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Sample records for 120-220 nm spectral

  1. Quantum efficiency of cesium iodide photocathodes in the 120-220 nm spectral range traceable to a primary detector standard

    CERN Document Server

    Rabus, H; Richter, M; Ulm, G; Friese, J; Gernhäuser, R; Kastenmüller, A; Maier-Komor, P; Zeitelhack, K

    1999-01-01

    Differently prepared CsI samples have been investigated in the 120-220 nm spectral range for their quantum efficiency, spatial uniformity and the effect of radiation aging. The experiments were performed at the PTB radiometry laboratory at the Berlin synchrotron radiation facility BESSY. A calibrated GaAsP Schottky photodiode was used as transfer detector standard to establish traceability to the primary detector standard, because this type of photodiode - unlike silicon p-on-n photodiodes - proved to be of sufficiently stable response when exposed to vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The paper reviews the experimental procedures that were employed to characterize and calibrate the GaAsP photodiode and reports the results that were obtained on the investigated CsI photocathodes.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Spectral Response for 650 nm Silicon Photodetector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The theoretical spectral response formula of the N+-N-I-P+ silicon photodetector with high/low emission junction is given. At the same time, considering the process requirements, the optimum structure parameters of silicon photodetector are obtained by numerical calculation and simulation. Under the condition of these optimum structure parameters, the responsivity of the silicon photodetector will be 0.48A/W at 650nm.

  3. Thin film and multilayer optics for XUV spectral domain (1 nm to 60 nm)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The XUV spectral domain (1-60 nm wavelength range) has experienced rapid growth in recent years. On one side, the sources (synchrotron radiation, harmonic generation, x-ray laser, free-electron laser...) require ever more efficient optics, on the other hand, applications (diagnostics of hot plasma, solar physics, x-ray microscopy, EUV lithography, x-ray analysis...) provide new constraints on the design of multilayer stacks. The multilayer mirrors are the only way to achieve efficient optics operating at non-grazing incidence angles in this spectral range. Our work within the team XUV Optics at Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique focuses on the study of materials in thin layers correlated to the study of optical properties of multilayers. The objective is to achieve new multilayer components previously unavailable in the XUV domain, through a better understanding of physical phenomena in these nano-layer stacks. We show through several examples of how we have managed both to improve the performance of multilayer mirrors in a broad spectral range, and secondly, to develop new optical functions: beam splitters, broadband mirrors, dual-band mirrors or phase compensation mirrors. (author)

  4. Spectral narrowing of a 980 nm tapered diode laser bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Lucas Leclin, Gaëlle;

    2011-01-01

    in wavelength specific applications and hence, it is vital to stabilize the emission spectrum of these devices. In our experiment, we describe the wavelength narrowing of a 12 element 980 nm tapered diode laser bar using a simple Littman configuration. The tapered laser bar which suffered from a big smile has......, a slow axis focusing cylindrical lens of 40 mm focal length and an output coupler which is 10% reflective. In the free running mode, the laser emission spectrum was 5.5 nm wide at an operating current of 30A. The output power was measured to be in excess of 12W. Under the external cavity operation......, the wavelength spread of the laser could be limited to 0.04 nm with an output power in excess of 8 W at an operating current of 30A. The spectrum was found to be tunable in a range of 16 nm....

  5. Broadband light generation at ~1300 nm through spectrally recoiled solitons and dispersive waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Peter Andreas; Frosz, Michael Henoch; Bang, Ole;

    2008-01-01

    We experimentally study the generation of broadband light at ~1300 nm from an 810 nm Ti:sapphire femtosecond pump laser. We use two photonic crystal fibers with a second infrared zero-dispersion wavelength (λZ2) and compare the efficiency of two schemes: in one fiber λZ2=1400 nm and the light...... at 1300 nm is composed of spectrally recoiled solitons; in the other fiber λZ2=1200 nm and the light at 1300 nm is composed of dispersive waves....

  6. A reflectivity profilometer for the optical characterisation of grade reflectivity mirrors in the 250 nm - 1100 nm spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colucci, Alessandro; Nichelatti, Enrico [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1998-04-01

    It`s developed the prototype of an instrument that can be used for the optical characterisation of graded reflectivity mirrors at any wavelength in the spectral region from 250 nm to 1100 nm. The instrument utilises a high-pressure Xe arc lamp as light source. Light is spectrally filtered by means of a grating monochromator. The sample is illuminated with an image of the monochromator exit slit. After reflection from the sample, this image is projected onto a 1024-elements charge-coupled device linear array driven by a digital frame board and interfaced with a personal computer. It`s tested the instrument accuracy by comparing measurement results with the corresponding ones obtained by means of a laser scanning technique. Measurement Rms repeatability has been estimated to be approximately of 0.8%. [Italiano] E` stato sviluppato il prototipo di uno strumento per la catatterizzazione ottica di specchi a riflettivita` variabile, operante a qualsiasi lunghezza d`onda nell`intervallo spettrale da 250 nm a 1100 nm. La sorgente dello strumento e` una lampada ad arco allo Xenon ad alta pressione. La luce e` filtrata spettralmente per mezzo di un monocromatore a reticolo. Il campione viene illuminato da un`immagine della fenditura d`uscita del monocromatore. Dopo essere stata riflessa dal campione, questa immagine viene proiettata su un array CCD lineare a 1024 elementi, connesso elettronicamente a una scheda digitale e interfacciato a un personal computer. L`accuratezza dello strumento e` stata verificata confrontando alcune misure con le corrispondenti misure ottenute mediante una tecnica a scansione laser. La ripetibilita` RMS delle misure e` stata stimata essere circa dello 0.8%.

  7. Improved spectral characteristics of 980 nm broad area slotted Fabry-Perot diode lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Zhuo; Wang Jun; Xiong Cong; Liu Yuanyuan; Liu Suping; Ma Xiaoyu

    2012-01-01

    A novel broad area slotted Fabry-Perot diode laser is designed and fabricated.Using a new semianalytical method,we introduce effective refractive index perturbations in the form of etched slot features into a conventional 980 nm broad area Fabry-Perot cavity,and the spectral characteristics of the device are expected to be noticeably improved.A low density of slot features is formed by using standard optical lithography and inductively coupled plasma dry etching.The experimental results show that the full spectral width at half-maximum is less than 0.4 nm,meanwhile,the thermal shift of the emission spectrum is decreased from 0.26 to 0.07 nm/℃ over a temperature range of 10 to 60 ℃.The improved spectral characteristics of the device are proved to be attributed to such slotted Fabry-Perot laser structures.

  8. Solar Spectral Irradiance at 782 nm as Measured by the SES Sensor Onboard Picard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Irbah, A.; Cessateur, G.; Bekki, S.; Damé, L.; Bolsée, D.; Pereira, N.

    2016-04-01

    Picard is a satellite dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of the total and solar spectral irradiance, the solar diameter, the solar shape, and to the Sun's interior through the methods of helioseismology. The satellite was launched on June 15, 2010, and pursued its data acquisitions until March 2014. A Sun Ecartometry Sensor (SES) was developed to provide the stringent pointing requirements of the satellite. The SES sensor produced an image of the Sun at 782 ± 2.5 nm. From the SES data, we obtained a new time series of the solar spectral irradiance at 782 nm from 2010 to 2014. During this period of Solar Cycle 24, the amplitude of the changes has been of the order of ± 0.08 %, corresponding to a range of about 2× 10^{-3} W m^{-2} nm^{-1}. SES observations provided a qualitatively consistent evolution of the solar spectral irradiance variability at 782 nm. SES data show similar amplitude variations with the semi-empirical model Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S), whereas the Spectral Irradiance Monitor instrument (SIM) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment satellite (SORCE) highlights higher amplitudes.

  9. Spectral beam combining of a 980 nm tapered diode laser bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Ostendorf, Ralf;

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate spectral beam combining of a 980 nm tapered diode laser bar. The combined beam from 12 tapered emitters on the bar yielded an output power of 9.3 W at 30 A of operating current. An M2 value of 5.3 has been achieved along the slow axis. This value is close to that of a free running...

  10. Improved spectral fitting of nitrogen dioxide from OMI in the 405–465 nm window

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geffen, van J.H.G.M.; Boersma, K.F.; Roozendael, van M.; Hendrick, F.; Mahieu, E.; Smedt, de I.; Sneep, M.; Veefkind, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    An improved nitrogen dioxide (NO2) slant column density retrieval for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) in the 405–465 nm spectral region is presented. Since the launch of OMI on board NASA's EOS-Aura satellite in 2004, differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) retrievals of NO2 slant

  11. Using the electron synchrotron radiation for the calibration of the spectral density in UV and long-wave vacuum UV range (160 nm to 340 nm)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron synchrotron radiation was investigated with a view to the development of methods for the calibration of the spectral density in the UV and long-wave vacuum UV spectral regions. The relative spectral radiation flow of a synchrotron can be calculated over a wide spectral region. In order to determine the absolute radiation flow in the vaccum UV, the synchrotron radiation in the visible region is compared with a reference source (calibrated tungsten filament lamp). Between 160 nm and 340 nm, the spectral beam density calibration with the synchrotron radiation is uncertain by about +- 5%. Between 280 nm and 340 nm, calibrations of deuterium lamps at the synchrotron and at a cavity radiator vary by less than 10%. (orig./WL)

  12. Comparison of Molecular Iodine Spectral Properties at 514.7 and 532 nm Wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrabina J.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present results of investigation and comparison of spectral properties of molecular iodine transitions in the spectral region of 514.7 nm that are suitable for laser frequency stabilization and metrology of length. Eight Doppler-broadened transitions that were not studied in detail before were investigated with the help of frequency doubled Yb-doped fiber laser, and three of the most promising lines were studied in detail with prospect of using them in frequency stabilization of new laser standards. The spectral properties of hyperfine components (linewidths, signal-to-noise ratio were compared with transitions that are well known and traditionally used for stabilization of frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser at the 532 nm region with the same molecular iodine absorption. The external frequency doubling arrangement with waveguide crystal and the Yb-doped fiber laser is also briefly described together with the observed effect of laser aging.

  13. CCPR-S1 Supplementary comparison for spectral radiance in the range of 220 nm to 2500 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlevnoy, Boris; Sapritsky, Victor; Rougie, Bernard; Gibson, Charles; Yoon, Howard; Gaertner, Arnold; Taubert, Dieter; Hartmann, Juergen

    2009-08-01

    In 1997, the Consultative Committee for Photometry and Radiometry (CCPR) initiated a supplementary comparison of spectral radiance in the wavelength range from 220 nm to 2500 nm (CCPR-S1) using tungsten strip-filament lamps as transfer standards. Five national metrology institutes (NMIs) took part in the comparison: BNM/INM (France), NIST (USA), NRC (Canada), PTB (Germany) and VNIIOFI (Russia), with VNIIOFI as the pilot laboratory. Each NMI provided the transfer lamps that were used to transfer their measurements to the pilot laboratory. The intercomparison sequence began with the participant measurements, then the pilot measurements, followed by a second set of measurements by the participant laboratory. The measurements were carried out from 1998 to 2002, with the final report completed in 2008. This paper presents the descriptions of measurement facilities and uncertainties of the participants, as well as the comparison results that were analysed in accordance with the Guidelines for CCPR Comparisons Report Preparation, and a re-evaluation of the results taking into account the instability of some of the transfer lamps. Excluding a few wavelengths, all participants agree with each other within ±1.5%. The disagreement decreases to approximately ±1.0% when the anomalous data are excluded from the analysis.

  14. Wideband multilayer gratings for the 17-25 nm spectral region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaowei; Kozhevnikov, Igor V; Huang, Qiushi; Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal; Wang, Zhanshan

    2016-06-27

    An approach to designing wideband blazed multilayer gratings is introduced and applied to gratings operating at 17-25 nm. We demonstrate single-order operation of broadband multilayer gratings, despite their very wide spectral and angular bandpass, when only one diffraction wave is excited and the diffraction efficiency reaches the reflectivity of a conventional depth-graded multilayer mirror, eliminating overlapping of different-order diffraction waves. The selection principles for the geometrical parameters of gratings are discussed. We formulate a "law of similarity" for wideband gratings that allows us to design gratings with different geometrical parameters but practically the same spectral dependence of the diffraction efficiency. PMID:27410659

  15. Detection of Solar Rotational Variability in the LYRA 190 - 222 nm Spectral Band

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, A. V.; Shapiro, A. I.; Dominique, M.; Dammasch, I. E.; Wehrli, C.; Rozanov, E.; Schmutz, W.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the variability of the spectral solar irradiance during the period from 7 January, 2010 until 20 January, 2010 as measured by the Herzberg channel (190-222 nm) of the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) onboard PROBA2. In this period of time observations by the LYRA nominal unit experienced degradation and the signal produced by the Herzberg channel frequently jumped from one level to another. Both these factors significantly complicates the analysis. We present the algorithm which allow...

  16. Normal spectral emissivity of niobium (at 900 nm) by a pulse-heating reflectometric technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The normal spectral emissivity of niobium strip specimens was measured using a new pulse-heating reflectometric technique. The hemispherical spectral reflectivity of the surface of a strip tangent to an integrating sphere is determined by a high-speed lock-in technique. At the same time, the radiance temperature of the strip is measured by high-speed pyrometry from approximately 1,000 K to the melting point. Details of the measurement method and of the related calibration techniques are reported. Results of the normal spectral emissivity of niobium at 900 nm from room temperature to its melting point are presented, discussing differences related to the heating rate and to surface conditions

  17. Detection of Solar Rotational Variability in the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) 190 - 222 nm Spectral Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A. V.; Shapiro, A. I.; Dominique, M.; Dammasch, I. E.; Wehrli, C.; Rozanov, E.; Schmutz, W.

    2013-08-01

    We analyze the variability of the spectral solar irradiance during the period from 7 January 2010 until 20 January 2010 as measured by the Herzberg channel (190 - 222 nm) of the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) onboard PROBA2. In this period of time, observations by the LYRA nominal unit experienced degradation and the signal produced by the Herzberg channel frequently jumped from one level to another. Both factors significantly complicate the analysis. We present the algorithm that allowed us to extract the solar variability from the LYRA data and compare the results with SORCE/SOLSTICE measurements and with modeling based on the Code for the Solar Irradiance (COSI).

  18. Detection of Solar Rotational Variability in the LYRA 190 - 222 nm Spectral Band

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, A V; Dominique, M; Dammasch, I E; Wehrli, C; Rozanov, E; Schmutz, W

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the variability of the spectral solar irradiance during the period from 7 January, 2010 until 20 January, 2010 as measured by the Herzberg channel (190-222 nm) of the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) onboard PROBA2. In this period of time observations by the LYRA nominal unit experienced degradation and the signal produced by the Herzberg channel frequently jumped from one level to another. Both these factors significantly complicates the analysis. We present the algorithm which allowed us to extract the solar variability from the LYRA data and compare the results with SORCE/SOLSTICE measurements and with modeling based on the Code for the Solar Irradiance (COSI).

  19. Broadband semiconductor optical amplifiers of the spectral range 750 – 1100 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A line of travelling-wave semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) based on heterostructures used for production of broadband superluminescent diodes is developed. The pure small-signal gains of the developed SOA modules are about 25 dB, while the gain bandwidths at a level of –10 dB reach 50 – 100 nm. As a whole, the SOA modules cover the IR spectral range from 750 to 1100 nm. The SOAs demonstrate a high reliability at a single-mode fibre-coupled cw output power up to 50 mW. Examples of application of two of the developed SOA modules as active elements of broadband fast-tunable lasers are presented. (lasers)

  20. 355-nm high spectral resolution airborne lidar LNG: system description and first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, D; Pelon, J; Blouzon, F; Spatazza, J; Genau, P; Buchholtz, G; Amarouche, N; Abchiche, A; Aouji, O

    2015-10-10

    A high spectral resolution (HSR) measurement capability in the ultraviolet has been added to the 3-wavelength-2-polarization-backscatter lidar LNG (lidar aerosols nouvelle génération) and tested during several flights. The system includes a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) as a spectral discriminator and does not require any frequency locking between the emitter and the interferometer. Results obtained during test flights show that the backscatter and extinction coefficients at 355 nm can be measured with a relative precision of 10% for 60 m and 240 m vertical resolution, respectively, in aerosol layers of 10-6  m-1 sr-1 backscatter coefficient with a 30-km horizontal resolution. The same relative precision is obtained in cirrus clouds of a 2×10-5  m-1 sr-1 backscatter coefficient for the same vertical resolution and a horizontal resolution reduced to 5 km. The capacity of the system to perform wind velocity measurements is also demonstrated with precisions in the range of 1 to 2  ms-1. Particle-to-total backscatter ratio and line-of-sight speed measurements have been performed on ground echoes; averaged data show biases less than 1% and 0.15  ms-1, respectively. PMID:26479818

  1. Improved spectral fitting of nitrogen dioxide from OMI in the 405-465 nm window

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, J. H. G. M.; Boersma, K. F.; Van Roozendael, M.; Hendrick, F.; Mahieu, E.; De Smedt, I.; Sneep, M.; Veefkind, J. P.

    2015-04-01

    An improved nitrogen dioxide (NO2) slant column density retrieval for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) in the 405-465 nm spectral region is presented. Since the launch of OMI on board NASA's EOS-Aura satellite in 2004, differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) retrievals of NO2 slant column densities have been the starting point for the KNMI DOMINO and NASA SP NO2 vertical column data as well as the OMI NO2 data of some other institutes. However, recent intercomparisons between NO2 retrievals from OMI and other UV/Vis and limb spectrometers, as well as ground-based measurements, suggest that OMI stratospheric NO2 is biased high. This study revises and, for the first time, fully documents the OMI NO2 retrieval in detail. The representation of the OMI slit function to convolve high-resolution reference spectra onto the relevant spectral grid is improved. The window used for the wavelength calibration is optimised, leading to much-reduced fitting errors. Ozone and water vapour spectra used in the fit are updated, reflecting the recently improved knowledge of their absorption cross section in the literature. The improved spectral fit also accounts for absorption by the O2-O2 collision complex and by liquid water over clear-water areas. The main changes in the improved spectral fitting result from the updates related to the wavelength calibration: the RMS error of the fit is reduced by 23% and the NO2 slant column by 0.85 × 1015 molec cm-2, independent of latitude, solar zenith angle and NO2 value. Including O2-O2 and liquid water absorption and updating the O3 and water vapour cross-section spectra further reduces NO2 slant columns on average by 0.35 × 1015 molec cm-2, accompanied by a further 9% reduction in the RMS error of the fit. The improved OMI NO2 slant columns are consistent with independent NO2 retrievals from other instruments to within a range that can be explained by photochemically driven diurnal increases in stratospheric NO2 and by

  2. Multifunctional 1050 nm Spectral Domain OCT System at 147 kHz for Posterior Eye Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anqi Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of optical coherence tomography in ophthalmology has shown great interests in using the system in 1 µm in contrast to 800 nm wavelength range due to the less reflection and absorption of retinal pigment epithelium and pigmented choroidal melanocytes in 1 µm wavelength. The clinical value of using 1 µm system has been demonstrated in choroid imaging, retinal and choroidal microcirculation, etc. By examining different aspects of the posterior eye, the specificity and sensitivity of diagnosis can be increased. On the other hand, higher speed can greatly reduce the measuring time and motion artifacts, which brings comfort to the patients and improves the image quality. In this work, we report a newly developed multifunctional 1050 nm spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT system working at 147 kHz A-scan rate for posterior eye imaging. The uniqueness of this system is: 1 its capability of providing not only simultaneous structural imaging of the complete posterior eye, but also the visualization of the retinal blood vessel network with larger field of view and good image quality compared with former SD-OCT systems; 2 it’s fast 147 kHz A-scan rate which has not been reported before. It is demonstrated through in vivo experiments that this system delivers not only superior performance of posterior eye structural imaging but also detailed visualization of microcirculation network in retina. The choroid of the eye with either myopic or normal conditions can clearly be visualized through the entire scanning volume. These results indicate great potential in applying this new system for clinical studies.

  3. Full Stokes observations in the He I 1083 nm spectral region covering an M3.2 flare

    OpenAIRE

    Kuckein, C.; Collados, M.; Sainz, R. Manso; Ramos, A. Asensio

    2015-01-01

    We present an exceptional data set acquired with the Vacuum Tower Telescope (Tenerife, Spain) covering the pre-flare, flare, and post-flare stages of an M3.2 flare. The full Stokes spectropolarimetric observations were recorded with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter in the He I 1083.0 nm spectral region. The object under study was active region NOAA 11748 on 2013 May 17. During the flare the chomospheric He I 1083.0 nm intensity goes strongly into emission. However, the nearby photospheric Si...

  4. Methane Absorption Coefficients in the 750-940 nm region derived from Intracavity Laser Absorption Spectral Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, J. J.

    2002-09-01

    The absorption spectrum of methane has been recorded in the visible to near-IR region using the intracavity laser spectroscopy technique. Spectra are recorded at high spectral resolution for narrow overlapping intervals in the region for room and 77 K temperature methane samples. After spectra are deconvolved for the instrument function, absorption coefficients are derived. These will be presented (750-940 nm for room temperature methane; 850-920 nm for 77 K methane) and compared with results reported by other workers. Future work in this area also will be indicated. Support from NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program (NAG5-6091 and a Major Equipment Grant) is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. NUV/Blue spectral observations of sprites in the 320-460 nm region: ${\\mathrm N_2}$ (2PG) Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Heavner, M J; Siefring, C; Sentman, D D; Moudry, D R; Wescott, E M; Bucsela, E J

    2010-01-01

    A near-ultraviolet (NUV) spectrograph (320-460 nm) was flown on the EXL98 aircraft sprite observation campaign during July 1998. In this wavelength range video rate (60 fields/sec) spectrographic observations found the NUV/blue emissions to be predominantly N2 (2PG). The negligible level of N2+ (1NG) present in the spectrum is confirmed by observations of a co-aligned, narrowly filtered 427.8 nm imager and is in agreement with previous ground-based filtered photometer observations. The synthetic spectral fit to the observations indicates a characteristic energy of ~1.8 eV, in agreement with our other NUV observations.

  6. A upper limit for water dimer absorption in the 750 nm spectral region and a revised water line list

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. L. Shillings

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The absorption of solar radiation by water dimer molecules in the Earth's atmosphere can potentially act as a positive feedback effect for climate change. There seems little doubt from the results of previous laboratory and theoretical studies that significant concentrations of the water dimer should be present in the atmosphere, yet attempts to detect water dimer absorption signatures in atmospheric field studies have so far yielded inconclusive results. Here we report spectral measurements in the near-infrared in the expected region of the third overtone of the water dimer hydrogen-bonded OHb stretching vibration around 750 nm. The results were obtained using broadband cavity ringdown spectroscopy (BBCRDS, a methodology that allows absorption measurements to be made under controlled laboratory conditions but over absorption path lengths representative of atmospheric conditions. In order to account correctly and completely for overlapping absorption of monomer molecules in the same spectral region, we have also constructed a new list of spectral data (UCL08 for the water monomer in the 750–20 000 cm−1 (13 μm–500 nm range.

    Our results show that the additional lines included in the UCL08 spectral database provide a substantially improved representation of the measured water monomer absorption in the 750 nm region, particularly at wavelengths dominated by weak monomer absorption features. No absorption features which could not be attributed to the water monomer were detected in the BBCRDS experiments up to water mixing ratios more than an order of magnitude greater than those in the ambient atmosphere. The absence of detectable water dimer features leads us to conclude that, in the absence of significant errors in calculated dimer oscillator strengths or monomer/dimer equilibrium constants, the widths of water dimer features present around 750 nm must be substantially greater (~100 cm−1 HWHM than

  7. Simulation of broad spectral bandwidth emitters at 1060 nm for optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, I. G.; Childs, D. T. D.; Stevens, B. J.; Groom, K. M.; Hogg, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    The simulation of broad spectral bandwidth light sources (semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) and superluminescent diodes (SLD)) for application in ophthalmic optical coherence tomography is reported. The device requirements and origin of key device parameters are outlined, and a range of single and double InGaAs/GaAs quantum well (QW) active elements are simulated with a view to application in different OCT embodiments. We confirm that utilising higher order optical transitions is beneficial for single QW SOAs, but may introduce deleterious spectral modulation in SLDs. We show how an addition QW may be introduced to eliminate this spectral modulation, but that this results in a reduction of the gain spectrum width. We go on to explore double QW structures where the roles of the two QWs are reversed, with the narrow QW providing long wavelength emission and gain. We show how this modification in the density of states results in a significant increase in gain-spectrum width for a given current.

  8. Full Stokes observations in the He I 1083 nm spectral region covering an M3.2 flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kuckein, C; Sainz, R Manso; Ramos, A Asensio

    2015-01-01

    We present an exceptional data set acquired with the Vacuum Tower Telescope (Tenerife, Spain) covering the pre-flare, flare, and post-flare stages of an M3.2 flare. The full Stokes spectropolarimetric observations were recorded with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter in the He I 1083.0 nm spectral region. The object under study was active region NOAA 11748 on 2013 May 17. During the flare the chomospheric He I 1083.0 nm intensity goes strongly into emission. However, the nearby photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm spectral line profile only gets shallower and stays in absorption. Linear polarization (Stokes Q and U) is detected in all lines of the He I triplet during the flare. Moreover, the circular polarization (Stokes V) is dominant during the flare, being the blue component of the He I triplet much stronger than the red component, and both are stronger than the Si I Stokes V profile. The Si I inversions reveal enormous changes of the photospheric magnetic field during the flare. Before the flare magnetic field conc...

  9. Chromospheric polarimetry through multi-line observations of the 850 nm spectral region

    CERN Document Server

    Noda, C Quintero; Katsukawa, Y; Rodriguez, J de la Cruz; Carlsson, M; Anan, T; Oba, T; Ichimoto, K; Suematsu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Future solar missions and ground-based telescopes aim to understand the magnetism of the solar chromosphere. We performed a supporting study in Quintero Noda et al. (2016) focused on the infrared Ca II 8542 A line and we concluded that is one of the best candidates because it is sensitive to a large range of atmospheric heights, from the photosphere to the middle chromosphere. However, we believe that it is worth to try improving the results produced by this line observing additional spectral lines. In that regard, we examined the neighbour solar spectrum looking for spectral lines that could increase the sensitivity to the atmospheric parameters. Interestingly, we discovered several photospheric lines that greatly improve the photospheric sensitivity to the magnetic field vector. Moreover, they are located close to a second chromospheric line that also belongs to the Ca II infrared triplet, i.e. the Ca II 8498 A line, and enhances the sensitivity to the atmospheric parameters at chromospheric layers. We conc...

  10. In vivo functional imaging of embryonic chick heart using ultrafast 1310nm-band spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Yin, Xin; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2013-02-01

    During the cardiac development, the cardiac wall and the blood flow actively interact with each other, and determine the biomechanical environment to which the embryonic heart exposes. Employing an ultrafast 1310nm-band dual-camera spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT), the radial strain rate of the myocardial wall can be extracted with high signal-to-noise ratio, at the same time the Doppler velocity of the blood flow can also be displayed. The ability to simultaneously characterize these two cardiac tissues provides a powerful approach to better understand the interaction between the cardiac wall and the blood flow, which is important to the investigation of cardiac development.

  11. Dual-Frequency 780-nm Ti:Sa Laser for High Spectral Purity Tunable CW THz Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Loas, Goulc'Hen; Romanelli, Marco; Alouini, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    International audience — A two-axis, two-polarization, dual-frequency Ti:Sa laser optimized for high spectral purity CW-THz generation is demonstrated. The laser output power is 50mW. Its mean emission wavelength is optimized around 780nm in order to suit the maximum efficiency of low temperature grown GaAs photomixers. Despite the extremely wide gain bandwidth of Ti:Sa, a proper intracavity filtering design, adapted to this particular laser architecture, enables tunable and single-frequen...

  12. An upper limit for water dimer absorption in the 750 nm spectral region and a revised water line list

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. L. Shillings

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Absorption of solar radiation by water dimer molecules in the Earth's atmosphere has the potential to act as a positive feedback effect for climate change. There seems little doubt from the results of previous laboratory and theoretical studies that significant concentrations of the water dimer should be present in the atmosphere, yet attempts to detect water dimer absorption signatures in atmospheric field studies have so far yielded inconclusive results. Here we report spectral measurements in the near-infrared around 750 nm in the expected region of the | 0〈f | 4〉b|0 〉 overtone of the water dimer's hydrogen-bonded OH stretching vibration. The results were obtained using broadband cavity ringdown spectroscopy (BBCRDS, a methodology that allows absorption measurements to be made under controlled laboratory conditions but over absorption path lengths representative of atmospheric conditions. In order to account correctly and completely for the overlapping absorption of monomer molecules in the same spectral region, we have also constructed a new list of spectral data (UCL08 for the water monomer in the 750–20 000 cm−1 (13 μm–500 nm range.

    Our results show that the additional lines included in the UCL08 spectral database provide an improved representation of the measured water monomer absorption in the 750 nm region. No absorption features other than those attributable to the water monomer were detected in BBCRDS experiments performed on water vapour samples containing dimer concentrations up to an order of magnitude greater than expected in the ambient atmosphere. The absence of detectable water dimer features leads us to conclude that, in the absence of significant errors in calculated dimer oscillator strengths or monomer/dimer equilibrium constants, the widths of any water dimer absorption features present around 750 nm are of the order of 100 cm−1 HWHM, and certainly greater

  13. Novel SO2 spectral evaluation scheme using the 360–390 nm wavelength range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS is a well established spectroscopic method to determine trace gases in the atmosphere. During the last decade, passive DOAS, which uses solar radiation scattered in the atmosphere as a light source, has become a standard tool to determine SO2 column densities and emission fluxes from volcanoes and other large sources by ground based as well as satellite measurements. For the determination of SO2 column densities, the structured absorption of the molecule in the 300–330 nm region (due to the A1B1←X1A1 transition is used. However, there are several problems limiting the accuracy of the technique in this particular application. Here we propose to use an alternative wavelength region (360–390 nm due to the spin-forbidden a3B2←X1A1 transition for the DOAS evaluation of SO2 in conditions where high SO2 column densities prevail. We show this range to have considerable advantages in such cases, in particular when the particle content of the plume is high and when measurements are performed at large distances from the area of interest.

  14. PMMA-based resists for a spectral range near 13 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Bulgakova, S A; Luchin, V I; Mazanova, L M; Molodnjakov, S A; Salashchenko, N N

    2000-01-01

    A number of poly(meth)acrylates positive resists of various chemical structures were synthesized and the sensitivity of 0.2 mu m resists films to soft X-ray radiation of a laser plasma source at a wavelength of 13 nm was investigated. We found that the sensitivity of methylmethacrylate (MMA) copolymers depending on the nature of comonomers changes within the limits of 12.3-1.7 mJ/cm sup 2 in a combination with the contrast gamma=5.4-1.0. This sensitivity is higher than that of PMMA, which changes from 12 to 45 mJ/cm sup 2 at the contrast gamma=2.6-8.0 depending on the developer composition of methylethylketone (MEK)/isopropyl alcohol (IPA).

  15. Optical properties of parietal peritoneum in the spectral range 350-2500 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozintseva, Marina D.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Genina, Elina A.; Gorodkov, Sergey Y.; Morozov, Dmitry A.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2014-01-01

    The wide application of optical methods in the areas of diagnostics, therapy and surgery of modern medicine has stimulated the investigation of optical properties of various biological tissues. Numerous investigations related to determination of tissue optical properties are available; however, the optical properties of many tissues have not been studied in a wide wavelength range. In this work the optical properties of parietal peritoneum in the wavelength range 350-2500 nm were measured. Measurement of the diffuse reflectance, total and collimated transmittance were performed using LAMBDA 950 (Perkin Elmer, USA) spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere, and values of absorption and scattering coefficients, and the scattering anisotropy factor were calculated by inverse Monte Carlo Method.

  16. Spectral emissivity and optical properties at λ= 632.8 nm for liquid uranium and zirconium at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectral emissivities, refractive indices, and extinction coefficients of pure liquid uranium and zirconium were measured versus temperature by He-Ne laser polarimetry at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The experiments were conducted under containerless conditions using electromagnetic leviation and heating supplemented by CO2 laser beam heating. Clean liquid metal surfaces were achieved by heating the specimens to high temperatures at which oxides evaporated and nitrides decomposed. Results were obtained for liquid uranium and zirconium in the temperature ranges 2000-2800 K and 2000-2600 K, respectively and included data for liquid zirconium undercooled by 125 K. The spectral emissivity of zirconium was equal to 0.345 and was independent of temperature. The spectral emissivity of uranium increased with temperature from 0.272 at 2000 K to 0.294 K at 2800 K. The melting temperature of zirconium was determined from its emissivity and apparent melting temperature to be 2125±11 K, in good agreement with values in the literature. (orig.)

  17. Using spectral characteristics to interpret auroral imaging in the 731.9 nm O+ line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Strømme

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous observations were made of dynamic aurora during substorm activity on 26 January 2006 with three high spatial and temporal resolution instruments: the ASK (Auroral Structure and Kinetics instrument, SIF (Spectrographic Imaging Facility and ESR (EISCAT Svalbard Radar, all located on Svalbard (78° N, 16.2° E. One of the narrow field of view ASK cameras is designed to detect O+ ion emission at 731.9 nm. From the spectrographic data we have been able to determine the amount of contaminating N2 and OH emission detected in the same filter. This is of great importance to further studies using the ASK instrument, when the O+ ion emission will be used to detect flows and afterglows in active aurora. The ratio of O+ to N2 emission is dependent on the energy spectra of electron precipitation, and was found to be related to changes in the morphology of the small-scale aurora. The ESR measured height profiles of electron densities, which allowed estimates to be made of the energy spectrum of the precipitation during the events studied with optical data from ASK and SIF. It was found that the higher energy precipitation corresponded to discrete and dynamic features, including curls, and low energy precipitation corresponded to auroral signatures that were dominated by rays. The evolution of these changes on time scales of seconds is of importance to theories of auroral acceleration mechanisms.

  18. The Measurement of the Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability at 782 nm during the Solar Cycle 24 using the SES on-board PICARD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, Mustapha; Hauchecorne, Alain; Irbah, Abdanour; Bekki, Slimane

    2016-04-01

    A Sun Ecartometry Sensor (SES) was developed to provide the stringent pointing requirements of the PICARD satellite. The SES sensor produced an image of the Sun at 782+/-5 nm. From the SES data, we obtained a new time series of the solar spectral irradiance at 782nm from 2010 to 2014. SES observations provided a qualitatively consistent evolution of the solar spectral irradiance variability at 782 nm during the solar cycle 24. Comparisons will be made with Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S) semi-empirical model and with the Spectral Irradiance Monitor instrument (SIM) on-board the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment satellite (SORCE). These data will help to improve the representation of the solar forcing in the IPSL Global Circulation Model.

  19. Optical coherence microscopy in 1700 nm spectral band for high-resolution label-free deep-tissue imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Masahito; Teranishi, Tatsuhiro; Kawagoe, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Norihiko

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a label-free, high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal microscopy. Here, we report that the 1700-nm spectral band has the great potential to improve the imaging depth in high-resolution OCM imaging of animal tissues. Recent studies to improve the imaging depth in OCT revealed that the 1700-nm spectral band is a promising choice for imaging turbid scattering tissues due to the low attenuation of light in the wavelength region. In this study, we developed high-resolution OCM by using a high-power supercontinuum source in the 1700-nm spectral band, and compared the attenuation of signal-to-noise ratio between the 1700-nm and 1300-nm OCM imaging of a mouse brain under the condition of the same sensitivity. The comparison clearly showed that the 1700-nm OCM provides larger imaging depth than the 1300-nm OCM. In this 1700-nm OCM, the lateral resolution of 1.3 μm and the axial resolution of 2.8 μm, when a refractive index was assumed to be 1.38, was achieved. PMID:27546517

  20. Optical coherence microscopy in 1700 nm spectral band for high-resolution label-free deep-tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Masahito; Teranishi, Tatsuhiro; Kawagoe, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Norihiko

    2016-08-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a label-free, high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal microscopy. Here, we report that the 1700-nm spectral band has the great potential to improve the imaging depth in high-resolution OCM imaging of animal tissues. Recent studies to improve the imaging depth in OCT revealed that the 1700-nm spectral band is a promising choice for imaging turbid scattering tissues due to the low attenuation of light in the wavelength region. In this study, we developed high-resolution OCM by using a high-power supercontinuum source in the 1700-nm spectral band, and compared the attenuation of signal-to-noise ratio between the 1700-nm and 1300-nm OCM imaging of a mouse brain under the condition of the same sensitivity. The comparison clearly showed that the 1700-nm OCM provides larger imaging depth than the 1300-nm OCM. In this 1700-nm OCM, the lateral resolution of 1.3 μm and the axial resolution of 2.8 μm, when a refractive index was assumed to be 1.38, was achieved.

  1. Detection of wine grape nutrient levels using visible and near infrared 1nm spectral resolution remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Grant; van Aardt, Jan; Bajorski, Peter; Vanden Heuvel, Justine

    2016-05-01

    The grape industry relies on regular crop assessment to aid in the day-to-day and seasonal management of their crop. More specifically, there are six key nutrients of interest to viticulturists in the growing of wine grapes, namely nitrogen, potassium, phosphorous, magnesium, zinc and boron. Traditional methods of determining the levels of these nutrients are through collection and chemical analysis of petiole samples from the grape vines themselves. We collected ground-level observations of the spectra of the grape vines, using a hyperspectral spectrometer (0.4-2.5um), at the same time that petioles samples were harvested. We then interpolated the data into a consistent 1 nm spectral resolution before comparing it to the nutrient data collected. This nutrient data came from both the industry standard petiole analysis, as well as an additional leaf-level analysis. The data were collected for two different grape cultivars, both during bloom and veraison periods to provide variability, while also considering the impact of temporal/seasonal change. A narrow-band NDI (Normalized Difference Index) approach, as well as a simple ratio index, was used to determine the correlation of the reflectance data to the nutrient data. This analysis was limited to the silicon photodiode range to increase the utility of our approach for wavelength-specific cameras (via spectral filters) in a low cost drone platform. The NDI generated correlation coefficients were as high as 0.80 and 0.88 for bloom and veraison, respectively. The ratio index produced correlation coefficient results that are the same at two decimal places with 0.80 and 0.88. These results bode well for eventual non-destructive, accurate and precise assessment of vineyard nutrient status.

  2. Preparation of dental amalgam and spectral diagnosis of mercury in plasmas-laser in the region of 250 nm – 850 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we presents results of the spectral study of plasmas-laser of dental amalgam by technique Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). Plasmas were generated focusing the beam of a Nd: YAG laser on the matrix of the mixture Ag-Sn-Cu and on amalgams with different proportions of mercury (3:2, 5:2, 6:2). Based on the spectral results and reported atomic parameters, became estimation of electron temperature plasmas- laser and their behavior with the concentration of Hg. The estimated values of the electron temperature for the respective proportions were 20 846 K, 19 139 K and 16 872 K, using the distribution of population of Boltzmann energy levels associated with spectral lines, considering conditions Local Thermodinamic Equilibrium (LTE) of plasmas

  3. Preparation of dental amalgam and spectral diagnosis of mercury in plasmas-laser in the region of 250 nm - 850 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Ossa, A.; Pacheco, P.; Sarmiento, R.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we presents results of the spectral study of plasmas-laser of dental amalgam by technique Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). Plasmas were generated focusing the beam of a Nd: YAG laser on the matrix of the mixture Ag-Sn-Cu and on amalgams with different proportions of mercury (3:2, 5:2, 6:2). Based on the spectral results and reported atomic parameters, became estimation of electron temperature plasmas- laser and their behavior with the concentration of Hg. The estimated values of the electron temperature for the respective proportions were 20 846 K, 19 139 K and 16 872 K, using the distribution of population of Boltzmann energy levels associated with spectral lines, considering conditions Local Thermodinamic Equilibrium (LTE) of plasmas.

  4. Relationship of 2 100-2 300 nm Spectral Characteristics of Wheat Canopy to Leaf Area Index and Leaf N as Affected by Leaf Water Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chun-Jiang; WANG Ji-Hua; LIU Liang-Yun; HUANG Wen-Jiang; ZHOU Qi-Fa

    2006-01-01

    The effects of leaf water status in a wheat canopy on the accuracy of estimating leaf area index (LAI) and N were determined in this study using extracted spectral characteristics in the 2 000-2 300 nm region of the short wave infrared (SWI) band. A newly defined spectral index, relative adsorptive index in the 2 000-2 300 nm region (RAI2000-2300), which can be calculated by RAI2000-2300 = (R2224 - R2054) (R2224 + R2054)-1 with R being the reflectance at 2 224 or2 054 nm, was utilized. This spectral index, RAI2000-2300, was significantly correlated (P < 0.01) with green LAI and leaf N concentration and proved to be potentially valuable for monitoring plant green LAI and leaf N at the field canopy scale. Moreover, plant LAI could be monitored more easily and more successfully than plant leaf N. The study also showed that leaf water had a strong masking effect on the 2 000-2 300 nm spectral characteristics and both the coefficient between RAI2000-2300 and green LAI and that between RAI2000-2300 and leaf N content decreased as leaf water content increased.

  5. Portable multispectral imaging system based on light-emitting diodes for spectral recovery from 370 to 1630 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Ramírez, Jorge; Vilaseca, Meritxell; Pujol, Jaume

    2014-05-10

    To expand and investigate the potential of spectral imaging, we developed a portable multispectral system using light-emitting diodes. This system recovers spectral information from the UV to the near IR over a large area using two different image sensors synchronized with 23 bands of illumination. The system was assessed for spectral reconstruction through simulations and experimental measurements by means of two methods of spectral reconstruction and three different evaluation metrics. The results over a Macbeth ColorChecker chart and other samples, including pigments usually employed in art paintings, are compared and discussed. The portable multispectral system using LEDs constitutes a cost-effective and versatile method for spectral imaging. PMID:24922036

  6. Design of a sun tracker for the automatic measurement of spectral irradiance and construction of an irradiance database in the 330-1100 nm range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canada, J.; Maj, A. [Departamento de Termodinamica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera, s/n. 46022 Valencia (Spain); Utrillas, M.P.; Martinez-Lozano, J.A.; Pedros, R.; Gomez-Amo, J.L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Tierra y Termodinamica, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    An automatic global and direct solar spectral irradiance system has been designed based on two LICOR spectro radiometers equipped with fibre optics and remote cosine sensors. To measure direct irradiance a sun tracker based on step motors has been developed. The whole system is autonomous and works continuously. From the measurements provided by this system a spectral irradiance database in the 330-1100 nm range has been created. This database contains normal direct and global horizontal irradiances as well as diffuse irradiance on a horizontal plane, together with total atmospheric optical thickness and aerosol optical depth. (author)

  7. Study of two-photon resonant four-wave sum mixing in xenon in the spectral region of 105-110 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Two-photon resonant four-wave mixing in Xe gaseous medium was studied by subjecting a variety of molecular samples, including acetone, furan, thiophene, triethylamine, and dimethylsilacyclobutane, to the laser sources produced for ionization. The peak positions and widths of the five spectral regions between 105 and 110 nm where four-wave sum mixing in Xe occurs were characterized. Research highlights: → VUV radiation (105-110 nm) is produced by nonlinear four-wave mixing in xenon. → The peak positions and widths of five possible spectral regions are characterized. → The previous reported VUV region of 113-117 nm is extended to shorter wavelength. - Abstract: The two-photon resonant four-wave sum and difference mixing in Xe gaseous medium was studied by subjecting a variety of molecular samples, including acetone, furan, thiophene, triethylamine, and dimethylsilacyclobutane, to the coherent radiation sources produced from the four-wave mixing processes for ionization. Ionization of all samples studied showed similar behavior and is due to the laser radiation from four-wave sum mixing. It is demonstrated that in a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region of 105-110 nm four-wave sum mixing in Xe can only occur in five discontinued regions, all of which are to the blue of a Xe atomic transition. The peak positions and widths of the five spectral regions were characterized. Study of the triethylamine sample with its ionization energy lower than the photon energy of the VUV radiation from the difference mixing illustrated the competition between the sum and difference mixing occurring simultaneously in the Xe gas cell.

  8. Development of a unique laboratory standard: Indium gallium arsenide detector for the 500-1700 nm spectral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    A planar (5 mm diameter) indium gallium arsenide detector having a high (greater than 50 pct) quantum efficiency from the visible into the infrared spectrum (500 to 1700 nm) was fabricated. Quantum efficiencies as high as 37 pct at 510 nm, 58 pct at 820 nm and 62 pct at 1300 nm and 1550 nm were measured. A planar InP/InGaAs detector structure was also fabricated using vapor phase epitaxy to grow device structures with 0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 micrometer thick InP caps. Quantum efficiency was studied as a function of cap thickness. Conventional detector structures were also used by completely etching off the InP cap after zinc diffusion. Calibrated quantum efficiencies were measured. Best results were obtained with devices whose caps were completely removed by etching. Certain problems still remain with these detectors including non-uniform shunt resistance, reproducibility, contact resistance and narrow band anti-reflection coatings.

  9. Mars 1064 nm spectral radiance measurements determined from the receiver noise response of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Neumann, Gregory A; Abshire, James B; Zuber, Maria T

    2006-06-10

    A technique was developed to compute the radiance of the scene viewed by the optical receiver of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter. The technique used the detection threshold and the false detection rate of the receiver to provide a passive radiometry measurement of Mars at the 1064 nm wavelength over a 2 nm bandwidth and subkilometer spatial resolution in addition to the altimetry and active radiometry measurements. The passive radiometry measurement is shown to have a 2% or better precision and has been stable over several Martian years. We describe the principle of operation of the instrument and its calibration and assess its performance from sample orbital measurements. PMID:16761033

  10. Mars 1064-nm Spectral Radiance Measurements from the Receiver Noise Response of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Neumann, Gregory A.; Abshire, James B.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter not only provides surface topography from the laser pulse time-of-flight, but also two radiometric measurements, the active measurement of transmitted and reflected laser pulse energy, and the passive measurement of reflected solar illumination. The passive radiometry measurement is accomplished in a novel fashion by monitoring the noise density at the output of the photodetector and solving for the amount of background light. The passive radiometry measurements provide images of Mars at 1064-nm wavelength over a 2 nm bandwidth with sub-km spatial resolution and with 2% or better precision under full illumination. We describe in this paper the principle of operation, the receiver mathematical model, its calibration, and performance assessment from sample measurement data.

  11. UAS-based soil carbon mapping using VIS-NIR (480–1000 nm) multi-spectral imaging: Potential and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldana Jague, Emilien; Heckrath, Goswin; Macdonald, Andy;

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods to assess the soil organic carbon (SOC) content based on soil sampling and analysis are time consuming and expensive, and the results are influenced by the sampling design. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) multi-spectral i......Traditional methods to assess the soil organic carbon (SOC) content based on soil sampling and analysis are time consuming and expensive, and the results are influenced by the sampling design. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) multi...... practices, provide a valuable resource to evaluate this approach. We acquired images (wavelength: 480–550–670–780–880–1000 nm) at an altitude of 120 m over an area of 2 ha using a multi-spectral camera mounted on an UAS. The high-resolution images captured smallscale variations at the soil surface (e...

  12. Full anterior segment biometry with extended imaging range spectral domain optical coherence tomography at 1340 nm

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Peng; Johnstone, Murray; Ruikang K Wang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We demonstrate an extended-imaging-range anterior-segment optical coherence tomography (eAS-OCT) system for the biometric assessment of full AS in human eye. This newly developed eAS-OCT operating at 1340-nm wavelength band is simultaneously capable of an imaging speed of 120 kHz A-line scan rate, an axial resolution of 7.2 μm, and an extended imaging range of up to 16 mm in air. Imaging results from three healthy subjects and one subject with a narrow-angle demonstrate the instrume...

  13. Assessment of the CALIPSO Lidar 532 nm attenuated backscatter calibration using the NASA LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Rogers

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO spacecraft has provided global, high-resolution vertical profiles of aerosols and clouds since it became operational on 13 June 2006. On 14 June 2006, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL was deployed aboard the NASA Langley B-200 aircraft for the first of a series of 86 underflights of the CALIPSO satellite to provide validation measurements for the CALIOP data products. To better assess the range of conditions under which CALIOP data products are produced, these validation flights were conducted under both daytime and nighttime lighting conditions, in multiple seasons, and over a large range of latitudes and aerosol and cloud conditions. This paper presents a quantitative assessment of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration (through the 532 nm total attenuated backscatter using internally calibrated airborne HSRL underflight data and is the most extensive study of CALIOP 532 nm calibration. Results show that HSRL and CALIOP 532 nm total attenuated backscatter agree on average within 2.7% ± 2.1% (CALIOP lower at night and within 2.9% ± 3.9% (CALIOP lower during the day, demonstrating the accuracy of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration algorithms. Additionally, comparisons with HSRL show consistency of the CALIOP calibration before and after the laser switch in 2009 as well as improvements in the daytime version 3.01 calibration scheme compared with the version 2 calibration scheme. Potential biases and uncertainties in the methodology relevant to validating satellite lidar measurements with an airborne lidar system are discussed and found to be less than 4.5% ± 3.2% for this validation effort with HSRL. Results from this study are also compared with prior assessments of the CALIOP 532 nm attenuated backscatter calibration.

  14. Spectral features and thermal resistance of 976-nm cw laser diodes with a power up to 15 W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezotosnyi, V. V.; Krokhin, O. N.; Oleshchenko, V. A.; Pevtsov, V. F.; Popov, Yu M.; Cheshev, E. A.

    2016-08-01

    The spectral characteristics of cw laser diodes with a maximum reliable power of 15 W mounted on F-mount heat sinks are studied. It is found that the spectrum envelopes have features at emission powers exceeding 5 – 7 W. A method for determining the maximum of a spectrum envelope under the conditions of its broadening and appearance of features is discussed. The thermal resistance of diodes is determined experimentally at pump currents from threshold to maximum (14 A) and is found to be 2.25 K W-1 at a current of 10 A and 1.5 K W-1 at a current of 4 A. The results obtained are compared with the literature data. The adequacy of using the thermal resistance parameter for comparing and estimating thermal characteristics of laser diodes is considered.

  15. Airborne differential absorption lidar for water vapour measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in the spectral region around 940 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poberaj, G.

    2000-07-01

    Two all-solid-state laser systems were developed and studied in detail to optimise their performance for an airborne water vapour differential absorption lidar (DIAL). Their special features are high average output powers and excellent spectral properties in the 940-nm spectral region relevant for monitoring very low water vapour contents in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. One system is an injection-seeded pulsed Ti:sapphire ring laser with a spectral bandwidth of 105 MHz and an average power of 1.1 W. The other system is an injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO) in a ring configuration. Using KTP as nonlinear crystal, a signal output with a spectral bandwidth of 140 MHz and an average power of 1.2 W was achieved. Both systems, the Ti:sapphire ring laser and the KTP OPO, possess spectral purity values higher than 99%. The pump source for these systems is a frequency doubled diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser operating at a repetition rate of 100 Hz. The KTP OPO system has been used as a transmitter in a new airborne water vapour DIAL instrument. For the first time, measurements of two-dimensional water vapour distributions with a high vertical (500 m) and horizontal (20 km) resolution across several potential vorticity streamers were performed. Very low water vapour mixing ratios (10-50 ppmv) and strong gradients were observed in the tropopause region. The sensitivity of the DIAL instrument in the centre of a stratospheric intrusion ranges from 3% in the near field to 12% in the far field (4 km). The first comparison experiments with in situ measuring instruments show a good agreement. Considerable differences are found between DIAL measurements and data obtained from the ECMWF operational analyses and a mesoscale numerical model. (orig.)

  16. Metamorphic distributed Bragg reflectors for the 1440–1600 nm spectral range: Epitaxy, formation, and regrowth of mesa structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, A. Yu., E-mail: anton@beam.ioffe.ru; Karachinsky, L. Ya.; Novikov, I. I.; Babichev, A. V. [Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation); Berezovskaya, T. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg National Research Academic University (Russian Federation); Nevedomskiy, V. N. [Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    It is shown that metamorphic In{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/In{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.7}As distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with a reflection band at 1440–1600 nm and a reflectance of no less than 0.999 can be fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on a GaAs substrate. It is demonstrated that mesa structures formed from metamorphic DBRs on a GaAs substrate can be regrown by MBE and microcavities can be locally formed in two separate epitaxial processes. The results obtained can find wide application in the fabrication of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with a buried tunnel junction.

  17. Assessment of the CALIPSO Lidar 532 nm Attenuated Backscatter Calibration Using the NASA LaRC Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Raymond R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Obland, Michael D.; Harper, David B.; Cook, Anthony L.; Powell, Kathleen A.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) spacecraft has provided global, high-resolution vertical profiles of aerosols and clouds since it became operational on 13 June 2006. On 14 June 2006, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed aboard the NASA Langley B-200 aircraft for the first of a series of 86 underflights of the CALIPSO satellite to provide validation measurements for the CALIOP data products. To better assess the range of conditions under which CALIOP data products are produced, these validation flights were conducted under both daytime and nighttime lighting conditions, in multiple seasons, and over a large range of latitudes and aerosol and cloud conditions. This paper presents a quantitative assessment of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration (through the 532 nm total attenuated backscatter) using an internally calibrated airborne HSRL underflight data and is the most extensive study of CALIOP 532 nm calibration. Results show that average HSRL and CALIOP 532 nm total attenuated backscatter agree on average within 2.7% +/- 2.1% (CALIOP lower) at night and within 2.9 % +/- 3.9% (CALIOP lower) during the day., demonstrating the accuracy of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration algorithms. Additionally, comparisons with HSRL show consistency of the CALIOP calibration before and after the laser switch in 2009 as well as improvements in the daytime version 3 calibration scheme compared with the version 2 calibration scheme. Potential systematic uncertainties in the methodology relevant to validating satellite lidar measurements with an airborne lidar system are discussed and found to be less than 3.7% for this validation effort with HSRL. Results from this study are also compared to those from prior assessments of CALIOP calibration and attenuated backscatter.

  18. Simulation of laser propagation through a three-layer human skin model in the spectral range from 1000 to 1900 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasouri, Babak; Murphy, Thomas E.; Berberoglu, Halil

    2014-07-01

    For understanding the mechanisms of low-level laser/light therapy (LLLT), accurate knowledge of light interaction with tissue is necessary. We present a three-dimensional, multilayer reduced-variance Monte Carlo simulation tool for studying light penetration and absorption in human skin. Local profiles of light penetration and volumetric absorption were calculated for uniform as well as Gaussian profile beams with different spreads over the spectral range from 1000 to 1900 nm. The results showed that lasers within this wavelength range could be used to effectively and safely deliver energy to specific skin layers as well as achieve large penetration depths for treating deep tissues, without causing skin damage. In addition, by changing the beam profile from uniform to Gaussian, the local volumetric dosage could increase as much as three times for otherwise similar lasers. We expect that this tool along with the results presented will aid researchers in selecting wavelength and laser power in LLLT.

  19. Spectral kinetic modeling and long-term behavior assessment of Arthrospira platensis growth in photobioreactor under red (620 nm) light illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farges, Bérangère; Laroche, Céline; Cornet, Jean-François; Dussap, Claude-Gilles

    2009-01-01

    The ability to cultivate the cyanobacterium Arhtrospira platensis in artificially lightened photobioreactors using high energetic efficiency (quasi-monochromatic) red LED was investigated. To reach the same maximal productivities as with the polychromatic lightening control conditions (red + blue, P/2e(-) = 1.275), the need to work with an optimal range of wavelength around 620 nm was first established on batch and continuous cultures. The long-term physiological and kinetic behavior was then verified in a continuous photobioreactor illuminated only with red (620 nm) LED, showing that the maximum productivities can be maintained over 30 residence times with only minor changes in the pigment content of the cells corresponding to a well-known adaptation mechanism of the photosystems, but without any effect on growth and stoichiometry. For both poly and monochromatic incident light inputs, a predictive spectral knowledge model was proposed and validated for the first time, allowing the calculation of the kinetics and stoichiometry observed in any photobioreactor cultivating A. platensis, or other cyanobacteria if the parameters were updated. It is shown that the photon flux (with a specified wavelength) must be used instead of light energy flux as a relevant control variable for the growth. The experimental and theoretical results obtained in this study demonstrate that it is possible to save the energy consumed by the lightening device of photobioreactors using red LED, the spectral range of which is defined according to the action spectrum of photosynthesis. This appears to be crucial information for applications in which the energy must be rationalized, as it is the case for life support systems in closed environments like a permanent spatial base or a submarine.

