interventions targeting HIV-stigma are therefore necessary. To find an intervention that is worthwhile, a Cost-Benefit Analysis is needed which compares costs and benefits. There are many documented costs of HIV-stigma. What is missing is a valuation of the benefits of reducing HIV-stigma. The purpose of this paper is to present a general method that can be used to value the benefits of stigma reduction programs. The method involves estimating the marginal rate of substitution (MRS) between stigma and income in the utility function of older people with HIV. To illustrate how our framework can be used, we applied it to a sample of just over 900 people coming from the 2005-06 ROAH study (Research on Older Adults with HIV) in New York City. PMID:26820574

  3. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX); Mireles, Jose (Universidad Aut%C3%94onoma de Ciudad Ju%C3%94arez Ciudad Ju%C3%94arez, Mexico); Marquez, Noel (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX); Quinones, Stella (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX)

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  4. Reduced thymic output in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Hinojosa, Adria; Knight, Andrea; Compton, Claude; Gleeson, Michael; Travers, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Athletes undergoing intensive training schedules have chronic exposure to stress-induced hormones such as cortisol that can depress immune function. We compared the circulating levels of T cell receptor excision circles (TREC), a marker of recent thymic emigrants, as well as the levels of naïve and memory subsets in a group of elite endurance athletes and in controls. The athletes showed a reduction in absolute numbers of naïve T cells, particularly in CD4 T cells. In contrast, memory cells were increased. TREC levels in the athletes were significantly reduced compared to age-matched controls. Such changes resemble premature ageing of the T cell component of the immune system. Since thymic production of T cells naturally decline with age, these results raise the concern that prolonging high intensity exercise into the 4th decade of life may have deleterious consequences for athletes' health.

  5. Behavioral intervention to reduce AIDS risk activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J A; St Lawrence, J S; Hood, H V; Brasfield, T L

    1989-02-01

    Behavior change can curtail the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In this study, 104 gay men with a history of frequent AIDS high-risk behavior completed self-report, self-monitoring, and behavioral measures related to AIDS risk. The sample was randomly divided into experimental and waiting-list control groups. The experimental intervention provided AIDS risk education, cognitive-behavioral self-management training, sexual assertion training, and attention to the development of steady and self-affirming social supports. Experimental group participants greatly reduced their frequency of high-risk sexual practices and increased behavioral skills for refusing sexual coercions, AIDS risk knowledge, and adoption of "safer sex" practices. Change was maintained at the 8-month follow-up. PMID:2925974

  6. Moving and handling: reducing risk through assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Gemma

    2016-06-01

    Manual handling injuries can occur almost anywhere in a healthcare environment, and most staff perform a variety of moving and handling tasks every day. Heavy lifting, awkward posture, and previous or existing injury can increase the risk of musculoskeletal disorders. A healthcare professional's involvement in moving and handling is more widespread than it might appear, and their actions and understanding of techniques, legislation and guidelines have a direct effect on patient care. Every situation that involves the handling, or partial handling, of a person presents varying levels of risk to the patient and the carer. Maintaining a good level of patient mobility and independence is an essential part of care delivery and can reduce the risk of long-term physical and psychological effects. Delivery of care should focus on the individual's capacity, not their incapacity, to ensure that they are treated with dignity and respect. PMID:27275915

  7. Using relaxational dynamics to reduce network congestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontti, Ana L. Pastore y.; La Rocca, Cristian E.; Toroczkai, Zoltán; Braunstein, Lidia A.; Macri, Pablo A.; López, Eduardo

    2008-09-01

    We study the effects of relaxational dynamics on congestion pressure in scale-free (SF) networks by analyzing the properties of the corresponding gradient networks (Toroczkai and Bassler 2004 Nature 428 716). Using the Family model (Family and Bassler 1986 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 19 L441) from surface-growth physics as single-step load-balancing dynamics, we show that the congestion pressure considerably drops on SF networks when compared with the same dynamics on random graphs. This is due to a structural transition of the corresponding gradient network clusters, which self-organize so as to reduce the congestion pressure. This reduction is enhanced when lowering the value of the connectivity exponent λ towards 2.

  8. Comparison of interventions to reduce sun exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Dawn C; Black, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light is the leading behavioral cause of skin cancer. This study evaluated the efficacy of 2 interventions to reduce UV exposure in college students prior to an opportunity for high-intensity exposure. Participants of 1 college campus were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 interventions prior to their spring holiday spent in a warm, sunny location: (1) a community-based informational campaign, or (2) a combination of the campaign and a cognitive-behavioral small group intervention. Participants of a second college campus served as a comparison group. The cognitive-behavioral group exhibited increased knowledge, more positive attitudes toward UV protection, greater advancement through stages of change, and greater protective clothing use relative to the comparison or community-education groups. The informational campaign had little apparent impact in this study. PMID:19433378

  9. Communication in reducing facility siting risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisconti, A.S. (Council for Energy Awareness, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Today, social considerations are as important as technical ones in siting new nuclear facilities. Siting any industrial facility has become extremely difficult in this era of not in my backyard (NIMBY). Even if NIMBY does not arise locally, well-organized national opposition groups can be counted on to step in to fan the flames, especially when the industrial facility has to do with anything nuclear. It is now generally recognized that the greatest risk of failure for new nuclear facilities is not technical but social. Applying lessons gained from past experience and social science research can help reduce that risk. From these lessons, six principles for public interaction and communication stand out: (1) create goodwill now; (2) involve the community early; (3) establish the need; (4) communicate controls, not risk; (5) avoid jargon; (6) understand your public.

