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Sample records for 10d effective action

  1. Identifying body residues of HCBP associated with 10-d mortality and partial life cycle effects in the midge, Chironomus riparius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, H; Fisher, S W; Landrum, P F

    2001-05-01

    The relationship between the body residue of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (HCBP) and its effects, including 10-d mortality and chronic sublethal effects on the midge, Chironomus riparius, are examined in a partial life cycle assessment. The alga, Chlorella vulgaris, was loaded with 14C-labeled HCBP and fed to midges as the method for delivery of the toxicant. In a 10-d bioassay, median lethal body residue (LR50) was 0.57 (95% CI: 0.49-0.66) mmol/kg. In the partial life cycle test, midges were fed a mixture of 12C- and 14C-HCBP-laden algae and exposed in four separate tests to assess the different developmental stages representing 2nd to 3rd instar, 2nd to 4th, 2nd to pupa, and 2nd to adult stages. A variety of sublethal endpoints were monitored, including developmental time within a stadium, body concentration at the end of each stadium, body weight, and fecundity (the number of ova) for the female pupae and adults. Overall, midge body concentrations of HCBP increased with increasing exposure concentration. Body weight was not significantly affected by HCBP except during the 4th instar. Body residue also increased with each successive stadium. Developmental time increased significantly with increasing body concentration in 2nd to 4th, 2nd to pupa, and 2nd to adult tests, while there was no statistical significance in developmental time for the 2nd to 3rd instar test. The number of ova decreased significantly in adults with increasing body concentration of HCBP, with an average of 345 ova in controls, 289 ova at 0.028 mmol/kg of HCBP, and 258 ova at 0.250 mmol/kg. These data, which relate chronic endpoints to body residues, suggest that sublethal endpoints in invertebrates are useful for defining sublethal hazards of PCBs. These data also suggest that ecological consequences may result from relatively low body burdens of PCBs.

  2. Action-Specific Effects Underwater

    OpenAIRE

    Witt, Jessica; Schuck, Donald M; Taylor, J. Eric T.

    2011-01-01

    Action-specific effects on perception are apparent in terrestrial environments. For example, targets that require more effort to walk, jump, or throw to look farther away than when the targets require less effort. Here, we examined whether action-specific effects would generalize to an underwater environment. Instead, perception might be geometrically precise, rather than action-specific, in an environment that is novel from an evolutionary perspective. We manipulated ease to swim by giving p...

  3. Short-term effects of replacing milk with cola beverages on insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-glucose metabolism: a 10 d interventional study in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Camilla; Kristensen, Mette; Boiesen, Marlene; Kudsk, Jane; Fleischer Michaelsen, Kim; Mølgaard, Christian

    2009-10-01

    In the Western world, a trend towards increased consumption of carbonated soft drinks combined with a decreasing intake of milk is observed. This may affect circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and fasting insulin, as seen in pre-pubertal children. The present study was designed to reflect the trend of replacing milk with carbonated beverages in young men and to study the effects of this replacement on IGF-I, IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), IGF-I:IGFBP-3 and glucose-insulin metabolism. A randomised, controlled crossover intervention study, in which eleven men aged 22-29 years were given a low-Ca diet in two 10 d periods with 10 d washout in between. In one period, they drank 2.5 litres of Coca Cola(R) per day and the other period 2.5 litres of semi-skimmed milk. Serum IGF-I, IGFBP-3 (RIA), insulin (fluoro immunoassay) and glucose (Cobas) were determined at baseline and end point of each intervention period. Insulin resistance and beta-cell function were calculated with the homeostasis model assessment. A decrease in serum IGF-I was observed in the cola period compared with the milk period (P cola over a 10 d period decreases total IGF-I compared with a high intake of milk, with no effect on glucose-insulin metabolism in adult men. It is unknown whether this is a transient phenomenon or whether it has long-term consequences.

  4. Action orientation overcomes the ego depletion effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Junhua; Xiao, Shanshan; Shi, Yucai; Mao, Lihua

    2015-04-01

    It has been consistently demonstrated that initial exertion of self-control had negative influence on people's performance on subsequent self-control tasks. This phenomenon is referred to as the ego depletion effect. Based on action control theory, the current research investigated whether the ego depletion effect could be moderated by individuals' action versus state orientation. Our results showed that only state-oriented individuals exhibited ego depletion. For individuals with action orientation, however, their performance was not influenced by initial exertion of self-control. The beneficial effect of action orientation against ego depletion in our experiment results from its facilitation for adapting to the depleting task.

  5. Wilsonian Effective Action of Superstring Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Ashoke

    2016-01-01

    By integrating out the heavy fields in type II or heterotic string field theory one can construct the effective action for the light fields. This effective theory inherits all the algebraic structures of the parent theory and the effective action automatically satisfies the Batalin-Vilkovisky quantum master equation. This theory is manifestly ultraviolet finite, has only light fields as its explicit degrees of freedom, and the Feynman diagrams of this theory reproduce the exact scattering amplitudes of light states in string theory to any arbitrary order in perturbation theory. Furthermore in this theory the degrees of freedom of light fields above certain energy scale are also implicitly integrated out. This energy scale is determined by a particular parameter labelling a family of equivalent actions, and can be made arbitrarily low, leading to the interpretation of the effective action as the Wilsonian effective action.

  6. Wilsonian effective action of superstring theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ashoke

    2017-01-01

    By integrating out the heavy fields in type II or heterotic string field theory one can construct the effective action for the light fields. This effective theory inherits all the algebraic structures of the parent theory and the effective action automatically satisfies the Batalin-Vilkovisky quantum master equation. This theory is manifestly ultraviolet finite, has only light fields as its explicit degrees of freedom, and the Feynman diagrams of this theory reproduce the exact scattering amplitudes of light states in string theory to any arbitrary order in perturbation theory. Furthermore in this theory the degrees of freedom of light fields above certain energy scale are also implicitly integrated out. This energy scale is determined by a particular parameter labelling a family of equivalent actions, and can be made arbitrarily low, leading to the interpretation of the effective action as the Wilsonian effective action.

  7. Vacuum effective action: semiclassical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, I L [Departamento de Fisica, ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

    2007-11-15

    We present a brief review of quantum corrections to the action of gravity. The main attention is concentrated on the quantum theory of matter fields (QFT) on classical metric background. The list of most interesting possible applications of quantum corrections includes inflation and the Dark Energy problem. We show that both problems can be, in principle, resolved within the semiclassical theory, without invoking quantum gravity or string theory.

  8. Complex Effective Action and Schwinger Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous pair production from background fields or spacetimes is one of the most prominent phenomena predicted by quantum field theory. The Schwinger mechanism of production of charged pairs by a strong electric field and the Hawking radiation of all species of particles from a black hole are the consequence of nonperturbative quantum effects. In this review article, the vacuum structure and pair production is reviewed in the in-out formalism, which provides a consistent framework for quantum field theory in the sense that the complex action explains not only the vacuum persistence but also pair production. The current technology of intense lasers is still lower by a few order than the Schwinger limit for electron-positron pair production, while magnetic fields of magnetars on the surface are higher than the Schwinger limit and even higher at the core. On the other hand, the zero effective mass of electron and hole in graphene and Dirac or Weyl semimetals will open a window for experimental test of quantum...

  9. Universality and ambiguity in fermionic effective actions

    CERN Document Server

    de Berredo-Peixoto, Guilherme; Shapiro, Ilya L

    2012-01-01

    We discuss an ambiguity in the one-loop effective action of massive fields which takes place in massive fermionic theories. The universality of logarithmic UV divergences in different space-time dimensions leads to the non-universality of the finite part of effective action, which can be called the non-local multiplicative anomaly. The general criteria of existence of this phenomena are formulated and applied to fermionic operators with different external fields.

  10. Effective supergravity actions for conifold transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohaupt, Thomas; Saueressig, Frank E-mail: F.S.Saueressig@phys.uu.nl

    2005-03-01

    We construct gauged supergravity actions which describe the dynamics of M-theory on a Calabi-Yau threefold in the vicinity of a conifold transition. The actions explicitly include N charged hypermultiplets descending from wrapped M2-branes which become massless at the conifold point. While the vector multiplet sector can be treated exactly, we approximate the hypermultiplet sector by the non-compact Wolf spaces X(1+N). The effective action is then uniquely determined by the charges of the wrapped M2-branes. (author)

  11. Action-based effects on music perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter-Jan eMaes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The classical, disembodied approach to music cognition conceptualizes action and perception as separate, peripheral phenomena. In contrast, embodied accounts to music cognition emphasize the central role of the close coupling of action and perception. It is a commonly established fact that perception spurs action tendencies. We present a theoretical framework capturing the ways that the human motor system, and the actions it produces, can reciprocally influence the perception of music. The cornerstone of this framework is the common coding theory postulating a representational overlap in the brain between the planning, the execution, and the perception of movement. The integration of action and perception in so-called internal models is explained as a result of associative learning processes. Characteristic of internal models is that they allow intended or perceived sensory states to be transferred into corresponding motor commands (inverse modelling, and vice versa, to predict the sensory outcomes of planned actions (forward modelling. Embodied accounts typically adhere to inverse modelling to explain action effects on music perception (Leman, 2007. We extent this account by pinpointing forward modelling as an alternative mechanism by which action can modulate perception. We provide an extensive overview of recent empirical evidence in support of this idea. Additionally, we demonstrate that motor dysfunctions can cause perceptual disabilities, supporting the main idea of the paper that the human motor system plays a functional role in auditory perception. The finding that music perception is shaped by the human motor system, and the action it produces, suggests that the musical mind is highly embodied. However, we advocate for a more radical approach to embodied (music cognition in the sense that it needs to be considered as a dynamic process, in which aspects of action, perception, introspection, and social interaction are of crucial

  12. Action-based effects on music perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Pieter-Jan; Leman, Marc; Palmer, Caroline; Wanderley, Marcelo M.

    2013-01-01

    The classical, disembodied approach to music cognition conceptualizes action and perception as separate, peripheral processes. In contrast, embodied accounts of music cognition emphasize the central role of the close coupling of action and perception. It is a commonly established fact that perception spurs action tendencies. We present a theoretical framework that captures the ways in which the human motor system and its actions can reciprocally influence the perception of music. The cornerstone of this framework is the common coding theory, postulating a representational overlap in the brain between the planning, the execution, and the perception of movement. The integration of action and perception in so-called internal models is explained as a result of associative learning processes. Characteristic of internal models is that they allow intended or perceived sensory states to be transferred into corresponding motor commands (inverse modeling), and vice versa, to predict the sensory outcomes of planned actions (forward modeling). Embodied accounts typically refer to inverse modeling to explain action effects on music perception (Leman, 2007). We extend this account by pinpointing forward modeling as an alternative mechanism by which action can modulate perception. We provide an extensive overview of recent empirical evidence in support of this idea. Additionally, we demonstrate that motor dysfunctions can cause perceptual disabilities, supporting the main idea of the paper that the human motor system plays a functional role in auditory perception. The finding that music perception is shaped by the human motor system and its actions suggests that the musical mind is highly embodied. However, we advocate for a more radical approach to embodied (music) cognition in the sense that it needs to be considered as a dynamical process, in which aspects of action, perception, introspection, and social interaction are of crucial importance. PMID:24454299

  13. Action-effect bindings and ideomotor learning in intention- and stimulus-based actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvid eHerwig

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available According to ideomotor theory, action-effect associations are crucial for voluntary action control. Recently, a number of studies started to investigate the conditions that mediate the acquisition and application of action-effect associations by comparing actions carried out in response to exogenous stimuli (stimulus-based with actions selected endogenously (intention-based. There is evidence that the acquisition and/or application of action-effect associations is boosted when acting in an intention-based action mode. For instance, bidirectional action-effect associations were diagnosed in a forced choice test phase if participants previously experienced action-effect couplings in an intention-based but not in a stimulus-based action mode. The present study aims at investigating effects of the action mode on action-effect associations in more detail. In a series of experiments, we compared the strength and durability of short-term action-effect associations (binding immediately following intention- as well as stimulus-based actions. Moreover, long-term action-effect associations (learning were assessed in a subsequent test phase. Our results show short-term action-effect associations of equal strength and durability for both action modes. However, replicating previous results, long-term associations were observed only following intention-based actions. These findings indicate that the effect of the action mode on long-term associations cannot merely be a result of accumulated short-term action-effect bindings. Instead, only those episodic bindings are selectively perpetuated or retrieved that integrate action-relevant aspects of the processing event, i.e., in case of intention-based actions, the link between action and ensuing effect.

  14. Analytic results for the effective action

    CERN Document Server

    Blau, Steven K; Wipf, Andreas; 10.1142/S0217751X91002549

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by the seminal work of Schwinger, we obtain explicit closed form expressions for the one-loop effective action in a constant electromagnetic field. We discuss both massive and massless charged scalars and spinors in two, three, and four dimensions. Both strong field and weak field limits are calculable. The latter limit results in an asymptotic expansion whose first term reproduces the Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian. We use the zeta function renormalization prescription, and indicate its relationship to Schwinger's renormalized effective action.

  15. Effective action for strongly correlated electron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraz, A., E-mail: aferraz.iccmp@gmail.com [International Institute of Physics - UFRN, Department of Experimental and Theoretical Physics - UFRN, Natal (Brazil); Kochetov, E.A. [International Institute of Physics - UFRN, Natal (Brazil); Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-21

    The su(2|1) coherent-state path-integral representation of the partition function of the t-J model of strongly correlated electrons is derived at finite doping. The emergent effective action is compared to the one proposed earlier on phenomenological grounds by Shankar to describe holes in an antiferromagnet [R. Shankar, Nucl. Phys. B 330 (1990) 433]. The t-J model effective action is found to have an important 'extra' factor with no analogue in Shankar's action. It represents the local constraint of no double electron occupancy and reflects the rearrangement of the underlying phase-space manifold due to the presence of strong electron correlation. This important ingredient is shown to be essential to describe the physics of strongly correlated electron systems.

  16. (-)-Carvone: antispasmodic effect and mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Fábia Valéria M; da Rocha, Marcelly Barbosa; de Souza, Damião P; Marçal, Rosilene Moretti

    2013-03-01

    (-)-Carvone is a monoterpene ketone found in spearmint (Mentha spicata var. crispa) essential oil that is widely used as an odor and flavor additive. An intestinal antispasmodic effect was recently reported for (-)-carvone, and it has been shown to be more potent than its (+)-antipode. The mechanism of (-)-carvone action in the intestines has not been investigated. To gain a better understanding of the (-)-carvone antispasmodic effect, we investigated its pharmacological effects in the guinea pig ileum. Terminal portions of the ileum were mounted for isotonic contraction recordings. The effect of (-)-carvone was compared with that of the classical calcium channel blocker (CCB) verapamil. In isolated ileal smooth muscle, (-)-carvone did not produce direct contractile or relaxation responses and did not modify electrically elicited contractions or low K(+)-evoked contractions. The submaximal contractions induced by histamine (p<0.001), BaCl2 (p<0.05), and carbachol (p<0.01) were significantly reduced by (-)-carvone. The contractile response elicited by high concentrations of carbachol was reduced but not abolished by (-)-carvone. No additive action was detected with co-incubation of (-)-carvone and verapamil on carbachol-induced contraction. (-)-Carvone reduced the contraction induced by high K(+) and was almost 100 times more potent than verapamil. Thus, (-)-carvone showed a typical and potent CCB-like action. Many effects described for both (-)-carvone and spearmint oil can be explained as a CCB-like mode of action.

  17. Variational Calculation of the Effective Action

    CERN Document Server

    Sugihara, T

    1998-01-01

    An indication of spontaneous symmetry breaking is found in the two-dimensional $\\lambda\\phi^4$ model, where an attention is payed to a functional form of an effective action. An effective energy, which is an effective action for a static field, is obtained as a functional of the classical field from the ground state of hamiltonian $H[J]$ interacting with a constant external field. The energy and wavefunction of the ground state are calculated in terms of DLCQ (Discretized Light-Cone Quantization) under antiperiodic boundary condition. A field configuration which is physically meaningful is found as a solution of the quantum mechanical Euler-Lagrange equation in the $J\\to 0$ limit. It is shown that there exists a nontrivial field configuration in the broken phase of $Z_2$ symmetry because of a boundary effect.

  18. Geometrical effective action and Wilsonian flows

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlowski, J M

    2003-01-01

    A gauge invariant flow equation is derived by applying a Wilsonian momentum cut-off to gauge invariant field variables. The construction makes use of the geometrical effective action for gauge theories in the Vilkovisky-DeWitt framework. The approach leads to modified Nielsen identities that pose non-trivial constraints on consistent truncations. We also evaluate the relation of the present approach to gauge fixed formulations as well as discussing possible applications.

  19. Holographic Heavy-Light Chiral Effective Action

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang

    2016-01-01

    We propose a variant of the $D4$-$D8$ construction to describe the low energy effective theory of heavy-light mesons, interacting with the lowest lying pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The heavy degrees of freedom are identified with the $D8_L$-$D8_H$ string low energy modes, and are approximated near the world volume of $N_f-1$ light $D8_L$ branes, by fundamental vector field valued in $U(N_f-1)$. The effective action follows from the reduction of the bulk D-brane Born-Infeld (DBI) and Chern-Simons (CS) actions, and is shown to exhibit both chiral and heavy-quark symmetry. The action interpolates continuously between the $U(N_f)$ case with massless mesons, and the $U(N_f-1)$ case with heavy-light mesons. The heavy-light meson radial spectrum is Regge-like. The one-pion and two-pion couplings to the heavy-light multiplets are evaluated. The partial widths for the charged decays $G\\rightarrow H+\\pi$ are shown to be comparable to the recently reported full widths for both the charm and bottom mesons.

  20. Effective actions for relativistic fluids from holography

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, Jan; Pinzani-Fokeeva, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent progress in developing action formulations of relativistic hydrodynamics, we use holography to derive the low energy dissipationless effective action for strongly coupled conformal fluids. Our analysis is based on the study of novel double Dirichlet problems for the gravitational field, in which the boundary conditions are set on two codimension one timelike hypersurfaces (branes). We provide a geometric interpretation of the Goldstone bosons appearing in such constructions in terms of a family of spatial geodesics extending between the ultraviolet and the infrared brane. Furthermore, we discuss supplementing double Dirichlet problems with information about the near-horizon geometry. We show that upon coupling to a membrane paradigm boundary condition, our approach reproduces correctly the complex dispersion relation for both sound and shear waves. We also demonstrate that upon a Wick rotation, our formulation reproduces the equilibrium partition function formalism, provided the near-horiz...

  1. Constraining the D3-brane effective action

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Anirban

    2008-01-01

    We consider higher derivative corrections of the type D^{2k} R^2 in the effective action of the D3-brane with trivial normal bundle. Based on the perturbative disc and annulus amplitudes, and constraints of supersymmetry and duality, we argue that these interactions are protected, at least for small values of k. Their coefficient functions receive only a finite number of perturbative contributions, and non-perturbative contributions from D-instantons. We propose expressions for these modular forms for low values of k.

  2. The influence of action effects in task switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eLukas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to ideomotor theories, intended effects caused by a certain action are anticipated before action execution. In the present study, we examined the question of whether action effects play a role in cued task switching. In our study, the participants practiced task-response-effect mappings in an acquisition phase, in which action effects occur after a response in a certain task context. In the ensuing transfer phase, the previously practiced mappings were changed in a random, unpredictable task-response-effect mapping. When changed into unpredictable action effects, RT as well as switch costs increased, but this occurred mainly in trials with short preparation time and not with long preparation time. Moreover, switch costs were generally smaller with predictable action effects than with unpredictable action effects. This suggests that anticipated task-specific action effects help to activate the relevant task set before task execution when the task is not yet already prepared based on the cue.

  3. Effective action theory of Andreev level spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaktionov, Artem V.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2015-12-01

    With the aid of the Keldysh effective action technique we develop a microscopic theory describing Andreev level spectroscopy experiments in nontunnel superconducting contacts. We derive an effective impedance of such contacts which accounts for the presence of Andreev levels in the system. At subgap bias voltages and low temperatures, inelastic Cooper pair tunneling is accompanied by transitions between these levels resulting in a set of sharp current peaks. We evaluate the intensities of such peaks, establish their dependence on the external magnetic flux piercing the structure and estimate the thermal broadening of these peaks. We also specifically address the effect of capacitance renormalization in a nontunnel superconducting contact and its impact on both the positions and heights of the current peaks. At overgap bias voltages, the I -V curve is determined by quasiparticle tunneling and contains current steps related to the presence of discrete Andreev states in our system.

  4. Effective action for stochastic partial differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochberg, David [Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Fisica Fundamental, Apartado 50727, 28080 Madrid, (Spain); Centro de Astrobiologia, INTA, Carratera Ajalvir, Km. 4, 28850 Torrejon, Madrid, (Spain); Molina-Paris, Carmen [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Perez-Mercader, Juan [Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Fisica Fundamental, Apartado 50727, 28080 Madrid, (Spain); Visser, Matt [Physics Department, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri 63130-4899 (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) are the basic tool for modeling systems where noise is important. SPDEs are used for models of turbulence, pattern formation, and the structural development of the universe itself. It is reasonably well known that certain SPDEs can be manipulated to be equivalent to (nonquantum) field theories that nevertheless exhibit deep and important relationships with quantum field theory. In this paper we systematically extend these ideas: We set up a functional integral formalism and demonstrate how to extract all the one-loop physics for an arbitrary SPDE subject to arbitrary Gaussian noise. It is extremely important to realize that Gaussian noise does not imply that the field variables undergo Gaussian fluctuations, and that these nonquantum field theories are fully interacting. The limitation to one loop is not as serious as might be supposed: Experience with quantum field theories (QFTs) has taught us that one-loop physics is often quite adequate to give a good description of the salient issues. The limitation to one loop does, however, offer marked technical advantages: Because at one loop almost any field theory can be rendered finite using zeta function technology, we can sidestep the complications inherent in the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism (the SPDE analog of the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin formalism used in QFT) and instead focus attention on a minimalist approach that uses only the physical fields (this ''direct approach'' is the SPDE analog of canonical quantization using physical fields). After setting up the general formalism for the characteristic functional (partition function), we show how to define the effective action to all loops, and then focus on the one-loop effective action and its specialization to constant fields: the effective potential. The physical interpretation of the effective action and effective potential for SPDEs is addressed and we show that key features carry over from

  5. Effective action for stochastic partial differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, D; Molina-París, C; Pérez-Mercader, J; Visser, M

    1999-12-01

    Stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) are the basic tool for modeling systems where noise is important. SPDEs are used for models of turbulence, pattern formation, and the structural development of the universe itself. It is reasonably well known that certain SPDEs can be manipulated to be equivalent to (nonquantum) field theories that nevertheless exhibit deep and important relationships with quantum field theory. In this paper we systematically extend these ideas: We set up a functional integral formalism and demonstrate how to extract all the one-loop physics for an arbitrary SPDE subject to arbitrary Gaussian noise. It is extremely important to realize that Gaussian noise does not imply that the field variables undergo Gaussian fluctuations, and that these nonquantum field theories are fully interacting. The limitation to one loop is not as serious as might be supposed: Experience with quantum field theories (QFTs) has taught us that one-loop physics is often quite adequate to give a good description of the salient issues. The limitation to one loop does, however, offer marked technical advantages: Because at one loop almost any field theory can be rendered finite using zeta function technology, we can sidestep the complications inherent in the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism (the SPDE analog of the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin formalism used in QFT) and instead focus attention on a minimalist approach that uses only the physical fields (this "direct approach" is the SPDE analog of canonical quantization using physical fields). After setting up the general formalism for the characteristic functional (partition function), we show how to define the effective action to all loops, and then focus on the one-loop effective action and its specialization to constant fields: the effective potential. The physical interpretation of the effective action and effective potential for SPDEs is addressed and we show that key features carry over from QFT to the case of

  6. Exploring soft constraints on effective actions

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Massimo; Huang, Yu-tin; Lee, Chao-Jung; Wen, Congkao

    2016-01-01

    We study effective actions for simultaneous breaking of space-time and internal symmetries. Novel features arise due to the mixing of Goldstone modes under the broken symmetries which, in contrast to the usual Adler's zero, leads to non-vanishing soft limits. Such scenarios are common for spontaneously broken SCFT's. We explicitly test these soft theorems for $\\mathcal{N}=4$ sYM in the Coulomb branch both perturbatively and non-perturbatively. We explore the soft constraints systematically utilizing recursion relations. In the pure dilaton sector of a general CFT, we show that all amplitudes up to order $s^{n} \\sim \\partial^{2n}$ are completely determined in terms of the $k$-point amplitudes at order $s^k$ with $k \\leq n$. Terms with at most one derivative acting on each dilaton insertion are completely fixed and coincide with those appearing in the conformal DBI, i.e. DBI in AdS. With maximal supersymmetry, the effective actions are further constrained, leading to new non-renormalization theorems. In particu...

  7. The Universal One-Loop Effective Action

    CERN Document Server

    Drozd, Aleksandra; Quevillon, Jérémie; You, Tevong

    2016-01-01

    We present the universal one-loop effective action for all operators of dimension up to six obtained by integrating out massive, non-degenerate multiplets. Our general expression may be applied to loops of heavy fermions or bosons, and has been checked against partial results available in the literature. The broad applicability of this approach simplifies one-loop matching from an ultraviolet model to a lower-energy effective field theory (EFT), a procedure which is now reduced to the evaluation of a combination of matrices in our universal expression, without any loop integrals to evaluate. We illustrate the relationship of our results to the Standard Model (SM) EFT, using as an example the supersymmetric stop and sbottom squark Lagrangian and extracting from our universal expression the Wilson coefficients of dimension-six operators composed of SM fields.

  8. From action intentions to action effects: how does the sense of agency come about?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérian eChambon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sense of agency refers to the feeling of controlling an external event through one’s own action. On one influential view, agency depends on how predictable the consequences of one’s action are, getting stronger as the match between predicted and actual effect of an action gets closer. Thus, sense of agency arises when external events that follow our action are consistent with predictions of action effects made by the motor system while we perform or simply intend to perform an action. According to this view, agency is inferred retrospectively, after an action has been performed and its consequences are known. In contrast, little is known about whether and how internal processes involved in the selection of actions may influence subjective sense of control, in advance of the action itself, and irrespective of effect predictability. In this article, we review several classes of behavioural and neuroimaging data suggesting that earlier processes, linked to fluency of action selection, prospectively contribute to sense of agency. These findings have important implications for better understanding human volition and abnormalities of action experience.

  9. Causal binding of actions to their effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehner, Marc J; Humphreys, Gruffydd R

    2009-10-01

    According to widely held views in cognitive science harking back to David Hume, causality cannot be perceived directly, but instead is inferred from patterns of sensory experience, and the quality of these inferences is determined by perceivable quantities such as contingency and contiguity. We report results that suggest a reversal of Hume's conjecture: People's sense of time is warped by the experience of causality. In a stimulus-anticipation task, participants' response behavior reflected a shortened experience of time in the case of target stimuli participants themselves had generated, relative to equidistant, equally predictable stimuli they had not caused. These findings suggest that causality in the mind leads to temporal binding of cause and effect, and extend and generalize beyond earlier claims of intentional binding between action and outcome.

  10. Motor imagery during action observation modulates automatic imitation effects in rhythmical actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lloyd Eaves

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that passively observing a task-irrelevant rhythmical action can bias the cycle time of a subsequently executed rhythmical action. Here we use the same paradigm to investigate the impact of different forms of motor imagery (MI during action observation (AO on this automatic imitation (AI effect. Participants saw a picture of the instructed action followed by a rhythmical distractor movie, wherein cycle time was subtly manipulated across trials. They then executed the instructed rhythmical action. When participants imagined performing the instructed action in synchrony with the distractor action (AO + MI, a strong imitation bias was found that was significantly greater than in our previous study. The bias was pronounced equally for compatible and incompatible trials, wherein observed and imagined actions were different in type (e.g., face washing vs. painting or plane of movement, or both. In contrast, no imitation bias was observed when MI conflicted with AO. In Experiment 2, motor execution synchronised with AO produced a stronger imitation bias compared to AO + MI, showing an advantage in synchronisation for overt execution over MI. Furthermore, the bias was stronger when participants synchronised the instructed action with the distractor movie, compared to when they synchronised the distractor action with the distractor movie. Although we still observed a significant bias in the latter condition, this finding indicates a degree of specificity in AI effects for the identity of the synchronised action. Overall, our data show that MI can substantially modulate the effects of AO on subsequent execution, wherein: (1 combined AO + MI can enhance AI effects relative to passive AO; (2 observed and imagined actions can be flexibly coordinated across different action types and planes; and (3 conflicting AO + MI can abolish AI effects. Therefore, combined AO + MI instructions should be considered in motor training and

  11. String effective actions, dualities, and generating solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chemissany, Wissam Ali

    2008-01-01

    This thesis covers in general two separate topics: the string e®ective actions and the geodesic motion of brane solutions. The main theme of the ¯rst topic, i.e., the string e®ective actions, is the construction of the abelian D-brane e®ective action. In the limit of constant ¯eld strengths this act

  12. Shocking action: Facilitative effects of punishing electric shocks on action control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Andreas B; Dignath, David; Erle, Thorsten M; Wiemer, Julian

    2017-08-01

    Four experiments examined motivational effects of response-contingent electric shocks on action initiation. Although the shock was unambiguously aversive for the individual in line with subjective and functional criteria, results showed that the shock-producing action was initiated faster relative to a response producing no shock. However, no facilitation effect was found when strong shocks were delivered, ruling out increased emotional arousal as an explanation. The action was initiated faster even when the response discontinued to generate a shock. Furthermore, a control experiment with affectively neutral vibrotactile stimulations at homologous sites showed an analogous response facilitation effect. Overall, the results contradict the widespread belief that a contingency with a punishing response effect is sufficient for a response suppression. Instead, the results suggest that punishing action effects can facilitate action initiation via anticipatory feedback processes. Implications for theories and applications of punishment are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. The effective action in four-dimensional CDT

    CERN Document Server

    Gizbert-Studnicki, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    We present recent results concerning the measurement and analysis of the effective action in four-dimensional Causal Dynamical Triangulations. The action describes quantum fluctuations of the spatial volume of the CDT universe (or alternatively the scale factor) after integrating out other degrees of freedom. We use the covariance of volume fluctuations to measure and parametrize the effective action inside the de Sitter phase, also called the C phase. We show that the action is consistent with a simple discretization of the minisuperspace action (with a reversed overall sign). We discuss possible subleading corrections and show how to construct a more complicated effective action comprising both integer and half-integer discrete proper time layers. We introduce a new method of the effective action measurement based on the transfer matrix. We show that the results of the new method are fully consistent with the covariance matrix method inside the de Sitter phase. We use the new method to measure the effective...

  14. Action-effect congruence during observational learning leads to faster action sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Jared C; Gray, Zachary; Schilberg, Lukas; Vidrin, Ilya; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Common coding theory suggests that any action (pressing a piano key) is intimately linked with its resultant sensory effect (an auditory musical tone). We conducted two experiments to explore the effect of varying auditory action-effect patterns during complex action learning. In Experiment 1, participants were assigned to 1 of 4 groups, watched a silent video of a hand playing a sequence on a piano keyboard with no auditory action effect (observation) and were asked to practise and perform the sequence on an identical keyboard with varying action effects (reproduction). During reproduction, Group 1 heard no auditory tones (identical to observed video), Group 2 heard typical scale-ascending piano tones with each key press, Group 3 heard fixed but out-of-sequence piano tones with each key press, and Group 4 heard random piano tones with each key press. In Experiment two, new participants were assigned to 1 of 2 groups and watched an identical video; however, the video in this experiment contained typical, scale-ascending piano sounds. During reproduction, Group 1 heard no auditory tones while Group 2 heard typical, scale-ascending piano tones with each key press (identical to observed video). Our results showed that participants whose action-effect patterns during reproduction matched those in the observed video learned the action sequence faster than participants whose action-effect patterns during reproduction differed from those in the observed video. Additionally, our results suggest that adding an effect during reproduction (when one is absent during observation) is somewhat more detrimental to action sequence learning than removing an effect during reproduction (when one is present during observation).

  15. Effects of social intention on movement kinematics in cooperative actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois eQuesque

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Optimal control models of biological movements are used to account for those internal variables that constrain voluntary goal-directed actions. They however do not take into account external environmental constraints as those associated to social intention. We investigated here the effects of the social context on kinematic characteristics of sequential actions consisting in placing an object on an initial pad (preparatory action before reaching and grasping as fast as possible the object to move it to another location (main action. Reach-to-grasp actions were performed either in an isolated condition or in the presence of a partner (audience effect, located in the near or far space (effect of shared reachable space, and who could intervene on the object in a systematic fashion (effect of social intention effect or not (effect of social uncertainty. Results showed an absence of audience effect but nevertheless an influence of the social context both on the main and the preparatory actions. In particular, a localized effect of shared reachable space was observed on the main action, which was smoother when performed within the reachable space of the partner. Furthermore, a global effect of social uncertainty was observed on both actions with faster and jerkier movements. Finally, social intention affected the preparatory action with higher wrist displacements and slower movements when the object was placed for the partner rather than placed for self-use. Overall, these results demonstrate specific effects of action space, social uncertainty and social intention on the planning of reach-to-grasp actions, in particular on the preparatory action, which was performed with no specific execution constraint. These findings underline the importance of considering the social context in optimal models of action control for human-robot interactions, in particular when focusing on the implementation of motor parameters required to afford intuitive

  16. On the calculation of effective actions by string methods

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, M G

    1993-01-01

    Strassler's formulation of the string-derived Bern-Kosower formalism is reconsidered with particular emphasis on effective actions and form factors. Two- and three point form factors in the nonabelian effective action are calculated and compared with those obtained in the heat kernel approach of Barvinsky, Vilkovisky et al. We discuss the Fock-Schwinger gauge and propose a manifestly covariant calculational scheme for one-loop effective actions in gauge theory.

  17. A convergent series for the QED effective action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y M; Pak, D G

    2001-03-05

    The one-loop effective action of QED obtained by Heisenberg and Euler and by Schwinger has been expressed by an asymptotic perturbative series which is divergent. In this Letter we present a nonperturbative but convergent series of the effective action. With the convergent series we establish the existence of the manifest electric-magnetic duality in the one-loop effective action of QED.

  18. Foundation ActionScript 30 Image Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Yard, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Flash has always been a tool for delivering compelling and unique experiences through dynamic visual presentation. The Flash platform has grown to include application development in Flex, video streaming with the Flash Media Server, and desktop delivery through AIR, but all of that content still comes down to pixels on the screen, and all of those pixels can be manipulated through the power of the ActionScript language. In this book, you will find in-depth coverage of the graphics capabilities of ActionScript 3.0: the enhanced drawing API in Flash Player 10 that allows you to draw vector shape

  19. Action-specific effects in perception and their potential applications

    OpenAIRE

    Witt, Jessica K.; Linkenauger, Sally; Wickens, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Spatial perception is biased by action. Hills appear steeper and distances appear farther to individuals who would have to exert more effort to transverse the space. Objects appear closer, smaller, and faster when they are easier to obtain. Athletes who are playing better than others see their targets as bigger. These phenomena are collectively known as action-specific effects on perception. In this target article, we review evidence for action-specific effects, including evidence that they r...

  20. Effective Action and Schwinger Pair Production in Strong QED

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2009-01-01

    Some field theoretical aspects, such as the effective action and Schwinger pair production, are critically reviewed in strong QED. The difference of the boundary conditions on the solutions of the field equation is discussed to result in the effective action both in the Coulomb and time-dependent gauge. Finally, the apparent spin-statistics inversion is also discussed, where the WKB action for bosons (fermions) works well for fermion (boson) pair-production rate.

  1. Effective action for supersymmetric chiral anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivoshchekov, V.K.; Chekhov, L.O.

    1987-05-01

    It is shown that consistency conditions of the type of the Wess-Zumino conditions are necessary and sufficient conditions for local integrability of the supersymmetric chiral anomaly. It follows from the requirement of global integrability that the coefficient of the anomalous action is discrete. Explicit expressions are obtained for consistent anomalies and the corresponding functionals, which depend on superfields of various types.

  2. Effective action and semiclassical limit of spin foam models

    CERN Document Server

    Mikovic, A

    2011-01-01

    We define an effective action for spin foam models of quantum gravity by adapting the background field method from quantum field theory. We show that the Regge action is the leading term in the semi-classical expansion of the spin foam effective action if the vertex amplitude has the large-spin asymptotics which is proportional to an exponential function of the vertex Regge action. In the case of the known three-dimensional and four-dimensional spin foam models this amounts to modifying the vertex amplitude such that the exponential asymptotics is obtained. In particular, we show that the ELPR/FK model vertex amplitude can be modified such that the new model is finite and has the Einstein-Hilbert action as its classical limit. We also calculate the first-order and some of the second-order quantum corrections in the semi-classical expansion of the effective action.

  3. Action-effect learning in early childhood: does language matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbach, Julia; Kray, Jutta; Hommel, Bernhard

    2011-07-01

    Previous work showed that language has an important function for the development of action control. This study examined the role of verbal processes for action-effect learning in 4-year-old children. Participants performed an acquisition phase including a two-choice key-pressing task in which each key press (action) was followed by a particular sound (effect). Children were instructed to either (1) label their actions along with the corresponding effects, (2) verbalize task-irrelevant words, (3) or perform without verbalization. In a subsequent test phase, they responded to the same sound effects either under consistent or under inconsistent sound-key mappings. Evidence for action-effect learning was obtained only if action and effects were labeled or if no verbalization was performed, but not if children verbalized task-irrelevant labels. Importantly, action-effect learning was most pronounced when children verbalized the actions and the corresponding effects, suggesting that task-relevant verbal labeling supports the integration of event representations.