  20. Direct spectral analysis of tea samples using 266 nm UV pulsed laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and cross validation of LIBS results with ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, M A; Habibullah, Y B; Baig, Umair; Oloore, L E

    2016-05-15

    Tea is one of the most common and popular beverages spanning vast array of cultures all over the world. The main nutritional benefits of drinking tea are its anti-oxidant properties, presumed protection against certain cancers, inhibition of inflammation and possible protective effects against diabetes. Laser induced breakdown spectrometer (LIBS) was assembled as a powerful tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis of various brands of tea samples using 266 nm pulsed UV laser. LIBS spectra for six brands of tea samples in the wavelength range of 200-900 nm was recorded and all elements present in our tea samples were identified. The major toxic elements detected in several brands of tea samples were bromine, chromium and minerals like iron, calcium, potassium and silicon. The spectral assignment was conducted prior to the determination of concentration of each element. For quantitative analysis, calibration curves were drawn for each element using standard samples prepared in known concentration in the tea matrix. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and electron density) were also determined prior to the tea samples spectroscopic analysis. The concentration of iron, chromium, potassium, bromine, copper, silicon and calcium detected in all tea samples was between 378-656, 96-124, 1421-6785, 99-1476, 17-36, 2-11 and 92-130 mg L(-1) respectively. The limits of detection estimated for Fe, Cr, K, Br, Cu, Si, Ca in tea samples were 22, 12, 14, 11, 6, 1 and 12 mg L(-1) respectively. To further confirm the accuracy of our LIBS results, we determined the concentration of each element present in tea samples by using standard analytical technique like ICP-MS. The concentrations detected with our LIBS system are in excellent agreement with ICP-MS results. The system assembled for spectral analysis in this work could be highly applicable for testing the quality and purity of food and also pharmaceuticals products. PMID:26992530

  1. Vegetation species composition and canopy architecture information expressed in leaf water absorption measured in the 1000 nm and 2200 spectral region by an imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert O.; Roberts, Dar A.

    1995-01-01

    Plant species composition and plant architectural attributes are critical parameters required for the measuring, monitoring, and modeling of terrestrial ecosystems. Remote sensing is commonly cited as an important tool for deriving vegetation properties at an appropriate scale for ecosystem studies, ranging from local to regional and even synoptic scales. Classical approaches rely on vegetation indices such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) to estimate biophysical parameters such as leaf area index or intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (IPAR). Another approach is to apply a variety of classification schemes to map vegetation and thus extrapolate fine-scale information about specific sites to larger areas of similar composition. Imaging spectrometry provides additional information that is not obtainable through broad-band sensors and that may provide improved inputs both to direct biophysical estimates as well as classification schemes. Some of this capability has been demonstrated through improved discrimination of vegetation, estimates of canopy biochemistry, and liquid water estimates from vegetation. We investigate further the potential of leaf water absorption estimated from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data as a means for discriminating vegetation types and deriving canopy architectural information. We expand our analysis to incorporate liquid water estimates from two spectral regions, the 1000-nm region and the 2200-nm region. The study was conducted in the vicinity of Jasper Ridge, California, which is located on the San Francisco peninsula to the west of the Stanford University campus. AVIRIS data were acquired over Jasper Ridge, CA, on June 2, 1992, at 19:31 UTC. Spectra from three sites in this image were analyzed. These data are from an area of healthy grass, oak woodland, and redwood forest, respectively. For these analyses, the AVIRIS-measured upwelling radiance spectra for the entire Jasper

  2. Realization of band gap shrinkage to the spectral characteristics of high-luminous-efficiency 658 nm AlGaInP/GaInP multiple quantum well lasers at room temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chackrabarti, Santosh; Zargar, Rayees A.; Bansal, Jyoti; Zaker, Tho-alfiqar A.; Hafiz, A. K.

    2016-08-01

    The temperature dependent spectral shifts in 658 nm AlGaInP multiple quantum well (MQW) red laser diodes due to band gap narrowing at room temperatures (5 °Csbnd 45 °C) is reported. The density of states effective mass approximation and the conduction band effective mass approximation are employed to formulate the carrier concentrations. The spectral shift mechanism is explored with a threshold current density of 42.28 kA/cm2 and a good characteristic temperature of 149 K. The photoluminescence (PL) peak intensity shifts towards the higher wavelength(red shift) and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) increases with the increase in temperature. The band gap narrowing value determined by a simple formula amounts to 67.4 meV and displays N1/3 dependence at higher densities. The carrier density dependence conveys that the red shift of the spectral emission is due to band gap narrowing.

  3. New Sub-nanometer Spectral Estimates of the 0-5 nm Solar Soft X-Ray Irradiance at Mars Using the Extreme UltraViolet Monitor (EUVM) Onboard MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, E.; Eparvier, F. G.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Peterson, W. K.; Mitchell, D. L.; Xu, S.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    characterize the effectiveness of this technique, we compare Mars atmospheric photoelectron spectral measurements made by MAVEN's Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA) against modeled photoelectron spectra which use the EUVM derived 0-5 nm solar spectrum as an input.

  4. Assessment of the CALIPSO Lidar 532 nm attenuated backscatter calibration using the NASA LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    OpenAIRE

    R. R. Rogers; C. A. Hostetler; J. W. Hair; R. A. Ferrare; Liu, Z.; Obland, M. D.; Harper, D. B.; Cook, A. L.; K.A. Powell; M. A. Vaughan; Winker, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) spacecraft has provided global, high-resolution vertical profiles of aerosols and clouds since it became operational on 13 June 2006. On 14 June 2006, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed aboard the NASA Langley B-200 aircraft for the first of a series of 86 underflights of the CALIPSO...

  5. Air fluorescence measurements in the spectral range 300-420 nm using a 28.5 GeV electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Belov, K; Belz, J; Cao, Z; Dalton, M; Fedorova, Y; Huentemeyer, P; Jones, B F; Jui, C C H; Loh, E C; Manago, N; Martens, K; Matthews, J N; Maestas, M; Smith, J; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Thomas, J; Thomas, S; Chen, P; Field, C; Hast, C; Iverson, R; Ng, J S T; Odian, A; Reil, K; Walz, D; Bergman, D R; Thomson, G; Zech, A; Chang, F-Y; Chen, C-C; Chen, C-W; Huang, M A; Hwang, W-Y P; Lin, G-L

    2007-01-01

    Measurements are reported of the yield and spectrum of fluorescence, excited by a 28.5 GeV electron beam, in air at a range of pressures of interest to ultra-high energy cosmic ray detectors. The wavelength range was 300 - 420 nm. System calibration has been performed using Rayleigh scattering of a nitrogen laser beam. In atmospheric pressure dry air at 304 K the yield is 20.8 +/- 1.6 photons per MeV.

  6. Thermal coagulation-induced changes of the optical properties of normal and adenomatous human colon tissues in vitro in the spectral range 400-1100 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ao Huilan; Xing Da; Wei Huajiang; Gu Huaimin [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, ina Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Wu Guoyong; Lu Jianjun [Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)], E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn

    2008-04-21

    The absorption coefficients, the reduced scattering coefficients and the optical penetration depths for native and coagulated human normal and adenomatous colon tissues in vitro were determined over the range of 400-1100 nm using a spectrophotometer with an internal integrating sphere system, and the inverse adding-doubling method was applied to calculate the tissue optical properties from diffuse reflectance and total transmittance measurements. The experimental results showed that in the range of 400-1100 nm there were larger absorption coefficients (P < 0.01) and smaller reduced scattering coefficients (P < 0.01) for adenomatous colon tissues than for normal colon tissues, and there were smaller optical penetration depths for adenomatous colon tissues than for normal colon tissues, especially in the near-infrared wavelength. Thermal coagulation induced significant increase of the absorption coefficients and reduced scattering coefficients for the normal and adenomatous colon tissues, and significantly reduced decrease of the optical penetration depths for the normal and adenomatous colon tissues. The smaller optical penetration depth for coagulated adenomatous colon tissues is a disadvantage for laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is necessary to adjust the application parameters of lasers to achieve optimal therapy.

  7. Simultaneous quantum dash-well emission in a chirped dash-in-well superluminescent diode with spectral bandwidth >700 nm

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2013-10-01

    We report on the quantitative evidence of simultaneous amplified spontaneous emission from the AlGaInAs/InAs/ InP-based quantum-well (Qwell) and quantum-dashes (Qdash) in a multistack dash-in-an-asymmetric-well superluminescent diode heterostructure. As a result, an emission bandwidth (full width at half-maximum) of 700 nm is achieved, covering entire O-E-S-C-L-U communication bands, and a maximum continuous wave output power of 1.3 mW, from this device structure. This demonstration paves a way to bridge entire telecommunication bands through proper optimization of device gain region, bringing significant advances and impact to a variety of cross-disciplinary field applications. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  8. Spectral Differentiation of Trace Concentrations of NO(2) from NO by Laser Photofragmentation with Fragment Ionization at 226 and 452 nm: Quantitative Analysis of NO-NO(2) Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, R L; Sausa, R C

    2000-05-20

    Laser-induced photofragmentation with fragment ionization is used to detect and spectrally differentiate trace concentrations of NO(2) from NO in NO-NO(2) mixtures. A laser operating near 226 or 452 nm ionizes the target molecules, and the resulting electrons are collected with miniature electrodes. NO is detected by (1 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization by means of its A (2)?(+) ? X (2)? (0, 0) transitions near 226 nm, whereas NO(2) is detected near 226 nm by laser photofragmentation with subsequent NO fragment ionization by means of both its A (2)?(+) ? X (2)? (0, 0) and (1, 1) transitions. The NO fragment generated from the photolysis of NO(2) is produced rovibrationally excited with a significant population in the first vibrational level of the ground electronic state (X (2)?, upsilon? = 1). In contrast, ambient NO has a room-temperature, Boltzmann population distribution favoring the lowest ground vibrational level (X (2)?, upsilon? = 0). Thus discrimination is possible when the internal energy distributions of both fragment NO and ambient NO are probed. We also demonstrate this approach using visible radiation, further simplifying the experimental apparatus because frequency doubling of the laser radiation is not required. We measured up to three decades of NO-NO(2) mixtures with limits of detection (signal-to-noise ratio of 3) in the low parts per billion for both NO and NO(2) for a 10-s integration time using both ultraviolet or visible radiation.

  9. Generation of high-power femtosecond supercontinua in the near-IR spectral range using broadband parametric frequency conversion in LBO and DCDA crystals pumped at λ = 620 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podshivalov, A. A.; Potemkin, F. V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.

    2014-09-01

    The pump wavelength of parametric amplifiers based on CLBO, DCDA and LBO crystals and pumped by the second harmonic of a femtosecond Cr : forsterite laser (620 nm) is close to optimal for broadband amplification because of the proximity of group velocities of interacting pulses. Injection of a broadband continuum into the range of the signal-wave gain in LBO and DCDA parametric amplifiers, pumped at λ = 620 nm, leads to generation of broadband femtosecond pulses with a spectrum ranging from 1050 to 1600 nm and peak powers up to 20 MW.

  10. Spectral Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Jie; Wang, Li-Lian

    2011-01-01

    Along with finite differences and finite elements, spectral methods are one of the three main methodologies for solving partial differential equations on computers. This book provides a detailed presentation of basic spectral algorithms, as well as a systematical presentation of basic convergence theory and error analysis for spectral methods. Readers of this book will be exposed to a unified framework for designing and analyzing spectral algorithms for a variety of problems, including in particular high-order differential equations and problems in unbounded domains. The book contains a large

  11. External cavity diode laser around 657 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Desheng Lǖ (吕德胜); Kaikai Huang (黄凯凯); Fengzhi Wang (王凤芝); DonghaiYang (杨东海)

    2003-01-01

    Operating a laser diode in an external cavity, which provides frequency-selective feedback, is a very effective method to tune the laser frequency to a range far from its free running frequency. For the Ca atomic Ramsey spectroscopy experiment, we have constructed a 657-nm laser system based on the LittmanMetcalf configuration with a 660-nm commercial laser diode. Continuously 10-GHz tuning range was achieved with about 100-kHz spectral linewidth, measured with beat-note spectrum of two identical laser systems.

  12. Albuquerque, NM, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Albuquerque, NM (35.0N, 106.5W) is situated on the edge of the Rio Grande River and flood plain which cuts across the image. The reddish brown surface of the Albuquerque Basin is a fault depression filled with ancient alluvial fan and lake bed sediments. On the slopes of the Manzano Mountains to the east of Albuquerque, juniper and other timber of the Cibola National Forest can be seen as contrasting dark tones of vegetation.

  13. Measurements of spectral snow albedo at Neumayer, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    S. Wuttke; Seckmeyer, G.; König-Langlo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Spectral albedo in high resolution, from 290 to 1050 nm, has been measured at Neumayer, Antarctica, (70°39' S, 8°15' W) during the austral summer 2003/2004. At 500 nm, the spectral albedo nearly reaches unity, with slightly lower values below and above 500 nm. Above 600 nm, the spectral albedo decreases to values between 0.45 and 0.75 at 1000 nm. For one cloudless case an albedo up to 1.01 at 500 nm could be determined. This can be explained by the larger directional...

  14. Spectral stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to stratigraphic analysis is described which uses photogeologic and spectral interpretation of multispectral remote sensing data combined with topographic information to determine the attitude, thickness, and lithology of strata exposed at the surface. The new stratigraphic procedure is illustrated by examples in the literature. The published results demonstrate the potential of spectral stratigraphy for mapping strata, determining dip and strike, measuring and correlating stratigraphic sequences, defining lithofacies, mapping biofacies, and interpreting geological structures.

  15. Spectral beam combining of diode lasers with high efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, André; Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin;

    2012-01-01

    Based on spectral beam combining we obtain 16 W of output power, combining two 1063 nm DBR-tapered diode lasers. The spectral separation within the combined beam can be used for subsequent sum-frequency generation.......Based on spectral beam combining we obtain 16 W of output power, combining two 1063 nm DBR-tapered diode lasers. The spectral separation within the combined beam can be used for subsequent sum-frequency generation....

  16. Global four-band spectral classification of Jupiter's clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voyager 2 digital images of Jupiter have been used to construct a global data base of cloud reflectance (normal albedo) in four spectral bands: three wideband colors with effective wavelengths at 431 nm (VI), 564 nm (GR), and 599 nm (OR), plus the narrowband CH4 filter centered at 621 nm

  17. The Missing Solar Irradiance Spectrum: 1 to 7 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; Lewis, M.; David, M.; Schunk, R. W.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Warren, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    During large X-class flares the Earth's upper atmospheric E-region responds immediately to solar photons in the 1 to 7 nm range. The response can change the E-region density by factors approaching 10, create large changes in conductivity, and plague HF communications. GOES-XRS provide 0.1 to 0.8 nm and a 0.05 to 0.4 nm integral channels; SOHO-SEM provided a 0 to 50 nm irradiance; TIMED and SORCE-XPS diode measurements also integrated down to 0.1 nm; and most recently SDO-EVE provided a 0.1 to 7 nm irradiance. For atmospheric response to solar flares the cadence is also crucial. Both GOES and SDO provided integral measurements at 10 seconds or better. Unfortunately these measurements have failed to capture the 1 to 7 nm spectral changes that occur during flares. It is these spectral changes that create the major impact since the ionization cross-section of the dominant atmospheric species, N2 and O2, both contain step function changes in the cross-sections. Models of the solar irradiance over this critical wavelength regime have suffered from the need to model the spectral variability based on incomplete measurements. The most sophisticated empirical model FISM [Chamberlin et al., 2008] used 1 nm spectral binning and various implementations of the above integral measurements to describe the 1 to 7 nm irradiance. Since excellent solar observations exist at other wavelengths it is possible to construct an empirical model of the solar atmosphere and then use this model to infer the spectral distribution at wavelengths below 5 nm. This differential emission measure approach has been used successfully in other contexts [e.g., Warren, 2005, Chamberlin et al., 2009]. This paper contrasts the broadband versus spectrally resolved descriptions of the incoming irradiance that affects the upper atmospheric E-layer. The results provide a prescription of what wavelength resolution would be needed to adequately measure the incoming solar irradiance in the 1 to 7 nm range.

  18. Spectral Image Analysis for Measuring Ripeness of Tomatoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, G.; Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Young, I.T.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, spectral images of five ripeness stages of tomatoes have been recorded and analyzed. The electromagnetic spectrum between 396 and 736 nm was recorded in 257 bands (every 1.3 nm). Results show that spectral images offer more discriminating power than standard RGB images for measuring r

  19. Design and implementation of a sub-nm resolution microspectrometer based on a Linear-Variable Optical Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Emadi, A.; Wu, H; De Graaf, G.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the concept of a microspectrometer based on a Linear Variable Optical Filter (LVOF) for operation in the visible spectrum is presented and used in two different designs: the first is for the narrow spectral band between 610 nm and 680 nm, whereas the other is for the wider spectral band between 570 nm and 740 nm. Design considerations, fabrication and measurement results of the LVOF are presented. An iterative signal processing algorithm based on an initial calibration has been ...

  20. Solar spectral irradiance changes during cycle 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchenko, S. V.; DeLand, M. T. [Also at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA. (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by ∼0.6% ± 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% ± 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar 'continuum'. Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar 'continuum', the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at λ ≳ 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  1. Solar irradiance models and measurements: a comparison in the 220 nm to 240 nm wavelength band

    CERN Document Server

    Unruh, Yvonne C; Krivova, Natalie A

    2011-01-01

    Solar irradiance models that assume solar irradiance variations to be due to changes in the solar surface magnetic flux have been successfully used to reconstruct total solar irradiance on rotational as well as cyclical and secular time scales. Modelling spectral solar irradiance is not yet as advanced, and also suffers from a lack of comparison data, in particular on solar-cycle time scales. Here we compare solar irradiance in the 220 nm to 240 nm band as modelled with SATIRE-S and measured by different instruments on the UARS and SORCE satellites. We find good agreement between the model and measurements on rotational time scales. The long-term trends, however, show significant differences. Both SORCE instruments, in particular, show a much steeper gradient over the decaying part of cycle 23 than the modelled irradiance or that measured by UARS/SUSIM.

  2. High power linearly polarized Raman fiber laser at 1120 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua Wang; Lei Zhang; Jun Zhou; Lei Si; Jinbao Chen; Yan Feng

    2012-01-01

    An all-fiber linearly polarized Raman fiber laser at 1 120 nm is demonstrated.With a 1 070-nm linearly polarized Yb-doped fiber laser as pump source,an output of up to 7.7 W at 1 120 nm is obtained with an optical efficiency of 55%.The polarization extinction ratio of the linearly polarized Raman fiber is higher than 18 dB.A numerical simulation model is developed to determine the Raman coefficient of the gain fiber and to evaluate the laser performance.The spectral isolation between the Raman fiber laser and the pump fiber laser is determined to be necessary for further improvements of performance.%An all-fiber linearly polarized Raman fiber laser at 1120 nm is demonstrated. With a 1070-nm linearly polarized Yb-doped fiber laser as pump source, an output of up to 7.7 W at 1120 nm is obtained with an optical efficiency of 55%. The polarization extinction ratio of the linearly polarized Raman fiber is higher than 18 dB. A numerical simulation model is developed to determine the Raman coefficient of the gain fiber and to evaluate the laser performance. The spectral isolation between the Raman fiber laser and the pump fiber laser is determined to be necessary for further improvements of performance.

  3. 308-nm excimer laser in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesenhoff, Tim

    1992-06-01

    Root canal preparation was performed on 20 extracted human teeth. After opening the coronal pulp, the root canals were prepared by 308 nm excimer laser only. All root canals were investigated under SEM after separation in the axial direction. By sagittal separation of the mandibles of freshly slaughtered cows, it was possible to get access to the tissues and irradiate under optical control. Under irradiation of excimer laser light, tissue starts to fluoresce. It was possible to demonstrate that each tissue (dentin, enamel, bone, pulpal, and connective tissue) has a characteristic spectral pattern. The SEM analyses showed that it is well possible to prepare root canals safely. All organic soft tissue has been removed by excimer laser irradiation. There was no case of via falsa. The simultaneous spectroscopic identification of the irradiated tissue provides a safe protection from overinstrumentation. First clinical trials on 20 patients suffering of chronical apical parodontitis have been carried out successfully.

  4. Spectrally resolved white light interferometry to measure material dispersion over a wide spectral band in a single acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosa, Yago; Lago, Elena López; Varela, Luis Miguel; de la Fuente, Raúl

    2016-07-25

    In this paper we apply spectrally resolved white light interferometry to measure refractive and group index over a wide spectral band from 400 to 1000 nm. The output of a Michelson interferometer is spectrally decomposed by a homemade prism spectrometer with a high resolution camera. The group index is determined directly from the phase extracted from the spectral interferogram while the refractive index is estimated once its value at a given wavelength is known. PMID:27464179

  5. Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is an unsupervised feature extraction technique similar to PCA that was developed to better distinguish spectral features in...

  6. Reflectance Spectral Characteristics of Lunar Surface Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Liao Zou; Jian-Zhong Liu; Jian-Jun Liu; Tao Xu

    2004-01-01

    Based on a comprehensive analysis of the mineral composition of major lunar rocks (highland anorthosite, lunar mare basalt and KREEP rock), we investigate the reflectance spectral characteristics of the lunar rock-forming minerals, including feldspar, pyroxene and olivine. The affecting factors, the variation of the intensity of solar radiation with wavelength and the reflectance spectra of the lunar rocks are studied. We also calculate the reflectivity of lunar mare basalt and highland anorthosite at 300 nm, 415 nm, 750 nm, 900 nm, 950 nm and 1000 nm.It is considered that the difference in composition between lunar mare basalt and highland anorthosite is so large that separate analyses are needed in the study of the reflectivity of lunar surface materials in the two regions covered by mare basalt and highland anorthosite, and especially in the region with high Th contents, which may be the KREEP-distributed region.

  7. Characteristics of THz Emission from GaAs Crystal Excited by 400 nm and 800 nm Optical Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yu-Ping; XU Xin-Long; YAN Wei; WANG Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ THz emission spectroscopy is used to study the generation mechanism dependent behaviour of terahertz (THz) electromagnetic waves from the GaAs crystal under excitation by 400 nm and 800 nm femtosecond (fs) pulses,respectively. The wavelength dependence of the emission spectrum under two types of THz generation mechanisms is analysed. Under the optical rectification mechanism, a slight enhancement of the spectral amplitude in the high-frequency regime is observed in a GaAs(110) crystal by the excitation of a 400-nm optical pulse compared with that of 800nm. Whereas an obvious red shift of the amplitude spectrum occurs in the GaAs(100) sample under the transient photoconduction mechanism. These phenomena are explained in detail by the duration of the optical pump pulse and the band structure of GaAs, respectively.

  8. 750 nm 1.5 W frequency-doubled semiconductor disk laser with a 44 nm tuning range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Esa J; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Ranta, Sanna; Rantamäki, Antti; Sirbu, Alexei; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Kapon, Eli; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate 1.5 W of output power at the wavelength of 750 nm by intracavity frequency doubling a wafer-fused semiconductor disk laser diode-pumped at 980 nm. An optical-to-optical efficiency of 8.3% was achieved using a bismuth borate crystal. The wavelength of the doubled emission could be tuned from 720 to 764 nm with an intracavity birefringent plate. The beam quality parameter M2 of the laser output was measured to be below 1.5 at all pump powers. The laser is a promising tool for biomedical applications that can take advantage of the large penetration depth of light in tissue in the 700-800 nm spectral range.

  9. Spectral variations of UV-A and PAR solar radiation in estuarine waters of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Talaulikar, M.; Suresh, T.; Silveira, N.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Lotlikar, A.

    The spectral solar radiation measurements in the range 350-800 nm were carried out in the estuarine waters of Goa using hyperspectral radiometer. The results of the analysis of solar light in the spectral range of photosynthetically available...

  10. Characterization of an 800 nm SASE FEL at saturation

    CERN Document Server

    Tremaine, Aaron M; Ben-Zvi, I; Bertolini, L R; Carr, R; Cornacchia, M; Frigola, P; Hill, J M; Johnson, E; Klaisner, L; Le Sage, G P; Libkind, M; Malone, R; Murokh, A; Nuhn, H D; Pellegrini, C; Rakowsky, G; Reiche, S; Rosenzweig, J; Ruland, R; Skaritka, J; Toor, A; Van Bibber, K A; Wang, X J

    2002-01-01

    Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier is a free electron laser (FEL) designed to saturate at a radiation wavelength of 800 nm within a 4 m long, strong focusing undulator. Large gain is achieved by driving the FEL with 72 MeV, high brightness beam of BNL's accelerator test facility. We present measurements that demonstrate saturation in addition to the frequency spectrum of the FEL radiation. Energy, gain length and spectral characteristics are compared and shown to agree with simulation and theoretical predictions.

  11. Study of the emission spectra of a 1320-nm semiconductor disk laser and its second harmonic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochelashvili, K. S.; Derzhavin, S. I.; Evdokimova, O. N.; Zolotovskii, I. O.; Podmazov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    The spectral characteristics of an optically pumped external-cavity semiconductor disk laser near λ = 1320 nm are studied experimentally. Intracavity second harmonic generation is obtained using an LBO nonlinear crystal. The output power at a wavelength of 660 nm in the cw regime was 620 mW, and the peak power in the pulsed regime was 795 mW.

  12. Photoionization of Nitromethane at 355nm and 266nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Denhi; Betancourt, Francisco; Poveda, Juan Carlos; Guerrero, Alfonso; Cisneros, Carmen; Álvarez, Ignacio

    2014-05-01

    Nitromethane is one of the high-yield clean liquid fuels, i.e., thanks to the oxygen contained in nitromethane, much less atmospheric oxygen is burned compared to hydrocarbons such as gasoline, making the nitromethane an important prototypical energetic material, the understanding of its chemistry is relevant in other fields such as atmospheric chemistry or biochemistry. In this work we present the study of photoionization dynamics by multiphoton absorption with 355 nm and 266 nm wavelength photons, using time of flight spectrometry in reflectron mode (R-TOF). Some of the observed ion products appear for both wavelength and other only in one of them; both results were compared with preview observations and new ions were detected. This work is supported by CONACYT grant 165410 and DGAPA-UNAM grants IN-107-912 and IN-102-613.

  13. High-resolution optical signatures of fresh and aged explosives in the 420nm to 620nm illumination range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, Robert; Grun, Jacob; Gump, Jared

    2012-06-01

    Optical signatures of fresh and aged explosives are measured and compared to determine whether there exist differences in the signatures that can be exploited for detection. The explosives examined are RDX, TNT, and HMX, which have been heated for two weeks at 75 degrees centigrade or irradiated for two weeks with a 15-Watt ultraviolet lamp (254nm). The optical signatures are obtained by illuminating the samples with a sequence of laser wavelengths between 420nm and 620nm in 10 nm steps and measuring the spectra of light scattered from the sample at each laser wavelength. The measurements are performed on the Naval Research Laboratory's SWOrRD instrument. SWOrRD is capable of illuminating a sample with laser wavelength between 210nm and 2000nm, in steps of 0.1nm, and measuring the spectrum of light scattered from the sample at each wavelength. SWOrRD's broad tuning range, high average power (1- 300mW), narrow line width (< 4cm-1), and rapid wavelength tunability enable these measurements. Results, based on more than 80 measurements - each at 21 sequential laser wavelengths, indicate that the variation in spectral line amplitude observed when altering laser illumination wavelength differs between fresh and aged explosives. Thus, an instrument for rapid and reagent-less differentiation between aged and fresh explosives, based on illumination with a few appropriately chosen laser wavelengths appears feasible.

  14. 65 nm CMOS Sensors Applied to Mathematically Exact Colorimetric Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Mayr, C; Krause, A; Schlüßler, J -U; Schüffny, R

    2014-01-01

    Extracting colorimetric image information from the spectral characteristics of image sensors is a key issue in accurate image acquisition. Technically feasible filter/sensor combinations usually do not replicate colorimetric responses with sufficient accuracy to be directly applicable to color representation. A variety of transformations have been proposed in the literature to compensate for this. However, most of those rely on heuristics and/or introduce a reconstruction dependent on the composition of the incoming illumination. In this work, we present a spectral reconstruction method that is independent of illumination and is derived in a mathematically strict way. It provides a deterministic method to arrive at a least mean squared error approximation of a target spectral characteristic from arbitrary sensor response curves. Further, we present a new CMOS sensor design in a standard digital 65nm CMOS technology. Novel circuit techniques are used to achieve performance comparable with much larger-sized spe...

  15. Tunable high-power narrow-spectrum external-cavity diode laser based on tapered amplifier at 668 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Mingjun; Erbert, G.; Sumpf, B.;

    2010-01-01

    A 668 nm tunable high-power narrow-spectrum diode laser system based on a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier in external cavity is demonstrated. The laser system is tunable from 659 to 675 nm. As high as 1.38 W output power is obtained at 668.35 nm. The emission spectral bandwidth is less than...

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  17. Spectral and kinetic analysis of thermoluminescence from manganiferous carbonatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chithambo, M.L., E-mail: m.chithambo@ru.ac.za [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, PO BOX 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Pagonis, V. [Physics Department, McDaniel College, Westminster, MD 21158 (United States); Ogundare, F.O. [Department of Physics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan (Nigeria)

    2014-01-15

    Thermoluminescence spectra of manganiferous carbonatite has been studied from 30 °C to 400 °C over the wavelength range from 200 nm to 800 nm. The natural thermoluminescence appears above 200 °C and shows continuous spectral distribution from 240 nm to 800 nm. Above 500 nm the emission appears in the form of line structure emission. These are reproduced by laboratory irradiation which also produces broad bands near 100 °C. The emission features are attributed to presence of Mn{sup 2+} impurities in the carbonatite matrix. The spectral study was supplemented by kinetic analysis of the most prominent peaks and their kinetic features are reported. -- Highlights: • Thermoluminescence spectra of manganiferous carbonatite over 200 nm to 800 nm is reported. • A detailed kinetic analysis of associated electron traps has been carried out. • The emission is linked to Mn{sup 2+} impurities and transitions involved are proposed.

  18. Analysis of multi-mode to single-mode conversion at 635 nm and 1550 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Vanessa; Bogatzki, Angelina; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Hofmann, Jens; Schröder, Henning

    2016-03-01

    We propose two low-cost and robust optical fiber systems based on the photonic lantern (PL) technology for operating at 635 nm and 1550 nm. The PL is an emerging technology that couples light from a multi-mode (MM) fiber to several single-mode (SM) fibers via a low-loss adiabatic transition. This bundle of SM fibers is observed as a MM fiber system whose spatial modes are the degenerate supermodes of the bundle. The adiabatic transition allows that those supermodes evolve into the modes of the MM fiber. Simulations of the MM fiber end structure and its taper transition have been performed via functional mode solver tools in order to understand the modal evolution in PLs. The modelled design consists of 7 SM fibers inserted into a low-index capillary. The material and geometry of the PLs are chosen such that the supermodes match to the spatial modes of the desired step-index MM fiber in a moderate loss transmission. The dispersion of materials is also considered. These parameters are studied in two PL systems in order to reach a spectral transmission from 450 nm to 1600 nm. Additionally, an analysis of the geometry and losses due to the mismatching of modes is presented. PLs are typically used in the fields of astrophotonics and space photonics. Recently, they are demonstrated as mode converters in telecommunications, especially focusing on spatial division multiplexing. In this study, we show the use of PLs as a promising interconnecting tool for the development of miniaturized spectrometers operating in a broad wavelength range.

  19. 2 nm continuously tunable 488nm micro-integrated diode-laser-based SHG light source for Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braune, M.; Maiwald, M.; Sumpf, B.; Tränkle, G.

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy in the visible spectral range is of great interest due to resonant Raman effects. Nevertheless, fluorescence and ambient light can mask the weak Raman lines. Shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy is a demonstrated tool to overcome this drawback. To apply this method, a light source with two alternating wavelengths is necessary. The spectral distance between these two wavelengths has to be adapted to the width of the Raman signal. According to the sample under investigation the width of the Raman signal could be in the range of 3 cm-1 - 12 cm-1. In this work, a micro-integrated light source emitting at 488 nm with a continuous wavelength tuning range up to 2 nm (83 cm-1) is presented. The pump source, a DFB laser emitting at 976 nm, and a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) ridge waveguide crystal is used for the second harmonic generation (SHG). Both components are mounted on a μ-Peltier-element for temperature control. Here, a common wavelength tuning of the pump wavelength and the acceptance bandwidth of the SHG crystal via temperature is achieved. With the results the light source is suitable for portable Raman and SERDS experiments with a flexible spectral distance between both excitation wavelengths for SERDS with respect to the sample under investigation.

  20. 65-nm Cyclone Ⅲ FPGA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Altera公司低功耗、低成本Cyclone Ⅲ系列65nm FPGA所有8个型号的产品级芯片实现量产,Cyclone Ⅲ系列产品已迅速应用于无线、军事、显示、汽车和工业市场的大量客户系统中。

  1. The Spectral Shift Function and Spectral Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azamov, N. A.; Carey, A. L.; Sukochev, F. A.

    2007-11-01

    At the 1974 International Congress, I. M. Singer proposed that eta invariants and hence spectral flow should be thought of as the integral of a one form. In the intervening years this idea has lead to many interesting developments in the study of both eta invariants and spectral flow. Using ideas of [24] Singer’s proposal was brought to an advanced level in [16] where a very general formula for spectral flow as the integral of a one form was produced in the framework of noncommutative geometry. This formula can be used for computing spectral flow in a general semifinite von Neumann algebra as described and reviewed in [5]. In the present paper we take the analytic approach to spectral flow much further by giving a large family of formulae for spectral flow between a pair of unbounded self-adjoint operators D and D + V with D having compact resolvent belonging to a general semifinite von Neumann algebra {mathcal{N}} and the perturbation V in {mathcal{N}} . In noncommutative geometry terms we remove summability hypotheses. This level of generality is made possible by introducing a new idea from [3]. There it was observed that M. G. Krein’s spectral shift function (in certain restricted cases with V trace class) computes spectral flow. The present paper extends Krein’s theory to the setting of semifinite spectral triples where D has compact resolvent belonging to {mathcal{N}} and V is any bounded self-adjoint operator in {mathcal{N}} . We give a definition of the spectral shift function under these hypotheses and show that it computes spectral flow. This is made possible by the understanding discovered in the present paper of the interplay between spectral shift function theory and the analytic theory of spectral flow. It is this interplay that enables us to take Singer’s idea much further to create a large class of one forms whose integrals calculate spectral flow. These advances depend critically on a new approach to the calculus of functions of non

  2. Spectral luminescence analysis of amniotic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobozhanina, Ekaterina I.; Kozlova, Nataly M.; Kasko, Leonid P.; Mamontova, Marina V.; Chernitsky, Eugene A.

    1997-12-01

    It is shown that the amniotic fluid has intensive ultra-violet luminescence caused by proteins. Along with it amniotic fluid radiated in the field of 380 - 650 nm with maxima at 430 - 450 nm and 520 - 560 nm. The first peak of luminescence ((lambda) exc equals 350 nm; (lambda) em equals 430 - 440 nm) is caused (most probably) by the presence in amniotic fluid of some hormones, NADH2 and NADPH2. A more long-wave component ((lambda) exc equals 460 nm; (lambda) em equals 520 - 560 nm) is most likely connected with the presence in amniotic fluid pigments (bilirubin connected with protein and other). It is shown that intensity and maximum of ultra-violet luminescence spectra of amniotic fluid in normality and at pathology are identical. However both emission spectra and excitation spectra of long-wave ((lambda) greater than 450 nm) luminescence of amniotic fluid from pregnant women with such prenatal abnormal developments of a fetus as anencephaly and spina bifida are too long-wave region in comparison with the norm. Results of research testify that spectral luminescent analysis of amniotic fluid can be used for screening of malformations of the neural tube. It is very difficult for a practical obstetrician to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of the fetus. Apart from ultrasonic examination, cytogenetic examination of amniotic fluid and defumination of concentrations of alpha-fetoprotein and acetylcholin-esterases in the amniotic fluid and blood plasma are the most widely used diagnostic approaches. However, biochemical and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are time-consuming. In the present work spectral luminescence properties of the amniotic fluid are investigated to determine spectral parameters that can be used to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of their offsprings.

  3. 200 nm-1000 nm spectra of light emitted in the impact of 40Ar10+ upon Al and Si solid surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小安; 赵永涛; 李福利; 杨治虎; 肖国青; 詹文龙

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the measured results of the 200 nm-1000 nm characteristic spectral lines of Al, Si and Ar atoms when highly charged ions 40Ar10+ are incident upon Al and P-type Si surfaces. The ion 40Ar10+ is provided by the ECR ion source of the National Laboratory of the Heavy Ion Accelerator in Lanzhou. The results show that when the low-speed ions in the highly charged state interact with the solid surfaces, the characteristic spectral lines of the target atoms and ions spurted from the surfaces can be effectively excited. Moreover, because of the competition of the non-radiation de-excitation of the hollow atom by emitting secondary electrons with the de-excitation process by radiating photons, the spectral intensity of the characteristic spectral lines of Ar atoms on the P-type Si surface is, as a whole, greater than that of Ar atoms on the Al surface.

  4. Spectral theory of ordinary differential operators

    CERN Document Server

    Weidmann, Joachim

    1987-01-01

    These notes will be useful and of interest to mathematicians and physicists active in research as well as for students with some knowledge of the abstract theory of operators in Hilbert spaces. They give a complete spectral theory for ordinary differential expressions of arbitrary order n operating on -valued functions existence and construction of self-adjoint realizations via boundary conditions, determination and study of general properties of the resolvent, spectral representation and spectral resolution. Special attention is paid to the question of separated boundary conditions, spectral multiplicity and absolutely continuous spectrum. For the case nm=2 (Sturm-Liouville operators and Dirac systems) the classical theory of Weyl-Titchmarch is included. Oscillation theory for Sturm-Liouville operators and Dirac systems is developed and applied to the study of the essential and absolutely continuous spectrum. The results are illustrated by the explicit solution of a number of particular problems including th...

  5. Multi-spectral confocal microendoscope for in-vivo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Andrew Robert

    The concept of in-vivo multi-spectral confocal microscopy is introduced. A slit-scanning multi-spectral confocal microendoscope (MCME) was built to demonstrate the technique. The MCME employs a flexible fiber-optic catheter coupled to a custom built slit-scan confocal microscope fitted with a custom built imaging spectrometer. The catheter consists of a fiber-optic imaging bundle linked to a miniature objective and focus assembly. The design and performance of the miniature objective and focus assembly are discussed. The 3mm diameter catheter may be used on its own or routed though the instrument channel of a commercial endoscope. The confocal nature of the system provides optical sectioning with 3mum lateral resolution and 30mum axial resolution. The prism based multi-spectral detection assembly is typically configured to collect 30 spectral samples over the visible chromatic range. The spectral sampling rate varies from 4nm/pixel at 490nm to 8nm/pixel at 660nm and the minimum resolvable wavelength difference varies from 7nm to 18nm over the same spectral range. Each of these characteristics are primarily dictated by the dispersive power of the prism. The MCME is designed to examine cellular structures during optical biopsy and to exploit the diagnostic information contained within the spectral domain. The primary applications for the system include diagnosis of disease in the gastro-intestinal tract and female reproductive system. Recent data from the grayscale imaging mode are presented. Preliminary multi-spectral results from phantoms, cell cultures, and excised human tissue are presented to demonstrate the potential of in-vivo multi-spectral imaging.

  6. Performance comparison of 850-nm and 1550-nm VCSELs exploiting OOK, OFDM, and 4-PAM over SMF/MMF links for low-cost optical interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karinou, Fotini; Deng, Lei; Rodes Lopez, Roberto;

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally compare the performance of two commercially available vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes (VCSELs), a multi-mode 850-nm and a single-mode 1550-nm, exploiting on–off keying/direct detection (OOK/DD), and orthogonal frequency division multiplexed (OFDM) quadrature phase...... modulation (4-PAM), for the 1550-nm transmitter over SMF and MMF links and we compare it to the data-rate equivalent NRZ-OOK. The extensive performance comparison under various transmission scenarios shows the superiority of 1550-nm single-mode VCSEL compared to its multi-mode 850-nm counterpart. Moreover...... in that case, whereas these advanced, spectrally-efficient modulation formats become severely degraded when transmitted over MMF links, especially, when employing the inexpensive 850-nm VCSELs as transmitter. Finally, we compare the performance of the point-to-point links under investigation to the performance...

  7. Broad spectral range synchronized flat-top arrayed waveguide grating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akca, B. Imran; Doerr, Christopher R.; Pollnau, Markus; Ridder, de René M.

    2012-01-01

    A broad-band Mach-Zehnder-interferometer-synchronized flat-top arrayed waveguide grating is presented with a 0.5-dB bandwidth of 12 nm over 90 nm of spectral range and a central excess loss value of -0.5 dB.

  8. Spectral signatures of penumbral transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reardon, K. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Tritschler, A. [National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak, P.O. Box 62, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Katsukawa, Y. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-12-20

    In this work we investigate the properties of penumbral transients observed in the upper photospheric and chromospheric region above a sunspot penumbra using two-dimensional spectroscopic observations of the Ca II 854.21 nm line with a 5 s cadence. In our 30 minutes of observations, we identify several penumbral-micro jets (PMJs) with cotemporal observations from Dunn Solar Telescope/IBIS and Hinode/SOT. We find that the line profiles of these PMJ events show emission in the two wings of the line (±0.05 nm), but little modification of the line core. These are reminiscent of the line profiles of Ellerman bombs observed in plage and network regions. Furthermore, we find evidence that some PMJ events have a precursor phase starting 1 minute prior to the main brightening that might indicate initial heating of the plasma prior to an acoustic or bow shock event. With the IBIS data, we also find several other types of transient brightenings with timescales of less than 1 minute that are not clearly seen in the Hinode/SOT data. The spectral profiles and other characteristics of these events are significantly different from those of PMJs. The different appearances of all these transients are an indicator of the general complexity of the chromospheric magnetic field and underscore the highly dynamic behavior above sunspots. It also highlights the care that is needed in interpreting broadband filter images of chromospheric lines, which may conceal very different spectral profiles, and the underlying physical mechanisms at work.

  9. Wavelength stabilizer based on dual fiber Bragg gratings for 980nm Mini-uncooled pump laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuangshuang; Li, Yi; Jiang, Qunjie; Wu, Bin; Yu, Xiaojing; Wang, Haifang

    2008-12-01

    High power 980nm pump lasers are the key components in optical fiber amplifier. Wavelength stability for 980nm Miniuncooled pump laser is required to maintain the amplifier's efficiency throughout its lifetime. In this paper, a new type of wavelength stabilizer for uncooled pump laser which utilizes two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) matched in wavelength, bandwidth, and reflectivity is presented. The characteristics of transmissivity and reflectivity for the dual FBGs stabilized 980nm pump laser are theoretically modeled and experimentally studied. The results show that the output spectral characteristics of the uncooled pump laser with the dual FBGs have been greatly improved. The laser module can work steadily over a wide temperature range from 0°C to 70°C, with 0.2nm wavelength shift, along with more than 45dB side mode suppression ratio, and less than 1.57nm spectral bandwidth.

  10. Zeta Spectral Action

    CERN Document Server

    Kurkov, Maxim A; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Watcharangkool, Apimook

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel definition of the bosonic spectral action using zeta function regularization, in order to address the issues of renormalizability, ultraviolet completeness and spectral dimensions. We compare the zeta spectral action with the usual (cutoff based) spectral action and discuss its purely spectral origin, predictive power, stressing the importance of the issue of the three dimensionful fundamental constants, namely the cosmological constant, the Higgs vacuum expectation value, and the gravitational constant. We emphasize the fundamental role of the neutrino Majorana mass term for the structure of the bosonic action.

  11. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  12. On-chip visible-to-infrared supercontinuum generation with more than 495 THz spectral bandwidth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Epping, J.P.; Hellwig, T.; Hoekman, M.; Mateman, R.; Leinse, A.; Heideman, R.G.; Rees, van A.; Slot, van der P.J.M.; Lee, C.J.; Fallnich, C.; Boller, K-J.

    2015-01-01

    We report ultra-broadband supercontinuum generation in high-confinement Si3N4 integrated optical waveguides. The spectrum extends through the visible (from 470 nm) to the infrared spectral range (2130 nm) comprising a spectral bandwidth wider than 495 THz, which is the widest supercontinuum spectrum

  13. Laser produced spectrum of Si(2) molecule in the region of 540-1010 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, K S; Gopal, R

    2008-12-01

    The laser produced spectrum of Si(2) molecule is recorded for the first time using laser ablation technique in the region of 540-1010 nm. About 110 bands are observed in the entire spectral region and all these bands are classified into three band systems, viz. E-X, F-X and G-X of Si(2) molecule lying in the region of 814-1010 nm, 630-900 nm and 546-710 nm, respectively. All these electronic transitions take place from ground state X(3)Sigma(g)(-) state. The molecular constants of all these states have been determined.

  14. High spectral resolution airborne short wave infrared hyperspectral imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liqing; Yuan, Liyin; Wang, Yueming; Zhuang, Xiaoqiong

    2016-05-01

    Short Wave InfraRed(SWIR) spectral imager is good at detecting difference between materials and penetrating fog and mist. High spectral resolution SWIR hyperspectral imager plays a key role in developing earth observing technology. Hyperspectral data cube can help band selections that is very important for multispectral imager design. Up to now, the spectral resolution of many SWIR hyperspectral imagers is about 10nm. A high sensitivity airborne SWIR hyperspectral imager with narrower spectral band will be presented. The system consists of TMA telescope, slit, spectrometer with planar blazed grating and high sensitivity MCT FPA. The spectral sampling interval is about 3nm. The IFOV is 0.5mrad. To eliminate the influence of the thermal background, a cold shield is designed in the dewar. The pixel number of spatial dimension is 640. Performance measurement in laboratory and image analysis for flight test will also be presented.

  15. Precise acquisition and unsupervised segmentation of multi-spectral images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez, David Delgado; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær;

    2007-01-01

    In this work, an integrated imaging system to obtain accurate and reproducible multi-spectral images and a novel multi-spectral image segmentation algorithm are proposed. The system collects up to 20 different spectral bands within a range that vary from 395 nm to 970 nm. The system is designed...... to acquire geometrically and chromatically corrected images in homogeneous and diffuse illumination, so images can be compared over time. The proposed segmentation algorithm combines the information provided by all the spectral bands to segment the different regions of interest. Three experiments...... are conducted to show the ability of the system to acquire highly precise, reproducible and standardized multi-spectral images and to show its applicabilities in different situations....

  16. Dual-wavelength diode laser with electrically adjustable wavelength distance at 785  nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumpf, Bernd; Kabitzke, Julia; Fricke, Jörg; Ressel, Peter; Müller, André; Maiwald, Martin; Tränkle, Günther

    2016-08-15

    A spectrally adjustable monolithic dual-wavelength diode laser at 785 nm as an excitation light source for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) is presented. The spectral distance between the two excitation wavelengths can be electrically adjusted between 0 and 2.0 nm using implemented heater elements above the distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) gratings. Output powers up to 180 mW at a temperature of 25°C were measured. The spectral width is smaller than 13 pm, limited by the spectrum analyzer. The device is well-suited for Raman spectroscopy, and the flexible spectral distance allows a target-specific adjustment of the excitation light source for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS). PMID:27519065

  17. Delayed fluorescence spectroscopy and mechanism of the 730 nm component of chloroplast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng-long; XING Da; FAN Duo-wang; QIAN Long; LU Mai

    2006-01-01

    Charge recombination in reaction center (RC) of photosystem Ⅱ(PS Ⅱ)is regarded as the location of 685 nm delayed fluorescence (DF). The mechanism of 730 nm component appearing in the DF spectrum for chloroplast was studied by various spectral analysis methods. Experimental results of the DF spectrum at different chloroplast concentration show that the intensity of peaks at 685nm and 730 nm ascends with the chloroplast concentration increasing when the concentration is relatively low. When the concentration increases to the level of 7.8 μg/ml, a maximum intensity of the peak at 685 nm appears but the intensity of 730 nm peak still increases. The peak at 730 nm finally reaches a maximum intensity at the chloroplast concentration of 31.2 μg/ml while the intensity of the 685 nm peak has apparently fallen down. The results of absorption spectrum show that the ratios of A685 to A730 keep almost constant with the increasing of chloroplast concentration. Furthermore, the excitation spectrum for 730 nm fluorescence shows that the 685nm light has high excitation efficiency.These results indicate that the 730nm component of DF spectrum is the fluorescence of chlorophyll in PS Ⅰ RC excited by 685 nm DF. Meanwhile, this can be further verified by the invariability of DF spectrum at different delay time (1 second~9 seconds).

  18. NM-Series of Representative Manufactured Nanomaterials - Zinc Oxide NM-110, NM-111, NM-112, NM-113: Characterisation and Test Item Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Charanjeet; FRIEDRICHS, Steffi; Levin, Michael; BIRKEDAL Rene; JENSEN Keld Astrup; Pojana, Giulio; Wohlleben, Wendel; Schulte, Stefan; Wiench, Karin; TURNEY T; KOULAEVA D; Marshall, Damian; Hund-Rinke, K.; KOERDEL W.; VAN DOREN E

    2011-01-01

    The European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) provides scientific support to European Union policy regarding nanotechnology. Over the last three years, the JRC, in collaboration with international public and private partners, focused part of its work on establishing and applying a priority list (NM-Series) of Representative Manufactured Nanomaterials (RMNs) in support of one of the most comprehensive nanomaterial research programmes that is currently being carried out: the Organisation ...

  19. Sub-180 nm generation with borate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chen; Yoshimura, Masashi; Tsunoda, Jun; Kaneda, Yushi; Imade, Mamoru; Sasaki, Takatomo; Mori, Yusuke

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrated a new scheme for the generation of 179 nm vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) light with an all-solid-state laser system. It was achieved by mixing the deep-ultraviolet (DUV) of 198.8 nm and the infrared (IR) of 1799.9 nm. While CsB3O5 (CBO) did not satisfy the phase-matching at around 180 nm, 179 nm output was generated with LiB3O5 (LBO) for the first time. The phase-matching property of LBO at around 180 nm was also investigated. There was small deviation from theoretical curve in the measurement, which is still considered reasonable.

  20. Enhancement of 800 nm upconversion emission in a thulium doped tellurite microstructured fiber pumped by a 1560 nm femtosecond fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhixu; Yao, Chuanfei; Wang, Shunbin; Zheng, Kezhi; Xiong, Liangming; Luo, Jie; Lv, Dajuan; Qin, Guanshi; Ohishi, Yasutake; Qin, Weiping

    2016-04-01

    We report enhanced upconversion (UC) fluorescence in Tm3+ doped tellurite microstructured fibers (TDTMFs) fabricated by using a rod-in-tube method. Under the pumping of a 1560 nm femtosecond fiber laser, ultrabroadband supercontinuum light expanding from ˜1050 to ˜2700 nm was generated in a 4 cm long TDTMF. Simultaneously, intense 800 nm UC emission from the 3H4 → 3H6 transition of Tm3+ was observed in the same TDTMF. Compared to that pumped by a 1560 nm continuous wave fiber laser, the UC emission intensity was enhanced by ˜4.1 times. The enhancement was due to the spectral broadening in the TDTMF under the pumping of the 1560 nm femtosecond fiber laser.

  1. Photoinduced spectral changes of photoluminescent gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulionytė, Marija; Marcinonytė, Raminta; Rotomskis, Ričardas

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au NCs), composed of several atoms with sizes up to a few nanometers, have recently stimulated extensive interest. Unique molecule-like behaviors, low toxicity, and facile synthesis make photoluminescent Au NCs a very promising alternative to organic fluorophores and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in broad ranges of biomedical applications. However, using gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) for bioimaging might cause their degradation under continuous excitation with UV light, which might result in toxicity. We report spectral changes of photoluminescent 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES)-coated (Au-MES) NCs under irradiation with UV/blue light. Photoluminescent water soluble Au-MES NCs with a photoluminescence (PL) band maximum at 476 nm (λex=420 nm) were synthesized. Under irradiation with 402 nm wavelength light the size of photoluminescent Au-MES NCs decreased (λem=430 nm). Irradiating the sample solution with 330 nm wavelength light, nonluminescent Au NPs were disrupted, and photoluminescent Au NCs (λem=476 nm) were formed. Irradiation with 330 nm wavelength light did not directly affect photoluminescent Au-MES NCs, however, increase in PL intensity indicated the formation of photoluminescent Au NCs from the disrupted nonluminescent Au NPs. This study gives a good insight into the photostability of MES-coated Au NPs under continuous excitation with UV/blue light.

  2. The other spectral flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gato-Rivera, Beatriz; Gato-Rivera, Beatriz; Rosado, Jose Ignacio

    1995-01-01

    Recently we showed that the spectral flow acting on the N=2 twisted topological theories gives rise to a topological algebra automorphism. Here we point out that the untwisting of that automorphism leads to a spectral flow on the untwisted N=2 superconformal algebra which is different from the usual one. This "other" spectral flow does not interpolate between the chiral ring and the antichiral ring. In particular, it maps the chiral ring into the chiral ring and the antichiral ring into the antichiral ring. We discuss the similarities and differences between both spectral flows. We also analyze their action on null states.

  3. Spectrally tailored supercontinuum generation from single-mode-fiber amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Qiang; Guo, Zhengru; Zhang, Qingshan [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Optical System, Engineering Research Center of Optical Instrument and System (Ministry of Education), School of Optical-Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, 516 Jungong Road, Shanghai 200093 (China); Liu, Yang; Li, Wenxue [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, 3663 Zhongshan North Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); Zeng, Heping, E-mail: hpzeng@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Optical System, Engineering Research Center of Optical Instrument and System (Ministry of Education), School of Optical-Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, 516 Jungong Road, Shanghai 200093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, 3663 Zhongshan North Road, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2014-05-19

    Spectral filtering of an all-normal-dispersion Yb-doped fiber laser was demonstrated effective for broadband supercontinuum generation in the picosecond time region. The picosecond pump pulses were tailored in spectrum with 1 nm band-pass filter installed between two single-mode fiber amplifiers. By tuning the spectral filter around 1028 nm, four-wave mixing was initiated in a photonic crystal fiber spliced with single-mode fiber, as manifested by the simultaneous generation of Stokes wave at 1076 nm and anti-Stokes wave at 984 nm. Four-wave mixing took place in cascade with the influence of stimulated Raman scattering and eventually extended the output spectrum more than 900 nm of 10 dB bandwidth. This technique allows smooth octave supercontinuum generation by using simple single-mode fiber amplifiers rather than complicated multistage large-mode-area fiber amplifiers.

  4. Observation of Quiet Limb in He I 1083.0 nm, H Paschen alpha1281.8 nm and H Brackett gamma 2166.1 nm lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad Choudhary, Debi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we shall present the results of an observational study of the quiet solar limb in the near infrared lines using the New IR Array Camera (NAC) and the vertical spectrograph at the focal plane of McMath-Pierce telescope. The NAC, at the exit port of the spectrograph, was used to record the limb spectrum in HeI 1083.0 nm, Hydrogen Paschen 1281.8 nm and Brackett 2165.5 nm wavelength regions. The NAC is a 1024x1024 InSb Alladin III Detector operating over 1-5 micron range with high density sampling at 0.018 arc second/pixel. The all-reflective optical train minimizes number of surfaces and eliminates ghosts leading to low scatter, ghost-free optics. The close-cycle cryogenic provides a stable cooling environment over six hour period with an accuracy of 0.01K leading to low dark current. The low read out noise combined with low scattered light and dark current makes NAC an ideal detector for making high quality infrared spectral observations of solar limb. The limb spectrums were obtained by placing the spectrograph slit perpendicular to the limb at an interval of 10 degrees around the solar disk. We shall report the intensity profile, line-of-sight velocity and line width distribution around the sun derived from the spectra along the slit.