  10. Reducing the losses of optical metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Anan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The field of metamaterials is driven by fascinating and far-reaching theoretical visions, such as perfect lenses, invisibility cloaking, and enhanced optical nonlinearities. However, losses have become the major obstacle towards real world applications in the optical regime. Reducing the losses of optical metamaterials becomes necessary and extremely important. In this thesis, two approaches are taken to reduce the losses. One is to construct an indefinite medium. Indefinite media are materials where not all the principal components of the permittivity and permeability tensors have the same sign. They do not need the resonances to achieve negative permittivity, ε. So, the losses can be comparatively small. To obtain indefinite media, three-dimensional (3D) optical metallic nanowire media with different structures are designed. They are numerically demonstrated that they are homogeneous effective indefinite anisotropic media by showing that their dispersion relations are hyperbolic. Negative group refraction and pseudo focusing are observed. Another approach is to incorporate gain into metamaterial nanostructures. The nonlinearity of gain is included by a generic four-level atomic model. A computational scheme is presented, which allows for a self-consistent treatment of a dispersive metallic photonic metamaterial coupled to a gain material incorporated into the nanostructure using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The loss compensations with gain are done for various structures, from 2D simplified models to 3D realistic structures. Results show the losses of optical metamaterials can be effectively compensated by gain. The effective gain coefficient of the combined system can be much larger than the bulk gain counterpart, due to the strong local-field enhancement.

  11. Carbon dioxide reducing processes; Koldioxidreducerande processer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Fredrik

    1999-12-01

    This thesis discusses different technologies to reduce or eliminate the carbon dioxide emissions, when a fossil fuel is used for energy production. Emission reduction can be accomplished by separating the carbon dioxide for storage or reuse. There are three different ways of doing the separation. The carbon dioxide can be separated before the combustion, the process can be designed so that the carbon dioxide can be separated without any energy consumption and costly systems or the carbon dioxide can be separated from the flue gas stream. Two different concepts of separating the carbon dioxide from a combined cycle are compared, from the performance and the economical point of view, with a standard natural gas fired combined cycle where no attempts are made to reduce the carbon dioxide emissions. One concept is to use absorption technologies to separate the carbon dioxide from the flue gas stream. The other concept is based on a semi-closed gas turbine cycle using carbon dioxide as working fluid and combustion with pure oxygen, generated in an air-separating unit. The calculations show that the efficiency (power) drop is smaller for the first concept than for the second, 8.7 % points compared to 13.7 % points, when power is produced. When both heat and power are produced, the relation concerning the efficiency (power) remains. Regarding the overall efficiency (heat and power) the opposite relation is present. A possible carbon dioxide tax must exceed 0.21 SEK/kg CO{sub 2} for it to be profitable to separate carbon dioxide with any of these technologies.

  12. Robust Optical Richness Estimation with Reduced Scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rykoff, E.S.; /LBL, Berkeley; Koester, B.P.; /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP; Rozo, E.; /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP; Annis, J.; /Fermilab; Evrard, A.E.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Hansen, S.M.; /Lick Observ.; Hao, J.; /Fermilab; Johnston, D.E.; /Fermilab; McKay, T.A.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Wechsler, R.H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-06-07

    Reducing the scatter between cluster mass and optical richness is a key goal for cluster cosmology from photometric catalogs. We consider various modifications to the red-sequence matched filter richness estimator of Rozo et al. (2009b), and evaluate their impact on the scatter in X-ray luminosity at fixed richness. Most significantly, we find that deeper luminosity cuts can reduce the recovered scatter, finding that {sigma}{sub ln L{sub X}|{lambda}} = 0.63 {+-} 0.02 for clusters with M{sub 500c} {approx}> 1.6 x 10{sup 14} h{sub 70}{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The corresponding scatter in mass at fixed richness is {sigma}{sub ln M|{lambda}} {approx} 0.2-0.3 depending on the richness, comparable to that for total X-ray luminosity. We find that including blue galaxies in the richness estimate increases the scatter, as does weighting galaxies by their optical luminosity. We further demonstrate that our richness estimator is very robust. Specifically, the filter employed when estimating richness can be calibrated directly from the data, without requiring a-priori calibrations of the red-sequence. We also demonstrate that the recovered richness is robust to up to 50% uncertainties in the galaxy background, as well as to the choice of photometric filter employed, so long as the filters span the 4000 {angstrom} break of red-sequence galaxies. Consequently, our richness estimator can be used to compare richness estimates of different clusters, even if they do not share the same photometric data. Appendix A includes 'easy-bake' instructions for implementing our optimal richness estimator, and we are releasing an implementation of the code that works with SDSS data, as well as an augmented maxBCG catalog with the {lambda} richness measured for each cluster.

  13. Teaching Physics from a Reduced Gravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benge, Raymond D.; Young, C.; Davis, S.; Worley, A.; Smith, L.; Gell, A.

    2010-01-01

    This poster reports on an educational experiment flown in January 2009 as part of NASA's Microgravity University program. The experiment flown was an investigation into the properties of harmonic oscillators in reduced gravity. Harmonic oscillators are studied in every introductory physics class. The equation for the period of a harmonic oscillator does not include the acceleration due to gravity, so the period should be independent of gravity. However, the equation for the period of a pendulum does include the acceleration due to gravity, so the period of a pendulum should appear longer under reduced gravity (such as lunar or Martian gravity) and shorter under hyper-gravity. Typical homework problems for introductory physics classes ask questions such as "What would be the period of oscillation if this experiment were performed on the Moon or Mars?” This gives students a chance to actually see the effects predicted by the equations. These environments can be simulated aboard an aircraft. Video of the experiments being performed aboard the aircraft is to be used in introductory physics classes. Students will be able to record information from watching the experiment performed aboard the aircraft in a similar manner to how they collect data in the laboratory. They can then determine if the experiment matches theory. Video and an experimental procedure are being prepared based upon this flight, and these materials will be available for download by faculty anywhere with access to the internet who wish to use the experiment in their own classrooms in both college and high school physics classes.

  14. Evaluating strategies to reduce urban air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, L.; Relvas, H.; Silveira, C.; Ferreira, J.; Monteiro, A.; Gama, C.; Rafael, S.; Freitas, S.; Borrego, C.; Miranda, A. I.