  4. Singularity-free cosmological solutions of the superstring effective action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniadis, I. (Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Centre de Physique Theorique); Rizos, J. (Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Centre de Physique Theorique); Tamvakis, K. (Ioannina Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Physics)

    1994-03-07

    We study the cosmological solutions of the one-loop corrected superstring effective action, in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background, and in the presence of the dilaton and modulus fields. A particularly interesting class of solutions is found which avoid the initial singularity and are consistent with the perturbative treatment of the effective action. (orig.)

  5. Kaluza-Klein monopole and 5-brane effective actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyras, E; Lozano, Y

    2000-01-01

    We review the construction of the Kaluza-Klein monopole of the Type IIA theory in the most general case of a massive background, as well as its relation via T-duality with the Type IIB NS-5-brane. This last effective action is shown to be related by S-duality to the D5-brane effective action. [GRAPH

  6. Gauge dependence of the effective action in Einstein gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, P.M.; Reshetnyak, A.A. [Tomsk State Pedagogical Institute (Russian Federation)

    1995-10-01

    Einstein gravity is considered in a special one-parameter background gauge. The one-loop effective action of the theory is calculated to the first order in the gauge parameter. It is shown that, on the mass shell, the effective action is independent of the gauge parameter. 57 refs.

  7. 10D = eesti disainer + soome firma / Ilona Gurjanova

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gurjanova, Ilona, 1958-

    2006-01-01

    Koostööprojektist, mille tulemusena pidi valmima kümnel eesti disaineril soome mööblitootja poolt tellitud mööbliese, mille valmistab eesti tootja. 10D disainikonkursi võitjad: I koht -Igor Volkov, lastetool "Dixi", II - Martin Pärn, istepink "Kosta", Tarmo Luisk, pehme järi "Dog", ära märgiti Ilona Gurjanova graafiliselt kujundatud kahhelkivid ja ürituse tunnusgraafika

  8. Duality symmetries and the type II string effective action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the duality symmetries of Type II string effective actions in nine, ten and eleven dimensions. As a by-product we give a covariant action underlying the ten-dimensional Type IIB supergravity theory. We apply duality symmetries to construct dyonic Type II string solutions in six dimensions

  9. Effective action for EPRL/FK spin foam models

    CERN Document Server

    Mikovic, Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    We show that a natural modification of the EPRL/FK vertex amplitude gives a finite spin foam model whose effective action gives the Einstein-Hilbert action in the limit of large spins and arbitrarily fine spacetime triangulations. The first-order quantum corrections can be easily computed and we show how to calculate the higher-order corrections.

  10. Effective action for hard thermal loops in gravitational fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Francisco

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We examine, through a Boltzmann equation approach, the generating action of hard thermal loops in the background of gravitational fields. Using the gauge and Weyl invariance of the theory at high temperature, we derive an explicit closed-form expression for the effective action.

  11. Effective Action of Scalar QED in Electric Field Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang Pyo; Yoon, Yongsung

    2008-01-01

    We use the evolution operator method to find the one-loop effective action of scalar QED in electric field backgrounds in terms of the Bogoliubov coefficient between the ingoing and the outgoing vacuum. The effective action shows the general relation between the vacuum persistence and the mean number of created pairs for any electric field. We obtain the exact effective action for a constant electric field and a pulsed electric field, E_0 sech^2 (t/tau), and show that the imaginary part correctly yields the vacuum persistence.

  12. Techniques for calculations with nPI effective actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrington M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a symmetric scalar theory with quartic coupling in 2- and 3- dimensions and compare the self-consistent 4-point vertex obtained from the 4PI effective action with the Bethe-Salpeter 4-vertex from 2PI effective action. We show that when the coupling is large the contributions from the higher order effective action are large. We also show that one can solve the 2PI equations of motion in 4-dimensions, without introducing counter-terms, using a renormalization group method. This method provides a promising starting point to study the renormalization of higher order nPI theories.

  13. Effective supergravity actions for flop transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarv, Laur; Mohaupt, Thomas; Saueressig, Frank E-mail: F.Saueressig@tpi.uni-jena.de

    2003-12-01

    We construct a family of five-dimensional gauged supergravity actions which describe flop transitions of M-theory compactified on Calabi-Yau three folds. While the vector multiplet sector can be treated exactly, we use the Wolf spaces X(1+N) = U(1+N,2)/(U(1+N) x U(2)) to model the universal hyper multiplet together with N charged hyper multiplets corresponding to winding states of the M2-brane. The metric, the Killing vectors and the moment maps of these spaces are obtained explicitly by using the superconformal quotient construction of quaternion-Kaehler manifolds. The inclusion of the extra hyper multiplets gives rise to a non-trivial scalar potential which is uniquely fixed by M-theory physics. (author)

  14. On the influence of reward on action-effect binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Simon Muhle-Karbe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ideomotor theory states that the formation of anticipatory representations about the perceptual consequences of an action (i.e. action-effect (A-E binding provides the functional basis of voluntary action control. A host of studies has demonstrated that A-E binding occurs fast and effortlessly, yet only little is known about cognitive and affective factors that influence this learning process. In the present study, we sought to test whether the motivational value of an action modulates the acquisition of A-E associations. To this end, we associated specific actions with monetary incentives during the acquisition of novel A-E mappings. In a subsequent test phase, the degree of binding was assessed by presenting the former effect stimuli as task-irrelevant response primes in a forced-choice response task in the absence of any reward. Binding, as indexed by response priming through the former action effects, was only found for reward-related A-E mappings. Moreover, the degree to which reward associations modulated the binding strength was predicted by individuals’ trait sensitivity to reward. These observations indicate that the association of actions and their immediate outcomes depends on the motivational value of the action during learning, as well as on the motivational disposition of the individual. On a larger scale, these findings also highlight the link between ideomotor theories and reinforcement-learning theories, providing an interesting perspective for future research on anticipatory regulation of behavior.

  15. The internal anticipation of sensory action effects: when action induces FFA and PPA activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Kühn

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary action – in particular the ability to produce desired effects in the environment – is fundamental to human existence. According to ideomotor theory we can achieve goals in the environment by means of anticipating their outcomes. We aimed at providing neurophysiological evidence for the assumption that performing actions calls for the activation of brain areas associated with the sensory effects usually evoked by the actions. We conducted an fMRI study in which right and left button presses lead to the presentation of face and house pictures. We compared a baseline phase with the same phase after participants experienced the association between button presses and pictures. We found an increase in the parahippocampal place area (PPA for the response that has been associated with house pictures and fusiform face area (FFA for the response that has been coupled with face pictures. This observation constitutes support for ideomotor theory.

  16. World-volume Effective Actions of Exotic Five-branes

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Tetsuji; Yata, Masaya

    2014-01-01

    We construct world-volume effective actions of exotic $5^2_2$-branes in type IIA and IIB string theories. The effective actions are given in fully space-time covariant forms with two Killing vectors associated with background isometries. The effective theories are governed by the six-dimensional $\\mathcal{N}=(2,0)$ tensor multiplet and $\\mathcal{N}=(1,1)$ vector multiplet, respectively. Performing the S-duality transformation to the $5^2_2$-brane effective action in type IIB string theory, we also work out the world-volume action of the $5^2_3$-brane. We discuss some additional issues relevant to the exotic five-branes in type I and heterotic string theories.

  17. QCD Effective action at high temperature and small chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Villavicencio, C

    2007-01-01

    We present a construction of an effective Yang-Mills action for QCD, from the expansion of the fermionic determinant in terms of powers of the chemical potential at high temperature, for the case of massless quarks. We analyze this expansion in the perturbative region and find that it gives extra spurious information. We propose for the non-perturbative sector a simplified effective action which, in principle, contains only the relevant information.

  18. Urban Heat Island Effect Actions - Neighborhood Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisville Metro Government — The urban heat island effect — defined as the difference in temperature between the core of Louisville and its suburbs — contributes to heat-related illnesses and...

  19. Courses of action for effects based operations using evolutionary algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Sajjad; Levis, Alexander H.

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents an Evolutionary Algorithms (EAs) based approach to identify effective courses of action (COAs) in Effects Based Operations. The approach uses Timed Influence Nets (TINs) as the underlying mathematical model to capture a dynamic uncertain situation. TINs provide a concise graph-theoretic probabilistic approach to specify the cause and effect relationships that exist among the variables of interest (actions, desired effects, and other uncertain events) in a problem domain. The purpose of building these TIN models is to identify and analyze several alternative courses of action. The current practice is to use trial and error based techniques which are not only labor intensive but also produce sub-optimal results and are not capable of modeling constraints among actionable events. The EA based approach presented in this paper is aimed to overcome these limitations. The approach generates multiple COAs that are close enough in terms of achieving the desired effect. The purpose of generating multiple COAs is to give several alternatives to a decision maker. Moreover, the alternate COAs could be generalized based on the relationships that exist among the actions and their execution timings. The approach also allows a system analyst to capture certain types of constraints among actionable events.

  20. Renormalization and effective actions for general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neugebohrn, F.

    2007-05-15

    Quantum gravity is analyzed from the viewpoint of the renormalization group. The analysis is based on methods introduced by J. Polchinski concerning the perturbative renormalization with flow equations. In the first part of this work, the program of renormalization with flow equations is reviewed and then extended to effective field theories that have a finite UV cutoff. This is done for a scalar field theory by imposing additional renormalization conditions for some of the nonrenormalizable couplings. It turns out that one so obtains a statement on the predictivity of the effective theory at scales far below the UV cutoff. In particular, nonrenormalizable theories can be treated without problems in the proposed framework. In the second part, the standard covariant BRS quantization program for Euclidean Einstein gravity is applied. A momentum cutoff regularization is imposed and the resulting violation of the Slavnov-Taylor identities is discussed. Deriving Polchinski's renormalization group equation for Euclidean quantum gravity, the predictivity of effective quantum gravity at scales far below the Planck scale is investigated with flow equations. A fine-tuning procedure for restoring the violated Slavnov-Taylor identities is proposed and it is argued that in the effective quantum gravity context, the restoration will only be accomplished with finite accuracy. Finally, the no-cutoff limit of Euclidean quantum gravity is analyzed from the viewpoint of the Polchinski method. It is speculated whether a limit with nonvanishing gravitational constant might exist where the latter would ultimatively be determined by the cosmological constant and the masses of the elementary particles. (orig.)

  1. Perception, action, and Roelofs effect: a mere illusion of dissociation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Dassonville

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available A prominent and influential hypothesis of vision suggests the existence of two separate visual systems within the brain, one creating our perception of the world and another guiding our actions within it. The induced Roelofs effect has been described as providing strong evidence for this perception/action dissociation: When a small visual target is surrounded by a large frame positioned so that the frame's center is offset from the observer's midline, the perceived location of the target is shifted in the direction opposite the frame's offset. In spite of this perceptual mislocalization, however, the observer can accurately guide movements to the target location. Thus, perception is prone to the illusion while actions seem immune. Here we demonstrate that the Roelofs illusion is caused by a frame-induced transient distortion of the observer's apparent midline. We further demonstrate that actions guided to targets within this same distorted egocentric reference frame are fully expected to be accurate, since the errors of target localization will exactly cancel the errors of motor guidance. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the various perceptual and motor effects of the induced Roelofs illusion without requiring the existence of separate neural systems for perception and action. Given this, the behavioral dissociation that accompanies the Roelofs effect cannot be considered evidence of a dissociation of perception and action. This indicates a general need to re-evaluate the broad class of evidence purported to support this hypothesized dissociation.

  2. Boldine action against the stannous chloride effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiniger, I W; Ribeiro da Silva, C; Felzenszwalb, I; de Mattos, J C; de Oliveira, J F; da Silva Dantas, F J; Bezerra, R J; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Bernardo-Filho, M

    1999-12-15

    Peumus boldus extract has been used in popular medicine in the treatment of biliar litiase, hepatic insufficiency and liver congestion. Its effects are associated to the substance boldine that is present in its extract. In the present work, we evaluated the influence of boldine both in: (i) the structural conformation of a plasmid pUC 9.1 through gel electrophoresis analysis; and in (ii) the survival of the strain of Escherichia coli AB1157 submitted to reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated by a Fenton like reaction, induced by stannous chloride. Our results show a reduction of the lethal effect induced by stannous chloride on the survival of the E. coli culture in the presence of boldine. The supercoiled form of the plasmid is not modified by stannous chloride in the presence of boldine. We suggest that the protection induced by boldine could be explained by its anti-oxidant mechanism. In this way, the boldine could be reacting with stannous ions, protecting them against the oxidation and, consequently, avoiding the generation of ROS.

  3. Effective Action of Softly Broken Supersymmetric Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Nibbelink, S G; Nibbelink, Stefan Groot; Nyawelo, Tino S.

    2007-01-01

    We study the renormalization of (softly) broken supersymmetric theories at the one loop level in detail. We perform this analysis in a superspace approach in which the supersymmetry breaking interactions are parameterized using spurion insertions. We comment on the uniqueness of this parameterization. We compute the one loop renormalization of such theories by calculating superspace vacuum graphs with multiple spurion insertions. To preform this computation efficiently we develop algebraic properties of spurion operators, that naturally arise because the spurions are often surrounded by superspace projection operators. Our results are general apart from the restrictions that higher super covariant derivative terms and some finite effects due to non-commutativity of superfield dependent mass matrices are ignored. One of the soft potentials induces renormalization of the Kaehler potential.

  4. Non-dissipative hydrodynamics: effective actions versus entropy current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy; Bhattacharyya, Sayantani; Rangamani, Mukund

    2013-02-01

    While conventional hydrodynamics incorporating dissipative effects is hard to derive from an action principle, it is nevertheless possible to construct classical actions when the dissipative terms are switched off. In this note we undertake a systematic exploration of such constructions from an effective field theory approach and argue for the existence of non-trivial second order non-dissipative hydrodynamics involving pure energy-momentum transport. We find these fluids to be characterized by five second-order transport coefficients based on the effective action (a three parameter family is Weyl invariant). On the other hand since all flows of such fluids are non-dissipative, they entail zero entropy production; one can therefore understand them using the entropy current formalism which has provided much insight into hydrodynamic transport. An analysis of the most general stress tensor with zero entropy production however turns out to give a seven parameter family of non-dissipative hydrodynamics (a four parameter sub-family being Weyl invariant). The non-dissipative fluids derived from the effective action approach are a special case of the fluid dynamics constrained by conservation of the entropy current. We speculate on the reasons for the mismatch and potential limitations of the effective action approach.

  5. Effective Actions of Matrix Models on Homogeneous Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Imai, T; Takayama, Y; Tomino, D

    2002-01-01

    We evaluate the effective actions of supersymmetric matrix models on fuzzy S^2times S^2 up to the two loop level. Remarkably it turns out to be a consistent solution of IIB matrix model. Based on the power counting and SUSY cancellation arguments, we can identify the 't Hooft coupling and large N scaling behavior of the effective actions to all orders. In the large N limit, the quantum corrections survive except in 2 dimensional limits. They are O(N) and O(N^{4over 3}) for 4 and 6 dimensional spaces respectively. We argue that quantum effects single out 4 dimensionality of space-time.

  6. Truncation Effects in Monte Carlo Renormalization Group Improved Lattice Actions

    CERN Document Server

    Takaishi, T; Forcrand, Ph. de

    1998-01-01

    We study truncation effects in the SU(3) gauge actions obtained by the Monte Carlo renormalization group method. By measuring the heavy quark potential we find that the truncation effects in the actions coarsen the lattice by 40-50 % from the original blocked lattice. On the other hand, we find that rotational symmetry of the heavy quark potentials is well recovered on such coarse lattices, which may indicate that rotational symmetry breaking terms are easily cancelled out by adding a short distance operator. We also discuss the possibility of reducing truncation effects.

  7. One-loop effective action in quantum gravitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rachwal, Leslaw; Codello, Alessandro; Percacci, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present the formalism of computing one-loop effective action for Quantum Gravitation using non-local heat kernel methods. We found agreement with previous old results. In main part of my presentation I considered the system of E-H gravitation and scalar fields. We were able to derive non......-local quantum effective action up to the second order in heat kernel generalized curvatures. By going to flat spacetime expressions for gravitational form factors are possible to construct and compare with the results from effective field theory for gravity....

  8. Early markers of ongoing action-effect learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruge, Hannes; Krebs, Ruth M; Wolfensteller, Uta

    2012-01-01

    Acquiring knowledge about the relationship between stimulus conditions, one's own actions, and the resulting consequences or effects, is one prerequisite for intentional action. Previous studies have shown that such contextualized associations between actions and their effects (S-R-E associations) can be picked up very quickly. The present study examined how such weakly practiced associations might affect overt behavior during the process of initial learning and during subsequent retrieval, and how these two measures are inter-related. We examined incidental (S-)R-E learning in the context of trial-and-error S-R learning and in the context of instruction-based S-R learning. Furthermore, as a control condition, common outcome (CO) learning blocks were included in which all responses produced one common sound effect, hence precluding differential (S-)R-E learning. Post-learning retrieval of R-E associations was tested by re-using previously produced sound effects as novel imperative stimuli combined with actions that were either compatible or incompatible with the previously encountered R-E mapping. The central result was that the size of the compatibility effect could be predicted by the size of relative response slowing during ongoing learning in the preceding acquisition phase, both in trial-and-error learning and in instruction-based learning. Importantly, this correlation was absent for the CO control condition, precluding accounts based on unspecific factors. Instead, the results suggest that differential outcomes are "actively" integrated into action planning and that this takes additional planning time. We speculate that this might be especially true for weakly practiced (S-)R-E associations before an initial goal-directed action mode transitions into a more stimulus-based action mode.

  9. Early markers of ongoing action-effect learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes eRuge

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring knowledge about the relationship between stimulus conditions, one’s own actions, and the resulting consequences or effects, is one prerequisite for intentional action. Previous studies have shown that such contextualized associations between actions and their effects (S-R-E associations can be picked up very quickly. The present study examined how such weakly practiced associations might affect overt behavior during the process of initial learning and during subsequent retrieval, and how these two measures are inter-related. We examined incidental (S-R-E learning in the context of trial-and-error S-R learning and in the context of instruction-based S-R learning. Furthermore, as a control condition, common outcome (CO learning blocks were included in which all responses produced one common sound effect, hence precluding differential (S-R-E learning. Post-learning retrieval of R-E associations was tested by re-using previously produced sound effects as novel imperative stimuli combined with actions that were either compatible or incompatible with the previously encountered R-E mapping. The central result was that the size of the compatibility effect could be predicted by the size of relative response slowing during ongoing learning in the preceding acquisition phase, both in trial-and-error learning and in instruction-based learning. Importantly, this correlation was absent for the common outcome control condition, precluding accounts based on unspecific factors. Instead, the results suggest that differential outcomes are ‘actively’ integrated into action planning and that this takes additional planning time. We speculate that this might be especially true for weakly practiced (S-R-E associations before an initial goal-directed action mode transitions into a more stimulus-based action mode.

  10. The Geometric Construction of WZW Effective Action in Noncommutative Manifold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU BoYu; WANG YongQiang; YANG ZhanYing; YUE RuiHong

    2002-01-01

    By constructing close-one-cochain density in the gauge group space we get the Wess Zumino Witten(WZW) effective Lagrangian on high-dimensional noncommutative space. Especially consistent anomalies derived fromthis WZW effective action in noncommutative four-dimensional space coincide with those obtained by L. Bonora etc.(hep-th /0002210).

  11. The Geometric Construction of WZW Effective Action in Noncommutative Manifold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By constructing close-one-cochain density Ω12n in the gauge group space we get the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) effective Lagrangian on high-dimensional noncommutative space.Especially consistent anomalies derived from this WZW effective action in noncommutative four-dimensional space coincide with those obtained by L.Bonora etc.(het-th/0002210).

  12. Power effects on cognitive control: Turning conflict into action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Petra C; Kleiman, Tali; Amodio, David M

    2015-06-01

    Power is known to promote effective goal pursuit, especially when it requires one to overcome distractions or bias. We proposed that this effect involves the ability to engage and implement cognitive control. In Study 1, we demonstrated that power enhances behavioral performance on a response conflict task and that it does so by enhancing controlled processing rather than by reducing automatic processing. In Study 2, we used an event-related potential index of anterior cingulate activity to test whether power effects on control were due to enhanced conflict sensitivity or action implementation. Power did not significantly affect neural sensitivity to conflict; rather, high power was associated with a stronger link between conflict processing and intended action, relative to low power. These findings suggest a new perspective on how social factors can affect controlled processing and offer new evidence regarding the transition between conflict detection and the implementation of action control.

  13. Non-dissipative hydrodynamics: Effective actions versus entropy current

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy; Rangamani, Mukund

    2012-01-01

    While conventional hydrodynamics incorporating dissipative effects is hard to derive from an action principle, it is nevertheless possible to construct classical actions when the dissipative terms are switched off. In this note we undertake a systematic exploration of such constructions from an effective field theory approach and argue for the existence of non-trivial second order non-dissipative hydrodynamics involving pure energy-momentum transport. We find these fluids to be characterized by five second-order transport coefficients based on the effective action (a three parameter family is Weyl invariant). On the other hand since all flows of such fluids are non-dissipative, they entail zero entropy production; one can therefore understand them using the entropy current formalism which has provided much insight into hydrodynamic transport. An analysis of the most general stress tensor with zero entropy production however turns out to give a seven parameter family of non-dissipative hydrodynamics (a four pa...

  14. Vacuum States in 2D Tachyon Effective Action

    CERN Document Server

    Kluson, J

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we will study the ground states of the toy model of 2D closed string tachyon effective action. We will firstly construct the classical solutions of the tachyon effective action that do not induce backreaction on metric and dilaton. Then we will study the quantum mechanics of the zero mode of the tachyon field. We will find family of vacuum states labelled with single parameter. We will also perform the quantum mechanical analysis of the tachyon effective action when we take into account dynamics of nonzero modes. We will calculate the vacuum expectation values of components of the stress energy tensor and dilaton source and we will argue that there is not any backreaction on metric and dilaton.

  15. 2PI effective action and gauge invariance problems

    OpenAIRE

    Carrington, M. E.; Kunstatter, G.; Zaraket, H.

    2003-01-01

    The problem of maintaining gauge invariance when truncating the two particle irreducible (2PI) effective action has been studied recently by several authors. Here we give a simple and very general derivation of the gauge dependence identities for the off-shell 2PI effective action. We consider the case where the gauge is fixed by an arbitrary function of the quantum gauge field, subject only to the restriction that the Faddeev-Popov matrix is invertable. We also study the background field gau...

  16. Duality, Monodromy and Integrability of Two Dimensional String Effective Action

    CERN Document Server

    Das, A; Melikyan, A; Das, Ashok

    2002-01-01

    The monodromy matrix, ${\\hat{\\cal M}}$, is constructed for two dimensional tree level string effective action. The pole structure of ${\\hat{\\cal M}}$ is derived using its factorizability property. It is found that the monodromy matrix transforms non-trivially under the non-compact T-duality group, which leaves the effective action invariant and this can be used to construct the monodromy matrix for more complicated backgrounds starting from simpler ones. We construct, explicitly, ${\\hat{\\cal M}}$ for the exactly solvable Nappi-Witten model, both when B=0 and $B\

  17. Boundary Conditions for NHEK through Effective Action Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bin; NING Bo; ZHANG Jia-Ju

    2012-01-01

    We study the asymptotic symmetry group (ASG) of the near horizon geometry of extreme Kerr black hole through the effective action approach developed by Porfyriadis and Wilczek (arXiv:1007.1031v1[gr qc]).By requiring a finite boundary effective action,we derive a new set of asymptotic Killing vectors and boundary conditions,which are much more relaxed than the ones proposed by Matsuo Y et al.[Nucl.Phys.B 825 (2010) 231],and still allow a copy of a conformal group as its ASG.In the covariant formalism,the asymptotic charges are finite,with the corresponding central charge vanishing.By using the quasi-local charge and introducing a plausible cut-off,we find that the higher order terms of the asymptotic Killing vectors,which could not be determined through the effective action approach,contribute to the central charge as well.We also show that the boundary conditions suggested by Guica et al.[Phys.Rev.D 80 (2009)124008] lead to a divergent first-order boundary effective action.%We study the asymptotic symmetry group (ASG) of the near horizon geometry of extreme Kerr black hole through the effective action approach developed by Porfyriadis and Wilczek (arXiv:1007.1031vl[gr qc]). By requiring a finite boundary effective action, we derive a new set of asymptotic Killing vectors and boundary conditions, which are much more relaxed than the ones proposed by Matsuo Y et al. [Nucl. Phys. B 825 (2010) 231], and still allow a copy of a conformal group as its ASG. In the covariant formalism, the asymptotic charges are finite, with the corresponding central charge vanishing. By using the quasi-local charge and introducing a plausible cut-off, we find that the higher order terms of the asymptotic Killing vectors, which could not be determined through the effective action approach, contribute to the central charge as well. We also show that the boundary conditions suggested by Guica et al. [Phys. Rev. D 80 (2009) 124008] lead to a divergent first-order boundary effective action.

  18. Computing the effective action with the functional renormalization group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codello, Alessandro; Percacci, Roberto; Rachwał, Lesław

    2016-01-01

    The “exact” or “functional” renormalization group equation describes the renormalization group flow of the effective average action Γ k. The ordinary effective action Γ 0 can be obtained by integrating the flow equation from an ultraviolet scale k= Λ down to k= 0. We give several examples of such...... of QED and of Yang–Mills theory. We also compute the two-point functions for scalars and gravitons in the effective field theory of scalar fields minimally coupled to gravity.......The “exact” or “functional” renormalization group equation describes the renormalization group flow of the effective average action Γ k. The ordinary effective action Γ 0 can be obtained by integrating the flow equation from an ultraviolet scale k= Λ down to k= 0. We give several examples...... of such calculations at one-loop, both in renormalizable and in effective field theories. We reproduce the four-point scattering amplitude in the case of a real scalar field theory with quartic potential and in the case of the pion chiral Lagrangian. In the case of gauge theories, we reproduce the vacuum polarization...

  19. Anomalous effective action, Noether current, Virasoro algebra and Horizon entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan [IUCAA, Ganeshkhind, Pune University Campus, Post Bag 4, Pune (India); Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Racah Institute of Physics, Jerusalem (Israel); Chakraborty, Sumanta [IUCAA, Ganeshkhind, Pune University Campus, Post Bag 4, Pune (India)

    2014-05-15

    Several investigations show that in a very small length scale there exist corrections to the entropy of black hole horizon. Due to fluctuations of the background metric and the external fields the action incorporates corrections. In the low energy regime, the one-loop effective action in four dimensions leads to trace anomaly. We start from the Noether current corresponding to the Einstein-Hilbert plus the one-loop effective action to calculate the charge for the diffeomorphisms which preserve the Killing horizon structure. Then a bracket for the charges is calculated. We show that the Fourier modes of the bracket are exactly similar to the Virasoro algebra. Then using the Cardy formula the entropy is evaluated. Finally, the explicit terms of the entropy expression is calculated for a classical background. It turns out that the usual expression for the entropy; i.e. the Bekenstein-Hawking form, is not modified. (orig.)

  20. Effective action approach to wave propagation in scalar QED plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Yuan; Qin, Hong

    2016-01-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory with nontrivial background fields is developed and applied to study waves in plasmas. The effective action of the electromagnetic 4-potential is calculated ab initio from the standard action of scalar QED using path integrals. The resultant effective action is gauge invariant and contains nonlocal interactions, from which gauge bosons acquire masses without breaking the local gauge symmetry. To demonstrate how the general theory can be applied, we study a cold unmagnetized plasma and a cold uniformly magnetized plasma. Using these two examples, we show that all linear waves well-known in classical plasma physics can be recovered from relativistic quantum results when taking the classical limit. In the opposite limit, classical wave dispersion relations are modified substantially. In unmagnetized plasmas, longitudinal waves propagate with nonzero group velocities even when plasmas are cold. In magnetized plasmas, anharmonically spaced Bernstein waves persist even when plasma...

  1. The ligand Sas and its receptor PTP10D drive tumour-suppressive cell competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masatoshi; Ohsawa, Shizue; Kunimasa, Kei; Igaki, Tatsushi

    2017-02-09

    Normal epithelial cells often exert anti-tumour effects against nearby oncogenic cells. In the Drosophila imaginal epithelium, clones of oncogenic cells with loss-of-function mutations in the apico-basal polarity genes scribble or discs large are actively eliminated by cell competition when surrounded by wild-type cells. Although c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signalling plays a crucial role in this cell elimination, the initial event, which occurs at the interface between normal cells and polarity-deficient cells, has not previously been identified. Here, through a genetic screen in Drosophila, we identify the ligand Sas and the receptor-type tyrosine phosphatase PTP10D as the cell-surface ligand-receptor system that drives tumour-suppressive cell competition. At the interface between the wild-type 'winner' and the polarity-deficient 'loser' clones, winner cells relocalize Sas to the lateral cell surface, whereas loser cells relocalize PTP10D there. This leads to the trans-activation of Sas-PTP10D signalling in loser cells, which restrains EGFR signalling and thereby enables elevated JNK signalling in loser cells, triggering cell elimination. In the absence of Sas-PTP10D, elevated EGFR signalling in loser cells switches the role of JNK from pro-apoptotic to pro-proliferative by inactivating the Hippo pathway, thereby driving the overgrowth of polarity-deficient cells. These findings uncover the mechanism by which normal epithelial cells recognize oncogenic polarity-deficient neighbours to drive cell competition.

  2. Action Research: Effective Marketing Strategies for a Blended University Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ruth Gannon; Ley, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    This action research study investigated a marketing plan based on collaboration among a program faculty team and other organizational units for a graduate professional program. From its inception through the second year of operation, program enrollment increased due to the marketing plan based on an effective approach grounded in simple marketing…

  3. Effects of Action Relations on the Configural Coding between Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddoch, M. J.; Pippard, B.; Booth, L.; Rickell, J.; Summers, J.; Brownson, A.; Humphreys, G. W.

    2011-01-01

    Configural coding is known to take place between the parts of individual objects but has never been shown between separate objects. We provide novel evidence here for configural coding between separate objects through a study of the effects of action relations between objects on extinction. Patients showing visual extinction were presented with…

  4. Solution-generating transformations and the string effective action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E; Janssen, B; Ortin, T

    1996-01-01

    We study exhaustively the solution-generating transformations (dualities) that occur in the context of the low-energy effective action of superstring theory. We first consider target-space duality ('T duality') transformations in the absence of vector fields. We find that for one isometry the full d

  5. The background effective average action approach to quantum gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D’Odorico, G.; Codello, A.; Pagani, C.

    2016-01-01

    of an UV attractive non-Gaussian fixed-point, which we find characterized by real critical exponents. Our closure method is general and can be applied systematically to more general truncations of the gravitational effective average action. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016....

  6. Action Research: Effective Marketing Strategies for a Blended University Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ruth Gannon; Ley, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    This action research study investigated a marketing plan based on collaboration among a program faculty team and other organizational units for a graduate professional program. From its inception through the second year of operation, program enrollment increased due to the marketing plan based on an effective approach grounded in simple marketing…

  7. Two-Loop Gluon Regge Trajectory from Lipatov's Effective Action

    CERN Document Server

    Chachamis, Grigorios; Madrigal, José Daniel; Vera, Agustín Sabio

    2012-01-01

    Lipatov's high-energy effective action is a useful tool for computations in the Regge limit beyond leading order. Recently, a regularisation/subtraction prescription has been proposed that allows to apply this formalism to calculate next-to-leading order corrections in a consistent way. We illustrate this procedure with the computation of the gluon Regge trajectory at two loops.

  8. Effect and mode of action of some systemic nematicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    In this study, nematicidal effects, mode of action and specific characters of some systemic nematicides were studied, in search of substitutes for the widely used soil fumigants that require high dosages. The thesis comprises:- a review of literature,- development of techniques,- a test for nematici

  9. Constraining the effective action by a method of external sources

    CERN Document Server

    Garbrecht, Bjorn

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel method of evaluating the effective action, wherein the physical one- and two-point functions are obtained in the limit of non-vanishing external sources. We illustrate the self-consistency of this method by recovering the usual 2PI effective action due to Cornwall, Jackiw and Tomboulis, differing only by the fact that the saddle-point evaluation of the path integral is performed along the extremal quantum, rather than classical, path. As such, this approach is of particular relevance to situations where the dominant quantum and classical paths are non-perturbatively far away from one-another. A pertinent example is the decay of false vacua in radiatively-generated potentials, as may occur for the electroweak vacuum of the Standard Model. In addition, we describe how the external sources may instead be chosen so as to yield the two-particle-point-irreducible (2PPI) effective action of Coppens and Verschelde. Finally, in the spirit of the symmetry-improved effective action of Pilaftsis and Te...

  10. BEPS Action 2: Neutralizing the Effects on Hybrid Mismatch Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, R.; Marres, O.

    2015-01-01

    Curbing tax arbitrage is one of the main priorities of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) (endorsed by the G20 and the G8) ever since the public debate on base erosion fully erupted. Neutralizing the effect of hybrid mismatch arrangements has become Action No. 2 of the

  11. Effective action approach to dynamical generation of fermion mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Blasone, Massimo; Smaldone, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a mechanism for the dynamical generation of flavor mixing, in the framework of the Nambu--Jona Lasinio model. Our approach is illustrated both with the conventional operatorial formalism and with functional integral and ensuing one-loop effective action. The results obtained are briefly discussed.

  12. BEPS Action 2: Neutralizing the Effects on Hybrid Mismatch Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, R.; Marres, O.

    2015-01-01

    Curbing tax arbitrage is one of the main priorities of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) (endorsed by the G20 and the G8) ever since the public debate on base erosion fully erupted. Neutralizing the effect of hybrid mismatch arrangements has become Action No. 2 of the

  13. Effective action for a quantum scalar field in warped spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff da Silva, J.M.; Mendonca, E.L.; Scatena, E. [Universidade Estadual Paulista ' ' Julio de Mesquita Filho' ' -UNESP, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    We investigate the one-loop corrections, at zero as well as finite temperature, of a scalar field taking place in a braneworld motivated warped background. After to reach a well-defined problem, we calculate the effective action with the corresponding quantum corrections to each case. (orig.)

  14. Effective QED Actions Representations, Gauge Invariance, Anomalies and Mass Expansions

    CERN Document Server

    Deser, Stanley D; Seminara, D

    1998-01-01

    We analyze and give explicit representations for the effective abelian vector gauge field actions generated by charged fermions with particular attention to the thermal regime in odd dimensions, where spectral asymmetry can be present. We show, through $\\zeta-$function regularization, that both small and large gauge invariances are preserved at any temperature and for any number of fermions at the usual price of anomalies: helicity/parity invariance will be lost in even/odd dimensions, and in the latter even at zero mass. Gauge invariance dictates a very general ``Fourier'' representation of the action in terms of the holonomies that carry the novel, large gauge invariant, information. We show that large (unlike small) transformations and hence their Ward identities, are not perturbative order-preserving, and clarify the role of (properly redefined) Chern-Simons terms in this context. From a powerful representation of the action in terms of massless heat kernels, we are able to obtain rigorous gauge invariant...

  15. Action co-representation: the joint SNARC effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Silke; Sebanz, Natalie; Prinz, Wolfgang; Knoblich, Günther

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, communication has been defined as the intentional exchange of symbolic information between individuals. In contrast, the mirror system provides a basis for nonsymbolic and nonintentional information exchange between individuals. We believe that understanding the role of the mirror system in joint action has the potential to serve as a bridge between these two domains. The present study investigates one crucial component of joint action: the ability to represent others' potential actions in the same way as one's own in the absence of perceptual evidence. In two experiments a joint spatial numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect is demonstrated, providing further evidence that individuals form functionally equivalent representations of their own and others' potential actions. It is shown that numerical (symbolic) stimuli that are mapped onto a spatially arranged internal representation (a mental number line) can activate a co-represented action in the same way as spatial stimuli. This generalizes previous results on co-representation.We discuss the role of the mirror system in co-representation as a basis for shared intentionality and communication.

  16. Action video game training reduces the Simon Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Claire V; Barrett, Doug J K; Nitka, Aleksander; Raynes, Kerry

    2016-04-01

    A number of studies have shown that training on action video games improves various aspects of visual cognition including selective attention and inhibitory control. Here, we demonstrate that action video game play can also reduce the Simon Effect, and, hence, may have the potential to improve response selection during the planning and execution of goal-directed action. Non-game-players were randomly assigned to one of four groups; two trained on a first-person-shooter game (Call of Duty) on either Microsoft Xbox or Nintendo DS, one trained on a visual training game for Nintendo DS, and a control group who received no training. Response times were used to contrast performance before and after training on a behavioral assay designed to manipulate stimulus-response compatibility (the Simon Task). The results revealed significantly faster response times and a reduced cost of stimulus-response incompatibility in the groups trained on the first-person-shooter game. No benefit of training was observed in the control group or the group trained on the visual training game. These findings are consistent with previous evidence that action game play elicits plastic changes in the neural circuits that serve attentional control, and suggest training may facilitate goal-directed action by improving players' ability to resolve conflict during response selection and execution.