  5. [Plant Spectral Discrimination Based on Phenological Features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Jian-long; Jia, Kun; Li, Xiao-song

    2015-10-01

    Spectral analysis plays a significant role onplant characteristic identification and mechanism recognition, there were many papers published on the aspects of absorption features in the spectra of chlorophyll and moisture, spectral analysis onvegetation red edge effect, spectra profile feature extraction, spectra profile conversion, vegetation leaf structure and chemical composition impacts on the spectra in past years. However, fewer researches issued on spectral changes caused by plant seasonal changes of life form, chlorophyll, leaf area index. This paper studied on spectral observation of 11 plants of various life form, plant leaf structure and its size, phenological characteristics, they include deciduous forest with broad vertical leaf, needle leaf evergreen forest, needle leaf deciduous forest, deciduous forest with broadflat leaf, high shrub with big leaf, high shrub with little leaf, deciduous forest with broad little leaf, short shrub, meadow, steppe and grass. Field spectral data were observed with SVC-HR768 (Spectra Vista company, USA), the band width covers 350-2 500 nm, spectral resolution reaches 1-4 nm. The features of NDVI, spectral maximum absorption depth in green band, and spectral maximum absorption depth in red band were measured after continuum removal processing, the mean, amplitude and gradient of these features on seasonal change profile were analyzed, meanwhile, separability research on plant spectral feature of growth period and maturation period were compared. The paper presents a calculation method of separability of vegetation spectra which consider feature spatial distances. This index is carried on analysis of the vegetation discrimination. The results show that: the spectral features during plant growth period are easier to distinguish than them during maturation period. With the same features comparison, plant separability of growth period is 3 points higher than it during maturation period. The overall separabilityof vegetation

  6. Spectral studies of ocean water using DOAS

    OpenAIRE

    M. Vountas; Dinter, T.; Bracher, A.; Burrows, J.P.; Sierk, B.

    2007-01-01

    International audience Methods enabling the retrieval of oceanic parameter from the space borne instrumentation Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric ChartographY (SCIAMACHY) using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) are presented. SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT measures back scattered solar radiation at a spectral resolution (0.2 to 1.5 nm). The DOAS method was used for the first time to fit modelled Vibrational Raman Scattering (VRS) in liquid water and in s...

  7. In-vivo multi-spectral confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Andrew R.; Udovich, Joshua A.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2005-03-01

    A multi-spectral confocal microendoscope (MCME) for in-vivo imaging has been developed. The MCME employs a flexible fiber-optic catheter coupled to a slit-scan confocal microscope with an imaging spectrometer. The catheter consists of a fiber-optic imaging bundle linked to a miniature objective and focus assembly. The focus mechanism allows for imaging to a maximum tissue depth of 200 microns. The 3mm diameter catheter may be used on its own or routed though the instrument channel of a commercial endoscope. The confocal nature of the system provides optical sectioning with 3 micron lateral resolution and 30 micron axial resolution. The system incorporates two laser sources and is therefore capable of simultaneous acquisition of spectra from multiple dyes using dual excitation. The prism based multi-spectral detection assembly is typically configured to collect 30 spectral samples over the visible range. The spectral sampling rate varies from 4nm/pixel at 490nm to 8nm/pixel at 660nm and the minimum resolvable wavelength difference varies from 8nm to 16nm over the same spectral range. Each of these characteristics are primarily dictated by the dispersion characteristics of the prism. The MCME is designed to examine cellular structures during optical biopsy and to exploit the diagnostic information contained within the spectral domain. The primary applications for the system include diagnosis of disease in the gastro-intestinal tract and female reproductive system. In-vitro, and ex-vivo multi-spectral results are presented.

  8. Photoreceptor spectral sensitivity in the bumblebee, Bombus impatiens (Hymenoptera: Apidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Skorupski

    Full Text Available The bumblebee Bombus impatiens is increasingly used as a model in comparative studies of colour vision, or in behavioural studies relying on perceptual discrimination of colour. However, full spectral sensitivity data on the photoreceptor inputs underlying colour vision are not available for B. impatiens. Since most known bee species are trichromatic, with photoreceptor spectral sensitivity peaks in the UV, blue and green regions of the spectrum, data from a related species, where spectral sensitivity measurements have been made, are often applied to B impatiens. Nevertheless, species differences in spectral tuning of equivalent photoreceptor classes may result in peaks that differ by several nm, which may have small but significant effects on colour discrimination ability. We therefore used intracellular recording to measure photoreceptor spectral sensitivity in B. impatiens. Spectral peaks were estimated at 347, 424 and 539 nm for UV, blue and green receptors, respectively, suggesting that this species is a UV-blue-green trichromat. Photoreceptor spectral sensitivity peaks are similar to previous measurements from Bombus terrestris, although there is a significant difference in the peak sensitivity of the blue receptor, which is shifted in the short wave direction by 12-13 nm in B. impatiens compared to B. terrestris.

  9. Measurements of spectral snow albedo at Neumayer, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wuttke

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Spectral albedo in high resolution, from 290 to 1050 nm, has been measured at Neumayer, Antarctica, (70°39' S, 8°15' W during the austral summer 2003/2004. At 500 nm, the spectral albedo nearly reaches unity, with slightly lower values below and above 500 nm. Above 600 nm, the spectral albedo decreases to values between 0.45 and 0.75 at 1000 nm. For one cloudless case an albedo up to 1.01 at 500 nm could be determined. This can be explained by the larger directional component of the snow reflectivity for direct incidence, combined with a slightly mislevelled sensor and the snow surface not being perfectly horizontal. A possible explanation for an observed decline in albedo is an increase in snow grain size. The theoretically predicted increase in albedo with increasing solar zenith angle (SZA could not be observed. This is explained by the small range of SZA during albedo measurements, combined with the effect of changing snow conditions outweighing the effect of changing SZA. The measured spectral albedo serves as input for radiative transfer models, describing radiation conditions in Antarctica.

  10. On Longitudinal Spectral Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif

    1979-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the longitudinal spectral coherence differs significantly from the transversal spectral coherence in its dependence on displacement and frequency. An expression for the longitudinal coherence is derived and it is shown how the scale of turbulence, the displacement between...

  11. The High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloranta, E. W.; Roesler, F. L.; Sroga, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    The High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) system was developed for the remote measurement of atmospheric optical properties. Measurements are obtained by the separation of the backscattered signal into aerosol and molecular channels using a high spectral resolution Fabry-Perot optical interferometer to separate the aerosol contributions to backscatter near the laser wavelength from the Doppler-shifted molecular component of the backscatter. The transmitter consists of an optically pumped pulsed dye laser of the oscillator-amplifier design which emits at 467.88 nm, with a bandwidth of less than 0.3 pm. The transmitter and receiver share a common Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, although they do not share the same field stop, but rather two conjugate stops. The HSRL system uses a computer-controlled dual-channel photon-counting data acquisition system providing for stable measurements at very low power levels and an excellent dynamic range. The system has been used to obtain airborne measurements of height profiles of aerosol and molecular backscatter cross sections.

  12. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tohsing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectral sky radiance (380–760 nm is derived from measurements with a Hemispherical Sky Imager (HSI system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated by spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelength 380 nm to 760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less then 20% for all sky conditions.

  13. Spectral analysis of Cu2+ and Mn2+ ions doped borofluorophosphate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Sudhakar Reddy; S Buddhudu

    2007-10-01

    We report here on the development and spectral analysis of Cu2+ (0.5 mol%) and Mn2+ (0.5 mol%) ions doped in two new series of glasses. The visible absorption spectra of Cu2+ and Mn2+ glasses have shown broad absorption bands at 820 nm and 495 nm, respectively. For Cu2+ BFP glasses, excitation at 380 nm, a blue emission at 441 nm and also a weak emission at 418 nm ions have been observed. For Mn2+ ions doped BFP glasses, excitation at 410 nm and a red shift at 605 nm emission have been observed.

  14. Modelling Ar II spectral emission from the ASTRAL helicon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Burgos, Jorge; Boivin, Robert; Loch, Stuart; Kamar, Ola; Ballance, Connor; Pindzola, Mitch

    2008-11-01

    We describe our spectral modeling of ArII emission from the ASTRAL helicon plasma at Auburn University. Collisional-radiative theory is used to model the emitted spectrum, with account being taken for the density and temperature variation along the line of sight. This study has two main aims. Firstly to test the atomic data used in the model and secondly to identify spectral line ratios in the 200 nm - 1000 nm range that could be used as temperature diagnostics. Using the temperature at which Ar II emission starts to be seen we have been able to test recent ionization and recombination data. Using selected spectral lines we were then able to test the importance of the continuum-coupling effects included in the most recent Ar+ electron impact excitation data. Selected spectral line ratios have been identified that show a strong temperature variation and have potential as a temperature diagnostic.

  15. Spectral radius of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Stevanovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Spectral Radius of Graphs provides a thorough overview of important results on the spectral radius of adjacency matrix of graphs that have appeared in the literature in the preceding ten years, most of them with proofs, and including some previously unpublished results of the author. The primer begins with a brief classical review, in order to provide the reader with a foundation for the subsequent chapters. Topics covered include spectral decomposition, the Perron-Frobenius theorem, the Rayleigh quotient, the Weyl inequalities, and the Interlacing theorem. From this introduction, the

  16. Spectral signatures of hydrilla from a tank and field setting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alfonso BLANCO; John J.QU; William E.ROPER

    2012-01-01

    The invasion of hydrilla in many waterways has caused significant problems resulting in high maintenance costs for eradicating this invasive aquatic weed.Present identification methods employed for detecting hydrilla invasions such as aerial photography and videos are difficult,costly,and time consuming.Remote sensing has been used for assessing wetlands and other aquatic vegetation,but very little information is available for detecting hydrilla invasions in coastal estuaries and other water bodies.The objective of this study is to construct a library of spectral signatures for identifying and classifying hydrilla invasions.Spectral signatures of hydrilla were collected from an experimental tank and field locations in a coastal estuary in the upper Chesapeake Bay.These measurements collected from the experimental tank,resulted in spectral signatures with an average peak surface reflectance in the near-infrared (NIR) region of 16% at a wavelength of 818 nm.However,the spectral measurements,collected in the estuary,resulted in a very different spectral signature with two surface reflectance peaks of 6% at wavelengths of 725 nm and 818 nm.The difference in spectral signatures between sites are a result of the components in the water column in the estuary because of increased turbidity (e.g.,nutrients,dissolved matter and suspended matter),and canopy being lower (submerged) in the water column.Spectral signatures of hydrilla observed in the tank and the field had similar characteristics with low reflectance in visible region of the spectrum from 400 to 700 nm,but high in the NIR region from 700 to 900 nm.

  17. Observations of the spectral dependence of linear particle depolarization ratio of aerosols using NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, S. P.; Hair, J. W.; Kahnert, M.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Berkoff, T. A.; Seaman, S. T.; Collins, J. E.; Fenn, M. A.; Rogers, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Linear particle depolarization ratio is presented for three case studies from the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar-2 HSRL-2). Particle depolarization ratio from lidar is an indicator of non-spherical particles and is sensitive to the fraction of non-spherical particles and their size. The HSRL-2 instrument measures depolarization at three wavelengths: 355, 532, and 1064 nm. The three measurement cases presented here include two cases of dust-dominated aerosol and one case of smoke aerosol. These cases have partial analogs in earlier HSRL-1 depolarization measurements at 532 and 1064 nm and in literature, but the availability of three wavelengths gives additional insight into different scenarios for non-spherical particles in the atmosphere. A case of transported Saharan dust has a spectral dependence with a peak of 0.30 at 532 nm with smaller particle depolarization ratios of 0.27 and 0.25 at 1064 and 355 nm, respectively. A case of aerosol containing locally generated wind-blown North American dust has a maximum of 0.38 at 1064 nm, decreasing to 0.37 and 0.24 at 532 and 355 nm, respectively. The cause of the maximum at 1064 nm is inferred to be very large particles that have not settled out of the dust layer. The smoke layer has the opposite spectral dependence, with the peak of 0.24 at 355 nm, decreasing to 0.09 and 0.02 at 532 and 1064 nm, respectively. The depolarization in the smoke case may be explained by the presence of coated soot aggregates. We note that in these specific case studies, the linear particle depolarization ratio for smoke and dust-dominated aerosol are more similar at 355 nm than at 532 nm, having possible implications for using the particle depolarization ratio at a single wavelength for aerosol typing.

  18. Narrow line width operation of a 980 nm gain guided tapered diode laser bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Barrientos-Barria, Jessica;

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate two different schemes for the spectral narrowing of a 12 emitter 980 nm gain guided tapered diode laser bar. In the first scheme, a reflective grating has been used in a Littman Metcalf configuration and the wavelength of the laser emission could be narrowed down from more than 5.5...

  19. Large-mode-area hybrid photonic crystal fiber amplifier at 1178 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Chen, Mingchen; Shirakawa, Akira;

    2015-01-01

    Amplification of 1178 nm light is demonstrated in a large-mode-area single-mode ytterbium-doped hybrid photonic crystal fiber, relying on distributed spectral filtering of spontaneous emission at shorter wavelengths. An output power of 53 W is achieved with 29 dB suppression of parasitic lasing...

  20. Lyman alpha solar spectral irradiance line profile observations and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Martin; Machol, Janet; Quemerais, Eric; Curdt, Werner; Kretschmar, Matthieu; Haberreiter, Margit

    2016-04-01

    Solar lyman alpha solar spectral irradiance measurements are available on a daily basis, but only the 1-nm integrated flux is typically published. The International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland has sponsored a team to make higher spectral resolution data available to the community. Using a combination of SORCE/SOLSTICE and SOHO/SUMER observations plus empirical and semi-empirical modeling, we will produce a dataset of the line profile. Our poster will describe progress towards this goal.

  1. Spectral albedo of arctic snow during intensive melt period

    OpenAIRE

    O. Meinander; Kazadzis, S.; A. Arola; Kivi, R.; Kontu, A.; H. Suokanerva; Aaltonen, V.; Manninen, T.; J.-L. Roujean; O. Hautecoeur

    2010-01-01

    Spectral albedo and water liquid content of intensively melting Arctic snow were measured during the Snow Reflectance Transition Experiment (SNORTEX), in Sodankylä, Finland, in April 2009. The upwelling and downwelling spectral irradiance, measured at 290–550 nm with a double monochromator spectroradiometer, revealed the snow albedo to increase as a function wavelength. At the same time, we found the albedo of melting snow to decrease by ~10%, as a function of time within one day. During four...

  2. Design of an 1800 nm Raman Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    Different approaches are being explored to increase the capacity of communication systems [1,2], both long and short range systems. One approach is by exploiting new optical wavelength bands, outside the conventional communication window from 1530 nm to 1625 nm. Hollow core fibers have been...... in the pump power requirement and deteriorated noise properties. Here we demonstrate a Raman amplifier designed for signal wavelengths around 1800 nm. The amplification fiber is an OFS PM Raman fiber, and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser emitting at 1680 nm [4]. The amplifier was pumped co......-polarized and backward, with respect to the singal. In Fig. 2 a measured Raman on/off gain exceeding 9 dB for 285 mW of injected pump power is obtained in a 4.35 km long fiber. A broadband supercontinuum source was used as a signal from 1700 nm to 1900 nm....

  3. [Study on spectral reflectance characteristics of hemp canopies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yi-Chen; Jia, Kun; Wu, Bing-Fang; Li, Qiang-Zi

    2010-12-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) is a special economic crop and widely used in many field. It is significative for the government to master the information about planting acreage and spatial distribution of hemp for hemp industrial policy decision in China. Remote sensing offers a potential way of monitoring large area for the cultivation of hemp. However, very little study on the spectral properties of hemp is available in the scientific literature. In the present study, the spectral reflectance characteristics of hemp canopy were systematically analyzed based on the spectral data acquired with ASD FieldSpec portable spectrometer. The wavebands and its spectral resolution for discriminating hemp from other plants were identified using difference analysis. The major differences in canopy reflectance of hemp and other plants were observed near 530, 552, 734, 992, 1 213, 1 580 and 2 199 nm, and the maximal difference is near 734 nm. The spectral resolution should be 30 nm or less in visible and near infrared regions, and 50 nm or less in middle infrared regions.

  4. Vowel Inherent Spectral Change

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    It has been traditional in phonetic research to characterize monophthongs using a set of static formant frequencies, i.e., formant frequencies taken from a single time-point in the vowel or averaged over the time-course of the vowel. However, over the last twenty years a growing body of research has demonstrated that, at least for a number of dialects of North American English, vowels which are traditionally described as monophthongs often have substantial spectral change. Vowel Inherent Spectral Change has been observed in speakers’ productions, and has also been found to have a substantial effect on listeners’ perception. In terms of acoustics, the traditional categorical distinction between monophthongs and diphthongs can be replaced by a gradient description of dynamic spectral patterns. This book includes chapters addressing various aspects of vowel inherent spectral change (VISC), including theoretical and experimental studies of the perceptually relevant aspects of VISC, the relationship between ar...

  5. A Fundus Photographic Method with Narrow Spectral Band Luminance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    We perfected the narrow spectral band fundus photographic system using interference filters at the wavelengths of 417, 478, 500, 530, 547, 570, 589, 607, 628 and 648nm. Tests about the light penetration of filters and exposure of various brand films were made on this system. Studies of the contrast of fundal tissues and structures under the different narrow spectral band light were made on 43 Chinese fellow eyes. The results indicates that the interference filters of 570 nm have the highest light penetr...

  6. Hypersensitisation using 266nm Laser Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Canning, John; Kristensen, Martin

    UV-hypersensitisation using 266nm VW-light on hydrogenated Ge-doped fibre is reported. The optimum fluence to be between 5 to 10 kJ/cm2, coinciding with results obtained using 355nm light, indicating same end-process in both reactions.......UV-hypersensitisation using 266nm VW-light on hydrogenated Ge-doped fibre is reported. The optimum fluence to be between 5 to 10 kJ/cm2, coinciding with results obtained using 355nm light, indicating same end-process in both reactions....

  7. Dust Explosion Characteristics of Agglomerated 35 nm and 100 nm Aluminum Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Chun Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the experiment, nanoparticles of 35 nm Al and 100 nm Al powders, respectively, formed particles with average sizes of 161 nm and 167 nm in agglomeration. The characteristics of dust cloud explosions with the two powder sizes, 35 nm and 100 nm, revealed considerable differences, as shown here: (dp/dtmax-35 nm = 1254 bar/s, (dp/dtmax-100 nm = 1105 bar/s; Pmax-35 nm = 7.5 bar, Pmax-100 nm = 12.3 bar, and MEC-35 nm = 40 g/m3, MEC-100 nm = 50 g/m3. The reason of Pmax-35 nm value is smaller than Pmax-100 nm may be due to agglomeration. From an analysis of the explosive residue, the study found that nanoparticles of 35 nm Al powder became filamentous strands after an explosion, where most of 100 nm Al nanoparticles maintained a spherical structure, This may be because the initial melting temperature of 35 nm Al is 435.71°C, while that for 100 nm Al is 523.58°C, higher by 87.87°C. This study discovered that explosive property between the 35 nm Al and 100 nm Al powders after agglomeration were different.

  8. NBS (National Bureau of Standards) measurement services: spectral-irradiance calibrations. Special pub. (Final)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the measurement methods and instrumentation used in realization and transfer of the NBS scale of spectral irradiance. The basic measurement equation for the irradiance realization is derived. The spectral responsivity function, linearity of response, and size of source effect of the spectroradiometer are described. The analysis of sources of error and estimates of uncertainty are described. The analysis of sources of error and estimates of uncertainty are described. The assigned uncertainties (3-sigma level) in spectral irradiance range from 2.2% at 250 nm to 1.0% at 654.6 nm to 6.5% at 2400 nm

  9. Increased spectral bandwidths in nonlinear conversion processes by use of multicrystal designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M

    1998-10-15

    The fourth-harmonic generation of broadband 243-nm radiation is reported. The broadband radiation is achieved by implementation of a multicrystal design to overcome spectral bandwidth limitations, and a plane-wave analysis is developed that shows increased spectral bandwidths for these designs. The fourth harmonic of a Cr:LiSAF laser operating at 972 nm is generated in beta-barium borate (BBO). The results demonstrate a spectral bandwidth at 243 nm more than five times broader than that which is expected from a single BBO crystal of equivalent length.

  10. Increased spectral bandwidths in nonlinear conversion processes by use of multicrystal designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M

    1998-10-15

    The fourth-harmonic generation of broadband 243-nm radiation is reported. The broadband radiation is achieved by implementation of a multicrystal design to overcome spectral bandwidth limitations, and a plane-wave analysis is developed that shows increased spectral bandwidths for these designs. The fourth harmonic of a Cr:LiSAF laser operating at 972 nm is generated in beta-barium borate (BBO). The results demonstrate a spectral bandwidth at 243 nm more than five times broader than that which is expected from a single BBO crystal of equivalent length. PMID:18091854

  11. Spectrally selective glazings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  12. A 23-dB bismuth-doped optical fiber amplifier for a 1700-nm band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firstov, Sergei V; Alyshev, Sergey V; Riumkin, Konstantin E; Khopin, Vladimir F; Guryanov, Alexey N; Melkumov, Mikhail A; Dianov, Evgeny M

    2016-01-01

    It is now almost twenty-five years since the first Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA) was demonstrated. Currently, the EDFA is one of the most important elements widely used in different kinds of fiber-optic communication systems. However, driven by a constantly increasing demand, the network traffic, growing exponentially over decades, will lead to the overload of these systems ("capacity crunch") because the operation of the EDFA is limited to a spectral region of 1530-1610 nm. It will require a search for new technologies and, in this respect, the development of optical amplifiers for new spectral regions can be a promising approach. Most of fiber-optic amplifiers are created using rare-earth-doped materials. As a result, wide bands in shorter (1150-1530 nm) and longer wavelength (1600-1750 nm) regions with respect to the gain band of Er-doped fibers are still uncovered. Here we report on the development of a novel fiber amplifier operating in a spectral region of 1640-1770 nm pumped by commercially available laser diodes at 1550 nm. This amplifier was realized using bismuth-doped high-germania silicate fibers fabricated by MCVD technique. PMID:27357592

  13. Shot-to-shot spectrally-resolved characterization of continuous-wave-triggered supercontinuum near 1 um

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Zhibo; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate shot-to-shot (at a rate of 20 MHz), broadband (>200 nm), spectrally-resolved (spectral resolution of 0.2 nm) statistical characterization of continuous-wave-triggered supercontinuum in the 1 um regime, enabled by optical time stretch.

  14. Narrow linewidth broadband tunable semiconductor laser at 840 nm with dual acousto-optic tunable configuration for OCT applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorovskiy, Alexander; Shramenko, Mikhail V.; Lobintsov, Andrei A.; Yakubovich, Sergei D.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a tunable narrow linewidth semiconductor laser for the 840 nm spectral range. The laser has a linear cavity comprised of polarization maintaining (PM) fiber. A broadband semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) in in-line fiber-coupled configuration acts as a gain element. It is based on InGaAs quantum-well (QW) active layer. SOA allows for tuning bandwidth exceeding 25 nm around 840 nm. Small-signal fiber-to-fiber gain of SOA is around 30 dB. A pair of acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF) with a quasi-collinear interaction of optical and acoustic waves are utilized as spectrally selective elements. AOTF technology benefits in continuous tuning, broadband operation, excellent reproducibility and stability of the signal, as well as a high accuracy of wavelength selectivity due to the absence of mechanically moving components. A single AOTF configuration has typical linewidth in 0.05-0.15 nm range due to a frequency shift obtained during each roundtrip. A sequential AOTF arrangement enables instantaneous linewidth generation of <0.01 nm by compensating for this shift. Linewidth as narrow as 0.0036 nm is observed at 846 nm wavelength using a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer with 50 MHz spectral resolution. Output power is in the range of 1 mW. While the majority of commercial tunable sources operate in 1060-1550 nm spectral ranges, the 840 nm spectral range is beneficial for optical coherence tomography (OCT). The developed narrow linewidth laser can be relevant for OCT with extended imaging depth, as well as spectroscopy, non-destructive testing and other applications.

  15. Laser hypersensitisation using 266nm light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Canning, J.; Kristensen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    UV hypersensitisation using CW 266 nm light on hydrogenated Ge-doped fibre is reported. The optimum sensitisation fluence is found to be in the range of 5 to 10 kJ/cm2, coinciding with previous results obtained using 355 nm light, indicating the same end-process used in the photochemical reaction...

  16. High Resolving Power Volume Diffractive Gratings for 400-2700 nm Spectral Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main purpose of this NASA SBIR Phase II proposal is development of a novel type of high resolving power diffraction gratings based on volume Bragg gratings...

  17. High Resolving Power Volume Diffractive Gratings for 400-2700 nm Spectral Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this NASA SBIR Phase I proposal is to develop a novel type of high resolving power diffraction gratings based on volume Bragg gratings technology....

  18. Ytterbium‐doped distributed spectral filtering photonic crystal fibers for use at wavelengths above 1100 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    ‐to‐active volume ratio. Thereby, a stable beam with nearly diffraction‐limited quality can be achieved. The fibers are often cladding‐pumped with a number of low‐brightness semiconductor laser diodes, in which way a low‐cost pump of several kilowatts can be achieved [1]. However, the frequencies, which can......Rare‐earth doped high‐power fiber lasers and amplifiers have attracted a lot of attention, due to the advantages of the fiber amplification scheme. Compared to conventional optically pumped bulk lasers, heat is dissipated much more effectively in fiber lasers, having a large surface...... to avoid parasitic lasing due to Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) build‐up. Nonlinear effects, such as stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering and four‐wave mixing, set the upper limit for achievable powers in fiber amplifiers. To increase the nonlinear threshold, Large‐Mode‐Area...

  19. Noncomputable Spectral Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Teutsch, J

    2007-01-01

    It is possible to enumerate all computer programs. In particular, for every partial computable function, there is a shortest program which computes that function. f-MIN is the set of indices for shortest programs. In 1972, Meyer showed that f-MIN is Turing equivalent to 0'', the halting set with halting set oracle. This paper generalizes the notion of shortest programs, and we use various measures from computability theory to describe the complexity of the resulting "spectral sets." We show that under certain Godel numberings, the spectral sets are exactly the canonical sets 0', 0'', 0''', ... up to Turing equivalence. This is probably not true in general, however we show that spectral sets always contain some useful information. We show that immunity, or "thinness" is a useful characteristic for distinguishing between spectral sets. In the final chapter, we construct a set which neither contains nor is disjoint from any infinite arithmetic set, yet it is 0-majorized and contains a natural spectral set. Thus ...

  20. High-q microring resonator with narrow free spectral range for pulse repetition rate multiplication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Ji, Hua; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn;

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator microring resonator with a free-spectral-range of 0.32 nm, an extinction ratio of 27 dB, and a quality factor of ~140900 at 1550 nm that is used for pulse repetition-rate multiplication from 10 to 40 GHz.......We demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator microring resonator with a free-spectral-range of 0.32 nm, an extinction ratio of 27 dB, and a quality factor of ~140900 at 1550 nm that is used for pulse repetition-rate multiplication from 10 to 40 GHz....

  1. Photovoltaic spectral responsivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Dunlavy, D.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the various elemental random and nonrandom error sources in typical spectral responsivity measurement systems. The authors focus specifically on the filter and grating monochrometer-based spectral responsivity measurement systems used by the Photovoltaic (PV) performance characterization team at NREL. A variety of subtle measurement errors can occur that arise from a finite photo-current response time, bandwidth of the monochromatic light, waveform of the monochromatic light, and spatial uniformity of the monochromatic and bias lights; the errors depend on the light source, PV technology, and measurement system. The quantum efficiency can be a function of he voltage bias, light bias level, and, for some structures, the spectral content of the bias light or location on the PV device. This paper compares the advantages and problems associated with semiconductor-detector-based calibrations and pyroelectric-detector-based calibrations. Different current-to-voltage conversion and ac photo-current detection strategies employed at NREL are compared and contrasted.

  2. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  3. Design of an 1800nm Raman amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental results for a Raman amplifier that operates at 1810 nm and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser at 1680 nm. Both the pump laser and the Raman amplifier is polarization maintaining. A challenge when scaling Raman amplifiers to longer wavelengths is the increase...... performance of the amplifier is also investigated for both configurations. Our results show an on/off gain exceeding 20 dB at 1810 nm for which the obtained effective noise figure is below 3 dB....

  4. Narrow linewidth broadband tunable semiconductor laser at 840 nm with dual acousto-optic tunable configuration for OCT applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorovskiy, Alexander; Shramenko, Mikhail V.; Lobintsov, Andrei A.; Yakubovich, Sergei D.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a tunable narrow linewidth semiconductor laser for the 840 nm spectral range. The laser has a linear cavity comprised of polarization maintaining (PM) fiber. A broadband semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) in in-line fiber-coupled configuration acts as a gain element. It is based on InGaAs quantum-well (QW) active layer. SOA allows for tuning bandwidth exceeding 25 nm around 840 nm. Small-signal fiber-to-fiber gain of SOA is around 30 dB. A pair of acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF) with a quasi-collinear interaction of optical and acoustic waves are utilized as spectrally selective elements. AOTF technology benefits in continuous tuning, broadband operation, excellent reproducibility and stability of the signal, as well as a high accuracy of wavelength selectivity due to the absence of mechanically moving components. A single AOTF configuration has typical linewidth in 0.05-0.15 nm range due to a frequency shift obtained during each roundtrip. A sequential AOTF arrangement enables instantaneous linewidth generation of power is in the range of 1 mW. While the majority of commercial tunable sources operate in 1060-1550 nm spectral ranges, the 840 nm spectral range is beneficial for optical coherence tomography (OCT). The developed narrow linewidth laser can be relevant for OCT with extended imaging depth, as well as spectroscopy, non-destructive testing and other applications.

  5. Design and implementation of a sub-nm resolution microspectrometer based on a Linear-Variable Optical Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadi, Arvin; Wu, Huaiwen; de Graaf, Ger; Wolffenbuttel, Reinoud

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the concept of a microspectrometer based on a Linear Variable Optical Filter (LVOF) for operation in the visible spectrum is presented and used in two different designs: the first is for the narrow spectral band between 610 nm and 680 nm, whereas the other is for the wider spectral band between 570 nm and 740 nm. Design considerations, fabrication and measurement results of the LVOF are presented. An iterative signal processing algorithm based on an initial calibration has been implemented to enhance the spectral resolution. Experimental validation is based on the spectrum of a Neon lamp. The results of measurements have been used to analyze the operating limits of the concept and to explain the sources of error in the algorithm. It is shown that the main benefits of a LVOF-based microspectrometer are in case of implementation in a narrowband application. The realized LVOF microspectrometers show a spectral resolution of 2.2 nm in the wideband design and 0.7 nm in the narrowband design. PMID:22274371

  6. DPAL pump system exceeding 3kW at 766nm and 30 GHz bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenning, Tobias; McCormick, Dan; Irwin, David; Stapleton, Dean; Guiney, Tina; Patterson, Steve

    2016-03-01

    Due to their low quantum defect, diode pumped alkali metal vapor lasers (DPALs) offer the promise of scalability to very high average power levels while maintaining excellent beam quality. Research on DPALs has progressed to ever increasing power levels across multiple gain media species over the last years, necessitating pump power in the kW range. Each material requires a specific pump wavelength: near 852nm for cesium, 780nm for rubidium, 766nm for potassium, and 670nm for lithium atoms. The shorter pump wavelength below 800nm are outside the typical wavelength range for pump diodes developed for diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSS). The biggest challenge in pumping these materials efficiently is the need for maintaining the narrow gain media absorption band of approximately 0.01nm while greatly increasing power. Typical high power diode lasers achieve spectral widths around 3nm (FWHM) in the near infrared spectrum, but optical gratings may be used internal or external to the cavity to reduce the spectral width. Recently, experimental results have shown yet narrower line widths ranging from picometers at very low power levels to sub-100 picometers for water cooled stacks around 1kW of output power. The focus of this work is the development of a fiber-based pump system for potassium DPAL. The individual tasks are the development of high power 766nm chip material, a fiber-coupled module as a building block, and a scalable system design to address power requirements from hundreds of watts to tens of kilowatts. Results for a 3kW system achieving ~30GHz bandwidth at 766nm will be shown. Approaches for power-scaling and size reduction will be discussed.

  7. Spectral Networks and Snakes

    CERN Document Server

    Gaiotto, Davide; Neitzke, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We apply and illustrate the techniques of spectral networks in a large collection of A_{K-1} theories of class S, which we call "lifted A_1 theories." Our construction makes contact with Fock and Goncharov's work on higher Teichmuller theory. In particular we show that the Darboux coordinates on moduli spaces of flat connections which come from certain special spectral networks coincide with the Fock-Goncharov coordinates. We show, moreover, how these techniques can be used to study the BPS spectra of lifted A_1 theories. In particular, we determine the spectrum generators for all the lifts of a simple superconformal field theory.

  8. Low-Cost Spectral Sensor Development Description.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Yellowhair, Julius

    2014-11-01

    Solar spectral data for all parts of the US is limited due in part to the high cost of commercial spectrometers. Solar spectral information is necessary for accurate photovoltaic (PV) performance forecasting, especially for large utility-scale PV installations. A low-cost solar spectral sensor would address the obstacles and needs. In this report, a novel low-cost, discrete- band sensor device, comprised of five narrow-band sensors, is described. The hardware is comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf components to keep the cost low. Data processing algorithms were developed and are being refined for robustness. PV module short-circuit current ( I sc ) prediction methods were developed based on interaction-terms regression methodology and spectrum reconstruction methodology for computing I sc . The results suggest the computed spectrum using the reconstruction method agreed well with the measured spectrum from the wide-band spectrometer (RMS error of 38.2 W/m 2 -nm). Further analysis of computed I sc found a close correspondence of 0.05 A RMS error. The goal is for ubiquitous adoption of the low-cost spectral sensor in solar PV and other applications such as weather forecasting.

  9. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tohsing

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Spectral sky radiance (380–760 nm is derived from measurements with a hemispherical sky imager (HSI system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images, non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated using spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelengths 380–760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less than 20% for all sky conditions.

  10. A Flat Spectral Response AWG Demultiplexer Composed of Slabs with Islands and Peninsulas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutaka; Natsume; Junji; Yamauchi; Ryoichi; Tazawa; Koji; Ishikawa; Shigeru; Kawaguchi; Yuichi; Yamamoto; Hisamatsu; Nakano

    2003-01-01

    Phase adjustment elements called islands and peninsulas are introduced to obtain an AWG demultiplexer with a flat spectral response. Use of the peninsulas enables us to achieve a IdB bandwidth of 0.5 nm.

  11. A Flat Spectral Response AWG Demultiplexer Composed of Slabs with Islands and Peninsulas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutaka Natsume; Junji Yamauchi; Ryoichi Tazawa; Koji Ishikawa; Shigeru Kawaguchi; Yuichi Yamamoto; Hisamatsu Nakano

    2003-01-01

    Phase adjustment elements called islands and peninsulas are introduced to obtain an AWG demultiplexer with a flat spectral response. Use of the peninsulas enables us to achieve a 1dB bandwidth of 0.5 nm.

  12. The properties of ITE's silicon avalanche photodiodes within the spectral range used in scintillation detection

    CERN Document Server

    Wegrzecka, I

    1999-01-01

    The design and properties of 3 mm silicon avalanche photodiodes developed at ITE are presented. Their performance parameters within the spectral range applicable in scintillation detection (400-700 nm) are discussed and compared to those for near infrared radiation.

  13. Spectral library searching in proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griss, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Spectral library searching has become a mature method to identify tandem mass spectra in proteomics data analysis. This review provides a comprehensive overview of available spectral library search engines and highlights their distinct features. Additionally, resources providing spectral libraries are summarized and tools presented that extend experimental spectral libraries by simulating spectra. Finally, spectrum clustering algorithms are discussed that utilize the same spectrum-to-spectrum matching algorithms as spectral library search engines and allow novel methods to analyse proteomics data.

  14. Spectral tunability of realistic plasmonic nanoantennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portela, Alejandro; Matsui, Hiroaki; Tabata, Hitoshi, E-mail: tabata@bioeng.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Yano, Takaaki; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Hara, Masahiko [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Santschi, Christian; Martin, Olivier J. F. [Nanophotonics and Metrology Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Lausanne CH-1015 (Switzerland)

    2014-09-01

    Single nanoantenna spectroscopy was carried out on realistic dipole nanoantennas with various arm lengths and gap sizes fabricated by electron-beam lithography. A significant difference in resonance wavelength between realistic and ideal nanoantennas was found by comparing their spectral response. Consequently, the spectral tunability (96 nm) of the structures was significantly lower than that of simulated ideal nanoantennas. These observations, attributed to the nanofabrication process, are related to imperfections in the geometry, added metal adhesion layer, and shape modifications, which are analyzed in this work. Our results provide important information for the design of dipole nanoantennas clarifying the role of the structural modifications on the resonance spectra, as supported by calculations.

  15. 130-nm tunable grating-mirror VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We have reported that a combination of the high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirror as movable mirror and the extended cavity configuration with an antireflection layer can provide a tuning wavelength range of 100 nm for tunable VCSELs. Here, we report that using the air-coupled cavity configurat......We have reported that a combination of the high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirror as movable mirror and the extended cavity configuration with an antireflection layer can provide a tuning wavelength range of 100 nm for tunable VCSELs. Here, we report that using the air-coupled cavity...... configuration instead of the extended cavity configuration can bring 130-nm tuning range around 1330-nm wavelength. The air-coupled cavity is known to reduce the quantum confinement factor in VCSELs, increasing threshold. In our air-coupled cavity HCG VCSEL case, the very short power penetration length...

  16. Laser ablation synthesis and spectral characterization of ruby nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, M. S.; Bardina, A. A.; Savelyev, A. G.; Khramov, V. N.; Khaydukov, E. V.

    2016-04-01

    The laser ablation method was implemented for synthesis of ruby nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were obtained by nanosecond ablation of bulk ruby crystal in 10% ethanol water solution. The nanoparticles enable water colloid stability and exhibit narrow photoluminescent line at 694 nm when pumped at blue-green spectral range. The ruby nanoparticles were characterized by SEM and Z-sizer.

  17. PM Raman fiber laser at 1679 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth.......We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth....

  18. Cascaded quadratic soliton compression at 800 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Moses, Jeffrey;

    2007-01-01

    We study soliton compression in quadratic nonlinear materials at 800 nm, where group-velocity mismatch dominates. We develop a nonlocal theory showing that efficient compression depends strongly on characteristic nonlocal time scales related to pulse dispersion.......We study soliton compression in quadratic nonlinear materials at 800 nm, where group-velocity mismatch dominates. We develop a nonlocal theory showing that efficient compression depends strongly on characteristic nonlocal time scales related to pulse dispersion....

  19. A novel 852-nm tunable fiber laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanlong Shen; Chun Gu; LixinXu; Anting Wang; Hai Ming; Yang Liu; Xiaobing Wang

    2009-01-01

    @@ We report a novel fiber laser operating at 850-nm band by using semiconductor optical amplifier and fiber grating.The laser system is stable, compact, and the operating wavelength can be tuned continuously from about 851 to 854 nm for Cs atomic clock system by stretching the fiber grating.An output power up to 20 mW is obtained with a signal-to-background ratio beyond 30 dB.

  20. Spectral signatures of chirality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    We present a new way of measuring chirality, via the spectral shift of photonic band gaps in one-dimensional structures. We derive an explicit mapping of the problem of oblique incidence of circularly polarized light on a chiral one-dimensional photonic crystal with negligible index contrast to t...

  1. Laser pulse transient method for measuring the normal spectral emissivity of samples with arbitrary surface quality

    OpenAIRE

    Jeromen, Andrej; Grabec, Igor; Govekar, Edvard

    2015-01-01

    A laser pulse transient method for measuring normal spectral emissivity is described. In this method, a laser pulse (l=1064 nm) irradiates the top surface of a flat specimen. A two-dimensional temperature response of the bottom surface is measured with a calibrated thermographic camera. By solving an axisymmetric boundary value heat conduction problem, the normal spectral emissivity at 1064 nm is determined by using an iterative nonlinear least-squares estimation procedure. The method can be ...

  2. Spectral signature of short attosecond pulse trains

    CERN Document Server

    Mansten, E; Mauritsson, J; Ruchon, T; LHuillier, A; Tate, J; Gaarde, M B; Eckle, P; Guandalini, A; Holler, M; Schapper, F; Gallmann, L; Keller, U

    2008-01-01

    We report experimental measurements of high-order harmonic spectra generated in Ar using a carrier-envelope-offset (CEO) stabilized 12 fs, 800nm laser field and a fraction (less than 10%) of its second harmonic. Additional spectral peaks are observed between the harmonic peaks, which are due to interferences between multiple pulses in the train. The position of these peaks varies with the CEO and their number is directly related to the number of pulses in the train. An analytical model, as well as numerical simulations, support our interpretation.

  3. Comparison of Nd:YAG Ceramic Laser Pumped at 885 nm and 808 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Nan; ZHANG Xiao-Fu; MA Qing-Lei; WANG Bao-Shan; CUI Da-Fu; PENG Qin-Jun; XU Zu-Yan; PAN Yu-Bai; FENG Xi-Qi

    2009-01-01

    Laser performance of 1064 nm domestic Nd: YA G ceramic lasers for 885 nm direct pumping and 808 nm traditional pumping are compared. Higher slope efficiency of 34% and maximum output power of 16.5 W are obtained for the 885nm pump with a 6ram length 1 at% Nd:YAG ceramic. The advantages for 885nm direct pumping are discussed in detail. This pumping scheme for highly doping a Nd:YAG ceramic laser is considered as an available way to generate high power and good beam quality simultaneously.

  4. The solar chromosphere at high resolution with IBIS. I. New insights from the Ca II 854.2 nm line

    CERN Document Server

    Cauzzi, G; Uitenbroek, H; Cavallini, F; Falchi, A; Falciani, R; Janssen, K; Rimmele, T; Vecchio, A; Woeger, F

    2007-01-01

    (Abridged) Aims: In this paper, we seek to establish the suitability of imaging spectroscopy performed in the Ca II 854.2 nm line as a means to investigate the solar chromosphere at high resolution. Methods: We utilize monochromatic images obtained with the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) at multiple wavelengths within the Ca II 854.2 nm line and over several quiet areas. We analyze both the morphological properties derived from narrow-band monochromatic images and the average spectral properties of distinct solar features such as network points, internetwork areas and fibrils. Results: The spectral properties derived over quiet-Sun targets are in full agreement with earlier results obtained with fixed-slit spectrographic observations, highlighting the reliability of the spectral information obtained with IBIS. Furthermore, the very narrowband IBIS imaging reveals with much clarity the dual nature of the Ca II 854.2 nm line: its outer wings gradually sample the solar photosphere, while the c...

  5. The use of hyperspectral imaging in the VNIR (400-1000nm) and SWIR range (1000-2500nm) for detecting counterfeit drugs with identical API composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyński, Sławomir; Koprowski, Robert; Marmion, Mathieu; Duda, Piotr; Błońska-Fajfrowska, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    The risk of death from taking counterfeit drugs is now greater than the probability of dying from malaria and AIDS combined (at least half a million deaths each year). At the same time, counterfeit medicines are falsified more and more "skillfully". According to WHO about 10% of counterfeit drugs are copies of original products. The methods of hyperspectral imaging and image analysis and processing were used to detect counterfeit drugs. Original Viagra® (Pfizer) and counterfeit tablets were compared. Hyperspectral imaging was used to acquire hyperspectral data cubes from both original and counterfeit tablets in the spectral range of 400-2500nm. Spectral parameters for both the original Viagra® and counterfeit drugs were compared. Grey-Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) analysis and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were performed. Hyperspectral analysis of the surface of the original Viagra® and counterfeit tablets demonstrates significant differences in reflectance (maximum difference for 1619.75nm). The GLCM contrast for the falsified drug is on average higher than for the original one 16±4%. GLCM contrast analysis enables to quantify homogeneity of distribution of tablet ingredients and enables to distinguish tablets with identical chemical composition. SWIR (1000-2500nm) hyperspectral imaging has a definite advantage over imaging in VNIR (400-1000nm) - higher wavelength is less sensitive to non-uniform illumination. PMID:27591580

  6. Liquid optical phantoms mimicking spectral characteristics of laboratory mouse biotissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loginova, D. A.; Sergeeva, E. A.; Krainov, A. D.; Agrba, P. D.; Kirillin, M. Yu

    2016-06-01

    Optical phantoms mimicking optical properties of real biotissues in the visible and IR spectral regions are developed based on measurements of the spectral characteristics of ex vivo samples of laboratory mouse biotissues. The phantoms are composed of aqueous solutions of Lipofundin, Indian ink and red ink with different spectral characteristics. The deviations of the measured absorption and scattering coefficients of phantoms in the wavelength range 480 – 580 nm from the corresponding values for real biotissues do not exceed 25% and 2%, respectively. For phantoms in the wavelength region 580 – 880 nm, the deviations of the absorption coefficient do not exceed 40% and the deviations of the scattering coefficient do not exceed 25%. These values, in general, fall within the range of variations for different individual mice of one strain.

  7. Compact multi-spectral imaging system for dermatology and neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordmans, Herke Jan; de Roode, Rowland; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2007-03-01

    A compact multi-spectral imaging system is presented as diagnostic tool in dermatology and neurosurgery. Using an electronically tunable filter, a sensitive high resolution digital camera, 140 spectral images from 400 nm up to 720 nm are acquired in 40 s. Advanced image processing algorithms are used to enable interactive acquisition, viewing, image registration and image analysis. Experiments in the department of dermatology and neurosurgery show that multispectral imaging reveals much more detail than conventional medical photography or a surgical microscope, as images can be reprocessed to enhance the view on e.g. tumor boundaries. Using a hardware-based interactive registration algorithm, multi-spectral images can be aligned to correct for motion occurred during image acquisition or to compare acquisitions from different moments in time. The system shows to be a powerful diagnostics tool for medical imaging in the visual and near IR range.

  8. Spectral signature of Egyptian crude oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crude petroleum oils are complex mixtures of diverse hydrocarbons, in widely varying compositions, that originate from a variety of geological sources. Fluorescence emission spectra have been measured for two types of Egyptian crude petroleum oil, its light and heavy products over a broad range of excitation and emission wavelengths. Both types of crude oil products are characterized by spectral signatures with a differing topography: the number of fluorescent peaks, their coordinates (λex, λem) on the plane of the three dimensions spectrum, and the shape of the bands formed by the contour line density, changeable in either direction. The refined light oil shows emission spectra at λmax between 350 and 500 nm according to the excitation wavelength. The refined heavy oil shows very broad unstructured emission spectra with λmax > 400 nm. As a group, they could certainly be distinguished from the light oil samples and most of the crude oil

  9. Effects of 946-nm thermal shift and broadening on Nd3+:YAG laser performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed Ebrahim, Pourmand; Ghasem, Rezaei

    2015-12-01

    Spectroscopic properties of flashlamp pumped Nd3+:YAG laser are studied as a function of temperature in a range from -30 °C to 60 °C. The spectral width and shift of quasi three-level 946.0-nm inter-Stark emission within the respective intermanifold transitions of 4F3/2 → 4I9/2 are investigated. The 946.0-nm line shifts toward the shorter wavelength and broadens. In addition, the threshold power and slope efficiency of the 946.0-nm laser line are quantified with temperature. The lower the temperature, the lower the threshold power is and the higher the slope efficiency of the 946.0-nm laser line is, thus the higher the laser output is. This phenomenon is attributed to the ion-phonon interaction and the thermal population in the ground state. Project supported by Estahban Branch, Islamic Azad University.

  10. Retinal Oximetry with 510-600 nm Light Based on Partial Least-Squares Regression Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Hidenobu; Furukawa, Hiromitsu

    2010-11-01

    The oxygen saturation distribution in the retinal blood stream is estimated by measuring spectral images and adopting the partial-least squares regression. The wavelengths range used for the calculation is from 510 to 600 nm. The regression model for estimating the retinal oxygen saturation is built on the basis of the arterial and venous blood spectra. The experiment is performed using an originally designed spectral ophthalmoscope. The obtained two-dimensional (2D) oxygen saturation indicates the reasonable oxygen level across the retina. The measurement quality is compared with those obtained using other wavelengths sets and data processing methods.

  11. SPECTRAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SELECTED HERMATYPIC CORALS FROM GULF OF KACHCHH, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ray Chaudhury

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hermatypic, scleractinian corals are the most important benthic substrates in a coral reef ecosystem. The existing, high (spatial resolution, broad-band, multi-spectral, space-borne sensors have limited capability to spatially detect and spectrally discriminate coral substrates. In situ hyperspectral signatures of eight coral targets were collected with the help of Analytical Spectral Devices FieldSpec spectroradiometer from Paga and Laku Point reefs of Gulf of Kachchh, India to study the spectral behaviour of corals. The eight coral targets consisted of seven live corals representing four distinct colony morphologies and one bleached coral target. The coral spectra were studied over a continuous range of 350 to 1350 nm. The corals strongly reflected in the NIR and MIR regions with regional central maximas located at 820 and 1070 nm respectively. In the visible region the live coral spectra conformed to "brown mode" of coral reflectance with triple-peaked pattern at 575, 600 and 650 nm. All coral spectra are characterized with two distinct absorption features: chlorophyll absorption at 675 nm and water absorption at 975 nm. The live and the bleached corals get distinguished in the visible region over 400 to 600 nm region. Water column over the targets modifies the spectral shape and magnitude. First and second-order derivatives help in identifying spectral windows to distinguish live and bleached corals.

  12. Photopic spectral sensitivities of the red and the yellow field of the pigeon retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortel, J.F.; Wubbels, R.J.; Nuboer, J.F.W.

    1984-01-01

    The spectral sensitivities of the red field and the yellow field in the retina of the homing pigeon (Columba Livia) were determined on the basis of ERG responses. Between 450 and 550 nm the relative spectral sensitivity of the yellow field turned out to be higher than that of the red field. The resu

  13. Spectral correlation control in down-converted photon pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Andrzej; Kolenderski, Piotr

    2016-07-01

    Sources of photon pairs based on the spontaneous parametric down-conversion process are commonly used for long-distance quantum communication and quantum information processing. The key feature for improving the range of transmission is engineering their spectral properties. Our analysis shows the way for full control of spectral correlation within a fiber-coupled photon pair. The result of extensive numerical simulations allows us to specify the settings for the generation of pairs featuring positive-energy correlation, which can potentially improve the signal-to-noise ratio in practical implementation of quantum communication protocols. We analytically and numerically analyze the characteristics of a source based on a β -barium borate crystal cut for type-II phase matching at the degenerated frequencies 755 nm →1550 nm +1550 nm . The presented framework is general and can be applied to other crystals.

  14. Spectral estimation of soil water content in visible and near infra-red range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Nagy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Soils can be examined on the basis of spectral data, using such methods with which the reflected radiation can be divided into a large number of (several hundreds small spectral channel (some nm. Based on the spectral characteristics of the soils, or the different index numbers calculated from hyperspectral data water content of soils can be well characterized. The examined soil samples were coming from different apple orchards of which soils had different physical characteristics (sandy loamy and clay. The goals of my experiments were the evaluation of spectral measurement method for soil content detection, and to carry out algorithms for fast field scale spectral evaluation of different soil water content. The spectral measuring was carried out by laboratory scale AvaSpec 2048 spectrometer at 400 – 1000 nm wavelength interval with 0.6 nm spectral resolutions and by ASD FieldSpec Junior at 350 – 2500 nm. After drying, dry soil samples were watered by 2.5 m/m% till maximal saturation, and each wetting was measured spectrally. Based on spectral properties, reflectances were decreased in the whole spectral range within the continuous wetting due to the high absorption characteristics of water. The most water sensitive spectral ranges were selected by principal component, and such algorithms were created, with which the water content can be detectable in the certain soil. The algorithms can facilitate farmers for irrigation scheduling of their orchards. These results can also be utilizable in precision water management, since it can be a basis for such integrated active sensors with LED or laser light source, measuring reflectance at the certain spectral range, which can facilitate real time water status assessment of orchards.

  15. Fiber delivered two-color picosecond source through nonlinear spectral transformation for coherent Raman scattering imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ke; Xu, Chris

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a two-color, fiber-delivered picosecond source for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) imaging through nonlinear spectral transformation. The wavelength tunable picosecond pump is generated by nonlinear spectral compression of a prechirped femtosecond pulse in a fiber wavelength division multiplexer (WDM). The 1064-nm synchronized picosecond Stokes pulse is generated through pulse carving of a continuous wave laser, nonlinear spectral broadening in 100-m standard single-mode fiber,...

  16. Radiation Failures in Intel 14nm Microprocessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossev, Dobrin P.; Duncan, Adam R.; Gadlage, Matthew J.; Roach, Austin H.; Kay, Matthew J.; Szabo, Carl; Berger, Tammy J.; York, Darin A.; Williams, Aaron; LaBel, K.; Ingalls, James D.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the 14 nm Intel Broadwell 5th generation core series 5005U-i3 and 5200U-i5 was mounted on Dell Inspiron laptops, MSI Cubi and Gigabyte Brix barebones and tested with Windows 8 and CentOS7 at idle. Heavy-ion-induced hard- and catastrophic failures do not appear to be related to the Intel 14nm Tri-Gate FinFET process. They originate from a small (9 m 140 m) area on the 32nm planar PCH die (not the CPU) as initially speculated. The hard failures seem to be due to a SEE but the exact physical mechanism has yet to be identified. Some possibilities include latch-ups, charge ion trapping or implantation, ion channels, or a combination of those (in biased conditions). The mechanism of the catastrophic failures seems related to the presence of electric power (1.05V core voltage). The 1064 nm laser mimics ionization radiation and induces soft- and hard failures as a direct result of electron-hole pair production, not heat. The 14nm FinFET processes continue to look promising for space radiation environments.

  17. Miniaturized spectral imager for Aalto-1 nanosatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannila, Rami; Näsilä, Antti; Praks, Jaan; Saari, Heikki; Antila, Jarkko

    2011-11-01

    The Aalto-1 is a 3U-cubesat project coordinated by Aalto University. The satellite, Aalto-1, will be mainly built by students as project assignments and thesis works. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland will develop the main Earth observation payload, a miniaturized spectral imager, for the satellite. It is a novel highly miniaturized tunable filter type spectral imager. Mass of the spectral imager will be less than 400 grams, and dimensions will be approximately 80 mm x 80 mm x 45 mm. The spectral imager is based on a tunable Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) accompanied by an RGB CMOS image sensor. The FPI consists of two highly reflective surfaces separated by a tunable air gap and it is based either on a microelectromechanical (MEMS) or piezo-actuated structure. The MEMS FPI is a monolithic device, i.e. it is made entirely on one substrate in a batch process, without assembling separate pieces together. The gap is adjusted by moving the upper mirror with electrostatic force. Benefits of the MEMS FPI are low mass and small size. However, large aperture (2-10 mm) MEMS FPIs are currently under development, thus it is not yet known if their performance is adequate. The piezo-actuated FPI uses three piezo-actuators and is controlled in a closed capacitive feedback loop. The drawback of the piezo-actuated FPI is its higher mass. However, it has a large aperture which enables a shorter exposure times. Selection of the FPI type will be done after thorough evaluation. Depending on the selected FPI type, the spectral resolution of the imager will be 5 - 10 nm at full width at half maximum and it will operate in the visible and/or near infrared range.

  18. Spectrally tunable pixel sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfelder, G.; Buffa, C.; Longoni, A. F.; Zaraga, F.

    2013-01-01

    They are here reported the developments and experimental results of fully operating matrices of spectrally tunable pixels based on the Transverse Field Detector (TFD). Unlike several digital imaging sensors based on color filter arrays or layered junctions, the TFD has the peculiar feature of having electrically tunable spectral sensitivities. In this way the sensor color space is not fixed a priori but can be real-time adjusted, e.g. for a better adaptation to the scene content or for multispectral capture. These advantages come at the cost of an increased complexity both for the photosensitive elements and for the readout electronics. The challenges in the realization of a matrix of TFD pixels are analyzed in this work. First experimental results on an 8x8 (x 3 colors) and on a 64x64 (x 3 colors) matrix will be presented and analyzed in terms of colorimetric and noise performance, and compared to simulation predictions.

  19. Highly reliable high-efficiency wavelength-stabilized 885 nm diode laser bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisher, Paul; Bao, Ling; Huang, Hua; Wang, Jun; DeVito, Mark; Dong, Weimin; Grimshaw, Mike; Balsley, David; Martinsen, Rob; DeFranza, Mark; Patterson, Steve

    2009-05-01

    We report on the progress of highly-reliable, high-efficiency 885-nm diode laser bar arrays. Conduction-cooled hardsoldered bars rated to 60W and 57% conversion efficiency demonstrate >30,000 device hours under 1-sec on, 1-sec off hard pulse conditions failure-free. Microchannel-cooled bars rated to 100W and 62% efficiency demonstrate >100,000 accelerated device hours failure-free. Integrated volume Bragg grating fast axis lenses provide wavelength stabilization at low cost. Vertically stacked arrays (seven bars each) of such configuration are demonstrated with a 0.8 nm FWHM spectral width and rated to 700W, 53% conversion efficiency.