    2016-02-01

    During the last years, specific air quality problems have been detected in the urban area of Porto (Portugal). Both PM10 and NO2 limit values have been surpassed in several air quality monitoring stations and, following the European legislation requirements, Air Quality Plans were designed and implemented to reduce those levels. In this sense, measures to decrease PM10 and NO2 emissions have been selected, these mainly related to the traffic sector, but also regarding the industrial and residential combustion sectors. The main objective of this study is to investigate the efficiency of these reduction measures with regard to the improvement of PM10 and NO2 concentration levels over the Porto urban region using a numerical modelling tool - The Air Pollution Model (TAPM). TAPM was applied over the study region, for a simulation domain of 80 × 80 km2 with a spatial resolution of 1 × 1 km2. The entire year of 2012 was simulated and set as the base year for the analysis of the impacts of the selected measures. Taking into account the main activity sectors, four main scenarios have been defined and simulated, with focus on: (1) hybrid cars; (2) a Low Emission Zone (LEZ); (3) fireplaces and (4) industry. The modelling results indicate that measures to reduce PM10 should be focused on residential combustion (fireplaces) and industrial activity and for NO2 the strategy should be based on the traffic sector. The implementation of all the defined scenarios will allow a total maximum reduction of 4.5% on the levels of both pollutants.

  15. Simple solutions for reduced fish farm hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Melvin L; Cole, Henry P

    2009-01-01

    Aquaculture poses emerging challenges for agricultural safety and health. Fish farming has many of the same hazards as other types of farming, but it also poses additional hazards associated with water impoundments and night-time work. In a multidisciplinary approach, researchers from four universities are identifying occupational hazards in fish farming and identifying no-cost or low-cost "simple solutions" to reduce or eliminate them. Simple solutions are discovered through farm visits so as to understand the countermeasures that individual stakeholders have taken to protect their workforce, and these countermeasures are documented and photographed to inform other farmers of these solutions. Equipping tractors with rollover protective structures is a standard practice to protect operators from serious injury in the event of an overturn. Other solutions identified include eliminating the need to climb feed bins to open and close the hatch for feed delivery by using a pull-cable at ground level. This simple technology eliminates the exposure to falling from an elevation, a risk that accounts for at least one reported death of a worker on a fish farm. Another solution is to replace metal paddles on a hatchery trough with plastic paddles that if and when entangled in a worker's hair or clothing slip on the rotating drive shaft and thus reduce laceration and entanglement injuries. Another simple solution to prevent entanglements in large pond aerators, used to mechanically dissolve oxygen into the water, that are operated by farm tractor power take-off shafts is to use electrically powered aerators. Bubble-type aerators are safer than electrically powered paddle aerators because workers are shielded from moving parts. Many additional simple solutions have been identified for a range of tasks in this environment. PMID:19437271

  16. Benefits from reducing risk of death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the categories of benefits to individuals, reductions in the risk of premature mortality are of central. concern to the public and environmental policy makers. These benefits can include those from reductions in own- risk, for example, an individual's valuation of reducing his or her own mortality risks; reductions in risk to an individual's family, friends, or co-workers (i.e., of people known to the individual); and reductions in risks to unknown individuals. The last type would be an example of altruistic value. The overall goal is to measure the welfare change from a change in the current and/or future probability of dying. The willingness to pay (WTP) reflects the amount of income taken from a person that would leave him or her indifferent to a decrease in risk, whenever it occurs. When this value is divided by the risk change, the resulting value is called the 'value of a statistical life'. Another relevant measure appearing in the literature is the value of life-years saved. A final issue concerns the type of premature mortality risks one is valuing when environmental pollution is at issue. While most effort has gone into estimating the welfare effects of a change in current probability of death of healthy workers on the job, this is more relevant for characterizing the benefits of reducing accidental death risks than death from environmental causes. Exposure to pollutants raises risks of developing cancer, chronic heart, respiratory, and other diseases that raise mortality risks in the future. Such exposure also may raise current death risks for the very old and the sick. But, surely the pollution effect that is analogous to occupational health risks-pollution exposures high enough to raise current risks of death for the healthy, prime-age person-is insignificant in the United States

  17. Naringenin reduces inflammatory pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Zarpelon, Ana C; Fattori, Victor; Manchope, Marília F; Mizokami, Sandra S; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2016-06-01

    Naringenin is a flavonoid widely consumed by humans that present anti-inflammatory activity and low toxicity. Recently, the analgesic effect of naringenin has been demonstrated in neuropathic pain models. Herein, we tested the analgesic effects of naringenin in several models of inflammatory pain. Mice received treatment with naringenin (16.7-150 mg/kg, per oral), or with the controls anti-inflammatory drugs indomethacin (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) or dipyrone (80 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) prior the inflammatory stimuli injection. For acute pain, we used acetic acid- and PBQ-induced visceral pain (abdominal writhings), and formalin-, capsaicin-, and CFA-induced paw flinching and licking. By using an electronic version of von Frey filaments, we also investigated the effects of naringenin in pain intensity to a mechanical stimulus (mechanical hyperalgesia) after carrageenan, capsaicin, CFA, or PGE2 intraplantar injection. Naringenin (50 mg/kg) reduced acute pain behaviors induced by all tested stimuli, including both phases of formalin test, suggesting a direct nociceptor modulatory effect of this compound besides its anti-inflammatory activity. Accordingly, naringenin also inhibited the increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulus induced by carrageenan, capsaicin, and PGE2. Daily treatment with naringenin during 7 days also reduced CFA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia without gastric or hepatic toxicity. The mechanisms of naringenin involve the inhibition of carrageenan-induced oxidative stress, hyperalgesic cytokines (IL-33, TNF-α, and IL-1β) production and NF-κB activation in the paw skin. Naringenin also activated the analgesic NO-cyclic GMP-PKG-ATP sensitive K(+) channel signaling pathway to inhibit carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and neutrophil recruitment. These results suggest that naringenin inhibits both inflammatory pain and neurogenic inflammation. PMID:26907804