  17. Computing the effective action with the functional renormalization group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Codello, Alessandro [CP3-Origins and the Danish IAS University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Percacci, Roberto [SISSA, Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Rachwal, Leslaw [Fudan University, Department of Physics, Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Shanghai (China); Tonero, Alberto [ICTP-SAIFR and IFT, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-04-15

    The ''exact'' or ''functional'' renormalization group equation describes the renormalization group flow of the effective average action Γ{sub k}. The ordinary effective action Γ{sub 0} can be obtained by integrating the flow equation from an ultraviolet scale k = Λ down to k = 0. We give several examples of such calculations at one-loop, both in renormalizable and in effective field theories. We reproduce the four-point scattering amplitude in the case of a real scalar field theory with quartic potential and in the case of the pion chiral Lagrangian. In the case of gauge theories, we reproduce the vacuum polarization of QED and of Yang-Mills theory. We also compute the two-point functions for scalars and gravitons in the effective field theory of scalar fields minimally coupled to gravity. (orig.)

  18. Norm theory and the action-effect: The role of social norms in regret following action and inaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldman, Gilad; Albarracín, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    The action-effect (Kahneman & Tversky, 1982) is one of the most widely cited and replicated effects in the regret literature, showing that negative outcomes are regretted more when they are a result of action compared to inaction. Building on theoretical arguments by norm theory (Kahneman & Miller,

  19. Effect of exercise on insulin action in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Mikines, K J; Galbo, Henrik

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 1 h of dynamic one-legged exercise on insulin action in human muscle was studied in 6 healthy young men. Four hours after one-legged knee extensions, a three-step sequential euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with arterial and bilateral femoral vein catheterization was perfo...... recovery of human skeletal muscle.......The effect of 1 h of dynamic one-legged exercise on insulin action in human muscle was studied in 6 healthy young men. Four hours after one-legged knee extensions, a three-step sequential euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with arterial and bilateral femoral vein catheterization...... consumption and at some insulin concentrations on potassium exchange. In contrast, no change in insulin effects on limb exchange of free fatty acids, glycerol, alanine or tyrosine were found after exercise. Glycogen concentration in rested vastus lateralis muscle did not increase measurably during the clamp...

  20. Covariant effective action for a Galilean invariant quantum Hall system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geracie, Michael; Prabhu, Kartik; Roberts, Matthew M.

    2016-09-01

    We construct effective field theories for gapped quantum Hall systems coupled to background geometries with local Galilean invariance i.e. Bargmann spacetimes. Along with an electromagnetic field, these backgrounds include the effects of curved Galilean spacetimes, including torsion and a gravitational field, allowing us to study charge, energy, stress and mass currents within a unified framework. A shift symmetry specific to single constituent theories constraints the effective action to couple to an effective background gauge field and spin connection that is solved for by a self-consistent equation, providing a manifestly covariant extension of Hoyos and Son's improvement terms to arbitrary order in m.

  1. Misunderstanding that the Effective Action is Convex under Broken Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Asanuma, Nobu-Hiko

    2016-01-01

    The widespread belief that the effective action is convex and has a flat bottom under broken global symmetry is shown to be wrong. We show spontaneous symmetry breaking necessarily accompanies non-convexity in the effective action for quantum field theory, or in the free energy for statistical mechanics, and clarify the magnitude of non-convexity. For quantum field theory, it is also explicitly proved that translational invariance breaks spontaneously when the system is in the non-convex region, and that different vacua of spontaneously broken symmetry cannot be superposed. As applications of non-convexity, we study the first-order phase transition which happens at the zero field limit of spontaneously broken symmetry, and we propose a simple model of phase coexistence which obeys the Born rule.

  2. Gauge symmetry breaking in gravity and auxiliary effective action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Amin

    2017-02-01

    In the context of the covariant symmetry breaking in gravity, we study the quantum aspect of Chamseddine-Mukhanov model by making use of path integral method. Utilizing one of the gauge fixing constraints, we remove the specific ghost degree of freedom. In continuation, we define an auxiliary effective action. Introducing an auxiliary field, we will have a new dynamic field in addition to the fundamental field.

  3. Topics In Gauge Theory (effective Action, Quantum Electrodynamics, Chern Simons)

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, T M

    1998-01-01

    This dissertation will present studies in three distinct areas of gauge theories. In Chern-Simons theories, the fate of the quantized Chern-Simons coupling constant upon renormalization of the theory is investigated. We find the Chern-Simons coupling constant remains quantized in the presence of residual non-abelian gauge symmetry. A two-flavor model of fermions is studied to determine the extent at which the vacuum condensate is locally proportional to the magnetic field. We find the proportionality is local in the limit of large flux. Using resolvent techniques, we find the exact effective action in a single pulsed electric background gauge field $E\\sb1$(t) = Esech $\\sp2$($t\\over r$). We derive the zero and first order derivative expansion for this electric field and compare with our exact results. Dispersion relations between the real and imaginary parts of the exact effective action are derived. In a uniform semi-classical approximation, we find the exact effective action for a spatially homogeneous backg...

  4. Brane Effective Actions, Kappa-Symmetry and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Simón

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This is a review on brane effective actions, their symmetries and some of their applications. Its first part covers the Green–Schwarz formulation of single M- and D-brane effective actions focusing on kinematical aspects: the identification of their degrees of freedom, the importance of world volume diffeomorphisms and kappa symmetry to achieve manifest spacetime covariance and supersymmetry, and the explicit construction of such actions in arbitrary on-shell supergravity backgrounds. Its second part deals with applications. First, the use of kappa symmetry to determine supersymmetric world volume solitons. This includes their explicit construction in flat and curved backgrounds, their interpretation as Bogomol’nyi–Prasad–Sommerfield (BPS states carrying (topological charges in the supersymmetry algebra and the connection between supersymmetry and Hamiltonian BPS bounds. When available, I emphasise the use of these solitons as constituents in microscopic models of black holes. Second, the use of probe approximations to infer about the non-trivial dynamics of strongly-coupled gauge theories using the anti de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT correspondence. This includes expectation values of Wilson loop operators, spectrum information and the general use of D-brane probes to approximate the dynamics of systems with small number of degrees of freedom interacting with larger systems allowing a dual gravitational description. Its final part briefly discusses effective actions for N D-branes and M2-branes. This includes both Super-Yang-Mills theories, their higher-order corrections and partial results in covariantising these couplings to curved backgrounds, and the more recent supersymmetric Chern–Simons matter theories describing M2-branes using field theory, brane constructions and 3-algebra considerations.

  5. Using the Psychology of Language to Effectively Communicate Actionable Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The words used to articulate science can have as significant a psychological impact on public perception as the data itself. It is therefore essential to utilize language that not only accurately relates the scientific information, but also effectively conveys a message that is congruent with the presenter's motivation for expressing the data. This is especially relevant for environmental subjects that are surrounded by emotionally charged, political discourses. For example are terms like catastrophe and disaster; while these words may accurately illustrate impartial scientific data, they will likely trigger psychological responses in audiences such as fear or denial that have a detrimental impact on the human decision making process. I propose a set of 5 key principles to assist in communicating data to the general public that both support the transfer of ideas and the presenter's intended psychological impact. 1) Articulate the underlying intentions that motivate the communication of data in a transparent manner 2) Use language congruent with the presenter's stated intentions 3) Maintain a neutral, non-judgmental attitude towards the complex human psychological and emotional dynamics present in a target audience 4) Demonstrate acceptance and compassion when analyzing past and present human actions that adversely affect the environment 5) Develop a perspective of non-attachment when proposing future actions and/or consequences of current human behaviors. The application of these 5 principles provides a framework to move from our current understanding of problems and solutions to effective physical action that allows us to gracefully adapt with our ever changing planet.

  6. Braneworld effective action An alternative to Kaluza-Klein reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Barvinsky, A O; Rathke, A; Kiefer, C; Barvinsky, Andrei; Kamenshchik, Alexander; Rathke, Andreas; Kiefer, Claus

    2003-01-01

    We construct the braneworld effective action in the two-brane Randall-Sundrum model in a setup alternative to Kaluza-Klein reduction: The action is written as a functional of the two metric and radion fields on the branes. In the low-energy spectrum of the model we find two - one massless and one massive - graviton modes, the mass of the massive mode diverging in the limit of merging branes. Our results confirm a recently proposed model of braneworld inflation with diverging branes. They also suggest the possibility of a new mechanism for a repulsive interbrane potential which can underlie the model of colliding "thick" branes in the Big Crunch/Big Bang transitions in cosmology. Mixing of the obtained massless and massive modes can be interpreted as radion-induced graviton oscillations potentially interesting for gravitational wave astronomy.

  7. Highly Effective Action from Large N Gauge Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hyun Seok

    2014-01-01

    Recently John H. Schwarz put forward a conjecture that the world-volume action of a probe $D3$-brane in an AdS5 x S5 background of type IIB superstring theory can be reinterpreted as the highly effective action (HEA) of four-dimensional N=4 superconformal field theory on the Coulomb branch. We argue that the HEA can be derived from the noncommutative (NC) field theory representation of the AdS/CFT correspondence and the Seiberg-Witten (SW) map defining a spacetime field redefinition between ordinary and NC gauge fields. It is based only on the well-known facts that the master fields of large N matrices are higher-dimensional NC U(1) gauge fields and the SW map is a local coordinate transformation eliminating U(1) gauge fields known as the Darboux theorem in symplectic geometry.

  8. Covariant Derivation of Effective Actions for SUSY Topological Defects

    CERN Document Server

    París, J; Roca, Jaume

    1998-01-01

    We make a first step to extend to the supersymmetric arena the effective action method, which is used to covariantly deduce the low energy dynamics of topological defects directly from their parent field theory. By focussing on two-dimensional supersymmetric theories we are able to derive the appropriate change of variables that singles out the low energy degrees of freedom. These correspond to super-worldline embeddings in superspace which are subject to a geometrical constraint. We obtain a supersymmetric and $\\kappa$--invariant low energy expansion, with the standard superparticle action as the leading term, which can be used for the determination of higher-order corrections. Our formulation fits quite naturally with the present geometrical description of also provides a basis for the exploration of these issues in higher-dimensional supersymmetric theories.

  9. Side effect of acting on the world: Acquisition of action-outcome statistic relation alters visual interpretation of action outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro eKawabe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Humans can acquire the statistical features of the external world and employ them to control behaviors. Some external events occur in harmony with an agent’s action, and thus humans should also be able to acquire the statistical features between an action and its external outcome. We report that the acquired action-outcome statistical features alter the visual appearance of the action outcome. Pressing either of two assigned keys triggered visual motion whose direction was statistically biased either upward or downward, and observers judged the stimulus motion direction. Points of subjective equality (PSE for judging motion direction were shifted repulsively from the mean of the distribution associated with each key. Our Bayesian model accounted for the PSE shifts, indicating the optimal acquisition of the action-effect statistical relation. The PSE shifts were moderately attenuated when the action-outcome contingency was reduced. The Bayesian model again accounted for the attenuated PSE shifts. On the other hand, when the action-outcome contiguity was greatly reduced, the PSE shifts were greatly attenuated, and however, the Bayesian model could not accounted for the shifts. The results indicate that visual appearance can be modified by prediction based on the optimal acquisition of action-effect causal relation.

  10. PARENTS' AUTHORITY AND THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THEIR EDUCATIONAL ACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanowska-Tolloczko Anna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Facing a gradual crisis of moral authority in the modern world, educationalists underline its importance in the education and upbringing process. The first and, for a long period of time, the most important authority for children are their parents, who often fail to understand the nature of their own significance and impact on the child. They often wrongly associate parental authority with unquestionable power and this faulty reasoning carries negative developmental implications as the child's submissiveness is not tantamount to acceptance and may result from his/her weakness or fear rather than from recognizing parental authority. This article is to emphasise that parents need to be fully aware of their own educational actions in the child upbringing process. It is important to understand that such actions affect the way parents are perceived by children. This article suggests a number of behaviours conducive to building and sustaining the sense of authority and respect as these features are fundamental in ensuring the effectiveness of educational actions undertaken by parents in the upbringing process.

  11. Dilaton Effective Action with $\\mathcal{N}=1$ Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Bobev, Nikolay; Olson, Timothy M

    2013-01-01

    We clarify the structure of the four-dimensional low-energy effective action that encodes the conformal and $U(1)$ R-symmetry anomalies in an $\\mathcal{N}=1$ supersymmetric field theory. The action depends on the dilaton, $\\tau$, associated with broken conformal symmetry, and the Goldstone mode, $\\beta$, of the broken $U(1)$ R-symmetry. We present the action for general curved spacetime and background gauge field up to and including all possible four-derivative terms. The result, constructed from basic principles, extends and clarifies the structure found by Schwimmer and Theisen in arXiv:1011.0696 using superfield methods. We show that the Goldstone mode $\\beta$ does not interfere with the proof of the four-dimensional $a$-theorem based on $2 \\to 2$ dilaton scattering. In fact, supersymmetry Ward identities ensure that a proof of the $a$-theorem can also be based on $2 \\to 2$ Goldstone mode scattering when the low-energy theory preserves $\\mathcal{N}=1$ supersymmetry. We find that even without supersymmetry,...

  12. Bending effects on lasing action of semiconductor nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weisong; Ma, Yaoguang; Wang, Yipei; Meng, Chao; Wu, Xiaoqin; Ye, Yu; Dai, Lun; Tong, Limin; Liu, Xu; Yang, Qing

    2013-01-28

    High flexibility has been one of advantages for one-dimensional semiconductor nanowires (NWs) in wide application of nanoscale integrated circuits. We investigate the bending effects on lasing action of CdSe NWs. Threshold increases and differential efficiency decreases gradually when we decrease the bending radius step by step. Red shift and mode reduction in the output spectra are also observed. The bending loss of laser oscillation is considerably larger than that of photoluminescence (PL), and both show the exponential relationship with the bending radius. Diameter and mode dependent bending losses are investigated. Furthermore, the polarizations of output can be modulated linearly by bending the NWs into different angles continuously.

  13. Partial Supergravity Breaking and the Effective Action of Consistent Truncations

    CERN Document Server

    Grimm, Thomas W; Lust, Severin

    2014-01-01

    We study vacua of N = 4 half-maximal gauged supergravity in five dimensions and determine crucial properties of the effective theory around the vacuum. The main focus is on configurations with exactly two broken supersymmetries, since they frequently appear in consistent truncations of string theory and supergravity. Evaluating one-loop corrections to the Chern-Simons terms we find necessary conditions to ensure that a consistent truncation also gives rise to a proper effective action of an underlying more fundamental theory. To obtain concrete examples, we determine the N=4 action of M-theory on six-dimensional SU(2)-structure manifolds with background fluxes. Calabi-Yau threefolds with vanishing Euler number are examples of SU(2)-structure manifolds that yield N=2 Minkowski vacua. We find that that one-loop corrections to the Chern-Simons terms vanish trivially and thus do not impose constraints on identifying effective theories. This result is traced back to the absence of isometries on these geometries. E...

  14. Effective action for the Regge processes in gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatov, L.N. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2011-05-15

    It is shown, that the effective action for the reggeized graviton interactions can be formulated in terms of the reggeon fields A{sup ++} and A{sup --} and the metric tensor g{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}} in such a way, that it is local in the rapidity space and has the property of general covariance. The corresponding effective currents j{sup -} and j{sup +} satisfy the Hamilton-Jacobi equation for a massless particle moving in the gravitational field. These currents are calculated explicitly for the shock wave-like fields and a variation principle for them is formulated. As an application, we reproduce the effective lagrangian for the multi-regge processes in gravity together with the graviton Regge trajectory in the leading logarithmic approximation with taking into account supersymmetric contributions. (orig.)

  15. Observation of Simple Intransitive Actions: The Effect of Familiarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plata Bello, Julio; Modroño, Cristián; Marcano, Francisco; González–Mora, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Humans are more familiar with index – thumb than with any other finger to thumb grasping. The effect of familiarity has been previously tested with complex, specialized and/or transitive movements, but not with simple intransitive ones. The aim of this study is to evaluate brain activity patterns during the observation of simple and intransitive finger movements with differing degrees of familiarity. Methodology A functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study was performed using a paradigm consisting of the observation of 4 videos showing a finger opposition task between the thumb and the other fingers (index, middle, ring and little) in a repetitive manner with a fixed frequency (1 Hz). This movement is considered as the pantomime of a precision grasping action. Results Significant activity was identified in the bilateral Inferior Parietal Lobule and premotor regions with the selected level of significance (FDR [False Discovery Rate] = 0.01). The extent of the activation in both regions tended to decrease when the finger that performed the action was further from the thumb. More specifically, this effect showed a linear trend (index>middle>ring>little) in the right parietal and premotor regions. Conclusions The observation of less familiar simple intransitive movements produces less activation of parietal and premotor areas than familiar ones. The most important implication of this study is the identification of differences in brain activity during the observation of simple intransitive movements with different degrees of familiarity. PMID:24073213

  16. Constraining gravitational interactions in the M theory effective action

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    We consider purely gravitational interactions of the type D^{2k} R^4 in the effective action of M theory in 11 dimensional flat spacetime, where k \\geq 0. The duality between M theory on S^1 and type IIA string theory, and the structure of the dilaton dependence of string amplitudes, show that the only non-vanishing interactions in the M theory effective action have k=3n. The coefficient of the D^{6n} R^4 interaction in M theory is determined by the genus (n+1) string amplitude of the D^{6n} R^4 interaction in the type IIA theory. Focussing on the even-even spin structure part of the type IIA string amplitude, this coefficient is given by the type IIB genus (n+1) amplitude, which we constrain using supersymmetry, S-duality and maximal supergravity. The source terms of the Poisson equations satisfied by the S-duality invariant IIB couplings play a central role in the analysis. This procedure yields partial contributions to several multi-loop type IIB string amplitudes, from which we extract the coefficients of...

  17. SYNERGIC EFFECT OF THE ACTION OF OPERATIONAL AND FINANCIAL RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MELANIA ELENA MICULEAC

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper allows us to understand the complex action of total risk at microeconomic level, taking into account several factors: the area in which it acts: the operating activity, generating an economic risk, and the financing activity, generating a financial risk; the nature of the observed indicators: the nature of the profit and the nature of the cash; the synergic effect of the action of operational and financial risk, resulting the total risk. We consider that the innovative value of the article resides in the suggested model of correlation between the activity volume and the capital structure, because different approaches give different results, that is why we suggest a unitary approach, a more pragmatic one of the phenomenon. Also, we established the phases observed in order to establish the global profitability threshold of an international corporation which develops activities in several sectors, through several branches. In this article we have used the method of real leverage which measures the total risk of a company by mixing the operating leverage with the financial leverage.

  18. Dura’s Effect on Securities Class Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scotland M. Duncan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available On April 19, 2005, the United States Supreme Court rendered a unanimous decision in Dura Pharmaceuticals, Inc. v. Broudo, which had been described as “the most important securities case in a decade.” Simply put, the decision raises the pleading standard for Rule 10b-5 cases asserting fraud-onthe-market; instead of requiring a showing of ex ante losses, such as inflation at the time of purchase, Dura requires a showing of ex post losses, such as market decline resulting from a corrective disclosure. This paper assesses the decision’s practical implications by examining and empirically testing whether the Supreme Court’s enhanced pleading requirements have impacted the frequency and magnitude of post-Reform Act (PSLRA class action securities cases. Specifically, this paper examines Dura’s effect on the filing and settling of cases, as well as on settlement amount. In particular, the results suggest that Dura, ceteris paribus, has had a statistically significant impact on both the filing and settlement of class actions, suggesting a reduction in frivolous litigation.

  19. Theoretical results on the effect of `shortcut' actions in MDPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Sara M.; Precup, Doina

    2014-04-01

    Temporally extended actions have been used extensively in reinforcement learning in order to speed up the process of learning good behaviours. While such actions are intuitively appealing, very little work has provided a formal analysis of the advantage that can be obtained by using such actions. In this paper, we tackle this problem using the methodology of stochastic processes. We present case studies of Markov decision processes with actions that allow 'shortcuts' between different parts of the environment, and show how such actions affect the travel time between states. Our main finding is that such actions allow for provably quicker travel around the environment, and the benefit increases with the dimensionality of the state space. Hence, extended actions help in efficiently exploring large, high-dimensional domains.

  20. Effective Actions of IIB Matrix Model on S^3

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, Hiromichi; Matsumoto, Koichiro

    2007-01-01

    S^3 is a simple principle bundle which is locally S^2 \\times S^1. It has been shown that such a space can be constructed in terms of matrix models. It has been also shown that such a space can be realized by a generalized compactification procedure in the S^1 direction. We investigate the effective action of supersymmetric gauge theory on S^3 with an angular momentum cutoff and that of a matrix model compactification. The both cases can be realized in a deformed IIB matrix model with a Myers Term. We find that the highly divergent contributions at the tree and one loop level are sensitive to the uv cutoff. However the two loop level contributions are universal since they are only logarithmically divergent. We expect that the higher loop contributions are insensitive to the uv cutoff since 3d gauge theory is super renormalizable.

  1. Effective action and vacuum expectations in nonlinear $\\sigma$ model

    CERN Document Server

    Fayzullaev, B A

    2015-01-01

    The equations for effective action for nonlinear $\\sigma$ model are derived using DeWitt method in two forms - for generator of vertex parts $\\Gamma$ and for generator of weakly connected parts $W$. Loop-expansion solutions to these equations are found. It is shown that vacuum expectation values for various quantities including divergence of a N\\"{o}ther current, trace of the energy-momentum tensor and so on, can be calculated by this method. Also it is shown that vacuum expectation to the sigma-field is determined by an explicit combination of tree Green function and classical solution. It is shown that the limit when coupling constant tends to zero is singular one.

  2. Effective action in a higher-spin background

    CERN Document Server

    Bekaert, Xavier; Mourad, Jihad

    2010-01-01

    We consider a free massless scalar field coupled to an infinite tower of background higher-spin gauge fields via minimal coupling to the traceless conserved currents. The set of Abelian gauge transformations is deformed to the non-Abelian group of unitary operators acting on the scalar field. The gauge invariant effective action is computed perturbatively in the external fields. The structure of the various (divergent or finite) terms is determined. In particular, the quadratic part of the logarithmically divergent (or of the finite) term is expressed in terms of curvatures and related to conformal higher-spin gravity. The generalized higher-spin Weyl anomalies are also determined. The relation with the theory of interacting higher-spin gauge fields on anti de Sitter spacetime via the holographic correspondence is discussed.

  3. Mephedrone: Public health risk, mechanisms of action, and behavioral effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F; Holder, Nicholas D; Ottoson, Paige E; Sweeney, Melanie D; Williams, Tyisha

    2013-08-15

    The recent shortage of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) has led to an increased demand for alternative amphetamine-like drugs such as the synthetic cathinone, 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone). Despite the re-classification of mephedrone as a Class B restricted substance by the United Kingdom and restrictive legislation by the United States, international policy regarding mephedrone control is still developing and interest in synthetic amphetamine-like drugs could drive the development of future mephedrone analogues. Currently, there is little literature investigating the mechanism of action and long-term effects of mephedrone. As such, we reviewed the current understanding of amphetamines, cathinones, and cocaine emphasizing the potentially translational aspects to mephedrone, as well as contrasting with the work that has been done specifically on mephedrone in order to present the current state of understanding of mephedrone in terms of its risks, mechanisms, and behavioral effects. Emerging research suggests that while there are structural and behavioral similarities of mephedrone with amphetamine-like compounds, it appears that serotonergic signaling may mediate more of mephedrone's effects unlike the more dopaminergic dependent effects observed in traditional amphetamine-like compounds. As new designer drugs are produced, current and continuing research on mephedrone and other synthetic cathinones should help inform policymakers' decisions regarding the regulation of novel 'legal highs.'

  4. 47 CFR 1.102 - Effective dates of actions taken pursuant to delegated authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... delegated authority. 1.102 Section 1.102 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL... by the Commission and Pursuant to Delegated Authority; Effective Dates and Finality Dates of Actions § 1.102 Effective dates of actions taken pursuant to delegated authority. (a) Final actions following...

  5. Learning Associations between Action and Perception: Effects of Incompatible Training on Body Part and Spatial Priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggett, Alison J.; Hudson, Matt; Tipper, Steve P.; Downing, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    Observation of another person executing an action primes the same action in the observer's motor system. Recent evidence has shown that these priming effects are flexible, where training of new associations, such as making a foot response when viewing a moving hand, can reduce standard action priming effects (Gillmeister, Catmur, Liepelt, Brass,…

  6. 43 CFR 46.115 - Consideration of past actions in the analysis of cumulative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Environmental Quality § 46.115 Consideration of past actions in the analysis of cumulative effects. When... Memorandum on Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects Analysis” dated June 24, 2005, or any... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Consideration of past actions in...

  7. Ecological effects of contaminants and remedial actions in Bear Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Burris, J.A. (C. E. Environmental, Inc., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Ecological studies of the Bear Creek watershed, which drains the area surrounding several Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities, were initiated in May 1984 and are continuing at present. These studies consisted of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek, and they were followed by a presently ongoing monitoring phase that involves reduced sampling intensities. The characterization phase utilized two approaches: (1) instream sampling of benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek to identify spatial and temporal patterns in distribution and abundance and (2) laboratory bioassays on water samples from Bear Creek and selected tributaries to identify potential sources of toxicity to biota. The monitoring phase of the ecological program relates to the long-term goals of identifying and prioritizing contaminant sources and assessing the effectiveness of remedial actions. It continues activities of the characterization phase at less frequent intervals. The Bear Greek Valley is a watershed that drains the area surrounding several closed Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities. Past waste disposal practices in Bear Creek Valley resulted in contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. Extensive remedial actions have been proposed at waste sites, and some of the have been implemented or are now underway. The proposed study plan consists of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek in the first year followed by a reduction in sampling intensity during the monitoring phase of the plan. The results of sampling conducted from May 1984 through early 1989 are presented in this report.

  8. Effects of action video game training on visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacker, Kara J; Curby, Kim M; Klobusicky, Elizabeth; Chein, Jason M

    2014-10-01

    The ability to hold visual information in mind over a brief delay is critical for acquiring information and navigating a complex visual world. Despite the ubiquitous nature of visual working memory (VWM) in our everyday lives, this system is fundamentally limited in capacity. Therefore, the potential to improve VWM through training is a growing area of research. An emerging body of literature suggests that extensive experience playing action video games yields a myriad of perceptual and attentional benefits. Several lines of converging work suggest that action video game play may influence VWM as well. The current study utilized a training paradigm to examine whether action video games cause improvements to the quantity and/or the quality of information stored in VWM. The results suggest that VWM capacity, as measured by a change detection task, is increased after action video game training, as compared with training on a control game, and that some improvement to VWM precision occurs with action game training as well. However, these findings do not appear to extend to a complex span measure of VWM, which is often thought to tap into higher-order executive skills. The VWM improvements seen in individuals trained on an action video game cannot be accounted for by differences in motivation or engagement, differential expectations, or baseline differences in demographics as compared with the control group used. In sum, action video game training represents a potentially unique and engaging platform by which this severely capacity-limited VWM system might be enhanced.

  9. Regulation of international energy markets: Economic effects of political actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakova, Anastasia V.

    Recent increases in volatility of energy prices have led many governments to reevaluate their regard of national energy reserves and reconsider future exploration, production, and consumption patterns. The flurry of activity that has been generated by such price volatility has included large-scale nationalizations of energy sectors, unilateral renegotiations of foreign energy development contracts, and expropriations of resources from foreign energy firms on one hand, and on the other hand more rapid energy sector liberalization, intensified search for and development of renewable fuels and technologies, and development of incentives for increased energy efficiency and conservation. The aim of this dissertation is to examine and quantify the extent of positive and negative effects that have resulted from some of these activities. The first chapter focuses on quantifying the effect that nationalistic sentiment has had on economic attractiveness of energy sectors during the decade prior to the recent global economic crisis, as measured by foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows. Empirical results demonstrate that both political and economic conditions play an important role in investors' decisions. A combination of investment friendliness, corruption levels, and democracy all help to explain the trends in energy-sector investment levels over time in my sample countries, although differences in the types of corruption existing in these nations do not. Investment levels, in turn, appear to influence future levels of oil production, underscoring the significance of good investment policies for future success of energy sectors. Chapter two considers the response of energy stock prices to severe regulatory actions. It employs an event study framework to examine causal effects of critical informational announcements (i.e. events of expropriation and nationalization) on daily returns and cumulative losses in firm value of energy corporations. Results show that a firm

  10. Effect of Composite Action on the Strength of Wood Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan A. Campos Varela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering certification for the installation of solar photovoltaic modules on wood roofs is often denied because existing wood roofs do not meet current building codes. Rather than requiring expensive structural retrofits, we desire to show that many roofs are actually sufficiently strong if the effect of composite action produced by joist-sheathing interaction is considered. In a series of laboratory experiments using a limited number of two-by-four wood joists with and without sheathing panels, conventionally sheathed stud-grade joists, surprisingly, exhibited between 18% and 63% higher nominal strength than similar bare joists. To explain this strength increase, a simple model was developed to predict the strengths of the nailed partially composite sections, but the model only justifies a 1.4% to 3.8% increase in bending strength of joists with an allowable bending strength of 1000 psi. More testing is indicated to resolve this discrepancy between laboratory results and analytical modeling results. In addition to elucidating nonlinear partial composite behavior of existing roof systems, this paper shows that, with minor changes in roof framing practices, strength increases of 70% or more are achievable, compared to the strengths of conventionally sheathed joists.

  11. Polyphenols: Extraction Methods, Antioxidative Action, Bioavailability and Anticarcinogenic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Brglez Mojzer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Being secondary plant metabolites, polyphenols represent a large and diverse group of substances abundantly present in a majority of fruits, herbs and vegetables. The current contribution is focused on their bioavailability, antioxidative and anticarcinogenic properties. An overview of extraction methods is also given, with supercritical fluid extraction highlighted as a promising eco-friendly alternative providing exceptional separation and protection from degradation of unstable polyphenols. The protective role of polyphenols against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, UV light, plant pathogens, parasites and predators results in several beneficial biological activities giving rise to prophylaxis or possibly even to a cure for several prevailing human diseases, especially various cancer types. Omnipresence, specificity of the response and the absence of or low toxicity are crucial advantages of polyphenols as anticancer agents. The main problem represents their low bioavailability and rapid metabolism. One of the promising solutions lies in nanoformulation of polyphenols that prevents their degradation and thus enables significantly higher concentrations to reach the target cells. Another, more practiced, solution is the use of mixtures of various polyphenols that bring synergistic effects, resulting in lowering of the required therapeutic dose and in multitargeted action. The combination of polyphenols with existing drugs and therapies also shows promising results and significantly reduces their toxicity.

  12. Soft symmetry improvement of two particle irreducible effective actions

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Two particle irreducible effective actions (2PIEAs) are valuable non-perturbative techniques in quantum field theory; however, finite truncations of them violate the Ward identities (WIs) of theories with spontaneously broken symmetries. The symmetry improvement (SI) method of Pilaftsis and Teresi attempts to overcome this by imposing the WIs as constraints on the solution; however the method suffers from the non-existence of solutions in linear response theory and in certain truncations in equilibrium. Motivated by this, we introduce a new method called soft symmetry improvement (SSI) which relaxes the constraint. Violations of WIs are allowed but punished in a least-squares implementation of the symmetry improvement idea. A new parameter $\\xi$ controls the strength of the constraint. The method interpolates between the unimproved ($\\xi \\to \\infty$) and SI ($\\xi \\to 0$) cases and the hope is that practically useful solutions can be found for finite $\\xi$. We study the SSI-2PIEA for a scalar O(N) model in the...

  13. How and when auditory action effects impair motor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ausilio, Alessandro; Brunetti, Riccardo; Delogu, Franco; Santonico, Cristina; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti

    2010-03-01

    Music performance is characterized by complex cross-modal interactions, offering a remarkable window into training-induced long-term plasticity and multimodal integration processes. Previous research with pianists has shown that playing a musical score is affected by the concurrent presentation of musical tones. We investigated the nature of this audio-motor coupling by evaluating how congruent and incongruent cross-modal auditory cues affect motor performance at different time intervals. We found facilitation if a congruent sound preceded motor planning with a large Stimulus Onset Asynchrony (SOA -300 and -200 ms), whereas we observed interference when an incongruent sound was presented with shorter SOAs (-200, -100 and 0 ms). Interference and facilitation, instead of developing through time as opposite effects of the same mechanism, showed dissociable time-courses suggesting their derivation from distinct processes. It seems that the motor preparation induced by the auditory cue has different consequences on motor performance according to the congruency with the future motor state the system is planning and the degree of asynchrony between the motor act and the sound presentation. The temporal dissociation we found contributes to the understanding of how perception meets action in the context of audio-motor integration.

  14. Fine tuning and vacuum stability in Wilsonian effective action

    CERN Document Server

    Krajewski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    We have computed Wilsonian effective action in a simple model containing scalar field with quartic self-coupling which interacts via Yukawa coupling with a Dirac fermion. The model is invariant under a chiral parity operation, which can be spontaneously broken by a vev of the scalar field. We have computed explicitly Wilsonian running of relevant parameters which makes it possible to discuss in a consistent manner the issue of fine-tuning and stability of the scalar potential. This has been compared with the typical picture based on Gell-Mann-Low running. Since Wilsonian running includes automatically integration out of heavy degrees of freedom, the running differs markedly from the Gell-Mann-Low version. However, similar behaviour can be observed: scalar mass squared parameter and the quartic coupling can change sign from a positive to a negative one due to running which causes spontaneous symmetry breaking or an instability in the renormalizable part of the potential for a given range of scales. However, ca...

  15. Lorentz-violating Euler-Heisenberg effective action

    CERN Document Server

    Furtado, J

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we study the radiative generation of the Lorentz-violating Euler-Heisenberg action, in the weak field approximation. For this, we first consider a nonperturbative calculation in the coefficient $c_{\\mu\

  16. 10D massive type IIA supergravities as the uplift of parabolic M2-brane torus bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia del Moral, Maria Pilar [Universidad de Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Restuccia, Alvaro [Universidad de Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Dept. de Fisica

    2016-04-15

    We remark that the two 10D massive deformations of the N = 2 maximal type IIA supergravity (Romans and HLW supergravity) are associated to the low energy limit of the uplift to 10D of M2-brane torus bundles with parabolic monodromy linearly and non-linearly realized respectively. Romans supergravity corresponds to M2-brane compactified on a twice-punctured torus bundle. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Soft symmetry improvement of two particle irreducible effective actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael J.; Whittingham, Ian B.

    2017-01-01

    Two particle irreducible effective actions (2PIEAs) are valuable nonperturbative techniques in quantum field theory; however, finite truncations of them violate the Ward identities (WIs) of theories with spontaneously broken symmetries. The symmetry improvement (SI) method of Pilaftsis and Teresi attempts to overcome this by imposing the WIs as constraints on the solution; however, the method suffers from the nonexistence of solutions in linear response theory and in certain truncations in equilibrium. Motivated by this, we introduce a new method called soft-symmetry improvement (SSI) which relaxes the constraint. Violations of WIs are allowed but punished in a least-squares implementation of the symmetry improvement idea. A new parameter ξ controls the strength of the constraint. The method interpolates between the unimproved (ξ →∞ ) and SI (ξ →0 ) cases, and the hope is that practically useful solutions can be found for finite ξ . We study the SSI 2PIEA for a scalar O (N ) model in the Hartree-Fock approximation. We find that the method is IR sensitive; the system must be formulated in finite volume V and temperature T =β-1 , and the V β →∞ limit must be taken carefully. Three distinct limits exist. Two are equivalent to the unimproved 2PIEA and SI 2PIEA respectively, and the third is a new limit where the WI is satisfied but the phase transition is strongly first order and solutions can fail to exist depending on ξ . Further, these limits are disconnected from each other; there is no smooth way to interpolate from one to another. These results suggest that any potential advantages of SSI methods, and indeed any application of (S)SI methods out of equilibrium, must occur in finite volume.

  18. Effects of navigated TMS on object and action naming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Hernandez-Pavon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS has been used to induce speech disturbances and to affect speech performance during different naming tasks. Lately, repetitive navigated TMS (nTMS has been used for non-invasive mapping of cortical speech-related areas. Different naming tasks may give different information that can be useful for presurgical evaluation. We studied the sensitivity of object and action naming tasks to nTMS and compared the distributions of cortical sites where nTMS produced naming errors. Eight healthy subjects named pictures of objects and actions during repetitive nTMS delivered to semi-random left-hemispheric sites. Subject-validated image stacks were obtained in the baseline naming of all pictures before nTMS. Thereafter, nTMS pulse trains were delivered while the subjects were naming the images of objects or actions. The sessions were video-recorded for offline analysis. Naming during nTMS was compared with the baseline performance. The nTMS-induced naming errors were categorized by error type and location. nTMS produced no-response errors, phonological paraphasias, and semantic paraphasias. In seven out of eight subjects, nTMS produced more errors during object than action naming. Both intrasubject and intersubject analysis showed that object naming was significantly more sensitive to nTMS. When the number of errors was compared according to a given area, nTMS to postcentral gyrus induced more errors during object than action naming. Object naming is apparently more easily disrupted by TMS than action naming. Different stimulus types can be useful for locating different aspects of speech functions. This provides new possibilities in both basic and clinical research of cortical speech representations.

  19. Intersubjective Action-Effect Binding: Eye Contact Modulates Acquisition of Bidirectional Association between Our and Others' Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsushi; Itakura, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    In everyday social life, we predict others' actions in response to our own actions. Subsequently, on the basis of these predictions, we control our actions to attain desired social outcomes and/or adjust our actions to accommodate the anticipated actions of the others. Representation of the bidirectional association between our and others'…

  20. Anatomy of One-Loop Effective Action in Noncommutative Scalar Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Kiem, Youngjai; Sato, Haru-Tada; Yee, Jung-Tay; Kiem, Youngjai; Rey, Soo-Jong; Sato, Haru-Tada; Yee, Jung-Tay

    2002-01-01

    One-loop effective action of noncommutative scalar field theory with cubic self-interaction is studied. Utilizing worldline formulation, both planar and nonplanar part of the effective action are computed explicitly. We find complete agreement of the result with Seiberg-Witten limit of string worldsheet computation and standard Feynman diagrammatics. We prove that, at low-energy and large noncommutativity limit, nonplanar part of the effective action is simplified enormously and is resummable into a quadratic action of scalar open Wilson line operators.

