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Sample records for 118-d-1 118-d-2 118-d-3

  1. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2007-04-12

    This report presents the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  2. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2 and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. L. Vialetti

    2008-05-20

    This report presents the final hazard categorization for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  3. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2006-12-06

    This report presents the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  4. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Ludowise

    2009-06-17

    This report presents the final hazard categorization for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site. A material at risk calculation was performed that determined the radiological inventory for each burial ground to be Hazard Category 3.

  5. Final Hazard Categorization and Auditable Safety Analysis for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2 and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2006-03-01

    This report presents the initial hazard categorization, final hazard categorization and auditable safety analysis for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  6. Kinetics of municipal sewage degradation in EGSB and UASB reactors at 10 ℃

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Kinetics of municipal sewage degradation in Expanded Granular Sludge Bed(EGSB)and Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket(UASB)reactors at 10℃ were investigated via continuous experimental equipments.The results indicated that the whole reaction process can be simulated by the first-order dynamic equation model.Dynamic parameters such as k,Vmax and Ks of UASB in hydrolysis acidification stage were 1.08 d-1,2.8 d-1 and 372 mg/L comparing to those of 1.18 d-1,3.5 d-1 and 112 mg/L in the methanogenesis stage respecti...

  7. The modified method of two-step differential extraction of sperm and vaginal epithelial cell DNA from vaginal fluid mixed with semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K; Sekiguchi, K; Mizuno, N; Kasai, K; Sakai, I; Sato, H; Seta, S

    1995-03-21

    This investigation was undertaken as an efficient method for isolating sperm DNA from a mixed fluid sample which contains vaginal epithelial cells in a greater amount. The modified method of the two-step differential extraction procedure was found to be suitable for separating sperm DNA and vaginal epithelial cell DNA from the mixed stains. As the first step of digestion, vaginal epithelial cells in the mixed stains were lysed with Proteinase K and SDS, and sperm heads remaining in the lysed solution were collected by centrifugation. As the second step digestion, the sperm heads were lysed with the buffer containing Proteinase K, SDS and DTT as reducing agent. DNA fractions extracted from the two lysed solutions were enriched, one with sperm DNA and the other with vaginal epithelial cell DNA. MCT118(D1S80), ApoB VNTR and HLADQ alpha types of sperm DNA were detected and were confirmed by matching with corresponding male blood DNA. In the case of vaginal secretion mixed with semen of two males, the mixture of MCT118 types of the two males was detected in sperm DNA fraction.

  8. Linkage mapping of the gene for Type III collagen (COL3A1) to human chromosome 2q using a VNTR polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Summar, M.L. (Vanderbilt Univ. Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States))

    1994-03-15

    The gene for the [alpha]1(III) chain of type III collagen, COL3A1, has been previously mapped to human chromosome 2q24.3-q31 by in situ hybridization. Physical mapping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has demonstrated that COL3A1 lies within 35 kb of COL5A2. The authors genotyped the CEPH families at the COL3A2 locus using a pentanucleotide repeat polymorphism within intron 25. They demonstrated significant linkage to 18 anonymous markers as well as the gene for carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPSI), which had been previously mapped to this region. No recombination was seen between COL3A1 and COL5A2 (Z = 9.93 at [theta] = 0) or D2S24 (Z = 10.55 at [theta] = 0). The locus order is (D2S32-D2S138-D2S148)-(D2S24-COL5A2-COL3A1)-(D2S118-D2S161), with odds of 1:2300 for the next most likely order. These relationships are consistent with the physical mapping of COL3A1 to the distal portion of 2q and place it proximal to CPSI by means of multipoint analysis. These linkage relationships should prove useful in further studies of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV and carbamyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency and provide an additional framework for localizing other genes in this region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. 生物质气化气发酵生产乙醇优良菌株的筛选%Microorganism screening for ethanol production using gasification gas from agricultural residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王风芹; 张炎达; 谢慧; 彭一丁; 宋安东