  20. Wavelength beam combining of a 980-nm tapered diode laser bar in an external cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    solution for preserving the beam quality of the bar in the range of that of a single emitter and at the same time, enabling the power scaling. We report spectral beam combining applied to a 12 emitter tapered laser bar at 980 nm. The external cavity has been designed for a wavelength separation of 4.0 nm......High power diode lasers are used in a large number of applications. A limiting factor for more widespread use of broad area lasers is the poor beam quality. Gain guided tapered diode lasers are ideal candidates for industrial applications that demands watt level output power with good beam quality...

  1. A compact design for monochromatic OSL measurements in the wavelength range 380-1020 NM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Poolton, N.R.J.; Willumsen, F.;

    1994-01-01

    The development and performance of a compact module is described that allows for the monochromatic illumination of samples in the wavelength range 380-1020 nm, enabling the measurement of energy-resolved optically stimulated luminescence. The unit is designed to couple directly to the existing....... The design allows for rapid spectral scanning with a choice of resolution of anywhere between 10 and 80 nm: stray light levels are less than 0.01%. The unit can equally be used for recording wavelength-resolved emission spectra, whether photo-excited or thermally stimulated; the capabilities of the system...

  2. Spectral correlates lexical prosody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okobi, Anthony

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to derive a quantitative acoustic model of lexical-prosodic characteristics of stressed vowels by looking at several spectral properties associated with the articulatory mechanisms used in speech production. Native speakers of American English were asked to name disyllabic visualizable nouns. Words containing liquids or glides were not used in this study because of their effect on the spectra of adjacent vowels. Subjects uttered short phrases in which the target word was pitch accent half of the time and unaccented the other half. Results show that within the category of full vowels, unstressed and stressed vowels can be distinguished by syllable/vowel durations and spectral tilt. Spectral tilt (SpT) is an acoustic measure related to the degree of glottal spreading. Stressed full vowels had longer duration and less SpT. Distinction between unaccented and accented stressed vowels can be made by amplitude of voicing (AV), F0 (pitch), and intensity contour differences. Accented stressed vowels have higher pitch, and greater AV and intensity. These results suggest that there are acoustic correlates to lexical stress that can be used to determine the stressed syllable of a word, regardless of whether or not it is pitch accented. [Work supported by NIH T32-DC00038.

  3. Liquid Carbon Reflectivity at 19 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Mincigrucci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We hereby report on a pump-probe reflectivity experiment conducted on amorphous carbon, using a 780 nm laser as a pump and a 19 nm FEL emission as probe. Measurements were performed at 50 degrees with respect to the surface normal to have an un-pumped reflectivity higher than 0.5%. A sub-10 fs time synchronization error could be obtained exploiting the nearly jitter-free capabilities of FERMI. EUV FEL-based experiments open the way to study the behaviour of a liquid carbon phase being unaffected by plasma screening.

  4. Comparative study of the photopic spectral sensitivity of domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus), turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo gallopavo) and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, C L; Prescott, N B; Jarvis, J R; Le Sueur, C; Perry, G C; Wathes, C M

    2006-06-01

    1. The photopic spectral sensitivity of domestic ducks and turkeys was determined using an operant psychophysical technique. Spectral sensitivity was determined over a range of specified wavelengths, including UVA, between 326 < lambda < 694 nm and the results were directly compared with human spectral sensitivity measured under similar experimental conditions. 2. Domestic ducks and turkeys had similar spectral sensitivities to each other, and could perceive UVA radiation, although turkeys were more sensitive to UVA than ducks. For both species, peak sensitivity was between 544 < lambda < 577 nm, with reduced sensitivity at lambda = 508 and 600 nm. Both ducks and turkeys had a very different and broader range of spectral sensitivity than the human subjects tested. 3. Spectral sensitivity and UVA perception in these avian species are discussed in relation to their visual ecology and the mechanisms controlling neural processing of colour information.

  5. Evaluation of Various Spectral Inputs for Estimation of Forest Biochemical and Structural Properties from Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolová, L.; Janoutová, R.; Malenovský, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this study we evaluated various spectral inputs for retrieval of forest chlorophyll content (Cab) and leaf area index (LAI) from high spectral and spatial resolution airborne imaging spectroscopy data collected for two forest study sites in the Czech Republic (beech forest at Štítná nad Vláří and spruce forest at Bílý Kříž). The retrieval algorithm was based on a machine learning method - support vector regression (SVR). Performance of the four spectral inputs used to train SVR was evaluated: a) all available hyperspectral bands, b) continuum removal (CR) 645 - 710 nm, c) CR 705 - 780 nm, and d) CR 680 - 800 nm. Spectral inputs and corresponding SVR models were first assessed at the level of spectral databases simulated by combined leaf-canopy radiative transfer models PROSPECT and DART. At this stage, SVR models using all spectral inputs provided good performance (RMSE for Cab sensor field of view.

  6. Visible supercontinuum generation in a graded index multimode fiber pumped at 1064  nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Galmiche, G; Sanjabi Eznaveh, Z; Eftekhar, M A; Antonio Lopez, J; Wright, L G; Wise, F; Christodoulides, D; Amezcua Correa, R

    2016-06-01

    We observe efficient supercontinuum generation that extends into the visible spectral range by pumping a low differential mode group delay graded index multimode fiber in the normal dispersion regime. For a 28.5 m long fiber, the generated spectrum spans more than two octaves, starting from below 450 nm and extending beyond 2400 nm. The main nonlinear mechanisms contributing to the visible spectrum generation are attributed to multipath four-wave mixing processes and periodic spatio-temporal breathing dynamics. Moreover, by exploiting the highly multimodal nature of this system, we demonstrate versatile generation of visible spectral peaks in shorter fiber spans by altering the launching conditions. A nonlinearly induced mode cleanup was also observed at the pump wavelength. Our results could pave the way for high brightness, high power, and compact, multi-octave continuum sources. PMID:27244412

  7. Temperature- and pressure-dependent absorption coefficients for CO2 and O2 at 193 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartinger, K. T.; Nord, S.; Monkhouse, P. B.

    Absorption of laser radiation at 193 nm by CO2 and O2 was studied at a series of different temperatures up to 1273 K and pressures up to 1 bar. The spectrum for CO2 was found to be broadband, so that absorption could be fitted to a Beer-Lambert law. On the other hand, the corresponding O2 spectrum is strongly structured and parameterisation requires a more complex relation, depending on both temperature and the product (pressure × absorption path length). In this context, the influence of spectral structure on the resulting spectrally integrated absorption coefficients is discussed. Using the fitting parameters obtained, effective transmissions at 193 nm can be calculated for a wide range of experimental conditions. As an illustration of the practical application of these data, the calculation of effective transmission for a typical industrial flue gas is described.

  8. Wavelength conversion based spectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    resolution for this spectral region. Today, an increasing number of applications exists outside the spectral region covered by Si-based devices, e.g. within cleantech, medical or food imaging. We present a technology based on wavelength conversion which will extend the spectral coverage of state of the art...

  9. Spectral Measures on Locally Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Ai Hua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose to study spectral measures on local fields. Some basic results are presented, including the stability of Bessel sequences under perturbation, the Landau theorem on Beurling density, the law of pure type of spectral measures, the boundedness of the Radon-Nikodym derivative of absolutely continuous $F$-spectral measures etc.

  10. Nuclear spectrometry and spectral interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of various spectrometric detectors is summarized and methods of spectral analysis described. Sections include instrumentation, differential pulse height analysis, energy resolution and the width of spectral peaks, proportional counters (operating characteristics and application to mineral analysis), solid state detectors and spectral peak analysis

  11. Spectral identification of lighting type and character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvidge, Christopher D; Keith, David M; Tuttle, Benjamin T; Baugh, Kimberly E

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the optimal spectral bands for the identification of lighting types and the estimation of four major indices used to measure the efficiency or character of lighting. To accomplish these objectives we collected high-resolution emission spectra (350 to 2,500 nm) for forty-three different lamps, encompassing nine of the major types of lamps used worldwide. The narrow band emission spectra were used to simulate radiances in eight spectral bands including the human eye photoreceptor bands (photopic, scotopic, and "meltopic") plus five spectral bands in the visible and near-infrared modeled on bands flown on the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). The high-resolution continuous spectra are superior to the broad band combinations for the identification of lighting type and are the standard for calculation of Luminous Efficacy of Radiation (LER), Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) and Color Rendering Index (CRI). Given the high cost that would be associated with building and flying a hyperspectral sensor with detection limits low enough to observe nighttime lights we conclude that it would be more feasible to fly an instrument with a limited number of broad spectral bands in the visible to near infrared. The best set of broad spectral bands among those tested is blue, green, red and NIR bands modeled on the band set flown on the Landsat Thematic Mapper. This set provides low errors on the identification of lighting types and reasonable estimates of LER and CCT when compared to the other broad band set tested. None of the broad band sets tested could make reasonable estimates of Luminous Efficacy (LE) or CRI. The photopic band proved useful for the estimation of LER. However, the three photoreceptor bands performed poorly in the identification of lighting types when compared to the bands modeled on the Landsat Thematic Mapper. Our conclusion is that it is feasible to identify lighting type and make reasonable estimates of LER and CCT using four or more spectral

  12. Spectral Identification of Lighting Type and Character

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Elvidge

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the optimal spectral bands for the identification of lighting types and the estimation of four major indices used to measure the efficiency or character of lighting. To accomplish these objectives we collected high-resolution emission spectra (350 to 2,500 nm for forty-three different lamps, encompassing nine of the major types of lamps used worldwide. The narrow band emission spectra were used to simulate radiances in eight spectral bands including the human eye photoreceptor bands (photopic, scotopic, and “meltopic” plus five spectral bands in the visible and near-infrared modeled on bands flown on the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM. The high-resolution continuous spectra are superior to the broad band combinations for the identification of lighting type and are the standard for calculation of Luminous Efficacy of Radiation (LER, Correlated Color Temperature (CCT and Color Rendering Index (CRI. Given the high cost that would be associated with building and flying a hyperspectral sensor with detection limits low enough to observe nighttime lights we conclude that it would be more feasible to fly an instrument with a limited number of broad spectral bands in the visible to near infrared. The best set of broad spectral bands among those tested is blue, green, red and NIR bands modeled on the band set flown on the Landsat Thematic Mapper. This set provides low errors on the identification of lighting types and reasonable estimates of LER and CCT when compared to the other broad band set tested. None of the broad band sets tested could make reasonable estimates of Luminous Efficacy (LE or CRI. The photopic band proved useful for the estimation of LER. However, the three photoreceptor bands performed poorly in the identification of lighting types when compared to the bands modeled on the Landsat Thematic Mapper. Our conclusion is that it is feasible to identify lighting type and make reasonable estimates of LER and CCT using four or

  13. SPECTRAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ELECTRORETINOGRAM IN X-LINKED DICHROMATS-A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Spectral characteristics of X-linked Dichromats(13 protanopes, 20 deuteranopes) were studied with spectral ERG. The results are as follows: The maximal spectral response of the b-wave in protanopes tended to shift toward the short wavelength side and the sensitivity to long wavelengths decreased obviously. The ratio value of the amplitude in 500nm and in 620nm(500/620) was greater in the protanope than that in the normal subject. Like the normals, the maximal response of the b-wave in deuteranopes appea...

  14. MEPHISTO spectromicroscope reaches 20 nm lateral resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Perfetti, Luca; Gilbert, B.; Fauchoux, O.; Capozi, M.; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.; Tonner, B. P.

    1999-03-01

    The recently described tests of the synchrotron imaging photoelectron spectromicroscope MEPHISTO (Microscope à Emission de PHotoélectrons par Illumination Synchrotronique de Type Onduleur) were complemented by further resolution improvements and tests, which brought the lateral resolution down to 20 nm. Images and line plot profiles demonstrate such performance.

  15. Spectral beam combining of multi-single emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baohua; Guo, Weirong; Guo, Zhijie; Xu, Dan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Thomas; Chen, Xiaohua

    2016-03-01

    Spectral beam combination expands the output power while keeps the beam quality of the combined beam almost the same as that of a single emitter. Spectral beam combination has been successfully achieved for high power fiber lasers, diode laser arrays and diode laser stacks. We have recently achieved the spectral beam combination of multiple single emitter diode lasers. Spatial beam combination and beam transformation are employed before beams from 25 single emitter diode lasers can be spectrally combined. An average output power about 220W, a spectral bandwidth less than 9 nm (95% energy), a beam quality similar to that of a single emitter and electro-optical conversion efficiency over 46% are achieved. In this paper, Rigorous Coupled Wave analysis is used to numerically evaluate the influence of emitter width, emitter pitch and focal length of transform lens on diffraction efficiency of the grating and spectral bandwidth. To assess the chance of catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD), the optical power in the internal cavity of a free running emitter and the optical power in the grating external cavity of a wavelength locked emitter are theoretically analyzed. Advantages and disadvantages of spectral beam combination are concluded.

  16. The Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.; The ASTRAL I & Science Teams, II

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) is an HST Treasury Program whose aim is to secure definitive ultraviolet (115-310 nm) spectra of representative bright stars utilizing the venerable -- yet still state-of-the-art -- Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The initial Cycle 18 installment of the program (146 orbits in 2010-2011) focused on late-type (``cool’’) stars, acquiring high-S/N, high spectral resolution measurements of eight pivotal targets, including iconic objects like Betelgeuse and Procyon. The latest episode, in current Cycle 21 (230 orbits in 2013-2014), is designed to record very high-S/N (>100) STIS echellegrams, at the highest resolution feasible ( 30,000-100,000), of 21 representative bright early-type (``hot’’) stars, including equally iconic objects like Vega, Sirius, Regulus, and Zeta Puppis. The targets span a broad range of spectral types between early-O and early-A, encompassing main sequence and evolved stars, fast and slow rotators, as well as chemically peculiar and magnetic objects. These high-quality STIS UV spectra will be publicly available immediately after observation from the HST archive; and, in post-processed and merged form, at the project website: http://casa.colorado.edu ayres/ASTRAL/. The UV "atlases" produced by the ASTRAL Program will enable investigations of a broad range of astrophysical problems -- stellar, interstellar, and beyond -- for many years to come. Supported by Guest Observer grants from STScI.

  17. Spectral reflectance pattern in soybean for assessing yellow mosaic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazala, I F Saad; Sahoo, R N; Pandey, Rakesh; Mandal, Bikash; Gupta, V K; Singh, Rajendra; Sinha, P

    2013-09-01

    Remote sensing technique is useful for monitoring large crop area at a single time point, which is otherwise not possible by visual observation alone. Yellow mosaic disease (YMD) is a serious constraint in soybean production in India. However, hardly any basic information is available for monitoring YMD by remote sensing. Present study examines spectral reflectance of soybean leaves due to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) infection in order to identify YMD sensitive spectral ratio or reflectance. Spectral reflectance measurement indicated significant (p yellow leaves induced due to nitrogen deficiency, the sensitive wavelength was ~589 nm. Due to viral infection, a shift occurred in red and infra-red slope (called red edge) on the left in comparison to healthy one. Red edge shift was a good indicator to discriminate yellow mosaic as chlorophyll gets degraded due to MYMIV infection. Correlation of reflectance at 688 nm (R688) and spectral reflectance ratio at 750 and 445 nm (R750/R445) with the weighted mosaic index indicated that detection of yellow mosaic is possible based on these sensitive bands. Our study for the first time identifies the yellow mosaic sensitive band as R688 and R750/R445, which could be utilized to scan satellite data for monitoring YMD affected soybean cropping regions.

  18. Repair of near-UV (365nm or 313 nm) induced DNA strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action of near-UV (365 nm or 313 nm) radiation in cellular inactivaton (biological measurements) and induction and repair of breaks (physical measurements) is studied in repair proficient strain and in pol A, rec A and uvr A deficient strains of Escherichia coli K-12. (M.A.C.)

  19. Detection of water vapour absorption around 363nm in measured atmospheric absorption spectra and its effect on DOAS evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampel, Johannes; Polyansky, Oleg. L.; Kyuberis, Alexandra A.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Lodi, Lorenzo; Pöhler, Denis; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich; Beirle, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Water vapour is known to absorb light from the microwave region to the blue part of the visible spectrum at a decreasing magnitude. Ab-initio approaches to model individual absorption lines of the gaseous water molecule predict absorption lines until its dissociation limit at 243 nm. We present first evidence of water vapour absorption at 363 nm from field measurements based on the POKAZATEL absorption line list by Polyansky et al. (2016) using data from Multi-Axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) and Longpath (LP)-DOAS measurements. The predicted absorptions contribute significantly to the observed optical depths with up to 2 × 10‑3. Their magnitude correlates well (R2 = 0.89) to simultaneously measured well-established water vapour absorptions in the blue spectral range from 452-499 nm, but is underestimated by a factor of 2.6 ± 0.6 in the ab-initio model. At a spectral resolution of 0.5nm this leads to a maximum absorption cross-section value of 5.4 × 10‑27 cm2/molec at 362.3nm. The results are independent of the employed cross-section data to compensate for the overlayed absorption of the oxygen dimer O4. The newly found absorption can have a significant impact on the spectral retrieval of absorbing trace-gas species in the spectral range around 363 nm. Its effect on the spectral analysis of O4, HONO and OClO are discussed.

  20. Laser and pinching discharge plasmas spectral characteristics in water window region 2

    CERN Document Server

    Kolar, Petr; Nevrkla, Michal; Vrba, Pavel; Jancarek, Alexandr

    2011-01-01

    Water window emission spectra of two laboratory nitrogen plasma sources were examined with a free standing grating spectrometer (FSGS). The highest line intensities at the wavelength 2.88 nm achievable with the sources were compared. Pulse energies for this line were judged as 0.02 mJ/srad and 0.16 mJ/srad with laser produced plasma system and pinching discharge plasma, respectively. The spectral resolution was found about 0.01 nm at 3rd order of spectral lines around wavelength 2.5 nm.

  1. Shock-Accelerated Flying Foil Diagnostic with a Chirped Pulse Spectral Interferometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建平; 李儒新; 曾志男; 王兴涛; 程传福; 徐至展

    2003-01-01

    A shock-accelerated flying foil is diagnosed with a chirped pulse spectral interferometry. The shock is pumped by a 1.2ps chirped laser pulse with a power of~1014 W/cm2 at 785nm irradiating on a 500nm aluminium film and detected by a probe pulse split from the pump based on a Michelson spectral interferometry. A flying foil of~5.595×10-6 g in~400 μm diameter was accelerated to~165 nm away from the initial target rear surface at~1.83 km/s before ablation.

  2. Generation of Spectral Clusters in a Mixture of Noble and Raman-Active Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Hosseini, Pooria; Russell, Philip St J

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel scheme for the generation of dense clusters of Raman sidebands. The scheme uses a broadband-guiding hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) filled with a mixture of H2, D2, and Xe for efficient interaction between the gas mixture and a green laser pump pulse (532 nm, 1 ns) of only 5 uJ energy. This results in the generation from noise of more than 135 ro-vibrational Raman sidebands covering the visible spectral region with an average spacing of only 2 THz. Such a spectrally dense and compact fiber-based source is ideal for applications where closely spaced narrow-band laser lines with high spectral power density are required, such as in spectroscopy and sensing. When the HC-PCF is filled with a H2-D2 mixture the Raman comb spans the spectral region from the deep UV (280 nm) to the near infrared (1000 nm).

  3. Spectral Variability of FSRQs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Minfeng Gu; Y. L. Ai

    2011-03-01

    The optical variability of 29 flat spectrum radio quasars in SDSS Stripe 82 region are investigated by using DR7 released multi-epoch data. All FSRQs show variations with overall amplitude ranging from 0.24 mag to 3.46 mag in different sources. About half of FSRQs show a bluer-when-brighter trend, which is commonly observed for blazars. However, only one source shows a redder-when-brighter trend, which implies it is rare in FSRQs. In this source, the thermal emission may be responsible for the spectral behaviour.

  4. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tearney, G.J.; Webb, R.H.; Bouma, B.E. [Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 50 Blossom Street, BAR 703, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    1998-08-01

    An endoscope-compatible, submicrometer-resolution scanning confocal microscopy imaging system is presented. This approach, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM), uses a quasi-monochromatic light source and a transmission diffraction grating to detect the reflectivity simultaneously at multiple points along a transverse line within the sample. Since this method does not require fast spatial scanning within the probe, the equipment can be miniaturized and incorporated into a catheter or endoscope. Confocal images of an electron microscope grid were acquired with SECM to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Optical Society of America}

  5. Rapid microscopy measurement of very large spectral images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Moshe; Shotan, Zav; Garini, Yuval

    2016-05-01

    The spectral content of a sample provides important information that cannot be detected by the human eye or by using an ordinary RGB camera. The spectrum is typically a fingerprint of the chemical compound, its environmental conditions, phase and geometry. Thus measuring the spectrum at each point of a sample is important for a large range of applications from art preservation through forensics to pathological analysis of a tissue section. To date, however, there is no system that can measure the spectral image of a large sample in a reasonable time. Here we present a novel method for scanning very large spectral images of microscopy samples even if they cannot be viewed in a single field of view of the camera. The system is based on capturing information while the sample is being scanned continuously 'on the fly'. Spectral separation implements Fourier spectroscopy by using an interferometer mounted along the optical axis. High spectral resolution of ~5 nm at 500 nm could be achieved with a diffraction-limited spatial resolution. The acquisition time is fairly high and takes 6-8 minutes for a sample size of 10mm x 10mm measured under a bright-field microscope using a 20X magnification. PMID:27137565

  6. Photoresist outgassing at 157 nm exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, Stefan; Angood, Steve; Ashworth, Dominic; Basset, Steve; Bloomstein, Theodore M.; Dean, Kim R.; Kunz, Roderick R.; Miller, Daniel A.; Patel, Shashikant; Rich, Georgia K.

    2001-08-01

    Contamination of optical elements during photoresist exposure is a serious issue in optical lithography. The outgassing of photoresist has been identified as a problem at 248nm and 193nm in production because the organic films that can be formed on an exposure lens can cause transmission loss and sever image distortion. At these exposure energies, the excitation of the photo acid generator, formation of acid, and cleavage of the protecting group are highly selective processes. At 157nm, the exposure energy is much higher (7.9 eV compared to 6.4 eV at 193nm) and it is known from laser ablation experiments that direct laser cleavage of sigma bonds occurs. The fragments formed during this irradiation can be considered as effective laser deposition precursors even in the mid ppb level. In this study, methods to quantify photoresist outgassing at 157 nm are discussed. Three criteria have been set up at International SEMATECH to protect lens contamination and to determine the severity of photoresist outgassing. First, we measured film thickness loss as a function of exposure dose for a variety of materials. In a second test we studied the molecular composition of the outgassing fragments with an exposure chamber coupled to a gas chromatograph and a mass spectrometer detector. Our third method was a deposition test of outgassing vapors on a CaF2 proof plate followed by analysis using VUV and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies (XPS). With this technique we found deposits for many different resists. Our main focus is on F- and Si- containing resists. Both material classes form deposits especially if these atoms are bound to the polymer side chains. Whereas the F-containing films can be cleaned off under 157nm irradiation, cleaning of Si-containing films mainly produces SiO2. Our cleaning studies of plasma deposited F-containing organic films on SiO2 did not indicate damage of this surface by the possible formation of HF. Despite that we strongly recommend engineering

  7. Double-pulse laser ablation sampling: Enhancement of analyte emission by a second laser pulse at 213 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Bruno Yue [Laser Technologies Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Department of Physics, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China); Mao, Xianglei [Laser Technologies Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Hou, Huaming [Laser Technologies Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China); Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard E. [Laser Technologies Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Cheung, Nai-Ho, E-mail: nhcheung@hkbu.edu.hk [Department of Physics, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-08-01

    For the purpose of devising methods for minimally destructive multi-element analysis, we compare the performance of a 266 nm–213 nm double-pulse scheme against that of the single 266 nm pulse scheme. The first laser pulse at 266 nm ablates a mica sample. Ten ns later, the second pulse at 213 nm and 64 mJ cm{sup −2} orthogonally intercepts the gas plume to enhance the analyte signal. Emissions from aluminum, silicon, magnesium and sodium are simultaneously observed. At low 266 nm laser fluence when only sub-ng of sample mass is removed, the signal enhancement by the 213 nm pulse is especially apparent. The minimum detectable amount of aluminum is about 24 fmol; it will be a hundred times higher if the sample is analyzed by the 266 nm pulse alone. The minimum detectable mass for the other analytes is also reduced by about two orders of magnitude when the second pulse at 213 nm is introduced. The spectral and temporal properties of the enhanced signal are consistent with the mechanism of ultra-violet laser excited atomic fluorescence of dense plumes. - Highlights: • We devise a two-laser-pulse scheme to analyze the elemental composition of mica as test samples. • We compare the analytical performance of the single 266 nm pulse scheme against the 266 nm – 213 nm two pulse scheme. • The two pulse scheme improves the absolute LODs of the analytes by about a hundred times. • The spectral and temporal properties of the enhanced signal are consistent with the mechanism.

  8. DNA Charge Transport over 34 nm

    OpenAIRE

    Slinker, Jason D.; Muren, Natalie B.; Renfrew, Sara E.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular wires show promise in nanoscale electronics but the synthesis of uniform, long conductive molecules is a significant challenge. DNA of precise length, by contrast, is easily synthesized, but its conductivity has not been explored over the distances required for nanoscale devices. Here we demonstrate DNA charge transport (CT) over 34 nm in 100-mer monolayers on gold. Multiplexed gold electrodes modified with 100-mer DNA yield sizable electrochemical signals from a distal, covalent Ni...

  9. The Effects of Water Vapor and Clouds on the Spectral Distribution of Solar Radiation at the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Mariani, P.; Gore, Warren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    During the Subsonic Contrail and Cloud Effect Special Study (SUCCESS) a Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer was deployed at the surface in a zenith observing position. The instrument measured the solar spectral downwelling irradiance between 350 and 2500 nm with 10 nm resolution. From April 12 through April 29 approximately 18000 spectra were acquired, under a variety of meteorological conditions including cloud free, cirrus, Stearns, and cumulonimbus clouds. This study focuses on the effect of cirrus and cirrus contrails on the spectral distribution of solar irradiance at the surface and on inferring cirrus properties from their spectral transmittance. The observations have also proven to be useful for comparing the solar spectral irradiance measurements with model predictions, and in particular, for inferring the amount of solar radiation absorbed in the clear and cloudy atmosphere.

  10. The Effect of Epidermal Structures on Leaf Spectral Signatures of Ice Plants (Aizoaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Hans-Jürgen Heim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal structures (ES of leaves are known to affect the functional properties and spectral responses. Spectral studies focused mostly on the effect of hairs or wax layers only. We studied a wider range of different ES and their impact on spectral properties. Additionally, we identified spectral regions that allow distinguishing different ES. We used a field spectrometer to measure ex situ leaf spectral responses from 350 nm–2500 nm. A spectral library for 25 species of the succulent family Aizoaceae was assembled. Five functional types were defined based on ES: flat epidermal cell surface, convex to papillary epidermal cell surface, bladder cells, hairs and wax cover. We tested the separability of ES using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA based on the spectral data. Subsequently, variable importance (VIP was calculated to identify spectral regions relevant for discriminating our functional types (classes. Classification performance was high, with a kappa value of 0.9 indicating well-separable spectral classes. VIP calculations identified six spectral regions of increased importance for the classification. We confirmed and extended previous findings regarding the visible-near-infrared spectral region. Our experiments also confirmed that epidermal leaf traits can be classified due to clearly distinguishable spectral signatures across species and genera within the Aizoaceae.

  11. Lasing at 300 nm and below: Optical challenges and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzella, D. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Couprie, M.E. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)]|[CEA DSM DRECAM SPAM, Gif Sur Yvette (France); Billardon, M. [ESPCI, Paris (France)

    1995-12-31

    The FEL experiment in the visible and near UV on the Super ACO storage ring has given, since 1989, important informations on the SRFEL dynamics and, furthermore, a very good beam stability has been achieved. In addition, the operation at 350 nm with this good stability and a long beam lifetime allowed us to perform the first user experiment in biology and to start with a campaign for using the laser as photons source for experiments in other domains, coupling FEL light and the Synchrotron Radiation. For this, FEL starts to be very competitive with respect to the other conventional laser sources, provided that it could oscillate further in the UV, say at 300 nm and below. So, the real challenge is now given by the lasing at shorter wavelengths and, for this, by the optical technology existing nowadays. Since 1992 the efforts have been concentrating to look for every kind of solution allowing us to overcome the problem of having a very low gain. From an optical point of view, in the range of wavelengths explored, there is a lack of transparents dielectric materials for substrates and coatings. Substrates are required at the same time to be relatively not absorbing (a few tens 10{sup -6}), to have a very good surface quality (RMS roughness below 10 {Angstrom}) because of scattering losses dramatically increasing in this spectral range and, due to the thermal load of the undulator emission, to have adequate thermal characteristics. In order to fulfill all these requirements, a good characterisation and modelisation of the substrates is needed, especially to correlate thermal loading and mechanical deformations from one hand, and roughness and scattering losses from the other hand. Coatings must be not absorbing too and, above all, the most amorphous as possible (this could be obtained with IBS deposition technique), in order to insure a good reproduction of the substrate roughness at the interfaces and on the top layer and an higher resistance to the XUV photons load.

  12. Near infrared imaging of teeth at wavelengths between 1200 and 1600 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Soojeong; Fried, Daniel; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.

    2011-03-01

    Near-IR (NIR) imaging is a new technology that is currently being investigated for the detection and assessment of dental caries without the use of ionizing radiation. Several papers have been published on the use of transillumination and reflectance NIR imaging to detect early caries in enamel. The purpose of this study was to investigate alternative near infrared wavelengths besides 1300-nm in the range from 1200- 1600-nm to determine the wavelengths that yield the highest contrast in both transmission and reflectance imaging modes. Artificial lesions were created on thirty tooth sections of varying thickness for transillumination imaging. NIR images at wavelengths from the visible to 1600-nm were also acquired for fifty-four whole teeth with occlusal lesions using a tungsten halogen lamp with several spectral filters and a Ge-enhanced CMOS image sensor. Cavity preparations were also cut into whole teeth and Z250 composite was used as a restorative material to determine the contrast between composite and enamel at NIR wavelengths. Slightly longer NIR wavelengths are likely to have better performance for the transillumination of occlusal caries lesions while 1300-nm appears best for the transillumination of proximal surfaces. Significantly higher performance was attained at wavelengths that have higher water absorption, namely 1460-nm and wavelengths greater than 1500-nm and these wavelength regions are likely to be more effective for reflectance imaging. Wavelengths with higher water absorption also provided higher contrast of composite restorations.

  13. Broadly tunable (440-670 nm) solid-state organic laser with disposable capsules

    CERN Document Server

    Mhibik, Oussama; Siove, Alain; Forget, Sebastien; Chenais, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    An innovative concept of thin-film organic solid-state laser is proposed, with diffraction-limited output and a broad tuning range covering the visible spectrum under UV optical pumping. The laser beam is tunable over 230 nm, from 440 to 670 nm, with a 3 nm full width at half maximum typical spectral width. The structure consists of a compact fixed bulk optical cavity, a polymeric intracavity etalon for wavelength tuning, as well as five different disposable glass slides coated with a dye-doped polymer film, forming a very simple and low-cost gain medium. The use of interchangeable/disposable "gain capsules" is an alternative solution to photodegradation issues, since gain chips can be replaced without realignment of the cavity. The laser lifetime of a single chip in ambient conditions and without encapsulation was extrapolated to be around 107 pulses at a microjoule energy-per-pulse level.

  14. Voigt deconvolution method and its applications to pure oxygen absorption spectrum at 1270 nm band

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Jalali, Muhammad A.; Aljghami, Issam F.; Mahzia, Yahia M.

    2016-03-01

    Experimental spectral lines of pure oxygen at 1270 nm band were analyzed by Voigt deconvolution method. The method gave a total Voigt profile, which arises from two overlapping bands. Deconvolution of total Voigt profile leads to two Voigt profiles, the first as a result of O2 dimol at 1264 nm band envelope, and the second from O2 monomer at 1268 nm band envelope. In addition, Voigt profile itself is the convolution of Lorentzian and Gaussian distributions. Competition between thermal and collisional effects was clearly observed through competition between Gaussian and Lorentzian width for each band envelope. Voigt full width at half-maximum height (Voigt FWHM) for each line, and the width ratio between Lorentzian and Gaussian width (ΓLΓG- 1) have been investigated. The following applied pressures were at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 bar, while the temperatures were at 298 K, 323 K, 348 K, and 373 K range.

  15. Continuous-wave dual-wavelength Nd:YAG laser operation at 1319 and 1338 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, G. C.; Lee, Y. D.; Zao, Y. D.; Xu, L. J.; Wang, J. B.; Chen, G. B.; Lu, J.

    2013-04-01

    We report an efficient continuous-wave (CW) dual-wavelength operation of an Nd:YAG (YAG: yttrium aluminum garnet) laser at 1319 and 1338 nm. An output power of 2.47 W for the dual-wavelength operation was achieved at the incident pump power of 16.7 W. Intracavity sum-frequency mixing at 1319 and 1338 nm was then realized in an LBO (lithium triborate) crystal to reach the red range. A maximum output power of 879 mW in the red spectral range at 664 nm has been achieved. The red output stability is better than 3.4%. The red beam quality M2 values are about 1.21 and 1.35 in the horizontal and vertical directions respectively.

  16. Estimation of spectral distribution of sky radiance using a commercial digital camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masanori; Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Murata, Isao

    2016-01-10

    Methods for estimating spectral distribution of sky radiance from images captured by a digital camera and for accurately estimating spectral responses of the camera are proposed. Spectral distribution of sky radiance is represented as a polynomial of the wavelength, with coefficients obtained from digital RGB counts by linear transformation. The spectral distribution of radiance as measured is consistent with that obtained by spectrometer and radiative transfer simulation for wavelengths of 430-680 nm, with standard deviation below 1%. Preliminary applications suggest this method is useful for detecting clouds and studying the relation between irradiance at the ground and cloud distribution. PMID:26835780

  17. Estimation of spectral distribution of sky radiance using a commercial digital camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masanori; Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Murata, Isao

    2016-01-10

    Methods for estimating spectral distribution of sky radiance from images captured by a digital camera and for accurately estimating spectral responses of the camera are proposed. Spectral distribution of sky radiance is represented as a polynomial of the wavelength, with coefficients obtained from digital RGB counts by linear transformation. The spectral distribution of radiance as measured is consistent with that obtained by spectrometer and radiative transfer simulation for wavelengths of 430-680 nm, with standard deviation below 1%. Preliminary applications suggest this method is useful for detecting clouds and studying the relation between irradiance at the ground and cloud distribution.

  18. Weak-signal conversion from 1550nm to 532nm with 84% efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Samblowski, Aiko; Baune, Christoph; Fiurasek, Jaromir; Schnabel, Roman

    2013-01-01

    We report on the experimental frequency conversion of a dim, coherent continuous-wave light field from 1550nm to 532nm with an external photon-number conversion efficiency of (84.4 +/- 1.5)%. We used sum-frequency generation, which was realized in a standing-wave cavity built around a periodically poled type I potassium titanyl phosphate (PPKTP) crystal, pumped by an intense field at 810 nm. Our result is in full agreement with a numerical model. For optimized cavity coupler reflectivities it predicts a conversion efficiency of up to 93% using the same PPKTP crystal.

  19. SOLAR/SOLSPEC ultraviolet solar spectral irradiance variability since 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, Luc; Bolsee, David; Hauchecorne, Alain; Meftah, Mustapha; Bekki, Slimane; Pereira, Nuno

    2016-07-01

    The SOLAR/SOLSPEC experiment measures the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) from the Space Station since April 2008. Measurements are carried between 166 nm and 3088 nm by three double-monochromators. SSI, particularly in the ultraviolet, is a key input to determine the dynamics and coupling of Earth's atmosphere in response to solar and terrestrial inputs. In-flight operations and performances of the instrument, including corrections, will be presented for the 8 years of the mission. After an accurate calibration following recent special on-orbit new operations, we present the variability measured in the UV by SOLAR/SOLSPEC. The accuracy of these measurements will be discussed.

  20. Spectral evolution of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fourth workshop organised by the Advanced School of Astronomy addresses the specific problems of galaxy and star formation processes, topics of uncertainty and controversy to which IRAS observations may give novel perspectives. The properties of stellar populations in the local group of galaxies are discussed. Several lectures deal with the fundamentals of the theory of spectral and photometrical evolution of stellar populations, and with recent developments in the theory of stellar structure, a necessary step to model and understand galactic evolution. Other lectures are concerned with empirical population syntheses and problems related to the UV spectra of elliptical and SO galaxies. The properties of galaxies at large lookback times and the search of primeval objects are also considered. (Auth.)

  1. Rectangular spectral collocation

    KAUST Repository

    Driscoll, Tobin A.

    2015-02-06

    Boundary conditions in spectral collocation methods are typically imposed by removing some rows of the discretized differential operator and replacing them with others that enforce the required conditions at the boundary. A new approach based upon resampling differentiated polynomials into a lower-degree subspace makes differentiation matrices, and operators built from them, rectangular without any row deletions. Then, boundary and interface conditions can be adjoined to yield a square system. The resulting method is both flexible and robust, and avoids ambiguities that arise when applying the classical row deletion method outside of two-point scalar boundary-value problems. The new method is the basis for ordinary differential equation solutions in Chebfun software, and is demonstrated for a variety of boundary-value, eigenvalue and time-dependent problems.

  2. Spectral proper orthogonal decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Sieber, Moritz; Paschereit, Christian Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The identification of coherent structures from experimental or numerical data is an essential task when conducting research in fluid dynamics. This typically involves the construction of an empirical mode base that appropriately captures the dominant flow structures. The most prominent candidates are the energy-ranked proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and the frequency ranked Fourier decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD). However, these methods fail when the relevant coherent structures occur at low energies or at multiple frequencies, which is often the case. To overcome the deficit of these "rigid" approaches, we propose a new method termed Spectral Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (SPOD). It is based on classical POD and it can be applied to spatially and temporally resolved data. The new method involves an additional temporal constraint that enables a clear separation of phenomena that occur at multiple frequencies and energies. SPOD allows for a continuous shifting from the energetically ...

  3. Spectral Animation Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Wang; Yang Liu; Xiaohu Guo; Zichun Zhong; Binh Le; Zhigang Deng

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a spectral approach to compress dynamic animation consisting of a sequence of homeomor-phic manifold meshes. Our new approach directly compresses the field of deformation gradient defined on the surface mesh, by decomposing it into rigid-body motion (rotation) and non-rigid-body deformation (stretching) through polar decompo-sition. It is known that the rotation group has the algebraic topology of 3D ring, which is different from other operations like stretching. Thus we compress these two groups separately, by using Manifold Harmonics Transform to drop out their high-frequency details. Our experimental result shows that the proposed method achieves a good balance between the reconstruction quality and the compression ratio. We compare our results quantitatively with other existing approaches on animation compression, using standard measurement criteria.

  4. Spectral disentangling with Spectangular

    CERN Document Server

    Sablowski, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    The paper introduces the software Spectangular for spectral disentangling via singular value decomposition with global optimisation of the orbital parameters of the stellar system or radial velocities of the individual observations. We will describe the procedure and the different options implemented in our program. Furthermore, we will demonstrate the performance and the applicability using tests on artificial data. Additionally, we use high-resolution spectra of Capella to demonstrate the performance of our code on real-world data. The novelty of this package is the implemented global optimisation algorithm and the graphical user interface (GUI) for ease of use. We have implemented the code to tackle SB1 and SB2 systems with the option of also dealing with telluric (static) lines.

  5. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF RADIOXENON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Matthew W.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2008-09-23

    Monitoring changes in atmospheric radioxenon concentrations is a major tool in the detection of an underground nuclear explosion. Ground based systems like the Automated Radioxenon Sampler /Analyzer (ARSA), the Swedish Unattended Noble gas Analyzer (SAUNA) and the Automatic portable radiometer of isotopes Xe (ARIX), can collect and detect several radioxenon isotopes by processing and transferring samples into a high efficiency beta-gamma coincidence detector. The high efficiency beta-gamma coincidence detector makes these systems highly sensitive to the radioxenon isotopes 133Xe, 131mXe, 133mXe and 135Xe. The standard analysis uses regions of interest (ROI) to determine the amount of a particular radioxenon isotope present. The ROI method relies on the peaks of interest falling within energy limits of the ROI. Some potential problems inherent in this method are the reliance on stable detector gains and a fixed resolution for each energy peak. In addition, when a high activity sample is measured there will be more interference among the ROI, in particular within the 133Xe, 133mXe, and 131mXe regions. A solution to some of these problems can be obtained through spectral fitting of the data. Spectral fitting is simply the fitting of the peaks using known functions to determine the number and relative peak positions and widths. By knowing this information it is possible to determine which isotopes are present. Area under each peak can then be used to determine an overall concentration for each isotope. Using the areas of the peaks several key detector characteristics can be determined: efficiency, energy calibration, energy resolution and ratios between interfering isotopes (Radon daughters).

  6. [Thermal spectral property of prism in hyper spectral imager].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiu-Sheng; Wu, Qing-Wen; Li, Ze-Xue; Chen, Li-Heng; Guo, Liang

    2010-06-01

    Prism is one of the most key parts in the hyper spectral imager (HSI). Consequently, to set thermal control target and make thermal control design, the thermal spectral property of prism in the HSI was studied. The working principle of the HSI and the definition of its thermal spectral property were introduced. The working environment of prism and its thermal effect were analyzed; also the study contents and technical route of the prism's thermal spectral property were discussed. The effects of different uniform temperature field on deflexion angle and angular dispersion of the prism in the HSI were deduced, and the changes in displacement of the spectra and the spectral bandwidth under different uniform temperature were obtained. For one instance, the thermal spectral property of the K9 prism and the fused silica prism were compared based on FEM and combined experiments, furthermore, its thermal control target was ascertained and a thermal spectral property test was carried out to validate the rationality of the thermal spectral property analysis. The results of analysis indicated that the changes in spectral bandwidth and spectrum resolution brought by thermal distortions can be ignored according to current fixing mode, and the displacement of the spectra is mainly determined by thermal coefficient of material refractive index; because of it's the lower thermal coefficient of material refractive index, the displacement of the spectra of the K9 prism is smaller under the same temperature changes; the material deflexion changes (dn/dlambda) of prism are not sensitive to the temperature, so the changes in spectral bandwidth caused by them are not obvious. And the results of test proved that the studied method of thermal spectral property is reasonable and essential, and the results are authentic and credible. So it can provide some guidance for setting thermal control target and optimizing thermal control design. PMID:20707180

  7. Yb fiber amplifier at 972.5 nm with frequency quadrupling to 243.1 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Burkley, Z; Cooper, S F; Brandt, A D; Yost, D C

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a continuous-wave ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier which produces 6.3 W at a wavelength of 972.5 nm. We frequency quadruple this source in two resonant doubling stages to produce 530 mW at 243.1 nm. Radiation at this wavelength is required to excite the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and could therefore find application in experimental studies of hydrogen and anti-hydrogen.

  8. High-speed low-current-density 850 nm VCSELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Anders; Westbergh, Petter; Gustavsson, Johan; Haglund, Åsa

    2010-02-01

    The design of an oxide confined 850 nm VCSEL has been engineered for high speed operation at low current density. Strained InGaAs/AlGaAs QWs, with a careful choice of In and Al concentrations based on rigorous band structure and gain calculations, were used to increase differential gain and reduce threshold carrier density. Various measures, including multiple oxide layers and a binary compound in the lower distributed Bragg reflector, were implemented for reducing capacitance and thermal impedance. Modulation bandwidths > 20 GHz at 25°C and > 15 GHz at 85°C were obtained. At room temperature, the bandwidth was found to be limited primarily by the still relatively large oxide capacitance, while at 85°C the bandwidth was also limited by the thermal saturation of the resonance frequency. Transmission up to 32 Gb/s (on-off keying) over multimode fiber was successfully demonstrated with the VCSEL biased at a current density of only 11 kA/cm2. In addition, using a more spectrally efficient modulation format (16 QAM subcarrier multiplexing), transmission at 40 Gb/s over 200 m multimode fiber was demonstrated.

  9. Wavelength beam combining of a 980-nm tapered diode laser bar in an external cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Thestrup, Birgitte

    2010-04-01

    High power diode lasers are used in a large number of applications. A limiting factor for more widespread use of broad area lasers is the poor beam quality. Gain guided tapered diode lasers are ideal candidates for industrial applications that demands watt level output power with good beam quality. By adapting a bar geometry, the output power could be scaled even up to several tens of watts. Unfortunately, the high divergence which is a characteristic feature of the bar geometry could lead to a degradation of the overall beam quality of the laser bar. However, spectral beam combining is an effective solution for preserving the beam quality of the bar in the range of that of a single emitter and at the same time, enabling the power scaling. We report spectral beam combining applied to a 12 emitter tapered laser bar at 980 nm. The external cavity has been designed for a wavelength separation of 4.0 nm between the emitters. An output power of 9 W has been achieved at an operating current of 30 A. The combined beam had an M2 value (1/e2) of 5.3 along the slow axis which is comparable to that of a single tapered emitter on the laser bar. The overall beam combining efficiency was measured to be 63%. The output spectrum of the individual emitters was narrowed considerably. In the free running mode, the individual emitters displayed a broad spectrum of the order of 0.5-1.0 nm while the spectral width has been reduced to 30-100 pm in the spectral beam combining mode.

  10. Monolithic PM Raman fiber laser at 1679 nm for Raman amplification at 1810 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    demonstrate a monolithic RM Raman fiber laser (RFL), which acts as a pump for a Raman amplifier (RA) at 1810 nm. The lasing wavelength of a RFL, thus also for a RA, can in principle be designed arbitrarily within the entire wavelength range from the Erbium band up to the Thulium/Holmium band...... by the utilization of cascaded SRS [3]. The Experimental setup is shown in Fig. 1a, and consists of a RFL pumped at 1564 nm lasing at the first stokes shift at 1679 nm [4] along with a RA with a gain maximum at the second stokes shift at 1810 nm. The monolithic RLF cavity contains two signal fiber Bragg gratings...... of OFS PM Raman fiber, with an estimated propagation loss of 0.42/0.46/1.3 dB/km at 1564/1679/1810 nm. The Raman gain coefficient was measured to be gR=2.66/2.35 W-1km-1 at 1679/1810 nm. The laser curve of the RFL is depicted in Fig. 1b, with a slope efficiency of 67 %. The high slope efficiency...

  11. Spectral imager based on Fabry-Perot interferometer for Aalto-1 nanosatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannila, Rami; Näsilä, Antti; Viherkanto, Kai; Holmlund, Christer; Näkki, Ismo; Saari, Heikki

    2013-09-01

    The Aalto-1 is a 3U-cubesat project coordinated by Aalto University. The satellite, Aalto-1, will be mainly built by students as project assignments and thesis works. The Aalto-1 is planned to launch on 2014. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is developing the main Earth observation payload, a miniaturized spectral imager unit, for the satellite. The spectral imager unit contains a spectral imager, a visible RGB-camera and control electronics of the cameras. Detailed design of the spectral imager unit has been completed and assembly of the spectral imager unit will be done in the autumn 2013. The spectral imager is based on a tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) accompanied by an RGB CMOS image sensor. The FPI consists of two highly reflective surfaces separated by a tunable air gap and it is based on a piezo-actuated structure. The piezo-actuated FPI uses three piezo-actuators and is controlled in a closed capacitive feedback loop. The spectral resolution of the imager will be 8-15 nm at full width at half maximum and it will operate in the wavelength range 500-900 nm. Imaging resolution of the spectral imager is 1024x1024 pixels and the focal length of the optics is 32 mm and F-number is 3.4. Mass of the spectral imager unit is approximately 600 grams, and dimensions are 97 mm x 97 mm x 48 mm.

  12. The Sensitivity of Hybrid Differential Stereoscopy for Spectral Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    DeForest, Craig E

    2007-01-01

    Stereoscopic spectral imaging is an observing technique that affords rapid acquisition of limited spectral information over an entire image plane simultaneously. Light from a telescope is dispersed into multiple spectral orders, which are imaged separately, and two or more of the dispersed images are combined using an analogy between the (x,y,\\lambda) spectral data space and conventional (x,y,z) three-space. Because no photons are deliberately destroyed during image acquisition, the technique is much more photon-efficient in some observing regimes than existing techniques such as scanned-filtergraph or scanned-slit spectral imaging. Hybrid differential stereoscopy, which uses a combination of conventional cross-correlation stereoscopy and linear approximation theory to extract the central wavelength of a spectral line, has been used to produce solar Stokes-V (line-of-sight) magnetograms in the 617.34 nm Fe I line, and more sophisticated inversion techniques are currently being used to derive Doppler and line ...

  13. [Study on spectral emissivity of C/C composites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bo; Cao, Wei-Wei; Jing, Min; Dong, Xing-Guang; Wang, Cheng-Guo

    2009-11-01

    Different types of C/C composites were prepared by conventional molding, and the changes in normal spectral emissivity of samples were tested. The testing results show that spectral emissivity of C/C composite reinforced by short cut carbon fibers is generally higher than the sample reinforced by carbon cloth in the entire 2500-13000nm wavelength region. The structure of short cut carbon fibers is relatively loose and the number of material particles is less than other samples in unit volume, which increases the penetration depth of electromagnetic waves. This is the reason for higher normal spectral emissivity and better heat radiation property. Meanwhile, the test results of normal spectral emissivity for fiber perform and C/C composite samples show that the spectral emissivity of resin carbon is better than fiber carbon because of the difference in microstructure for the two kinds of carbon materials. Laser Raman spectroscopy was employed to analyze the microstructures of different carbon materials, and the results show that because sp3 and sp2 hybrid states of carbon atoms in resin carbon produced more vibration modes, the resin carbon also has higher normal spectral emissivity and better characteristics of heat radiation.

  14. [Study on spectral emissivity of C/C composites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bo; Cao, Wei-Wei; Jing, Min; Dong, Xing-Guang; Wang, Cheng-Guo

    2009-11-01

    Different types of C/C composites were prepared by conventional molding, and the changes in normal spectral emissivity of samples were tested. The testing results show that spectral emissivity of C/C composite reinforced by short cut carbon fibers is generally higher than the sample reinforced by carbon cloth in the entire 2500-13000nm wavelength region. The structure of short cut carbon fibers is relatively loose and the number of material particles is less than other samples in unit volume, which increases the penetration depth of electromagnetic waves. This is the reason for higher normal spectral emissivity and better heat radiation property. Meanwhile, the test results of normal spectral emissivity for fiber perform and C/C composite samples show that the spectral emissivity of resin carbon is better than fiber carbon because of the difference in microstructure for the two kinds of carbon materials. Laser Raman spectroscopy was employed to analyze the microstructures of different carbon materials, and the results show that because sp3 and sp2 hybrid states of carbon atoms in resin carbon produced more vibration modes, the resin carbon also has higher normal spectral emissivity and better characteristics of heat radiation. PMID:20101951

  15. Spectral Sensitivity Measured with Electroretinogram Using a Constant Response Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Fernando Allan de Farias; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Martins, Sonia Limara; Aguiar, Renata Genaro; de Souza, John Manuel; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2016-01-01

    A new method is presented to determine the retinal spectral sensitivity function S(λ) using the electroretinogram (ERG). S(λ)s were assessed in three different species of myomorph rodents, Gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), Wistar rats (Ratus norvegicus), and mice (Mus musculus). The method, called AC Constant Method, is based on a computerized automatic feedback system that adjusts light intensity to maintain a constant-response amplitude to a flickering stimulus throughout the spectrum, as it is scanned from 300 to 700 nm, and back. The results are presented as the reciprocal of the intensity at each wavelength required to maintain a constant peak to peak response amplitude. The resulting S(λ) had two peaks in all three rodent species, corresponding to ultraviolet and M cones, respectively: 359 nm and 511 nm for mice, 362 nm and 493 nm for gerbils, and 362 nm and 502 nm for rats. Results for mouse and gerbil were similar to literature reports of S(λ) functions obtained with other methods, confirming that the ERG associated to the AC Constant-Response Method was effective to obtain reliable S(λ) functions. In addition, due to its fast data collection time, the AC Constant Response Method has the advantage of keeping the eye in a constant light adapted state. PMID:26800521

  16. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M. [Advanced Multidisciplinary MEMS-Based Integrated Electronic NCER Centre of Excellent (AMBIENCE), School of Microelectronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 02600 Arau, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  17. [Review of digital ground object spectral library].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Hu; Zhou, Ding-Wu

    2009-06-01

    A higher spectral resolution is the main direction of developing remote sensing technology, and it is quite important to set up the digital ground object reflectance spectral database library, one of fundamental research fields in remote sensing application. Remote sensing application has been increasingly relying on ground object spectral characteristics, and quantitative analysis has been developed to a new stage. The present article summarized and systematically introduced the research status quo and development trend of digital ground object reflectance spectral libraries at home and in the world in recent years. Introducing the spectral libraries has been established, including desertification spectral database library, plants spectral database library, geological spectral database library, soil spectral database library, minerals spectral database library, cloud spectral database library, snow spectral database library, the atmosphere spectral database library, rocks spectral database library, water spectral database library, meteorites spectral database library, moon rock spectral database library, and man-made materials spectral database library, mixture spectral database library, volatile compounds spectral database library, and liquids spectral database library. In the process of establishing spectral database libraries, there have been some problems, such as the lack of uniform national spectral database standard and uniform standards for the ground object features as well as the comparability between different databases. In addition, data sharing mechanism can not be carried out, etc. This article also put forward some suggestions on those problems.

  18. Quantitative Effects of the Spectral Calibration Accuracy of the Imaging Spectrometer on the Vegetation Red Edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The red edge position (REP) has been widely used to estimate vegetation parameters and also as a sensitive indicator of vegetation stress. Detailed characterizations of REP can be easily achieved from hyperspectral data obtained from imaging spectrometers. After launch of imaging spectrometers, shift in the center wavelength of the spectral channel may occur due to the vibrations and aging of components. In this paper, we firstly proposed a method to quantify the effects of the spectral shift of imaging spectrometers on the REP. The fundamental basis of the method was the simulation of the vegetation reflectance spectra after spectral shift (SSR). The quantitative relationship between the spectral shift value and the REP derived from the SSR was analysed. The result showed a significant linear relationship between spectral shift value and REP error (R2=0.9932). For a 10nm resolution spectrometer, channel center wavelength errors of 10%, 30% and 50% would introduce 0.8nm, 2.5nm and 5.3nm error in REP, respectively. The study indicated that spectral calibration error was an important factor to generate REP shift

  19. Molecular application of spectral photoacoustic imaging in pancreatic cancer pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshman, Minalini; Hupple, Clinton; Lohse, Ines; Hedley, David; Needles, Andrew; Theodoropoulos, Catherine

    2012-12-01

    Spectral imaging is an advanced photo-acoustic (PA) mode that can discern optical absorption of contrast agent(s) in the tissue micro-environment. This advancement is made possible by precise control of optical wavelength using a tunable pulsed laser, ranging from 680-970 nm. Differential optical absorption of blood oxygenation states makes spectral imaging of hemoglobin ideal to investigate remodeling of the tumor microenvironment- a molecular change that renders resistance to standard cancer treatment. Approach: Photo-acoustic imaging was performed on the Vevo® LAZR system (VisualSonics) at 5-20 Hz. Deep abdominal imaging was accomplished with a LZ250D probe at a center frequency of 21MHz and an axial resolution of 75 μm. The tumor model was generated in an immune compromised mouse by surgical implantation of primary patient derived tumors, in the pancreas. Results: Spectral imaging for oxygen saturation at 750 nm and 850 nm characterized this tumor with a poorly oxygenated core surrounded by a well oxygenated periphery. Multispectral imaging identified a sub region in the core with a four-fold signal exclusively at 750 and 800 nm. A co-registered 2D image of this region was shown to be echogenic and calcification was suspected. Perfusion imaging with contrast enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles (Vevo MicroMarker® contrast agents, VisualSonics) identified functional vessels towards this sub region. Histology confirmed calcification and vascularization in the tumor core. Taken together, non-invasive characterization of the tumor microenvironment using photo-acoustics rendered spectral imaging a sensitive tool to monitor molecular changes representative of progression of pancreatic cancer that kills within 6 months of diagnosis.