  1. Response selection difficulty modulates the behavioral impact of rapidly learnt action effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta eWolfensteller

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that we can pick up action effect associations when acting in a free-choice intentional mode. However, it is less clear whether and when action effect associations are learnt and actually affect behavior if we are acting in a forced-choice mode, applying a specific stimulus-response (S-R rule. In the present study, we investigated whether response selection difficulty imposed by S-R rules influences the initial rapid learning and the behavioral expression of previously learnt but weakly practiced action effect associations when those are re-activated by effect exposure. Experiment 1 showed that the rapid acquisition of action effect associations is not directly influenced by response selection difficulty. By contrast, the behavioral expression of re-activated action effect associations is prevented when actions are directly activated by highly over-learnt response cues and thus response selection difficulty is low. However, all three experiments showed that if response selection difficulty is sufficiently high during re-activation, the same action effect associations do influence behavior. Experiment 2 and 3 revealed that the effect of response selection difficulty cannot be fully reduced to giving action effects more time to prime an action, but seems to reflect competition during response selection. Finally, the present data suggest that when multiple novel rules are rapidly learnt in succession, which requires a lot of flexibility, action effect associations continue to influence behavior only if response selection difficulty is sufficiently high. Thus, response selection difficulty might modulate the impact of experiencing multiple learning episodes on action effect expression and learning, possibly via inducing different strategies.

  2. The Geometry of Quantum Hall Effect: An Effective Action for all Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Karabali, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    We present a general formula for the topological part of the effective action for quantum Hall systems in higher dimensions, including fluctuations of the gauge field and metric around background fields of a specified topological class. The result is based on a procedure of integrating up from the Dolbeault index density which applies for the degeneracies of Landau levels, combined with some input from the standard descent procedure for anomalies. Features of the topological action in (2+1), (4+1), (6+1) dimensions, including the contribution due to gravitational anomalies, are discussed in some detail.

  3. Effects of context on visuomotor interference depends on the perspective of observed actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Bortoletto

    Full Text Available Visuomotor interference occurs when the execution of an action is facilitated by the concurrent observation of the same action and hindered by the concurrent observation of a different action. There is evidence that visuomotor interference can be modulated top-down by higher cognitive functions, depending on whether own performed actions or observed actions are selectively attended. Here, we studied whether these effects of cognitive context on visuomotor interference are also dependent on the point-of-view of the observed action. We employed a delayed go/no-go task known to induce visuomotor interference. Static images of hand gestures in either egocentric or allocentric perspective were presented as "go" stimuli after participants were pre-cued to prepare either a matching (congruent or non-matching (incongruent action. Participants performed this task in two different cognitive contexts: In one, they focused on the visual image of the hand gesture shown as the go stimulus (image context, whereas in the other they focused on the hand gesture they performed (action context. We analyzed reaction times to initiate the prepared action upon presentation of the gesture image and found evidence of visuomotor interference in both contexts and for both perspectives. Strikingly, results show that the effect of cognitive context on visuomotor interference also depends on the perspective of observed actions. When focusing on own-actions, visuomotor interference was significantly less for gesture images in allocentric perspective than in egocentric perspective; when focusing on observed actions, visuomotor interference was present regardless of the perspective of the gesture image. Overall these data suggest that visuomotor interference may be modulated by higher cognitive processes, so that when we are specifically attending to our own actions, images depicting others' actions (allocentric perspective have much less interference on our own actions.

  4. Action Research in Professional Development Schools: Effects on Student Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin-Scherer, Wade; Spinelli, Ann Marie; Giammatteo, Dawn; Johnson, Craig; Mayo-Molina, Sylvia; McGinley, Paula; Michalski, Candice; Schmidek, Susan; Tomaiuolo, Linda; Zisk, Laurie

    This report presents data from one elementary school's (Hartford, CT region) second year (1996-97) implementation of a mathematics reform action research project by the professional development team. Teachers from grades 2-5 systematically implemented an ancillary problem solving curriculum in their classrooms after receiving training by a…

  5. Effects of arsenicals on interferon formation and action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gainer, J.H.

    1972-01-01

    Interactions between arsenicals and interferon (IF) production and action are described. The protection afforded by poly I/poly C (PIC) against the death of mice from infection with the encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) was partially inhibited by sodium arsenite (NaAsO/sub 2/) and by roxarsone. Spleen of EMCV-exposed, NaAsO/sub 2/-treated mice contained 1 to 3 logs more virus than did spleen of saline solution-treated EMCV-exposed controls. A stimulating substance for the formation of plaques by the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) was present in spleen of the NaAsO/sub 2/-treated, EMCV-exposed mice. Detectable IF was not seen in spleen of NaAsO/sub 2/-treated, EMCV-exposed mice; low levels of IF were in spleen of EMCV-exposed control mice. Treatment of primary rabbit kidney (PRK) cell cultures with NaAsO/sub 2/ inhibited the induction of IF by PIC. In mouse embryo (ME) cells, NaAsO/sub 2/, sodium arsenate (Na/sub 2/HAsO/sub 4/), roxarsone, and p-arsanilic acid inhibited the action of mouse IF. The inhibition of IF action by the arsenicals was cell mediated and was time dependent, the inhibition by NaAsO/sub 2/ being ineffective before IF was added and 2 hours after IF was added, but being fully active at 0 and 1 hours after exposure of the cells to IF. The NaAsO/sub 2/ did not alter IF activity directly. A dose-response relationship occurred between the concentration of arsenical tested and the percentage of inhibition of IF action which ensued. Data presented have indicated that high concentrations of arsenicals inhibited both the synthesis and the action of IF, whereas low concentrations of arsenicals increased the antiviral activity of low levels of IF. 11 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  6. 2PI Effective Action and Evolution Equations of N = 4 super Yang-Mills

    CERN Document Server

    Smolic, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    We employ nPI effective action techniques to study N = 4 super Yang-Mills, and write down the 2PI effective action of the theory. We also supply the evolution equations of two-point correlators within the theory.

  7. What is the general action of ghrelin for vertebrates? - comparisons of ghrelin's effects across vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2013-01-15

    Ten years and more passed since ghrelin was discovered. Various physiological actions of ghrelin have been documented in both mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates. Do these actions have any commonality? In this review, we focused on several effects of ghrelin, and compared the effect across vertebrates. We would like to discuss possible general function of ghrelin in vertebrates.

  8. 2PI effective action and evolution equations of N=4 super Yang-Mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena [University of Amsterdam, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-08-15

    We employ nPI effective action techniques to study N=4 super Yang-Mills, and write down the 2PI effective action of the theory to two-loop order in the symmetric phase. We also supply the evolution equations of two-point correlators within the theory. (orig.)

  9. Loop expansion of the average effective action in the functional renormalization group approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, Peter M.; Merzlikin, Boris S.

    2015-10-01

    We formulate a perturbation expansion for the effective action in a new approach to the functional renormalization group method based on the concept of composite fields for regulator functions being their most essential ingredients. We demonstrate explicitly the principal difference between the properties of effective actions in these two approaches existing already on the one-loop level in a simple gauge model.

  10. Loop expansion of average effective action in functional renormalization group approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    We formulate a perturbation expansion for the effective action in new approach to the functional renormalization group (FRG) method based on concept of composite fields for regulator functions being therein most essential ingredients. We demonstrate explicitly the principal difference between properties of effective actions in these two approaches existing already on the one-loop level in a simple gauge model.

  11. One-loop effective action for Einstein gravity in special background gauge

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, P M; Lavrov, P M; Reshetnyak, A A

    1995-01-01

    The one-loop effective action for Einstein gravity in a special one-parameter background gauge is calculated up to first order in a gauge parameter. It is shown that the effective action does not depend upon the gauge parameter on shell.

  12. Action semantics modulate action prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that action prediction involves an internal action simulation that runs time-locked to the real action. The present study replicates and extends these findings by indicating a real-time simulation process (Graf et al., 2007), which can be differentiated from a similarity-based evaluation of internal action representations. Moreover, results showed that action semantics modulate action prediction accuracy. The semantic effect was specified by the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns (Experiment 1) and, more specifically, by the dynamics described by action verbs (Experiment 2) and the speed described by the verbs (e.g., "to catch" vs. "to grasp" vs. "to stretch"; Experiment 3). These results propose a linkage between action simulation and action semantics as two yet unrelated domains, a view that coincides with a recent notion of a close link between motor processes and the understanding of action language.

  13. Making connections to translate climate research into effective action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, K. J.; Niepold, F., III; Pierce, L.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change is strongly apparent at many scales and facets of the Earth system including glacier retreat, increased ocean acidity, altered meteorological patterns, and changing ecosystems. There is general recognition that a more strategic and coordinated response is needed to ameliorate these impacts on communities and to limit the global temperature increase to 1.5°C imposed by the 2015 Paris agreement. However, concrete plans to achieve these goals require actionable and specific guidance from the scientific community that is targeted for specific stakeholder groups within government agencies, industry, and individuals, while also supporting decision-makers plans and policies. This guidance depends on scientific advances that establish quantified predictions and minimize the levels of uncertainty. Although, these advances are ongoing; the decision maker, civil society organizations, and business and investor communities are not waiting for perfection. The urgency of taking action now has brought new approaches to the fore that try to bring the best available science into the business and decision making process. Combining a breadth of expertise, we highlight the specific transmission pathways of information needed for stakeholders, and it spans initial data collection and climate model construction, experimentation, analysis, synthesis of results, education, to government, communities, and business planning to reduce impacts and minimize additional human-caused contributions. We propose a multi-pathway relay along these paths. In one direction we encourage scientists to provide accessible and useable summary results with uncertainties to educators and stakeholders, who in turn need to collate results in a manner that enables interested parties to identify their specific mitigation action. In the other direction, stakeholders and shareholders are already requesting more comprehensive verification, validation, and active linkages to the way in which

  14. 17 CFR 249.312 - Form 10-D, periodic distribution reports by asset-backed issuers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... distribution reports by asset-backed issuers. 249.312 Section 249.312 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... shall be filed within 15 days after each required distribution date on the asset-backed securities, as... § 249.312 Form 10-D, periodic distribution reports by asset-backed issuers. This form shall be used by...

  15. Differential effects of K(+) channel blockers on frequency-dependent action potential broadening in supraoptic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlubek, M D; Cobbett, P

    2000-09-15

    Recordings were made from magnocellular neuroendocrine cells dissociated from the supraoptic nucleus of the adult guinea pig to determine the role of voltage gated K(+) channels in controlling the duration of action potentials and in mediating frequency-dependent action potential broadening exhibited by these neurons. The K(+) channel blockers charybdotoxin (ChTx), tetraethylammonium (TEA), and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) increased the duration of individual action potentials indicating that multiple types of K(+) channel are important in controlling action potential duration. The effect of these K(+) channel blockers was almost completely reversed by simultaneous blockade of voltage gated Ca(2+) channels with Cd(2+). Frequency-dependent action potential broadening was exhibited by these neurons during trains of action potentials elicited by membrane depolarizing current pulses presented at 10 Hz but not at 1 Hz. 4-AP but not ChTx or TEA inhibited frequency-dependent action potential broadening indicating that frequency-dependent action potential broadening is dependent on increasing steady-state inactivation of A-type K(+) channels (which are blocked by 4-AP). A model of differential contributions of voltage gated K(+) channels and voltage gated Ca(2+) channels to frequency-dependent action potential broadening, in which an increase of Ca(2+) current during each successive action potential is permitted as a result of the increasing steady-state inactivation of A-type K(+) channels, is presented.

  16. Explicit learning of arbitrary and non-arbitrary action-effect relations in adults and 4-year-olds

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan Alexander eVerschoor; Rena eEenshuistra; Jutta eKray; Szilvia eBiro; Bernhard eHommel

    2012-01-01

    Ideomotor theories claim that carrying out a movement that produces a perceivable effect creates a bidirectional association between the two, which can be used by action control processes to retrieve the associated action by anticipating its outcome. Indeed, previous implicit-learning studies have shown that practice renders novel but action-contingent stimuli effective retrieval cues of the action they used to follow, suggesting that experiencing sequences of actions and effects creates bidi...

  17. Effective action for. omega. -> 3. pi. ,. omega. ->. pi gamma. and rho ->. pi gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golterman, M.F.L.

    1988-10-31

    It is argued that the decay widths for ..omega.. -> 3..pi.., ..omega.. -> ..pi gamma.. and rho -> ..pi gamma.. do not follow from the gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten action. An alternative effective action for these decays is constructed and its parameters are fitted to the experimental values of the widths.

  18. In-Out Formalism for One-Loop Effective Actions in QED and Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    The in-out formalism is a systematic and powerful method for finding the effective actions in an electromagnetic field and a curved spacetime provided that the field equation has explicitly known solutions. The effective action becomes complex when pairs of charged particles are produced due to an electric field and curved spacetime. This may lead to a conjecture of one-to-one correspondence between the vacuum polarization (real part) and the vacuum persistence (imaginary part). We illustrate the one-loop effective action in a constant electric field in a Minkowski spacetime and in a uniform electric field in a two-dimensional (anti-) de sitter space.

  19. Effective action of composite fields for general gauge theories in BLT-covariant formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, P M; Reshetnyak, A A

    1996-01-01

    The gauge dependence of the effective action of composite fields for general gauge theories in the framework of the quantization method by Batalin, Lavrov and Tyutin is studied. The corresponding Ward identites are obtained. The variation of composite fields effective action is found in terms of new set of generators depending on composite field. The theorem of the on-shell gauge fixing independence for the effective action of composite fields in such formalism is proven. Brief discussion of gravitational-vector induced interaction for Maxwell theory with composite fields is given.

  20. Effective action of composite fields for general gauge theories in Batalin, Lavrov, and Tyutin covariant formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, P.M.; Odintsov, S.D. [Department of Mathematical Analysis, Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Tomsk 634041 (Russia)]|[Department ECM, Faculte de Fisica, Universidad de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Reshetnyak, A.A. [Quantum Field Theory Department, Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russia)

    1997-07-01

    The gauge dependence of the effective action of composite fields for general gauge theories in the framework of the quantization method by Batalin, Lavrov and Tyutin is studied. The corresponding Ward identities are obtained. The variation of composite fields effective action is found in terms of new set of generators depending on composite field. The theorem of the on-shell gauge fixing independence for the effective action of composite fields in such formalism is proven. A brief discussion of gravitational-vector induced interaction for Maxwell theory with composite fields is given. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. The effects of an action video game on visual and affective information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kira; West, Robert

    2013-04-04

    Playing action video games can have beneficial effects on visuospatial cognition and negative effects on social information processing. However, these two effects have not been demonstrated in the same individuals in a single study. The current study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to examine the effects of playing an action or non-action video game on the processing of emotion in facial expression. The data revealed that 10h of playing an action or non-action video game had differential effects on the ERPs relative to a no-contact control group. Playing an action game resulted in two effects: one that reflected an increase in the amplitude of the ERPs following training over the right frontal and posterior regions that was similar for angry, happy, and neutral faces; and one that reflected a reduction in the allocation of attention to happy faces. In contrast, playing a non-action game resulted in changes in slow wave activity over the central-parietal and frontal regions that were greater for targets (i.e., angry and happy faces) than for non-targets (i.e., neutral faces). These data demonstrate that the contrasting effects of action video games on visuospatial and emotion processing occur in the same individuals following the same level of gaming experience. This observation leads to the suggestion that caution should be exercised when using action video games to modify visual processing, as this experience could also have unintended effects on emotion processing. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. System markets: Indirect network effects in action, or inaction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L.G. Binken (Jeroen)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn this dissertation, I empirically examine system markets up close. More specifically I examine indirect network effects, both demand-side and supply-side indirect network effects. Indirect network effects are the source of positive feedback in system markets, or so network effect

  3. System markets: Indirect network effects in action, or inaction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L.G. Binken (Jeroen)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn this dissertation, I empirically examine system markets up close. More specifically I examine indirect network effects, both demand-side and supply-side indirect network effects. Indirect network effects are the source of positive feedback in system markets, or so network effect theo

  4. Effect of a prenylamine analog (MG8926) on spontaneous action potentials in isolated rabbit sinoatrial node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, H; Matsuoka, I; Ono, T; Yoshida, H; Uchibori, T; Kogi, K

    1996-12-01

    Effects of verapamil, prenylamine and a prenylamine analog, MG8926 on the intracellular spontaneous action potentials recorded from the isolated rabbit sinoatrial (SA) node were studied. Verapamil (1 microM), a selective inhibitor for slow Ca2+ channels, prolonged the cycle length, decreased the rate of diastolic depolarization, the rate of rise of action potential, the amplitude of action potential and the maximal diastolic potential, and usually arrested showing subthreshold fluctuation of the membrane potential within several ten min. Prenylamine (10 microM), a nonselective inhibitor for slow Ca2+ channels, tended to prolong the cycle length to decrease the diastolic depolarization, the rate of rise of action potential, the amplitude of action potential. However, these changes were statistically insignificant. Prenylamine at the concentration of 10 microM had no effect on the maximal diastolic potential. MG8926 (10 microM) prolonged the cycle length, decreased the rate of diastolic depolarization, the rate of rise of action potential and tended to decrease the amplitude of action potential. MG8926 at the concentration of 10 microM had almost no effect on the maximal diastolic potential. The present findings may indicate that replacement of phenyl residue of prenylamine by cyclohexyl residue increases the inhibitory action on the slow Ca2+ channels in rabbit SA node.

  5. Action time effect of lime on its depressive ability for pyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tichang Sun

    2004-01-01

    Two sample groups of bulk concentrates consisting mainly of pyrite and chalcopyrite from Daye and Chenghchao Mines in Hubei Province of China were used to investigate the effect of the action time of lime on its depressive ability for pyrite. The experimental results conducted with different samples and collectors showed that the action time between lime and pyrite markedly influences the depressive ability of lime. The depressive ability of lime increased with the action time increasing. It was also proved that the depressive results obtained at a large lime dosage after a shorter action time are similar to those obtained at a small lime dosage after a longer action time. The increase of depressive ability of lime after a longer action time is because that there are different mechanisms in different action time. The composition on the surface of pyrite acted for different time with lime was studied by using ESCA (Electron Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis). The results showed that iron hydroxide and calcium sulphate formed on the pyrite surface at the presence of lime in the pulp but the amounts of iron hydroxide and calcium sulphate were different at different action time. At the beginning action time the compound formed on the pyrite surface was mainly calcium sulphate and almost no iron hydroxide formed; but with the action time increasing, iron hydroxide formed. The longer the action time, the more iron hydroxide and the less calcium sulphate formed. It was considered that the stronger depressive ability of lime after a longer action time is because more iron hydroxide forms on the pyrite surface.

  6. Leadership: Improving Its Effectiveness. Research Action Brief Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, Eugene, OR.

    This brief summarizes the major findings of significant research studies dealing with different leadership behaviors and strategies for increasing leadership effectiveness. Fred Fiedler's Contingency Theory of Leadership Effectiveness emphasizes that a leader's effectiveness is determined by how well his leadership style fits the specific…

  7. Complete low-energy effective action in N=4 SYM: a direct N=2 supergraph calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchbinder, I.L. E-mail: joseph@tspu.edu.ru; Ivanov, E.A. E-mail: eivanov@thsun1.jinr.ru; Petrov, A.Yu. E-mail: petrov@fma.if.usp.brpetrov@tspu.edu.ru

    2003-03-10

    Using the covariant N=2 harmonic supergraph techniques we calculate the one-loop low-energy effective action of N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory in Coulomb branch with gauge group SU(2) spontaneously broken down to U(1). The full dependence of the low-energy effective action on both the hypermultiplet and gauge fields is determined. The direct quantum calculation confirms the correctness of the exact N=4 SYM low-energy effective action derived in on the purely algebraic ground by invoking a hidden N=2 supersymmetry which completes the manifest N=2 one to N=4. Our results provide an exhaustive solution to the problem of finding out the exact completely N=4 supersymmetric low-energy effective action for the theory under consideration.

  8. Mechanism and Effectiveness of Reduction Action of Unsaturated Polyester Resin Reducer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The reduction action mechanism of unsaturated polyester resin reducer is analysed.The experimental results show that the active reducer bearing reactive functional group on the ends of molecules effectively lowers the curing shrinkage of unvaturated polyester resin.

  9. SUSY QCD effective action in the large N/sub c/ limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavnov, A.A.; Chekhov, L.O.; Krivoshchekov, V.K.

    1987-08-06

    A low energy effective action for supersymmetric quantum chromodynamics (SUSY QCD) including anomalous terms is constructed in the leading order of the 1/N expansion. The absence of dynamical supersymmetry breaking is explicitly demonstrated.

  10. The Spillover Effects of Affirmative Action on Competitiveness and Unethical Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Ritwik; Gupta, Nabanita Datta; Villeval, Marie Claire

    We conduct an artefactual field experiment to examine various spillover effects of Affirmative Action policies in the context of castes in India. We test a) if individuals who compete in the presence of Affirmative Action policies remain competitive in the same proportion after the policy has been...... frequently a tournament payment scheme. However, we find no spillover effect on confidence and competitiveness once Affirmative Action is withdrawn: any lower caste’s gain in competitiveness due to the policy is then entirely wiped out. Furthermore, the strong existing bias of the dominant caste against...

  11. Effect of Action Verbs on the Performance of a Complex Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabahi, Tahar; Fargier, Patrick; Rifai Sarraj, Ahmad; Clouzeau, Cyril; Massarelli, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between language and motor action has been approached by studying the effect of action verbs, kinaesthetic imagery and mental subtraction upon the performance of a complex movement, the squat vertical jump (SVJ). The time of flight gave the value of the height of the SVJ and was measured with an Optojump® and a Myotest® apparatuses. The results obtained by the effects of the cognitive stimuli showed a statistically significant improvement of the SVJ performance after either loudly or silently pronouncing, hearing or reading the verb saute (jump in French language). Action verbs specific for other motor actions (pince = pinch, lèche = lick) or non-specific (bouge = move) showed no or little effect. A meaningless verb for the French subjects (tiáo = jump in Chinese) showed no effect as did rêve (dream), tombe (fall) and stop. The verb gagne (win) improved significantly the SVJ height, as did its antonym perds (lose) suggesting a possible influence of affects in the subjects’ performance. The effect of the specific action verb jump upon the heights of SVJ was similar to that obtained after kinaesthetic imagery and after mental subtraction of two digits numbers from three digits ones; possibly, in the latter, because of the intervention of language in calculus. It appears that the effects of the specific action verb jump did seem effective but not totally exclusive for the enhancement of the SVJ performance. The results imply an interaction among language and motor brain areas in the performance of a complex movement resulting in a clear specificity of the corresponding action verb. The effect upon performance may probably be influenced by the subjects’ intention, increased attention and emotion produced by cognitive stimuli among which action verbs. PMID:23844233

  12. Effect of action verbs on the performance of a complex movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahar Rabahi

    Full Text Available The interaction between language and motor action has been approached by studying the effect of action verbs, kinaesthetic imagery and mental subtraction upon the performance of a complex movement, the squat vertical jump (SVJ. The time of flight gave the value of the height of the SVJ and was measured with an Optojump® and a Myotest® apparatuses. The results obtained by the effects of the cognitive stimuli showed a statistically significant improvement of the SVJ performance after either loudly or silently pronouncing, hearing or reading the verb saute (jump in French language. Action verbs specific for other motor actions (pince = pinch, lèche = lick or non-specific (bouge = move showed no or little effect. A meaningless verb for the French subjects (tiáo = jump in Chinese showed no effect as did rêve (dream, tombe (fall and stop. The verb gagne (win improved significantly the SVJ height, as did its antonym perds (lose suggesting a possible influence of affects in the subjects' performance. The effect of the specific action verb jump upon the heights of SVJ was similar to that obtained after kinaesthetic imagery and after mental subtraction of two digits numbers from three digits ones; possibly, in the latter, because of the intervention of language in calculus. It appears that the effects of the specific action verb jump did seem effective but not totally exclusive for the enhancement of the SVJ performance. The results imply an interaction among language and motor brain areas in the performance of a complex movement resulting in a clear specificity of the corresponding action verb. The effect upon performance may probably be influenced by the subjects' intention, increased attention and emotion produced by cognitive stimuli among which action verbs.

  13. The Quantum Consistency of the Ten-Dimensional Heterotic String Effective Action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simon Davis

    2011-01-01

    The finiteness of superstring theory at each order in perturbation theory is considered with respect to the ten-dimensional effective action. The quantum consistency of the ten-dimensional superstring effective action is confirmed with an analysis of the perturbative expansion of the quartic sector. It is found to be compatible with the finiteness of reduced four-dimensional theory. Furthermore, implications for the validity of superstring perturbation theory at lower energies is considered.

  14. The effect of action recognition and robot awareness in cooperative robot teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, L.E.

    1995-03-01

    Previous research in cooperative robotics has investigated several possible ways of coordinating the actions of cooperative teams -- from implicit cooperation through sensory feedback to explicit cooperation using the exchange of communicated messages. These various approaches differ in the extent to which robot team members arc aware of, or recognize, the actions of their teammates, and the extent to which they use this information to effect their own actions. The research described in this paper investigates this issue of robot awareness of team member actions and its effect on cooperative team performance by examining the results of a series of experiments on teams of physical mobile robots performing a laboratory version of hazardous waste cleanup. In these experiments. we vary the team size (and thus the level of redundancy in team member capabilities) and the level of awareness robots have of their teammates` current actions and evaluate the team`s performance using two metrics: time and energy. The results indicate that the impact of action awareness on cooperative team performance is a function not only of team size and the metric of evaluation. but also on the degree to which the effects of actions can be sensed through the world, the relative amount of work that is available per robot, and the cost of replicated actions. From these empirical studies, we propose a number of principles regarding the use of action recognition and robot awareness of team member actions in cooperative teams -- principles which will help guide engineers in the design and composition of the proper cooperative team for a given robotic mission.

  15. 33 CFR 157.10d - Double hulls on tank vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... containing oil to the side shell plating, must not be less than the distance w as shown in Figure 157.10d(c) and specified as follows: (i) For a vessel of 5,000 DWT and above: w= meters; or, w=2.0 meters (79 in.), whichever is less, but in no case less than 1.0 meter (39 in.). (ii) For a vessel of less than 5,000 DWT:...

  16. Association of TNFRSF10D DNA-methylation with the survival of melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzinger, Gudrun; Mitteregger, Simone; Wolf, Barbara; Berger, Regina; Zelger, Bernhard; Weinlich, Georg; Fritsch, Peter; Goebel, Georg; Fiegl, Heidelinde

    2014-07-07

    In this retrospective pilot study, the DNA-methylation status of genes that have been demonstrated to be involved in melanoma carcinogenesis was analyzed in order to identify novel biomarkers for the risk assessment of melanoma patients. We analyzed DNA extracted from punch-biopsies from 68 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) melanoma specimens. Using MethyLight PCR, we examined 20 genes in specimens from a training set comprising 36 melanoma patients. Selected candidate genes were validated in a test set using FFPE tissue samples from 32 melanoma patients. First, we identified the TNFRSF10D DNA-methylation status (TNFRSF10D methylated vs. unmethylated) as a prognostic marker for overall (p = 0.001) and for relapse-free survival (p = 0.008) in the training set. This finding was confirmed in the independent test set (n = 32; overall survival p = 0.041; relapse-free survival p = 0.012). In a multivariate Cox-regression analysis including all patients, the TNFRSF10D DNA-methylation status remained as the most significant prognostic parameter for overall and relapse-free survival (relative-risk (RR) of death, 4.6 (95% CI: 2.0-11.0; p < 0.001), RR of relapse, 7.2 (95% CI: 2.8-18.3; p < 0.001)). In this study, we demonstrate that TNFRSF10D DNA-methylation analysis of a small tissue-punch from archival FFPE melanoma tissue is a promising approach to provide prognostic information in patients with melanoma.

  17. Association of TNFRSF10D DNA-Methylation with the Survival of Melanoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Ratzinger

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this retrospective pilot study, the DNA-methylation status of genes that have been demonstrated to be involved in melanoma carcinogenesis was analyzed in order to identify novel biomarkers for the risk assessment of melanoma patients. We analyzed DNA extracted from punch-biopsies from 68 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE melanoma specimens. Using MethyLight PCR, we examined 20 genes in specimens from a training set comprising 36 melanoma patients. Selected candidate genes were validated in a test set using FFPE tissue samples from 32 melanoma patients. First, we identified the TNFRSF10D DNA-methylation status (TNFRSF10D methylated vs. unmethylated as a prognostic marker for overall (p = 0.001 and for relapse-free survival (p = 0.008 in the training set. This finding was confirmed in the independent test set (n = 32; overall survival p = 0.041; relapse-free survival p = 0.012. In a multivariate Cox-regression analysis including all patients, the TNFRSF10D DNA-methylation status remained as the most significant prognostic parameter for overall and relapse-free survival (relative-risk (RR of death, 4.6 (95% CI: 2.0–11.0; p < 0.001, RR of relapse, 7.2 (95% CI: 2.8–18.3; p < 0.001. In this study, we demonstrate that TNFRSF10D DNA-methylation analysis of a small tissue-punch from archival FFPE melanoma tissue is a promising approach to provide prognostic information in patients with melanoma.

  18. The effect of viewing graspable objects and actions in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakoff, Ellen; Galpin, Adam; Dick, Jeremy; Moore, Peter; Tipper, Steven P

    2007-03-26

    Viewing action-relevant stimuli such as a graspable object or another person moving can affect the observer's own motor system. Evidence exists that external stimuli may facilitate or hinder movement in Parkinson's disease, so we investigated whether action-relevant stimuli would exert a stronger influence. We measured the effect of action-relevant stimuli (graspable door handles and finger movements) on reaction times compared with baseline stimuli (bars and object movements). Parkinson's patients were influenced by the location of the baseline stimuli, but unlike healthy controls, action-relevant stimuli did not exert a stronger influence. This suggests that external cues exert their influence in Parkinson's disease through lower-level visual processes and the influence of action-relevant stimuli on the motor system is disrupted.

  19. Spontaneously Broken Asymptotic Symmetries and an Effective Action for Horizon Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Eling, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Asymptotic spacetime symmetries have been conjectured to play an important role in quantum gravity. In this paper we study the breaking of asymptotic symmetries associated with a null horizon boundary. In two-dimensions, these symmetries are reparametrizations of the time parameter on the horizon. We show how this horizon reparametrization symmetry is explicitly and spontaneously broken in dilaton gravity and construct an effective action for these pseudo-Goldstone modes using the on-shell gravitational action for a null boundary. The variation of this action yields the horizon constraint equation. This action is invariant under a 2 parameter subgroup of $SL(2)$ transformations, whose Noether charges we interpret via the membrane paradigm. We place these results in the context of recent work on the near $AdS_2$/ near $CFT_1$ correspondence. In this setting the horizon action characterizes the infrared regime near the horizon and has a hydrodynamical sigma model form. We also discuss our construction in Genera...

  20. RG flows in d dimensions, the dilaton effective action, and the a-theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Elvang, Henriette

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the recent dilaton-based proof of the 4d a-theorem, we study the dilaton effective action for RG flows in d dimensions. When d is even, the action consists of a Wess-Zumino (WZ) term, whose Weyl-variation encodes the trace-anomaly, plus all Weyl-invariants. For d odd, the action consists of Weyl-invariants only. We present explicit results for the flat-space limit of the dilaton effective action in d-dimensions up to and including 8-derivative terms. GJMS-operators from conformal geometry motivate a form of the action that unifies the Weyl-invariants and anomaly-terms into a compact general-d structure. A new feature in 8d is the presence of an 8-derivative Weyl-invariant that pollutes the O(p^8)-contribution from the WZ action to the dilaton scattering amplitudes; this may challenge a dilaton-based proof of an a-theorem in 8d. We use the example of a free massive scalar for two purposes: 1) it allows us to confirm the structure of the d-dimensional dilaton effective action explicitly; we carry o...

  1. Adiponectin action: a combination of endocrine and autocrine/paracrine effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eSweeney

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The widespread physiological actions of adiponectin have now been well characterized as clinical studies and work in animal models have established strong correlations between circulating adiponectin levels and various disease-related outcomes. Thus, conventional thinking attributes many of adiponectins beneficial effects to endocrine actions of adipose-derived adiponectin. However, it is now clear that several tissues can themselves produce adiponectin and there is growing evidence that locally produced adiponectin can mediate functionally important autocrine or paracrine effects. In this review article we discuss regulation of adiponectin production, its mechanism of action via receptor isoforms and signaling pathways and its principal physiological effects (ie. metabolic and cardiovascular. The role of endocrine actions of adiponectin and changes in local production of adiponectin or its receptors in whole body physiology is discussed.

  2. World-volume effective action of exotic five-brane in M-theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Tetsuji [Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University, Hiyoshi 4-1-1, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology,Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Sasaki, Shin [Department of Physics, Kitasato University,Sagamihara 252-0373 (Japan); Yata, Masaya [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore,2, Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2016-02-25

    We study the world-volume effective action of an exotic five-brane, known as the M-theory 5{sup 3}-brane (M5{sup 3}-brane) in eleven dimensions. The supermultiplet of the world-volume theory is the N=(2,0) tensor multiplet in six dimensions. The world-volume action contains three Killing vectors k̂{sub Î}{sup M} (Î=1,2,3) associated with the U(1){sup 3} isometry. We find the effective T-duality rule for the eleven-dimensional backgrounds that transforms the M5-brane effective action to that of the M5{sup 3}-brane. We also show that our action provides the source term for the M5{sup 3}-brane geometry in eleven-dimensional supergravity.

  3. World-volume Effective Action of Exotic Five-brane in M-theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Tetsuji; Yata, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    We study the world-volume effective action of an exotic five-brane, known as the M-theory $5^3$-brane (M$5^3$-brane) in eleven dimensions. The supermultiplet of the world-volume theory is the $\\mathcal{N} = (2, 0)$ tensor multiplet in six dimensions. The world-volume action contains three Killing vectors $\\hat{k}_{\\hat{I}} {}^M \\ (\\hat{I} =1,2,3)$ associated with the $U(1)^3$ isometry. We find the effective T-duality rule for the eleven-dimensional backgrounds that transforms the M5-brane effective action to that of the M$5^3$-brane. We also show that our action provides the source term for the M$5^3$-brane geometry in eleven-dimensional supergravity

  4. Reproductive Performance of Rabbit does Artificially Inseminated with Semen Supplemented with GnRH Analogue [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH Ethylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogol, P

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate, the ability of a GnRH synthetic analogue [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH ethylamide to induce ovulation in rabbit does using intravaginal administration. A total of 138 primiparous lactating does were randomly divided into 4 groups that at the time of insemination received following treatments for ovulation induction: 1 μg of buserelin administered intramuscularly (control group); 5 μg of [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH ethylamide added to the semen dose (D5 group); 10 μg of [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH ethylamide added to the semen dose (D10 group); 15 μg of [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH ethylamide added to the semen dose (D15 group). Kindling rates were 68.8% in D10 and 66.7% in D15 groups and were comparable to that obtained in the control group (72.2%). The kindling rate in group D5 (29.4%) was significantly lower than those recorded in the other groups. The number of live born kits was not significantly affected by the ovulation induction treatment. The results of this study show that [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH ethylamide added directly into the semen dose can effectively stimulate ovulation in rabbits. The dose of 10 μg of [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH ethylamide per doe was sufficient to produce results comparable to those obtained by intramuscular administration of buserelin.

  5. Renormalization-group flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Following an approach of Matarrese and Pietroni, we derive the functional renormalization group (RG) flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures. Perturbative solutions of this RG flow equation are shown to be consistent with standard cosmological perturbation theory. Non-perturbative approximate solutions can be obtained by truncating the a priori infinite set of possible effective actions to a finite subspace. Using for the truncated effective action a form dictated by dissipative fluid dynamics, we derive RG flow equations for the scale dependence of the effective viscosity and sound velocity of non-interacting dark matter, and we solve them numerically. Physically, the effective viscosity and sound velocity account for the interactions of long-wavelength fluctuations with the spectrum of smaller-scale perturbations. We find that the RG flow exhibits an attractor behaviour in the IR that significantly reduces the dependence of the effective viscosity and sound velocity on the input ...

  6. [The effect of food intake on drug action].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletscher, W; Peretti, E

    1990-01-01

    Interactions between medicaments and food are only incompletely documented--despite their frequent occurrence. Food can influence the effect of medicaments in a variety of ways: the effect of the medicament can be delayed or weakened; in some cases the effect may also be increased. The interactions between the kinetics of medicaments and food are described in the present survey. The absorption conditions in the stomach and small intestine are influenced physiologically and chemically by food. In very rare cases the elimination of active ingredients too can be modified by the quality and quantity of the food. Detailed knowledge about the physical-chemical properties of the medicaments used help to optimize the pharmacotherapy in the individual case. For the patient, the easiest suggestion to follow would be to take the medicaments with plenty of water and always at the same time.