  18. Reduced calcium-dependent mitochondrial damage underlies the reduced vulnerability of excitotoxicity-tolerant hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Stanika, Ruslan I; Watts, Charlotte A; Brantner, Christine A; Smith, Carolyn L; Andrews, S Brian

    2008-03-01

    In central neurons, over-stimulation of NMDA receptors leads to excessive mitochondrial calcium accumulation and damage, which is a critical step in excitotoxic death. This raises the possibility that low susceptibility to calcium overload-induced mitochondrial damage might characterize excitotoxicity-resistant neurons. In this study, we have exploited two complementary models of preconditioning-induced excitotoxicity resistance to demonstrate reduced calcium-dependent mitochondrial damage in NMDA-tolerant hippocampal neurons. We have further identified adaptations in mitochondrial calcium handling that account for enhanced mitochondrial integrity. In both models, enhanced tolerance was associated with improved preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential and structure. In the first model, which exhibited modest neuroprotection, mitochondria-dependent calcium deregulation was delayed, even though cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium loads were quantitatively unchanged, indicating that enhanced mitochondrial calcium capacity accounts for reduced injury. In contrast, the second model, which exhibited strong neuroprotection, displayed further delayed calcium deregulation and reduced mitochondrial damage because downregulation of NMDA receptor surface expression depressed calcium loading. Reducing calcium entry also modified the chemical composition of the calcium-buffering precipitates that form in calcium-loaded mitochondria. It thus appears that reduced mitochondrial calcium loading is a major factor underlying the robust neuroprotection seen in highly tolerant cells. PMID:18036152

  19. Reducing deaths from pregnancy and childbirth. Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, G

    1993-01-01

    99% of all maternal deaths occur in the developing world, and South Asian countries account for most deaths. The causes are obstructed labor, hemorrhage, pregnancy-related hypertension (eclampsia), or unsafe abortion. The United Nation's Children's Fund estimates 340 maternal deaths for every 100,000 live births in India. In Indian rural areas, the maternal mortality rate is between 800 and 900 deaths per 100,000 live births in Bangladesh, 600; in Nepal, 830; and in Bhutan, 1710. IN comparison, the rate in the United States is 8 deaths per 100,000 live births. The technology for reducing maternal mortality has been utilized in most developed countries, as well as in parts of South Asia, in particular in Sri Lanka. The goal of the Safe Motherhood Initiative was to reduce maternal mortality by 50% by the year 2000. The immediate causes of maternal mortality include pregnancy and delivery and the management of complications such as hemorrhage, toxic and bacterial infections (sepsis), eclampsia, and obstructed labor. The poor health, nutrition, and socioeconomic status of women are the underlying causes of maternal death. One study in India found that inadequate medical treatment contributes to 36% to 47% of maternal deaths in hospitals. In India, abortion services are legal and acceptable on social, religious, and political grounds, but services are inaccessible. In Bangladesh, the availability of menstrual regulation is estimated to save 100,000 to 160,000 women from unsafe abortions each year. However, the inaccessibility of this service accounts for 700,000 unsafe abortions and 7000 maternal deaths. Gender bias in the allocation of meager food supplies results in the poor health and nutritional status of women, rendering a woman's pelvis too small, which causes obstructed labor and even death. Socioeconomic status is linked to access the family planning and health services which affect mortality and reproductive health. In Sri Lanka and Kerala, government

  20. Methods Reduce Cost, Enhance Quality of Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    For all the challenges posed by the microgravity conditions of space, weight is actually one of the more significant problems NASA faces in the development of the next generation of U.S. space vehicles. For the Agency s Constellation Program, engineers at NASA centers are designing and testing new vessels as safe, practical, and cost-effective means of space travel following the eventual retirement of the space shuttle. Program components like the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, intended to carry astronauts to the International Space Station and the Moon, must be designed to specific weight requirements to manage fuel consumption and match launch rocket capabilities; Orion s gross liftoff weight target is about 63,789 pounds. Future space vehicles will require even greater attention to lightweight construction to help conserve fuel for long-range missions to Mars and beyond. In order to reduce spacecraft weight without sacrificing structural integrity, NASA is pursuing the development of materials that promise to revolutionize not only spacecraft construction, but also a host of potential applications on Earth. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are one material of particular interest. These tubular, single-layer carbon molecules - 100,000 of them braided together would be no thicker than a human hair - display a range of remarkable characteristics. Possessing greater tensile strength than steel at a fraction of the weight, the nanotubes are efficient heat conductors with metallic or semiconductor electrical properties depending on their diameter and chirality (the pattern of each nanotube s hexagonal lattice structure). All of these properties make the nanotubes an appealing material for spacecraft construction, with the potential for nanotube composites to reduce spacecraft weight by 50 percent or more. The nanotubes may also feature in a number of other space exploration applications, including life support, energy storage, and sensor technologies. NASA s various

  1. Reducing the invasiveness of modelling frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchyts, G.; Baart, F.

    2010-12-01

    There are several modelling frameworks available that allow for environmental models to exchange data with other models. Many efforts have been made in the past years promoting solutions aimed at integrating different numerical models with each other as well as at simplifying the way to set them up, entering the data, and running them. Meanwhile the development of many modeling frameworks concentrated on the interoperability of different model engines, several standards were introduced such as ESMF, OMS and OpenMI. One of the issues with applying modelling frameworks is the invasessness, the more the model has to know about the framework, the more intrussive it is. Another issue when applying modelling frameworks are that a lot of environmental models are written in procedural and in FORTRAN, which is one of the few languages that doesn't have a proper interface with other programming languages. Most modelling frameworks are written in object oriented languages like java/c# and the modelling framework in FORTRAN ESMF is also objected oriented. In this research we show how the application of domain driven, object oriented development techniques to environmental models can reduce the invasiveness of modelling frameworks. Our approach is based on four different steps: 1) application of OO techniques and reflection to the existing model to allow introspection. 2) programming language interoperability, between model written in a procedural programming language and modeling framework written in an object oriented programming language. 3) Domain mapping between data types used by model and other components being integrated 4) Connecting models using framework (wrapper) We compare coupling of an existing model as it was to the same model adapted using the four step approach. We connect both versions of the models using two different integrated modelling frameworks. As an example of a model we use the coastal morphological model XBeach. By adapting this model it allows for