    2015-01-01

    利用农业废弃物合成气发酵生产燃料乙醇不仅可以缓解中国的能源危机,也是减轻环境污染、促进农业可持续发展和改善农村环境的重要举措。该文对实验室富集获得的4个菌系及国内外报道较多的4个菌株发酵生物质合成气生产燃料乙醇的潜力进行了研究。结果表明:菌株LP-fm4、Clostridium sp. P11和A-fm4发酵生物质合成气生产乙醇的净产量分别为179.23、152.92和115.08 mg/L;菌体比生长速率分别为1.46、1.66和1.18 d-1;乙醇比生成速率分别3.50、2.05和0.78 d-1,单位菌体生成乙醇的量分别为2252.90、1450.20和1132.37 mg/g,显著高于其他菌株(群)。多重比较分析与综合性状聚类分析结果表明前两者为利用合成气高效发酵乙醇的理想菌体,菌 A-fm4为具有潜力菌体。以期为未来农业废弃物合成气乙醇发酵提供了优良的菌种资源。%Ethanol is one of the most important alternative biofuels, which provides a net energy gain, has environmental benefits and is economically competitive. Ethanol production from syngas anaerobic fermentation appears to be a potential and promising technology compared to the existing chemical conversion techniques. Currently, syngas fermentation is being developed as one option towards the production of bio-ethanol from biomass. Agricultural residue biomass such as corn stalks and wheat stalks, has been an important part of the biomass resource in the world. Much attention has been attracted on the conversation and utilization of these biomasses with high value. The gasification of the agricultural residue biomass is a mature and industrialized technology up to now. Gasification of agricultural lignocellulosic residue followed by syngas fermentation to produce bio-ethanol is being explored owing to the low cost and availability of agricultural residue feedstock. The process can not only change trash to treasure but also be of benefit to reduce environmental pollution, which will promote the sustainable development of agriculture and improve the rural environment. It has been found that some anaerobic bacteria can be used to convert syngas to ethanol and acetic acid, such as Clostridium ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum. But the excellent strains are still very limited and their productivity levels are not high. According to the fact that bio-ethanol production from syngas in anaerobic conditions still can not be industrialized, special emphasis has been given to obtain the efficient microorganism fermenting that transfers syngas to ethanol. In order to obtain strains for high efficient ethanol production by syngas generated from agricultural residue, ethanol fermentations taking syngas as the sole carbon source and energy source were carried out. Ethanol production potentials were compared among the mixed-cultures A-fm4, B-fm4, G-fm4 and LP-fm4 and the reported strains Clostridium carboxidivorans P7, Clostridium sp. P11, C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum DSM10061. Meanwhile, microbial mixed-cultures A-fm4, B-fm4, G-fm4 and LP-fm4 were isolated from animal faeces samples of alpaca, papion, lesser panda and gibbon respectively under strict anoxic condition in 200 mL bottle. Batch fermentations were done in 300 mL serum bottles each containing 60 mL fermentation medium. 10%(v/v) of inoculum was transferred to fresh media. The 240 mL syngas was injected into the 300 mL serum bottle by syringe. Experiments were conducted for 7 days. The results showed that all of the cultures/mixed-cultures can transform syngas into biofuel ethanol. The net ethanol production and specific cell growth rate were 179.23, 152.92, 115.08 mg/L and 1.46, 1.66, 1.18 d-1, respectively, for culture/mixed-cultures LP-fm4, Clostridium sp. P11 and A-fm4. Their specific ethanol production rate and ethanol production amount per cell were 3.50, 2.05, 0.78 d-1 and 2252.90, 1450.20, 1132.37 mg/g (dry cell weight, DCW), respectively. These parameters were significantly higher than those of other treatments. Duncan analysis and dendrogram of cluster analysis also agreed that mixed-culture/strain LP-fm4 and Clostridium sp. P11 were the ideal microorganisms for ethanol production by syngas generated from agricultural residue, and mixed-culture A-fm4 was a potential candidate. The research results will provide excellent microorganisms for fermentation of syngas generated from agricultural residue in the future.

  10. The Science and Issues of Human DNA Polymorphisms: A Training Workshop for High School Biology Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micklos, David A.