  7. Acute Stressor Effects on Goal-Directed Action in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Stephanie; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Here we examined effects of acute stressors that involve either systemic coadministration of corticosterone/yohimbine (3 mg/kg each) to increase glucocorticoid/noradrenaline activity (denoted as "pharmacological" stressor) or one or several distinct restraint stressors (denoted as "single" vs. "multiple" stressor) on…

  8. Acute Stressor Effects on Goal-Directed Action in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Stephanie; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Here we examined effects of acute stressors that involve either systemic coadministration of corticosterone/yohimbine (3 mg/kg each) to increase glucocorticoid/noradrenaline activity (denoted as "pharmacological" stressor) or one or several distinct restraint stressors (denoted as "single" vs. "multiple" stressor) on…

  9. Antioxidative actions of statins: potential mechanisms for antiathersclerotic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takanori; Yasunari, Kenichi; Nakamura, Munehoro

    2006-05-01

    Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase (statins) are widely used for the prevention of atherosclerotic diseases. The effects of statins on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by in vitro and in vivo were studied. Administration of statins significantly decreased ROS generation in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects on Neurotoxin Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    sodium inhibitory effect of ethanol on channel - mediated sodium influx channels ...Exprnmantal Trherpeutics Ped in I.SA. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels : Effects on Neurotoxin Binding1 MICHAEL J. MULLIN 2 and... sodium channels . This indirect allosteric mechanism for inhibition of [H]BTX-B binding. effect orethanol was concentration-dependent and was

  11. The potential of the effective Polyakov line action from the underlying lattice gauge theory

    CERN Document Server

    Greensite, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    I adapt a numerical method, previously applied to investigate the Yang-Mills vacuum wavefunctional, to the problem of extracting the effective Polyakov line action from SU(N) lattice gauge theories, with or without matter fields. The method can be used to find the variation of the effective Polyakov line action along any trajectory in field configuration space; this information is sufficient to determine the potential term in the action, and strongly constrains the possible form of the kinetic term. The technique is illustrated for both pure and gauge-Higgs SU(2) lattice gauge theory at finite temperature. A surprise, in the pure gauge theory, is that the potential of the corresponding Polyakov line action contains a non-analytic (yet center-symmetric) term proportional to |P|^3, where P is the trace of the Polyakov line at a given point, in addition to the expected analytic terms proportional to even powers of P.

  12. Neurocognitive mechanisms underlying social learning in infancy: infants' neural processing of the effects of others' actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Markus; Hunnius, Sabine; Bekkering, Harold

    2013-10-01

    Social transmission of knowledge is one of the reasons for human evolutionary success, and it has been suggested that already human infants possess eminent social learning abilities. However, nothing is known about the neurocognitive mechanisms that subserve infants' acquisition of novel action knowledge through the observation of other people's actions and their consequences in the physical world. In an electroencephalogram study on social learning in infancy, we demonstrate that 9-month-old infants represent the environmental effects of others' actions in their own motor system, although they never achieved these effects themselves before. The results provide first insights into the neurocognitive basis of human infants' unique ability for social learning of novel action knowledge.

  13. Effective actions, boundaries, and precision calculations of Casimir energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghababaie, Y.; Burgess, C. P.

    2004-10-01

    We perform the matching required to compute the leading effective boundary contribution to the QED Lagrangian in the presence of a conducting surface, once the electron is integrated out. Our result resolves a confusion in the literature concerning the interpretation of the leading such correction to the Casimir energy. It also provides a useful theoretical laboratory for brane-world calculations in which kinetic terms are generated on the brane, since a lot is known about QED near boundaries.

  14. The anomaly-induced effective action and natural inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Pelinson, A M; Solà, J; Takakura, F I

    2003-01-01

    The anomaly-induced inflation (modified Starobinsky model) is based on the application of the effective quantum field theory approach to the Early Universe. We present a brief general review of the model and show that it does not require a fine-tuning for the parameters of the theory or initial data, gives a real chance to meet a graceful exit to the FRW phase and also has positive features with respect to the metric perturbations.

  15. Estimation of Several Political Action Effects of Energy Prices

    CERN Document Server

    Whitford, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    One important effect of price shocks in the United States has been increased political attention paid to the structure and performance of oil and natural gas markets, along with some governmental support for energy conservation. This paper describes how price changes helped lead the emergence of a political agenda accompanied by several interventions, as revealed through Granger causality tests on change in the legislative agenda.

  16. Action-effect binding is decreased in motor conversion disorder: implications for sense of agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranick, Sarah M; Moore, James W; Yusuf, Nadia; Martinez, Valeria T; LaFaver, Kathrin; Edwards, Mark J; Mehta, Arpan R; Collins, Phoebe; Harrison, Neil A; Haggard, Patrick; Hallett, Mark; Voon, Valerie

    2013-07-01

    The abnormal movements seen in motor conversion disorder are affected by distraction and entrainment, similar to voluntary movement. Unlike voluntary movement, however, patients lack a sense of control for the abnormal movements, a failure of "self-agency." The action-effect binding paradigm has been used to quantify the sense of self-agency, because subjective contraction of time between an action and its effect only occurs if the patient feels that they are the agent responsible for the action. We used this paradigm, coupled with emotional stimuli, to investigate the sense of agency with voluntary movements in patients with motor conversion disorder. Twenty patients with motor conversion disorder and 20 age-matched and sex-matched healthy volunteers used a rotating clock to judge the time of their own voluntary key presses (action) and a subsequent auditory tone (effect) after they completed conditioning blocks in which high, medium, and low tones were coupled to images of happy, fearful, and neutral faces. The results replicated those produced previously: it was reported that an effect after a voluntary action occurred earlier, and the preceding action occurred later, compared with trials that used only key presses or tones. Patients had reduced overall binding scores relative to healthy volunteers, suggesting a reduced sense of agency. There was no effect of the emotional stimuli (faces) or other interaction effects. Healthy volunteers with subclinical depressive symptoms had higher overall binding scores. We demonstrate that patients with motor conversion disorder have decreased action-effect binding for normal voluntary movements compared with healthy volunteers, consistent with the greater experience of lack of control. Copyright © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  17. Low-energy effective action in N = 2 supersymmetric field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Bukhbinder, E I; Bukhbinder, I L; Ivanov, E A; Kuzenko, S M

    2001-01-01

    Review of new approach to finding effective action in N = 2 and N = 4 supersymmetric theory is given. The approach is based on the formulation of these theories in terms of unconstrained superfields in harmonic superspace. Construction of superfield model of N = 2 supersymmetric field theory (hypermultiplet, N = 2 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory) is discussed. N = 2 background field method is considered. Perturbative holomorphic effective potential in N = 2 models and non-holomorphic effective potential in N = 4 Yang-Mills field theory, defining exact low-energy effective action in this theory, are studied. Possible applications of low-energy effective action in supersymmetric theories and some open problems are discussed. Comparison of given approach with others is performed

  18. Effects of policosanol on gastroprotective action of D-002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Carbajal Quintana

    Full Text Available Introduction: policosanol, a mixture of higher aliphatic alcohols purified from sugar cane wax, is used to treat hypercholesterolemia. D-002 (Abexol, a mixture of higher aliphatic alcohols from beeswax, is an antioxidant supplement with gastroprotective effects. Then, concomitant intake of D-002 and policosanol may occur in routine practice, so potential pharmacological interactions between them should be researched on. Objective: to find out the influence of policosanol on the gastroprotective effect of D-002 on the ethanol-induced gastric ulcer model. Methods: rats were randomized into eight groups: one treated with the vehicle (control, two with D-002 (25 and 200 mg/kg, two with policosanol (25 and 200 mg/kg, two with the same doses of D-002 + policosanol and other with sucralfate (100 mg/kg. Treatments were given as single oral doses. One hour after treatment, rats received 60% ethanol orally and one hour later they were killed and their stomachs exposed. Effects on ulcer indexes (UI were assessed. Results: acute oral administration of D-002 (25 and 200 mg/kg significantly reduced the ulcer indexes by 40 % and 68 %, respectively, as compared to the control group, and policosanol by 26 % and 47 %, respectively. The concomitant administration of the same doses of D-002 and policosanol significantly decreased ulcer indexes by 64 % (both given at 25 mg/kg and by 92 % (both given at 200 mg/kg as compared to the respective monotherapies. Sucralfate (100 mg/kg significantly reduced (@ 99 % ulcer indexes compared to the control group. Conclusions: the concomitant oral administration of policosanol with D-00 2 gives greater gastroprotection than D-002 monotherapy, so both products can be taken together.

  19. Evolution of the violin: The law of effect in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Edward A; Cullen, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    As is true for most other human inventions, the origin of the violin is unknown. What is known is that this popular and versatile instrument has notably changed over the course of several hundred years. At issue is whether those evolutionary changes in the construction of the violin are the result of premeditated, intelligent design or whether they arose through a trial-and-error process. Recent scientific evidence favors the latter account. Our perspective piece puts these recent empirical findings into a comprehensive selectionist framework. According to this view, the many things we do and make--like violins--arise from a process of variation and selection which accords with the law of effect. Contrary to popular opinion, there is neither mystique nor romance in this process; it is as fundamental and ubiquitous as the law of natural selection. As with the law of natural selection in the evolution of organisms, there is staunch resistance to the role of the law of effect in the evolution of human inventions. We conclude our piece by considering several objections to our perspective.

  20. The effects of action observation training and mirror therapy on gait and balance in stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Jeong; Kim, Young Mi; Lee, Dong Kyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of action observation training and mirror therapy to improve on balance and gait function of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were randomly allocated to one of three groups: The action observation training with activity group practiced additional action observation training with activity for three 30-minute session for six weeks (n=12). The mirror therapy with activity group practiced additional mirror therapy with activity for three 30-minute sessions for six weeks (n=11). The only action observation training group practiced additional action observation training for three 30-minute sessions for weeks (n=12). All groups received conventional therapy for five 60-minute sessions over a six-week period. [Results] There were significant improvements in balance and gait function. The action observation training with activity group significantly improved subjects’ static balance. The action observation training with activity group and the mirror therapy with activity group significantly improved subjects’ gait ability. [Conclusion] The activation of mirror neurons combined with a conventional stroke physiotherapy program enhances lower-extremity motor recovery and motor functioning in stroke patients. PMID:28356646

  1. The effects of action observation training and mirror therapy on gait and balance in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Jeong; Kim, Young Mi; Lee, Dong Kyu

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of action observation training and mirror therapy to improve on balance and gait function of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were randomly allocated to one of three groups: The action observation training with activity group practiced additional action observation training with activity for three 30-minute session for six weeks (n=12). The mirror therapy with activity group practiced additional mirror therapy with activity for three 30-minute sessions for six weeks (n=11). The only action observation training group practiced additional action observation training for three 30-minute sessions for weeks (n=12). All groups received conventional therapy for five 60-minute sessions over a six-week period. [Results] There were significant improvements in balance and gait function. The action observation training with activity group significantly improved subjects' static balance. The action observation training with activity group and the mirror therapy with activity group significantly improved subjects' gait ability. [Conclusion] The activation of mirror neurons combined with a conventional stroke physiotherapy program enhances lower-extremity motor recovery and motor functioning in stroke patients.

  2. Dynamical tides in general relativity: Effective action and effective-one-body Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, Jan; Hinderer, Tanja; Buonanno, Alessandra; Taracchini, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Tidal effects have an important impact on the late inspiral of compact binary systems containing neutron stars. Most current models of tidal deformations of neutron stars assume that the tidal bulge is directly related to the tidal field generated by the companion, with a constant response coefficient. However, if the orbital motion approaches a resonance with one of the internal modes of the neutron star, this adiabatic description of tidal effects starts to break down, and the tides become dynamical. In this paper, we consider dynamical tides in general relativity due to the quadrupolar fundamental oscillation mode of a neutron star. We devise a description of the effects of the neutron star's finite size on the orbital dynamics based on an effective point-particle action augmented by dynamical quadrupolar degrees of freedom. We analyze the post-Newtonian and test-particle approximations of this model and incorporate the results into an effective-one-body Hamiltonian. This enables us to extend the description of dynamical tides over the entire inspiral. We demonstrate that dynamical tides give a significant enhancement of matter effects compared to adiabatic tides, at least for neutron stars with large radii and for low mass-ratio systems, and should therefore be included in accurate models for gravitational-wave data analysis.

  3. Covariant and single-field effective action with the background-field formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Safari, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    In the context of scalar quantum field theory we introduce a class of generically nonlinear quantum-background splits for which the splitting Ward identity, encoding the single field dependence in the effective action, can be solved exactly. We show that this can be used to construct an effective action which is both covariant and dependent on the background and fluctuation fields only through a single total field in a way independent from the dynamics. Moreover we discuss the criteria under which the ultraviolet symmetries are inherited by the quantum effective action. The approach is demonstrated through some examples, including the $O(N)$ effective field theory, which might be of interest for the Higgs sector of the Standard Model or its extensions.

  4. The low-energy N=4 SYM effective action in diverse harmonic superspaces

    CERN Document Server

    Buchbinder, I L; Samsonov, I B

    2016-01-01

    We review various superspace approaches to the description of the low-energy effective action in N=4 super Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We consider the four-derivative part of the low-energy effective action in the Coulomb branch. The typical components of this effective action are the gauge field F^4/X^4 and the scalar field Wess-Zumino terms. We construct N=4 supersymmetric completions of these terms in the framework of different harmonic superspaces supporting N=2,3,4 supersymmetries. These approaches are complementary to each other in the sense that they make manifest different subgroups of the total SU(4) R-symmetry group. We show that the effective action acquires an extremely simple form in those superspaces which manifest the non-anomalous maximal subgroups of SU(4). The common characteristic feature of our construction is that we restore the superfield effective actions exclusively by employing the N=4 supersymmetry and/or superconformal PSU(2,2|4) symmetry.

  5. The low-energy N = 4 SYM effective action in diverse harmonic superspaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, I. L.; Ivanov, E. A.; Samsonov, I. B.

    2017-05-01

    We review various superspace approaches to the description of the low-energy effective action in N = 4 super Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We consider the four-derivative part of the low-energy effective action in the Coulomb branch. The typical components of this effective action are the gauge field F 4/ X 4 and the scalar field Wess-Zumino terms. We construct N = 4 supersymmetric completions of these terms in the framework of different harmonic superspaces supporting N = 2,3,4 supersymmetries. These approaches are complementary to each other in the sense that they make manifest different subgroups of the total SU(4) R-symmetry group. We show that the effective action acquires an extremely simple form in those superspaces which manifest the non-anomalous maximal subgroups of SU(4). The common characteristic feature of our construction is that we restore the superfield effective actions exclusively by employing the N = 4 supersymmetry and/or superconformal PSU(2, 2| 4) symmetry.

  6. Differential effects of thioridazine enantiomers on action potential duration in rabbit papillary muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A. S.; Pennisi, C. P.; Sevcencu, C.;

    2015-01-01

    with (+)-thioridazine. In this study we for the first time investigate the cardiotoxicity of the isolated thioridazine enantiomers and show their effects on ventricular repolarization. The effects of (+)-thioridazine, (-)-thioridazine, and racemate on the rabbit ventricular action potential duration (APD) were...... investigated in a randomized controlled blinded experiment. Action potentials were measured in papillary muscles isolated from 21 female rabbits, and the drug effect on 90% APD in comparison with control (DeltaDelta-APD90) was evaluated. Increasing concentrations of (+)-thioridazine and the racemate caused...

  7. Reviewing Biosphere Reserves globally: effective conservation action or bureaucratic label?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzer, Kaera L; Witkowski, Edward T F; Erasmus, Barend F N

    2014-02-01

    The Biosphere Reserve (BR) model of UNESCO's Man and the Biosphere Programme reflects a shift towards more accountable conservation. Biosphere Reserves attempt to reconcile environmental protection with sustainable development; they explicitly acknowledge humans, and human interests in the conservation landscape while still maintaining the ecological values of existing protected areas. Conceptually, this model is attractive, with 610 sites currently designated globally. Yet the practical reality of implementing dual 'conservation' and 'development' goals is challenging, with few examples successfully conforming to the model's full criteria. Here, we review the history of Biosphere Reserves from first inception in 1974 to the current status quo, and examine the suitability of the designation as an effective conservation model. We track the spatial expansion of Biosphere Reserves globally, assessing the influence of the Statutory Framework of the World Network of Biosphere Reserves and Seville strategy in 1995, when the BR concept refocused its core objectives on sustainable development. We use a comprehensive range of case studies to discuss conformity to the Programme, the social and ecological consequences associated with implementation of the designation, and challenges in aligning conservation and development. Given that the 'Biosphere Reserve' label is a relatively unknown designation in the public arena, this review also provides details on popularising the Biosphere Reserve brand, as well as prospects for further research, currently unexploited, but implicit in the designation.

  8. Dynamical Tides in General Relativity: Effective Action and Effective-One-Body Hamiltonian

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhoff, Jan; Buonanno, Alessandra; Taracchini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Tidal effects have an important impact on the late inspiral of compact binary systems containing neutron stars. Most current models of tidal deformations of neutron stars assume that the tidal bulge is directly related to the tidal field generated by the companion, with a constant response coefficient. However, if the orbital motion approaches a resonance with one of the internal modes of the neutron star, this adiabatic description of tidal effects starts to break down, and the tides become dynamical. In this paper, we consider dynamical tides in general relativity due to the quadrupolar fundamental oscillation mode of a neutron star. We devise a description of the effects of the neutron star's finite size on the orbital dynamics based on an effective point-particle action augmented by dynamical quadrupolar degrees of freedom. We analyze the post-Newtonian and test-particle approximations of this model and incorporate the results into an effective-one-body Hamiltonian. This enables us to extend the descripti...

  9. The effect of taurine on chronic heart failure: actions of taurine against catecholamine and angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takashi; Schaffer, Stephen; Azuma, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Taurine, a ubiquitous endogenous sulfur-containing amino acid, possesses numerous pharmacological and physiological actions, including antioxidant activity, modulation of calcium homeostasis and antiapoptotic effects. There is mounting evidence supporting the utility of taurine as a pharmacological agent against heart disease, including chronic heart failure (CHF). In the past decade, angiotensin II blockade and β-adrenergic inhibition have served as the mainstay in the treatment of CHF. Both groups of pharmaceutical agents decrease mortality and improve the quality of life, a testament to the critical role of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin--angiotensin system in the development of CHF. Taurine has also attracted attention because it has beneficial actions in CHF, in part by its demonstrated inhibition of the harmful actions of the neurohumoral factors. In this review, we summarize the beneficial actions of taurine in CHF, focusing on its antagonism of the catecholamines and angiotensin II.

  10. Spontaneously broken asymptotic symmetries and an effective action for horizon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eling, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    Asymptotic spacetime symmetries have been conjectured to play an important role in quantum gravity. In this paper we study the breaking of asymptotic symmetries associated with a null horizon boundary. In two-dimensions, these symmetries are reparametrizations of the time parameter on the horizon. We show how this horizon reparametrization symmetry is explicitly and spontaneously broken in dilaton gravity and construct an effective action for these pseudo-Goldstone modes using the on-shell gravitational action for a null boundary. The variation of this action yields the horizon constraint equation. This action is invariant under a 2 parameter subgroup of SL(2) transformations, whose Noether charges we interpret via the membrane paradigm. We place these results in the context of recent work on the near AdS2/ near CFT1 correspondence. In this setting the horizon action characterizes the infrared regime near the horizon and has a hydrodynamical sigma model form. We also discuss our construction in General Relativity. In the three-dimensional case there is a natural generalization of our results. However, in higher dimensions, the variation of the effective action only yields the Raychaudhuri equation for small perturbations of the horizon.

  11. Effect of Action Video Games on the Spatial Distribution of Visuospatial Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C. Shawn; Bavelier, Daphne

    2006-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of action gaming on the spatial distribution of attention. The authors used the flanker compatibility effect to separately assess center and peripheral attentional resources in gamers versus nongamers. Gamers exhibited an enhancement in attentional resources compared with nongamers, not only in the periphery but…

  12. Kappa-symmetry of superstring sigma model and generalized 10d supergravity equations

    CERN Document Server

    Wulff, L

    2016-01-01

    We determine the constraints imposed on the 10d target superspace geometry by the requirement of classical kappa-symmetry of the Green-Schwarz superstring. In the type I case we find that the background must satisfy a generalization of type I supergravity equations. These equations depend on an arbitrary vector X_a and imply the one-loop scale invariance of the GS sigma model. In the special case when X_a is the gradient of a scalar \\phi (dilaton) one recovers the standard type I equations equivalent to the 2d Weyl invariance conditions of the superstring sigma model. In the type II case we find a generalized version of the 10d supergravity equations the bosonic part of which was introduced in arXiv:1511.05795. These equations depend on two vectors \\X_a and K_a subject to 1st order differential relations (with the equations in the NS-NS sector depending only on the combination X_a = \\X_a + K_a). In the special case of K_a=0 one finds that \\X_a=\\d_a \\phi and thus obtains the standard type II supergravity equat...

  13. Hypertrophic Effects of Concentric vs. Eccentric Muscle Actions: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Ogborn, Dan I; Vigotsky, Andrew D; Franchi, Martino V; Krieger, James W

    2017-09-01

    Schoenfeld, BJ, Ogborn, DI, Vigotsky, AD, Franchi, MV, and Krieger, JW. Hypertrophic effects of concentric vs. eccentric muscle actions: A systematic review and meta-analysis. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2599-2608, 2017-Controversy exists as to whether different dynamic muscle actions produce divergent hypertrophic responses. The purpose of this paper was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the hypertrophic effects of concentric vs. eccentric training in healthy adults after regimented resistance training (RT). Studies were deemed eligible for inclusion if they met the following criteria: (a) were an experimental trial published in an English-language refereed journal; (b) directly compared concentric and eccentric actions without the use of external implements (i.e., blood pressure cuffs) and all other RT variables equivalent; (c) measured morphologic changes using biopsy, imaging (magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography, or ultrasound), bioelectrical impedance, and/or densitometry; (d) had a minimum duration of 6 weeks; and (e) used human participants without musculoskeletal injury or any health condition that could directly, or through the medications associated with the management of said condition, be expected to impact the hypertrophic response to resistance exercise. A systematic literature search determined that 15 studies met inclusion criteria. Results showed that eccentric muscle actions resulted in a greater effect size (ES) compared with concentric actions, but results did not reach statistical significance (ES difference = 0.25 ± 0.13; 95% confidence interval: -0.03 to 0.52; p = 0.076). The mean percent change in muscle growth across studies favored eccentric compared with concentric actions (10.0% vs. 6.8, respectively). The findings indicate the importance of including eccentric and concentric actions in a hypertrophy-oriented RT program, as both have shown to be effective in

  14. Fight against the greenhouse effect. From the local to the international action; Lutte contre l'effet de serre. De l'action locale a l'action internationale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousel, M

    2002-07-01

    In the fight against the greenhouse gases emissions, the local government are directly concerned. This sheet aims to explain the greenhouse effect, the kyoto protocol, the french national policy and to orientate the local actions. (A.L.B.)

  15. [Effect of dexamethasone on indomethacin-induced gastric erosion formation upon duration of the hormonal action].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podvigina, T T; Morozova, O Iu; Bagaeva, T R; Filaretova, L P

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the study was to verify a dependence of dexamethasone effect on the gastric erosion formation upon duration of the hormonal action. Gastric erosions were induced by indometha cin (35 mg/kg, sc) in male rats after 24-hour fasting. The rats were given a single injection of dexamethasone at a dose of 1 mg/kg and they underwent the ulcerogenic stimulus (indomethacin) at va rious time points after the hormonal injection (1, 6, 12, 18, 24 hours as well as 3, 5, 7 days). The control rats were given dexamethasone vehicle. In 4 hours after indomethacin injection gastric erosions, corticosterone and blood glucose levels, as well as body and thymus weights were examined. The results obtained demonstrate a dependence ofdexamethasone effect on the gastric erosion formation upon duration of its action: dexamethasone attenuated or aggravated indomethacin-induced gastric erosions depending on the time of its injection. Gastroprotective action of dexamethasone was observed in the case of its injection 1, 6, and 12 hours before indomethacin. The further increase in the time interval caused transformation of gastroprotective action of dexamethasone against ulcerogenic effect. The data obtained suggest that a disturbance of carbohydrate regulation accompanied with the signs of catabolic effects of the glucocorticoid may be responsible for the ulcerogenic action of dexamethasone.

  16. The combined effect of precession and convection on the dynamo action

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Xing

    2016-01-01

    To understand the generation of the Earth's and planetary magnetic fields, we investigate numerically the combined effect of precession and convection on the dynamo action in a spherical shell. The convection alone, the precession alone and the combined effect of convection and precession are studied at the low Ekman number at which the precessing flow is already unstable. The key result is that although the precession or convection alone is not strong to support the dynamo action the combined effect of precession and convection can support the dynamo action because of the resonance of precessional and convective instabilities. This result may interpret why the geodynamo maintains for such a long history compared to the Martian dynamo.

  17. Gravitational effective action and entanglement entropy in UV modified theories with and without Lorentz symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesterov, Dmitry, E-mail: nesterov@lpi.r [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson - CNRS, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France)] [Theory Department, Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninsky Prospect 53, Moscow, Russia, 119991 (Russian Federation); Solodukhin, Sergey N., E-mail: Sergey.Solodukhin@lmpt.univ-tours.f [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson - CNRS, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France)

    2011-01-11

    We calculate parameters in the low energy gravitational effective action and the entanglement entropy in a wide class of theories characterized by improved ultraviolet (UV) behavior. These include (i) local and non-local Lorentz invariant theories in which inverse propagator is modified by higher-derivative terms and (ii) theories described by non-Lorentz invariant Lifshitz type field operators. We demonstrate that the induced cosmological constant, gravitational couplings and the entropy are sensitive to the way the theory is modified in UV. For non-Lorentz invariant theories the induced gravitational effective action is of the Horava-Lifshitz type. We show that under certain conditions imposed on the dimension of the Lifshitz operator the couplings of the extrinsic curvature terms in the effective action are UV finite. Throughout the paper we systematically exploit the heat kernel method appropriately generalized for the class of theories under consideration.

  18. Gauge Invariant Effective Action in Abelian Chiral Gauge Theory on the Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, H

    1999-01-01

    Lüscher's recent formulation of Abelian chiral gauge theories on the lattice, in the vacuum (or perturbative) sector in infinite lattice volume, is re-interpreted in terms of the lattice covariant regularization. The gauge invariance of the effective action and the integrability of the gauge current in anomaly-free cases become transparent then. The real part of the effective action is simply one-half of that of the Dirac fermion and, when the Dirac operator has proper properties in the continuum limit, the imaginary part in the continuum limit reproduces the $\\eta$-invariant.}

  19. Effects of some heavy metals on the action potentials of an identified Helix pomatia photosensitive neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartelija, Gordana; Radenović, Lidija; Todorović, Natasa; Nedeljković, Miodrag

    2005-06-01

    In the photosensitive MB neuron in the left parietal ganglion of Helix pomatia, the onset of light prolongs significantly (by about 40%) the duration of the action potential. The broadening of the action potential after the onset of light was found to be due to its calcium component and could not be induced after blocking Ca(2+) channels by Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) and in absence of Ca(2+) in medium. The blocking effect of both compounds was reversible. It was found that CdCl(2) exhibited a more intense blocking effect than PbCl(2).

  20. Vertex and Propagator in $\\Phi^{4}$ Theory from 4PI Effective Action in Two Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Carrington, M E

    2012-01-01

    A set of self-consistent nonlinear integral equations for the four-point vertex and the propagator are derived from the 4-loop 4PI effective action for scalar field theories. This set of integral equations are solved in two dimensions through numerical lattice calculations. We compare the calculated results with those of perturbation theories. We find that the 4PI calculations are well consistent with the perturbation ones in perturbative regions. Non-perturbative results are also obtained in the 4PI formalism when the interacting strength becomes large. Furthermore, the full-momentum dependence of the four-point vertex is easily obtained in the 4PI effective action theories.

  1. Regular cosmological solutions in low energy effective action from string theories

    CERN Document Server

    Fabris, J C; Pinto-Neto, N; Peter, P; Peter, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of obtaining singularity-free cosmological solutions in four dimensional effective actions motivated by string theory is investigated. In these effective actions, besides the Einstein-Hilbert term, the dilatonic and the axionic fields are also considered as well as terms coming from the Ramond-Ramond sector. A radiative fluid is coupled to the field equations, which appears as a consequence of the Maxwellian terms in the Ramond-Ramond sector. Singularity-free solutions are obtained when the dilatonic coupling constant is such that $\\omega - 3/2$.

  2. Optimal hostage rescue problem where action can only be taken once : case where effect vanishes thereafter

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Fengbo

    2001-01-01

    we propose the following model for optimal rescue problems concerning hostages. Suppose that a person is taken as a hostage and that a decision has to be made from among three alternatives: rescuing, no rescuing, or taking one action which will save the situation. It is assumed that the action can only be taken once and it will be effective only at that time, i.e., the effect vanishes thereafter. The objective here is to find the optimal decision rule so as to maximize the probability of the ...

  3. Complementary Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa eSartori

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person. Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i to simulate another person’s movements, (ii to predict another person’s future action/s, (iii to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one’s own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception–action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions.

  4. The interference effect of men's handling of muscular action figures on a lexical decision task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlett, Christopher P; Smith, Sara J; Harris, Richard J

    2006-12-01

    It has been shown in previous work [Action figures and men. Sex Roles 53, 877-885] that male participants who handled extremely muscular action figures had lower body esteem than those who did not handle action figures or a Ken doll. However, the internal mechanisms that dictated this effect are unclear. Therefore, the current study extended this previous work by having male participants handle action figures of varying muscularity and completing a lexical decision task with target words that consisted of both positive and negative body words and feeling words in order to determine if males would be primed to think negatively about their bodies and self or if positive thoughts about their bodies and self would be interfered with. The results show that those participants who handled the extremely muscular action figures responded significantly more slowly to feeling positive words (e.g., content, confident) and marginally more slowly to body positive words (e.g., muscle, bicep) than those who did not handle any action figures. Overall, this suggests that the interference of positive words, not the priming of negative words, is the internal mechanism that produces the decreased body image satisfaction after exposure to muscular stimuli. Implications and future research are discussed.

  5. The joint Simon effect depends on perceived agency, but not intentionality, of the alternative action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eStenzel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A co-actor’s intentionality has been suggested to be a key modulating factor for joint action effects like the joint Simon effect (JSE. However, in previous studies intentionality has often been confounded with agency defined as perceiving the initiator of an action as being the causal source of the action. The aim of the present study was to disentangle the role of agency and intentionality as modulating factors of the JSE. In Experiment 1, participants performed a joint go/nogo Simon task next to a co-actor who either intentionally controlled a response button with own finger movements (agency+/intentionality+ or who passively placed the hand on a response button that moved up and down on its own as triggered by computer signals (agency-/intentionality-. In Experiment 2, we included a condition in which participants believed that the co-actor intentionally controlled the response button with a Brain-Computer Interface while placing the response finger clearly besides the response button, so that the causal relationship between agent and action effect was perceptually disrupted (agency-/intentionality+. As a control condition, the response button was computer controlled while the co-actor placed the response finger besides the response button (agency-/intentionality-. We observed a JSE when the co-actor responded intentionally and the causal relationship between co-actor and action effect could be perceived, but not when the co-actor did not respond intentionally and the causal relationship was disrupted (Experiment 1. When the intentionality of the co-actor was maintained but the perception of the causal relationship between co-actor and action effect destroyed, the JSE was absent (Experiment 2. Our findings clearly indicate a vital role of a co-actor’s agency for the JSE and suggest that the ascription of agency is strongly perceptually grounded.

  6. Effects of action planning and coping planning within the theory of planned behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakpour, Amir H.; Zedi, Isa mohammadi; Chatzisarantis, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Patients on dialysis have low physical activity levels. The aim of the study was to examine the validity of action planning and coping planning within the theory of planned behaviour framework, for predicting physical activity behaviour of patients on hemodialysis. Methods: One hundred...... and forty four patients who were undergoing emodialysis were selected from dialysis centers. The mean age of the patients was 56.61 (SD= 11.38) years. The patients completed a questionnaire including variables from the theory of planned behaviour, action planning and coping planning. Physical activity...... was prospectively assessed at 4-weeks with the validated International Physical Activity Questionnaire self-report measure. A hierarchical regression analysis was performed to examine the effects of action planning and coping planning on physical activity behaviour. Results: There was a main effect for coping...

  7. Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility Actions on South Korean Adolescents’ Perceptions in the Food Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Hee Lim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Our objective in this study is to understand how adolescents respond to the food industry’s corporate social responsibility (CSR activities, especially the effects of such activities on consumers’ emotional responses, perceived authenticity, and attitudes toward the company. Understanding which types of CSR actions most influence adolescents is important for managers. This study examines adolescents’ responses to three types of CSR actions (career-related, environment-related, and wellbeing-related across two types of products (unhealthy and healthy foods. We find that CSR actions related to career issues have the greatest effects on adolescents’ emotional responses, perceived authenticity,and attitudes toward a company under the condition of healthy food products. In other words, when a healthy food company offers a career-related CSR program, adolescents have better responses than when an unhealthy food company offers the same CSR program.

  8. Optical back-action in silicon nanowire resonators: bolometric versus radiation pressure effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Santos, E.; Ramos, D.; Pini, V.; Llorens, J.; Fernández-Regúlez, M.; Calleja, M.; Tamayo, J.; San Paulo, A.

    2013-03-01

    We study optical back-action effects associated with confined electromagnetic modes in silicon nanowire resonators interacting with a laser beam used for interferometric read-out of the nanowire vibrations. Our analysis describes the resonance frequency shift produced in the nanowires by two different mechanisms: the temperature dependence of the nanowire's Young's modulus and the effect of radiation pressure. We find different regimes in which each effect dominates depending on the nanowire morphology and dimensions, resulting in either positive or negative frequency shifts. Our results also show that in some cases bolometric and radiation pressure effects can have opposite contributions so that their overall effect is greatly reduced. We conclude that Si nanowire resonators can be engineered for harnessing back-action effects for either optimizing frequency stability or exploiting dynamic phenomena such as parametric amplification.

  9. Applauding with closed hands: neural signature of action-sentence compatibility effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Aravena

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Behavioral studies have provided evidence for an action-sentence compatibility effect (ACE that suggests a coupling of motor mechanisms and action-sentence comprehension. When both processes are concurrent, the action sentence primes the actual movement, and simultaneously, the action affects comprehension. The aim of the present study was to investigate brain markers of bidirectional impact of language comprehension and motor processes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants listened to sentences describing an action that involved an open hand, a closed hand, or no manual action. Each participant was asked to press a button to indicate his/her understanding of the sentence. Each participant was assigned a hand-shape, either closed or open, which had to be used to activate the button. There were two groups (depending on the assigned hand-shape and three categories (compatible, incompatible and neutral defined according to the compatibility between the response and the sentence. ACEs were found in both groups. Brain markers of semantic processing exhibited an N400-like component around the Cz electrode position. This component distinguishes between compatible and incompatible, with a greater negative deflection for incompatible. Motor response elicited a motor potential (MP and a re-afferent potential (RAP, which are both enhanced in the compatible condition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present findings provide the first ACE cortical measurements of semantic processing and the motor response. N400-like effects suggest that incompatibility with motor processes interferes in sentence comprehension in a semantic fashion. Modulation of motor potentials (MP and RAP revealed a multimodal semantic facilitation of the motor response. Both results provide neural evidence of an action-sentence bidirectional relationship. Our results suggest that ACE is not an epiphenomenal post-sentence comprehension process. In contrast, motor

  10. Effect of Fuzheng Huayu formula and its actions against liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenghai; Hu, Yiyang; Xu, Lieming; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Ping

    2009-06-29

    Liver fibrosis is a common histological process to develop into cirrhosis in various chronic liver diseases including chronic hepatitis and fatty liver. Therefore anti-liver fibrosis is very important strategy to treat chronic liver diseases. Fuzheng Huayu (FZHY), a preparation containing herbs such as Radix Salvia Miltiorrhizae, Cordyceps, Semen Persicae, was formulated on the basis of Chinese medicine theory in treating liver fibrosis and was approved. Pharmacological studies and clinical trials demonstrate that FZHY has a significant effect against liver fibrosis and that many of the pharmacological actions are attributable to the effect. This article reviews the effects and actions of FZHY, in particular the effects observed from clinical trials in treating liver fibrosis caused by chronic hepatitis B and the actions on inhibition of hepatic stellate cell activation, protection of hepatocytes and inhibition of hepatic sinusoidal capillarization. This article also reviews the coordinated effects of the constituent herbs of FZHY and the actions of their active compounds such as salvianonic acid B (SA-B) on liver fibrosis.

  11. Effect of Fuzheng Huayu formula and its actions against liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Lieming

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Liver fibrosis is a common histological process to develop into cirrhosis in various chronic liver diseases including chronic hepatitis and fatty liver. Therefore anti-liver fibrosis is very important strategy to treat chronic liver diseases. Fuzheng Huayu (FZHY, a preparation containing herbs such as Radix Salvia Miltiorrhizae, Cordyceps, Semen Persicae, was formulated on the basis of Chinese medicine theory in treating liver fibrosis and was approved. Pharmacological studies and clinical trials demonstrate that FZHY has a significant effect against liver fibrosis and that many of the pharmacological actions are attributable to the effect. This article reviews the effects and actions of FZHY, in particular the effects observed from clinical trials in treating liver fibrosis caused by chronic hepatitis B and the actions on inhibition of hepatic stellate cell activation, protection of hepatocytes and inhibition of hepatic sinusoidal capillarization. This article also reviews the coordinated effects of the constituent herbs of FZHY and the actions of their active compounds such as salvianonic acid B (SA-B on liver fibrosis.