  2. Whole Grain Intake Reduces Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qiucheng; Zheng, Huazhen; Bi, Jingcheng; Wang, Xinying; Jiang, Tingting; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Xu, Min; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Li; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mounting evidence from epidemiology studies suggests that whole grain intake may reduce pancreatic cancer risk, but convincing evidence is scarce. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the association between whole grain intake and pancreatic cancer risk. Relevant observational studies were identified by searching PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Cochrane library databases for the period from January 1980 to July 2015, with no restrictions. We calculated the summary odds ratios (ORs) for pancreatic cancer using random-effects model meta-analysis. Between-study heterogeneity was analyzed using the I2 statistic. A total of 8 studies regarding whole grain intake were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled OR of pancreatic cancer for those with high versus low whole grain intake was 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64–0.91; P = 0.002). There was no significant heterogeneity across these studies (I2 = 11.7%; Pheterogeneity = 0.339). In the subgroup analysis by geographic area, the summary ORs of developing pancreatic cancer were 0.64 (95% CI, 0.53–0.79; P < 0.001; I2 = 0%; Pheterogeneity = 0.482) in the United States (n = 4) and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.63–1.43; P = 0.803; I2 = 45.6%; Pheterogeneity = 0.175) in Europe (n = 2). In the subgroup analysis by type of whole grain, the summary ORs were 0.72 (95% CI, 0.60–0.87; P = .001; I2 = 0; Pheterogeneity = 0.876) for grains (n = 4) and 0.74 (95% CI, 0.27–2.02; P = 0.554; I2 = 86.3%; Pheterogeneity = 0.007) for wheat (n = 2). A high intake of whole grains was associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Because of the absent of more cohort studies, further prospective studies need to be conducted to ensure conclusions that are more robust. PMID:26945361

  3. Reoxidation of Reduced Uranium with Iron(III) (Hydr)Oxides under Sulfate-Reducing Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricansG20 the effects of iron(III) (hydr)oxides (hematite, goethite, and ferrihydrite) on microbial reduction and reoxidation of uranium (U) were evaluated under lactate-limited sulfate-reducing conditions. With lactate present, G20 reduced U(VI) in both 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonate (PIPES) and bicarbonate buffer. Once lactate was depleted, however, microbially reduced U served as an electron donor to reduce Fe(III) present in iron(III) (hydr)oxides. With the same initial amount of Fe(III) (10 mmol/L) for each iron(III) (hydr)oxide,reoxidation of U(IV) was greater with hematite than with goethite or ferrihydrite. As the initial mass loading of hematite increased from 0 to 20 mmol of Fe(III)/L, the rate and extent of U(IV) reoxidation increased. Subsequent addition of hematite [15 mmol of Fe(III)/L] to stationary-phase cultures containing microbially reduced U(IV) also resulted in rapid reoxidation to U(VI). Analysis by U L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) of microbially reduced U particles yielded spectra similar to that of natural uraninite. Observations by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis confirmed that precipitated U associated with cells was uraninite with particle diameters of 3-5 nm. By the same techniques, iron sulfide precipitates were found to have a variable Fe and S stoichiometry and were not associated with cells

  4. Reoxidation of Reduced Uranium with Iron(III) (Hydr)Oxides under Sulfate-Reducing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sani, Rajesh K.; Peyton, Brent M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E.

    2005-03-04

    In cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricansG20 the effects of iron(III) (hydr)oxides (hematite, goethite, and ferrihydrite) on microbial reduction and reoxidation of uranium (U) were evaluated under lactate-limited sulfate-reducing conditions. With lactate present, G20 reduced U(VI) in both 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonate (PIPES) and bicarbonate buffer. Once lactate was depleted, however, microbially reduced U served as an electron donor to reduce Fe(III) present in iron(III) (hydr)oxides. With the same initial amount of Fe(III) (10 mmol/L) for each iron(III) (hydr)oxide,reoxidation of U(IV) was greater with hematite than with goethite or ferrihydrite. As the initial mass loading of hematite increased from 0 to 20 mmol of Fe(III)/L, the rate and extent of U(IV) reoxidation increased. Subsequent addition of hematite [15 mmol of Fe(III)/L] to stationary-phase cultures containing microbially reduced U(IV) also resulted in rapid reoxidation to U(VI). Analysis by U L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) of microbially reduced U particles yielded spectra similar to that of natural uraninite. Observations by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis confirmed that precipitated U associated with cells was uraninite with particle diameters of 3-5 nm. By the same techniques, iron sulfide precipitates were found to have a variable Fe and S stoichiometry and were not associated with cells.