  20. Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability in Cycle 24: Observations and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Marchenko, S V; Lean, J L

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), we characterize both short-term (solar rotation) and long-term (solar cycle) changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) between 265-500 nm during the on-going Cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the GOME-2 and SORCE instruments and find fair-to-excellent, depending on wavelength, agreement among the observations and predictions of the NRLSSI2 and SATIRE-S models.

  1. Vegetation Species Composition and Canopy Architecture Information Expressed in Leaf Water Absorption Measured in the 1000nm and 2200 nm Spectral Region by an Imaging Spectometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. O.; Roberts, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    Plant species composition and plant architectural attributes are critical parameters required for the measuring, monitoring and modeling of terrestrial ecosystems. Remote sensing is commonly cited as an important tool for deriving vegetation properties at an appropriate scale for ecosystem studies, ranging from local, to regional and even synoptic scales (e.g. Wessman 1992).

  2. Nd:YAG Lasers Operating at 1064 nm and 946 nm by Direct Pumping and Thermally Boosted Pumping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XV Chang-Wen; WEI Zhi-Yi; HE Kun-Na; LI De-Hua; ZHANG Yong-Dong; ZHANG Zhi-Guo

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a 1064nm Nd:YAG laser by directly pumping into the upper lasing level with a tunable Ti:sapphire laser. The valid wavelength is demonstrated at 868.3nm, 875.2nm, 883.8nm, and 885.5nm, re-spectively. To our knowledge, this is the first time that 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser pumped by 875.2nm laser. In addition, laser wavelength at 946 nm is also generated by direct pumping together with traditional pumping.

  3. Research Into a Neon Spectral Line Profile of Dusty Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Pikalev, Aleksandr

    2014-01-01

    Ordered dusty structures influence plasma conditions. This influence can be revealed, when plasma spectral characteristics change, as dusty particles are injected. For example, a variation in the atomic temperature leads to a variation in the profiles of spectral lines. We studied the profile of a 585 nm neon spectral line in the dusty structures. The structures levitated in a positive column of a glow discharge at a pressure of 50-150 Pa and with a current of 1-9 mA. We scanned the profile with the use of a Fabry-Perot interferometer, by changing the air pressure between the interferometer mirrors. To process the data, a special algorithm was developed. The algorithm is resistant to a noise and a scanning speed instability. We have found an upper bound of the impact of dusty structures on the profile width. The appearance of macroparticles changes the atomic plasma temperature less than by 10 K.

  4. Enhancing solar cell efficiency by using spectral converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Sark, W.G.J.H.M. [Department of Science, Technology and Society, Copernicus Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijerink, A. [Department of Chemistry of Condensed Matter, Debye Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schropp, R.E.I. [Department of Surfaces, Interfaces and Devices, Debye Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Van Roosmalen, J.A.M. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Lysen, E.H. [Utrecht Centre for Energy research UCE, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2005-04-01

    Planar converters containing quantum dots as wavelength-shifting moieties on top of a multi-crystalline silicon and an amorphous silicon solar cell were studied. The highly efficient quantum dots are to shift the wavelengths where the spectral response of the solar cell is low to wavelengths where the spectral response is high, in order to improve the conversion efficiency of the solar cell. It was calculated that quantum dots with an emission at 603 nm increase the multi-crystalline solar cell short-circuit current by nearly 10%. Simulation results for planar converters on hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells show no beneficial effects, due to the high spectral response at low wavelength.

  5. Enhancing solar cell efficiency by using spectral converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van [Utrecht University (Netherlands). Copernicus Institute; Meijerink, A.; Schropp, R.E.I. [Utrecht University (Netherlands). Debye Institute; Roosmalen, J.A.M. van [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Lysen, E.H. [Utrecht University (Netherlands). Centre for Energy Research

    2005-05-01

    Planar converters containing quantum dots as wavelength-shifting moieties on top of a multi-crystalline silicon and an amorphous silicon solar cell were studied. The highly efficient quantum dots are to shift the wavelengths where the spectral response of the solar cell is low to wavelengths where the spectral response is high, in order to improve the conversion efficiency of the solar cell. It was calculated that quantum dots with an emission at 603 nm increase the multi-crystalline solar cell short-circuit current by nearly 10%. Simulation results for planar converters on hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells show no beneficial effects, due to the high spectral response at low wavelength. (author)

  6. Nonlinear spectral imaging microscopy of rabbit aortic wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quangang Liu; Jianxin Chen; Shuangmu Zhuo; Xingshan Jiang; Kecheng Lu

    2009-01-01

    Employing nonlinear spectral imaging technique based on two-photon-excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation (SHG) of biological tissue, we combine the image-guided spectral analysis method and multi-channel subsequent detection imaging to map and visualize the intrinsic species in a native rabbit aortic wall. A series of recorded nonlinear spectral images excited by a broad range of laser wavelengths (730-910 nm) are used to identify five components in the native rabbit aortic wall, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), elastic fiber, flavin, porphyrin derivatives, and collagen. Integrating multi-channel subsequent detection imaging technique, the high-resolution, high contrast images of collagen and elastic fiber in the aortic wall are obtained. Our results demonstrate that this method can yield complementary biochemical and morphological information about aortic tissues, which have the potential to determine the tissue pathology associated with mechanical properties of aortic wall and to evaluate the pharmacodynamical studies of vessels.

  7. [The study of M dwarf spectral classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhen-Ping; Pan, Jing-Chang; Luo, A-Li

    2013-08-01

    As the most common stars in the galaxy, M dwarfs can be used to trace the structure and evolution of the Milky Way. Besides, investigating M dwarfs is important for searching for habitability of extrasolar planets orbiting M dwarfs. Spectral classification of M dwarfs is a fundamental work. The authors used DR7 M dwarf sample of SLOAN to extract important features from the range of 600-900 nm by random forest method. Compared to the features used in Hammer Code, the authors added three new indices. Our test showed that the improved Hammer with new indices is more accurate. Our method has been applied to classify M dwarf spectra of LAMOST. PMID:24159887

  8. DEVELOPMENT AND UTILIZATION OF URBAN SPECTRAL LIBRARY FOR REMOTE SENSING OF URBAN ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Ezaty Mohd Nasarudin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral technology is useful for urban studies due to its capability in examining detailed spectral characteristics of urban materials. This study aims to develop a spectral library of urban materials and demonstrate its application in remote sensing analysis of an urban environment. Field measurements were conducted by using ASD FieldSpec 3 Spectroradiometer with wavelength range from 350 to 2500 nm. The spectral reflectance curves of urban materials were interpreted and analyzed. A collection of 22 spectral data was compiled into a spectral library. The spectral library was put to practical use by utilizing the reference spectra for WorldView-2 satellite image classification which demonstrates the usability of such infrastructure to facilitatefurther progress of remote sensing applications in Malaysia.

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND UTILIZATION OF URBAN SPECTRAL LIBRARY FOR REMOTE SENSING OF URBAN ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Ezaty Mohd Nasarudin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral technology is useful for urban studies due to its capability in examining detailed spectral characteristics of urban materials. This study aims to develop a spectral library of urban materials and demonstrate its application in remote sensing analysis of an urban environment. Field measurements were conducted by using ASD FieldSpec 3 Spectroradiometer with wavelength range from 350 to 2500 nm. The spectral reflectance curves of urban materials were interpreted and analyzed. A collection of 22 spectral data was compiled into a spectral library. The spectral library was put to practical use by utilizing the reference spectra for WorldView-2 satellite image classification which demonstrates the usability of such infrastructure to facilitate further progress of remote sensing applications in Malaysia.

  10. Discrimination of periodontal diseases using diffuse reflectance spectral intensity ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra Sekhar, Prasanth; Betsy, Joseph; Presanthila, Janam; Subhash, Narayanan

    2012-02-01

    This clinical study was to demonstrate the applicability of diffuse reflectance (DR) intensity ratio R620/R575 in the quantification and discrimination of periodontitis and gingivitis from healthy gingiva. DR spectral measurements were carried out with white-light illumination from 70 healthy sites in 30 healthy volunteers, and 63 gingivitis- and 58 periodontitis-infected sites in 60 patients. Clinical parameters such as probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, and gingival index were recorded in patient population. Diagnostic accuracies for discrimination of gingivitis and periodontitis from healthy gingiva were determined by comparison of spectral signatures with clinical parameters. Divergence of average DR spectral intensity ratio between control and test groups was studied using analysis of variance. The mean DR spectrum on normalization at 620 nm showed marked differences between healthy tissue, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Hemoglobin concentration and apparent SO2 (oxygen saturation) were also calculated for healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis sites. DR spectral intensities at 545 and 575 nm showed a decreasing trend with progression of disease. Among the various DR intensity ratios studied, the R620/R575 ratio provided a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94% for discrimination of healthy tissues from gingivitis and a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 100% for discrimination of gingivitis from periodontitis.

  11. Combing Visible and Infrared Spectral Tests for Dust Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yaping; Levy, Robert; Kleidman, Richard; Remer, Lorraine; Mattoo, Shana

    2016-01-01

    The MODIS Dark Target aerosol algorithm over Ocean (DT-O) uses spectral reflectance in the visible, near-IR and SWIR wavelengths to determine aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom Exponent (AE). Even though DT-O does have "dust-like" models to choose from, dust is not identified a priori before inversion. The "dust-like" models are not true "dust models" as they are spherical and do not have enough absorption at short wavelengths, so retrieved AOD and AE for dusty regions tends to be biased. The inference of "dust" is based on postprocessing criteria for AOD and AE by users. Dust aerosol has known spectral signatures in the near-UV (Deep blue), visible, and thermal infrared (TIR) wavelength regions. Multiple dust detection algorithms have been developed over the years with varying detection capabilities. Here, we test a few of these dust detection algorithms, to determine whether they can be useful to help inform the choices made by the DT-O algorithm. We evaluate the following methods: The multichannel imager (MCI) algorithm uses spectral threshold tests in (0.47, 0.64, 0.86, 1.38, 2.26, 3.9, 11.0, 12.0 micrometer) channels and spatial uniformity test [Zhao et al., 2010]. The NOAA dust aerosol index (DAI) uses spectral contrast in the blue channels (412nm and 440nm) [Ciren and Kundragunta, 2014]. The MCI is already included as tests within the "Wisconsin" (MOD35) Cloud mask algorithm.

  12. New confocal microscopy hyperspectral imager for NIR-emitting bioprobes: high spectral resolution for a wide spectral range (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcet, Stéphane; Benayas, Antonio; Quintanilla, Marta; Mangiarini, Francesca; Verhaegen, Marc; Vetrone, Fiorenzo; Blais-Ouellette, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    Functional nanoscale materials are being extensively investigated for applications in biology and medicine and are ready to make significant contributions in the realization of exciting advancements in diverse areas of diagnostics and therapeutics. Aiming for more accurate, efficient, non-invasive and fast diagnostic tools, the use of near-infrared (NIR) light in the range of the 1st and 2nd biological window (NIR-I: 0.70-0.95 µm; NIR-II: 1.00-1.35 µm) provides deeper penetration depth into biological tissue, better image contrast, reduced phototoxicity and photobleaching. Consequently, NIR-based bioimaging became a quickly emerging field and manifold new NIR-emitting bioprobes have been reported. Since commercially available microscopes are not optimized for this kind of NPs, a new microscopy hyperspectral confocal imager has been developed to cover a broad spectral range (400 to 1700 nm) with high spectral resolution. The smallest spectral variation can be easily monitored thanks to the high spectral resolution (as low as 0.2 nm). This is possible thanks to a combination of an EMCCD and an InGaAs camera with a high resolution spectrometer. An extended number of NPs can be excited with a Ti:Sapphire laser, which provides tunable illumination within 690-1040 nm. Cells and tissues can be mapped in less than 100 ms, allowing in-vivo imaging. As a proof of concept, here we present the preliminary results of the spatial distribution of the fluorescence signal intensity from lanthanide doped nanoparticles incorporated into a system of biological interest. The temperature sub-mm gradient - analyzing the spectral features so gathered through an all-optical route is also thoroughly discussed.

  13. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF EXCHANGE RATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEŠA LOTRIČ DOLINAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Using spectral analysis is very common in technical areas but rather unusual in economics and finance, where ARIMA and GARCH modeling are much more in use. To show that spectral analysis can be useful in determining hidden periodic components for high-frequency finance data as well, we use the example of foreign exchange rates

  14. Examining the Spectral Separability of Prosopis glandulosa from Co-Existent Species Using Field Spectral Measurement and Guided Regularized Random Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyasha Mureriwa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The invasive taxa of Prosopis is rated the world’s top 100 unwanted species, and a lack of spatial data about the invasion dynamics has made the current control and monitoring methods unsuccessful. This study thus tests the use of in situ spectroscopy data with a newly-developed algorithm, guided regularized random forest (GRRF, to spectrally discriminate Prosopis from coexistent acacia species (Acacia karroo, Acacia mellifera and Ziziphus mucronata in the arid environment of South Africa. Results show that GRRF was able to reduce the high dimensionality of the spectroscopy data and select key wavelengths (n = 11 for discriminating amongst the species. These wavelengths are located at 356.3 nm, 468.5 nm, 531.1 nm, 665.2 nm, 1262.3 nm, 1354.1 nm, 1361.7 nm, 1376.9 nm, 1407.1 nm, 1410.9 nm and 1414.6 nm. The use of these selected wavelengths increases the overall classification accuracy from 79.19% and a Kappa value of 0.7201 when using all wavelengths to 88.59% and a Kappa of 0.8524 when the selected wavelengths were used. Based on our relatively high accuracies and ease of use, it is worth considering the GRRF method for reducing the high dimensionality of spectroscopy data. However, this assertion should receive considerable additional testing and comparison before it is accepted as a substitute for reliable high dimensionality reduction.

  15. Airborne Shortwave Infrared Spectral Remote Sensing as a Direct Prospecting Method for Oil and Gas Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨柏林

    1994-01-01

    The spectral characters of hydrocarbons in some oil-bearing strata and soil layers ouer oil and gas reservoirs in the Junggar Basin and northern Tarim Basin in Xinjng are compared with those of chemically pure hydrocarbons.The hydrocarbons are characterized by the bi-absorption at 2310nm and 2350nm.Hydrocarbon and radioactive anomalies in oil and gas terrains are found much more widespread than carbonate alterations.Based on the spectra of heavy hydrocarbons related to oil between 2270nm and 2460nm and refined data treatme nt, remote sensing may hold encouraging promise as a directly prospecting technique for oil and gas resources.

  16. Spectral numbers in Floer theories

    CERN Document Server

    Usher, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The chain complexes underlying Floer homology theories typically carry a real-valued filtration, allowing one to associate to each Floer homology class a spectral number defined as the infimum of the filtration levels of chains representing that class. These spectral numbers have been studied extensively in the case of Hamiltonian Floer homology by Oh, Schwarz, and others. We prove that the spectral number associated to any nonzero Floer homology class is always finite, and that the infimum in the definition of the spectral number is always attained. In the Hamiltonian case, this implies that what is known as the "nondegenerate spectrality" axiom holds on all closed symplectic manifolds. Our proofs are entirely algebraic and rather elementary, and apply to any Floer-type theory (including Novikov homology) satisfying certain standard formal properties provided that one works with coefficients in a Novikov ring whose degree-zero part \\Lambda_0 is a field. The key ingredient is a theorem about linear transforma...

  17. Covariance Propagation in Spectral Indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, P.J., E-mail: pjgriff@sandia.gov

    2015-01-15

    The dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This paper identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, and provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.

  18. Polarization-dependent aluminum metasurface operating at 450 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Zhu, Xiaolong; Carstensen, Marcus S;

    2015-01-01

    is achieved by rotating an elongated rectangular structure of length 180 nm and width 110 nm inside a square lattice of period 250 nm. In the case of 45 degrees rotation of the structure with respect to the lattice, the normal-incidence reflectance drops around the resonance wavelength of 457 nm from about 60...

  19. Spectrally based mapping of riverbed composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, Carl J.; Stegman, Tobin K.; Overstreet, Brandon T.

    2016-07-01

    Remote sensing methods provide an efficient means of characterizing fluvial systems. This study evaluated the potential to map riverbed composition based on in situ and/or remote measurements of reflectance. Field spectra and substrate photos from the Snake River, Wyoming, USA, were used to identify different sediment facies and degrees of algal development and to quantify their optical characteristics. We hypothesized that accounting for the effects of depth and water column attenuation to isolate the reflectance of the streambed would enhance distinctions among bottom types and facilitate substrate classification. A bottom reflectance retrieval algorithm adapted from coastal research yielded realistic spectra for the 450 to 700 nm range; but bottom reflectance-based substrate classifications, generated using a random forest technique, were no more accurate than classifications derived from above-water field spectra. Additional hypothesis testing indicated that a combination of reflectance magnitude (brightness) and indices of spectral shape provided the most accurate riverbed classifications. Convolving field spectra to the response functions of a multispectral satellite and a hyperspectral imaging system did not reduce classification accuracies, implying that high spectral resolution was not essential. Supervised classifications of algal density produced from hyperspectral data and an inferred bottom reflectance image were not highly accurate, but unsupervised classification of the bottom reflectance image revealed distinct spectrally based clusters, suggesting that such an image could provide additional river information. We attribute the failure of bottom reflectance retrieval to yield more reliable substrate maps to a latent correlation between depth and bottom type. Accounting for the effects of depth might have eliminated a key distinction among substrates and thus reduced discriminatory power. Although further, more systematic study across a broader range

  20. Spectrally based mapping of riverbed composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, Carl; Stegman, Tobin K.; Overstreet, Brandon T.

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing methods provide an efficient means of characterizing fluvial systems. This study evaluated the potential to map riverbed composition based on in situ and/or remote measurements of reflectance. Field spectra and substrate photos from the Snake River, Wyoming, USA, were used to identify different sediment facies and degrees of algal development and to quantify their optical characteristics. We hypothesized that accounting for the effects of depth and water column attenuation to isolate the reflectance of the streambed would enhance distinctions among bottom types and facilitate substrate classification. A bottom reflectance retrieval algorithm adapted from coastal research yielded realistic spectra for the 450 to 700 nm range; but bottom reflectance-based substrate classifications, generated using a random forest technique, were no more accurate than classifications derived from above-water field spectra. Additional hypothesis testing indicated that a combination of reflectance magnitude (brightness) and indices of spectral shape provided the most accurate riverbed classifications. Convolving field spectra to the response functions of a multispectral satellite and a hyperspectral imaging system did not reduce classification accuracies, implying that high spectral resolution was not essential. Supervised classifications of algal density produced from hyperspectral data and an inferred bottom reflectance image were not highly accurate, but unsupervised classification of the bottom reflectance image revealed distinct spectrally based clusters, suggesting that such an image could provide additional river information. We attribute the failure of bottom reflectance retrieval to yield more reliable substrate maps to a latent correlation between depth and bottom type. Accounting for the effects of depth might have eliminated a key distinction among substrates and thus reduced discriminatory power. Although further, more systematic study across a broader

  1. DFB-ridge laser diodes at 894 nm for Cesium atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bandel, N.; Garcia, M.; Lecomte, M.; Larrue, A.; Robert, Y.; Vinet, E.; Driss, O.; Parrilaud, O.; Krakowski, M.; Gruet, F.; Matthey, R.; Mileti, G.

    2016-02-01

    Time and frequency applications are in need of high accuracy and high stability clocks. Optically pumped compact industrial Cesium atomic clocks are a promising approach that could satisfy these demands. However, the stability of these clocks relies, among others, on the performances of the laser diodes that are used. This issue has led the III-V Lab to commit to the European Euripides-LAMA project that aims to provide competitive compact optical Cesium clocks for ground applications. This work will provide key experience for further space technology qualification. III-V Lab is in charge of the design, fabrication and reliability of Distributed-Feedback diodes (DFB) at 894 nm (D1 line of Cesium) and 852 nm (D2 line). LTF-Unine is in charge of their spectral characterisation. The use of D1 line for pumping will provide simplified clock architecture compared to the D2 line pumping thanks to simpler atomic transitions and a larger spectral separation between lines in the 894 nm case. Also, D1 line pumping overcomes the issue of unpumped "idle states" that occur with D2 line. The modules should provide narrow linewidth (= 10 Hz and 109 Hz2/Hz @ f >= 10 Hz.

  2. Absorption Measurements of Periodically Poled Potassium Titanyl Phosphate (PPKTP at 775 nm and 1550 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Steinlechner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficient generation of second-harmonic light and squeezed light requires non-linear crystals that have low absorption at the fundamental and harmonic wavelengths. In this work the photo-thermal self-phase modulation technique is exploited to measure the absorption coefficient of periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PPKTP at 1,550 nm and 775 nm. Themeasurement results are (84±40 ppm/cmand (127±24 ppm/cm, respectively. We conclude that the performance of state-of-the-art frequency doubling and squeezed light generation in PPKTP is not limited by absorption.

  3. CCN Spectral Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, James G.

    2009-02-27

    Detailed aircraft measurements were made of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra associated with extensive cloud systems off the central California coast in the July 2005 MASE project. These measurements include the wide supersaturation (S) range (2-0.01%) that is important for these polluted stratus clouds. Concentrations were usually characteristic of continental/anthropogenic air masses. The most notable feature was the consistently higher concentrations above the clouds than below. CCN measurements are so important because they provide a link between atmospheric chemistry and cloud-climate effects, which are the largest climate uncertainty. Extensive comparisons throughout the eleven flights between two CCN spectrometers operated at different but overlapping S ranges displayed the precision and accuracy of these difficult spectral determinations. There are enough channels of resolution in these instruments to provide differential spectra, which produce more rigorous and precise comparisons than traditional cumulative presentations of CCN concentrations. Differential spectra are also more revealing than cumulative spectra. Only one of the eleven flights exhibited typical maritime concentrations. Average below cloud concentrations over the two hours furthest from the coast for the 8 flights with low polluted stratus was 614?233 at 1% S, 149?60 at 0.1% S and 57?33 at 0.04% S cm-3. Immediately above cloud average concentrations were respectively 74%, 55%, and 18% higher. Concentration variability among those 8 flights was a factor of two. Variability within each flight excluding distances close to the coast ranged from 15-56% at 1% S. However, CN and probably CCN concentrations sometimes varied by less than 1% over distances of more than a km. Volatility and size-critical S measurements indicated that the air masses were very polluted throughout MASE. The aerosol above the clouds was more polluted than the below cloud aerosol. These high CCN concentrations from

  4. Measurements of Soot Mass Absorption Coefficients from 300 to 660 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Fisher, Al; Helgestad, Taylor; Lambe, Andrew; Sedlacek, Arthur; Smith, Geoffrey; Cappa, Christopher; Davidovits, Paul; Onasch, Timothy; Freedman, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Soot, a product of incomplete combustion, plays an important role in the earth's climate system through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. In particular, the assumed mass absorption coefficient (MAC) of soot and its variation with wavelength presents a significant uncertainty in the calculation of radiative forcing in global climate change models. As part of the fourth Boston College/Aerodyne soot properties measurement campaign, we have measured the mass absorption coefficient of soot produced by an inverted methane diffusion flame over a spectral range of 300-660 nm using a variety of optical absorption techniques. Extinction and absorption were measured using a dual cavity ringdown photoacoustic spectrometer (CRD-PAS, UC Davis) at 405 nm and 532 nm. Scattering and extinction were measured using a CAPS PMssa single scattering albedo monitor (Aerodyne) at 630 nm; the absorption coefficient was determined by subtraction. In addition, the absorption coefficients in 8 wavelength bands from 300 to 660 nm were measured using a new broadband photoacoustic absorption monitor (UGA). Soot particle mass was quantified using a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA, Cambustion), mobility size with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI) and soot concentration with a CPC (Brechtel). The contribution of doubly charged particles to the sample mass was determined using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (DMT). Over a mass range of 1-8 fg, corresponding to differential mobility diameters of ~150 nm to 550 nm, the value of the soot MAC proved to be independent of mass for all wavelengths. The wavelength dependence of the MAC was best fit to a power law with an Absorption Ångstrom Coefficient slightly greater than 1.

  5. Spectral behavior of gravel dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jie; Wu, Teng; Zhong, Deyu

    2015-02-01

    Spectral behavior of gravel dunes formed under different flow discharges is analyzed with an attempt to verify the '- 3' spectral law that has been confirmed extensively for sand dunes. A schematic spectrum of gravel dunes is proposed based on the spectral analysis as well as results from the literature. The results of spectral analysis show a significant deviation from the '- 3' spectral law for gravel dunes, and the magnitude of deviation correlates with flow discharge. Possible explanations for the deviation from the '- 3' spectral law, being associated with kinetic and geometrical characteristics, have been explored. To investigate the kinetic characteristics of gravel dunes, a wavelet-based method that calculates the celerity of dunes based on a pair of elevational time series is quantitatively tested. Our results suggest that (1) the kinetic explanation based on the relationship between dune celerity and dune length cannot fully explain the spectral behavior of gravel dunes; (2) the geometrical explanation based on the self-similarity hypothesis is confirmed by the relationship between dune length and dune height; and (3) the development of gravel sheets accounts for the differences in kinetic and geometrical characteristics between gravel dunes and sand dunes.

  6. spectral-cube: Read and analyze astrophysical spectral data cubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Thomas; Ginsburg, Adam; Beaumont, Chris; Leroy, Adam; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Spectral-cube provides an easy way to read, manipulate, analyze, and write data cubes with two positional dimensions and one spectral dimension, optionally with Stokes parameters. It is a versatile data container for building custom analysis routines. It provides a uniform interface to spectral cubes, robust to the wide range of conventions of axis order, spatial projections, and spectral units that exist in the wild, and allows easy extraction of cube sub-regions using physical coordinates. It has the ability to create, combine, and apply masks to datasets and is designed to work with datasets too large to load into memory, and provide basic summary statistic methods like moments and array aggregates.

  7. SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT THE CHINA RADIOMETRIC CALIBRATION TEST SITE FOR THE REMOTE SENSING SATELITE SENSOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉香; 张广顺; 刘志权; 张立军; 朱顺斌; 戎志国; 邱康睦

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive field experiment was made with the support of the project of China Radiometric Calibration Site (CRCS) during June-July 1999. Ground reflectance spectra were measured at Dunhuang Calibration Test Site in the experiment. More than two thousands of spectral curves were acquired in a 20 km × 20 km area. The spectral coverage is from 350 nm to 2500 nm. The measurement values show that reflectance is between 10% and 33% at the VISSWIR spectral region. The standard deviation of reflectance is between 1.0% and 2.0% for the spectral range. Optical characteristics and ground reflectance measurements at the Dunhuang test site, result analysis and error source were described. In addition, a comparison of the reflectance obtained in 1999 with those measured in 1994 and 1996 was also made.

  8. Reflectance Spectral Characteristics of Minerals in the Mboukoumassi Sylvite Deposit, Kouilou Province, Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Fu Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents reflectance spectra, determined with an ASD Inc. TerraSpec® spectrometer, of five types of ore and gangue minerals from the Mboukoumassi sylvite deposit, Democratic Republic of the Congo. The spectral absorption features, with peaks at 999, 1077, 1206, 1237, 1524, and 1765 nm, of the ore mineral carnallite were found to be different from those of gangue minerals. Spectral comparison among carnallite samples from different sylvite deposits suggests that, in contrast to spectral shapes, the absorption features of carnallite are highly reproducible. Heating of carnallite to 400 and 750°C, and comparing the spectra of heated and non-heated samples, indicates that spectral absorption is related to lattice hydration or addition of hydroxyl. Since carnallite undergoes deliquescence easily, the absorption features of carnallite in the 350–2500 nm spectrum could serve as a robust tool for carnallite identification and separation.

  9. Spectral characteristics of caries-related autofluorescence spectra and their use for diagnosis of caries stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sung-Ae; Jung, Kyeong-Hoon; Ko, Ching-Chang; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify factors useful for diagnosis of the caries stage from laser-induced autofluorescence (AF) spectra. Affected teeth were accurately staged and allocated to four groups: sound, stage II, stage III, or stage IV. A 405-nm laser was used to produce AF spectra. The spectrum factors analyzed were spectrum slope at 550 to 600 nm, spectral area from 500 and 590 nm, and intensity ratio of peaks 625 and 667 nm (625/667 nm). DIAGNOdent was used as control measurement. AF spectra of sound teeth had a peak near 500 nm followed by a smooth decline to 800 nm. As caries progressed, some specimens in stages II to IV showed one or two peak(s) near 625 and 667 nm. Slopes at 550 to 600 nm and areas under the curve at 500 to 590 nm were significantly different (pDIAGNOdent readings for sound and stage II and stage III and IV were not significantly different. Among the studied factors, the spectrum slope at 550 to 600 nm and area under curve at 500 to 590 nm could be useful treatment decision-making tools for carious lesions.

  10. Photodissociation of the Propargyl (C3D3) Radicals at 248 nm and 193 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumark., D.M.; Crider, P.E.; Castiglioni, L.; Kautzman, K.K.

    2009-01-21

    The photodissociation of perdeuterated propargyl (D{sub 2}CCCD) and propynyl (D{sub 3}CCC) radicals was investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Radicals were produced from their respective anions by photodetachment at 540 nm and 450 nm (below and above the electron affinity of propynyl). The radicals were then photodissociated by 248 nm or 193 nm light. The recoiling photofragments were detected in coincidence with a time- and position-sensitive detector. Three channels were observed: D{sub 2} loss, CD + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} + C{sub 2}. Obervation of the D loss channel was incompatible with this experiment and was not attempted. Our translational energy distributions for D{sub 2} loss peaked at nonzero translational energy, consistent with ground state dissociation over small (< 1 eV) exit barriers with respect to separated products. Translational energy distributions for the two heavy channels peaked near zero kinetic energy, indicating dissociation on the ground state in the absence of exit barriers.

  11. Evaluation of the Diode laser (810nm,980nm) on dentin tubule diameter following internal bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Salim, Soheil; Sarraf, Pegah; Javad-Kharazifard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diode laser irradiation and bleaching materials on the dentinal tubule diameter after laser bleaching. Material and Methods The dentin discs of 40 extracted third molar were used in this experiment. Each disc surface was divided into two halves by grooving. Half of samples were laser bleached at different wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Other half of each disc with no laser bleaching remained as a negative control. Dentin discs were assigned randomly into four groups (n=10) with following hydrogen peroxide and diode laser wavelength specifications; Group 1 (30% - 810 nm), group 2 (30% - 980 nm), group 3 (46% - 810 nm) and group 4 (46% - 980 nm). All specimens were sent for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis in order to measure tubular diameter in laser treated and control halves. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). Results A significant reduction in dentin tubule diameter was observed in groups 1, 2 and 4. There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 3 and 4 after bleaching. Conclusions The SEM results showed that diode laser was able to reduce dentin tubule diameter and its effect on dentin was dependent on chemical action of bleaching material. Key words:Laser, diode, dentin, tubule, diameter. PMID:27398172

  12. The Spectrum of Thorium from 250 nm to 5500 nm: Ritz Wavelengths and Optimized Energy Levels

    CERN Document Server

    Redman, Stephen L; Sansonetti, Craig J

    2013-01-01

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists (Giacchetti et al. 1974; Zalubas & Corliss 1974; Zalubas 1976; Palmer & Engleman 1983; Engleman et al. 2003; Lovis & Pepe 2007; Kerber et al. 2008) to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly-, and doubly-ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19679 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40000 1/cm to 1800 1/cm). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer & Engleman (1983) and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. (2008). We also found a la...

  13. An 80-W Laser Diode Array with 0.1 nm Linewidth for Rubidium Vapor Laser Pumping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zi-Ning; WANG Hong-Yan; LU Qi-Sheng; HUA Wei-Hong; XU Xiao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    The spectral linewidth of a 64-emitter laser-diode array is effectively suppressed by using a volume Bragg grating (VBG) based external cavity.At a maximal driven current of 90 A,the device produces a cw output of 80 W with 1.2 W/A slope efficiency and 0.1 nm spectral linewidth (FWHM) centered at 780 nm.The power extraction efficiency reaches 90% as compared with the free running case.The central wavelength of the narrowed spectrum is tuned over a 0.3nm range by adjusting the VBG's temperature.The absorption of 45% laser radiation by a 5-mm-long rubidium vapor cell with 150Torr ethane and 450 Torr helium at 383K is demonstrated.Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers (DPALs) have attracted much attention and have developed quickly in recent years due to their great potential in the high power laser field.[1-4] The efficient operation of DPALs requires pump sources with a linewidth that matches the pressure-broadened absorption band of alkali atoms.In moderate (~5 atm buffer gas) and low (~1 atm buffer gas) pressure operating regimes,the required pump linewidths should be 0.4 nm and less than 0.1 nm,respectively,[5] while the typical linewidth of commercial laser diode arrays (LDAs) is 2-4 nm.%The spectral linewidth of a 64-emitter laser-diode array is effectively suppressed by using a volume Bragg grating (VBG) based external cavity. At a maximal driven current of 90 A, the device produces a cw output of80W with 1.2 W/A slope efficiency and 0.1 nm spectral linewidth (FWHM) centered at 780 nm. The power extraction efficiency reaches 90% as compared with the free running case. The central wavelength of the narrowed spectrum is tuned over a 0.3nm range by adjusting the VBG's temperature. The absorption of 45% laser radiation by a 5-mm-long rubidium vapor cell with 150 Torr ethane and 450 Torr helium at 383 K is demonstrated.

  14. Timescale Analysis of Spectral Lags

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ti-Pei Li; Jin-Lu Qu; Hua Feng; Li-Ming Song; Guo-Qiang Ding; Li Chen

    2004-01-01

    A technique for timescale analysis of spectral lags performed directly in the time domain is developed. Simulation studies are made to compare the time domain technique with the Fourier frequency analysis for spectral time lags. The time domain technique is applied to studying rapid variabilities of X-ray binaries and γ-ray bursts. The results indicate that in comparison with the Fourier analysis the timescale analysis technique is more powerful for the study of spectral lags in rapid variabilities on short time scales and short duration flaring phenomena.

  15. Time and spectrum-resolving multiphoton correlator for 300–900 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Kelsey D.; Thibault, Marilyne; Jennewein, Thomas [Institute for Quantum Computing and Department for Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Kolenderski, Piotr, E-mail: kolenderski@fizyka.umk.pl [Institute for Quantum Computing and Department for Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Institute of Physics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-10-14

    We demonstrate a single-photon sensitive spectrometer in the visible range, which allows us to perform time-resolved and multi-photon spectral correlation measurements at room temperature. It is based on a monochromator composed of two gratings, collimation optics, and an array of single photon avalanche diodes. The time resolution can reach 110 ps and the spectral resolution is 2 nm/pixel, limited by the design of the monochromator. This technique can easily be combined with commercial monochromators and can be useful for joint spectrum measurements of two photons emitted in the process of parametric down conversion, as well as time-resolved spectrum measurements in optical coherence tomography or medical physics applications.

  16. Electro-optic dual-comb interferometry over 40  nm bandwidth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Vicente; Andrekson, Peter A; Torres-Company, Víctor

    2016-09-15

    Dual-comb interferometry is a measurement technique that uses two laser frequency combs to retrieve complex spectra in a line-by-line basis. This technique can be implemented with electro-optic frequency combs, offering intrinsic mutual coherence, high acquisition speed and flexible repetition-rate operation. A challenge with the operation of this kind of frequency comb in dual-comb interferometry is its limited optical bandwidth. Here, we use coherent spectral broadening and demonstrate electro-optic dual-comb interferometry over the entire telecommunications C band (200 lines covering ∼40  nm, measured within 10 μs at 100 signal-to-noise ratio per spectral line). These results offer new prospects for electro-optic dual-comb interferometry as a suitable technology for high-speed broadband metrology, for example in optical coherence tomography or coherent Raman microscopy. PMID:27628354

  17. Electro-optic dual-comb interferometry over 40 nm bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Vicente; Andrekson, Peter A.; Torres-Company, Víctor

    2016-09-01

    Dual-comb interferometry is a measurement technique that uses two laser frequency combs to retrieve complex spectra in a line-by-line basis. This technique can be implemented with electro-optic frequency combs, offering intrinsic mutual coherence, high acquisition speed and flexible repetition-rate operation. A challenge with the operation of this kind of frequency comb in dual-comb interferometry is its limited optical bandwidth. Here, we use coherent spectral broadening and demonstrate electro-optic dual-comb interferometry over the entire telecommunications C band (200 lines covering ~ 40 nm, measured within 10 microseconds at 100 signal-to-noise ratio per spectral line). These results offer new prospects for electro-optic dual-comb interferometry as a suitable technology for high-speed broadband metrology, for example in optical coherence tomography or coherent Raman microscopy.

  18. Electro-optic dual-comb interferometry over 40-nm bandwidth

    CERN Document Server

    Duran, Vicente; Torres-Company, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dual-comb interferometry is a measurement technique that uses two laser frequency combs to retrieve complex spectra in a line-by-line basis. This technique can be implemented with electro-optic frequency combs, offering intrinsic mutual coherence, high acquisition speed and flexible repetition-rate operation. A challenge with the operation of this kind of frequency comb in dual-comb interferometry is its limited optical bandwidth. Here, we use coherent spectral broadening and demonstrate electro-optic dual-comb interferometry over the entire telecommunications C band (200 lines covering ~ 40 nm, measured within 10 microseconds at 100 signal-to-noise ratio per spectral line). These results offer new prospects for electro-optic dual-comb interferometry as a suitable technology for high-speed broadband metrology, for example in optical coherence tomography or coherent Raman microscopy.

  19. 1000-1400-nm partially mode-locked pulse from a simple all-fiber cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaoming; Xu, Yiqing; Wong, Kenneth K Y

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a partially mode-locked pulse laser delivering ultra-wideband optical spectrum, i.e., 1000-1400 nm at 30 dB, from a simple all-fiber short cavity with all-normal dispersion. Examined by both real-time temporal and spectral analyzers, the partially mode-locked pulse exhibits double-scale noise-like characteristics-the fast L-shaped mode-locked pulse modulated by slow free-running Q-switched envelopes. Moreover, the statistical analysis as a function of its optical bandwidth shows that the spectral tuning does not compromise the temporal stability, but affects the pulsing periodicity. It is believed that the wide spectrum of knowledge obtained here would enrich the field of noise-like pulse, such as being beneficial to the rogue wave generation. PMID:26125353

  20. Broadband measurements of aerosol extinction in the ultraviolet spectral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Flores, J. M.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.; Rudich, Y.

    2013-04-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements have reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross sections and complex refractive indices. We describe a new laboratory instrument to measure aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The instrument consists of two broadband channels which span the 360-390 and 385-420 nm spectral regions using two light emitting diodes (LED) and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. We determined aerosol extinction cross sections and directly observed Mie scattering resonances for aerosols that are purely scattering (polystyrene latex spheres and ammonium sulfate), slightly absorbing (Suwannee River fulvic acid), and strongly absorbing (nigrosin dye). We describe an approach for retrieving refractive indices as a function of wavelength from the measured extinction cross sections over the 360-420 nm wavelength region. The retrieved refractive indices for PSL and ammonium sulfate agree within uncertainty with the literature values for this spectral region. The refractive index determined for nigrosin is 1.78 (± 0.03) + 0.19 (± 0.08)i at 360 nm and 1.63 (± 0.03) + 0.21 (± 0.05)i at 420 nm. The refractive index determined for Suwannee River fulvic acid is 1.71 (± 0.02) + 0.07 (± 0.06)i at 360 nm and 1.66 (± 0.02) + 0.06 (± 0.04)i at 420 nm. These laboratory results support the potential for a field instrument capable of determining ambient aerosol optical extinction, average aerosol extinction cross section, and complex refractive index as a function of wavelength.

  1. Grading of apples based on firmness and soluble solids content using VIS-SWNIR spectroscopy and spectral scattering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorting apple fruit based on internal quality will enhance the industry’s competiveness and profitability and assure consumer satisfaction. In this research, visible and shortwave near-infrared (Vis-SWNIR) spectroscopy (460–1,100 nm) and spectral scattering (450–1,050 nm) were used for sorting apple...

  2. Assessing corn water stress using spectral reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefford, Brenna S.

    Multiple remote sensing techniques have been developed to identify crop water stress, but some methods may be difficult for farmers to apply. Unlike most techniques, shortwave vegetation indices can be calculated using satellite, aerial, or ground imagery from the green (525-600 nm), red (625-700 nm), and near infrared (750-900 nm) spectral bands. If vegetation indices can be used to monitor crop water stress, growers could use this information as a quick low-cost guideline for irrigation management, thus helping save water by preventing over irrigating. This study occurred in the 2013 growing season near Greeley, CO, where pressurized drip irrigation was used to irrigate twelve corn ( Zea mays L.) treatments of varying water deficit. Multispectral data was collected and four different vegetation indices were evaluated: Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Optimized Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (OSAVI), Green Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (GNDVI), and the Wide Dynamic Range Vegetation Index (WDRVI). The four vegetation indices were compared to corn water stress as indicated by the stress coefficient (Ks) and water deficit in the root zone, calculated by using a water balance that monitors crop evapotranspiration (ET), irrigation events, precipitation events, and deep percolation. ET for the water balance was calculated using two different methods for comparison purposes: (1) calculation of the stress coefficient (Ks) using FAO-56 standard procedures; (2) use of canopy temperature ratio (Tc ratio) of a stressed crop to a non-stressed crop to calculate Ks. It was found that obtaining Ks from Tc ratio is a viable option, and requires less data to obtain than Ks from FAO-56. In order to compare the indices to Ks, vegetation ratios were developed in the process of normalization. Vegetation ratios are defined as the non-stressed vegetation index divided by the stressed vegetation index. Results showed that vegetation ratios were sensitive to water

  3. Extended femtosecond laser wavelength range to 330 nm in a high power LBO based optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jintao; Gu, Chenglin; Wang, Chingyue; Hu, Minglie

    2016-06-13

    We experimentally demonstrate a compact tunable, high average power femtosecond laser source in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. The laser source is based on intra-cavity frequency doubling of a temperature-tuned lithium tribotate (LBO) optical parametric oscillator (OPO), synchronously pumped at 520 nm by a frequency-doubled, Yb-fiber femtosecond laser amplifier system. By adjusting crystal temperature, the OPO can provide tunable visible to near-infrared (NIR) signal pulse, which have a wide spectral tuning range from 660 to 884 nm. Using a β-barium borate (BBO) crystal for intra-cavity frequency doubling, tunable femtosecond UV pulse are generated across 330~442 nm with up to 364 mW at 402 nm.

  4. Extended femtosecond laser wavelength range to 330 nm in a high power LBO based optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jintao; Gu, Chenglin; Wang, Chingyue; Hu, Minglie

    2016-06-13

    We experimentally demonstrate a compact tunable, high average power femtosecond laser source in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. The laser source is based on intra-cavity frequency doubling of a temperature-tuned lithium tribotate (LBO) optical parametric oscillator (OPO), synchronously pumped at 520 nm by a frequency-doubled, Yb-fiber femtosecond laser amplifier system. By adjusting crystal temperature, the OPO can provide tunable visible to near-infrared (NIR) signal pulse, which have a wide spectral tuning range from 660 to 884 nm. Using a β-barium borate (BBO) crystal for intra-cavity frequency doubling, tunable femtosecond UV pulse are generated across 330~442 nm with up to 364 mW at 402 nm. PMID:27410342

  5. On line contribution functions and examining spectral line formation in 3D model stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Amarsi, Anish Mayur

    2015-01-01

    Line contribution functions are useful diagnostics for studying spectral line formation in stellar atmospheres. I derive an expression for the contribution function to the abso- lute flux depression that emerges from three-dimensional box-in-a-star model stellar atmospheres. I illustrate the result by comparing the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) spectral line formation of the high-excitation permitted OI777nm lines with the non-LTE case.

  6. Spectrally narrowed external-cavity high-power stack of laser diode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H; Ruset, I C; Hersman, F W

    2005-06-01

    We describe an effective external cavity for narrowing the spectral linewidth of a multiarray stack of laser diode arrays. For a commercially available 279-W free-running five-array laser diode array operating at 60 A, we narrow the spectral linewidth to 0.40 nm at FWHM with 115 W of cw power output. This technique leads to the possibility of higher-efficiency, lower-cost production of hyperpolarized noble gases for magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Analysis of the spectral response of flourishing-withering vegetation changes based on ground spectral measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guli·Japper; CHEN Xi; ZHAO Jin; MA ZhongGuo; CHANG Cun; ZHANG XueRen

    2007-01-01

    A structural mode was used to characterize vegetation composition at the plant leaf level and a flourishing-withering ratio was developed. The spectral responses of vegetation with different flourishing-withering ratios were analyzed, the change rates of the chlorophyll and moisture content indices of vegetation with different flourishing-withering ratios were compared, and correlations between the chlorophyll and moisture content indices were analyzed. The results reveal that leaves with an intermediate flourishing-withering ratio can increase the absorption signatures of vegetation and that band ranges of 570-700 nm and 1300-1540 nm can play a role in indicating changes in the flourishing-withering ratios of vegetation; NPQI, NPCI, R695/R420, R695/R760, R750/R700, the peak-value area of red selvedge, the red selvedge amplitude, the ratio between the red selvedge amplitude and the minimum amplitude, and the NDVl of vegetation change regularly with the change in flourishing-withering ratios,and these nine vegetation indices are highly related to the chlorophyll content. Vegetation indexes of NDWI and PRI are very sensitive to the flourishing-withering change in vegetation and are closely related to the moisture content, and the correlation coefficient is higher than 0.9. The derivative of the spectra is more effective in describing changes in the structural mode of vegetation with different flourishing-withering ratios, especially at band ranges of 552-628 nm and 630-686 nm, and it is more sensitive to the mixed flourishing-withering ratios of leaves rather than to the vegetation indices. The red selvedge position in the spectrum is highly related to the chlorophyll content and is not sensitive to changes in the structural mode of mixed flourishing-withering leaves. The red selvedge parameters are sensitive to changes in the flourishing-withering ratio at the peak-value area of the red selvedge amplitude and the ratio between the red selvedge amplitude and the

  8. Spectral Band Selection for Urban Material Classification Using Hyperspectral Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bris, A.; Chehata, N.; Briottet, X.; Paparoditis, N.

    2016-06-01

    In urban areas, information concerning very high resolution land cover and especially material maps are necessary for several city modelling or monitoring applications. That is to say, knowledge concerning the roofing materials or the different kinds of ground areas is required. Airborne remote sensing techniques appear to be convenient for providing such information at a large scale. However, results obtained using most traditional processing methods based on usual red-green-blue-near infrared multispectral images remain limited for such applications. A possible way to improve classification results is to enhance the imagery spectral resolution using superspectral or hyperspectral sensors. In this study, it is intended to design a superspectral sensor dedicated to urban materials classification and this work particularly focused on the selection of the optimal spectral band subsets for such sensor. First, reflectance spectral signatures of urban materials were collected from 7 spectral libraires. Then, spectral optimization was performed using this data set. The band selection workflow included two steps, optimising first the number of spectral bands using an incremental method and then examining several possible optimised band subsets using a stochastic algorithm. The same wrapper relevance criterion relying on a confidence measure of Random Forests classifier was used at both steps. To cope with the limited number of available spectra for several classes, additional synthetic spectra were generated from the collection of reference spectra: intra-class variability was simulated by multiplying reference spectra by a random coefficient. At the end, selected band subsets were evaluated considering the classification quality reached using a rbf svm classifier. It was confirmed that a limited band subset was sufficient to classify common urban materials. The important contribution of bands from the Short Wave Infra-Red (SWIR) spectral domain (1000-2400 nm) to material

  9. Matched Spectral Filter Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — OPTRA proposes the development of an imaging spectrometer for greenhouse gas and volcanic gas imaging based on matched spectral filtering and compressive imaging....

  10. Spectral determinant on quantum graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the spectral determinant of the Laplacian on finite graphs characterized by their number of vertices V and bonds B. We present a path integral derivation which leads to two equivalent expressions of the spectral determinant of the Laplacian in terms of either a VxV vertex matrix or a 2Bx2B link matrix that couples the arcs (oriented bonds) together. This latter expression allows us to rewrite the spectral determinant as an infinite product of contributions of periodic orbits on the graph. We also present a diagrammatic method that permits us to write the spectral determinant in terms of a finite number of periodic orbit contributions. These results are generalized to the case of graphs in a magnetic field. Several examples illustrating this formalism are presented and its application to the thermodynamic and transport properties of weakly disordered and coherent mesoscopic networks is discussed

  11. Broadband Advanced Spectral System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NovaSol proposes to develop an advanced hyperspectral imaging system for earth science missions named BRASS (Broadband Advanced Spectral System). BRASS combines...

  12. Substitution dynamical systems spectral analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Queffélec, Martine

    2010-01-01

    This volume mainly deals with the dynamics of finitely valued sequences, and more specifically, of sequences generated by substitutions and automata. Those sequences demonstrate fairly simple combinatorical and arithmetical properties and naturally appear in various domains. As the title suggests, the aim of the initial version of this book was the spectral study of the associated dynamical systems: the first chapters consisted in a detailed introduction to the mathematical notions involved, and the description of the spectral invariants followed in the closing chapters. This approach, combined with new material added to the new edition, results in a nearly self-contained book on the subject. New tools - which have also proven helpful in other contexts - had to be developed for this study. Moreover, its findings can be concretely applied, the method providing an algorithm to exhibit the spectral measures and the spectral multiplicity, as is demonstrated in several examples. Beyond this advanced analysis, many...

  13. Synchronization of 1064 and 1342 nm pulses using passive saturable absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Janousek, Jiri; Melich, Radek;

    2004-01-01

    The material V:YAG can work as a saturable absorber both at 1064 and 1342 nm. It is shown in this paper, that the saturation effect is spectrally homogeneous. V:YAG can therefore be used for generation of passively synchronized Qswitched pulses at wavelengths hundreds of nanometers apart. First...... a pump–probe experiment is described, investigating the fundamental cross wavelength coupling. Then the first measurements of synchronized Q-switched pulses using a solid-state passive saturable absorber are presented. Finally a setup containing two different saturable absorbing materials is investigated......, showing very stable passive synchronized Q-switching at two distinct wavelengths....

  14. Stable 811.53 nm diode laser pump source for optically pumped metastable Ar laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Zuo, Duluo; Zhao, Jun; Li, Bin; Yu, Anlan; Wang, Xinbing

    2016-10-01

    A stable external cavity diode laser coupled with volume Bragg grating for metastable argon atoms pumping is presented. The measured maximum output power of the continuous wave is 6.5 W when the spectral width (FWHM) is less than 21 pm around 811.53 nm and the power efficiency is 68%. The tuning range of the emission wavelength is bigger than 270 pm. The calculated deviation in relative absorption efficiency caused by the fluctuations of wavelength and power is less than 4%.

  15. The spectral properties of uranium hexafluoride and its thermal decomposition products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krascella, N. L.

    1976-01-01

    This investigation was initiated to provide basic spectral data for gases of interest to the plasma core reactor concept. The attenuation of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation by helium at pressures up to 20 atm over path lengths of about 61 cm and in the approximate wavelength range between 80 and 300 nm was studied. Measurements were also conducted to provide basic VUV data with respect to UF6 and UF6/argon mixtures in the wavelength range between 80 and 120 nm. Finally, an investigation was initiated to provide basic spectral emission and absorption data for UF6 and possible thermal decomposition products of UF6 at elevated temperatures.

  16. Optimization of Quantum-Dot Molecular Beam Epitaxy for Broad Spectral Bandwidth Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Majid, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The optimization of the key growth parameters for broad spectral bandwidth devices based on quantum dots is reported. A combination of atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence of test samples, and optoelectronic characterization of superluminescent diodes (SLDs) is used to optimize the growth conditions to obtain high-quality devices with large spectral bandwidth, radiative efficiency (due to a reduced defective-dot density), and thus output power. The defective-dot density is highlighted as being responsible for the degradation of device performance. An SLD device with 160 nm of bandwidth centered at 1230 nm is demonstrated.

  17. Vacuum Energy as Spectral Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Fulling

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantum vacuum energy (Casimir energy is reviewed for a mathematical audience as a topic in spectral theory. Then some one-dimensional systems are solved exactly, in terms of closed classical paths and periodic orbits. The relations among local spectral densities, energy densities, global eigenvalue densities, and total energies are demonstrated. This material provides background and motivation for the treatment of higher-dimensional systems (self-adjoint second-order partial differential operators by semiclassical approximation and other methods.

  18. The Generalized Spectral Kurtosis Estimator

    OpenAIRE

    Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.

    2010-01-01

    Due to its conceptual simplicity and its proven effectiveness in real-time detection and removal of radio frequency interference (RFI) from radio astronomy data, the Spectral Kurtosis (SK) estimator is likely to become a standard tool of a new generation of radio telescopes. However, the SK estimator in its original form must be developed from instantaneous power spectral density (PSD) estimates, and hence cannot be employed as an RFI excision tool downstream of the data pipeline in existing ...

  19. Prym varieties of spectral covers

    CERN Document Server

    Hausel, Tamás

    2010-01-01

    Given a possibly reducible and non-reduced spectral cover X over a smooth projective complex curve C we determine the group of connected components of the Prym variety Prym(X/C). We also describe the sublocus of characteristics a for which the Prym variety Prym(X_a/C) is connected. These results extend special cases of work of Ng\\^o who considered integral spectral curves.

  20. Spectral affinity in protein networks

    OpenAIRE

    Teng Shang-Hua; Voevodski Konstantin; Xia Yu

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks enable us to better understand the functional organization of the proteome. We can learn a lot about a particular protein by querying its neighborhood in a PPI network to find proteins with similar function. A spectral approach that considers random walks between nodes of interest is particularly useful in evaluating closeness in PPI networks. Spectral measures of closeness are more robust to noise in the data and are more precise...

  1. Nanocatalytic resonance scattering spectral analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The resonance scattering spectral technique has been established using the synchronous scanning technique on spectrofluorometry.Because of its advantages of simplicity,rapidity and sensitivity,it has been widely applied to analyses of proteins,nucleic acids and inorganic ions.This paper summarizes the application of immunonanogold and aptamer modified nanogold(AptAu) catalytic resonance scattering spectral technique in combination with the work of our group,citing 53 references.

  2. Intra-cavity frequency-doubled mode-locked semiconductor disk laser at 325 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Roman; Baumgärtner, Stefan; Sauter, Fabian; Kahle, Hermann; Schwarzbäck, Thomas; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter

    2015-07-27

    We present a passively mode-locked semiconductor disk laser (SDL) emitting at 650nm with intra-cavity second harmonic generation to the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range. Both the gain and the absorber structure contain InP quantum dots (QDs) as active material. In a v-shaped cavity using the semiconductor samples as end mirrors, a beta barium borate (BBO) crystal is placed in front of the semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) for pulsed UV laser emission in one of the two outcoupled beams. Autocorrelation (AC) measurements at the fundamental wavelength reveal a FWHM pulse duration of 1.22ps. With a repetition frequency of 836MHz, the average output power is 10mW per beam for the red emission and 0.5mW at 325nm.