  12. Effect of an educational game on university students' learning about action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchi, Kelly Cristina Gaviao; Montrezor, Luís Henrique; Marcondes, Fernanda K

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an educational game that is used for teaching the mechanisms of the action potentials in cell membranes. The game was composed of pieces representing the intracellular and extracellular environments, ions, ion channels, and the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pump. During the game activity, the students arranged the pieces to demonstrate how the ions move through the membrane in a resting state and during an action potential, linking the ion movement with a graph of the action potential. To test the effect of the game activity on student understanding, first-year dental students were given the game to play at different times in a series of classes teaching resting membrane potential and action potentials. In all experiments, students who played the game performed better in assessments. According to 98% of the students, the game supported the learning process. The data confirm the students' perception, indicating that the educational game improved their understanding about action potentials.

  13. The combined effects of action observation and passive proprioceptive training on adaptive motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yuming; Bao, Shancheng; Wang, Jinsung

    2016-09-01

    Sensorimotor adaptation can be induced by action observation, and also by passive training. Here, we investigated the effect of a protocol that combined action observation and passive training on visuomotor adaptation, by comparing it with the effect of action observation or passive training alone. Subjects were divided into five conditions during the training session: (1) action observation, in which the subjects watched a video of a model who adapted to a novel visuomotor rotation; (2) proprioceptive training, in which the subject's arm was moved passively to target locations that were associated with desired trajectories; (3) combined training, in which the subjects watched the video of a model during a half of the session and experienced passive movements during the other half; (4) active training, in which the subjects adapted actively to the rotation; and (5) a control condition, in which the subjects did not perform any task. Following that session, all subjects adapted to the same visuomotor rotation. Results showed that the subjects in the combined training condition adapted to the rotation significantly better than those in the observation or proprioceptive training condition, although their performance was not as good as that of those who adapted actively. These findings suggest that although a protocol that combines action observation and passive training consists of all the processes involved in active training (error detection and correction, effector-specific and proprioceptively based reaching movements), these processes in that protocol may work differently as compared to a protocol in which the same processes are engaged actively.

  14. Effects of Movement Velocity and Maximal Concentric and Eccentric Actions on the Bilateral Deficit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickin, D. Clark; Too, Danny

    2006-01-01

    This study was performed to examine the effects of movement velocity and maximal concentric and eccentric actions on the bilateral deficit. Eighteen female participants performed maximal unilateral and bilateral knee extensions concentrically and eccentrically across six movement velocities (30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180[degrees]/s). Repeated…

  15. Modulatory effect of raloxifene and estrogen on the metabolic action of growth hormone in hypopituitary women.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Birzniece, Vita

    2010-05-01

    The metabolic action of GH is attenuated by estrogens administered via the oral route. Selective estrogen receptor modulators lower IGF-I to a lesser degree than 17beta-estradiol in GH-deficient women, and their effect on fat and protein metabolism is unknown.

  16. The Effects of Single Laban Effort Action Instruction on Undergraduate Conducting Students' Gestural Clarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, John T., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Laban Effort Action (slash) instruction in an undergraduate conducting class on college wind ensemble member's ratings of conductors' gestural clarity. Participants--undergraduate and graduate wind ensemble members (N = 28)--rated 32 videos of eight undergraduate conducting students who had…

  17. 22 CFR 161.12 - Environmental effects abroad of major departmental actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... analysis shall be prepared in accordance with separate Departmental procedures (Foreign Affairs Manual... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental effects abroad of major departmental actions. 161.12 Section 161.12 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  18. Effect of small scale motions on dynamo actions generated by the Beltrami-like flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Mingtian, E-mail: mingtian@sdu.edu.cn

    2016-08-12

    The geodynamo and solar dynamo are driven by the turbulent flows which involve motions of various scales. Of particular interest is what role is played by the small scale motions in these dynamos. In this paper, the integral equation approach is employed to investigate the effect of the small scale motions on dynamo actions driven by multiscale Beltrami-like flows in a cylindrical vessel. The result shows that some small scale motions can trigger a transition of a dynamo from a steady to an unsteady state. Our results also show that when the poloidal components of the small and large scale flows share the same direction in the equatorial plane, the small scale flows have more positive or less detrimental effect on the onsets of the dynamo actions in comparison with the case that the poloidal components have different directions. These findings shed light on the effect of the small scale turbulence on dynamo actions. - Highlights: • Dynamo actions driven by multiscale Beltrami-like flows are investigated. • Some small scale motions induce transition of dynamo from steady to unsteady state. • Direction of small scale poloidal flow has a significant effect on dynamo threshold.

  19. The quantum vacuum in electromagnetic fields: From the Heisenberg-Euler effective action to vacuum birefringence

    CERN Document Server

    Karbstein, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The focus of these lectures is on the quantum vacuum subjected to classical electromagnetic fields. To this end we explicitly derive the renowned Heisenberg-Euler effective action in constant electromagnetic fields in a rather pedagogical and easy to conceive way. As an application, we use it to study vacuum birefringence constituting one of the most promising optical signatures of quantum vacuum nonlinearity.

  20. Nonperturbative corrections to 4D string theory effective actions from SL(2,Z) duality and supersymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Llana, Daniel; Rocek, Martin; Saueressig, Frank; Theis, Ulrich; Vandoren, Stefan

    2007-05-25

    We find the D(-1)- and D1-brane instanton contributions to the hypermultiplet moduli space of type IIB string compactifications on Calabi-Yau threefolds. These combine with known perturbative and world sheet instanton corrections into a single modular invariant function that determines the hypermultiplet low-energy effective action.

  1. Effects of the "Positive Action" Program on Indicators of Positive Youth Development among Urban Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kendra M.; Vuchinich, Samuel; Ji, Peter; DuBois, David L.; Acock, Alan; Bavarian, Niloofar; Day, Joseph; Silverthorn, Naida; Flay, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated effects of "Positive Action," a school-based social-emotional and character development intervention, on indicators of positive youth development (PYD) among a sample of low-income, ethnic minority youth attending 14 urban schools. The study used a matched-pair, cluster-randomized controlled design at the school…

  2. Context Effects on the Processing of Action-Relevant Object Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Giovanna; Lindemann, Oliver; Bekkering, Harold

    2010-01-01

    In 4 experiments, we investigated the effects of object affordance in reach-to-grasp actions. Participants indicated whether a depicted small or large object was natural or manmade by means of different object-grasping responses (i.e., with a power or a precision grip). We observed that the size of the depicted object affected the grasping…

  3. Context effects on the processing of action-relevant object features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girardi, G.; Lindemann, O.; Bekkering, H.

    2010-01-01

    In 4 experiments, we investigated the effects of object affordance in reach-to-grasp actions. Participants indicated whether a depicted small or large object was natural or manmade by means of different object-grasping responses (i.e., with a power or a precision grip). We observed that the size of

  4. Action naming in anomic aphasic speakers : Effects of instrumentality and name relation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, R.; Bastiaanse, Y.R.M.

    Many studies reveal effects of verb type on verb retrieval, mainly in agrammatic aphasic speakers. In the current study, two factors that might play a role in action naming in anomic aphasic speakers were considered: the conceptual factor instrumentality and the lexical factor name relation to a

  5. Toward a Psychophysics of Agency: Detecting Gain and Loss of Control over Auditory Action Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repp, Bruno H.; Knoblich, Gunther

    2007-01-01

    Theories of agency--the feeling of being in control of one's actions and their effects--emphasize either perceptual or cognitive aspects. This study addresses both aspects simultaneously in a finger-tapping paradigm. The tasks required participants to detect when synchronization of their taps with computer-controlled tones changed to…

  6. The effective action for the 4-point functions in abelian open superstring theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roo, M; Eenink, MGC; Eenink, Martijn G.C.

    2003-01-01

    We construct the derivative corrections to the four-point vertices in the abelian open string effective action to all orders in alpha'. The result is based on the structure of the string four-point function. Supersymmetry of these vertices is guaranteed by the supersymmetry of the F-4 term in the ef

  7. Characterizing Teaching Effectiveness in the Joint Action Theory in Didactics: An Exploratory Study in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensevy, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study of two consecutive reading sessions conducted in primary school by two different teachers. Our purpose is twofold. From a theoretical viewpoint, we propose a tentative set of conditions of teaching effectiveness by relying on the Joint Action Theory in Didactics. From a methodological viewpoint, drawing on…

  8. NLO corrections to the gluon induced forward jet vertex from the high energy effective action

    CERN Document Server

    Chachamis, Grigorios; Madrigal, Jose Daniel; Vera, Agustin Sabio

    2012-01-01

    We determine both real and virtual next-to-leading order corrections to the gluon induced forward jet vertex, from the high energy effective action proposed by Lipatov. For these calculations we employ the same regularization and subtraction formalism developed in our previous work on the quark-initiated vertex. We find agreement with previous results in the literature.

  9. Coping with Sales Call Anxiety and Its Effects on Protective Actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D. Belschak (Frank); W.J.M.I. Verbeke (Willem); R.P. Bagozzi (Richard)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWe study how salespeople cope with sales call anxiety and find that two tactics ultimately reduce dysfunctional protective actions in selling interactions. That is, situation modification and attentional deployment both moderate the effects of felt physiological sensations and anxiety o

  10. Effects of the "Positive Action" Program on Indicators of Positive Youth Development among Urban Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kendra M.; Vuchinich, Samuel; Ji, Peter; DuBois, David L.; Acock, Alan; Bavarian, Niloofar; Day, Joseph; Silverthorn, Naida; Flay, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated effects of "Positive Action," a school-based social-emotional and character development intervention, on indicators of positive youth development (PYD) among a sample of low-income, ethnic minority youth attending 14 urban schools. The study used a matched-pair, cluster-randomized controlled design at the school…

  11. Effect of an Educational Game on University Students' Learning about Action Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchi, Kelly Cristina Gaviao; Montrezor, Luís Henrique; Marcondes, Fernanda K.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an educational game that is used for teaching the mechanisms of the action potentials in cell membranes. The game was composed of pieces representing the intracellular and extracellular environments, ions, ion channels, and the Na+-K+-ATPase pump. During the game activity, the students arranged…

  12. Using Action Research Interventions to Improve the Effectiveness of an Executive Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct an in-depth investigation of an executive team, to determine which internal and external factors impacted the team and to determine in what ways action research interventions improved the team's effectiveness. Methodology: The subjects in this study were seven members of a school district…

  13. Positive Education for School Leaders: Exploring the Effects of Emotion-Gratitude and Action-Gratitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Lea; Stokes, Helen

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study describes the effect of two gratitude interventions designed to trigger emotion-gratitude (gratitude diary) and action-gratitude (gratitude letter) in school leaders. Case study methodology was applied to analyse reflective journals of 27 school leaders. The gratitude diary served to foster a more balanced view of the…

  14. Memory for actions: self-performed tasks and the reenactment effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W; Hornstein, Susan L

    2003-04-01

    Encoding action phrases by enactment (self-performed tasks, or SPTs) leads to better memory than does observing actions (experimenter-performed tasks, or EPTs) or hearing action phrases (Engelkamp, 1998). In addition, recognition memory for SPTs is enhanced when test items are reenacted. Experiment 1 demonstrated a reenactment effect for EPTs, as well as for SPTs, indicating that the effect can be based on visual, as well as motoric, feedback. However, the reenactment effect in SPTs was found even when the participants were blindfolded at test (Experiment 2), indicating that the basis for the reenactment effect differs across SPTs and EPTs. Experiments 3 and 4 provided additional evidence that visual feedback is not critical for reenactment recognition in the case of SPTs. In addition, these experiments failed to show a hand congruency effect (enhanced recognition when the same hand enacts at study and at test), indicating that this effect is not as generalizable as the reenactment effect. These results have important implications for the motor-encoding hypothesis of the enactment effect.

  15. Explicit learning of arbitrary and non-arbitrary action-effect relations in adults and 4-year-olds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Alexander eVerschoor

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ideomotor theories claim that carrying out a movement that produces a perceivable effect creates a bidirectional association between the two, which can be used by action control processes to retrieve the associated action by anticipating its outcome. Indeed, previous implicit-learning studies have shown that practice renders novel but action-contingent stimuli effective retrieval cues of the action they used to follow, suggesting that experiencing sequences of actions and effects creates bidirectional action-effect associations. We investigated whether action-effect associations are also acquired under explicit-learning conditions and whether familiar action-effect relations (such as between a trumpet and a trumpet sound are learned the same way as novel, arbitrary relations are. We also investigated whether these factors affect adults and 4-year-old children equally. Our findings suggest that explicit learning produces the same bidirectional action-effect associations as implicit learning does, that non-arbitrary relations improve performance without affecting learning per se, and that adults and young children show equivalent performance—apart from the common observation that children have greater difficulty to withstand stimulus-induced action tendencies.

  16. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorash ZM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor antagonists with benzodiazepines, which may impact the clinical use of alprazolam, was also studied. Behavioral despair was examined in six groups of albino mice. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally. The control group received only a single dose of 1% Tween 80. The second group received a single dose of alprazolam, and the third group received an antagonist followed by alprazolam. The fourth group was treated with imipramine, and the fifth group received an antagonist followed by imipramine. The sixth group was treated with a single dose of an antagonist alone (atenolol, a β1-selective adrenoceptor antagonist; propranolol, a non selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist; and prazocin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Results confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Prazocin treatment alone produced depression, but it significantly potentiated the antidepressant actions of imipramine and alprazolam. Atenolol alone produced an antidepressant effect and potentiated the antidepressant action of alprazolam. Propranolol treatment alone produced depression, and antagonized the effects of alprazolam and imipramine, even producing depression in combined treatments. In conclusion, our results reveal that alprazolam may produce antidepressant effects through the release of noradrenaline, which stimulates β2 receptors to produce an antidepressant action. Imipramine may act by activating β2 receptors by blocking or down-regulating β1 receptors.

  17. Effects of benactyzine on action potentials and contractile force of guinea pig papillary muscles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Aim:To explore the effects of benactyzine (BEN) on the action potential and contractile force in guinea pig papillary muscles.Methods:Conventional microelectrode technique was used to record the fast action potentials (FAP) and slow action potentials (SAP) of guinea pig papillary muscles.Results:Benactyzine 5,10,50 μmol·L-1 suppressed the maximal upstroke velocity (vmax) of FAP and contractile force (Fc) concentration-dependently while prolonged the action potential duration at 50%,90% repolarization (APD50,APD90) and effective refractory period (ERP) of FAP.The suppression on the vmax was frequency-dependent.Benactyzine 5,10,50μmol·L-1 lengthened the APD50,APD90 of SAP induced by isoprenaline or histamine when perfused with KCl 22 mmol·L-1 Tyrode's solution.The vmax of the SAP was not decreased by benactyzine 5,10 μmol·L-1 but by 50 μmol·L-1.The effects on the SAP were antagonized by elevation of the extracellular calcium from 2.0 to 5.6 mmol·L-1.The effects of benactyzine on SAP elicited by tetrodotoxin resembled that by isoprenaline or histamine except the more pronounced suppression on vmax and action potential amplitude (APA).The persistent rapid spontaneous activity and triggered tachyarrhythmia induced by ouabain were also abolished immediately by benactyzine 5 μmol·L-1.Conclusion:Benactyzine can inhibit Na+,K+,Ca2+ transmembrane movement and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in the myocardium,and this may be the electrophysiological basis of its effects against experimental arrhythmias.

  18. Employee Communicative Actions and Companies' Communication Strategies to Mitigate the Negative Effects of Crises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzei, Alessandra; Ravazzani, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Can communication with employees lessen the negative effects of a crisis? In the pre-crisis stage, employee communication can strengthen internal commitment, while in the crisis stage it can reinforce the commitment by means of accommodative crisis communication strategies. Employee...... commitment is at the basis of positive employee communicative actions, like advocacy and positive referrals, which finally protect the company’s reputation. After a theoretical exploration of these issues, this chapter presents first a case study showing how continuous internal communication efforts...... and factual communication based on managers’ and company’s actions are crucial in order to build quality relationships with employees. In turn, this leads to positive employee communicative actions when a crisis occurs. Second, it illustrates a survey of Italian companies which examined internal crisis...

  19. THE EFFECTS OF MAINTENANCE ACTIONS ON THE PFDavg OF SPRING OPERATED PRESSURE RELIEF VALVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, S.; Gross, R.

    2014-04-01

    The safety integrity level (SIL) of equipment used in safety instrumented functions is determined by the average probability of failure on demand (PFDavg) computed at the time of periodic inspection and maintenance, i.e., the time of proof testing. The computation of PFDavg is generally based solely on predictions or estimates of the assumed constant failure rate of the equipment. However, PFDavg is also affected by maintenance actions (or lack thereof) taken by the end user. This paper shows how maintenance actions can affect the PFDavg of spring operated pressure relief valves (SOPRV) and how these maintenance actions may be accounted for in the computation of the PFDavg metric. The method provides a means for quantifying the effects of changes in maintenance practices and shows how these changes impact plant safety.

  20. [Antihypoxic effect of 3-hydroxypyridine and succinic acid derivatives and their nootropic action in alloxan diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchegorskiĭ, I A; Rassokhina, L M; Miroshnichenko, I Iu

    2011-01-01

    Relationship between the antihypoxic effect of 3-hydroxypyridine and succinic acid derivatives (emoxipine, reamberin and mexidol) and their effect on conditional learning, glycemia, and lipidemia was studied in rats with alloxan-induced diabetes. In parallel, the analogous relationship was investigated for alpha-lipoic acid that is regarded as a "gold standard" in treatment of diabetic neuropathy. It was established that single administration of emoxipine and mexidol in mice in doses equivalent to therapeutic-range doses in humans produces antihypoxic effect manifested by increased resistance to acute hypoxic hypoxia in test animals. Alpha-lipoic acid is inferior to emoxipin and mexidol in the degree of antihypoxic action. Reamberin does not exhibit this effect. The introduction of emoxipin, reamberin, mexidol, and alpha-lipoic acid in rats with alloxan diabetes during 7 or 14 days in doses equivalent to therapeutic-range doses in humans corrects conditional learning disorders in direct relationship with the antihypoxic activity of these drugs. The development of the nootropic effect of emoxipin, mexidol, and alpha-lipoic acid is related to a decrease in hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in rats with alloxan diabetes. The nootropic action of reamberin is accompanied by a transient hypoglycemizing effect and aggravation of dyslipidemic disorders. The antihypoxic activity of investigated drugs determines the direction and expression of their lipidemic effect, but is not correlated with the hypoglycemizing action these drugs on test animals with alloxan diabetes.

  1. Feature activation during word recognition: action, visual, and associative-semantic priming effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kevin J Y; Dijkstra, Ton; Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann

    2015-01-01

    Embodied theories of language postulate that language meaning is stored in modality-specific brain areas generally involved in perception and action in the real world. However, the temporal dynamics of the interaction between modality-specific information and lexical-semantic processing remain unclear. We investigated the relative timing at which two types of modality-specific information (action-based and visual-form information) contribute to lexical-semantic comprehension. To this end, we applied a behavioral priming paradigm in which prime and target words were related with respect to (1) action features, (2) visual features, or (3) semantically associative information. Using a Go/No-Go lexical decision task, priming effects were measured across four different inter-stimulus intervals (ISI = 100, 250, 400, and 1000 ms) to determine the relative time course of the different features. Notably, action priming effects were found in ISIs of 100, 250, and 1000 ms whereas a visual priming effect was seen only in the ISI of 1000 ms. Importantly, our data suggest that features follow different time courses of activation during word recognition. In this regard, feature activation is dynamic, measurable in specific time windows but not in others. Thus the current study (1) demonstrates how multiple ISIs can be used within an experiment to help chart the time course of feature activation and (2) provides new evidence for embodied theories of language.

  2. Feature activation during word recognition: action, visual, and associative-semantic priming effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J.Y. Lam

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Embodied theories of language postulate that language meaning is stored in modality-specific brain areas generally involved in perception and action in the real world. However, the temporal dynamics of the interaction between modality-specific information and lexical-semantic processing remain unclear. We investigated the relative timing at which two types of modality-specific information (action-based and visual-form information contribute to lexical-semantic comprehension. To this end, we applied a behavioral priming paradigm in which prime and target words were related with respect to (1 action features, (2 visual features, or (3 semantically associative information. Using a Go/No-Go lexical decision task, priming effects were measured across four different inter-stimulus intervals (ISI = 100 ms, 250 ms, 400 ms, and 1,000 ms to determine the relative time course of the different features . Notably, action priming effects were found in ISIs of 100 ms, 250 ms, and 1,000 ms whereas a visual priming effect was seen only in the ISI of 1,000 ms. Importantly, our data suggest that features follow different time courses of activation during word recognition. In this regard, feature activation is dynamic, measurable in specific time windows but not in others. Thus the current study (1 demonstrates how multiple ISIs can be used within an experiment to help chart the time course of feature activation and (2 provides new evidence for embodied theories of language.

  3. Effect of actions promoting healthy eating on students' lipid profile: A controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita De Cássia Ribeiro-Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of nutrition intervention actions on the lipid profile of children and adolescents enrolled in public elementary schools. METHODS: This nine-month, controlled, intervention study included 202 students aged 7 to 14 years attending two schools (intervention/control located in a poor neighborhood of the municipality of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Actions were implemented in the intervention school to promote healthy eating habits, presented as "Ten steps to healthy eating". The effect of these actions was assessed by subjecting the students at baseline and end of the follow-up to biochemical, maturation, and anthropometric measurements and a produce intake survey. The dependent variables were the changes in the study biochemical parameters: total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglycerides. Analysis of covariance assessed the changes that occurred over the study period. RESULTS: The mean total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglycerides of the intervention students decreased 13.18 mg/dL (p=0.001, 7.41 mg/dL (p=0.038, and 12.37 mg/dL (p=0.029, respectively, compared with the control students. CONCLUSION: Actions of this nature have a positive impact on lipid profile. This study adds to those that use effective and viable public health strategies implementable at the primary care level.

  4. Effects of acetylcholine and noradrenalin on action potentials of isolated rabbit sinoatrial and atrial myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie O. Verkerk

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system controls heart rate and contractility through sympathetic and parasympathetic inputs to the cardiac tissue, with acetylcholine (ACh and noradrenalin (NA as the chemical transmitters. In recent years, it has become clear that specific Regulators of G protein Signalling proteins (RGS proteins suppress muscarinic sensitivity and parasympathetic tone, identifying RGS proteins as intriguing potential therapeutic targets. In the present study, we have identified the effects of 1 µM ACh and 1 µM NA on the intrinsic action potentials of sinotrial (SA nodal and atrial myocytes. Single cells were enzymatically isolated from the SA node or from the left atrium of rabbit hearts. Action potentials were recorded using the amphotericin-perforated patch-clamp technique in the absence and presence of ACh, NA or a combination of both. In SA nodal myocytes, ACh increased cycle length and decreased diastolic depolarization rate, whereas NA decreased cycle length and increased diastolic depolarization rate. Both ACh and NA increased maximum upstroke velocity. Furthermore, ACh hyperpolarized the maximum diastolic potential. In atrial myocytes stimulated at 2 Hz, both ACh and NA hyperpolarized the maximum diastolic potential, increased the action potential amplitude, and increased the maximum upstroke velocity. Action potential duration at 50 and 90% repolarization was decreased by ACh, but increased by NA. The effects of both ACh and NA on action potential duration showed a dose dependence in the range of 1–1,000 nM, while a clear-cut frequency dependence in the range of 1–4 Hz was absent. Intermediate results were obtained in the combined presence of ACh and NA in both SA nodal and atrial myocytes. Our data uncover the extent to which SA nodal and atrial action potentials are intrinsically dependent on ACh, NA or a combination of both and may thus guide further experiments with RGS proteins.

  5. The climate mitigation gap: education and government recommendations miss the most effective individual actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynes, Seth; Nicholas, Kimberly A.

    2017-07-01

    Current anthropogenic climate change is the result of greenhouse gas accumulation in the atmosphere, which records the aggregation of billions of individual decisions. Here we consider a broad range of individual lifestyle choices and calculate their potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in developed countries, based on 148 scenarios from 39 sources. We recommend four widely applicable high-impact (i.e. low emissions) actions with the potential to contribute to systemic change and substantially reduce annual personal emissions: having one fewer child (an average for developed countries of 58.6 tonnes CO2-equivalent (tCO2e) emission reductions per year), living car-free (2.4 tCO2e saved per year), avoiding airplane travel (1.6 tCO2e saved per roundtrip transatlantic flight) and eating a plant-based diet (0.8 tCO2e saved per year). These actions have much greater potential to reduce emissions than commonly promoted strategies like comprehensive recycling (four times less effective than a plant-based diet) or changing household lightbulbs (eight times less). Though adolescents poised to establish lifelong patterns are an important target group for promoting high-impact actions, we find that ten high school science textbooks from Canada largely fail to mention these actions (they account for 4% of their recommended actions), instead focusing on incremental changes with much smaller potential emissions reductions. Government resources on climate change from the EU, USA, Canada, and Australia also focus recommendations on lower-impact actions. We conclude that there are opportunities to improve existing educational and communication structures to promote the most effective emission-reduction strategies and close this mitigation gap.

  6. Reducing aggressive intergroup action tendencies : effects of intergroup contact via perceived intergroup threat

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, K; Hewstone, M.; Küpper, B.; Zick, A.; Tausch, N

    2014-01-01

    Katharina Schmid and Miles Hewstone gratefully acknowledge support from the Leverhulme Trust that facilitated the writing of this paper. Two studies tested the prediction that more positive intergroup contact would be associated with reduced aggressive intergroup action tendencies, an effect predicted to occur indirectly via reduced intergroup threat perceptions, and over and above well-established effects of contact on intergroup attitudes. Study 1, using data based on a cross-section of ...

  7. Inverse Scattering Method and Soliton Solution Family for String Effective Action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ya-Jun

    2009-01-01

    A modified Hauser-Ernst-type linear system is established and used to develop an inverse scattering method for solving the motion equations of the string effective action describing the coupled gravity, dilaton and Kalb-Ramond fields. The reduction procedures in this inverse scattering method are found to be fairly simple, which makes the proposed inverse scattering method applied fine and effective. As an application, a concrete family of soliton solutions for the considered theory is obtained.

  8. Mechanisms of action underlying the antiandrogenic effects of the fungicide prochloraz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laier, Peter; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Boberg, Julie

    2006-01-01

    The fungicide prochloraz has got multiple mechanisms of action that may influence the demasculinizing and reproductive toxic effects of the compound. In the present study, Wistar rats were dosed perinatally with prochloraz (50 and 150 mg/kg/day) from gestational day (GD) 7 to postnatal day (PND) ...... acts directly on the fetal testis to inhibit steroidogenesis and that this effect is exhibited at protein, and not at genomic, level. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  9. Promoting the translation of intentions into action by implementation intentions: behavioral effects and physiological correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieber, Frank; Thürmer, J. Lukas; Gollwitzer, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    The present review addresses the physiological correlates of planning effects on behavior. Although intentions to act qualify as predictors of behavior, accumulated evidence indicates that there is a substantial gap between even strong intentions and subsequent action. One effective strategy to reduce this intention–behavior gap is the formation of implementation intentions that specify when, where, and how to act on a given goal in an if-then format (“If I encounter situation Y, then I will initiate action Z!”). It has been proposed that implementation intentions render the mental representation of the situation highly accessible and establish a strong associative link between the mental representations of the situation and the action. These process assumptions have been examined in behavioral research, and in physiological research, a field that has begun to investigate the temporal dynamics of and brain areas involved in implementation intention effects. In the present review, we first summarize studies on the cognitive processes that are central to the strategic automation of action control by implementation intentions. We then examine studies involving critical samples with impaired self-regulation. Lastly, we review studies that have applied physiological measures such as heart rate, cortisol level, and eye movement, as well as electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on the neural correlates of implementation intention effects. In support of the assumed processes, implementation intentions increased goal attainment in studies on cognitive processes and in critical samples, modulated brain waves related to perceptual and decision processes, and generated less activity in brain areas associated with effortful action control. In our discussion, we reflect on the status quo of physiological research on implementation intentions, methodological and conceptual issues, related research, and propose future

  10. Promoting the translation of intentions into action by implementation intentions: Behavioral effects and physiological correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eWieber

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present review addresses the physiological correlates of planning effects on behavior. Although intentions to act qualify as predictors of behavior, accumulated evidence indicates that there is a substantial gap between even strong intentions and subsequent action. One effective strategy to reduce this intention-behavior gap is the formation of implementation intentions that specify when, where, and how to act on a given goal in an if-then format (If I encounter situation Y, then I will initiate action Z!. It has been proposed that implementation intentions render the mental representation of the situation highly accessible and establish a strong associative link between the mental representations of the situation and the action. These process assumptions have been examined in behavioral research, and in physiological research, a field that has begun to investigate the temporal dynamics of and brain areas involved in implementation intention effects. In the present review, we first summarize studies on the cognitive processes that are central to the strategic automation of action control by implementation intentions. We then examine studies involving critical samples with impaired self-regulation. Lastly, we review studies that have applied physiological measures such as heart rate, cortisol level, and eye movement, as well as electroencephalography (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies on the neural correlates of implementation intention effects. In support of the assumed processes, implementation intentions increased goal attainment in studies on cognitive processes and in critical samples, modulated brain waves related to perceptual and decision processes, and generated less activity in brain areas associated with effortful action control. In our discussion, we reflect on the status quo of physiological research on implementation intentions, methodological and conceptual issues, related research, and propose future

  11. Renormalization-group flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Garny, Mathias; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2017-01-01

    Following an approach of Matarrese and Pietroni, we derive the functional renormalization group (RG) flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures. Perturbative solutions of this RG flow equation are shown to be consistent with standard cosmological perturbation theory. Non-perturbative approximate solutions can be obtained by truncating the a priori infinite set of possible effective actions to a finite subspace. Using for the truncated effective action a form dictated by dissipative fluid dynamics, we derive RG flow equations for the scale dependence of the effective viscosity and sound velocity of non-interacting dark matter, and we solve them numerically. Physically, the effective viscosity and sound velocity account for the interactions of long-wavelength fluctuations with the spectrum of smaller-scale perturbations. We find that the RG flow exhibits an attractor behaviour in the IR that significantly reduces the dependence of the effective viscosity and sound velocity on the input values at the UV scale. This allows for a self-contained computation of matter and velocity power spectra for which the sensitivity to UV modes is under control.

  12. Kappa-symmetry of superstring sigma model and generalized 10d supergravity equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseytlin, A.A.; Wulff, L. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College,London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-29

    We determine the constraints imposed on the 10d target superspace geometry by the requirement of classical kappa-symmetry of the Green-Schwarz superstring. In the type I case we find that the background must satisfy a generalization of type I supergravity equations. These equations depend on an arbitrary vector X{sub a} and imply the one-loop scale invariance of the GS sigma model. In the special case when X{sub a} is the gradient of a scalar ϕ (dilaton) one recovers the standard type I equations equivalent to the 2d Weyl invariance conditions of the superstring sigma model. In the type II case we find a generalized version of the 10d supergravity equations the bosonic part of which was introduced in http://arxiv.org/abs/1511.05795. These equations depend on two vectors X{sub a} and K{sub a} subject to 1st order differential relations (with the equations in the NS-NS sector depending only on the combination X{sub a}=X{sub a}+K{sub a}). In the special case of K{sub a}=0 one finds that X{sub a}=∂{sub a}ϕ and thus obtains the standard type II supergravity equations. New generalized solutions are found if K{sub a} is chosen to be a Killing vector (and thus they exist only if the metric admits an isometry). Non-trivial solutions of the generalized equations describe K-isometric backgrounds that can be mapped by T-duality to type II supergravity solutions with dilaton containing a linear isometry-breaking term. Examples of such backgrounds appeared recently in the context of integrable η-deformations of AdS{sub n}×S{sup n} sigma models. The classical kappa-symmetry thus does not, in general, imply the 2d Weyl invariance conditions for the GS sigma model (equivalent to type II supergravity equations) but only weaker scale invariance type conditions.

  13. What Makes You Go Faster?: The Effect of Reward on Speeded Action under Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-jie Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the potential reward and risk associated with a choice of action plays an important role in everyday decision making. However, the details behind how reward and risk affect the decisions for actions remain unclear. The present study investigates the influence of reward and risk on a decision to make a speeded motor response. One hundred and ten college students performed a Speed-Rewarded Go-NoGo task during which they were rewarded proportionally based on the speed and accuracy of their response. On each trial, the magnitude of potential reward and the probability of a forthcoming Go signal (Go-probability were presented prior to the Go or NoGo signal. Personality traits, such as risk taking and impulsive tendencies, were measured to determine their contribution in explaining individual differences in task performance. The results showed that larger amount of rewards can motivate people to respond faster, and this effect was modulated by the assessed risk, suggesting that decisions for actions are based on a systematic trade-off between rewards and risks. Moreover, when the assessed risk was high, individuals with greater risk taking and impulsive tendencies did not adequately adjust their behavior across different reward levels. These findings shed light on the mechanistic understanding of the effect of reward and risk on decisions for a speeded action.

  14. Mixed Heavy-Light Matching in the Universal One-Loop Effective Action

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Sebastian A R; You, Tevong; Zhang, Zhengkang

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a general result for evaluating the path integral at one loop was obtained in the form of the Universal One-Loop Effective Action. It may be used to derive effective field theory operators of dimensions up to six, by evaluating the traces of matrices in this expression, with the mass-dependence encapsulated in the universal coefficients. Here we show that it can account for loops of mixed heavy-light particles in the matching procedure. Our prescription for computing these mixed contributions to the Wilson coefficients is conceptually simple. Moreover it has the advantage of maintaining the universal structure of the effective action, which we illustrate using the example of integrating out a heavy electroweak triplet scalar coupling to a light Higgs doublet. Finally we also identify new structures that were previously neglected in the universal results.

  15. Linear response theory for symmetry improved two particle irreducible effective actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael J.; Whittingham, Ian B.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the linear response of an O (N ) scalar quantum field theory subject to external perturbations using the symmetry-improved two-particle irreducible effective action (SI-2PIEA) formalism [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. Despite satisfactory equilibrium behavior, we find a number of unphysical effects at the linear response level. Goldstone boson field fluctuations are overdetermined, with the only consistent solution being to set the fluctuations and their driving sources to zero, except for momentum modes where the Higgs and Goldstone self-energies obey a particular relationship. Also Higgs field fluctuations propagate masslessly, despite the Higgs propagator having the correct mass. These pathologies are independent of any truncation of the effective action and still exist even if we relax the overdetermining Ward identities, so long as the constraint is formulated O (N ) covariantly. We discuss possible reasons for the apparent incompatibility of the constraints and linear response approximation and possible ways forward.

  16. Linear Response Theory for Symmetry Improved Two Particle Irreducible Effective Actions

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Michael J; Kosov, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the linear response of an O(N) scalar quantum field theory subject to external perturbations using the symmetry improved two particle irreducible effective action formalism [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. Despite satisfactory equilibrium behavior, we find a number of unphysical effects at the linear response level. Goldstone boson field fluctuations are over-determined, with the only consistent solution being to set the fluctuations and their driving sources to zero, except for momentum modes where the Higgs and Goldstone self-energies obey a particular relationship. Also Higgs field fluctuations propagate masslessly, despite the Higgs propagator having the correct mass. These pathologies are independent of any truncation of the effective action and still exist even if we relax the over-determining Ward identities, so long as the constraint is formulated O(N)-covariantly. We discuss possible reasons for the apparent incompatibility of the constraints and linear respo...

  17. Discretization effects and the scalar meson correlator in mixed-action lattice simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Aubin, C; Van de Water, Ruth S

    2008-01-01

    We study discretization effects in a mixed-action lattice theory with domain-wall valence quarks and Asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks. At the level of the chiral effective Lagrangian, discretization effects in the mixed-action theory give rise to two new parameters as compared to the lowest order Lagrangian for staggered fermions -- the residual quark mass, m_res, and the mixed valence-sea meson mass-splitting, Delta_mix. We find that the size of m_res is approximately four times smaller than our lightest valence quark mass on our coarser lattice spacing, and comparable to that of simulations by RBC and UKQCD. We also find that the size of Delta_mix is comparable to the smallest of the staggered meson taste-splittings measured by MILC. Because lattice artifacts are different in the valence and sea sectors of the mixed-action theory, they give rise to unitarity-violating effects that disappear in the continuum limit. Such effects are expected to be mild for many quantities of interest, but are significant ...

  18. Impact of nutritional labelling on 10-d energy intake, appetite perceptions and attitudes towards food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonneau, Elise; Perron, Julie; Drapeau, Vicky; Lamarche, Benoît; Doucet, Éric; Pomerleau, Sonia; Provencher, Véronique

    2015-12-28

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of nutritional labelling on energy intake, appetite perceptions and attitudes towards food. During a 10-d period, seventy normal-weight (BMIlabelling groups in which the only difference was the label posted on lunch meal entrée: (1) low-fat label, (2) energy label (energy content of the entrée and average daily needs) and (3) no label (control). Average energy intake was calculated by weighing all foods before v. after daily consumption. Hunger and fullness perceptions were rated on visual analogue scales immediately before and after each meal. Satiety efficiency was assessed through the calculation of the satiety quotient (SQ). The appreciation and perceived healthiness of the lunch entrées were rated on eight-point Likert scales. There was no difference in energy intake, SQ and attitudes towards food between the three labelling groups. Fasting hunger perception was higher in the low-fat label group compared with the two others groups (P=0·0037). No interactions between labelling groups and BMI categories were observed. In conclusion, although labelling does not seem to influence energy intake, a low-fat label may increase women's fasting hunger perceptions compared with an energy label or no label.