    2006-10-30

    This project achieved its goal of implementing a nationwide training program to introduce high school biology teachers to the key uses and societal implications of human DNA polymorphisms. The 2.5-day workshop introduced high school biology faculty to a laboratory-based unit on human DNA polymorphisms â which provides a uniquely personal perspective on the science and Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. As proposed, 12 workshops were conducted at venues across the United States. The workshops were attended by 256 high school faculty, exceeding proposed attendance of 240 by 7%. Each workshop mixed theoretical, laboratory, and computer work with practical and ethical implications. Program participants learned simplified lab techniques for amplifying three types of chromosomal polymorphisms: an Alu insertion (PV92), a VNTR (pMCT118/D1S80), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the mitochondrial control region. These polymorphisms illustrate the use of DNA variations in disease diagnosis, forensic biology, and identity testing - and provide a starting point for discussing the uses and potential abuses of genetic technology. Participants also learned how to use their Alu and mitochondrial data as an entrée to human population genetics and evolution. Our work to simplify lab techniques for amplifying human DNA polymorphisms in educational settings culminated with the release in 1998 of three Advanced Technology (AT) PCR kits by Carolina Biological Supply Company, the nationâÂÂs oldest educational science supplier. The kits use a simple 30-minute method to isolate template DNA from hair sheaths or buccal cells and streamlined PCR chemistry based on Pharmacia Ready-To-Go Beads, which incorporate Taq polymerase, deoxynucleotide triphosphates, and buffer in a freeze-dried pellet. These kits have greatly simplified teacher implementation of human PCR labs, and their use is growing at a rapid pace. Sales of human

  11. The Science and Issues of Human DNA Polymoprhisms: A Training Workshop for High School Biology Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David. A Micklos

    2006-10-30

    This project achieved its goal of implementing a nationwide training program to introduce high school biology teachers to the key uses and societal implications of human DNA polymorphisms. The 2.5-day workshop introduced high school biology faculty to a laboratory-based unit on human DNA polymorphisms – which provides a uniquely personal perspective on the science and Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. As proposed, 12 workshops were conducted at venues across the United States. The workshops were attended by 256 high school faculty, exceeding proposed attendance of 240 by 7%. Each workshop mixed theoretical, laboratory, and computer work with practical and ethical implications. Program participants learned simplified lab techniques for amplifying three types of chromosomal polymorphisms: an Alu insertion (PV92), a VNTR (pMCT118/D1S80), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the mitochondrial control region. These polymorphisms illustrate the use of DNA variations in disease diagnosis, forensic biology, and identity testing - and provide a starting point for discussing the uses and potential abuses of genetic technology. Participants also learned how to use their Alu and mitochondrial data as an entrée to human population genetics and evolution. Our work to simplify lab techniques for amplifying human DNA polymorphisms in educational settings culminated with the release in 1998 of three Advanced Technology (AT) PCR kits by Carolina Biological Supply Company, the nation’s oldest educational science supplier. The kits use a simple 30-minute method to isolate template DNA from hair sheaths or buccal cells and streamlined PCR chemistry based on Pharmacia Ready-To-Go Beads, which incorporate Taq polymerase, deoxynucleotide triphosphates, and buffer in a freeze-dried pellet. These kits have greatly simplified teacher implementation of human PCR labs, and their use is growing at a rapid pace. Sales of human polymorphism

  12. The Science and Issues of Human DNA Polymorphisms: A Training Workshop for High School Biology Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micklos, David A.

    2006-10-30

    This project achieved its goal of implementing a nationwide training program to introduce high school biology teachers to the key uses and societal implications of human DNA polymorphisms. The 2.5-day workshop introduced high school biology faculty to a laboratory-based unit on human DNA polymorphisms â which provides a uniquely personal perspective on the science and Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. As proposed, 12 workshops were conducted at venues across the United States. The workshops were attended by 256 high school faculty, exceeding proposed attendance of 240 by 7%. Each workshop mixed theoretical, laboratory, and computer work with practical and ethical implications. Program participants learned simplified lab techniques for amplifying three types of chromosomal polymorphisms: an Alu insertion (PV92), a VNTR (pMCT118/D1S80), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the mitochondrial control region. These polymorphisms illustrate the use of DNA variations in disease diagnosis, forensic biology, and identity testing - and provide a starting point for discussing the uses and potential abuses of genetic technology. Participants also learned how to use their Alu and mitochondrial data as an entrée to human population genetics and evolution. Our work to simplify lab techniques for amplifying human DNA polymorphisms in educational settings culminated with the release in 1998 of three Advanced Technology (AT) PCR kits by Carolina Biological Supply Company, the nationâÂÂs oldest educational science supplier. The kits use a simple 30-minute method to isolate template DNA from hair sheaths or buccal cells and streamlined PCR chemistry based on Pharmacia Ready-To-Go Beads, which incorporate Taq polymerase, deoxynucleotide triphosphates, and buffer in a freeze-dried pellet. These kits have greatly simplified teacher implementation of human PCR labs, and their use is growing at a rapid pace. Sales of human