  5. Stopping or reducing dietary fiber intake reduces constipation and its associated symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kok-Sun Ho; Charmaine You Mei Tan; Muhd Ashik Mohd Daud; Francis Seow-Choen

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of reducing dietary fiber on patients with idiopathic constipation.METHODS:Sixty-three cases of idiopathic constipation presenting between May 2008 and May 2010 were enrolled into the study after colonoscopy excluded an organic cause of the constipation.Patients with previous colon surgery or a medical cause of their constipation were excluded.All patients were given an explanation on the role of fiber in the gastrointestinal tract.They were then asked to go on a no fiber diet for 2 wk.Thereafter,they were asked to reduce the amount of dietary fiber intake to a level that they found acceptable.Dietary fiber intake,symptoms of constipation,difficulty in evacuation of stools,anal bleeding,abdominal bloating or abdominal pain were recorded at 1 and 6 mo.RESULTS:The median age of the patients (16 male,47 female) was 47 years (range,20-80 years).At 6 mo,41 patients remained on a no fiber diet,16 on a reduced fiber diet,and 6 resumed their high fiber diet for religious or personal reasons.Patients who stopped or reduced dietary fiber had significant improvement in their symptoms while those who continued on a high fiber diet had no change.Of those who stopped fiber completely,the bowel frequency increased from one motion in 3.75 d (± 1.59 d) to one motion in 1.0 d (± 0.0 d) (P < 0.001);those with reduced fiber intake had increased bowel frequency from a mean of one motion per 4.19 d (± 2.09 d)to one motion per 1.9 d (± 1.21 d) on a reduced fiber diet (P < 0.001); those who remained on a high fiber diet continued to have a mean of one motion per 6.83 d (± 1.03 d) before and after consultation.For no fiber,reduced fiber and high fiber groups,respectively,symptoms of bloating were present in 0%,31.3% and 100% (P < 0.001) and straining to pass stools occurred in 0%,43.8% and 100% (P < 0.001).CONCLUSION:Idiopathic constipation and its associated symptoms can be effectively reduced by stopping or even lowering the intake

  6. Reducing the loss of genetic diversity associated with assisted colonization-like introductions of animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaana KEKKONEN; Jon E BROMMER

    2015-01-01

    Translocations, especially assisted colonizations, of animals are increasingly used as a conservation management tool. In many cases, however, limited funding and other logistic challenges limit the number of individuals available for translocation. In conservation genetics, small populations are predicted to rapidly lose genetic diversity which can deteriorate population sur-vival. Thus, how worried should we be about the loss of genetic diversity when introducing small, isolated populations? Histori-cal species introductions provide a means to assess these issues. Here we review 13 studies of “assisted colonization-like” intro-ductions of animals, where only a small known number of founders established an isolated population without secondary contact to the source population. We test which factors could be important in retaining genetic diversity in these cases. In many cases, loss in heterozygosity (-12.1%) was detected, and more seriously the loss in allelic richness (-27.8 %). Number of founders seemed to have an effect but it also indicated that high population growth rate could help to retain genetic diversity, i.e. future management actions could be effective even with a limited number of founders if population growth would be enhanced. On the contrary, translocated organisms with longer generation times did not seem to retain more genetic diversity. We advocate that, where possible, future studies on translocated animals should report the loss of genetic diversity (both heterozygosity and allelic richness), which is essential for meta-analyses like this one for deepening our understanding of the genetic consequences of as-sisted colonization, and justifying management decisions [Current Zoology 61 (5): 827–834, 2015].

  7. Transient reducing greenhouse warming on early Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Wordsworth, Robin; Lokshtanov, Sergei; Vigasin, Andrei; Ehlmann, Bethany; Head, James; Sanders, Cecilia; Wang, Huize

    2016-01-01

    The evidence for abundant liquid water on early Mars despite the faint young Sun is a long-standing problem in planetary research. Here we present new ab initio spectroscopic and line-by-line climate calculations of the warming potential of reduced atmospheres on early Mars. We show that the strength of both CO2-H2 and CO2-CH4 collision-induced absorption (CIA) has previously been significantly underestimated. Contrary to previous expectations, methane could have acted as a powerful greenhouse gas on early Mars due to CO2-CH4 CIA in the critical 250-500 cm^-1 spectral window region. In atmospheres of 0.5 bar CO2 or more, percent levels of H2 or CH4 raise annual mean surface temperatures by tens of degrees, with temperatures reaching 273 K for pressures of 1.25-2 bar and 2-10% of H2 and CH4. Methane and hydrogen produced following aqueous alteration of Mars' crust could have combined with volcanically outgassed CO2 to form transient atmospheres of this composition 4.5-3.5 Ga. This scenario for the late Noachia...

  8. Analyzing and reducing plagiarism at university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge López Puga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism is one of the less desirable practises in the academic context. This paper presents an experience of massive plagiarism detection at university and the steps taken to prevent its subsequent occurrence. Plagiarism was detected in the first assessment phase of a research project practise. As a result, students were required to arrange ethical group discussions with the professor to prevent plagiarism in the future. A substantial reduction in the rate of plagiarism was observed from the first practical assessment to the second one, t(16=2.5, p=.02, d=0.83, 1-?=.63, unilateral contrast. Additionally, a survey was developed to analyse students’ opinions and attitudes about plagiarism. A sample of 64 students (15 boys and 49 girls with an average age of 22.69 (SD=2.8 filled in an electronic questionnaire. More than a half of the sample (56.92% admitted that they had plagiarised before but most of the students (83.08% agreed they would not like someone else plagiarising their reports. A preliminary short scale to measure attitude towards plagiarism in undergraduate students at university is provided. Finally, a set of recommendations are given based on this experience to prevent and to reduce the level of plagiarism in the university contex.

  9. Reducing tube bundle deposition using alternative amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle deposition rates were measured in a high-temperature loop for magnetite and hematite depositing onto Inconel-600 under flow-boiling conditions with pH controlled, using one of the following amines: morpholine, ammonia, ethanolamine, or dimethylamine. Hematite particles deposited at rates 10 times greater than those measured for magnetite although the hematite deposition rate dropped when the loop was operated under reducing conditions. The magnetite deposition rate was influenced by the amine used to control the pH, with the relative rate decreasing in the following series: morpholine (1) : ethanolamine (0.72) : ammonia (0.51) dimethylamine (0.25). These trends in deposition rate are discussed in terms of the surface chemistry of the corrosion products. Deposition rates for both magnetite and hematite increased significantly once the mixture quality exceeded about 0.3, which may be related to a change in the heat-transfer mechanism from nucleate boiling to 2-phase forced-convection through a thin film. (author)

  10. Effect of Jiaosanxian on Reducing Blood Lipid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Ai-wu; TIAN Run; ZHAO Jiao