  19. Effectiveness and sustainability of remedial actions for land restoration in Abeokuta urban communities, Ogun State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal-Adebowale, Okanlade

    2016-04-01

    Land as a major collective human property faces a great deal of threats and eventual degradation from both natural and human causal factors across the globe. But for the central role of land in human's sustenance and quality living, man cannot afford to lose its natural asset and as such takes mitigating or remedial actions to save and restore his land for sustainable use. In view of this, the study assessed the causal factors of land degradation in urban areas of Abeokuta and effectiveness and sustainability of the taken remedial actions to stem the tide of land degradation in the study area. The selected communities were purposively selected based on the observed prevalence of degraded lands in the areas. A qualitative research approach which encompasses observational techniques - participant/field observation, interactive discussion and photographic capturing, was used for collection of data on land degradation in the study area. A combination of phenomenological, inductive thematic analysis and conversation/discourse analysis was employed for data analysis. The results showed land gradients/slopes, rainfall, run-offs/erosion, land-entrenched foot impacts, sand scraping/mining, poor/absence of drainage system and land covers as causal factors of land degradation in the study area. The employed remedial actions for restoration of degraded land included filling of drenches with sand bags, wood logs, bricks and stones, and sand filling. The study though observed that filling of drenches caused by erosion with rubles/stones and construction of drainage were effective remedial actions, good drainage system was presumed to be the most appropriate and sustainable remedial action for land restoration in the study area.

  20. Remarks on effective action and entanglement entropy of Maxwell field in generic gauge

    CERN Document Server

    Solodukhin, Sergey N

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the dependence of the effective action and the entanglement entropy in the Maxwell theory on the gauge fixing parameter $a$ in $d$ dimensions. For a generic value of $a$ the corresponding vector operator is nonminimal. The operator can be diagonalized in terms of the transverse and longitudinal modes. Using this factorization we obtain an expression for the heat kernel coefficients of the nonminimal operator in terms of the coefficients of two minimal Beltrami-Laplace operators acting on 0- and 1-forms. This expression agrees with an earlier result by Gilkey et al. Working in a regularization scheme with the dimensionful UV regulators we introduce three different regulators: for transverse, longitudinal and ghost modes, respectively. We then show that the effective action and the entanglement entropy do not depend on the gauge fixing parameter $a$ provided the certain ($a$-dependent) relations are imposed on the regulators. Comparing the entanglement entropy with the black hole entropy expressed in...

  1. A note on scaling arguments in the effective average action formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Pagani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The effective average action (EAA) is a scale dependent effective action where a scale $k$ is introduced via an infrared regulator. The $k-$dependence of the EAA is governed by an exact flow equation to which one associates a boundary condition at a scale $\\mu$. We show that the $\\mu-$dependence of the EAA is controlled by an equation fully analogous to the Callan-Symanzik equation which allows to define scaling quantities straightforwardly. Particular attention is paid to composite operators which are introduced along with new sources. We discuss some simple solutions to the flow equation for composite operators and comment their implications in the case of a local potential approximation.

  2. Effect of mode of administration on guaifenesin pharmacokinetics and expectorant action in the rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Leonid; Lavy, Eran; Hoffman, Amnon

    2009-06-01

    Guaifenesin is a very commonly used and prescribed oral expectorant drug. However, its mechanism of action is not completely elucidated and the available information is limited. The purpose was to evaluate whether guaifenesin action on respiratory tract secretion is mediated through a reflex stimulation of the gastric mucosa or by the systemic exposure due to the absorption of the drug to the blood circulation. Guaifenesin was administered to rats by various routes: intravenous bolus, oral gavage, and gastric, jejunal or cecal infusions (through surgically implanted catheters). Phenol red respiratory tract secretion (after intraperitoneal or intravenous injection) was used as a marker for degree of expectorant action. Administration of saline by gavage was used as control. Respiratory secretion following oral bolus was approximately 2-fold higher (pguaifenesin was 1.5-fold higher than following oral administration. The abdominal surgery was found to eliminate the effect of guaifenesin although it did not change systemic absorption. Guaifenesin was equally absorbed from all parts of the gastrointestinal tract. It was demonstrated that expectorant action of guaifenesin is mediated by stimulation of the gastrointestinal tract and not by the systemic exposure to the drug.

  3. Supplemental action learning workshops: Understanding the effects of independent and cooperative workshops on students' knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Kathryn Michelle

    Community colleges enroll more than half of the undergraduate population in the United States, thereby retaining students of varying demographics with extracurricular demands differing from traditional four-year university students. Often in a collegiate lecture course, students are limited in their abilities to absorb and process information presented by their instructors due to content-specific cognitive gaps between the instructor and the student (Preszler, 2009). Research has shown that implementation of instructor-facilitated action learning workshops as supplemental instruction may help bridge these cognitive gaps allowing better student conceptualization and dissemination of knowledge (Drake, 2011; Fullilove & Treisman, 1990; Preszler, 2009; Udovic, Morris, Dickman, Postlethwait, & Wetherwax, 2002). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of cooperative action learning workshops and independent action learning workshops on students' knowledge of specified topics within a General Biology I with lab course. The results of this investigation indicate that implementation of an instructor-facilitated action learning workshop did not affect students' knowledge gain; furthermore, attendance of a particular workshop style (independent or cooperative) did not affect students' knowledge gain.

  4. Lay Evaluation of Financial Experts: The Action Advice Effect and Confirmation Bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Zaleskiewicz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this experimental project was to investigate lay peoples’ perceptions of epistemic authority (EA in the field of finance. EA is defined as the extent to which a source of information is treated as evidence for judgments independently of its objective expertise and based on subjective beliefs. Previous research suggested that EA evaluations are biased and that lay people tend to ascribe higher EA to experts who advise action (in the case of medical experts or confirm clients’ expectations (in the case of politicians. However, there has been no research into biases in lay evaluations of financial experts and this project is aimed to fill this gap. Experiment 1 showed that lay people tended to ascribe greater authority to financial consultants who gave more active advice to clients considering taking out a mortgage. Experiment 2 confirmed the action advice effect found in Experiment 1. However, the outcomes of Experiments 2 and – particularly – 3 suggested that this bias might also be due to clients’ desire to confirm their own opinions. Experiment 2 showed that the action advice effect was moderated by clients’ own opinions on taking loans. Lay people ascribed the greatest EA to the advisor in the scenario in which he advised taking action and where this coincided with the client’s positive opinion on the advisability of taking out a loan. In Experiment 3 only participants with a positive opinion on the financial product ascribed greater authority to experts who recommended it; participants whose opinion was negative tended to rate consultants who advised rejecting the product more highly. To conclude, these three experiments revealed that lay people ascribe higher EA to financial consultants who advise action rather than maintenance of the status quo, but this effect is limited by confirmation bias: when the client’s a priori opinion is salient, greater authority is ascribed to experts whose advice confirms it. In this

  5. Self-Duality Helicity and Higher-Loop Euler-Heisenberg Effective Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Schubert, Christian

    2004-10-01

    The Euler-Heisenberg effective action in a self-dual background is remarkably simple at two-loop. This simplicity is due to the inter-relationship between self-duality, helicity and supersymmetry. Applications include two-loop helicity amplitudes, beta-functions and nonperturbative effects. The two-loop Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian for QED in a self-dual background field is naturally expressed in terms of one-loop quantities. This mirrors similar behavior recently found in two-loop amplitudes in N=4 SUSY Yang-Mills theory.

  6. Effects of the Positive Action Program on Indicators of Positive Youth Development Among Urban Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Kendra M.; Vuchinich, Samuel; Ji, Peter; DuBois, David L.; Acock, Alan; Bavarian, Niloofar; Day, Joseph; Silverthorn, Naida; Flay, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated effects of Positive Action, a school-based social-emotional and character development (SECD) intervention, on indicators of positive youth development (PYD) among a sample of low-income, ethnic minority youth attending 14 urban schools. The study used a matched-pair, cluster-randomized controlled design at the school level. A multiple-measure self-report protocol assessed four key strengths and resources for PYD: self-concept, peer affiliations, ethics, and social skills....

  7. Improved hard-thermal-loop effective action for hot QED and QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Flechsig, F; Flechsig, Fritjof; Rebhan, Anton K

    1995-01-01

    The conventional results for hard thermal loops, which are the building blocks of resummed perturbation theory in thermal field theories, have collinear singularities when external momenta are light-like. It is shown that by taking into account asymptotic thermal masses these singularities are removed. The thus improved hard thermal loops can be summarized by compact gauge-invariant effective actions, generalizing the ones found by Taylor and Wong, and by Braaten and Pisarski.

  8. Effects of action of ultrasound with capsaicin in the treatment of post traumatic pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan OSWALD

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous methods of administering drugs to the body,both passive and active. A recent review of the literature on phonophoresis reports that 75 % of the studies reviewed reported positive effects, ultrasound energy with drugs like gel or cream can travel through body tissue. Capsaicin was the active ingredient in hot chilli peppers has selection actions on unmyelinated C fibres and thinly myelinated A primary sensory neurones.

  9. Low energy effective action on a self-gravitating D-brane

    CERN Document Server

    Onda, S; Koyama, K; Hayakawa, S; Onda, Sumitada; Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Koyama, Kazuya; Hayakawa, Shoko

    2003-01-01

    Recently the study of braneworld on the self-gravitating D-brane has been initiated and derived the gravitational equation on the brane by holographic and geometrical projection methods. Surprisingly, in common with these two methods, the matter on the brane cannot be the source of the gravity on the brane at leading order. In this paper we will propose the low energy effective action on the D-brane coupled with gravity which derives the same results.

  10. Derivative expansion for the effective action of chiral gauge fermions. The normal parity component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcedo, L.L. [Dept. de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Granada (Spain)

    2001-04-01

    Explicit exact formulas are presented, up to fourth order in a strict chiral covariant derivative expansion, for the normal parity component of the Euclidean effective action of even-dimensional Dirac fermions. The bosonic background fields considered are scalar, pseudo-scalar, vector and axial vector. No assumptions are made on the internal symmetry group and, in particular, the scalar and pseudo-scalar fields need not be on the chiral circle. (orig.)

  11. Derivative expansion for the effective action of chiral gauge fermions. The abnormal parity component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcedo, L.L. [Dept. de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Granada (Spain)

    2001-04-01

    Explicit exact formulas are presented, for the leading order term in a strict chiral covariant derivative expansion, for the abnormal parity component of the effective action of two- and four-dimensional Dirac fermions in the presence of scalar, pseudo-scalar, vector and axial vector background fields. The formulas hold for completely general internal symmetry groups and general configurations. In particular, the scalar and pseudo-scalar fields need not be on the chiral circle. (orig.)

  12. Coding Controlled and Triggered Cursor Movements as Action Effects: Influences on the Auditory Simon Effect for Wheel-Rotation Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Yuan Debbie; Procter, Robert W.; Pick, David F.

    2007-01-01

    Four experiments investigated influences of irrelevant action effects on response selection in Simon tasks for which tone pitch was relevant and location irrelevant, and responses were clockwise-counterclockwise wheel rotations. When the wheel controlled left-right movement of a cursor in a direction opposite an instructed left-right hand-movement…

  13. Partially Massless Higher-Spin Theory II: One-Loop Effective Actions

    CERN Document Server

    Brust, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    We continue our study of a generalization of the D-dimensional linearized Vasiliev higher-spin equations to include a tower of partially massless (PM) fields. We compute one-loop effective actions by evaluating zeta functions for both the "minimal" and "non-minimal" parity-even versions of the theory. Specifically, we compute the log-divergent part of the effective action in odd-dimensional Euclidean AdS spaces for D=7 through 19 (dual to the $a$-type conformal anomaly of the dual boundary theory), and the finite part of the effective action in even-dimensional Euclidean AdS spaces for D=4 through 8 (dual to the free energy on a sphere of the dual boundary theory). We pay special attention to the case D=4, where module mixings occur in the dual field theory and subtlety arises in the one-loop computation. The results provide evidence that the theory is UV complete and one-loop exact, and we conjecture and provide evidence for a map between the inverse Newton's constant of the partially massless higher-spin th...

  14. Affordance effects in grasping actions for graspable objects: electromyographic reaction time study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomotaka; Takagi, Mineko; Sugawara, Kenichi

    2012-12-01

    It is unclear whether affordance effects shorten the reaction time in the interaction between objects and actions. This study investigated affordance effects based on compatibility between perception of graspable objects and the act of grasping. The electromyographic reaction time (EMG-RT) was used as the response, and Go/NoGo (Experiment 1) and choice (Experiment 2) reaction-time tasks were performed using combinations of two types of stimulus image (tools and animals) and two types of response task (flexion and extension of all fingers). In Experiment 1, no interaction of stimulus images and response tasks occurred, but the EMG-RT for tools was statistically significantly delayed longer than that for animals. In Experiment 2, the EMG-RT of flexion of all fingers for tools was statistically significantly delayed compared with that for animals, showing interaction. Affordance effects based on compatibility of objects and actions are the basis on human-tool interaction. This interaction induces a goal-directed act and prolongs motor execution of grasping actions for them.

  15. Observing Grasping Actions Directed to Emotion-Laden Objects: Effects upon Corticospinal Excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira-Campos, Anaelli A.; Saunier, Ghislain; Della-Maggiore, Valeria; De Oliveira, Laura A. S.; Rodrigues, Erika C.; Vargas, Claudia D.

    2016-01-01

    The motor system is recruited whenever one executes an action as well as when one observes the same action being executed by others. Although it is well established that emotion modulates the motor system, the effect of observing other individuals acting in an emotional context is particularly elusive. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect induced by the observation of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects upon corticospinal excitability (CSE). Participants classified video-clips depicting the right-hand of an actor grasping emotion-laden objects. Twenty video-clips differing in terms of valence but balanced in arousal level were selected. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were then recorded from the first dorsal interosseous using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) while the participants observed the selected emotional video-clips. During the video-clip presentation, TMS pulses were randomly applied at one of two different time points of grasping: (1) maximum grip aperture, and (2) object contact time. CSE was higher during the observation of grasping directed to unpleasant objects compared to pleasant ones. These results indicate that when someone observes an action of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects, the effect of the object valence promotes a specific modulation over the motor system. PMID:27625602

  16. Observing grasping actions directed to emotion-laden objects: effects upon corticospinal excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaelli A Nogueira-Campos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The motor system is recruited whenever one executes an action as well as when one observes the same action being executed by others. Although it is well established that emotion modulates the motor system, the effect of observing other individuals acting in an emotional context is particularly elusive. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect induced by the observation of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects upon corticospinal excitability (CSE. Participants classified video-clips depicting the right-hand of an actor grasping emotion-laden objects. Twenty video-clips differing in terms of valence but balanced in arousal level were selected. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs were then recorded from the first dorsal interosseous using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS while the participants observed the selected emotional video-clips. During the video-clip presentation, TMS pulses were randomly applied at one of two different time points of grasping: (1 maximum grip aperture, and (2 object contact time. CSE was higher during the observation of grasping directed to unpleasant objects compared to pleasant ones. These results indicate that when someone observes an action of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects, the effect of the object valence promotes a specific modulation over the motor system.

  17. Effect of membrane structure on the action of polyenes: I. Nystatin action in cholesterol- and ergosterol-containing membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Récamier, K S; Hernández-Gómez, A; González-Damián, J; Ortega-Blake, I

    2010-09-01

    A detailed and thorough characterization of nystatin-induced permeability on lipid bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)-containing ergosterol or cholesterol is presented. The results show that the same collection of transmembrane pores appears in membranes containing either sterol. The concentration range for the appearance of these pores is sterol-dependent. Another mechanism of action, membrane disruption, is also observed in ergosterol-POPC membranes. The greater potency of nystatin present in ergosterol-containing membranes cannot be explained simply by the longer opening times of its pores, as has been suggested; it is also due to an increased number of events in these membranes. The present results and those of a companion paper lead us to propose that membrane structure is the determining factor for drug selectivity in membranes with different sterols.

  18. Interference effects of two and three super-tall buildings under wind action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Gu; Zhuang-Ning Xie

    2011-01-01

    Most previous investigations on interference effects of tall buildings under wind actions focused on the wind induced interference effects between two buildings,and the interference effects of three or more buildings have seldom been studied so far due to the huge workload involved in experiments and data processing.In this paper,mean and dynamic force/response interference effects and peak wind pressure interference effects of two and three tall buildings,especially the three-building configuration,are investigated through a series of wind tunnel tests on typical tall building models using high frequency force balance technique and wind pressure measurements.Furthermore,the present paper focuses on the effects of parameters,including breadth ratio and height ratio of the buildings and terrain category,on the interference factors and derives relevant regression results for the interference factors.

  19. Acute effects of specific actions after the “on your marks” command

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOANNIS KESOGLOU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Improved temporal sequencing of high – intensity muscle contractions prior to the sprint start may maximize motoneuron excitability and may enhance fast twitch fiber recruitment and sprint start effectiveness. The aim of the study was to assess a the electromyographic activity of the gastrocnemius lateralis, biceps femoris and vastus femoris muscles under exposure to specific voluntary, dynamic actions (quick skipping or tuck jumps that sometimes sprinters perform after the “on your marks” command and to an external involuntary stimulus (WBV-whole body vibration and b the effectiveness of the above stimuli applied on the activation level of lower limb muscles in order to produce neuromuscular activation the very last moment just behind the blocks, as this is measured by the RT and time in 1.5m and 3m after the sprint start.Ten male sprinters executed sprint starts under 4 experimental conditions after the “on your marks command”: 1st condition – without performing any action, 2nd performing tuck jumps, 3rd performing quick skipping and 4th after being exposed to vibration stimuli. No significant difference in average muscle activity was observed after evaluation of the EMG raw data for the tuck jumps and quick skipping actions. No significant differences were, also, observed for RT and time in 1.5m and 3m in conditions 2 to 4.

  20. Learning to control actions: transfer effects following a procedural cognitive control computerized training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitzan Shahar

    Full Text Available Few studies have addressed action control training. In the current study, participants were trained over 19 days in an adaptive training task that demanded constant switching, maintenance and updating of novel action rules. Participants completed an executive functions battery before and after training that estimated processing speed, working memory updating, set-shifting, response inhibition and fluid intelligence. Participants in the training group showed greater improvement than a no-contact control group in processing speed, indicated by reduced reaction times in speeded classification tasks. No other systematic group differences were found across the different pre-post measurements. Ex-Gaussian fitting of the reaction-time distribution revealed that the reaction time reduction observed among trained participants was restricted to the right tail of the distribution, previously shown to be related to working memory. Furthermore, training effects were only found in classification tasks that required participants to maintain novel stimulus-response rules in mind, supporting the notion that the training improved working memory abilities. Training benefits were maintained in a 10-month follow-up, indicating relatively long-lasting effects. The authors conclude that training improved action-related working memory abilities.

  1. New Insights into the Mechanisms of Action of Cotinine and its Distinctive Effects from Nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizzell, J Alex; Echeverria, Valentina

    2015-10-01

    Tobacco consumption is far higher among a number of psychiatric and neurological diseases, supporting the notion that some component(s) of tobacco may underlie the oft-reported reduction in associated symptoms during tobacco use. Popular dogma holds that this component is nicotine. However, increasing evidence support theories that cotinine, the main metabolite of nicotine, may underlie at least some of nicotine's actions in the nervous system, apart from its adverse cardiovascular and habit forming effects. Though similarities exist, disparate and even antagonizing actions between cotinine and nicotine have been described both in terms of behavior and physiology, underscoring the need to further characterize this potentially therapeutic compound. Cotinine has been shown to be psychoactive in humans and animals, facilitating memory, cognition, executive function, and emotional responding. Furthermore, recent research shows that cotinine acts as an antidepressant and reduces cognitive-impairment associated with disease and stress-induced dysfunction. Despite these promising findings, continued focus on this potentially safe alternative to tobacco and nicotine use is lacking. Here, we review the effects of cotinine, including comparisons with nicotine, and discuss potential mechanisms of cotinine-specific actions in the central nervous system which are, to date, still being elucidated.

  2. Effective-action approach to wave propagation in scalar QED plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuan; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Qin, Hong

    2016-07-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory with nontrivial background fields is developed and applied to study waves in plasmas. The effective action of the electromagnetic 4-potential is calculated ab initio from the standard action of scalar QED using path integrals. The resultant effective action is gauge invariant and contains nonlocal interactions, from which gauge bosons acquire masses without breaking the local gauge symmetry. To demonstrate how the general theory can be applied, we give two examples: a cold unmagnetized plasma and a cold uniformly magnetized plasma. Using these two examples, we show that all linear waves well known in classical plasma physics can be recovered from relativistic quantum results when taking the classical limit. In the opposite limit, classical wave dispersion relations are modified substantially. In unmagnetized plasmas, longitudinal waves propagate with nonzero group velocities even when plasmas are cold. In magnetized plasmas, anharmonically spaced Bernstein waves persist even when plasmas are cold. These waves account for cyclotron absorption features observed in spectra of x-ray pulsars. Moreover, cutoff frequencies of the two nondegenerate electromagnetic waves are red-shifted by different amounts. These corrections need to be taken into account in order to correctly interpret diagnostic results in laser plasma experiments.

  3. The Gospel according to DeWitt revisited: quantum effective action in braneworld models

    CERN Document Server

    Barvinsky, A O

    2005-01-01

    We construct quantum effective action in spacetimes with branes (boundaries) and establish its relation to the "cosmological wave function" of the bulk -- the solution of the corresponding Wheeler-DeWitt equation which can be considered as a means of the holographic description of braneworld models. We show that for a special type of the bulk-brane gauge fixing procedure the one-loop part of the action decouples into the additive sum of brane-to-brane and bulk-to-bulk effective actions, and this decomposition proliferates in a special way in higher orders of the Feynman diagrammatic expansion. This property is based on a special duality relation between the Dirichlet and Neumann boundary value problems when applied to the functional determinants of wave operators and the field-theoretic version of the well-known semiclassical Van Vleck-Morette determinant. It facilitates the gauge-independent way of treating the strong-coupling and VDVZ problems in brane induced gravity models. Importance of this technique in...

  4. The effect of somatostatin on release and insulinotropic action of gastric inhibitory polypeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, R A; Dryburgh, J R; Brown, J C

    1975-12-01

    Studies were carried out in conscious dogs in which the effect of intravenous somatostatin on immunoreactive gastric inhibitory polypeptide (IR-GIP) release was investigated. In addition, the inhibitory action of somatostatin on the insulin response to pure porcine GIP was assessed. Intravenous administration of somatostatin resulted in a delayed IR-GIP and immunoreactive insulin (IRI) response to oral glucose. Somatostatin also delayed the IR-GIP response to the ingestion of fat. In both types of experiments, initial depression of IRI levels was followed by a sharp rise in IRI release. Intravenous infusion of somatostatin produced 80% inhibition of the IRI response to pure porcine GIP. It was concluded that somatostatin inhibits the physiological release of IR-GIP and the insulinotropic action of exogenous porcine GIP.

  5. Next-to-leading gluonic reggeons in the high-energy effective action

    CERN Document Server

    Kirschner, R

    1998-01-01

    We study the next-to-leading gluon exchange in the high-energy scattering that contributes to the amplitude to order $s^0$ up to logarithmic corrections. Similar to the leading gluon exchange these contribution can be described in terms of reggeon exchanges. There are several gluonic reggeons at the next-to-leading level. Some of them transfer parity or gauge group representation different from the leading gluonic reggeon. Unlike the leading one they are sensitive to the helicity and transverse momenta of the scattering partons. We extend the high-energy effective action and derive from the action of gluodynamics the terms describing the next-to-leading reggeons and their interaction in the multi-Regge approximation.

  6. On modelling of physical effects accompanying the propagation of action potentials in nerve fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Engelbrecht, Jüri; Tamm, Kert; Laasmaa, Martin; Vendelin, Marko

    2016-01-01

    The recent theoretical and experimental studies have revealed many details of signal propagation in nervous systems. In this paper an attempt is made to unify various mathematical models which describe the signal propagation in nerve fibres. The analysis of existing single models permits to select the leading physiological effects. As a result, a more general mathematical model is described based on the coupling of action potentials with mechanical waves in a nerve fibre. The crucial issue is how to model coupling effects which are strongly linked to the ion currents through biomembranes.

  7. Variations in onset of action potential broadening: effects on calcium current studied in chick ciliary ganglion neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattillo, J M; Artim, D E; Simples, J E; Meriney, S D

    1999-02-01

    1. The voltage dependence and kinetic properties of stage 40 ciliary ganglion calcium currents were determined using short (10 ms) voltage steps. These properties aided the interpretation of the action potential-evoked calcium current described below, and the comparison of our data with those observed in other preparations. 2. Three different natural action potential waveforms were modelled by a series of ramps to generate voltage clamp commands. Calcium currents evoked by these model action potentials were compared before and after alterations in the repolarization phase of each action potential. 3. Abrupt step repolarizations from various time points were used to estimate the time course of calcium current activation during each action potential. Calcium current evoked by fast action potentials (duration at half-amplitude, 0.5 or 1.0 ms) did not reach maximal activation until the action potential had repolarized by 40-50 %. In contrast, calcium current evoked by a slow action potential (duration at half-amplitude, 2.2 ms) was maximally activated near the peak of the action potential. 4. Slowing the rate of repolarization of the action potential (broadening) from different times was used to examine effects on peak and total calcium influx. With all three waveforms tested, broadening consistently increased total calcium influx (integral). However, peak calcium current was either increased or decreased depending on the duration of the control action potential tested and the specific timing of the initiation of broadening the repolarization phase. 5. The opposite effects on peak calcium current observed with action potential broadening beginning at different time points in repolarization may provide a mechanism for the variable effects of potassium channel blockers on transmitter release magnitude.

  8. Test of a model of antiarrhythmic drug action. Effects of quinidine and lidocaine on myocardial conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondeghem, L; Katzung, B G

    1980-06-01

    The effects of quinidine and lidocaine on the maximum upstroke velocity (Vmax) of the ventricular myocardial action potential were compared with the effects predicted by a model over a wide range of driving rates, rhythm disturbances and holding potentials. These rate-, rhythm- and voltage-dependent effects were accurately predicted by the proposed model. The model was also able to predict several previously undocumented properties of the drugs: 1) If lidocaine decreases Vmax of a pulse train, the steady state is reached within a few action potentials. 2) The poststimulation recovery of Vmax in the presence of lidocaine or quinidine can occur in a multiexponential fashion, if the membrane potential is kept at the potential where both the fast (operating mainly at more negative membrane potentials) and the slow (operating at more positive potentials) recovery processes are operative. 3) Hyperpolarization markedly attenuates the rate-dependent drug effects. 4) Combinations of lidocaine and quinidine have a superadditive effect on the Vmax of early extrasystoles.

  9. Effects of acoustic noise on the auditory nerve compound action potentials evoked by electric pulse trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourski, Kirill V; Abbas, Paul J; Miller, Charles A; Robinson, Barbara K; Jeng, Fuh-Cherng

    2005-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of acoustic noise on the auditory nerve compound action potentials in response to electric pulse trains. Subjects were adult guinea pigs, implanted with a minimally invasive electrode to preserve acoustic sensitivity. Electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAP) were recorded from the auditory nerve trunk in response to electric pulse trains both during and after the presentation of acoustic white noise. Simultaneously presented acoustic noise produced a decrease in ECAP amplitude. The effect of the acoustic masker on the electric probe was greatest at the onset of the acoustic stimulus and it was followed by a partial recovery of the ECAP amplitude. Following cessation of the acoustic noise, ECAP amplitude recovered over a period of approximately 100-200 ms. The effects of the acoustic noise were more prominent at lower electric pulse rates (interpulse intervals of 3 ms and higher). At higher pulse rates, the ECAP adaptation to the electric pulse train alone was larger and the acoustic noise, when presented, produced little additional effect. The observed effects of noise on ECAP were the greatest at high electric stimulus levels and, for a particular electric stimulus level, at high acoustic noise levels.

  10. Alignment effects in beer mugs: Automatic action activation or response competition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roest, Sander A; Pecher, Diane; Naeije, Lilian; Zeelenberg, René

    2016-08-01

    Responses to objects with a graspable handle are faster when the response hand and handle orientation are aligned (e.g., a key press with the right hand is required and the object handle is oriented to the right) than when they are not aligned. This effect could be explained by automatic activation of specific motor programs when an object is viewed. Alternatively, the effect could be explained by competition at the response level. Participants performed a reach-and-grasp or reach-and-button-press action with their left or right hand in response to the color of a beer mug. The alignment effect did not vary as a function of the type of action. In addition, the alignment effect disappeared in a go/no-go version of the task. The same results were obtained when participants made upright/inverted decisions, so that object shape was task-relevant. Our results indicate that alignment effects are not due to automatic motor activation of the left or right limb.

  11. Tetrandrine and related bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloids from medicinal herbs: cardiovascular effects and mechanisms of action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chiu-Yin KWAN; FI ACHIKE

    2002-01-01

    Tetrandrine (TET), a bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid purified and identified an active ingredient in a Chinese medicinal herb, Radix Stephanae tetrandrae, has been used traditionally for the treatment of congestive circulatory disorder and inflammatory diseases. TET, together with a few of its structural analogues, has long been demonstrated to have antihypertensive action in clinical as well as animal studies. Presumably, the primary anti-hypertensive action of TET is due to its vasodilatory properties. TET prevents or inhibits vascular contraction induced by membrane depolarization with KCl or α-adrenoceptor activation with phenylephrine (PE). TET (30 μmol/L) also inhibits the release of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) as well as NO production by inducible NO synthase.TET apparently inhibits multiple Ca2+ entry pathways as demonstrated in cell types lacking the L-type Ca2+ channels.In cardiac muscle cells, TET inhibits both L- and T-type Ca2+ channels. In addition to its actions on cardiovascular tissues, TET may also exert its anti-hypertensive action via a Ca2+-dependent manner on other tissues intimately involved in the modulation of blood pressure control, such as adrenal glands. In adrenal glomerulosa cells, KCl- or angiotensin II-induced aldosterone synthesis is highly dependent on extracellular Ca2+. Steroidogenesis and Ca2+-influx in bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells have been shown to be potently inhibited by TET. In bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, TET inhibits Ca2+ currents via L- and N-type channels as well as other unidentified channels with IC50 of 10 μmol/L. Other than the Ca2+ antagonistic effects, TET also interacts with the α-adrenergic receptors and muscarinic receptors based on functional as well as radioligand binding studies. Apart from its functional effects,TET and related compounds also exert effects on tissue structures, such as remodelling of hypertrophied heart and inhibition of angiogenesis, probably by causing apoptotic

  12. The influence of performance on action-effect integration in sense of agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wen; Yamashita, Atsushi; Asama, Hajime

    2017-08-01

    Sense of agency refers to the subjective feeling of being able to control an outcome through one's own actions or will. Prior studies have shown that both sensory processing (e.g., comparisons between sensory feedbacks and predictions basing on one's motor intentions) and high-level cognitive/constructive processes (e.g., inferences based on one's performance or the consequences of one's actions) contribute to judgments of sense of agency. However, it remains unclear how these two types of processes interact, which is important for clarifying the mechanisms underlying sense of agency. Thus, we examined whether performance-based inferences influence action-effect integration in sense of agency using a delay detection paradigm in two experiments. In both experiments, participants pressed left and right arrow keys to control the direction in which a moving dot was travelling. The dot's response delay was manipulated randomly on 7 levels (0-480ms) between the trials; for each trial, participants were asked to judge whether the dot response was delayed and to rate their level of agency over the dot. In Experiment 1, participants tried to direct the dot to reach a destination on the screen as quickly as possible. Furthermore, the computer assisted participants by ignoring erroneous commands for half of the trials (assisted condition), while in the other half, all of the participants' commands were executed (self-control condition). In Experiment 2, participants directed the dot as they pleased (without a specific goal), but, in half of the trials, the computer randomly ignored 32% of their commands (disturbed condition) rather than assisted them. The results from the two experiments showed that performance enhanced action-effect integration. Specifically, when task performance was improved through the computer's assistance in Experiment 1, delay detection was reduced in the 480-ms delay condition, despite the fact that 32% of participants' commands were ignored

  13. Bridging the gap between the other and me: the functional role of motor resonance and action effects in infants' imitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulus, M.A.; Hunnius, S.; Vissers, M.E.; Bekkering, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates a two-stage model of infants' imitative learning from observed actions and their effects. According to this model, the observation of another person's action activates the corresponding motor code in the infants motor repertoire (i.e. leads to motor resonance). The second pro

  14. The high energy behavior of QCD. The effective action and the triple-Pomeron-vertex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hentschinski, Martin

    2009-07-15

    We study integrations over light-cone momenta in the high energy effective action of QCD. After a brief review of the effective action, we arrive on a regularization mechanism from matching of effective action diagrams with QCD diagrams, which we apply to a re-derivation of the reggeized gluon and of the BFKL-equation. We study consequences of the proposed regularization on the analytic structure of 2{yields}3 and 2{yields}4 production amplitudes in the Multi-Regge-Kinematics. We derive a certain part of the 1-loop corrections to the production vertex and demonstrate that they yield the on-set of corrections demanded by the Steinmann-relations. The Reggeon-Particle-2-Reggeon vertex is determined and applied to the construction of various signature configurations of the production amplitudes. We extend the proposed regularization method to states of three and four reggeized gluons and propose a supplement to the effective Lagrangian. We derive vertices for the 1-3 and 2-4 reggeized-gluon-transition inside the elastic amplitude and verify that signature conservation is obeyed. Integral equations for the state of three and four reggeized gluons are formulated and shown to be in accordance with a result by Bartels and Wuesthoff. In a second part we investigate the high-energy behavior of QCD for different surface topologies of color graphs. After a brief review of the planar limit (bootstrap and gluon reggeization) and of the cylinder topology (BFKL) we investigate the 3{yields}3 scattering in the triple Regge limit which belongs to the pair-of-pants topology. We re-derive the triple Pomeron vertex function and show that it belongs to a specific set of graphs in color space which we identify as the analog of the Mandelstam diagram. We then extend the study to the high-energy behavior of N=4 SYM where we find a new class of color graphs not present in QCD. (orig.)

  15. Effects of focal prefrontal cortex lesions on electrophysiological indices of executive attention and action control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Løvstad, Marianne

    2014-06-01

    The human capacity to maintain an overarching control over mental states and behavior relies on multiple, distributed and dynamically interacting brain networks, in which prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a critical role. PFC exerts top-down executive control over subcortical and posterior cortical areas via extensive reciprocal connections. The orbital, lateral, and medial PFC subdivisions are associated with distinct executive functions, but their precise roles in large-scale neural networks remain to be determined. The main objective of our research program is to specify cognitive and neural mechanisms that govern executive control functions. We study effects of focal PFC lesions on behavioral and electrophysiological correlates of attention and action control utilizing experiments that relate to real-life requirements for executive control. We provide a selective review of studies on the impact of lesions to PFC subregions on novelty processing, anticipatory attention, and action preparation and motor inhibition. The studies provide evidence for the contribution of both lateral, dorsomedial and orbital PFC in novelty processing and dynamic contextual updating. We also report evidence for a role of lateral PFC in motor preparation and anticipatory attention. In contrast to the common view that orbitofrontal cortex plays a general role in inhibitory control, we report findings indicating an involvement in action outcome monitoring rather than in behavioral inhibition as such. We argue that improved understanding of how basic aspects of attentional control and inhibition is regulated in the brain, will shed light on the complex behavioral, cognitive and emotional problems experienced by patients with executive dysfunction.

  16. PIBID pedagogia and the education learning: between propositions and effective actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilaine do Rosário Neves

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was developed having as objective to analyze the process of education learning, by students of Pedagogy when inserting and developing activities at school, through the Institutional Program Initiation of Scholarship to Teaching (PIBID/2012. For purposes of this paper, we treat the actions planned by the students during the participation in the Program; implications; the potential and limitations of these actions in its teaching learning processes. As data collection instruments, we used the questionnaire, the semi-structured interviews, observations of the meetings of PIBID and the visit to schools where five graduation students used to study. The survey data allowed us to find that although they have gone under changes, most of the actions set out in Subproject PIBID Pedagogia for students were effective in practice; the students experienced the school of exploratory and participatory way; They were present at meetings, workshops and academic and scientific events, favoring the teaching learning, some afforded more intensely (on the educational context, students and their characteristics, to teamwork, to deal with the unexpected and other less (concerning the planning of teaching, content matters, ways of teaching and interaction with students.

  17. Gauge Coupling Field, Currents, Anomalies and N=1 Super-Yang-Mills Effective Actions

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosetti, Nicola; Derendinger, Jean-Pierre; Hartog, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    Working with a gauge coupling field in a linear superfield, we construct effective Lagrangians for N=1 super-Yang-Mills theory fully compatible with the expected all-order behaviour or physical quantities. Using the one-loop dependence on its ultraviolet cutoff and anomaly matching or cancellation of R and dilatation anomalies, we obtain the Wilsonian effective Lagrangian. With similar anomaly matching or cancellation methods, we derive the effective action for gaugino condensates, as a function of the real coupling field. Both effective actions lead to a derivation of the NSVZ beta function from algebraic arguments only. The extension of results to N=2 theories or to matter systems is briefly considered. The main tool for the discussion of anomalies is a generic supercurrent structure with 16_B+16_F operators (the S multiplet), which we derive using superspace identities and field equations for a fully general gauge theory Lagrangian with the linear gauge coupling superfield, and with various U(1)_R currents...