  3. 615 nm GaInNAs VECSEL with output power above 10 W.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantola, Emmi; Leinonen, Tomi; Penttinen, Jussi-Pekka; Korpijärvi, Ville-Markus; Guina, Mircea

    2015-08-10

    A high-power optically-pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) generating 10.5 W of cw output power at 615 nm is reported. The gain mirror incorporated 10 GaInNAs quantum wells and was designed to have an emission peak in the 1230 nm range. The fundamental emission was frequency doubled to the red spectral range by using an intra-cavity nonlinear LBO crystal. The maximum optical-to-optical conversion efficiency was 17.5%. The VECSEL was also operated in pulsed mode by directly modulating the pump laser to produce light pulses with duration of ~1.5 µs. The maximum peak power for pulsed operation (pump limited) was 13.8 W. This corresponded to an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 20.4%. PMID:26367883

  4. Intra-cavity frequency-doubled mode-locked semiconductor disk laser at 325 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Roman; Baumgärtner, Stefan; Sauter, Fabian; Kahle, Hermann; Schwarzbäck, Thomas; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter

    2015-07-27

    We present a passively mode-locked semiconductor disk laser (SDL) emitting at 650nm with intra-cavity second harmonic generation to the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range. Both the gain and the absorber structure contain InP quantum dots (QDs) as active material. In a v-shaped cavity using the semiconductor samples as end mirrors, a beta barium borate (BBO) crystal is placed in front of the semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) for pulsed UV laser emission in one of the two outcoupled beams. Autocorrelation (AC) measurements at the fundamental wavelength reveal a FWHM pulse duration of 1.22ps. With a repetition frequency of 836MHz, the average output power is 10mW per beam for the red emission and 0.5mW at 325nm. PMID:26367654

  5. Study on the recognition of camouflage targets with hyper-spectral detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-chun; Wang, Qi-chao; Lin, Zhi-dan; Zhao, Da-peng; Shi, Jia-ming; Chen, Zong-sheng

    2015-10-01

    In order to acquire more information of the scene to improve the veracity of recognition of camouflage targets, an electrically tunable hyper-spectral detection system, which is based on acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF), was designed. The system includes collimated optical system, AOTF and its controller, imaging lens, CCD sensor and so on. The system has a property of being fast and electronically tunable, so a quick scan of spectrum over the waveband of 550 nm ~ 900nm can be realized. A series of hyper-spectral imaging experiments about a camouflage aluminum plane, coated with three typical camouflage pigments (dark green, light green and khaki) within a complex meadow environment were accomplished at specific wavelengths from 580 nm to 840 nm with 10 nm spectral resolution. The hyper-spectral characteristics of three pigments and various backgrounds were acquired to deduce the intensity contrast information between them. The experimental results demonstrated that the reflex characteristic of three typical camouflage pigments were different from that of natural background. The several wavelengths or wave bands, which were used to detect and recognize the man-made targets placed in typical woodland environment, were obtained by analyzing the experimental data.

  6. Short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectral imager based on Fabry-Perot interferometer for remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannila, Rami; Holmlund, Christer; Ojanen, Harri J.; Näsilä, Antti; Saari, Heikki

    2014-10-01

    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a spectral imager for short-wave infrared (SWIR) wavelength range. The spectral imager is based on a tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) accompanied by a commercial InGaAs Camera. The FPI consists of two dielectric coated mirrors separated by a tunable air gap. Tuning of the air gap tunes also transmitted wavelength and therefore FPI acts as a tunable band bass filter. The FPI is piezo-actuated and it uses three piezo-actuators in a closed capacitive feedback loop for air gap tuning. The FPI has multiple order transmission bands, which limit free spectral range. Therefore spectral imager contains two FPI in a stack, to make possible to cover spectral range of 1000 - 1700 nm. However, in the first tests imager was used with one FPI and spectral range was limited to 1100-1600 nm. The spectral resolution of the imager is approximately 15 nm (FWHM). Field of view (FOV) across the flight direction is 30 deg. Imaging resolution of the spectral imager is 256 x 320 pixels. The focal length of the optics is 12 mm and F-number is 3.2. This imager was tested in summer 2014 in an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and therefore a size and a mass of the imager were critical. Total mass of the imager is approximately 1200 grams. In test campaign the spectral imager will be used for forest and agricultural imaging. In future, because results of the UAV test flights are promising, this technology can be applied to satellite applications also.

  7. Spectral measurements of PMCs from SBUV/2 instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deland, Matthew T.; Shettle, Eric P.; Thomas, Gary E.; Olivero, John J.

    2006-01-01

    The SBUV/2 (Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet, model 2) instrument is designed to monitor ozone stratospheric profile and total column ozone using measurements of the Earth's backscattered ultraviolet albedo. We have previously demonstrated that the normal radiance measurements from SBUV/2 instruments, which sample 12 discrete wavelengths between 252 and 340 nm during each scan, can be used to identify polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs). Some SBUV/2 instruments also periodically view the earth in continuous scan mode, covering the wavelength range 160 400 nm with 0.15 nm sampling. Analysis of these data show PMC occurrence rates similar to the normal discrete scan results, although the observation technique reduces the number of daily measurements by a factor of six. PMC observed by SBUV/2 instruments show a monotonic variation in the residual spectral albedo over the wavelength range 250 300 nm, with maximum enhancements of 10 15% at 250 nm. This result is consistent with microphysical model predictions from Jensen [1989.A numerical model of polar mesospheric cloud formation and evolution, Ph. D. Thesis, University of Colorado]. We find no evidence for a systematic localized increase in PMC residual albedo for wavelengths near 260 nm, in contrast to the recently reported results from the MSX UVISI instrument [Carbary J.F., et al., 2004. Evidence for bimodal particle distribution from the spectra of polar mesospheric clouds. Geophysics Research. Letters 31, L13108]. This result is observed for three different SBUV/2 instruments in both Northern and Southern Hemisphere data over a 13-year span. Our Mie scattering calculations show that the location and magnitude of the 260 nm “hump” feature is dependent upon the specific scattering angles appropriate to the MSX measurements. Although it explains the MSX spectrum, the bimodal size distribution proposed by Carbary et al. (2004), cannot explain the lack of scattering angle dependence of the SBUV/2 spectral shapes. The

  8. Leaf Level Chlorophyll Fluorescence Emission Spectra: Narrow Band versus Full 650-800 nm Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, E.; Zhang, Q.; Campbell, P. K.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Corp, L.; Cheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) retrievals in narrow spectral regions (sample the total full-spectrum ChlF and are made at non-optimal wavelengths since they are not located at the peak fluorescence emission features. We wish to estimate the total full-spectrum ChlF based on emissions obtained at selected wavelengths. For this, we drew upon leaf emission spectra measured on corn leaves obtained from a USDA experimental cornfield in MD (USA). These emission spectra were determined for the adaxial and abaxial (i.e., top and underside) surfaces of leaves measured throughout the 2008 and 2011 growing seasons (n>400) using a laboratory instrument (Fluorolog-3, Horiba Scientific, USA), recorded in either 1 nm or 5 nm increments with monochromatic excitation wavelengths of either 532 or 420 nm. The total ChlF signal was computed as the area under the continuous spectral emission curves, summing the emission intensities (counts per second) per waveband. The individual narrow (1 or 5 nm) waveband emission intensities were linearly related to full emission values, with variable success across the spectrum. Equations were developed to estimate total ChlF from these individual wavebands. Here, we report the results for the average adaxial/abaxial emissions. Very strong relationships were achieved for the relatively high fluorescence intensities at the red chlorophyll peak, centered at 685 nm (r2= 0.98, RMSE = 5.53 x 107 photons/s) and in the nearby O2-B atmospheric absorption feature centered at 688 nm (r2 = 0.94, RMSE = 4.04 x 107), as well as in the far-red peak centered at 740 nm (r2=0.94, RMSE = 5.98 x107). Very good retrieval success occurred for the O2-A atmospheric absorption feature on the declining NIR shoulder centered at 760 nm (r2 = 0.88, RMSE = 7.54 x 107). When perfect retrievals were assumed (0% noise), retrievals remained good in the low emission regions on either side of the peaks-- those associated with the H alpha line at 655 nm (r2 = 0.83, RMSE =8

  9. Studies on 405nm blue-violet diode laser with external grating cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Gao, Jun; Zhao, Jun; Yu, Anlan; Luo, Shiwen; Xiong, Dongsheng; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo

    2016-03-01

    Spectroscopy applications of free-running laser diodes (LD) are greatly restricted as its broad band spectral emission. And the power of a single blue-violet LD is around several hundred milliwatts by far, it is of great importance to obtain stable and narrow line-width laser diodes with high efficiency. In this paper, a high efficiency external cavity diode laser (ECDL) with high output power and narrow band emission at 405 nm is presented. The ECDL is based on a commercially available LD with nominal output power of 110 mW at an injection current of 100 mA. The spectral width of the free-running LD is about 1 nm (FWHM). A reflective holographic grating which is installed on a home-made compact adjustable stage is utilized for optical feedback in Littrow configuration. In this configuration, narrow line-width operation is realized and the effects of grating groove density as well as the groove direction related to the beam polarization on the performances of the ECDL are experimentally investigated. In the case of grating with groove density of 3600 g/mm, the threshold is reduced from 21 mA to 18.3 mA or 15.6 mA and the tuning range is 3.95 nm or 6.01 nm respectively when the grating is orientated in TE or TM polarization. In addition, an output beam with a line-width of 30 pm and output power of 92.7 mW is achieved in TE polarization. With these narrow line-width and high efficiency, the ECDL is capable to serve as a light source for spectroscopy application such as Raman scattering and laser induced fluorescence.

  10. Absolute frequency references at 1529 nm and 1560 nm using modulation transfer spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    de Escobar, Y Natali Martinez; Coop, Simon; Vanderbruggen, Thomas; Kaczmarek, Krzysztof T; Mitchell, Morgan W

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a double optical frequency reference (1529 nm and 1560 nm) for the telecom C-band using $^{87}$Rb modulation transfer spectroscopy. The two reference frequencies are defined by the 5S$_{1/2} F=2 \\rightarrow $ 5P$_{3/2} F'=3$ two-level and 5S$_{1/2} F=2 \\rightarrow $ 5P$_{3/2} F'=3 \\rightarrow $ 4D$_{5/2} F"=4$ ladder transitions. We examine the sensitivity of the frequency stabilization to probe power and magnetic field fluctuations, calculate its frequency shift due to residual amplitude modulation, and estimate its shift due to gas collisions. The short-term Allan deviation was estimated from the error signal slope for the two transitions. Our scheme provides a simple and high performing system for references at these important wavelengths. We estimate an absolute accuracy of $\\sim$ 1 kHz is realistic.

  11. Fast dispersion encoded full range OCT for retinal imaging at 800 nm and 1060 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Bernd; Považay, Boris; Unterhuber, Angelika; Wang, Ling; Hermann, Boris; Rey, Sara; Matz, Gerald; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    The dispersion mismatch between sample and reference arm in frequency-domain OCT can be used to iteratively suppress complex conjugate artifacts and thereby increase the imaging range. We propose a fast dispersion encoded full range (DEFR) algorithm that detects multiple signal components per iteration. The influence of different dispersion levels on the reconstruction quality is analyzed for in vivo retinal tomograms at 800 nm. Best results have been achieved with about 30 mm SF11, with neglectable resolution decrease due to finite resolution of the spectrometer. Our fast DEFR algorithm achieves an average suppression ratio of 55 dB and converges within 5 to 10 iterations. The processing time on non-dedicated hardware was 5 to 10 seconds for tomograms with 512 depth scans and 4096 sampling points per depth scan. Application of DEFR to the more challenging 1060 nm wavelength region is demonstrated by introducing an additional optical fibre in the sample arm.

  12. Spectral Properties and Upconversion Luminescence of Er3+, Yb3+: BaWO4 Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The optical quality of Er3+, Yb3+: BaWO4 crystal was grown by Czochralski method. Absorption spectra were measured and energy levels were assigned. According to Judd-Ofelt theory, the spectral strength parameters of Er3+ ion were fitted to be Ω2=0.3926×10-20 cm2, Ω4=0.0721×10-20 cm2, Ω6=0.0028×10-20 cm2. Emission peaks centered at around 523, 544 and 670 nm were observed under 334 nm He-Cd laser excitation and emission peaks centered at 1001 and 1534 nm were detected under 976 nm laser excitation. Strong green emission was also observed when the crystal was pumped with 808 nm and 976 nm laser. The mechanisms of frequency upconversion and sensitization were analyzed.

  13. TUNABLE DIODE LASER MEASUREMENTS OF NO2 NEAR 670 NM AND 395 NM. (R823933)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two single-mode diode lasers were used to record high-resolution absorption spectra of NO2 (dilute in Ar) near 670.2 and 394.5 nm over a range of temperatures (296 to 774 K) and total pressures (2.4 x 10(-2) to 1 atm). A commercial InGaAsP laser was tuned 1.3 cm(-1) at a repetiti...

  14. Cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating of white-light continuum (500–900 nm) generated in bulk media by 1053 nm laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, T.; Hussain, M.; Figueira, G.

    2016-06-01

    We have efficiently characterized the white-light continuum (WLC) generation covering 500–900 nm in a bulk sapphire plate using 280 fs pulse duration, 1053 nm center-wavelength seed laser pulses. We have acquired the well-optimized smoother region of the WLC spectrum successfully by using an FGS-900 color glass filter (Edmund Optics, Inc.). We have suppressed the spectral components below 500 nm and over 900 nm including an intense 1053 nm residual seed laser peak of the WLC spectrum. The experimental artifacts have been avoided by suppressing the intense 1053 nm seed laser. We employed the sum frequency generation cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating (SFG-XFROG) technique for characterization. The XFROG measurement was carried out by introducing the crystal dithering method up to 10° in 2° intervals to obtain the phase matching effectively over the filtered and smoother region of the WLC spectrum. This well-optimized WLC region covering 500–900 nm has significant importance for use as a seed pulse in an optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) system.

  15. Generation of 170-fs Laser Pulses at 1053 nm by a Passively Mode-Locked Yb:YAG Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Bin-Bin; WEI Zhi-Yi; LI De-Hua; TENG Hao; Bourdet G. L

    2009-01-01

    A novel method is developed to obtain 1.05μm laser operation with a Yb:YAG laser. By using a Yb:YAG crystal with proper length and doping concentration, a femtosecond Yb: YAG laser is realized at the central wavelength of 1053nm. The measured pulse duration and spectral bandwidth (FWHM) are 17ors and 7nm; the repetition rate is 80 MHz. Under a power pump of 2 W, an average mode-locking power of 180mW is achieved.

  16. Generation of a 650 nm - 2000 nm Laser Frequency Comb based on an Erbium-Doped Fiber Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Ycas, Gabriel; Diddams, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    We present a laser frequency comb based upon a 250 MHz mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser that spans more than 300 terahertz of bandwidth, from 660 nm to 2000 nm. The system generates 1.2 nJ, 70 fs pulses at 1050 nm by amplifying the 1580 nm laser light in Er:fiber, followed by nonlinear broadening to 1050 nm and amplification in Yb:fiber. Extension of the frequency comb into the visible is achieved by supercontinuum generation from the 1050 nm light. Comb coherence is verified with cascaded f-2f interferometry and comparison to a frequency stabilized laser.

  17. Performance comparison of bismuth/erbium co-doped optical fibre by 830 nm and 980 nm pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Binbin; Luo, Yanhua; Zareanborji, Amirhassan; Xiao, Gui; Peng, Gang-Ding; Wen, Jianxiang

    2016-10-01

    The performance of bismuth/erbium co-doped fibre (BEDF) by 830 nm and 980 nm pumping has been studied in detail, including the small signal absorption, pump absorption, emission, gain and excited state absorption (ESA). Based on the study, energy transition diagrams of BEDF under 830 nm or 980 nm pumping are proposed to clarify the spectroscopic properties. The results demonstrate the advantages of 830 nm pumping for BEDF over 980 nm pumping when considering the absorption, pumping efficiency, excited state absorption and optical amplification.

  18. Minimization of spectral phase errors in spectrally resolved white light interferometry by the iterative least-squared phase-shifting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce an iterative least-squared phase-shifting method, reported as inherently insensitive to any types of phase-shifting errors, to calculate the spectral phase in phase-shifting spectrally resolved white light interferometry (PS-SRI). The actual phase shifts corresponding to all wavelengths can be reversely determined from the phase-shifted spectral interference fringes through least-squares fitting and the spectral phase is calculated by using the actual phase shifts in an iterative numerical manner. Because this method reduces the phase-shifting errors for calculating the spectral phase effectively, it can contribute to improving the accuracy of measuring topographic surface profiles. Moreover, it leads to accomplishing thin film thickness measurements less than 100 nm, in which most white light scanning interferometry and spectrally resolved white light interferometry (SRI) have difficulty because of mismatching measured spectral phase with the theoretical model by the spectral phase error. In this paper, a short description of the iterative least-squared phase-shifting method is presented and verified with simulations for calculating the topographic surface and thin film thickness profiles in PS-SRI. (paper)

  19. Al-free active region laser diodes at 894 nm for compact Cesium atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Bandel, N.; Bébé Manga Lobé, J.; Garcia, M.; Larrue, A.; Robert, Y.; Vinet, E.; Lecomte, M.; Drisse, O.; Parillaud, O.; Krakowski, M.

    2015-03-01

    Time-frequency applications are in need of high accuracy and high stability clocks. Compact industrial Cesium atomic clocks optically pumped is a promising area that could satisfy these demands. However, the stability of these clocks relies, among others, on the performances of laser diodes that are used for atomic pumping. This issue has led the III-V Lab to commit to the European Euripides-LAMA project that aims to provide competitive compact optical Cesium clocks for earth applications. This work will provide key experience for further space technology qualification. We are in charge of the design, fabrication and reliability of Distributed-Feedback diodes (DFB) at 894nm (D1 line of Cesium) and 852nm (D2 line). The use of D1 line for pumping will provide simplified clock architecture compared to D2 line pumping thanks to simpler atomic transitions and larger spectral separation between lines in the 894nm case. Also, D1 line pumping overcomes the issue of unpumped "dark states" that occur with D2 line. The modules should provide narrow linewidth (<1MHz), very good reliability in time and, crucially, be insensitive to optical feedback. The development of the 894nm wavelength is grounded on our previous results for 852nm DFB. Thus, we show our first results from Al-free active region with InGaAsP quantum well broad-area lasers (100μm width, with lengths ranging from 2mm to 4mm), for further DFB operation at 894nm. We obtained low internal losses below 2cm-1, the external differential efficiency is 0.49W/A with uncoated facets and a low threshold current density of 190A/cm², for 2mm lasers at 20°C.

  20. Deposition of robust multilayer mirror coatings for storage ring FEL lasing at 176nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günster, St.; Ristau, D.; Trovó, M.; Danailov, M.; Gatto, A.; Kaiser, N.; Sarto, F.; Piegari, A.

    2005-09-01

    Progress was achieved in the last years in the development of multilayer mirrors used in storage ring Free Electron Lasers (FEL) operating in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range. Based on dense oxide coatings deposited by Ion Beam Sputtering, a stable lasing at 190 nm was demonstrated. The extension towards shorter wavelengths had to overcome severe problems connected to the radiation resistance and the necessary reflectivity of the resonator mirrors. In this context, radiation resistance can be considered as the ability of the mirror materials to withstand the high power laser radiation and the intense energetic background radiation generated in the synchrotron source. The bombardment with high energetic photons leads to irreversible changes and a coloration on the specimen. Reflectivity requirements can be evaluated from the tolerable losses of FEL systems. At ELETTRA FEL the resonator mirror reflectivity must be above 95 %. Evaporated fluoride multilayer mirrors provide sufficient reflectivity, but they do not exhibit an adequate radiation resistance. Pure oxide multilayers show a sufficient radiation resistance, but they cannot reach the necessary reflectivity below 190 nm. A successful approach combines evaporated fluoride multilayer stack with a dense protection layer of silicon dioxide deposited by Ion Beam Sputtering. Such mirror systems were produced reaching a reflectivity of approximately 99 % at 180 nm. Lasing in the storage ring FEL at ELETTRA was realised in the range between 176 - 179 nm. The mirror reflectivity shows only a slight degradation after lasing, which could be fully restored after the lasing experiment.

  1. Rocket measurements of the solar spectral irradiance during solar minimum, 1972-1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Five sounding rocket experiments conducted between December 1972 and March 1977, a period spanning solar minimum between cycles 20 and 21, provide full disc solar irradiance data in the spectral range 120-190 nm. The five measurements have been combined to give a solar minimum reference table. This spectrum is compared with other measurements obtained during the same time period. A table of intensities for the strong emission lines at wavelengths between 120 and 190 nm is presented.

  2. Understanding Soliton Spectral Tunneling as a Spectral Coupling Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun; Wang, Shaofei; Zeng, Xianglong;

    2013-01-01

    Soliton eigenstate is found corresponding to a dispersive phase profile under which the soliton phase changes induced by the dispersion and nonlinearity are instantaneously counterbalanced. Much like a waveguide coupler relying on a spatial refractive index profile that supports mode coupling bet...... exactly implies phase as well as group-velocity matching between the input soliton and tunneled soliton, namely a soliton phase matching condition. Examples in realistic photonic crystal fibers are also presented.......Soliton eigenstate is found corresponding to a dispersive phase profile under which the soliton phase changes induced by the dispersion and nonlinearity are instantaneously counterbalanced. Much like a waveguide coupler relying on a spatial refractive index profile that supports mode coupling...... between channels, here we suggest that the soliton spectral tunneling effect can be understood supported by a spectral phase coupler. The dispersive wave number in the spectral domain must have a coupler-like symmetric profile for soliton spectral tunneling to occur. We show that such a spectral coupler...

  3. Bandgap Engineering of 1300 nm Quantum Dots/Quantum Well Nanostructures Based Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Alhashim, Hala H.

    2016-05-29

    The main objectives of this thesis are to develop viable process and/or device technologies for bandgap tuning of 1300-nm InGaAs/GaAs quantum-dot (QD) laser structures, and broad linewidth 1300-nm InGaAsP/InP quantum well (QW) superluminescent diode structures. The high performance bandgap-engineered QD laser structures were achieved by employing quantum-dot intermixing (QDI) based on impurity free vacancy diffusion (IFVD) technique for eventual seamless active-passive integration, and bandgap-tuned lasers. QDI using various dielectric-capping materials, such as HfO2, SrTiO3, TiO2, Al2O3 and ZnO, etc, were experimented in which the resultant emission wavelength can be blueshifted to ∼ 1100 nm ─ 1200 nm range depending on process conditions. The significant results extracted from the PL characterization were used to perform an extensive laser characterization. The InAs/GaAs quantum-dot lasers with QDs transition energies were blueshifted by ~185 nm, and lasing around ~1070 – 1190 nm was achieved. Furthermore, from the spectral analysis, a simultaneous five-state lasing in the InAs/InGaAs intermixed QD laser was experimentally demonstrated for the first time in the very important wavelength range from 1030 to 1125 nm. The QDI methodology enabled the facile formation of a plethora of devices with various emission wavelengths suitable for a wide range of applications in the infrared. In addition, the wavelength range achieved is also applicable for coherent light generation in the green – yellow – orange visible wavelength band via frequency doubling, which is a cost-effective way of producing compact devices for pico-projectors, semiconductor laser based solid state lighting, etc. [1, 2] In QW-based superluminescent diode, the problem statement lies on achieving a flat-top and ultra-wide emission bandwidth. The approach was to design an inhomogeneous active region with a comparable simultaneous emission from different transition states in the QW stacks, in

  4. Injection molding of high aspect ratio sub-100 nm nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matschuk, Maria; Larsen, Niels B

    2013-01-01

    with FDTS. Reduced adhesion forces are consistent with lowered friction that reduces the risk of fracturing the nanoscopic pillars during demolding. Optimized mold surface chemistry and associated injection molding conditions permitted the fabrication of square arrays of 40 nm wide and 107 nm high (aspect...... ratio >2.5) pillars on a 200 nm pitch....

  5. Spectral emissivity measurements of liquid refractory metals by spectrometers combined with an electrostatic levitator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectral emissivity measurement system combined with an electrostatic levitator was developed for high-temperature melts. The radiation intensity from a high-temperature sample was measured with a multichannel photospectrometer (MCPD) over the 700–1000 nm spectral range, while a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) measured the radiation over the 1.1–6 µm interval. These spectrometers were calibrated with a blackbody radiation furnace, and the spectral hemispherical emissivity was calculated. The system's capability was evaluated with molten zirconium samples. The spectral hemispherical emissivity of molten zirconium showed a negative wavelength dependence and an almost constant variation over the 1850–2210 K temperature range. The total hemispherical emissivity of zirconium calculated by integrating the spectral hemispherical emissivity was found to be around 0.32, which showed good agreement with the literature values. The constant pressure heat capacity of molten zirconium at melting temperature was calculated to be 40.9 J mol−1 K−1. (paper)

  6. Versatile chromatic dispersion measurement of a single mode fiber using spectral white light interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yong; Kim, Dug Young

    2006-11-27

    We present a versatile and accurate chromatic dispersion measurement method for single mode optical fibers over a wide spectral range (200 nm) using a spectral domain white light interferometer. This technique is based on spectral interferometry with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer setup and a broad band light source. It takes less than a second to obtain a spectral interferogram for a few tens of centimeter length fiber sample. We have demonstrated that the relative group velocity, the chromatic dispersion and the dispersion slope of a sample fiber can be obtained very accurately regardless of the zero-dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of a sample after frequency dependent optical phase was directly retrieved from a spectral interferogram. The measured results with our proposed method were compared with those obtained with a conventional time-domain dispersion measurement method. A good agreement between those results indicates that our proposed method can measure the chromatic dispersion of a short length optical fiber with very high accuracy.

  7. A feasibility study on diagnosing wheat water status using spectral reflectance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A total of 110 wheat leaf samples were collected in the field andtheir spectral reflectances were measured with a spectroradiometer in laboratory. After a spectral normalizing technique, the spectral absorption feature parameters such as the absorption depth and area, were extracted from each leaf spectrum. The relative water content (RWC) was measured for samples. The experimental results indicated that the spectral absorption depth and area of wheat leaves at 1 450 nm were correlated with their RWC. So we can diagnose wheat water status by using their spectral reflectances. Furthermore, we discuss the possibility of developing new instruments based on the analysis of the spectroradiometer data for non-destructive and instantaneous measurement of the wheat water status in the field.

  8. Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operated megapixel spectral camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkynen, Jussi; Holmlund, Christer; Saari, Heikki; Ojala, Kai; Antila, Tapani

    2011-11-01

    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a lightweight Fabry-Perot interferometer based hyperspectral imager weighting only 400 g which makes it compatible with various small UAV platforms. The concept of the hyperspectral imager has been published in SPIE Proc. 74741 and 76682. This UAV spectral imager is capable of recording 5 Mpix multispectral data in the wavelength range of 500 - 900 nm at resolutions of 10-40 nm, Full-Width-Half-Maximum (FWHM). An internal memory buffer allows 16 Mpix of image data to be stored during one image burst. The user can configure the system to take either three 5 Mpix images or up to 54 VGA resolution images with each triggering. Each image contains data from one, two or three wavelength bands which can be separated during post processing. This allows a maximum of 9 spectral bands to be stored in high spatial resolution mode or up to 162 spectral bands in VGA-mode during each image burst. Image data is stored in a compact flash memory card which provides the mass storage for the imager. The field of view of the system is 26° × 36° and the ground pixel size at 150 m flying altitude is around 40 mm in high-resolution mode. The design, calibration and test flight results will be presented.

  9. Evolution and mechanism of spectral tuning of blue-absorbing visual pigments in butterflies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motohiro Wakakuwa

    Full Text Available The eyes of flower-visiting butterflies are often spectrally highly complex with multiple opsin genes generated by gene duplication, providing an interesting system for a comparative study of color vision. The Small White butterfly, Pieris rapae, has duplicated blue opsins, PrB and PrV, which are expressed in the blue (λ(max = 453 nm and violet receptors (λ(max = 425 nm, respectively. To reveal accurate absorption profiles and the molecular basis of the spectral tuning of these visual pigments, we successfully modified our honeybee opsin expression system based on HEK293s cells, and expressed PrB and PrV, the first lepidopteran opsins ever expressed in cultured cells. We reconstituted the expressed visual pigments in vitro, and analysed them spectroscopically. Both reconstituted visual pigments had two photointerconvertible states, rhodopsin and metarhodopsin, with absorption peak wavelengths 450 nm and 485 nm for PrB and 420 nm and 482 nm for PrV. We furthermore introduced site-directed mutations to the opsins and found that two amino acid substitutions, at positions 116 and 177, were crucial for the spectral tuning. This tuning mechanism appears to be specific for invertebrates and is partially shared by other pierid and lycaenid butterfly species.

  10. Broadening of the Spectral Atomic Lines Analysis in High Density Argon Corona Plasma by Using Voigt Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, M.; Bonifaci, N.; Denat, A.; Atrazhev, V. M.

    2015-06-01

    Studies of spectrum emission from high density argon plasma corona has been done. The analysis of the boardening of spectral atomic lines of Ar-I profile has been curried out by using an empirical approximation based on a Voigt profile. Full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the spectral-lines of 763.5 nm has been determined from atmospheric pressure until liquid state. The study liquid argon was curried out in a variation of temperature from K to 151.2 K and hydrostatics pressure from 2.1 MPa to 6.4 MPa. These pressure gives the densities N∞ (i.e. density very far from ionization zone) a variation from 1.08 1022 to 2.11 1022 cm-3. FWHM of Voigt approximation (Wv) of the line 763,5 nm of 'Ar I for: the emission lamp very low pressure (Wv = 0,160 nm) and our corona discharge at a pressure of MPa (Wv = 0,67 nm) and at a pressure of 9,5 MPa (Wv = 1,16 nm). In gas, corona plasma has been generated from 0.1 MPa to 9.5 MPa. We found that the broadening spectral line increase by increasing densities both for. the spectral-lines of 763.5 nm and 696.5 nm. We concluded that broadening of spectrum cause of Van der Waals force.

  11. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hynek Hermansky

    2011-10-01

    Information is carried in changes of a signal. The paper starts with revisiting Dudley’s concept of the carrier nature of speech. It points to its close connection to modulation spectra of speech and argues against short-term spectral envelopes as dominant carriers of the linguistic information in speech. The history of spectral representations of speech is briefly discussed. Some of the history of gradual infusion of the modulation spectrum concept into Automatic recognition of speech (ASR) comes next, pointing to the relationship of modulation spectrum processing to wellaccepted ASR techniques such as dynamic speech features or RelAtive SpecTrAl (RASTA) filtering. Next, the frequency domain perceptual linear prediction technique for deriving autoregressive models of temporal trajectories of spectral power in individual frequency bands is reviewed. Finally, posterior-based features, which allow for straightforward application of modulation frequency domain information, are described. The paper is tutorial in nature, aims at a historical global overview of attempts for using spectral dynamics in machine recognition of speech, and does not always provide enough detail of the described techniques. However, extensive references to earlier work are provided to compensate for the lack of detail in the paper.

  12. All-fiber supercontinuum source in the range of 1550 – 2400 nm based on telecommunication multimode fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time to our best knowledge we have realized all-fiber supercontinuum source based on standard telecommunication multimode fiber. To pump the source Q-switched Er-doped fiber laser was used. The observed spectrum covers the spectral range from 1550 to 2400 nm with the power variation less than two decades. Average power of 0.85 W and pulse energy of 0.19 mJ was measured

  13. First Observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission in a Free-Electron Laser at 109 nm Wavelength

    CERN Document Server

    Andruszków, J; Ayvazyan, V T; Baboi, N I; Bakker, R; Balakin, V; Barni, D; Bazhan, A; Bernard, M; Bosotti, A; Bourdon, J C; Brefeld, W; Brinkmann, R; Bühler, S; Carneiro, J P; Castellano, M G; Castro, P; Catani, L; Chel, S; Cho, Y; Choroba, S; Colby, E R; Decking, W; Den Hartog, P; Desmons, M; Dohlus, M; Edwards, D; Edwards, H T; Faatz, B; Feldhaus, J; Ferrario, M; Fitch, M J; Flöttmann, K; Fouaidy, M; Gamp, A; Garvey, Terence; Geitz, M A; Gluskin, E S; Gretchko, V; Hahn, U; Hartung, W H; Hubert, D; Hüning, M; Ischebek, R; Jablonka, M; Joly, J M; Juillard, M; Junquera, T; Jurkiewicz, P; Kabel, A C; Kahl, J; Kaiser, H; Kamps, T; Katelev, V V; Kirchgessner, J L; Körfer, M; Kravchuk, L V; Kreps, G; Krzywinski, J; Lokajczyk, T; Lange, R; Leblond, B; Leenen, M; Lesrel, J; Liepe, M; Liero, A; Limberg, T; Lorenz, R; Lu, H H; Lu, F H; Magne, C; Maslov, M A; Materlik, G; Matheisen, A; Menzel, J; Michelato, P; Möller, W D; Mosnier, A; Müller, U C; Napoly, O; Novokhatskii, A V; Omeich, M; Padamsee, H; Pagani, C; Peters, F; Petersen, B; Pierini, P; Pflüger, J; Piot, P; Phung Ngoc, B; Plucinski, L; Proch, D; Rehlich, K; Reiche, S; Reschke, D; Reyzl, I; Rosenzweig, J; Rossbach, J; Roth, S; Saldin, E L; Sandner, W; Sanok, Z; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, G; Schmüser, P; Schneider, J R; Schneidmiller, E A; Schreiber, H J; Schreiber, S; Schütt, P; Sekutowicz, J; Serafini, L; Sertore, D; Setzer, S; Simrock, S; Sonntag, B F; Sparr, B; Stephan, F; Sytchev, V V; Tazzari, S; Tazzioli, F; Tigner, Maury; Timm, M; Tonutti, M; Trakhtenberg, E; Treusch, R; Trines, D; Verzilov, V A; Vielitz, T; Vogel, V; Von Walter, G; Wanzenberg, R; Weiland, T; Weise, H; Weisend, J G; Wendt, M; Werner, M; White, M M; Will, I; Wolff, S; Yurkov, M V; Zapfe, K; Zhogolev, P; Zhou, F

    2000-01-01

    We present the first observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) in a free-electron laser (FEL) in the Vacuum Ultraviolet regime at 109 nm wavelength (11 eV). The observed free-electron laser gain (approx. 3000) and the radiation characteristics, such as dependency on bunch charge, angular distribution, spectral width and intensity fluctuations all corroborate the existing models for SASE FELs.

  14. Compact Diode-Pumped Continuous-Wave Nd:LuVO4 Lasers Operated at 916 nm and 458 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ling; ZHANG Chun-Yu; WEI Zhi-Yi; ZHANG Chi; LONG Yong-Bing; ZHANG Zhi-Guo; ZHANG Huai-Jin; WANG Ji-Yang

    2006-01-01

    @@ We report the compact diode-pumped continuous-wave (CW) Nd:LuVO4 lasers operated at 916nm and 458nm for the first time. The maximum output power of 780mW at 916nm laser is obtained with a slope efficiency of 9.3%. We generate 50mW of 458nm blue laser employing a type-Ⅰ critical phase-matched LBO crystal.

  15. Kilowatt high-efficiency narrow-linewidth monolithic fiber amplifier operating at 1034 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Nader A.; Flores, Angel; Anderson, Brian M.; Rowland, Ken; Dajani, Iyad

    2016-03-01

    Power scaling investigation of a narrow-linewidth, Ytterbium-doped all-fiber amplifier operating at 1034 nm is presented. Nonlinear stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) effects were suppressed through the utilization of an external phase modulation technique. Here, the power amplifier was seeded with a spectrally broadened master oscillator and the results were compared using both pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS) and white noise source (WNS) phase modulation formats. By utilizing an optical band pass filter as well as optimizing the length of fiber used in the pre-amplifier stages, we were able to appreciably suppress unwanted amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). Notably, through PRBS phase modulation, greater than two-fold enhancement in threshold power was achieved when compared to the WNS modulated case. Consequently, by further optimizing both the power amplifier length and PRBS pattern at a clock rate of 3.5 GHz, we demonstrated 1 kilowatt of power with a slope efficiency of 81% and an overall ASE content of less than 1%. Beam quality measurements at 1 kilowatt provided near diffraction-limited operation (M2 knowledge, the power scaling results achieved in this work represent the highest power reported for a spectrally narrow all-fiber amplifier operating at < 1040 nm in Yb-doped silica-based fiber.

  16. Optical Spectral Variability of Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haritma Gaur

    2014-09-01

    It is well established that blazars show flux variations in the complete electromagnetic (EM) spectrum on all possible time scales ranging from a few tens of minutes to several years. Here, we report the review of optical flux and spectral variability properties of different classes of blazars on IDV and STV time-scales. Our analysis show HSPs are less variable in optical bands as compared to LSPs. Also, we investigated the spectral slope variability and found that the average spectral slopes of LSPs showed a good agreement with the synchrotron self-Compton loss-dominated model. However, spectra of the HSPs and FSRQs have significant additional emission components. In general, spectra of BL Lacs get flatter when they become brighter, while for FSRQs the opposite trend appears to hold.

  17. The Generalized Spectral Kurtosis Estimator

    CERN Document Server

    Nita, Gelu M

    2010-01-01

    Due to its conceptual simplicity and its proven effectiveness in real-time detection and removal of radio frequency interference (RFI) from radio astronomy data, the Spectral Kurtosis (SK) estimator is likely to become a standard tool of a new generation of radio telescopes. However, the SK estimator in its original form must be developed from instantaneous power spectral density (PSD) estimates, and hence cannot be employed as an RFI excision tool downstream of the data pipeline in existing instruments where any time averaging is performed. In this letter, we develop a generalized estimator with wider applicability for both instantaneous and averaged spectral data, which extends its practical use to a much larger pool of radio instruments.

  18. The Infrared Spectrum of Uranium Hollow Cathode Lamps from 850 nm to 4000 nm: Wavenumbers and Line Identifications from Fourier Transform Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Lawler, James E.; Nave, Gillian; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2011-08-01

    We provide new measurements of wavenumbers and line identifications of 10, 100 U I and U II near-infrared (NIR) emission lines between 2500 cm-1 and 12, 000 cm-1 (4000-850 nm) using archival Fourier transform spectrometer spectra from the National Solar Observatory. This line list includes isolated uranium lines in the Y, J, H, K, and L bands (0.9-1.1 μm, 1.2-1.35 μm, 1.5-1.65 μm, 2.0-2.4 μm, and 3.0-4.0 μm, respectively), and provides six times as many calibration lines as thorium in the NIR spectral range. The line lists we provide enable inexpensive, commercially available uranium hollow cathode lamps to be used for high-precision wavelength calibration of existing and future high-resolution NIR spectrographs.

  19. High-power dense wavelength division multiplexing (HP-DWDM) of frequency stabilized 9xx diode laser bars with a channel spacing of 1.5 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengesbach, Stefan; Holly, Carlo; Krauch, Niels; Witte, Ulrich; Westphalen, Thomas; Traub, Martin; Hoffmann, Dieter

    2014-03-01

    We present a compact High-Power DenseWavelength Division Multiplexer (HP-DWDM) based on Volume Bragg Gratings (VBGs) for spectrally stabilized diode lasers with a low average beam quality M2 <=50. The center wavelengths of the five input channels with a spectral spacing of 1.5 nm are 973 nm, 974.5 nm, 976 nm, 977.5 nm and 979 nm. Multiplexing efficiencies of 97%+/-2% have been demonstrated with single mode, frequency stabilized laser radiation. Since the diffraction efficiency strongly depends on the beam quality, the multiplexing efficiency decreases to 94% (M2 = 25) and 85%+/-3% (M2 = 45) if multimode radiation is overlaid. Besides, the calculated multiplexing efficiency of the radiation with M2 = 45 amounts to 87:5 %. Thus, calculations and measurements are in good agreement. In addition, we developed a dynamic temperature control for the multiplexing VBGs which adapts the Bragg wavelengths to the diode laser center wavelengths. In short, the prototype with a radiance of 70GWm-2 sr-1 consists of five spectrally stabilized and passively cooled diode laser bars with 40Woutput after beam transformation. To achieve a good stabilization performance ELOD (Extreme LOw Divergence) diode laser bars have been chosen in combination with an external resonator based on VBGs. As a result, the spectral width defined by 95% power inclusion is < 120pm for each beam source across the entire operating range from 30 A to 120 A. Due to the spectral stabilization, the output power of each bar decreases in the range of < 5 %.

  20. Performance assessment of onboard and scene-based methods for Airborne Prism Experiment spectral characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Odorico, Petra; Guanter, Luis; Schaepman, Michael E; Schläpfer, Daniel

    2011-08-20

    Accurate spectral calibration of airborne and spaceborne imaging spectrometers is essential for proper preprocessing and scientific exploitation of high spectral resolution measurements of the land and atmosphere. A systematic performance assessment of onboard and scene-based methods for in-flight monitoring of instrument spectral calibration is presented for the first time in this paper. Onboard and ground imaging data were collected at several flight altitudes using the Airborne Prism Experiment (APEX) imaging spectrometer. APEX is equipped with an in-flight characterization (IFC) facility allowing the evaluation of radiometric, spectral, and geometric system properties, both in-flight and on-ground for the full field of view. Atmospheric and onboard filter spectral features present in at-sensor radiances are compared with the same features in reference transmittances convolved to varying instrument spectral configurations. A spectrum-matching algorithm, taking advantage of the high sensitivity of measurements around sharp spectral features toward spectrometer spectral performance, is used to retrieve channel center wavelength and bandwidth parameters. Results showed good agreement between spectral parameters estimated using onboard IFC and ground imaging data. The average difference between estimates obtained using the O(2) and H(2)O features and those obtained using the corresponding filter features amounted to about 0.3 nm (0.05 of a spectral pixel). A deviation from the nominal laboratory instrument spectral calibration and an altitude-dependent performance was additionally identified. The relatively good agreement between estimates obtained by the two approaches in similar spectral windows suggests they can be used in a complementary fashion: while the method relying on atmospheric features can be applied without the need for dedicated calibration acquisitions, the IFC allows assessment at user-selectable wavelength positions by custom filters as well as for

  1. Stingray: Spectral-timing software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Bachetti, Matteo; Stevens, Abigail L.; Migliari, Simone; Balm, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Stingray is a spectral-timing software package for astrophysical X-ray (and more) data. The package merges existing efforts for a (spectral-)timing package in Python and is composed of a library of time series methods (including power spectra, cross spectra, covariance spectra, and lags); scripts to load FITS data files from different missions; a simulator of light curves and event lists that includes different kinds of variability and more complicated phenomena based on the impulse response of given physical events (e.g. reverberation); and a GUI to ease the learning curve for new users.

  2. Bright Photon Pair Source with High Spectral and Spatial Purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) is a reliable and robust source of photons for quantum information applications. For applications that involve operations such as entanglement swapping or single-photon heralding, two-photon states are required to be factorable (uncorrelated) in their spectral and spatial degrees of freedom. We report the design and experimental characterization of an SPDC source that has been optimized for high spectral and spatial purity. The source is pumped by the 776 nm output of a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser and consists of a periodically-poled Potassium Titanyl Phosphate (PPKTP) crystal phase-matched for collinear type-II SPDC. The dispersive properties of PPKTP at these wavelengths is such that it is possible to minimize the spectral entanglement by matching the widths of the pump to the spectral phase-matching function. The spatial entanglement is minimized through careful control of the pump focus, yielding nearly single-mode emission. An advantage of this approach is that the emission rate into the collection modes is very high, resulting in a very bright SPDC source. We also report a scheme that employs the output of collinear sources such as these to produce polarization-entangled photon pairs. The scheme, which requires only simple polarization elements, can be scaled to N-photon GHZ states.

  3. 9nm node wafer defect inspection using three-dimensional scanning, a 405nm diode laser, and a broadband source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renjie; Edwards, Chris; Bryniarski, Casey A.; Popescu, Gabriel; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2015-03-01

    We recently built a 405nm laser based optical interferometry system for 9nm node patterned wafer defect inspection. Defects with volumes smaller than 15nm by 90nm by 35nm have been detected. The success of defect detection relied on accurate mechanical scanning of the wafer and custom engineered image denoising post-processing. To further improve the detection sensitivity, we designed a higher precision XYZ scanning stage and replaced the laser source with an incoherent LED to remove the speckle noise. With these system modifications, we successfully detected both defects and surface contamination particles in bright-field imaging mode. Recently, we have upgraded this system for interferometric defect inspection.

  4. Spectral analysis of tissues from patients with cancer using a portable spectroscopic diagnostic ratiometer unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Pu, Yang; Sordillo, Peter P.; Budansky, Yury; Alfano, R. R.

    2014-05-01

    Spectral profiles of tissues from patients with breast carcinoma, malignant carcinoid and non-small cell lung carcinoma were acquired using native fluorescence spectroscopy. A novel spectroscopic ratiometer device (S3-LED) with selective excitation wavelengths at 280 nm and 335 nm was used to produce the emission spectra of the key biomolecules, tryptophan and NADH, in the tissue samples. In each of the samples, analysis of emission intensity peaks from biomolecules showed increased 340 nm/440 nm and 340 nm/460 nm ratios in the malignant samples compared to their paired normal samples. This most likely represented increased tryptophan to NADH ratios in the malignant tissue samples compared to their paired normal samples. Among the non-small cell lung carcinoma and breast carcinomas, it appeared that tumors of very large size or poor differentiation had an even greater increase in the 340 nm/440 nm and 340 nm/460 nm ratios. In the samples of malignant carcinoid, which is known to be a highly metabolically active tumor, a marked increase in these ratios was also seen.

  5. Supercontinuum generation with the use of nanosecond pulses at the wavelength of 1550nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, Jacek; Maciejewska, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Broadband and spectrally flat supercontinuum (SC) generation in standard single-mode passive and Tm-doped fibers pumped by 1.55 μm pulses in the anomalous dispersion region is presented. Initial results on SC generation in a singlemode fluoride fiber are also presented. Using only a piece of commercially available SMF-28 as a nonlinear medium, the SC covering the spectral range from ~1.3 μm to 2.5 μm with the mean power of 1.71 W and a 5 dB spectral flatness of 640 nm is reported. When pumping a piece of Tm-doped fiber, the spectrum spreading from ~1.4 μm to 2.65 μm with its significant part located over 1.8 μm wavelength was recorded. SC generated in a fluoride fiber spread from ~0.9 μm to 3.2 μm with the average power of 0.85 W (out of which, over 0.1 W was located beyond 2.4 μm) was achieved.

  6. Spectral Reflectance Features of Rocks and Ores and Their Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨柏林; 王兴理

    1991-01-01

    The spectral reflectance features of rocks and minerals are correlated with their composition,col-or,grain size and surface state.Different wall rocks,altered rocks and ores have their spectral reflectance features,which are very helpful for the explanation of remote sensing data and searching for mineral deposits by remote sensing.After the treatment of spectrum data and searching for mineral deposits by remote sensing.After the treatment of spectrum data of rocks and ores and physical and chemical parameters in the mathematical statistics,we analyzed the laboratorial spectrum dataand put forward better wave bands(520-590,650-710,730-760,770-860,1560-1760,2200 and 2300-2400nm) for distinguishing rocks and ores.

  7. A Spectral Analysis of Laser Induced Fluorescence of Iodine

    CERN Document Server

    Bayram, S B

    2015-01-01

    When optically excited, iodine absorbs in the 490- to 650-nm visible region of the spectrum and, after radiative relaxation, it displays an emission spectrum of discrete vibrational bands at moderate resolution. This makes laser-induced fuorescence spectrum of molecular iodine especially suitable to study the energy structure of homonuclear diatomic molecules at room temperature. In this spirit, we present a rather straightforward and inexpensive experimental setup and the associated spectral analysis which provides an excellent exercise of applied quantum mechanics fit for advanced laboratory courses. The students would be required to assign spectral lines, fill a Deslandres table, process the data to estimate the harmonic and anharmonic characteristics of the ground vibronic state involved in the radiative transitions, and thenceforth calculate a set of molecular constants and discuss a model of molecular vibrator.

  8. Construction of Spectral Discoloration Model for Red Lead Pigment by Aging Test and Simulating Degradation Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of spectral discoloration model, based on aging test and simulating degradation experiment, was proposed to detect the aging degree of red lead pigment in ancient murals and to reproduce the spectral data supporting digital restoration of the ancient murals. The degradation process of red lead pigment under the aging test conditions was revealed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and spectrophotometer. The simulating degradation experiment was carried out by proportionally mixing red lead and lead dioxide with referring to the results of aging test. The experimental result indicated that the pure red lead was gradually turned into black lead dioxide, and the amount of tiny particles of the aging sample increased faced with aging process. Both the chroma and lightness of red lead pigment decreased with discoloration, and its hue essentially remains unchanged. In addition, the spectral reflectance curves of the aging samples almost started rising at about 550 nm with the inflection moving slightly from about 570 nm to 550 nm. The spectral reflectance of samples in long- and in short-wavelength regions was fitted well with the logarithmic and linear function. The spectral discoloration model was established, and the real aging red lead pigment in Dunhuang murals was measured and verified the effectiveness of the model.

  9. Retrieval of Total Suspended Matters Using Field Spectral Data in Shitoukoumen Reservoir, Jilin Province, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jingping; ZHANG Bai; LI Fang; SONG Kaishan; WANG Zongming; LIU Dianwei

    2009-01-01

    From August to October in 2006, three times of field spectral measurements with a Field Spec FR spectroradiometer (Analytical Spectral Devices, Inc., USA) were carried out in Shitoukoumen Reservoir, Jilin Province, Northeast China. Owing to the serious soil and water loss in the upstream, reflectance curves of the reservoir were characterized by high concentrations of total suspended matter (TSM). Extending the spectral analysis to 1200nm in the near-infrared band, this research revealed an obvious reflectance peak around 1070nm which was caused by the strong backscattering of high TSM. The method of partial least squares (PLS) regression was applied to retrieving the TSM. Reflectance in two spectral bands, i.e., 675-948nm and 1029-1105nm, were used as variables to develop PLS models. Traditional linear regression, first derivative model and logarithmic model were also used for the comparison of different models. Results showed that the PLS model based on Rrs(675)-Rrs(948) gave out best results with high precision and stability. Although the PLS model based on Rrs(1029)-Rrs(1105) did not have an outstanding performance due to lots of noise, the reflectance peak in the near-infrared band was an important TSM feature and its efficient exploitation would have a eunsiderable significance in TSM remote sensing.

  10. Raman spectral imaging for quantitative contaminant evaluation in skim milk powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study uses a point-scan Raman spectral imaging system for quantitative detection of melamine in milk powder. A sample depth of 2 mm and corresponding laser intensity of 200 mW were selected after evaluating the penetration of a 785 nm laser through milk powder. Horizontal and vertical spatial r...

  11. Comparison between HMME mediated photodynamic therapy using 413nm and 532nm for port wine stains: a mathematical simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Gu, Y.; Chen, R.; Xu, L. Q.; Liao, X. H.; Huang, N. Y.; Wang, Y. Y.

    2007-11-01

    Introduction: As it is always difficult to find the optimal combination of photosensitizer and of laser wavelength to achieve selective vascular damage in PWS-PDT, the selective vascular effects of HMME (Hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether) mediated PDT with 413 nm and with 532 nm were compared by mathematical simulation in this study. Materials & Methods: Firstly, distribution of 413 nm, 532 nm light in PWS tissue was simulated by Monte Carlo model. Two energy density groups were set, one is 80mW/cm2x40min for both 413 nm and 532 nm, the other is 80mW/cm2x40min for 532 nm while 80mW/cm2x20min in for 413 nm. Secondly, the productivity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in target vessels and normal tissue were simulated using a simulation system for PDT of PWS established in our lab, which considering the amount of light and photosensitizer in tissue, the molar extinction coefficient of photosensitizer, and quantum yield of ROS. Concentration of HMME for each wavelength were same. Finally, the productivity of ROS n in target vessels and normal tissue were compared between 413 nm PDT and 532 nm PDT under different energy density. Result: Under the same energy density, ROS productivity in target vessels of 413 nm PDT was significantly higher than that of 532 nm PDT. Moreover, it was still higher at low energy density than that of 532nm PDT with high energy density. Conclusion: HMME mediated PDT using 413 nm has the potential to increase the selective vascular effect of PDT for PWS by shortening treatment time.

  12. Rayleigh imaging in spectral mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Karl; Danielsson, Mats; Fredenberg, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Spectral imaging is the acquisition of multiple images of an object at different energy spectra. In mammography, dual-energy imaging (spectral imaging with two energy levels) has been investigated for several applications, in particular material decomposition, which allows for quantitative analysis of breast composition and quantitative contrast-enhanced imaging. Material decomposition with dual-energy imaging is based on the assumption that there are two dominant photon interaction effects that determine linear attenuation: the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering. This assumption limits the number of basis materials, i.e. the number of materials that are possible to differentiate between, to two. However, Rayleigh scattering may account for more than 10% of the linear attenuation in the mammography energy range. In this work, we show that a modified version of a scanning multi-slit spectral photon-counting mammography system is able to acquire three images at different spectra and can be used for triple-energy imaging. We further show that triple-energy imaging in combination with the efficient scatter rejection of the system enables measurement of Rayleigh scattering, which adds an additional energy dependency to the linear attenuation and enables material decomposition with three basis materials. Three available basis materials have the potential to improve virtually all applications of spectral imaging.

  13. Asymptotics of thermal spectral functions

    CERN Document Server

    Caron-Huot, S

    2009-01-01

    We use operator product expansion (OPE) techniques to study the spectral functions of currents at finite temperature, in the high-energy time-like region $\\omega\\gg T$. The leading corrections to the spectral function of currents and stress tensors are proportional to $\\sim T^4$ expectation values in general, and the leading corrections $\\sim g^2T^4$ are calculated at weak coupling, up to one undetermined coefficient in the shear viscosity channel. Spectral functions in the asymptotic regime are shown to be infrared safe up to order $g^8T^4$. The convergence of sum rules in the shear and bulk viscosity channels is established in QCD to all orders in perturbation theory, though numerically significant tails $\\sim T^4/(\\log\\omega)^3$ are shown to exist in the bulk viscosity channel and to have an impact on sum rules recently proposed by Kharzeev and Tuchin. We argue that the spectral functions of currents and stress tensors in strongly coupled $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super Yang-Mills do not receive any medium-dependent...

  14. Spectral dimension of the universe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambjørn, J.; Jurkiewicz, J.; Loll, R.

    2006-01-01

    We measure the spectral dimension of universes emerging from nonperturbative quantum gravity, defined through state sums of causal triangulated geometries. While four-dimensional on large scales, the quantum universe appears two-di- mensional at short distances. We conclude that quantum gravity may

  15. Spectral ophthalmoscopy based on supercontinuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yueh-Hung; Yu, Jiun-Yann; Wu, Han-Hsuan; Huang, Bo-Jyun; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2010-02-01

    Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (CSLO) has been established to be an important diagnostic tool for retinopathies like age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetes. Compared to a confocal laser scanning microscope, CSLO is also capable of providing optical sectioning on retina with the aid of a pinhole, but the microscope objective is replaced by the optics of eye. Since optical spectrum is the fingerprint of local chemical composition, it is attractive to incorporate spectral acquisition into CSLO. However, due to the limitation of laser bandwidth and chromatic/geometric aberration, the scanning systems in current CSLO are not compatible with spectral imaging. Here we demonstrate a spectral CSLO by combining a diffraction-limited broadband scanning system and a supercontinuum laser source. Both optical sectioning capability and sub-cellular resolution are demonstrated on zebrafish's retina. To our knowledge, it is also the first time that CSLO is applied onto the study of fish vision. The versatile spectral CSLO system will be useful to retinopathy diagnosis and neuroscience research.

  16. Spectral characterization of abstract functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Let G be locally compact abelian group and GAMMA its dual group. Let X be locally convex complete space and X* its dual space. In this paper we give spectral characterization of bounded uniformly continuous functions from G to X. Also, we give applications to the characterization of solutions of functional differential equations. (author)

  17. Spectral triples and Toeplitz operators

    OpenAIRE

    Englis, M.; Falk, K.; Iochum, B.

    2014-01-01

    We give examples of spectral triples, in the sense of A. Connes, constructed using the algebra of Toeplitz operators on smoothly bounded strictly pseudoconvex domains in $C^n$, or the star product for the Berezin-Toeplitz quantization. Our main tool is the theory of generalized Toeplitz operators on the boundary of such domains, due to Boutet de Monvel and Guillemin.

  18. Spectral element simulation of ultrafiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.; Barker, Vincent A.; Hassager, Ole

    1998-01-01

    A spectral element method for simulating stationary 2-D ultrafiltration is presented. The mathematical model is comprised of the Navier-Stokes equations for the velocity field of the fluid and a transport equation for the concentration of the solute. In addition to the presence of the velocity...

  19. Universal dark quencher based on "clicked" spectrally distinct azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Hardouin, Julie; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony

    2013-12-01

    The first synthesis of an heterotrifunctional molecular scaffold derived from the popular DABCYL azo dye quencher has been achieved. The sequential derviatization of this trivalent azobenzene derivative with two other nonfluorescent azo dyes (Black Hole Quencher BHQ-1 and BHQ-3) and through effective reactions from the "bioconjugation chemistry" repertoire has led to an universal dark quencher (UDQ). This "clicked" poly azo dye is able to turn off an array of fluorophores covering the UV/NIR (300-750 nm) spectral range. PMID:24215300

  20. Some spectral response characteristics of ZnTe thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Sarma; N Mazumdar; H L Das

    2006-02-01

    Zinc telluride thin films have been grown at room temperature and higher temperature substrates by thermal evaporation technique in a vacuum of 10-6 torr. A main peak in the photocurrent is observed at 781 nm (1.58 eV) with two lower amplitude peaks on the lower wavelength side and one on higher wavelength side. The evaluated thermal activation energy is found to correspond well with the main spectral peak. From these studies it can be inferred that temperatures up to 453 K is still in the extrinsic conductivity region of the studied ZnTe thin films.