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of Jiaosanxian (JSX,consisted of stir-baked Hordei Fructus Germinatus-Crataegi Fructus-Massa Fermentata Medicinalis) on reducing blood lipid.Methods The model of hyperlipidemic mice was established by feeding high-fat diet.Kunming mice were randomly divided into six groups:blank,hyperlipidemic,Zhibituo,low-,mid-,and high-dose [100,200,and 400 mg/(kg·d)] JSX groups,and were continuously ig administered for 28 d.The contents of total cholesterol (TC),triglyceride (TG),low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C),and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in serum and liver and liver index were determined.Results The contents of TC,TG,and LDL-C in serum or liver were decreased significantly but the contents of HDL-C were increased more significantly in the mid-and high-dose JSX groups than those in hyperlipemic group.The weight and liver index were decreased significantly with the dose increasing of JSX.The lipid-decreasing effects were improved with the dose increasing.Conclusion These results suggest that JSX has the significant effects on hyperlipidemia.It could provide the experimental basis for the clinical use of JSX for the treatment of hyperlipidemia.

  11. Reducing employee travelling time through smart commuting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A. N. N. A.; Yusoff, Z. M.; Aziz, I. S.; Omar, D.

    2014-02-01

    Extremely congested roads will definitely delay the arrival time of each trip.This certainly impacted the journey of employees. Tardiness at the workplace has become a perturbing issue for companies where traffic jams are the most common worker excuses. A depressing consequence on daily life and productivity of the employee occurs. The issues of commuting distance between workplace and resident area become the core point of this research. This research will emphasize the use of Geographical Information System (GIS) technique to explore the distance parameter to the employment area and will focus on the accessibility pattern of low-cost housing. The research methodology consists of interview sessions and a questionnaire to residents of low-cost housing areas in Melaka Tengah District in Malaysia. The combination of these processes will show the criteria from the selected parameter for each respondent from their resident area to the employment area. This will further help in the recommendation of several options for a better commute or improvement to the existing routes and public transportations system. Thus enhancing quality of life for employees and helping to reduce stress, decrease lateness, absenteeism and improving productivity in workplace.

  12. Reducing costs through electronic data interchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin-Strike, S

    1994-01-01

    The times have never been riper for an investment in EDI to pay off for healthcare providers. As suppliers attain their implementation goals for electronic purchase orders, they are expanding their EDI capabilities. One area which seems to be attracting considerable attention is the entire contracting cycle, where there are numerous opportunities for reducing administrative costs and improving accuracy. A detailed example using a buying group's contract cycle shows how EDI can be used at every step of the way, from request for quotation to funds transfer and monthly purchase summaries. EDI can be implemented at any level, from PC to mainframe. Implementation is not cheap and integration may not be easy, but the benefits can justify the cost. The first step to successful implementation is to identify and quantify, throughout the entire organization, reengineering opportunities in which EDI can be used. Two industry organizations, the Health Industry Distributors Association (HIDA) and the Healthcare EDI Corporation (HEDIC) have taken leadership roles in simplifying the implementation process. PMID:10131505

  13. Cardiac Rehabilitation: Improving Function and Reducing Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servey, Jessica T; Stephens, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation is a comprehensive multidisciplinary program individually tailored to the needs of patients with cardiovascular disease. The overall goals focus on improving daily function and reducing cardiovascular risk factors. Cardiac rehabilitation includes interventions aimed at lowering blood pressure and improving lipid and diabetes mellitus control, with tobacco cessation, behavioral counseling, and graded physical activity. The physical activity component typically involves 36 sessions over 12 weeks, during which patients participate in supervised exercise under cardiac monitoring. There are also intensive programs that include up to 72 sessions lasting up to 18 weeks, although these programs are not widely available. Additional components of cardiac rehabilitation include counseling on nutrition, screening for and managing depression, and assuring up-to-date immunizations. Cardiac rehabilitation is covered by Medicare and recommended for patients following myocardial infarction, bypass surgery, and stent placement, and for patients with heart failure, stable angina, and several other conditions. Despite proven benefits in mortality rates, depression, functional capacity, and medication adherence, rates of referral for cardiac rehabilitation are suboptimal. Groups less likely to be referred are older adults, women, patients who do not speak English, and persons living in areas where cardiac rehabilitation is not locally available. Additionally, primary care physicians refer patients less often than cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons. PMID:27386722

  14. Reduced distractibility in a remote culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan W de Fockert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In visual processing, there are marked cultural differences in the tendency to adopt either a global or local processing style. A remote culture (the Himba has recently been reported to have a greater local bias in visual processing than Westerners. Here we give the first evidence that a greater, and remarkable, attentional selectivity provides the basis for this local bias. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Experiment 1, Eriksen-type flanker interference was measured in the Himba and in Western controls. In both groups, responses to the direction of a task-relevant target arrow were affected by the compatibility of task-irrelevant distractor arrows. However, the Himba showed a marked reduction in overall flanker interference compared to Westerners. The smaller interference effect in the Himba occurred despite their overall slower performance than Westerners, and was evident even at a low level of perceptual load of the displays. In Experiment 2, the attentional selectivity of the Himba was further demonstrated by showing that their attention was not even captured by a moving singleton distractor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We argue that the reduced distractibility in the Himba is clearly consistent with their tendency to prioritize the analysis of local details in visual processing.

  15. Operating Costs Reducing in MDF Manufacturing Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto Coeve Florino

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The sustained efforts by electric motors when subjected to cutting, trimming or finishing are directly related to the material being machined and the angle of attack of the tool. Choosing the right tool for this operation depends on an expected result. So the engines behave differently to each operation. The optimization between strength, speed, power, material and type of operation, can be found to reduce operational costs of production, besides determining the exact time to make the set-up of worn tool. The reduction in operating costs is an item of sustainability that outlines the strategic positioning on companies to become competitive in the global marketplace. With the great technological development present today, this issue goes away with the very latest products on the market for professionals who productivity will be dealt with in these modern maintenance equipment such as power quality analyzer, Imager, profile projector and microscope for research. The result of this work is the optimization of the cutting operation and energy consumption thereby demonstrating an optimum point of operation in a case study presented in this work.