  1. 9nm node wafer defect inspection using visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renjie; Edwards, Chris; Popescu, Gabriel; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2014-04-01

    Over the past 2 years, we have developed a common optical-path, 532 nm laser epi-illumination diffraction phase microscope (epi-DPM) and successfully applied it to detect different types of defects down to 20 by 100 nm in a 22nm node intentional defect array (IDA) wafer. An image post-processing method called 2DISC, using image frame 2nd order differential, image stitching, and convolution, was used to significantly improve sensitivity of the measured images. To address 9nm node IDA wafer inspection, we updated our system with a highly stable 405 nm diode laser. By using the 2DISC method, we detected parallel bridge defects in the 9nm node wafer. To further enhance detectability, we are exploring 3D wafer scanning, white-light illumination, and dark-field inspection.

  2. 500 nm Continuous Wave Tunable SingleFrequency MidIR Light Source for C–H Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgstedt, Lasse; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin;

    2012-01-01

    A computer controlled tunable mid-IR light source, based on single resonant difference frequency generation (DFG), is experimentally investigated. The DFG process is pumped by an external cavity tapered diode laser, tunable over a spectral range of 30 nm. Grating feedback to the single mode channel...... of the tapered diode narrows the spectrum and allows for tuning of the emitted spectrum in the range from 780 to 810 nm. The DFG process takes place intra-cavity in a high finesse diode pumped 1064 nm solid state Nd:YVO4 laser cavity, using periodically poled LiNbO3 as the nonlinear material. Based on this new...... approach, a tunable single-frequency output power exceeding 3 mW was obtained in the mid-IR tuning range from 2.9 to 3.4 μm....

  3. Study on the correlations between color rendering indices and the spectral power distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yue; Deng, Zhonghua; Guo, Ziquan; Liu, Zhuguang; Lan, Hai; Lu, Yijun; Cao, Yongge

    2014-06-30

    The intrinsic spectrally resolved sensitivity (ISRS) of color rendering indices (CRIs) is investigated by using spectral loss simulations. It is demonstrated that R(a) exhibits large sensitivities around 444, 480, 564, and 622 nm, while for R(9) the sensitivity peaks are around 461, 581 and 630 nm, which all shift slightly with the correlated color temperature. If considering the ISRS as a bridge between the spectral power distribution of LED and its CRI, one could obtain a high CRI by minimizing the deviation between the shapes of the illuminant spectrum and the reference spectrum, both after modulations by the ISRS as a weighting function. This approach, recommended as a guideline for the spectra design aiming at a high CRI, is described and justified in depth via a mathematical model. This method is spectra-oriented and could largely facilitate the spectra design. PMID:24978066

  4. High-speed spectral tuning CARS microscopy using AOTF laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Mamoru; Iwatsuka, Junichi; Niioka, Hirohiko; Araki, Tsutomu

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a high speed spectral tuning CARS microscopy system using a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser with an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) in the cavity. Since the wavelength of the laser is tunable with the applied radio frequency to the AOTF, the wavelength is electrically tunable.The pulse duration of the laser is about 10 ps, tunable range is 800 nm to 930 nm, and the tuning speed is ms order. The laser is synchronized with another mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser laser our own method using a balance cross-correlator and phase lock loop technique. The synchronized lasers are used for light source of multi-focus CARS microscopy system using a microlens array scanner, and the hyperspectral imaging of adipocyte cells is demonstrated.

  5. Fabrication and Spectral Properties of Wood-Based Luminescent Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianjun Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure impregnation pretreatment is a conventional method to fabricate wood-based nanocomposites. In this paper, the wood-based luminescent nanocomposites were fabricated with the method and its spectral properties were investigated. The results show that it is feasible to fabricate wood-based luminescent nanocomposites using microwave modified wood and nanophosphor powders. The luminescent strength is in positive correlation with the amount of phosphor powders dispersed in urea-formaldehyde resin. Phosphors absorb UV and blue light efficiently in the range of 400–470 nm and show a broad band of bluish-green emission centered at 500 nm, which makes them good candidates for potential blue-green luminescent materials.

  6. Remote sensing study of the influence of herbicides on the spectral reflectance of pea plant leaves (Pisum sativum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezhova, D.; Alexieva, V.; Yanev, T.; Ivanov, S.

    Results from a remote sensing study of spectral reflectance of leaves of pea plants Pisum sativum L treated by the herbicides atrazine 2 4-D glyphosate fluridone and chlorsulfuron are reported According to the classification of the Herbicide Action Committee reflecting their mode of action they belong to different groups photosystem II bloker - C1 atrazine synthetic auxins - O 2 4-D inhibition of EPSP synthase - G glyphosate photobleaching - F1 fluridone and inhibition of acetoctate synthase - B chlorsulfuron The plants studied were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber in a nutritious medium to which every herbicide was added at three low concentrations 1 mu M 0 1 mu M and 0 01 mu M with respect to the field dose applied in the agricultural practice The spectral measurements of the leaf spectral reflectance were carried out in laboratory using a multichannel spectrometer in the visible and near infrared regions of the spectrum 480 div 810 nm Data was registered in 128 channels at a high spectral resolution of 2 6 nm halfwidth and a spatial resolution of 2 mm 2 The reflectance spectra were obtained from the leaf-reflected radiation referenced against a standard white screen To assess the changes arising in the leaf spectral reflectance under the herbicide action the developed by us approach based on discriminant analysis and other statistical methods was applied The spectral reflectance characteristics SRC were investigated in three spectral intervals 520 div 580 nm region of maximal

  7. Effect of spectral resolution on the measurement of monoaromatic hydrocarbons by DOAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Fumin; XIE Pinhua; ZHANG Yinghua; ZHU Yanwu; SI Fuqi; LIU Wenqing; WANG Junde

    2008-01-01

    The excellent response characteristics and detection sensitivity with much lower operational cost and the capability to discriminate between the isomer of some monoaromatic hydrocarbons (MAHCs) make differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) a powerful tool to trace concentration variation of MAHCs. But due to the similarity in chemical structure, those MAHCs have the similar overlapped characteristic absorption structures, which make the selection of instrumental parameter critical to the accurate detection of MAHCs. Firstly, the spectral resolution used in DOAS system determines the nonlinear absorption of O2 and the mass dependence of characteristic absorption structure; thereby it determines the effect of elimination error of O2 absorption in the atmospheric spectra for the detection of MAHCs. Secondly, spectral resolution determines the differential absorption characteristics of twelve MAHCs representing major constituents in technical solvents used in the automobile industry and the interference of spectral overlapping. Thirdly, the spectral resolution determines the sensitivity, time resolution and linear range. So the spectral resolution range with the best ratio of signal to noise is used to determine the most suitable spectral resolution range, as well as the spectral resolution range that ensure the characteristic absorption structure of MAHCs and the minimization of O2 absorption interference. Finally, 0. 15-0. 16 nm (FWHM: full width at half maximum) is assumed to be closest to the optimum spectral resolution and it is confirmed by the results of practical measurement of MAHCs by DOAS.

  8. Dust Plasma Analogue for Interstellar 217.5 nm Extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović, I.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The new ultraviolet (UV extinction measurements of carbonaceous nanoparticles in the range from 140 nm to 260 nm are presented. The plasma polymerized hydrocarbon nanoparticles were already proposed as a new astro analogue, which describe the infrared (IR extinction spectra in an excellent way. We use the same particles to find the possible carrier of the "mysterious" UV 217.5 nm extinction "bump" of interstellar media (ISM.

  9. The Infrared Spectrum of Uranium Hollow Cathode Lamps from 850 nm to 4000 nm: Wavenumbers and Line Identifications from Fourier Transform Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Redman, Stephen L; Nave, Gillian; Ramsey, Lawrence W; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2011-01-01

    We provide new measurements of wavenumbers and line identifications of 10 100 UI and UII near-infrared (NIR) emission lines between 2500 cm-1 and 12 000 cm-1 (4000 nm to 850 nm) using archival FTS spectra from the National Solar Observatory (NSO). This line list includes isolated uranium lines in the Y, J, H, K, and L bands (0.9 {\\mu}m to 1.1 {\\mu}m, 1.2 {\\mu}m to 1.35 {\\mu}m, 1.5 {\\mu}m to 1.65 {\\mu}m, 2.0 {\\mu}m to 2.4 {\\mu}m, and 3.0 {\\mu}m to 4.0 {\\mu}m, respectively), and provides six times as many calibration lines as thorium in the NIR spectral range. The line lists we provide enable inexpensive, commercially-available uranium hollow-cathode lamps to be used for high-precision wavelength calibration of existing and future high-resolution NIR spectrographs.

  10. Detection limits of 405 nm and 633 nm excited PpIX fluorescence for brain tumor detection during stereotactic biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwardt, Niklas; Götz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Hollnburger, Bastian; Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    5-aminolevulinic-acid-(5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may be used to improve stereotactic brain tumor biopsies. In this study, the sensitivity of PpIX-based tumor detection has been investigated for two potential excitation wavelengths (405 nm, 633 nm). Using a 200 μm fiber in contact with semi-infinite optical phantoms containing ink and Lipovenös, PpIX detection limits of 4.0 nM and 200 nM (relating to 1 mW excitation power) were determined for 405 nm and 633 nm excitation, respectively. Hence, typical PpIX concentrations in glioblastomas of a few μM should be well detectable with both wavelengths. Additionally, blood layers of selected thicknesses were placed between fiber and phantom. Red excitation was shown to be considerably less affected by blood interference: A 50 μm blood layer, for instance, blocked the 405- nm-excited fluorescence completely, but reduced the 633-nm-excited signal by less than 50%. Ray tracing simulations demonstrated that - without blood layer - the sensitivity advantage of 405 nm rises for decreasing fluorescent volume from 50-fold to a maximum of 100-fold. However, at a tumor volume of 1 mm3, which is a typical biopsy sample size, the 633-nm-excited fluorescence signal is only reduced by about 10%. Further simulations revealed that with increasing fiber-tumor distance, the signal drops faster for 405 nm. This reduces the risk of detecting tumor tissue outside the needle's coverage, but diminishes the overlap between optically and mechanically sampled volumes. While 405 nm generally offers a higher sensitivity, 633 nm is more sensitive to distant tumors and considerably superior in case of blood-covered tumor tissue.

  11. Improving the spectral resolution of flat-field concave grating miniature spectrometers by dividing a wide spectral band into two narrow ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Pang, Jinchao; Li, Xinghui; Ni, Kai; Tian, Rui

    2015-11-10

    In this study, a new flat-field concave grating miniature spectrometer is proposed with improved resolution across a wide spectral band. A mirror is added to a conventional concave grating spectrometer and placed near the existing detector array, allowing a wide spectral band to be divided into two adjacent subspectral bands. One of these bands is directly detected by the detector, and the other is indirectly analyzed by the same detector after being reflected by the mirror. These two subspectral bands share the same entrance slit, concave grating, and detector, which allows for a compact size, while maintaining an improved spectral resolution across the entire spectral band. The positions of the mirror and other parameters of the spectrometer are designed by a computer procedure and the optical design software ZEMAX. Simulation results show that the resolution of this kind of flat-field concave grating miniature spectrometer is better than 1.6 nm across a spectral band of 700 nm. Experiments based on three laser sources reveal that the measured resolutions are comparable to the simulated ones, with a maximum relative error between them of less than 19%. PMID:26560772

  12. Improving the spectral resolution of flat-field concave grating miniature spectrometers by dividing a wide spectral band into two narrow ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Pang, Jinchao; Li, Xinghui; Ni, Kai; Tian, Rui

    2015-11-10

    In this study, a new flat-field concave grating miniature spectrometer is proposed with improved resolution across a wide spectral band. A mirror is added to a conventional concave grating spectrometer and placed near the existing detector array, allowing a wide spectral band to be divided into two adjacent subspectral bands. One of these bands is directly detected by the detector, and the other is indirectly analyzed by the same detector after being reflected by the mirror. These two subspectral bands share the same entrance slit, concave grating, and detector, which allows for a compact size, while maintaining an improved spectral resolution across the entire spectral band. The positions of the mirror and other parameters of the spectrometer are designed by a computer procedure and the optical design software ZEMAX. Simulation results show that the resolution of this kind of flat-field concave grating miniature spectrometer is better than 1.6 nm across a spectral band of 700 nm. Experiments based on three laser sources reveal that the measured resolutions are comparable to the simulated ones, with a maximum relative error between them of less than 19%.

  13. 7nm logic optical lithography with OPC-Lite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smayling, Michael C.; Tsujita, Koichiro; Yaegashi, Hidetami; Axelrad, Valery; Nakayama, Ryo; Oyama, Kenichi; Yamauchi, Shohei; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Koji

    2015-03-01

    The CMOS logic 22nm node was the last one done with single patterning. It used a highly regular layout style with Gridded Design Rules (GDR). Smaller nodes have required the same regular layout style but with multiple patterning for critical layers. A "line/cut" approach is being used to achieve good pattern fidelity and process margin.[1] As shown in Fig. 1, even with "line" patterns, pitch division will eventually be necessary. For the "cut" pattern, Design-Source-Mask Optimization (DSMO) has been demonstrated to be effective at the 20nm node and below.[2,3,4] Single patterning was found to be suitable down to 16nm, while double patterning extended optical lithography for cuts to the 10-12nm nodes. Design optimization avoided the need for triple patterning. Lines can be patterned with 193nm immersion with no complex OPC. The final line dimensions can be achieved by applying pitch division by two or four.[5] In this study, we extend the scaling using simplified OPC to the 7nm node for critical FEOL and BEOL layers. The test block is a reasonably complex logic function with ~100k gates of combinatorial logic and flip-flops, scaled from previous experiments. Simulation results show that for cuts at 7nm logic dimensions, the gate layer can be done with single patterning whose minimum pitch is 53nm, possibly some of the 1x metal layers can be done with double patterning whose minimum pitch is 53nm, and the contact layer will require triple patterning whose minimum pitch is 68nm. These pitches are less than the resolution limit of ArF NA=1.35 (72nm). However these patterns can be separated by a combination of innovative SMO for less than optical resolution limit and a process trick of hole-repair technique. An example of triple patterning coloring is shown in Fig 3. Fin and local interconnect are created by lines and trims. The number of trim patterns are 3 times (min. pitch=90nm) and twice (min. pitch=120nm), respectively. The small number of masks, large pitches, and

  14. Low-cost 420nm blue laser diode for tissue cutting and hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Kurt J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the use of a 420 nm blue laser diode for possible surgery and hemostasis. The optical absorption of blood-containing tissue is strongly determined by the absorption characteristics of blood. Blood is primarily comprised of plasma (yellowish extracellular fluid that is approximately 95% water by volume) and formed elements: red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs) and platelets. The RBCs (hemoglobin) are the most numerous, and due to the spectral absorption characteristics of hemoglobin, the optical absorption of blood has a strong relative maximum value in the 420 nm blue region of the optical spectrum. Small, low-cost laser diodes emitting at 420 nm with tens of watts of continuous wave (CW) optical power are becoming commercially available. Experiments on the use of such laser diodes for tissue cutting with simultaneous hemostasis were carried out and are here described. It was found that 1 mm deep x 1 mm wide cuts can be achieved in red meat at a focused laser power level of 3 W moving at a velocity of ~ 1 mm/s. The peripheral necrosis and thermal damage zone extended over a width of approximately 0.5 mm adjacent to the cuts. Preliminary hemostasis experiments were carried out with fresh equine blood in Tygon tubing, where it was demonstrated that cauterization can occur in regions of intentional partial tubing puncture.

  15. Stimulated scattering effects in gold-nanorod-water samples pumped by 532 nm laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiulin; Wu, Haopeng; Liu, Juan; Li, Shujing; He, Xingdao

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated scattering in gold-nanorod-water samples has been investigated experimentally. The scattering centers are impurity particles rather than the atoms or molecules of conventional homogeneous scattering media. The pump source for exciting stimulated scattering is a pulsed and narrow linewidth second-harmonic Nd: YAG laser, with 532 nm wavelength, ~8 ns pulse duration, and 10 Hz repetition rate. Experimental results indicate that SMBS, SBS and STRS can be generated in gold-nanorod-water samples under appropriate pump and absorption conditions. The incident pump energy has to be larger than a certain threshold value before stimulated scattering can be detected. The absorption coefficient of samples at 532 nm wavelength depends on the one of characteristic absorption bands of gold nanorods located around 530 nm. A critical absorption coefficient can be determined for the transition from SBS to STRS. Also, the spectral-line-broadening effects of STRS have been observed, the line-shape presents a pseudo-Voigt profile due to the random thermal motion of molecules and strong particle collision. PMID:26173804

  16. Graphene mode-locked femtosecond Cr2+:ZnS laser with ~300 nm tuning range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won Bae; Choi, Sun Young; Zhu, Chunhui; Kim, Mi Hye; Kim, Jun Wan; Kim, Jin Sun; Park, Hyung Ju; Shin, Dong Ho; Jung, Moon Youn; Wang, Fengqiu; Rotermund, Fabian

    2016-09-01

    Graphene has proved to be an excellent broadband saturable absorber for mode-locked operation of ultrafast lasers. However, for the mid-infrared (mid-IR) range where broadly tunable sources are in great needs, graphene-based broadly tunable ultrafast mid-IR lasers have not been demonstrated so far. Here, we report on passive mode-locking of a mid-IR Cr:ZnS laser by utilizing a transmission-type monolayer graphene saturable absorber and broad spectral tunability between 2120 nm and 2408 nm, which is the broadest tuning bandwidth ever reported for graphene mode-locked mid-IR solid-state lasers. The recovery time of the saturable absorber is measured to be ~2.4 ps by pump-probe technique at a wavelength of 2350 nm. Stably mode-locked Cr:ZnS laser delivers Fourier transform-limited 220-fs pulses with a pulse energy of up to 7.8 nJ. PMID:27607680

  17. [Models for estimating foliar Fe and Mn Concentration of Armeniaca vulgaris cv. Luntaibaixing using spectral reflectance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen-Zhu; Pan, Cun-De; Wang, Shi-Wei; Guo, Zhi-Chao; Wang, Qing-Tao; Ding, Fan; Li, Yuan

    2014-09-01

    Aimed at providing technology for a rapid nutrition diagnosis system of micronutrients in Armeniaca vulgaris cv. Luntaibaixing, we established an element concentration estimation model for its foliar ferrum (Fe) and manganese (Mn) concentration based on spectrum analysis. The foliar spectrum reflectance at various phenological periods of fruit development under different soil fertility conditions was measured by Unispec-SC spectrometer. By analyzing the correlation of foliar Fe, Mn concentration at various phenological periods of fruit development, the spectrum reflectance Rλ and its first-order differential f' (Rλ), we filtered out its sensitive bands. And we established an element concentration estimation model for its foliar Fe and Mn at various phenological periods of fruit development with the linear regression model. The results showed that the spectral sensitive bands of foliar Fe in fruit setting period were 873 and 874 nm, 375 and 437 nm in fruit core-hardening period, 836 and 837 nm in maturity period and 325 and 1 054 nm in post-harvest period. However, the spectral sensitive bands of Mn were 913 and 1 129 nm, 425 and 970 nm, 390 and 466 nm, 423 and 424 nm, respectively. The Fe and Mn concentration of A. vulgaris cv. Luntaibaixing leaves were the most relevant to the first-order differential f' (RD) of its spectrum reflectance, whose linear spectrum estimation model fitting degree was the highest and reached to a significant or highly significant level. It showed that the spectral sensitive bands of Fe and Mn element varied with different phenological periods of fruit development. The spectrum estimation models for its foliar Fe and Mn concentration could be established with linear model according to its first-order differential f' (Rλ). PMID:25532350

  18. Wavelength stabilization of a 980-nm semiconductor laser module stabilized with high-power uncooled dual FBG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yize Huang; Yuming Zhang; Yi Li; Haifang Wang; Xiaojing Yu; Hu Zhang; Wei Zhang; Huiqun Zhu; Sheng Zhou; Ruoxi Sun

    2011-01-01

    @@ An optimized dual fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is proposed for 980-nm semiconductor lasers without thermoelectric coolers to restrict temperature-induced wavelength shift.The mathematical model of the temperature-induced wavelength shift of the laser with the dual FBG is built using the external cavity feedback rate equations.The external cavity parameters are optimized for achieving the stability mode-locking laser output.The spectral characteristics of the dual FBG stabilized laser are measured to range from 0 to 70 ℃.The side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) is more than 45 dB, while the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) is less than 1 nm.The peak wavelength shift is less than 0.1 nm.The dual FBG wavelength shift proportional coefficient is between 0.1086 and 0.4342.%An optimized dual fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is proposed for 980-nm semiconductor lasers without thermoelectric coolers to restrict temperature-induced wavelength shift. The mathematical model of the temperature-induced wavelength shift of the laser with the dual FBG is built using the external cavity feedback rate equations. The external cavity parameters are optimized for achieving the stability mode-locking laser output. The spectral characteristics of the dual FBG stabilized laser are measured to range from 0 to 70 ℃. The side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) is more than 45 dB, while the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) is less than 1 nm. The peak wavelength shift is less than 0.1 nm. The dual FBG wavelength shift proportional coefficient is between 0.1086 and 0.4342.

  19. A case study of HF radar spectra and 630.0 nm auroral emission in the pre-midnight sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lester

    Full Text Available A comparison of HF radar backscatter observed by the CUTLASS Finland radar, meridian scanning photometer data from Longyearbyen, magnetic field variations from IMAGE stations, and particle precipitation measured by the DMSP F12 spacecraft is presented. The interval under discussion occurred in the pre-midnight local time sector, during a period of weakly northward interplanetary magnetic field. A region of HF backscatter, typically 8 degrees wide, occurred in the field of view of the CUTLASS Finland radar. A well defined gradient in the spectral width parameter was present, with mainly low (< 200 m s - 1 spectral widths in the lower latitude part of the scatter and predominantly large (> 200 ms - 1 spectral widths in the higher latitude part. The relationship between the spectral width and the red line (630.0 nm emission measured by the meridian scanning photometer is considered. The poleward border of the red line emission, which has, in the past, been proposed as being representative of the polar cap boundary, was co-located to within 1° of magnetic latitude with the gradient in spectral width for part of the interval. Statistically, large spectral widths occurred poleward of the red line emission, while small spectral widths occurred within or equatorward of the red line emission. Near simultaneous DMSP particle observations in the 20 eV to 20 keV range indicate that the poleward border of the red line emission and the gradient in spectral width occurred at the same latitude as the transition from auroral oval to polar rain particle energies. We conclude that the large spectral widths were not caused by particle precipitation associated with the auroral oval. There were two periods of special interest when the relationship between the red line and the spectral width broke down. The first of these happened during enhanced red line and green line (557.7 nm emission, with a drop out of the radar scatter and an enhanced, narrow westward

  20. Pre-flight radiometric and spectral calibration of Resourcesat-2A-LISS3* payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Harish; Detroja, M. P.; Padmanabhan, Deepa; Raj, Vedant; Kumar, Anil; Sarkar, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    Resourcesat-2A is a follow-on mission of Resourcesat-2, belongs to Indian Remote Sensing Program. It is expected to be launched in 2016 and is dedicated mainly to agricultural applications. One of the payloads, LISS3* is a medium resolution (23.5 m) sensor having four multispectral bands from 450 to 1650 nm. These spectral bands are named as B2 (550 nm), B3 (650 nm), B4 (815 nm) and B5 (1625 nm) respectively covering Visible, Near Infrared (NIR) and Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) regions. In order to provide quality data to the user community for long term scientific applications pre-flight ground calibration is carried out. This paper describes pre-flight spectral and radiometric calibration of LISS3* payload and its performance evaluation. Since it is a continuity mission to Resourcesat-2, which was launched in April 2011 so for generating long-term data record and correlation with previous observations, its parameters are compared with Resourcesat-2 LISS3* payload. The main spectral parameters like central wavelength, and pass band is determined using system level spectral response and compared for both the mission and differences are outlined. The next important exercise is pre-flight radiometric calibration, which was carried out in laboratory using a standard integrating sphere traceable to NIST standards. This paper highlights the technique adopted during pre-flight calibration of the radiometric response and performance assessment of all 4 bands of LISS3* in terms of major electro-optical parameters like Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), Saturation Radiance (SR) etc. The observed SR shows that the sensor can measure spectral radiance from Earth up to 100% albedo.

  1. Solar Cycle Spectral Irradiance Variation and Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Swartz, W. H.; Jackman, C. H.; Fleming, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Recent measurements from the SIM instrument on the SORCE satellite have been interpreted by Harder et al (Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L07801, doi:10.1029/2008GL036797, 2009) as implying a different spectral irradiance variation over the solar cycle than that put forward by Lean (Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 2425-2428, 2000). When we inserted this new wavelength dependent solar cycle variation into our 3D CCM we found a different solar cycle dependence of the ozone concentration as a function of altitude from that we derived using the traditional Lean wavelength dependence. Examination of these results led us to realize that the main issue is the solar cycle variation of radiation at wavelengths less than 240 nm versus the solar cycle variation of radiation at wavelengths between 240 nm and 300 nm. The impact of wavelengths less than 240 nm occurs through photodissociation of O2 leading to the production of ozone. The impact of wavelengths between 240 nm and 300 nm occurs through photodissociation of O3 leading to an increase in O atoms and enhanced ozone destruction. Thus one wavelength region gives an in-phase relationship of ozone with the solar cycle while the other wavelength region gives an out-of-phase relationship of ozone with the solar cycle. We have used the Goddard two-dimensional (2D) photochemistry transport model to examine this relationship in more detail. We calculate the altitude and latitude sensitivity of ozone to changes in the solar UV irradiance as a function of wavelength. These results can be used to construct the ozone response to arbitrary wavelength dependencies of solar UV variation.

  2. Spectral signature of ultraviolet solar irradiance in Zacatecas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinedo V, J. L; Mireles G, F; Rios M, C; Quirino T, L. L; Davila R, J. I [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas, Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2006-10-15

    This study presents an analysis of the global ultraviolet spectral irradiance (290-400 nm) registered in Zacatecas, a city near the Tropic of Cancer, located at 2500 m above sea level, latitude of 22 degrees N and longitude of 102 degrees W. The spectra have been measured using a Bentham radiometer with a 0.5 nm step in wavelength. The measurements show relatively high levels of ultraviolet irradiance (UV), which may be characteristic of areas close to the Tropic of Cancer. Faced with an increase of the incidence of skin cancer among the population of Zacatecas, these measurements highlight that a damage prevention plan is required. [Spanish] En este trabajo se presenta un analisis de la radiacion espectral global ultravioleta (290-400 nm) registrada en Zacatecas, una ciudad vecina al tropico de cancer, situada a 2500 m sobre el nivel del mar, latitud de 22 grados N y longitud de 102 grados O. Los espectros correspondientes han sido medidos mediante un espectroradiometro Bentham con un paso de 0.5 nm de longitud de onda. Las mediciones muestran niveles de radiacion ultravioleta (UV) relativamente elevados, que pueden ser caracteristicos de las zonas vecinas al tropico de cancer. Frente al aumento de incidencia de cancer en la piel en la poblacion del estado de Zacatecas, estas mediciones ponen en relieve la necesidad de formular un plan preventivo de danos.

  3. Immunonanogold Catalytic Resonance Scattering Spectral Assay of Trace Immunoglobulin M

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Ai-Hui; WANG Su-Mei; JIANG Zhi-Liang

    2008-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles of 10 nm were prepared by the improved method of trisodium citrate, and used to label goat anti-human immunoglobulin M (anti-IgM) to obtain a resonance scattering spectral probe for IgM. In pH 4.5 KH2PO4-Na2HPO4 buffer solution and in the presence of polyethylene glycol, the nanogold-labeled anti-IgM was combined with IgM specifically to form immunogold complex particles. After centrifugation, the immunonanogold in the supernatant catalyzed the reduction of AuCl-4 ions by NH2OH·HCl to form larger size gold particles in pH 1.9 citrate buffer solution, making the resonance scattering intensity at 580 nm enhanced. The amount of the nanogold-labeled anti-IgM in the supernatant decreased with the addition of IgM. The decreased intensity △I580 nm was proportional to the concentration of IgM in the range of 0.06--4.80 ng·mL-1. The regression equation was △I580nm= 14.5c(IgM)+1.8, with a detection limit of 0.03 ng·mL-1 IgM. The method was applied to the determina-tion of IgM in sera of healthy humans, with satisfactory results.

  4. Preliminary study of spectral features of normal and malignant cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, M.; Farooq, W. A.; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.

    2016-04-01

    In this study the fluorescence emission spectra of normal and malignant cell cultures were recorded at an excitation wavelength of 290 nm, corresponding to the higher fluorescence intensity at 350 nm (due to tryptophan) of three malignant cells and normal cells. Similarly, Stokes shift spectra were recorded for normal and malignant cell cultures with a shift, Δλ, of 70 nm. The Stokes shift shows the existence of discriminating features between normal and carcinoma cell lines due to the higher concentration of phenylalanine and tryptophan in carcinoma cell lines which are completely absent in normal cell lines. Hence, both the emission spectra and the Stokes shift spectra showed considerably different spectral features between the normal and malignant cells. The preliminary studies indicate the potential application of fluorescence spectroscopy for cancer detection using the spectral features of biofluorophores.

  5. An imaging spectro-polarimeter for measuring hemispherical spectrally resolved down-welling sky polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenault, David B.; Pezzaniti, J. L.; Roche, Michael; Hyatt, Brian

    2016-05-01

    A full sky imaging spectro-polarimeter has been developed that measures spectrally resolved (~2.5 nm resolution) radiance and polarization (𝑠0, 𝑠1, 𝑠2 Stokes Elements) of natural sky down-welling over approximately 2π sr between 400nm and 1000nm. The sensor is based on a scanning push broom hyperspectral imager configured with a continuously rotating polarizer (sequential measurement in time polarimeter). Sensor control and processing software (based on Polaris Sensor Technologies Grave' camera control software) has a straight-forward and intuitive user interface that provides real-time updated sky down-welling spectral radiance/polarization maps and statistical analysis tools.

  6. Spectral broadening in anatase titanium dioxide waveguides at telecommunication and near-visible wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Christopher C; Shtyrkova, Katia; Bradley, Jonathan D B; Reshef, Orad; Ippen, Erich; Mazur, Eric

    2013-07-29

    We observe spectral broadening of femtosecond pulses in single-mode anatase-titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) waveguides at telecommunication and near-visible wavelengths (1565 and 794 nm). By fitting our data to nonlinear pulse propagation simulations, we quantify nonlinear optical parameters around 1565 nm. Our fitting yields a nonlinear refractive index of 0.16 × 10(-18) m(2)/W, no two-photon absorption, and stimulated Raman scattering from the 144 cm(-1) Raman line of anatase with a gain coefficient of 6.6 × 10(-12) m/W. Additionally, we report on asymmetric spectral broadening around 794 nm. The wide wavelength applicability and negligible two-photon absorption of TiO(2) make it a promising material for integrated photonics.

  7. A seasonal verification of the Suits spectral reflectance model for wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaster, E. W.; Chance, J. E.; Wiegand, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Variables that characterize wheat canopies for the Suits Model and spectral bidirectional reflectance measurements in the 450 to 1350 nm interval were determined approximately weekly throughout the growing season for two cultivars of wheat that achieved maximum leaf area index of 5.3 and 10.8. The Suits Model plant variables were tabulated and experimental reflectance measurements were compared with the model predictions in the wavelength interval from 500 to 1150 nm at 50 nm increments for 17 measurement dates. The seasonal average coefficient of determination, r squared, was 0.88 between the Suits spectral bidirectional reflectance model and field-measured reflectance data. Poorest agreement was found very early and very late in the growing season, possibly due to low green plant biomass and incomplete ground cover.

  8. The relationship between leaf water status, gas exchange, and spectral reflectance in cotton leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, William D.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of leaf spectral reflectance, the components of water potential, and leaf gas exchanges as a function of leaf water content were made to evaluate the use of NIR reflectance as an indicator of plant water status. Significant correlations were determined between spectral reflectance at 810 nm, 1665 nm, and 2210 nm and leaf relative water content, total water potential, and turgor pressure. However, the slopes of these relationships were relatively shallow and, when evaluated over the range of leaf water contents in which physiological activity occurs (e.g., photosynthesis), had lower r-squared values, and some relationships were not statistically significant. NIR reflectance varied primarily as a function of leaf water content, and not independently as a function of turgor pressure, which is a sensitive indicator of leaf water status. The limitations of this approach to measuring plant water stress are discussed.

  9. Flash-lamp pumped Pr:YAP laser operated at wavelengths of 747 nm and 662 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibrich, Martin; Jelínková, Helena; Šulc, Jan; Nejezchleb, Karel; Škoda, Václav

    2009-02-01

    Successful room-temperature generation of Pr:YAP laser radiation at wavelengths of 747 nm and 662 nm was demonstrated. A flash-lamp pumped Pr:YAP laser was operated in free-running pulsed regime at room temperature. Permanent laser action was reached by means of a special UV color glass plate filter placed directly into the laser cavity. The maximum output energy and pulse length reached at wavelengths of 747 nm and 662 nm were 102 mJ, 92 μs and 6.1 mJ, 47.5 μs, respectively. The laser beam parameter M2 ~ 1.5 was measured when the 662 nm wavelength was generated. In the case of 747 nm wavelength generation, M2 ~ 1.2 was reached with a diaphragm inside the resonator. For different pumped energy values, the line shape and linewidth remained stable for both cases.

  10. Evaluation of dental pulp repair using low level laser therapy (688 nm and 785 nm) morphologic study in capuchin monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretel, H.; Oliveira, J. A.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Ramalho, L. T. O.

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) 688 nm and 785 nm accelerate dentin barrier formation and repair process after traumatic pulp exposure. The sample consisted of 45 premolars of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) with pulp exposure Class V cavities. All premolars were treated with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), divided in groups of 15 teeth each, and analyzed on 7th, 25th, and 60th day. Group GI - only Ca(OH)2, GII - laser 688 nm, and GIII - laser 785 nm. Laser beam was used in single and punctual dose with the parameters: continuous, 688 nm and 785 nm wavelength, tip's area of 0.00785 cm2, power 50 mW, application time 20 s, dose 255 J/cm2, energy 2 J. Teeth were capped with Ca(OH)2, Ca(OH)2 cement and restored with amalgam. All groups presented pulp repair. On 25th day the thickness of the formed dentin barrier was different between the groups GI and GII (p < 0.05) and between groups GI and GIII (p < 0.01). On 60th day there was difference between GI and GIII (p < 0.01). It may be concluded that, LLLT 688 nm and 785 nm accelerated dentin barrier formation and consequently pulp repair process, with best results using infrared laser 785 nm.

  11. Evaluation of dental pulp repair using low level laser therapy (688 nm and 785 nm) morphologic study in capuchin monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) 688 nm and 785 nm accelerate dentin barrier formation and repair process after traumatic pulp exposure. The sample consisted of 45 premolars of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) with pulp exposure Class V cavities. All premolars were treated with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), divided in groups of 15 teeth each, and analyzed on 7th, 25th, and 60th day. Group GI – only Ca(OH)2, GII – laser 688 nm, and GIII – laser 785 nm. Laser beam was used in single and punctual dose with the parameters: continuous, 688 nm and 785 nm wavelength, tip's area of 0.00785 cm2, power 50 mW, application time 20 s, dose 255 J/cm2, energy 2 J. Teeth were capped with Ca(OH)2, Ca(OH)2 cement and restored with amalgam. All groups presented pulp repair. On 25th day the thickness of the formed dentin barrier was different between the groups GI and GII (p th day there was difference between GI and GIII (p < 0.01). It may be concluded that, LLLT 688 nm and 785 nm accelerated dentin barrier formation and consequently pulp repair process, with best results using infrared laser 785 nm

  12. 355nm Photon-Recycled Fringe Imager for HSRL Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed work is to develop a high-efficiency aircraft-qualified Fabry-Perot-based interferometer for the High Spectral Resolution LIDAR (HSRL). Through this...

  13. Spectral diagonal ensemble Kalman filters

    CERN Document Server

    Kasanický, Ivan; Vejmelka, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A new type of ensemble Kalman filter is developed, which is based on replacing the sample covariance in the analysis step by its diagonal in a spectral basis. It is proved that this technique improves the aproximation of the covariance when the covariance itself is diagonal in the spectral basis, as is the case, e.g., for a second-order stationary random field and the Fourier basis. The method is extended by wavelets to the case when the state variables are random fields, which are not spatially homogeneous. Efficient implementations by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) are presented for several types of observations, including high-dimensional data given on a part of the domain, such as radar and satellite images. Computational experiments confirm that the method performs well on the Lorenz 96 problem and the shallow water equations with very small ensembles and over multiple analysis cycles.

  14. Spectral computations for bounded operators

    CERN Document Server

    Ahues, Mario; Limaye, Balmohan

    2001-01-01

    Exact eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and principal vectors of operators with infinite dimensional ranges can rarely be found. Therefore, one must approximate such operators by finite rank operators, then solve the original eigenvalue problem approximately. Serving as both an outstanding text for graduate students and as a source of current results for research scientists, Spectral Computations for Bounded Operators addresses the issue of solving eigenvalue problems for operators on infinite dimensional spaces. From a review of classical spectral theory through concrete approximation techniques to finite dimensional situations that can be implemented on a computer, this volume illustrates the marriage of pure and applied mathematics. It contains a variety of recent developments, including a new type of approximation that encompasses a variety of approximation methods but is simple to verify in practice. It also suggests a new stopping criterion for the QR Method and outlines advances in both the iterative refineme...

  15. A photonic crystal fiber with zero dispersion at 1064 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Andreas

    2002-01-01

    We report on the dispersion properties of a single mode, large core photonic crystal fiber. Using white light interferometry the fiber is found to have zero dispersion at 1064 nm......We report on the dispersion properties of a single mode, large core photonic crystal fiber. Using white light interferometry the fiber is found to have zero dispersion at 1064 nm...

  16. On high speed transmission with the 850 nm VCSELs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turkiewicz, Jarosław P.; Chorchos, Łukasz; Puerta Ramírez, Rafael;

    2016-01-01

    One of the key research challenges is development of energy efficient high bit rate data interconnects. The most promising solutions are based on 850 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) and multi mode fibre (MMF). In this paper options to realize energy efficient 850 nm data...

  17. Correlation-induced spectral changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Emil; James, Daniel F. V.

    1996-06-01

    This paper presents a review of research, both theoretical and experimental, concerning the influence of coherence properties of fluctuating light sources and of correlation properties of scattering media on the spectra of radiated and scattered fields. Much of this research followed a discovery made in 1986, that the spectrum of light may change on propagation, even in free space. More than 100 papers on this topic have been published to date and many of them are reviewed, or at least mentioned, in this article. After an introduction and a summary of some of the main mathematical results relating to second-order coherence theory of statistically stationary optical fields, spectral changes that may take place on superposing fields produced by two partially correlated sources are discussed. Spectral effects in fields produced by two-dimensional secondary sources and by three-dimensional primary sources are then considered. The section which follows describes spectral changes that may arise when polychromatic light is scattered on media whose physical properties vary randomly either in space and/or in time. A review is also presented of recent research, which has revealed that under certain circumstances the changes in the spectrum of light scattered on random media may imitate the Doppler effect, even though the source, the medium and the observer are all at rest with respect to one another. In the final section a brief review is given of a new emerging technique sometimes called spatial-coherence spectroscopy. It is based on the discovery that it is possible, under certain circumstances, to determine field correlations from spectral measurements.

  18. Correlation-induced spectral changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a review of research, both theoretical and experimental, concerning the influence of coherence properties of fluctuating light sources and of correlation properties of scattering media on the spectra of radiated and scattered fields. Much of this research followed a discovery made in 1986, that the spectrum of light may change on propagation, even in free space. More than 100 papers on this topic have been published to date and many of them are reviewed, or at least mentioned, in this article. After an introduction and a summary of some of the main mathematical results relating to second-order coherence theory of statistically stationary optical fields, spectral changes that may take place on superposing fields produced by two partially correlated sources are discussed. Spectral effects in fields produced by two-dimensional secondary sources and by three-dimensional primary sources are then considered. The section which follows describes spectral changes that may arise when polychromatic light is scattered on media whose physical properties vary randomly either in space and/or in time. A review is also presented of recent research, which has revealed that under certain circumstances the changes in the spectrum of light scattered on random media may imitate the Doppler effect, even though the source, the medium and the observer are all at rest with respect to one another. In the final section a brief review is given of a new emerging technique sometimes called spatial-coherence spectroscopy. It is based on the discovery that it is possible, under certain circumstances, to determine field correlations from spectral measurements. (author)

  19. Remote application for spectral collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Shelli R.; Steele, R. J.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Firpi, Alexer H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the area of collecting field spectral data using a spectrometer, it is common to have the instrument over the material of interest. In certain instances it is beneficial to have the ability to remotely control the spectrometer. While several systems have the ability to use a form of connectivity to capture the measurement it is essential to have the ability to control the settings. Additionally, capturing reference information (metadata) about the setup, system configuration, collection, location, atmospheric conditions, and sample information is necessary for future analysis leading towards material discrimination and identification. This has the potential to lead to cumbersome field collection and a lack of necessary information for post processing and analysis. The method presented in this paper describes a capability to merge all parts of spectral collection from logging reference information to initial analysis as well as importing information into a web-hosted spectral database. This allows the simplification of collecting, processing, analyzing and storing field spectra for future analysis and comparisons. This concept is developed for field collection of thermal data using the Designs and Prototypes (D&P) Hand Portable FT-IR Spectrometer (Model 102). The remote control of the spectrometer is done with a customized Android application allowing the ability to capture reference information, process the collected data from radiance to emissivity using a temperature emissivity separation algorithm and store the data into a custom web-based service. The presented system of systems allows field collected spectra to be used for various applications by spectral analysts in the future.

  20. Chebyshev and Fourier spectral methods

    CERN Document Server

    Boyd, John P

    2001-01-01

    Completely revised text focuses on use of spectral methods to solve boundary value, eigenvalue, and time-dependent problems, but also covers Hermite, Laguerre, rational Chebyshev, sinc, and spherical harmonic functions, as well as cardinal functions, linear eigenvalue problems, matrix-solving methods, coordinate transformations, methods for unbounded intervals, spherical and cylindrical geometry, and much more. 7 Appendices. Glossary. Bibliography. Index. Over 160 text figures.

  1. Densities, Spectral Densities and Modality

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, PL Laurie; Kovac, A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of specifying a simple approximating density function for a given data set (x1,…,xn). Simplicity is measured by the number of modes but several different definitions of approximation are introduced. The taut string method is used to control the numbers of modes and to produce candidate approximating densities. Refinements are introduced that improve the local adaptivity of the procedures and the method is extended to spectral densities.

  2. Moyal Planes are Spectral Triples

    CERN Document Server

    Gayral, V; Iochum, B; Schücker, T; Varilly, J C

    2004-01-01

    Axioms for nonunital spectral triples, extending those introduced in the unital case by Connes, are proposed. As a guide, and for the sake of their importance in noncommutative quantum field theory, the spaces $\\R^{2N}$ endowed with Moyal products are intensively investigated. Some physical applications, such as the construction of noncommutative Wick monomials and the computation of the Connes--Lott functional action, are given for these noncommutative hyperplanes.

  3. Spectrally resolved fluorescent lifetime imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hanley, Quentin S.

    2008-01-01

    Placing an imaging spectrograph or related components capable of generating a spectrum between a microscope and the image intensifier of a conventional fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) system creates a spectrally resolved FLIM (SFLIM). This arrangement provides a number of opportunities not readily available to conventional systems using bandpass filters. The examples include: simultaneous viewing of multiple fluorophores; tracking of both the donor and acceptor; and observation of a rang...

  4. Next-generation 193-nm laser for sub-100-nm lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffey, Thomas P.; Blumenstock, Gerry M.; Fleurov, Vladimir B.; Pan, Xiaojiang; Newman, Peter C.; Glatzel, Holger; Watson, Tom A.; Erxmeyer, J.; Kuschnereit, Ralf; Weigl, Bernhard

    2001-09-01

    The next generation 193 nm (ArF) laser has been designed and developed for high-volume production lithography. The NanoLithTM 7000, offering 20 Watts average output power at 4 kHz repetition rates is designed to support the highest exposure tool scan speeds for maximum productivity and wafer throughput. Fundamental design changes made to the laser core technologies are described. These advancements in core technology support the delivery of highly line-narrowed light with EQ 0.35 pm FWHM and EQ 0.95 pm at 95% included energy integral, enabling high contrast imaging from exposure tools with lens NA exceeding 0.75. The system has been designed to support production lithography, meeting specifications for bandwidth, dose stability (+/- 0.3% in 20 ms window) and wavelength stability (+/- 0.05 pm average line center error in 20 ms window) across 2 - 4 kHz repetition rates. Improvements in optical materials and coatings have led to increased lifetime of optics modules. Optimization of the discharge electrode design has increased chamber lifetime. Early life-testing indicates that the NanoLithTM core technologies have the potential for 400% reduction of cost of consumables as compared to its predecessor, the ELX-5000A and has been discussed elsewhere.

  5. The JCMT Spectral Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Plume, R; Helmich, F; Van der Tak, F F S; Roberts, H; Bowey, J; Buckle, J; Butner, H; Caux, E; Ceccarelli, C; Van Dishoeck, E F; Friberg, P; Gibb, A G; Hatchell, J; Hogerheijde, M R; Matthews, H; Millar, T; Mitchell, G; Moore, T J T; Ossenkopf, V; Rawlings, J; Richer, J; Roellig, M; Schilke, P; Spaans, M; Tielens, A G G M; Thompson, M A; Viti, S; Weferling, B; White, G J; Wouterloot, J; Yates, J; Zhu, M; White, Glenn J.

    2006-01-01

    Stars form in the densest, coldest, most quiescent regions of molecular clouds. Molecules provide the only probes which can reveal the dynamics, physics, chemistry and evolution of these regions, but our understanding of the molecular inventory of sources and how this is related to their physical state and evolution is rudimentary and incomplete. The Spectral Legacy Survey (SLS) is one of seven surveys recently approved by the JCMT Board. Starting in 2007, the SLS will produce a spectral imaging survey of the content and distribution of all the molecules detected in the 345 GHz atmospheric window (between 332 GHz and 373 GHz) towards a sample of 5 sources. Our intended targets are: a low mass core (NGC1333 IRAS4), 3 high mass cores spanning a range of star forming environments and evolutionary states (W49, AFGL2591, and IRAS20126), and a PDR (the Orion Bar). The SLS will use the unique spectral imaging capabilities of HARP-B/ACSIS to study the molecular inventory and the physical structure of these objects, w...

  6. Unitary groups and spectral sets

    CERN Document Server

    Dutkay, Dorin Ervin

    2012-01-01

    We study spectral theory for bounded Borel subsets of $\\br$ and in particular finite unions of intervals. For Hilbert space, we take $L^2$ of the union of the intervals. This yields a boundary value problem arising from the minimal operator $\\Ds = \\frac1{2\\pi i}\\frac{d}{dx}$ with domain consisting of $C^\\infty$ functions vanishing at the endpoints. We offer a detailed interplay between geometric configurations of unions of intervals and a spectral theory for the corresponding selfadjoint extensions of $\\Ds$ and for the associated unitary groups of local translations. While motivated by scattering theory and quantum graphs, our present focus is on the Fuglede-spectral pair problem. Stated more generally, this problem asks for a determination of those bounded Borel sets $\\Omega$ in $\\br^k$ such that $L^2(\\Omega)$ has an orthogonal basis of Fourier frequencies (spectrum), i.e., a total set of orthogonal complex exponentials restricted to $\\Omega$. In the general case, we characterize Borel sets $\\Omega$ having t...

  7. Tailoring 10 nm scale suspended graphene junctions and quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayari, Vahid; McRae, Andrew C; Yiğen, Serap; Island, Joshua O; Porter, James M; Champagne, Alexandre R

    2015-01-14

    The possibility to make 10 nm scale, and low-disorder, suspended graphene devices would open up many possibilities to study and make use of strongly coupled quantum electronics, quantum mechanics, and optics. We present a versatile method, based on the electromigration of gold-on-graphene bow-tie bridges, to fabricate low-disorder suspended graphene junctions and quantum dots with lengths ranging from 6 nm up to 55 nm. We control the length of the junctions, and shape of their gold contacts by adjusting the power at which the electromigration process is allowed to avalanche. Using carefully engineered gold contacts and a nonuniform downward electrostatic force, we can controllably tear the width of suspended graphene channels from over 100 nm down to 27 nm. We demonstrate that this lateral confinement creates high-quality suspended quantum dots. This fabrication method could be extended to other two-dimensional materials. PMID:25490053

  8. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Good

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300−2500 nm at incidence angles 15–60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0–60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350–1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article “Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators” in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells.

  9. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300-2500 nm at incidence angles 15-60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0-60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350-1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article "Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators" in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells.

  10. Spectral variability of deciduous leaves depending on the developmental stages and tree condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y.; Ryu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Foliar spectral characteristics could be the key information in modeling forest ecosystem and the remote sensing of vegetation identification. But it is not easy to determine a typical leaf spectrum of a species in a standardized state. That is because of variables critically influencing on the spectral property of leaves, such as inter- and intra-species features, phenological phase, or biotic and abiotic stress. In this study, we attempted to quantify the spectral variability of leaves depending on species, developmental stages, and the condition of trees. The contribution of these factors to the spectral variation was analyzed at the single leaf level, with a large number of samples from deciduous plants in the urban forested area. First, we collected tens of leaf-samples at every biweekly fieldwork in the growing season, for the selected 5 tree species popular in urban parks; Acer palmatum, Carpinus laxiflora, Prunus yedoensis, Quercus acutissima, and Zelkova serrata. And absorbance, reflectance and transmittance spectra of the leaves were acquired at the short-visible (400-700 nm) to infrared (700-2500 nm) spectral region with 1 nm interval. Seasonality in these leaf-spectra was used to understand the inter-species variation depending on developmental stages. Second, as a benchmark for testing intra-species variability and differences by tree condition, we additionally analyzed the spectral reflectance of 504 ripe leaves from 56 cherry trees (Cerasus × yedoensis) collected in the middle of summer. Last, using ANOVA (analysis of variance) and general linear model, we assessed the influence of our tested variables (i.e., species, developmental stage, and tree condition) on the spectral characteristics and their vegetation indices. As a result, we clarified that the changes in leaf-spectra was apparent across all the tested species during the growing season from May to June, indicating the increasing trend of absorbance in photosynthetically active radiation

  11. On the concept of spectral singularities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gusein Sh Guseinov

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss the concept of spectral singularities for non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. We exihibit spectral singularities of some well-known concrete Hamiltonians with complex-valued coefficients.

  12. Global and local aspects of spectral actions

    CERN Document Server

    Iochum, Bruno; Vassilevich, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    The principal object in noncommutatve geometry is the spectral triple consisting of an algebra A, a Hilbert space H, and a Dirac operator D. Field theories are incorporated in this approach by the spectral action principle, that sets the field theory action to Tr f(D^2/\\Lambda^2), where f is a real function such that the trace exists, and \\Lambda is a cutoff scale. In the low-energy (weak-field) limit the spectral action reproduces reasonably well the known physics including the standard model. However, not much is known about the spectral action beyond the low-energy approximation. In this paper, after an extensive introduction to spectral triples and spectral actions, we study various expansions of the spectral actions (exemplified by the heat kernel). We derive the convergence criteria. For a commutative spectral triple, we compute the heat kernel on the torus up the second order in gauge connection and consider limiting cases.

  13. Ultrafast CARS with Improved Spectral Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lochbrunner S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular vibrations are investigated by time and frequency resolved CARS applying ultrafast excitation and picosecond probing for high spectral resolution. Enhanced spectral structure and beating phenomena are demonstrated for coalescing Raman bands.

  14. Nonsquare Spectral Factorization for Nonlinear Control Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersen, Mark A.; Schaft, Arjan J. van der

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers nonsquare spectral factorization of nonlinear input affine state space systems in continuous time. More specifically, we obtain a parametrization of nonsquare spectral factors in terms of invariant Lagrangian submanifolds and associated solutions of Hamilton–Jacobi inequalities.

  15. Spectral efficiency analysis of OCDMA systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Yan; Kun Qiu; Yun Ling

    2009-01-01

    We discuss several kinds of code schemes and analyze their spectral efficiency, code utilizing efficiency, and the maximal spectral efficiency. Error correction coding is used to increase the spectral efficiency, and it can avoid the spectral decrease with the increase of the length. The extended primer code (EPC) has the highest spectral efficiency in the unipolar code system. The bipolar code system has larger spectral efficiency than unipolar code system, but has lower code utilizing efficiency and the maximal spectral efficiency. From the numerical results, we can see that the spectral efficiency increases by 0.025 (b/s)/Hz when the bit error rate (BER) increases from 10-9 to 10-7.

  16. Electronic transitions of jet-cooled SiC2, Si2Cn (n=1-3), Si3Cn (n=1,2), and SiC6H4 between 250 and 710 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Steglich, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Electronic transitions of the title molecules were measured between 250 and 710 nm using a mass-resolved 1+1' resonant two-photon ionization technique at a resolution of 0.1 nm. Calculations at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVQZ level of theory support the analyses. Because of their spectral properties, SiC$_2$, linear Si$_2$C$_2$, Si$_3$C, and SiC$_6$H$_4$ are interesting target species for astronomical searches in the visible spectral region. Of special relevance is the Si--C$_2$--Si chain, which features a prominent band at 516.4 nm of a strong transition ($f=0.25$). This band and one from SiC$_6$H$_4$ at 445.3 nm were also investigated at higher resolution (0.002 nm).

  17. Correlating Species and Spectral Diversity using Remote Sensing in Successional Fields in Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneece, I.; Epstein, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Conserving biodiversity can help preserve ecosystem properties and function. As the increasing prevalence of invasive plant species threatens biodiversity, advances in remote sensing technology can help monitor invasive species and their effects on ecosystems and plant communities. To assess whether we could study the effects of invasive species on biodiversity using remote sensing, we asked whether species diversity was positively correlated with spectral diversity, and whether correlations differed among spectral regions along the visible and near-infrared range. To answer these questions, we established community plots in secondary successional fields at the Blandy Experimental Farm in northern Virginia and collected vegetation surveys and ground-level hyperspectral data from 350 to 1025 nm wavelengths. Pearson correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation between spectral diversity and species diversity in the visible ranges of 350-499 nm (Pearson correlation=0.69, p=0.01), 500-589 nm (Pearson=0.64, p=0.03), and 590-674 nm (Pearson=0.70, p=0.01), slight positive correlation in the red edge range of 675-754 nm (Pearson=0.56, p=0.06), and no correlation in the near-infrared ranges of 755-924 nm (Pearson=-0.06, p=0.85) and 925-1025 nm (Pearson=0.30, p=0.34). These differences in correlations across spectral regions may be due to the elements that contribute to signatures in those regions and spectral data transformation methods. To investigate the role of pigment variability in these correlations, we estimated chlorophyll, carotenoid, and anthocyanin concentrations of five dominant species in the plots using vegetation indices. Although interspecific variability in pigment levels exceeded intraspecific variability, chlorophyll (F value=118) was more varied within species than carotenoids (F=322) and anthocyanins (F=126), perhaps contributing to the lack of correlation between species diversity and spectral diversity in the red edge region. Interspecific

  18. Visible spectral imager for occultation and nightglow (VISION) for the PICASSO Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, Heikki; Näsilä, Antti; Holmlund, Christer; Mannila, Rami; Näkki, Ismo; Ojanen, Harri J.; Fussen, Didier; Pieroux, Didier; Demoulin, Philippe; Dekemper, Emmanuel; Vanhellemont, Filip

    2015-10-01

    PICASSO - A PICo-satellite for Atmospheric and Space Science Observations is an ESA project led by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, in collaboration with VTT, Clyde Space Ltd. (UK), and the Centre Spatial de Liège (BE). VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd. will deliver the Visible Spectral Imager for Occultation and Nightglow (VISION) for the PICASSO mission. The VISION targets primarily the observation of the Earth's atmospheric limb during orbital Sun occultation. By assessing the radiation absorption in the Chappuis band for different tangent altitudes, the vertical profile of the ozone is retrieved. A secondary objective is to measure the deformation of the solar disk so that stratospheric and mesospheric temperature profiles are retrieved by inversion of the refractive raytracing problem. Finally, occasional full spectral observations of polar auroras are also foreseen. The VISION design realized with commercial of the shelf (CoTS) parts is described. The VISION instrument is small, lightweight (~500 g), Piezo-actuated Fabry-Perot Interferometer (PFPI) tunable spectral imager operating in the visible and near-infrared (430 - 800 nm). The spectral resolution over the whole wavelength range will be better than 10 nm @ FWHM. VISION has is 2.5° x 2.5° total field of view and it delivers maximum 2048 x 2048 pixel spectral images. The sun image size is around 0.5° i.e. ~500 pixels. To enable fast spectral data image acquisition VISION can be operated with programmable image sizes. VTT has previously developed PFPI tunable filter based AaSI Spectral Imager for the Aalto-1 Finnish CubeSat. In VISION the requirements of the spectral resolution and stability are tighter than in AaSI. Therefore the optimization of the of the PFPI gap control loop for the operating temperature range and vacuum conditions has to be improved. VISION optical, mechanical and electrical design is described.

  19. Spectral averaging techniques for Jacobi matrices

    CERN Document Server

    del Rio, Rafael; Schulz-Baldes, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    Spectral averaging techniques for one-dimensional discrete Schroedinger operators are revisited and extended. In particular, simultaneous averaging over several parameters is discussed. Special focus is put on proving lower bounds on the density of the averaged spectral measures. These Wegner type estimates are used to analyze stability properties for the spectral types of Jacobi matrices under local perturbations.

  20. Radio-astro-tools and spectral cube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Adam

    2016-03-01

    SpectralCube is a toolkit for efficiently handling and performing simple analysis of spectral data cubes. It was designed for use with ALMA and JVLA data, but is readily and easily applicable to other data cubes including optical and infrared IFUs. This 5-minute "lightning talk" gives a brief overview and update of spectral_cube & the radio-astro-tools packages.

  1. Calibration with near-continuous spectral measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Rasmussen, Michael; Madsen, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    In chemometrics traditional calibration in case of spectral measurements express a quantity of interest (e.g. a concentration) as a linear combination of the spectral measurements at a number of wavelengths. Often the spectral measurements are performed at a large number of wavelengths and in thi...

  2. On the photochemistry of IONO2: absorption cross section (240-370 nm) and photolysis product yields at 248 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, D M; Ashworth, S H; Plane, J M C

    2007-11-01

    The absolute absorption cross section of IONO(2) was measured by the pulsed photolysis at 193 nm of a NO(2)/CF(3)I mixture, followed by time-resolved Fourier transform spectroscopy in the near-UV. The resulting cross section at a temperature of 296 K over the wavelength range from 240 to 370 nm is given by log(10)(sigma(IONO(2))/cm(2) molecule(-1)) = 170.4 - 3.773 lambda + 2.965 x 10(-2)lambda(2)- 1.139 x 10(-4)lambda(3) + 2.144 x 10(-7)lambda(4)- 1.587 x 10(-10)lambda(5), where lambda is in nm; the cross section, with 2sigma uncertainty, ranges from (6.5 +/- 1.9) x 10(-18) cm(2) at 240 nm to (5 +/- 3) x 10(-19) cm(2) at 350 nm, and is significantly lower than a previous measurement [J. C. Mössinger, D. M. Rowley and R. A. Cox, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2002, 2, 227]. The photolysis quantum yields for IO and NO(3) production at 248 nm were measured using laser induced fluorescence of IO at 445 nm, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy of NO(3) at 662 nm, yielding phi(IO) iodine oxides, but the formation and subsequent photolysis of IONO(2) is very inefficient as an ozone-depleting cycle.

  3. A continuous wave 10 W cryogenic fiber amplifier at 1015 nm and frequency quadrupling to 254 nm

    OpenAIRE

    Steinborn, R.; Koglbauer, A; Bachor, P.; Diehl, T.; Kolbe, D.; Stappel, M.; Walz, J

    2013-01-01

    A stable, continuous wave, single frequency fiber amplifier system at 1015 nm with 10W output power is presented. It is based on a large mode double clad fiber cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature. The amplified light is frequency quadrupled to 254 nm and used for spectroscopy of the 6^1S - 6^3P transition in mercury.

  4. Spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption over the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Correia, A. L.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A. S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2011-09-01

    range of 450-880 nm. Further studies should be taken to assess the corresponding impact in the UV spectral range. The assumption that soot spectral properties represent all ambient light absorbing particles may cause a misjudgment of absorption towards the UV, especially in remote areas. Therefore, it is recommended to measure aerosol absorption at several wavelengths to accurately assess the impact of non-soot aerosols on climate and on photochemical atmospheric processes.

  5. A 1.5-W frequency doubled semiconductor disk laser tunable over 40 nm at around 745 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Esa J.; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Ranta, Sanna; Rantamäki, Antti; Saarela, Antti; Sirbu, Alexei; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Kapon, Eli; Okhotnikov, Oleg G.

    2016-03-01

    We report on a semiconductor disk laser emitting 1.5 W of output power at the wavelength of 745 nm via intracavity frequency doubling. The high power level and the medical treatments that rely on photosensitizing agents and biomarkers in the transmission window of tissue between 700 and 800 nm. The InP-based gain structure of the laser was wafer-fused with a GaAs-based bottom mirror and thermally managed with an intracavity diamond heat spreader. The structure was pumped with commercial low-cost 980 nm laser diode modules. Laser emission at 1490 nm was frequency-doubled with a bismuth borate crystal that was cut for type I critical phase matching. At the maximum output power, we achieved an optical-to-optical efficiency of 8.3% with beam quality parameter M2 below 1.5. The laser wavelength could be tuned with an intracavity birefringent plate from 720 to 764 nm.

  6. Spectral reflectance characteristics of different snow and snow-covered land surface objects and mixed spectrum fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.-H.; Zhou, Z.-M.; Wang, P.-J.; Yao, F.-M.; Yang, L.

    2011-01-01

    The field spectroradiometer was used to measure spectra of different snow and snow-covered land surface objects in Beijing area. The result showed that for a pure snow spectrum, the snow reflectance peaks appeared from visible to 800 nm band locations; there was an obvious absorption valley of snow spectrum near 1030 nm wavelength. Compared with fresh snow, the reflection peaks of the old snow and melting snow showed different degrees of decline in the ranges of 300~1300, 1700~1800 and 2200~2300 nm, the lowest was from the compacted snow and frozen ice. For the vegetation and snow mixed spectral characteristics, it was indicated that the spectral reflectance increased for the snow-covered land types(including pine leaf with snow and pine leaf on snow background), due to the influence of snow background in the range of 350~1300 nm. However, the spectrum reflectance of mixed pixel remained a vegetation spectral characteristic. In the end, based on the spectrum analysis of snow, vegetation, and mixed snow/vegetation pixels, the mixed spectral fitting equations were established, and the results showed that there was good correlation between spectral curves by simulation fitting and observed ones(correlation coefficient R2=0.9509).

  7. Fluorescence Imaging In Vivo up to 1700 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Diao, Shuo; Hong, Guosong; Antaris, Alexander L; Chang, Junlei; Wu, Justin Z; Zhang, Bo; Kuo, Calvin J; Dai, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Compared to visible and near-infrared regions below ~ 900 nm, imaging in the second near-infrared window beyond 1000 nm (NIR-II, 1000-1700 nm) is promising for deep-tissue high-resolution optical imaging in vivo owing to reduced scattering of photons traversing through tissues. Here, we succeeded fluorescence imaging in vivo in the long 1500-1700 nm (NIR-IIb) region using a novel, chemical separation enriched large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube material. Imaging in the 1500-1700 nm window resolved 3-4 um wide capillary blood vessels at ~ 3 millimeters depth through the intact body and brain of mice with the ability of blood-flow speed mapping in individual capillary vessels. Further, non-invasive single fluorophore imaging inside the tumor of a live mouse was achieved in the 1500-1700 nm window. NIR-IIb imaging can be generalized to a wide range of fluorophores emitting up to 1700 nm for a new paradigm of high performance in vivo optical imaging.

  8. Spectral images browsing using principal component analysis and set partitioning in hierarchical tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Long; Zhao, Deping

    2011-12-01

    Spectral imaging technology have been used mostly in remote sensing, but have recently been extended to new area requiring high fidelity color reproductions like telemedicine, e-commerce, etc. These spectral imaging systems are important because they offer improved color reproduction quality not only for a standard observer under a particular illuminantion, but for any other individual exhibiting normal color vision capability under another illuminantion. A possibility for browsing of the archives is needed. In this paper, the authors present a new spectral image browsing architecture. The architecture for browsing is expressed as follow: (1) The spectral domain of the spectral image is reduced with the PCA transform. As a result of the PCA transform the eigenvectors and the eigenimages are obtained. (2) We quantize the eigenimages with the original bit depth of spectral image (e.g. if spectral image is originally 8bit, then quantize eigenimage to 8bit), and use 32bit floating numbers for the eigenvectors. (3) The first eigenimage is lossless compressed by JPEG-LS, the other eigenimages were lossy compressed by wavelet based SPIHT algorithm. For experimental evalution, the following measures were used. We used PSNR as the measurement for spectral accuracy. And for the evaluation of color reproducibility, ΔE was used.here standard D65 was used as a light source. To test the proposed method, we used FOREST and CORAL spectral image databases contrain 12 and 10 spectral images, respectively. The images were acquired in the range of 403-696nm. The size of the images were 128*128, the number of bands was 40 and the resolution was 8 bits per sample. Our experiments show the proposed compression method is suitable for browsing, i.e., for visual purpose.

  9. Efficient 800nm upconversion luminescence emission in 1.319μm excited thulium-doped fluorogermanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia-Neto, A. S.; Vermelho, M. V. D.; Jacinto, C.; Gouveia, E. A.; Bueno, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Generation of near-infrared light within the first biological optical window via frequency upconversion in Tm3+-doped PbGeO3-PbF2-CdF2 glass excited within the second biological window at 1.319 μm is reported. The upconversion emission at 800 nm is the sole light signal observed in the entire UV-VIS-NIR spectral region making possible obtaining high contrast imaging. The dependence of the 800 nm signal upon the sample temperature was investigated and results showed an increase by a factor of x2.5 in the 30°C - 280°C range. Generation of detectable 690 nm for temperatures above 100°C in addition to the intense 800 nm main signal was also observed. The proposed excitation mechanism for the 800 nm thulium emitting level is assigned to a multiphonon-assisted excitation from the ground-state 3H6 to the 3H5 excited-state level, a rapid relaxation to the 3F4 level and followed by an excited-state absorption of the pump photons mediated by multiphonons connecting the 3F4 level to the 3H4 emitting level.

  10. 1.319 μm excited intense 800 nm frequency upconversion emission in Tm3+-doped fluorogermanate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia-Neto, A. S.; Vermelho, M. V. D.; Gouveia, E. A.; Bueno, L. A.; Jacinto, C.

    2015-11-01

    Generation of near-infrared light within the first biological optical window via frequency upconversion in Tm3+-doped PbGeO3-PbF2-CdF2 glass excited within the second biological window at 1.319 μm is reported. The upconversion emission at 800 nm is the sole light signal observed in the entire ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectral region making it possible obtaining high contrast imaging. The dependence of the 800 nm signal upon the sample temperature was investigated and results showed an increase by a factor of ×2.5 in the 30-280 °C range. Generation of detectable 690 nm for temperatures above 100 °C in addition to the intense 800 nm main signal was also observed. The proposed excitation mechanism for the 800 nm thulium emitting level is assigned to a multiphonon-assisted excitation from the ground-state 3H6 to the 3H5 excited-state level, a rapid relaxation to the 3F4 level and followed by an excited-state absorption of the pump photons mediated by multiphonons connecting the 3F4 level to the 3H4 emitting level.

  11. Onset of surface stimulated emission at 260 nm from AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaohang, E-mail: xiaohang.li@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: dupuis@gatech.edu [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955 (Saudi Arabia); Xie, Hongen; Ponce, Fernando A. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Ryou, Jae-Hyun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, and Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH), University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D., E-mail: xiaohang.li@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: dupuis@gatech.edu [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    We demonstrated onset of deep-ultraviolet (DUV) surface stimulated emission (SE) from c-plane AlGaN multiple-quantum well (MQW) heterostructures grown on a sapphire substrate by optical pumping at room temperature. The onset of SE became observable at a pumping power density of 630 kW/cm{sup 2}. Spectral deconvolution revealed superposition of a linearly amplified spontaneous emission peak at λ ∼ 257.0 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ∼12 nm and a superlinearly amplified SE peak at λ ∼ 260 nm with a narrow FWHM of less than 2 nm. In particular, the wavelength of ∼260 nm is the shortest wavelength of surface SE from III-nitride MQW heterostructures to date. Atomic force microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements were employed to investigate the material and structural quality of the AlGaN heterostructures, showing smooth surface and sharp layer interfaces. This study offers promising results for AlGaN heterostructures grown on sapphire substrates for the development of DUV vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs)

  12. Onset of surface stimulated emission at 260 nm from AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Xiaohang

    2015-12-14

    We demonstrated onset of deep-ultraviolet (DUV) surface stimulated emission (SE) from c-plane AlGaNmultiple-quantum well(MQW)heterostructuresgrown on a sapphire substrate by optical pumping at room temperature. The onset of SE became observable at a pumping power density of 630 kW/cm2. Spectral deconvolution revealed superposition of a linearly amplified spontaneous emission peak at λ ∼ 257.0 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ∼12 nm and a superlinearly amplified SE peak at λ ∼ 260 nm with a narrow FWHM of less than 2 nm. In particular, the wavelength of ∼260 nm is the shortest wavelength of surface SE from III-nitride MQWheterostructures to date. Atomic force microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements were employed to investigate the material and structural quality of the AlGaNheterostructures, showing smooth surface and sharp layer interfaces. This study offers promising results for AlGaNheterostructuresgrown on sapphire substrates for the development of DUV vertical cavity surface emitting lasers(VCSELs).

  13. Onset of surface stimulated emission at 260 nm from AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrated onset of deep-ultraviolet (DUV) surface stimulated emission (SE) from c-plane AlGaN multiple-quantum well (MQW) heterostructures grown on a sapphire substrate by optical pumping at room temperature. The onset of SE became observable at a pumping power density of 630 kW/cm2. Spectral deconvolution revealed superposition of a linearly amplified spontaneous emission peak at λ ∼ 257.0 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ∼12 nm and a superlinearly amplified SE peak at λ ∼ 260 nm with a narrow FWHM of less than 2 nm. In particular, the wavelength of ∼260 nm is the shortest wavelength of surface SE from III-nitride MQW heterostructures to date. Atomic force microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements were employed to investigate the material and structural quality of the AlGaN heterostructures, showing smooth surface and sharp layer interfaces. This study offers promising results for AlGaN heterostructures grown on sapphire substrates for the development of DUV vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs)

  14. Designing to win in sub-90nm mask production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan

    2005-11-01

    An informal survey conducted with key customers by Photronics indicates that the time gap between technology nodes has accelerated in recent years. Previously the cycle was three years. However, between 130nm and 90nm there was less than a 2 year gap, and between 90nm and 65nm a 1.5 year gap exists. As a result, the technical challenges have increased substantially. In addition, mask costs are rising exponentially due to high capital equipment cost, a shrinking customer base, long write times and increased applications of 193nm EAPSM or AAPSM. Collaboration among EDA companies, mask houses and wafer manufacturers is now more important than ever. This paper will explore avenues for reducing mask costs, mainly in the areas of: write-time reduction through design for manufacturing (DFM), and yield improvement through specification relaxation. Our study conducted through layout vertex modeling suggests that a simple design shape such as a square versus a circle or an angled structure helps reduce shot count and write time. Shot count reduction through mask layout optimization, and advancement in new generation E-beam writers can reduce write time up to 65%. An advanced laser writer can produce those less critical E-beam layers in less than half the time of an e-beam writer. Additionally, the emerging imprint lithography brings new life and new challenges to the photomask industry with applications in many fields outside of the semiconductor industry. As immersion lithography is introduced for 45nm device production, polarization and MEEF effects due to the mask will become severe. Larger magnification not only provides benefits on CD control and MEEF, but also extends the life time of current 90nm/65nm tool sets where 45nm mask sets can be produced at a lower cost.

  15. Design of a miniaturized integrated spectrometer for spectral tissue sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belay, Gebirie Yizengaw; Hoving, Willem; Ottevaere, Heidi; van der Put, Arthur; Weltjens, Wim; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    Minimally-invasive image-guided procedures become increasingly used by physicians to obtain real-time characterization feedback from the tissue at the tip of their interventional device (needle, catheter, endoscopic or laparoscopic probes, etc…) which can significantly improve the outcome of diagnosis and treatment, and ultimately reduce cost of the medical treatment. Spectral tissue sensing using compact photonic probes has the potential to be a valuable tool for screening and diagnostic purposes, e.g. for discriminating between healthy and tumorous tissue. However, this technique requires a low-cost broadband miniature spectrometer so that it is commercially viable for screening at point-of-care locations such as physicians' offices and outpatient centers. Our goal is therefore to develop a miniaturized spectrometer based on diffractive optics that combines the functionalities of a visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) and shortwave-infrared (SWIR) spectrometer in one very compact housing. A second goal is that the hardware can be produced in high volume at low cost without expensive time consuming alignment and calibration steps. We have designed a miniaturized spectrometer which operates both in the visible/near-infrared and shortwave-infrared wavelength regions ranging from 400 nm to 1700 nm. The visible/near-infrared part of the spectrometer is designed for wavelengths from 400 nm to 800 nm whereas the shortwave-infrared segment ranges from 850 nm to 1700 nm. The spectrometer has a resolution of 6 nm in the visible/near-infrared wavelength region and 10 nm in the shortwave-infrared. The minimum SNR of the spectrometer for the intended application is about 151 in the VIS/NIR range and 6000 for SWIR. In this paper, the modelling and design, and power budget analysis of the miniaturized spectrometer are presented. Our work opens a door for future affordable micro- spectrometers which can be integrated with smartphones and tablets, and used for point

  16. Hyper-Spectral Imager in visible and near-infrared band for lunar compositional mapping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A S Kiran Kumar; A Roy Chowdhury

    2005-12-01

    India ’s first lunar mission,Chandrayaan-1,will have a Hyper-Spectral Imager in the visible and near-infrared spectral bands along with other instruments.The instrument will enable mineralogical mapping of the Moon ’s crust in a large number of spectral channels.The planned Hyper-Spectral Imager will be the first instrument to map the lunar surface with the capability of resolving the spectral region,0.4 to 0.92 m in 64 continuous bands with a resolution of better than 15 nm and a spatial resolution of 80 m.Spectral separation will be done using a wedge filter and the image will be mapped onto an area detector.The detector output will be processed in the front-end processor to generate the 64-band data with 12-bit quantization.This paper gives a description of the Hyper-Spectral Imager instrument.

  17. Dynamic spectral characteristics measurement of DFB interband cascade laser under injection current tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhenhui; Luo, Gang; An, Ying; Li, Jinyi

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic spectral properties of semiconductor lasers during its tuning are very important for frequency modulation-based applications. The spectral properties of a distributed feedback (DFB) interband cascade laser (ICL) under injection current tuning (i.e., slope efficiency, dynamic tuning rate, and instantaneous linewidth) were measured by using short delayed self-heterodyne interferometry combined with time-frequency analysis of the interferometric signal. The relations of these spectral characteristics with the injection current, tuning frequency, and operating temperature of the laser were investigated as well. The dynamic tuning rate of the laser varies from 0.07 nm/mA to 0.16 nm/mA depending on the injection current and tuning frequency, which is considerably below the static tuning rate 0.20 nm/mA. The laser instantaneous linewidth increases within 360 kHz to 760 kHz as the injection current increases or the tuning frequency increases. Unexpectedly, both the dynamic tuning rate and linewidth seem not to be related to the operating temperature of the laser. These results will be very useful for understanding the spectral properties and optimizing the frequency modulation of DFB-ICLs.

  18. The future of solar spectral irradiance in the ultraviolet with the SOLSIM double-monochromator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, Luc; Bolsee, David; Rouanet, Nicolas; Gilbert, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) in the UV, and its variability, are of prime importance to quantify the solar forcing on the climate through radiation and their interactions with the local stratosphere, noticeably through the "top-down" mechanism amplifying UV solar forcing on the climate (UV affects stratospheric dynamics and temperatures, altering interplanetary waves and weather patterns both poleward and downward to the lower stratosphere and tropopause regions). SOLSIM (Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor) is a newly designed double-monochromator instrument covering the 170 - 340 nm ultraviolet spectral range. It is an enhanced and optimized version of the previously flown SOLSPEC instrument externally mounted on the Columbus module of the International Space Station. While SOLSPEC had 3 double-monochromators to cover the UV to the IR, the SOLSIM spectrometer is covering only the UV but with an almost constant 0.65 nm spectral resolution from 170 to 340 nm. To avoid thermal issues with the instrument, a sun-synchronous polar orbit 18h-6h (for almost constant observing) is preferred to the Space Station (SOLSIM is part of the model payload of the SUITS/SWUSV proposed mission). Characteristics, performances and calibrations foreseen for this new generation SSI instrument will be presented.

  19. Spectral detection of stress-related pigments in salt-lake succulent halophytic shrubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, Victoria A.; Guerschman, Juan P.; Schweiggert, Ralf M.; Colmer, Timothy D.; Veneklaas, Erik J.

    2016-10-01

    The spectral detection of vegetation pigment concentrations has a high potential value, but it is still underdeveloped, especially for pigments other than chlorophylls. In this study, the seasonal pigment dynamics of two Tecticornia species (samphires; halophytic shrubs) from north-western Australia were correlated with spectral indices that best document the pigment changes over time. Pigment dynamics were assessed by analysing betacyanin, chlorophyll and carotenoid concentrations at plant level and by measuring reflectance at contrasting seasonal dates. Plant reflectance was used to define a new reflectance index that was most sensitive to the seasonal shifts in Tecticornia pigment concentrations. The two Tecticornia species turned from green to red-pinkish for the period March-August 2012 when betacyanins increased almost nine times in both species. Chlorophyll levels showed the opposite pattern to that of betacyanins, whereas carotenoid levels were relatively stable. Normalised difference indices correlated well with betacyanin (r = 0.805, using bands at 600 and 620 nm) and chlorophyll (r = 0.809, using bands at 737 and 726 nm). Using knowledge of chlorophyll concentrations slightly improved the ability of the spectral index to predict betacyanin concentration (r = 0.822 at bands 606 and 620 nm, in the case of chemically determined chlorophyll, r = 0.809 when using remotely sensed chlorophyll). Our results suggest that this new spectral index can reliably detect changes in betacyanin concentrations in vegetation, with potential applications in ecological studies and environmental impact monitoring.

  20. 80 nm tunable DBR-free semiconductor disk laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Albrecht, A. R.; Cederberg, J. G.; Sheik-Bahae, M.

    2016-07-01

    We report a widely tunable optically pumped distributed Bragg reflector (DBR)-free semiconductor disk laser with 6 W continuous wave output power near 1055 nm when using a 2% output coupler. Using only high reflecting mirrors, the lasing wavelength is centered at 1034 nm and can be tuned up to a record 80 nm by using a birefringent filter. We attribute such wide tunability to the unique broad effective gain bandwidth of DBR-free semiconductor disk lasers achieved by eliminating the active mirror geometry.

  1. 120 nm Bandwidth Erbium-doped Fiber Amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜淳; 曾庆济; 肖石林

    2002-01-01

    A new dual band erbium-doped fiber amplifier configuration that provides 120 nm of optical bandwidth is simulated. This configuration employs a split-band architecture in which optical signals are splitted using a 1550/1610 nm port filter into two independent sub-bands which then pass in parallel through separate branches of the optical amplifier. Each branch may be optimized for the sub-band that traverses it. The independent sub-bands are combined and flattened before output, resulting in a 120 nm bandwidth gain-flattened optical amplifier.

  2. Tapered diode laser pumped 946 nm Nd:YAG laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Haynes Pak Hay; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael;

    2009-01-01

    We successfully implemented a 946 nm Nd:YAG laser based on a 808 nm tapered diode pump laser. The tapered diode is developed at the Ferdinand-Braun-Institute fur Hochstfrequenztechnik in Germany. Figure 2 shows the experimental setup and results of each pump source coupled into a 1.5 mm crystal...... laser, we show that tapered diode laser pumping potentially increase the power of 946 nm lasers by a factor of two and reduce the threshold by a factor of three....

  3. Spectral multitude and spectral dynamics reflect changing conjugation length in single molecules of oligophenylenevinylenes

    KAUST Repository

    Kobayashi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule study of phenylenevinylene oligomers revealed distinct spectral forms due to different conjugation lengths which are determined by torsional defects. Large spectral jumps between different spectral forms were ascribed to torsional flips of a single phenylene ring. These spectral changes reflect the dynamic nature of electron delocalization in oligophenylenevinylenes and enable estimation of the phenylene torsional barriers. © 2012 The Owner Societies.

  4. Packaging of wavelength stabilized 976nm 100W 105µm 0.15 NA fiber coupled diode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaochen; Liu, Rui; Gao, Yanyan; Zhang, Tujia; He, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Thomas; Zhang, Cuipeng

    2016-03-01

    Fiber coupled diode lasers are widely used in many fields now especially as pumps in fiber laser systems. In many fiber laser applications, high brightness pumps are essential to achieve high brightness fiber lasers. Furthermore, 976nm wavelength absorption band is narrow with Yb3+ doped fiber lasers which is more challenging for controlling wavelength stabilized in diode laser modules. This study designed and implemented commercial available high brightness and narrow wavelength width lasers to be able to use in previous mentioned applications. Base on multiple single emitters using spatial and polarization beam combining as well as fiber coupling techniques, we report a wavelength stabilized, 105μm NA 0.15 fiber coupled diode laser package with 100W of optical output power at 976 nm, which are 14 emitters inside each multiple single emitter module. The emitting aperture of the combined lasers output are designed and optimized for coupling light into a 105μm core NA 0.15 fiber. Volume Bragg grating technology has been used to improve spectral characteristics of high-power diode lasers. Mechanical modular design and thermal simulation are carried out to optimize the package. The spectral width is roughly 0.5 nm (FWHM) and the wavelength shift per °C Mechanical shock, vibration and accelerated aging tests show that the package is reliability and the MTTF is calculated to be more than 100k hours at 25°C.

  5. Ca II 854.2 nm Spectromagnetograms: A Powerful Chromospheric Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J. W.; Bertello, Luca; Branston, D.; Britanik, J.; Bulau, S.; Cole, L.; Gosain, Sanjay; Harker, Brian; Jones, Harrison P.; Marble, A.; Martinez Pillet, V.; Pevtsov, A.; Schramm, K.; Streander, Kim; Villegas, H.

    2016-05-01

    The transition from physical dominance by plasma flows in the photosphere to magnetic pressure in the solar chromosphere motivates as many diagnostic observations as possible across this important region. Among the few ground-accessible spectral lines formed within the chromosphere, the Ca II 854.2 nm line has the desirable properties of presence everywhere on the solar disk, Zeeman sensitivity, and narrow line width. Mapped observations of circular polarization within this line (spectromagnetograms) have been made at NSO infrequently since 1974, with regular daily full-disk observations starting in August 1996. Full-disk spectral observations of the complete Stokes polarization vector are now being made regularly since November 2015. It is not easy to estimate chromospheric magnetic field properties from the 854.2 nm line profile polarization. To provide rough quick-look vector field maps we found that the weak-field approximation provides a fair first estimate of the line-of-sight component but appears to be too simple to interpret the transverse magnetic field from frequently asymmetric, linearly-polarized line profiles. More realistic estimates of the chromospheric vector field, short of extremely lengthy, full 3D, non-local radiative transfer inversions, are being investigated. We briefly introduce recent instrumental modifications and observational characteristics, sample observations, and results concerning the expansion of the chromospheric field with increasing height, the presence of large areas of weak, nearly horizontal fields, and field estimates in plages, sunspots, flares, filaments, and filament channels. The Stokes spectra will be freely available to the community.This work utilizes SOLIS data obtained by the NSO Integrated Synoptic Program (NISP), managed by the National Solar Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  6. [Spectral emissivity of thin films].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, D

    2001-02-01

    In this paper, the contribution of multiple reflections in thin film to the spectral emissivity of thin films of low absorption is discussed. The expression of emissivity of thin films derived here is related to the thin film thickness d and the optical constants n(lambda) and k(lambda). It is shown that in the special case d-->infinity the emissivity of thin films is equivalent to that of the bulk material. Realistic numerical and more precise general numerical results for the dependence of the emissivity on d, n(lambda) and k(lambda) are given.

  7. Spectral Properties of Schwarzschild Instantons

    CERN Document Server

    Jante, Rogelio

    2016-01-01

    We study spectral properties of the Dirac and scalar Laplace operator on the Euclidean Schwarzschild space, both twisted by a family of abelian connections with anti-self-dual curvature. We show that the zero-modes of the gauged Dirac operator, first studied by Pope, take a particularly simple form in terms of the radius of the Euclidean time orbits, and interpret them in the context of geometric models of matter. For the gauged Laplace operator, we study the spectrum of bound states numerically and observe that it can be approximated with remarkable accuracy by that of the exactly solvable gauged Laplace operator on the Euclidean Taub-NUT space.

  8. Science with CMB spectral distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Chluba, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The measurements of COBE/FIRAS have shown that the CMB spectrum is extremely close to a perfect blackbody. There are, however, a number of processes in the early Universe that should create spectral distortions at a level which is within reach of present day technology. In this talk, I will give a brief overview of recent theoretical and experimental developments, explaining why future measurements of the CMB spectrum will open up an unexplored window to early-universe and particle physics with possible non-standard surprises but also several guaranteed signals awaiting us.

  9. Spectral signatures of photosynthesis. I. Review of Earth organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Nancy Y; Siefert, Janet; Govindjee; Blankenship, Robert E

    2007-02-01

    Why do plants reflect in the green and have a "red edge" in the red, and should extrasolar photosynthesis be the same? We provide (1) a brief review of how photosynthesis works, (2) an overview of the diversity of photosynthetic organisms, their light harvesting systems, and environmental ranges, (3) a synthesis of photosynthetic surface spectral signatures, and (4) evolutionary rationales for photosynthetic surface reflectance spectra with regard to utilization of photon energy and the planetary light environment. We found the "near-infrared (NIR) end" of the red edge to trend from blue-shifted to reddest for (in order) snow algae, temperate algae, lichens, mosses, aquatic plants, and finally terrestrial vascular plants. The red edge is weak or sloping in lichens. Purple bacteria exhibit possibly a sloping edge in the NIR. More studies are needed on pigment-protein complexes, membrane composition, and measurements of bacteria before firm conclusions can be drawn about the role of the NIR reflectance. Pigment absorbance features are strongly correlated with features of atmospheric spectral transmittance: P680 in Photosystem II with the peak surface incident photon flux density at approximately 685 nm, just before an oxygen band at 687.5 nm; the NIR end of the red edge with water absorbance bands and the oxygen A-band at 761 nm; and bacteriochlorophyll reaction center wavelengths with local maxima in atmospheric and water transmittance spectra. Given the surface incident photon flux density spectrum and resonance transfer in light harvesting, we propose some rules with regard to where photosynthetic pigments will peak in absorbance: (1) the wavelength of peak incident photon flux; (2) the longest available wavelength for core antenna or reaction center pigments; and (3) the shortest wavelengths within an atmospheric window for accessory pigments. That plants absorb less green light may not be an inefficient legacy of evolutionary history, but may actually satisfy

  10. Removal of copper oxide from copper surfaces using Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 266 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Aileen; Fischer, C.; Watkins, Kenneth G.; Glasmacher, Mathias; Steen, William M.; Kheyrandish, H.; Brown, A.

    1997-08-01

    During electronic device fabrication it is necessary to remove the oxides from copper surfaces prior to soldering in order to improve the surface wetability and achieve a good quality solder joint. The usual method of achieving this is by using acids in a flux. The work reported here explores the possibility of removing these oxides by laser cleaning using the harmonics of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, a technique which could be incorporated into a industrial laser soldering process. The effect of Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation (5 - 10 ns pulses), at 1064 nm, 532 nm and 266 nm, on the oxidized surface of a copper alloy foil is studied with increasing fluence. In order to successfully compare the effect of increasing fluence at the three wavelengths each area treated was only subjected to one laser pulse. The laser treated surfaces were characterized using optical microscopy, SEM, and surface analysis performed by static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SSIMS). SSIMS and SNMS (secondary neutral mass spectrometry) with mechanical depth profilometry were used to characterize the oxide layer. The reflectivity of the oxidized plates for the three wavelengths was ascertained using a reflectivity spectrometer. Successful cleaning was achieved at all wavelengths, above certain threshold values which defined the lower end of the process operating window for single pulse operation. The threshold for the cleaning process decreased with laser wavelength. Surface melting was evident at the lowest fluences examined for all the wavelengths (< .5 J/cm2). This value is well below the lower end of the process windows of all wavelengths. Microscopic `explosive' features were found at the onset of copper oxide removal possibly resulting from ionization or a plasma induced shock waves. There was some possible evidence of mechanical effects at 1064 nm and 532 nm. Large amounts of sputtered debris was found around the 266 nm craters. A SSIMS analysis was performed on the 532 nm spots. The

  11. Language identification using spectral and prosodic features

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, K Sreenivasa; Maity, Sudhamay

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses the impact of spectral features extracted from frame level, glottal closure regions, and pitch-synchronous analysis on the performance of language identification systems. In addition to spectral features, the authors explore prosodic features such as intonation, rhythm, and stress features for discriminating the languages. They present how the proposed spectral and prosodic features capture the language specific information from two complementary aspects, showing how the development of language identification (LID) system using the combination of spectral and prosodic features will enhance the accuracy of identification as well as improve the robustness of the system. This book provides the methods to extract the spectral and prosodic features at various levels, and also suggests the appropriate models for developing robust LID systems according to specific spectral and prosodic features. Finally, the book discuss about various combinations of spectral and prosodic features, and the desire...

  12. Planck 2013 results. IX. HFI spectral response

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; North, C; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Santos, D; Savini, G; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) spectral response was determined through a series of ground based tests conducted with the HFI focal plane in a cryogenic environment prior to launch. The main goal of the spectral transmission tests was to measure the relative spectral response (including out-of-band signal rejection) of all HFI detectors. This was determined by measuring the output of a continuously scanned Fourier transform spectrometer coupled with all HFI detectors. As there is no on-board spectrometer within HFI, the ground-based spectral response experiments provide the definitive data set for the relative spectral calibration of the HFI. The spectral response of the HFI is used in Planck data analysis and component separation, this includes extraction of CO emission observed within Planck bands, dust emission, Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources, and intensity to polarization leakage. The HFI spectral response data have also been used to provide unit conversion and colour correction analysis tools. Ver...

  13. Subnanosecond spectral diffusion measurement using photon correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Sallen, Gregory; Aichele, Thomas; André, Régis; Besombes, Lucien; Bougerol, Catherine; Richard, Maxime; Tatarenko, Serge; Kheng, Kuntheak; Poizat, Jean-Philippe; 10.1038/nphoton.2010.174

    2012-01-01

    Spectral diffusion is a result of random spectral jumps of a narrow line as a result of a fluctuating environment. It is an important issue in spectroscopy, because the observed spectral broadening prevents access to the intrinsic line properties. However, its characteristic parameters provide local information on the environment of a light emitter embedded in a solid matrix, or moving within a fluid, leading to numerous applications in physics and biology. We present a new experimental technique for measuring spectral diffusion based on photon correlations within a spectral line. Autocorrelation on half of the line and cross-correlation between the two halves give a quantitative value of the spectral diffusion time, with a resolution only limited by the correlation set-up. We have measured spectral diffusion of the photoluminescence of a single light emitter with a time resolution of 90 ps, exceeding by four orders of magnitude the best resolution reported to date.

  14. Quantifying solar spectral irradiance in aquatic habitats for the assessment of photoenhanced toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, M.G.; Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.; Diamond, S.

    2000-01-01

    The spectra and intensity of solar radiation (solar spectral irradiance [SSI]) was quantified in selected aquatic habitats in the vicinity of an oil field on the California coast. Solar spectral irradiance measurements consisted of spectral scans (280-700 rim) and radiometric measurements of ultraviolet (UV): UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). Solar spectral irradiance measurements were taken at the surface and at various depths in two marsh ponds, a shallow wetland, an estuary lagoon, and the intertidal area of a high-energy sandy beach. Daily fluctuation in SSI showed a general parabolic relationship with time; maximum structure-activity relationship (SAR) was observed at approximate solar noon. Solar spectral irradiance measurements taken at 10-cm depth at approximate solar noon in multiple aquatic habitats exhibited only a twofold variation in visible light and UVA and a 4.5-fold variation in UVB. Visible light ranged from 11,000 to 19,000 ??W/cm2, UVA ranged from 460 to 1,100 ??W/cm2, and UVB ranged from 8.4 to 38 ??W/cm2. In each habitat, the attenuation of light intensity with increasing water depth was differentially affected over specific wavelengths of SSI. The study results allowed the development of environmentally realistic light regimes necessary for photoenhanced toxicity studies.

  15. Spectral behavior of some modal soil profiles from São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alexandre Melo Demattê

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing has a high potential for environmental evaluation. However, a necessity exists for a better understanding of the relations between the soil attributes and spectral data. The objective of this work was to analyze the spectral behavior of some soil profiles from the region of Piracicaba, São Paulo State, using a laboratory spectroradiometer (400 to 2500 nm. The relations between the reflected electromagnetic energy and the soil physical, chemical and mineralogical attributes were analyzed, verifying the spectral variations of soil samples in depth along the profiles with their classification and discrimination. Sandy soil reflected more, presenting a spectral curve with an ascendant form, opposite to clayey soils. The 1900 nm band discriminated soil with 2:1 mineralogy from the 1:1 and oxidic soils. It was possible to detect the presence of kaolinite, gibbsite, hematite and goethite in the soils through the descriptive aspects of curves, absorption features and reflectance intensity. A relation exists between the weathering stage and spectral data. The evaluation of the superficial and subsuperficial horizon samples allowed characterizing and discriminating the analytical variability of the profile, helping to soil distinguishing and classification.

  16. Using Single-Scattering Albedo Spectral Curvature to Characterize East Asian Aerosol Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral dependence of aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) has been used to infer aerosol composition. In particular, aerosol mixtures dominated by dust absorption will have monotonically increasing SSA with wavelength while that dominated by black carbon absorption has monotonically decreasing SSA spectra. However, by analyzing SSA measured at four wavelengths, 440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm from the Aerosol Robotic Network data set, we find that the SSA spectra over East Asia are frequently peaked at 675 nm. In these cases, we suggest that SSA spectral curvature, defined as the negative of the second derivative of SSA as a function of wavelength, can provide additional information on the composition of these aerosol mixtures. Aerosol SSA spectral curvatures for East Asia during fall and winter are considerably larger than those found in places primarily dominated by biomass burning or dust aerosols. SSA curvature is found to increase as the SSA magnitude decreases. The curvature increases with coarse mode fraction (CMF) to a CMF value of about 0.4, then slightly decreases or remains constant at larger CMF. Mie calculations further verify that the strongest SSA curvature occurs at approx. 40% dust fraction, with 10% scattering aerosol fraction. The nonmonotonic SSA spectral dependence is likely associated with enhanced absorption in the shortwave by dust, absorption by black carbon at longer wavelengths, and also the flattened absorption optical depth spectral dependence due to the increased particle size.

  17. On 308 nm photofragmentation of the silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badr, Y. [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Science, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Wahed, M.G. Abd El [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig (Egypt); Mahmoud, M.A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig (Egypt)]. E-mail: mahmoudchem@yahoo.com

    2006-12-30

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were prepared by different chemical methods possessing different sizes 3 {+-} 2, 8 {+-} 2, and 20 {+-} 5 nm. The influence the size of Ag NPs was demonstrated by the absorption and fluorescence spectra, the maximum absorption of Ag NPs increases as the particle size increases. When Ag NPs irradiated with 308 nm excimer laser; the maximum absorption and the full width at half maximum decreased as the number of pulses increased up to 100,000 pulse; due to the size reduction. The fluorescence spectra of Ag NPs and irradiated Ag NPs with 308 nm excimer laser were recorded after excitation at 441.5 nm He-Cd laser, showing a red shift increasing as the particle size is increased.

  18. Space-Qualified 1064 nm Seed and Metrology Laser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A space-qualified, single-frequency oscillator operating at 1064 nm is a critical component for a number of active optical measurement systems that have been...

  19. Benchmarking of 50 nm features in thermal nanoimprint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gourgon, C.; Chaix, N.; Schift, H.;

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this benchmarking is to establish a comparison of several tools and processes used in thermal NIL with Si stamps at the nanoscale among the authors' laboratories. The Si stamps have large arrays of 50 nm dense lines and were imprinted in all these laboratories in a similar to 100...... nm thick mr-18010E film. Other materials, such as mr-17010E, were also tested. Good patterns were obtained and some limitations were identified. Reducing the pressure to 15 bars enables the printing of 50 nm structures without pulling them off. At higher pressures, some bending effects resulting...... in pattern deformation were observed. It was proven that a pressure of 1.5 bars is sufficient to imprint perfect 50 nm lines. The influence of the antiadhesive layer and mold design has been characterized by the demonstration of pulled off lines in some cases. Moreover, it has been shown...

  20. Compact 2050 nm Semiconductor Diode Laser Master Oscillator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I effort seeks to develop DFB laser master oscillators at the novel wavelength of 12050 nm. Two prototypes will be built, tested, and delivered ....

  1. Hyper-spectral characteristics and classiifcation of farmland soil in northeast of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yan-li; BAI You-lu; YANG Li-ping; WANG Lei; WANG Yi-lun; NI Lu; ZHOU Li-ping

    2015-01-01

    The physical and chemical heterogeneities of soils make the soil spectral different and complicated, and it is valuable to increase the accuracy of prediction models for soil organic matter (SOM) based on pre-classiifcation. This experiment was conducted under a controlable environment, and different soil samples from northeast of China were measured using ASD2500 hyperspectral instrument. The results showed that there are different relfectances in different soil types. There are statisticaly signiifcant correlation between SOM and relfectence at 0.05 and 0.01 levels in 550–850 nm, and al soil types get signiifcant at 0.01 level in 650–750 nm. The results indicated that soil types of the northeast can be divided into three categories: The ifrst category shows relatively lfat and low relfectance in the entire band; the second shows that the spectral relfectance curve raises fastest in 460–610 nm band, the sharp increase in the slope, but uneven slope changes; the third category slowly uplifts in the visible band, and its slope in the visible band is obviously higher than the ifrst category. Except for the classiifcation by curve shapes of relfectance, principal component analysis is one more effective method to classify soil types. The ifrst principal component includes 62.13–97.19% of spectral information and it mainly relates to the information in 560–600, 630–690 and 690–760 nm. The second mainly represents spectral information in 1640–1740, 2050–2120 and 2200–2300 nm. The samples with high OM are often in the left, and the others with low OM are in the right of the scatter plot (the ifrst principal component is the horizontal axis and the second is the longitudinal axis). Soil types in northeast of China can be classiifed effectively by those two principles; it is also a valuable reference to other soil in other areas.

  2. Highly Stable PM Raman Fiber Laser at 1680 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Liu, Xiaomin; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate thermal stabilization of a Raman fiber laser. At 1680 nm the laser emission exceeds 500 mW with a power variation below 0.5 %, both linewidth and wavelength variations are under 1 pm.......We demonstrate thermal stabilization of a Raman fiber laser. At 1680 nm the laser emission exceeds 500 mW with a power variation below 0.5 %, both linewidth and wavelength variations are under 1 pm....

  3. Cascaded Soliton Compression of Energetic Femtosecond Pulses at 1030 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Zhou, Binbin

    2012-01-01

    We discuss soliton compression with cascaded second-harmonic generation of energetic femtosecond pulses at 1030 nm. We discuss problems encountered with soliton compression of long pulses and show that sub-10 fs compressed pulses can be achieved.......We discuss soliton compression with cascaded second-harmonic generation of energetic femtosecond pulses at 1030 nm. We discuss problems encountered with soliton compression of long pulses and show that sub-10 fs compressed pulses can be achieved....

  4. 1060-nm Tunable Monolithic High Index Contrast Subwavelength Grating VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Chung, Il-Sug; Semenova, Elizaveta;

    2013-01-01

    We present the first tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) where the top distributed Bragg reflector has been completely substituted by an air-cladded high-index-contrast subwavelength grating (HCG) mirror. In this way, an extended cavity design can be realized by reducing the re...... efficiency. The HCG VCSEL shows a total tuning range of 16 nm around an emission wavelength of 1060 nm with 1-mW output power....

  5. Synchronously pumped femtosecond optical parametric oscillator at 1053 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A femtosecond optical parametric oscillator synchronously pumped by a Ti:Sapphire oscillator is reported.By the cavity length tuning,the signal wavelength is continuously tuned from 1000 to 1200 nm.The average output power of 32 mW is obtained at 1053 nm.The pulse width is measured to be 342 fs by intensity autocorrelation method.In addition,we observed bichromatic emission during the cavity length tuning process.

  6. Synchronously pumped femtosecond optical parametric oscillator at 1053 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Xin; ZHU JiangFeng; ZHOU BinBin; WEI ZhiYi

    2009-01-01

    A femtosecond optical parametric oscillator synchronously pumped by a Ti:Sapphire oscillator is re-ported. By the cavity length tuning, the signal wavelength is continuously tuned from 1000 to 1200 nm. The average output power of 32 mW is obtained at 1053 nm. The pulse width is measured to be 342 fs by intensity autocorrelation method. In addition, we observed bichromatic emission during the cavity length tuning process.

  7. Diode-pumped 1123-nm Nd:YAG laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoping Guo(郭晓萍); Meng Chen(陈檬); Gang Li(李港); Bingyuan zhang(张炳元); Jiandong Yang(杨建东); Zhigang Zhang(张志刚); Yonggang Wang(王勇刚)

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrated a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser with a plano-concave resonator. When the pump power is 1.57 W, the output power of 1123-nm laser is 132 mW at the temperature of 20 ℃, and the power change is less than 2% in an hour. A periodically poled LiNbOa (PPLN) was used as outer cavity frequency-doubling crystal and 561-nm laser was observed.

  8. EST Table: NM_001126235 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001126235 Tra2 10/09/29 76 %/156 aa ref|NP_001119705.1| transformer 2 isoform A ...[Bombyx mori] gb|AAT42220.2| transformer-2 protein A [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 65 %/101 aa FBpp0236157|Dvira2-P...gi|189240798|ref|XP_968550.2| PREDICTED: similar to transformer-2 protein A [Tribolium castaneum] NM_001126237 ...

  9. EST Table: NM_001126236 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001126236 Tra2 10/09/29 57 %/289 aa ref|NP_001119708.1| transformer 2 isoform D ...[Bombyx mori] gb|AAX47002.1| transformer-2 protein D [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 65 %/101 aa FBpp0236157|Dvira2-P...gi|189240798|ref|XP_968550.2| PREDICTED: similar to transformer-2 protein A [Tribolium castaneum] NM_001126237 ...

  10. EST Table: NM_001126234 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001126234 Tra2 10/09/29 76 %/156 aa ref|NP_001119705.1| transformer 2 isoform A ...[Bombyx mori] gb|AAT42220.2| transformer-2 protein A [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 65 %/101 aa FBpp0236157|Dvira2-P...gi|189240798|ref|XP_968550.2| PREDICTED: similar to transformer-2 protein A [Tribolium castaneum] NM_001126237 ...

  11. EST Table: NM_001126233 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001126233 Tra2 10/09/29 60 %/266 aa ref|NP_001119705.1| transformer 2 isoform A ...[Bombyx mori] gb|AAT42220.2| transformer-2 protein A [Bombyx mori] 10/09/13 65 %/101 aa FBpp0236157|Dvira2-P...gi|189240798|ref|XP_968550.2| PREDICTED: similar to transformer-2 protein A [Tribolium castaneum] NM_001126237 ...

  12. LINE PARAMETERS OF THE 782 nm BAND OF CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Y.; Liu, A.-W.; Li, X.-F.; Wang, J.; Cheng, C.-F.; Sun, Y. R.; Lambo, R.; Hu, S.-M., E-mail: smhu@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2013-09-20

    The 782 nm band of CO{sub 2}, in a transparent window of Earth's atmosphere, was the first CO{sub 2} band observed 80 yr ago in the spectra of Venus. The band is very weak and therefore not saturated by the thick atmosphere of Venus, but its spectral parameters are still very limited due to the difficulty of detecting it in the laboratory. It is the highest overtone (ν{sub 1} + 5ν{sub 3}) of CO{sub 2} given in widely used spectroscopy databases such as HITRAN and GEISA. In the present work, the band is studied using a cavity ring-down spectrometer with ultra-high sensitivity as well as high precision. The positions of 55 lines in the band were determined with an absolute accuracy of 3 × 10{sup –5} cm{sup –1}, two orders of magnitude better than previous studies. The line intensities, self-induced pressure broadening coefficients, and the shift coefficients were also derived from the recorded spectra. The obtained spectral parameters can be applied to model the spectra of the CO{sub 2}-rich atmospheres of planets like Venus and Mars.

  13. Normal spectral emissivity of stable and undercooled liquid silicon using electromagnetic levitation in a dc magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal spectral emissivity of a stable and undercooled liquid (1660–1790 K) was determined for wavelengths of 780–920 nm using direct measurement of radiance of statically electromagnetically levitated liquid silicon: a dc magnetic field suppressed surface oscillation and the transitional motion of the silicon droplet. A spectrometer used for spectral radiance measurement was calibrated using a quasi-blackbody with a copper metal fixed point. The emissivity shows weak negative wavelength dependence, and negligible temperature dependence. The wavelength dependence of the normal spectral emissivity is expressible using the Drude free electron model

  14. Action Spectra of Microalgal Photosynthesis and Depth Distribution of Spectral Scalar Irradiance in a Coastal Marine Sediment of Limfjorden, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    PLOUG, H.; LASSEN, C.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1993-01-01

    . a and carotenoids being the major photosynthetic pigments. The action spectrum of the cyanobacteria showed photosynthesis maxima at the absorption regions of Chl. a and phycocyanin. The measured depth distribution of spectral scalar irradiance and the action spectra of diatoms and cyanobacteria were used...... to calculate the spectral quality for photosynthesis of the 400-700 nm light to which the two populations were exposed. This spectral quality was compared to that of the light incident on the sediment surface. Due to preferential extinction of wavelengths, at which their photosynthetically active pigments had...

  15. On-chip measurements of Brownian relaxation of magnetic beads with diameters from 10 nm to 250 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of planar Hall effect magnetoresistive sensors for AC susceptibility measurements of magnetic beads with frequencies ranging from DC to 1 MHz. This wide frequency range allows for measuring Brownian relaxation of magnetic beads with diameters ranging from 10 nm to 250 nm...... to sedimentation, magnetic trapping, and signal per bead. Among the investigated beads, we conclude that the beads with a nominal diameter of 80 nm are best suited for future on-chip volume-based biosensing experiments using planar Hall effect sensors....

  16. Clock Gating Based Energy Efficient and Thermal Aware Design for Vedic Equation Solver on 28nm and 40nm FPGA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Bishwajeet; Pandey, Sujeet; Sharma, Shivani;

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we are integrating clock gating in design of energy efficient equation solver circuits based on Vedic mathematics. Clock gating is one of the best energy efficient techniques. The Sutra 'SunyamSamyasamuccaye' says thatif sum of numerator and sum of denominator is same then we can e......, 94.54% for 1800MHz, and 94.02% for 2.2GHz, when we use gated clock instead of un gated one on 40nm FPGA and temperature is 329.85K. Power consumption in 28nm FPGA is less than 40nm FPGA....

  17. A new COmpact hyperSpectral Imaging system (COSI) for UAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sima, Aleksandra; Baeck, Pieter-Jan; Delalieux, Stephanie; Livens, Stefan; Blommaert, Joris; Delauré, Bavo; Boonen, Miet

    2016-04-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the new COmpact hyperSpectral Imaging (COSI) system recently developed at the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO, Belgium) and suitable for multirotor Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) platforms. The camera is compact and lightweight, with a total mass of less than 500g including: an embedded computer, storage and power distribution unit. Such device miniaturization was possible thanks to the application of linear variable filters technology, in which image lines in the across flight direction correspond to different spectral bands as well as a different location on the ground (frame camera). The scanning motion is required to retrieve the complete spectrum for every point on the ground. The COSI camera captures data in 72 narrow (FWHM: 5nm to 10 nm) bands in the spectral range of 600-900 nm. Such spectral information is highly favourable for vegetation studies, since the main chlorophyll absorption feature centred around 680 nm is measured, as well as, the red-edge region (680 nm to 730 nm) which is often linked to plant stress. The NIR region furthermore reflects the internal plant structure, and is often linked to leaf area index and plant biomass. Next to the high spectral resolution, the COSI imager also provides a very high spatial data resolution i.e. images captured with a 9mm lens at 40m altitude cover a swath of ~40m with a ~2cm ground sampling distance. A dedicated data processing chain transforms the raw images into various information and action maps representing the status of the vegetation health and thus allowing for optimization of the management decisions within agricultural fields. In a number of test flights, hyperspectral COSI imager data were acquired covering diverse environments, e.g.: strawberry fields, natural grassland or pear orchards. Next to the COSI system overview, examples of collected data will be presented together with the results of the spectral data analysis. Lessons

  18. Alternatives to chemical amplification for 193nm lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylav, Burak; Zhao, Meng; Yin, Ran; Xie, Peng; Scholz, Chris; Smith, Bruce; Smith, Thomas; Zimmerman, Paul

    2010-04-01

    Research has been conducted to develop alternatives to chemically amplified 193 nm photoresist materials that will be able to achieve the requirements associated with sub-32 nm device technology. New as well as older photoresist design concepts for non-chemically amplified 193 nm photoresists that have the potential to enable improvements in line edge roughness while maintaining adequate sensitivity, base solubility, and dry etch resistance for high volume manufacturing are being explored. The particular platforms that have been explored in this work include dissolution inhibitor photoresist systems, chain scissioning polymers, and photoresist systems based on polymers incorporating formyloxyphenyl functional groups. In studies of two-component acidic polymer/dissolution inhibitor systems, it was found that compositions using ortho-nitrobenzyl cholate (NBC) as the dissolution inhibitor and poly norbornene hexafluoro alcohol (PNBHFA) as the base resin are capable of printing 90 nm dense line/space patterns upon exposure to a 193 nm laser. Studies of chain scission enhancement in methylmethacrylate copolymers showed that incorporating small amounts of absorptive a-cleavage monomers significantly enhanced sensitivity with an acceptable increase in absorbance at 193 nm. Specifically, it was found that adding 3 mol% of α-methyl styrene (α-MS) reduced the dose to clear of PMMA-based resist from 1400 mJ/cm2 to 420 mJ/cm2. Preliminary data are also presented on a direct photoreactive design concept based on the photo-Fries reaction of formyloxyphenyl functional groups in acrylic copolymers.

  19. Electron beam inspection methods for imprint lithography at 32 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography redefines nanoimprinting. This novel technique involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the limitations of inspection at half pitches of 32 nm and below. A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. Defects in both the mask and imprinted wafers were characterized scanning electron microscopy and the measured defect areas were calculated. These defects were then inspected using a KLA-T eS35 electron beam wafer inspection system. Defect sizes as small as 12 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectral atlas of HD 50138 (Borges Fernandes+, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges Fernandes, M.; Kraus, M.; Chesneau, O.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; de Araujo, F. X.; Stee, P.; Meilland, A.

    2009-09-01

    In this table, it is described the lines identified, with their radial velocities and equivalent widths in the high-resolution FEROS spectra obtained in 1999 and 2007. FEROS is a bench-mounted Echelle spectrograph with fibers, which covers a sky area of 2" of diameter, with a wavelength coverage from 360nm to 920nm and a spectral resolution of R=55000 (in the region around 600nm). The spectrum of 1999 was obtained with an exposure time of 180 seconds and has a S/N ratio of approximately 80 in the 550nm region. In 2007, we were able to take two consecutive spectra of the star, both with 180 seconds of exposure time. Since these spectra do not show significant differences, we added them up for a better S/N ratio, which is around 250. (1 data file).