  16. Decisions reduce sensitivity to subsequent information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfman, Zohar Z; Brezis, Noam; Moran, Rani; Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Donner, Tobias; Usher, Marius

    2015-07-01

    Behavioural studies over half a century indicate that making categorical choices alters beliefs about the state of the world. People seem biased to confirm previous choices, and to suppress contradicting information. These choice-dependent biases imply a fundamental bound of human rationality. However, it remains unclear whether these effects extend to lower level decisions, and only little is known about the computational mechanisms underlying them. Building on the framework of sequential-sampling models of decision-making, we developed novel psychophysical protocols that enable us to dissect quantitatively how choices affect the way decision-makers accumulate additional noisy evidence. We find robust choice-induced biases in the accumulation of abstract numerical (experiment 1) and low-level perceptual (experiment 2) evidence. These biases deteriorate estimations of the mean value of the numerical sequence (experiment 1) and reduce the likelihood to revise decisions (experiment 2). Computational modelling reveals that choices trigger a reduction of sensitivity to subsequent evidence via multiplicative gain modulation, rather than shifting the decision variable towards the chosen alternative in an additive fashion. Our results thus show that categorical choices alter the evidence accumulation mechanism itself, rather than just its outcome, rendering the decision-maker less sensitive to new information. PMID:26108628

  17. Increasing Immunization Compliance by Reducing Provisional Admittance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Wendy S; Varni, Susan E; Barry, Sara E; Frankowski, Barbara L; Harder, Valerie S

    2016-08-01

    Students in Vermont with incomplete or undocumented immunization status are provisionally admitted to schools and historically had a calendar year to resolve their immunization status. The process of resolving these students' immunization status was challenging for school nurses. We conducted a school-based quality improvement effort to increase student compliance with Vermont immunization regulations using a collaborative learning approach with public health school liaisons and school nurses from public schools to reduce provisional admittance in 2011-2012. Strategies included using a tracking system, accessing the immunization registry, promoting immunization importance, tracking immunization plans, and working with medical homes to update records. Participating school nurses observed decreases in the number of provisionally admitted students, although this reduction was not significantly different than matched comparison schools. We also found the number of provisionally admitted students fluctuated throughout the year and resolving the immunization status of New Americans and exchange students required special attention. Our approach supports the coordinated school health model and demonstrates the critical role school nurses play in improving population health outcomes. PMID:26699951

  18. Acupuncture to Reduce HIV-Associated Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Swanson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. HIV infection is associated with systemic inflammation that can increase risk for cardiovascular events. Acupuncture has been shown to have immunomodulatory effects and to improve symptoms in persons with inflammatory conditions. Objective. To test the anti-inflammatory effects of an acupuncture protocol that targets the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAIP, a neural mechanism whose activation has been shown to reduce the release of proinflammatory cytokines, in persons with HIV-associated inflammation. Design, Setting, Participants, and Interventions. Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted in an outpatient clinic located in a medically underserved urban neighborhood. Twenty-five clinically-stable HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy were randomized to receive once weekly CAIP-based acupuncture or sham acupuncture. Main Outcome Measures. Outcomes included plasma concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and D-dimer and fasting lipids. Results. Twenty-five participants completed the protocol (treatment group n=12, control group n=13. No adverse events related to the acupuncture protocol were observed. Compared to baseline values, the two groups did not significantly differ in any outcome measures at the end of the acupuncture protocol. Conclusions. CAIP-based acupuncture did not favorably modulate inflammatory or lipid parameters. Additional studies are warranted of CAIP-based protocols of different frequencies/durations.

  19. Reducing greenhouse gases: Promoting an international accord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports on a Cornell Center for the Environmental sponsored workshop to explore the prospects for reducing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide as well as others through voluntary, market-based international accords. Cornell specialists in a range of fields were joined by participants from other universities and policy groups. The topics discussed covered the threat to the biosphere, why international measures are essential, and how they might be implemented. Tradeoffs in terms of emission sources and sinks were explored, along with issues of technology transfer. A panel of experts considered the potential interactions between increases in atmospheric greenhouse gases and agriculture, transportation systems, and national politics. Several participants presented the perspectives of developing nations. Other speakers discussed strategies for effluent monitoring to insure compliance with international accords, including the development and use of remote-sensing technology. The prospects for market-based mechanisms to alleviate other environmental problems, including the threat to biodiversity, were discussed by Cornell biology professor Thomas Eisner

  20. Reducing food losses by intelligent food logistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedermann, Reiner; Nicometo, Mike; Uysal, Ismail; Lang, Walter

    2014-06-13

    The need to feed an ever-increasing world population makes it obligatory to reduce the millions of tons of avoidable perishable waste along the food supply chain. A considerable share of these losses is caused by non-optimal cold chain processes and management. This Theme Issue focuses on technologies, models and applications to monitor changes in the product shelf life, defined as the time remaining until the quality of a food product drops below an acceptance limit, and to plan successive chain processes and logistics accordingly to uncover and prevent invisible or latent losses in product quality, especially following the first-expired-first-out strategy for optimized matching between the remaining shelf life and the expected transport duration. This introductory article summarizes the key findings of this Theme Issue, which brings together research study results from around the world to promote intelligent food logistics. The articles include three case studies on the cold chain for berries, bananas and meat and an overview of different post-harvest treatments. Further contributions focus on the required technical solutions, such as the wireless sensor and communication system for remote quality supervision, gas sensors to detect ethylene as an indicator of unwanted ripening and volatile components to indicate mould infections. The final section of this introduction discusses how improvements in food quality can be targeted by strategic changes in the food chain.