  18. Gauge coupling field, currents, anomalies and N=1 super-Yang–Mills effective actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Ambrosetti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Working with a gauge coupling field in a linear superfield, we construct effective Lagrangians for N=1 super-Yang–Mills theory fully compatible with the expected all-order behavior or physical quantities. Using the one-loop dependence on its ultraviolet cutoff and anomaly matching or cancellation of R and dilatation anomalies, we obtain the Wilsonian effective Lagrangian. With similar anomaly matching or cancellation methods, we derive the effective action for gaugino condensates, as a function of the real coupling field. Both effective actions lead to a derivation of the NSVZ β function from algebraic arguments only. The extension of results to N=2 theories or to matter systems is briefly considered. The main tool for the discussion of anomalies is a generic supercurrent structure with 16B+16F operators (the S multiplet, which we derive using superspace identities and field equations for a fully general gauge theory Lagrangian with the linear gauge coupling superfield, and with various U(1R currents. As a byproduct, we show under which conditions the S multiplet can be improved to contain the Callan–Coleman–Jackiw energy-momentum tensor whose trace measures the breaking of scale invariance.

  19. Improving Conservation Community Group Effectiveness Using Mind Mapping and Action Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanabeth Luke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a case study where mind mapping is used within an action research project to foster improved community group effectiveness and decision-making. The case study focusses on the social dynamics experienced during the formative stage of a community action group in Byron Bay, New South Wales; one of a network of such groups, formed to ensure that sustainable environmental management practices are followed in proposed coal-seam gas developments. In the context of examining systemic social interactions within such a group, the study recognises both the importance of communication and the susceptibility of individuals to certain behavioural patterns. Negative emergent norms led to excessive behaviours that threatened to hinder effective communication and group behaviour. Use of mind mapping countered this negative tendency, focussing the inherent positive qualities of the group, and thus enabling more efficient decision-making. Shown to be an effective tool for overcoming communication barriers and increasing cohesion; its power lies in maintaining process transparency, removing power-structures and ego-centric personal barriers, hence facilitating effective communal knowledge sharing, clarification, idea crystallisation, and planning.

  20. Gauge coupling field, currents, anomalies and N = 1 super-Yang-Mills effective actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosetti, Nicola; Arnold, Daniel; Derendinger, Jean-Pierre; Hartong, Jelle

    2017-02-01

    Working with a gauge coupling field in a linear superfield, we construct effective Lagrangians for N = 1 super-Yang-Mills theory fully compatible with the expected all-order behavior or physical quantities. Using the one-loop dependence on its ultraviolet cutoff and anomaly matching or cancellation of R and dilatation anomalies, we obtain the Wilsonian effective Lagrangian. With similar anomaly matching or cancellation methods, we derive the effective action for gaugino condensates, as a function of the real coupling field. Both effective actions lead to a derivation of the NSVZ β function from algebraic arguments only. The extension of results to N = 2 theories or to matter systems is briefly considered. The main tool for the discussion of anomalies is a generic supercurrent structure with 16B +16F operators (the S multiplet), which we derive using superspace identities and field equations for a fully general gauge theory Lagrangian with the linear gauge coupling superfield, and with various U(1)R currents. As a byproduct, we show under which conditions the S multiplet can be improved to contain the Callan-Coleman-Jackiw energy-momentum tensor whose trace measures the breaking of scale invariance.

  1. The Age Effects on the Cognitive Processes of Intention-Based and Stimulus-Based Actions: An ERP Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ya-Nan; Zhu, Xinyi; Li, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The functional decline in action among older adults is caused not only by physical weakness but also by cognitive decline. In this study, we aimed to compare the cognitive effects of age between intention-based and stimulus-based action modes electrophysiologically. Because age-related declines in cognitive function might proceed distinctly according to specific action modes and processes, four specific cognitive processes, action-effect binding, stimulus-response linkage, action-effect feedback control, and effect-action retrieval, were investigated. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) during a modified acquisition-test paradigm in young (mean age = 21, SD = 2) and old (mean age = 69, SD = 5) groups. A temporal bisection task and a movement pre-cuing task were used during the acquisition and test phases, respectively. Using ERP indices including readiness potential (RP), P3, N2 and contingent negative variation (CNV) to identify these four specific processes for the two action modes, we revealed the effects of age on each ERP index. The results showed similar patterns of waveforms but consistently decreasing amplitudes of all four ERP indices in the old age group compared with the young age group, which indicates not only generally declining functions of action preparation in older adults but also age effects specific to the action modes and processes that might otherwise be mixed together under confounding experimental conditions. Particularly, an interference effect indexed by the differences in the amplitudes of CNV between congruent and incongruent tasks was observed in the young age group, which is consistent with previous behavioral reports. However, this effect was absent in the old age group, indicating a specific age-related deficit in the effect-action retrieval process of intention-based action, which might be caused by an age-related deficit in associative memory. In sum, this study investigated the cognitive processes of two action modes from

  2. The Age Effects on the Cognitive Processes of Intention-Based and Stimulus-Based Actions: An ERP Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Nan Niu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The functional decline in action among older adults is caused not only by physical weakness but also by cognitive decline. In this study, we aimed to compare the cognitive effects of age between intention-based and stimulus-based action modes electrophysiologically. Because age-related declines in cognitive function might proceed distinctly according to specific action modes and processes, four specific cognitive processes, action-effect binding, stimulus-response linkage, action-effect feedback control, and effect-action retrieval, were investigated. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs during a modified acquisition-test paradigm in young (mean age = 21, SD = 2 and old (mean age = 69, SD = 5 groups. A temporal bisection task and a movement pre-cuing task were used during the acquisition and test phases, respectively. Using ERP indices including readiness potential (RP, P3, N2 and contingent negative variation (CNV to identify these four specific processes for the two action modes, we revealed the effects of age on each ERP index. The results showed similar patterns of waveforms but consistently decreasing amplitudes of all four ERP indices in the old age group compared with the young age group, which indicates not only generally declining functions of action preparation in older adults but also age effects specific to the action modes and processes that might otherwise be mixed together under confounding experimental conditions. Particularly, an interference effect indexed by the differences in the amplitudes of CNV between congruent and incongruent tasks was observed in the young age group, which is consistent with previous behavioral reports. However, this effect was absent in the old age group, indicating a specific age-related deficit in the effect-action retrieval process of intention-based action, which might be caused by an age-related deficit in associative memory. In sum, this study investigated the cognitive processes of two

  3. Effects of Calcium Channel Blockers on Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam and Imipramine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorash ZM

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is effective as an anxiolytic and in the adjunct treatment of depression. In this study, the effects of calcium channel antagonists on the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine were investigated. A forced swimming maze was used to study behavioral despair in albino mice. Mice were divided into nine groups (n = 7 per group. One group received a single dose of 1% Tween 80; two groups each received a single dose of the antidepressant alone (alprazolam or imipramine; two groups each received a single dose of the calcium channel blocker (nifedipine or verapamil; four groups each received a single dose of the calcium channel blocker followed by a single dose of the antidepressant (with same doses used for either in the previous four groups. Drug administration was performed concurrently on the nine groups. Our data confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Both nifedipine and verapamil produced a significant antidepressant effect (delay the onset of immobility when administered separately. Verapamil augmented the antidepressant effects of alprazolam and imipramine (additive antidepressant effect. This may be due to the possibility that verapamil might have antidepressant-like effect through different mechanism. Nifedipine and imipramine combined led to a delay in the onset of immobility greater than their single use but less than the sum of their independent administration. This may be due to the fact that nifedipine on its own might act as an antidepressant but blocks one imipramine mechanism that depends on L-type calcium channel activation. Combining nifedipine with alprazolam produced additional antidepressant effects, which indicates that they exert antidepressant effects through different mechanisms.

  4. Effects of menthol on circular smooth muscle of human colon: analysis of the mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Antonella; Liotta, Rosa; Mulè, Flavia

    2014-10-05

    Menthol is the major constituent of peppermint oil, an herbal preparation commonly used to treat nausea, spasms during colonoscopy and irritable bowel disease. The mechanism responsible for its spasmolytic action remains unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects induced by menthol on the human distal colon mechanical activity in vitro and to analyze the mechanism of action. The spontaneous or evoked-contractions of the circular smooth muscle were recorded using vertical organ bath. Menthol (0.1 mM-30 mM) reduced, in a concentration-dependent manner, the amplitude of the spontaneous contractions without affecting the frequency and the resting basal tone. The inhibitory effect was not affected by 5-benzyloxytryptamine (1 μM), a transient receptor potential-melastatin8 channel antagonist, or tetrodotoxin (1 μM), a neural blocker, or 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (10 µM), inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive soluble guanylyl cyclase, or tetraethylammonium (10 mM), a blocker of potassium (K+)-channels. On the contrary, nifedipine (3 nM), a voltage-activated L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, significantly reduced the inhibitory menthol actions. Menthol also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner the contractile responses caused by exogenous application of Ca2+ (75-375 μM) in a Ca2+-free solution, or induced by potassium chloride (KCl; 40 mM). Moreover menthol (1-3 mM) strongly reduced the electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked atropine-sensitive contractions and the carbachol-contractile responses. The present results suggest that menthol induces spasmolytic effects in human colon circular muscle inhibiting directly the gastrointestinal smooth muscle contractility, through the block of Ca2+ influx through sarcolemma L-type Ca2+ channels.

  5. Effectiveness and mode of action of whitening dentifrices on enamel extrinsic stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshara, Salem; Lippert, Frank; Eckert, George J; Hara, Anderson T

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to investigate the mode of action and the whitening effect of whitening dentifrices. Two hundred fifty-six bovine enamel specimens (10 × 10 mm(2)) were prepared, partially stained, and assigned into eight groups (n = 32): six whitening dentifrices, one nonwhitening and deionized water (negative control), and further divided in two subgroups (n = 16), according to the test model: chemical (dentifrice slurry treatment only) or chemo-mechanical (slurry + toothbrushing). Specimens were treated with dentifrice slurries 2 ×/day for 1 min and toothbrushed or not, according to each model. In between dentifrice treatments, specimens were artificially stained for 5 h. This protocol was repeated for 5 days and enamel color changes (∆E) were measured after each day (days 1-5). The abrasive level of the dentifrices was determined following the ISO11609 guidelines. In the chemo-mechanical model, the whitening action of all dentifrices was observed after day 1, being higher than the negative control group (p 0.05). Differences on ∆E among dentifrices were observed, and they seemed to correlate well with their abrasive level (r(2) = 0.80). In the chemical model, no significant differences were observed among groups (p > 0.05), with ∆E remaining constant throughout the study. Higher ∆E values were observed in the chemo-mechanical model compared to the chemical (p dentifrices were effective in whitening stained enamel and their mode of action showed to be mainly mechanical (toothbrushing abrasion). The abrasive level of dentifrices seems to determine its whitening effectiveness.

  6. Therapeutic Effects and Mechanisms of Action of Rifaximin in Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPont, Herbert L

    2015-08-01

    Emerging preclinical and clinic evidence described herein suggests that the mechanism of action of rifaximin is not restricted to direct antibacterial effects within the gastrointestinal tract. Data from this study were derived from general and clinical trial-specific PubMed searches of English-language articles on rifaximin available through December 3, 2014. Search terms included rifaximin alone and in combination (using the Boolean operation "AND") with travelers' diarrhea, hepatic encephalopathy, liver cirrhosis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, and Crohn's disease. Rifaximin appears to reduce bacterial virulence and pathogenicity by inhibiting bacterial translocation across the gastrointestinal epithelial lining. Rifaximin was shown to decrease bacterial adherence to epithelial cells and subsequent internalization in a bacteria- and cell type-specific manner, without an alteration in bacterial counts, but with a down-regulation in epithelial proinflammatory cytokine expression. Rifaximin also appears to modulate gut-immune signaling. In animal models of inflammatory bowel disease, rifaximin produced therapeutic effects by activating the pregnane X receptor and thereby reducing levels of the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB. Therefore, for a given disease state, rifaximin may act through several mechanisms of action to exert its therapeutic effects. Clinically, rifaximin 600 mg/d significantly reduced symptoms of travelers' diarrhea (eg, time to last unformed stool vs placebo [32.0 hours vs 65.5 hours, respectively; P=.001]). For the prevention of hepatic encephalopathy recurrence, data indicate that treating 4 patients with rifaximin 1100 mg/d for 6 months would prevent 1 episode of hepatic encephalopathy. For diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, a significantly greater percentage (40.7%) of patients treated with rifaximin 1650 mg/d for 2 weeks experienced adequate global irritable bowel syndrome symptom

  7. Three-dimensional noncommutative Yukawa theory: Induced effective action and propagating modes

    CERN Document Server

    Bufalo, R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the analysis of noncommutative Yukawa theory, encompassing neutral and charged scalar fields. We approach the analysis by considering carefully the derivation of the respective effective actions. Hence, based on the obtained results, we compute the one-loop contributions to the neutral and charged scalar field self-energy, as well as to the Chern-Simons polarization tensor. In order to properly define the behaviour of the quantum fields, the known UV/IR mixing due to radiative corrections is analysed in the one-loop physical dispersion relation of the scalar and gauge fields.

  8. Effects of Potassium Currents upon Action Potential of Cardiac Cells Exposed to External Electric fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An-Ying Zhang; Xiao-Feng Pang

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies show that exposure to high-voltage electric fields would influence the electro cardiogram both in experimental animate and human beings. The effects of the external electric fields upon action potential of cardiac cells are studied in this paper based on the dynamical model, LR91. Fourth order Runger-Kuta is used to analyze the change of potassium ion channels exposed to external electric fields in detail. Results indicate that external electric fields could influence the current of potassium ion by adding an induced component voltage on membrane. This phenomenon might be one of the reasons of heart rate anomaly under the high-voltage electric fields.

  9. One-loop effective action of QCD at high temperature using the heat kernel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megias, E. [Universidad de Granada (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Moderna]. E-mail: emegias@ugr.es

    2004-07-01

    Perturbation theory is an important tool to describe the properties of QCD at very high temperatures. Recently a new technique has been proposed to compute the one-loop effective action of QCD at finite temperature by making a gauge covariant derivative expansion, which is fully consistent with topologically small and large gauge transformations (also time dependent transformations). This technique is based on the heat kernel expansion, and the thermal Wilson line plays an essential role. We consider a general SU(N-c) gauge group. (author)

  10. Effectiveness of Protective Action of Coatings from Moisture Sorption into Surface Layer of Sand Moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaźnica N.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the sorption process of surface layers of sand moulds covered by zirconium and zirconium - graphite alcohol coatings are presented in the paper. Investigations comprised two kinds of sand grains (silica sand and reclaimed sand of moulding sand with furan resin. Tests were performed under conditions of a high relative air humidity 75 - 85% and a constant temperature within the range 28 – 33°C. To evaluate the effectiveness of coatings protective action from moisture penetration into surface layers of sand moulds gravimetric method of quantitavie moisture sorption and ultrasonic method were applied in measurements.

  11. Effects of pedal type and pull-up action during cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mornieux, G; Stapelfeldt, B; Gollhofer, A; Belli, A

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of different shoe-pedal interfaces and of an active pulling-up action during the upstroke phase on the pedalling technique. Eight elite cyclists (C) and seven non-cyclists (NC) performed three different bouts at 90 rev . min (-1) and 60 % of their maximal aerobic power. They pedalled with single pedals (PED), with clipless pedals (CLIP) and with a pedal force feedback (CLIPFBACK) where subjects were asked to pull up on the pedal during the upstroke. There was no significant difference for pedalling effectiveness, net mechanical efficiency (NE) and muscular activity between PED and CLIP. When compared to CLIP, CLIPFBACK resulted in a significant increase in pedalling effectiveness during upstroke (86 % for C and 57 % NC, respectively), as well as higher biceps femoris and tibialis anterior muscle activity (p shoe-pedal interface (PED vs. CLIP) did not significantly influence cycling technique during submaximal exercise. However, an active pulling-up action on the pedal during upstroke increased the pedalling effectiveness, while reducing net mechanical efficiency.

  12. The novel combination of chlorpromazine and pentamidine exerts synergistic antiproliferative effects through dual mitotic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Margaret S; Johansen, Lisa; Zhang, Yanzhen; Wilson, Amy; Keegan, Mitchell; Avery, William; Elliott, Peter; Borisy, Alexis A; Keith, Curtis T

    2007-12-01

    Combination therapy has proven successful in treating a wide variety of aggressive human cancers. Historically, combination treatments have been discovered through serendipity or lengthy trials using known anticancer agents with similar indications. We have used combination high-throughput screening to discover the unexpected synergistic combination of an antiparasitic agent, pentamidine, and a phenothiazine antipsychotic, chlorpromazine. This combination, CRx-026, inhibits the growth of tumor cell lines in vivo more effectively than either pentamidine or chlorpromazine alone. Here, we report that CRx-026 exerts its antiproliferative effect through synergistic dual mitotic action. Chlorpromazine is a potent and specific inhibitor of the mitotic kinesin KSP/Eg5 and inhibits tumor cell proliferation through mitotic arrest and accumulation of monopolar spindles. Pentamidine treatment results in chromosomal segregation defects and delayed progression through mitosis, consistent with inhibition of the phosphatase of regenerating liver family of phosphatases. We also show that CRx-026 synergizes in vitro and in vivo with the microtubule-binding agents paclitaxel and vinorelbine. These data support a model where dual action of pentamidine and chlorpromazine in mitosis results in synergistic antitumor effects and show the importance of systematic screening for combinations of targeted agents.

  13. Novel insights into lithium's mechanism of action: neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Jorge A; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Zarate, Carlos A; Manji, Husseini K

    2010-01-01

    The monovalent cation lithium partially exerts its effects by activating neurotrophic and neuroprotective cellular cascades. Here, we discuss the effects of lithium on oxidative stress, programmed cell death (apoptosis), inflammation, glial dysfunction, neurotrophic factor functioning, excitotoxicity, and mitochondrial stability. In particular, we review evidence demonstrating the action of lithium on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated signal transduction, cAMP response element binding activation, increased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, the phosphatidylinositide cascade, protein kinase C inhibition, glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibition, and B-cell lymphoma 2 expression. Notably, we also review data from clinical studies demonstrating neurotrophic effects of lithium. We expect that a better understanding of the clinically relevant pathophysiological targets of lithium will lead to improved treatments for those who suffer from mood as well as neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. QCD Dirac Spectrum at Finite Chemical Potential: Anomalous Effective Action, Berry Phase and Composite Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang

    2015-01-01

    We show that the QCD Dirac spectrum at finite chemical potential using a 2-matrix model in the spontaneously broken phase, is amenable to a generic 2-dimensional effective action on a curved eigenvalue manifold. The eigenvalues form a droplet with strong screening and non-linear plasmons. The droplet is threaded by a magnetic vortex which is at the origin of a Berry phase. The adiabatic transport in the droplet maps onto the one in the fractional quantum Hall effect, suggesting that composite fermions at half filling are Dirac particles. We use this observation to argue for two novel anomalous effects in the edge transport of composite fermions, and conversely on a novel contribution to the QCD quark condensate in a rotating frame.

  15. Black applicants' reactions to affirmative action plans: effects of plan content and previous experience with discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Jerel E; Sinar, Evan F; Bachiochi, Peter D

    2002-04-01

    This study examined the effects of plan content and previous experience with discrimination on Black respondents' reactions to affirmative action plans. Black engineering students (N = 1,173) were randomly assigned to 1 of 6 plans implemented by a hypothetical organization and were asked to provide ratings of perceived fairness and intention to pursue a position at the organization. There were significant effects of plan content on perceived faimess and job pursuit intentions. Perceived fairness mediated the effect of content on intentions. Furthermore, previous experience with discrimination interacted with content to affect intentions. Individuals who had experienced relatively more discrimination in the workplace reported stronger intentions to pursue a position at an organization whose plan specified special training opportunities for minorities.

  16. The Effects of Action Potential Stimulation on Pain, Swelling and Function of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh Sepehri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most prevalent joint diseases. Electrical muscle stimulation is effective to improve its symptoms. Today, action potential stimulation (APS with various currents and periods is used to treat OA. This study aims at analyzing the effect of action potential stimulation in improving knee OA symptoms. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, patients with mild to moderate knee OA divided randomly in two groups each had 15 people. Along with the conventional exercises of physiotherapy, one group received 16 minutes action potential stimulation with the lowest intensity (sensible; but the other group besides receiving the conventional exercises of physiotherapy was connected into a plugged off machine for 16 minutes. Certain variables were measured and recorded four times. Results: Comparing the variables before and after intervention did not show any meaningful difference between the two groups. But within group, pain with p=0.0001 showed a meaningful decrease. Decreasing of swelling (inflammation in group 1 and 2 was meaningful with p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively. For group 1, knee flexion range was improved meaningfully between first and fourth times as p<0.031, but it was not meaningful for group 2. Duration of 50 meters walking and step up and down from three steps significantly decreased in both groups. Conclusion: Although there was no significant difference in variables between two groups, but within both groups’ pain and swelling decreased and functional ability increased, thus, it can be concluded that type of APS does not play a key role in treating knee OA.

  17. Action observation treatment improves recovery of postsurgical orthopedic patients: evidence for a top-down effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellelli, Giuseppe; Buccino, Giovanni; Bernardini, Bruno; Padovani, Alessandro; Trabucchi, Marco

    2010-10-01

    To assess whether action observation treatment (AOT) may also improve motor recovery in postsurgical orthopedic patients, in addition to conventional physiotherapy. Randomized controlled trial. Department of rehabilitation. Patients (N=60) admitted to our department postorthopedic surgery were randomly assigned to either a case (n=30) or control (n=30) group. Exclusion criteria were age 18 years or younger and 90 years or older, Mini-Mental State Examination score of 21 of 30 or lower, no ambulating order, advanced vision impairment, malignancy, pneumonia, or heart failure. All participants underwent conventional physiotherapy. In addition, patients in the case group were asked to observe video clips showing daily actions and to imitate them afterward. Patients in the control group were asked to observe video clips with no motor content and to execute the same actions as patients in the case group afterward. Participants were scored on functional scales at baseline and after treatment by a physician blinded to group assignment. Changes in FIM and Tinetti scale scores, and dependence on walking aids. At baseline, groups did not differ in clinical and functional scale scores. After treatment, patients in the case group scored better than patients in the control group (FIM total score, P=.02; FIM motor subscore, P=.001; Tinetti scale score, P=.04); patients in the case group were assigned more frequently to 1 crutch (P=.01). In addition to conventional physiotherapy, AOT is effective in the rehabilitation of postsurgical orthopedic patients. The present results strongly support top-down effects of this treatment in motor recovery, even in nonneurologic patients. Copyright © 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dissociating affordance and spatial compatibility effects using a pantomimed reaching action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couth, Samuel; Gowen, Emma; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2014-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated faster reaction times in response to appropriately oriented action-inducing stimuli (affordance effect, e.g. Tucker and Ellis in J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 24:830-846, 1998). However, it has been argued that faster responses may be due to a spatial compatibility effect. In the current investigation, we aimed to dissociate the affordance and spatial compatibility effects. Moreover, we explored these effects beyond button-press responses by measuring detailed kinematics of the arms and hands during a naturalistic reach response. Participants were presented with images of a door handle (affording) or an abstract (non-affording) stimulus and made a pantomimed reach response with either hand depending on a colour change of the stimulus (i.e. Blue = left, Green = right). Stimuli could be aligned as spatially compatible or incompatible with the responding hand. The colour change occurred after a delay of 0, 500 or 1,000 ms. Only spatially compatible affordance stimuli facilitated reach onset compared to other stimuli and compatibility combinations, replicating previous reaction time studies. Therefore, in the absence of graspable stimuli, spatial compatibility alone was not sufficient to facilitate reach onset. There was also a larger outwards deviation of reach trajectory for spatially incompatible abstract stimuli compared to spatially compatible abstract stimuli, which waned with stimulus onset delay. However, no such affect was observed for the affording stimuli. Accordingly, later kinematics of the reaching action was influenced by the spatial compatibility of the stimulus alone. Overall, the dissociation of affordance and spatial compatibility effects suggests that these effects are driven by visuomotor priming and the inhibition of the incompatible spatial location, respectively.

  19. National Wildlife Refuge System Action Plan : Response to Independent Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Refuge System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This action plan is the first in what the Leadership Team intends to be a recurring annual plan to monitor and address overall Refuge System effectiveness. The plan...

  20. The effects of rTMS over the primary motor cortex: the link between action and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Claudia; Colombo, Barbara; Cipresso, Pietro; Riva, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Is the primary motor cortex (M1) necessary for language comprehension? The present study investigates the role of the primary motor cortex during verbs comprehension, within the framework of the embodied theories of language. We applied rTMS over the right and left hand portion of M1 and tested the effects of the stimulation toward the processing of hand-related action verbs versus abstract verbs. Results underlined a specific inhibition effect following left stimulation, only with hand-related action verbs. These findings seem to corroborate the hypothesis of a functional role of M1 in action verbs comprehension.

  1. Aldosterone receptor antagonists--how cardiovascular actions may explain their beneficial effects in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaert, P; Elliott, J; Bernay, F; Guillot, E; Bardon, T

    2010-04-01

    Historically, aldosterone receptor antagonists (ARA) have been classified as 'potassium sparing diuretics'. However, the positive effect of spironolactone, the most extensively studied ARA, on morbidity and mortality observed in humans suffering cardiac insufficiency could not be explained by the renal effect of the drug alone, and a pivotal clinical study has led to extensive research. Many experimental studies have demonstrated that ARA have previously unexpected beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system including reduction in remodelling of the vascular smooth muscle cells and myocytes and improvement of endothelial cell dysfunction in heart failure. These effects improve vascular compliance and slow down the progression of left ventricular dysfunction and end-organ damage. Furthermore, aldosterone receptor blockade also restores the baroreceptor reflex, improving heart rate variability in heart failure in humans. Some of these effects have been demonstrated in dog models of cardiac disease and so justified further investigation of the potential benefit of ARA in dogs with congestive heart failure (CHF). Positive effects of spironolactone on morbidity and mortality appear to have been seen in studies conducted in dogs suffering from naturally occurring CHF. In addition, eplerenone has been shown to have benefits in canine models of heart failure. The precise mechanisms by which ARA produce these beneficial effects in dogs remain to be determined but this group of drugs clearly provide therapeutic actions out-with their diuretic effects.

  2. Toxicity, sublethal effects, and potential modes of action of select fungicides on freshwater fish and invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elskus, Adria A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of agricultural and urban use of fungicides and widespread detection of these pesticides in surface waters, relatively few data are available on the effects of fungicides on fish and invertebrates in the aquatic environment. Nine fungicides are reviewed in this report: azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, fludioxonil, myclobutanil, fenarimol, pyraclostrobin, pyrimethanil, and zoxamide. These fungicides were identified as emerging chemicals of concern because of their high or increasing global use rates, detection frequency in surface waters, or likely persistence in the environment. A review of the literature revealed significant sublethal effects of fungicides on fish, aquatic invertebrates, and ecosystems, including zooplankton and fish reproduction, fish immune function, zooplankton community composition, metabolic enzymes, and ecosystem processes, such as leaf decomposition in streams, among other biological effects. Some of these effects can occur at fungicide concentrations well below single-species acute lethality values (48- or 96-hour concentration that effects a response in 50 percent of the organisms, that is, effective concentration killing 50 percent of the organisms in 48 or 96 hours) and chronic sublethal values (for example, 21-day no observed adverse effects concentration), indicating that single-species toxicity values may dramatically underestimate the toxic potency of some fungicides. Fungicide modes of toxic action in fungi can sometimes reflect the biochemical and (or) physiological effects of fungicides observed in vertebrates and invertebrates; however, far more studies are needed to explore the potential to predict effects in nontarget organisms based on specific fungicide modes of toxic action. Fungicides can also have additive and (or) synergistic effects when used with other fungicides and insecticides, highlighting the need to study pesticide mixtures that occur in surface waters. For fungicides that partition to

  3. Remarks on effective action and entanglement entropy of Maxwell field in generic gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2012-12-01

    We analyze the dependence of the effective action and the entanglement entropy in the Maxwell theory on the gauge fixing parameter a in d dimensions. For a generic value of a the corresponding vector operator is nonminimal. The operator can be diagonalized in terms of the transverse and longitudinal modes. Using this factorization we obtain an expression for the heat kernel coefficients of the nonminimal operator in terms of the coefficients of two minimal Beltrami-Laplace operators acting on 0- and 1-forms. This expression agrees with an earlier result by Gilkey et al. Working in a regularization scheme with the dimensionful UV regulators we introduce three different regulators: for transverse, longitudinal and ghost modes, respectively. We then show that the effective action and the entanglement entropy do not depend on the gauge fixing parameter a provided the certain ( a-dependent) relations are imposed on the regulators. Comparing the entanglement entropy with the black hole entropy expressed in terms of the induced Newton's constant we conclude that their difference, the so-called Kabat's contact term, does not depend on the gauge fixing parameter a. We consider this as an indication of gauge invariance of the contact term.

  4. Extending the Universal One-Loop Effective Action: heavy-light coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Sebastian A. R.; Quevillon, Jérémie; You, Tevong; Zhang, Zhengkang

    2017-08-01

    The Universal One-Loop Effective Action (UOLEA) is a general expression for the effective action obtained by evaluating in a model-independent way the one-loop expansion of a functional path integral. It can be used to match UV theories to their low-energy EFTs more efficiently by avoiding redundant steps in the application of functional methods, simplifying the process of obtaining Wilson coefficients of operators up to dimension six. In addition to loops involving only heavy fields, matching may require the inclusion of loops containing both heavy and light particles. Here we use the recently-developed covariant diagram technique to extend the UOLEA to include heavy-light terms which retain the same universal structure as the previously-derived heavy-only terms. As an example of its application, we integrate out a heavy singlet scalar with a linear coupling to a light doublet Higgs. The extension presented here is a first step towards completing the UOLEA to incorporate all possible structures encountered in a covariant derivative expansion of the one-loop path integral.

  5. Fluoroquinolone Action against Mycobacteria: Effects of C-8 Substituents on Growth, Survival, and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuzhi; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Xilin; Domagala, John; Drlica, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones trap gyrase on DNA as bacteriostatic complexes from which lethal DNA breaks are released. Substituents at the C-8 position increase activities of N-1-cyclopropyl fluoroquinolones against several bacterial species. In the present study, a C-8-methoxyl group improved bacteriostatic action against gyrA (gyrase-resistant) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis BCG. It also enhanced lethal action against gyrase mutants of M. bovis BCG. When cultures of M. smegmatis, M. bovis BCG, and M. tuberculosis were challenged with a C-8-methoxyl fluoroquinolone, no resistant mutant was recovered under conditions in which more than 1,000 mutants were obtained with a C-8-H control. A C-8-bromo substituent also increased bacteriostatic and lethal activities against a gyrA mutant of M. bovis BCG. When lethal activity was normalized to bacteriostatic activity, the C-8-methoxyl compound was more bactericidal than its C-8-H control, while the C-8-bromo fluoroquinolone was not. The C-8-methoxyl compound was also found to be more effective than the C-8-bromo fluoroquinolone at reducing selection of resistant mutants when each was compared to a C-8-H control over a broad concentration range. These data indicate that a C-8-methoxyl substituent, which facilitates attack of first-step gyrase mutants, may help make fluoroquinolones effective antituberculosis agents. PMID:9797236

  6. Hypotensive effect and endothelium-dependent vascular action of leaves of Alpinia purpurata (Vieill K. Schum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Tesch da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the chemical profile, vascular reactivity, and acute hypotensive effect (AHE of the ethanolic extract of leaves of Alpinia purpurata (Vieill K. Schum (EEAP. Its chemical profile was evaluated using HPLC-UV, ICP-OES, and colorimetric quantification of total flavonoids and polyphenols. The vascular reactivity of the extract was determined using the mesenteric bed isolated from WKY. AHE dose-response curves were obtained for both EEAP and inorganic material isolated from AP (IAP in WKY and SHR animals. Cytotoxic and mutagenic safety levels were determined by the micronucleus test. Rutin-like flavonoids were quantified in the EEAP (1.8 ± 0.03%, and the total flavonoid and polyphenol ratios were 4.1 ± 1.8% and 5.1 ± 0.3%, respectively. We observed that the vasodilation action of EEAP was partially mediated by nitric oxide (·NO. The IAP showed the presence of calcium (137.76 ± 4.08 μg mg-1. The EEAP and IAP showed an AHE in WKY and SHR animals. EEAP did not have cytotoxic effects or cause chromosomic alterations. The AHE shown by EEAP could result from its endothelium-dependent vascular action. Rutin-like flavonoids, among other polyphenols, could contribute to these biological activities, and the calcium present in EEAP could act in a synergistic way.

  7. Influence of extra training means on effectiveness of fencers’ technical tactic actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopatenko G.O.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine influence of the worked out extra training means’ complex on effectiveness of realization of elite sportsmen’s competition functioning components. Material: in the research 12 fencers participated. The researches were conducted in the morning, against the background of organism’s recreation. Before sportsmen’s duel we applied two types of pre-competition warming up: traditional and experimental. Video recording was fulfilled with video camera Samsung HMX-S15. Results: we calculated volume, effectiveness and efficiency of sportsmen’s actions in fights with different opponents and in different situations of duel. We showed possibility of extra training complexes’ application, oriented on mobilization of workability in the process of direct pre-start preparation of elite sportsmen. Such exercises considered main actions and organism’s typical responses in the process of competition functioning. Conclusions: Consideration of typolical (for fencing organism’s responses and peculiarities of competition functioning structure influence positively on indicators of sportsmen’s competition functioning.

  8. EFFECTIVENESS OF A PARTICIPATORY ACTION ORIENTED TRAINING INTERVENTION APPROACH AMONG HARVESTERS IN OIL PALM PLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Yee Guan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Consistent with the global demand for palm oil, the intensified upstream harvesting activities of oil palms’ fresh fruit bunches, despite the harvesters evidences of various ergonomics risk factors leading to musculoskeletal disorders should be a cause for concern. Thus, this study describes the effectiveness of a modified and locally adapted Participatory Action-Oriented Training intervention program in improving the working environment of the harvesters. A training program modified and customized to the harvesters’ working in oil palm plantation consist of 3 primary instrument (awareness video, interactive lecture and action checklist with 3 reinforcing activities (to increase knowledge, enhance understanding and practical application. Based on the result of post-intervention assessment, the self-reported prevalence of MSD and KAP score among Intervention Group (IG did not significantly differ from Control Group (CG. Instead of decreasing, the prevalence of MSD in the past 12 months and 7 days increased within IG. Qualitative findings in this research show that the negative psychosocial and organizational climate has severely affected the implementation of PAOT rendering the effect of the intervention approach. The interventions were ineffective on the IG as this study suffers from various situational barriers as obstacles to benefit the full extent of PAOT advantages.

  9. Action-specific effects in a social context: others' abilities influence perceived speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Jessica K; Sugovic, Mila; Taylor, J Eric T

    2012-06-01

    According to the action-specific account of perception, perceivers see the environment relative to their ability to perform the intended action. For example, in a modified version of the computer game Pong, balls that were easier to block looked to be moving slower than balls that were more difficult to block (Witt & Sugovic, 2010). It is unknown, however, if perception can be influenced by another person's abilities. In the current experiment, we examined whether another person's ability to block a ball influenced the observer's perception of ball speed. Participants played and observed others play the modified version of Pong where the task was to successfully block the ball with paddles that varied in size, and both the actor and observer estimated the speed of the ball. The results showed that both judged the ball to be moving faster when it was harder to block. However, the same effect of difficulty on speed estimates was not found when observers watched a computer play, suggesting the effect is specific to people and not to the task. These studies suggest that the environment can be perceived relative to another person's abilities.

  10. Atypical antipsychotic drugs directly impair insulin action in adipocytes: effects on glucose transport, lipogenesis, and antilipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestri, Helliner S; Maianu, Lidia; Moellering, Douglas R; Garvey, W Timothy

    2007-04-01

    Treatment with second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) has been associated with weight gain and the development of diabetes mellitus, although the mechanisms are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that SGAs exert direct cellular effects on insulin action and substrate metabolism in adipocytes. We utilized two cultured cell models including 3T3-L1 adipocytes and primary cultured rat adipocytes, and tested for effects of SGAs risperidone (RISP), clozapine (CLZ), olanzapine (OLZ), and quetiapine (QUE), together with conventional antipsychotic drugs butyrophenone (BUTY), and trifluoperazine (TFP), over a wide concentration range from 1 to 500 microM. The effects of antipsychotic drugs on basal and insulin-stimulated rates of glucose transport were studied at 3 h, 15 h, and 3 days. Both CLZ and OLZ (but not RISP) at doses as low as 5 microM were able to significantly decrease the maximal insulin-stimulated glucose transport rate by approximately 40% in 3T3-L1 cells, whereas CLZ and RISP reduced insulin-stimulated glucose transport rates in primary cultured rat adipocytes by approximately 50-70%. Conventional drugs (BUTY and TFP) did not affect glucose transport rates. Regarding intracellular glucose metabolism, both SGAs (OLZ, QUE, RISP) and conventional drugs (BUTY and TFP) increased basal and/or insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation rates, whereas rates of lipogenesis were increased by CLZ, OLZ, QUE, and BUTY. Finally, rates of lipolysis in response to isoproterenol were reduced by the SGAs (CLZ, OLZ, QUE, RISP), but not by BUTY or TFP. These experiments demonstrate that antipsychotic drugs can differentially affect insulin action and metabolism through direct cellular effects in adipocytes. However, only SGAs were able to impair the insulin-responsive glucose transport system and to impair lipolysis in adipocytes. Thus, SGAs directly induce insulin resistance and alter lipogenesis and lipolysis in favor of progressive lipid accumulation and adipocyte enlargement. These

  11. Effective actions and N=1 vacuum conditions from SU(3) x SU(3) compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Cassani, Davide

    2007-01-01

    We consider compactifications of type II string theory on general SU(3) x SU(3) structure backgrounds allowing for a very large set of fluxes, possibly nongeometric ones. We study the effective 4d low energy theory which is a gauged N=2 supergravity, and discuss how its data are obtained from the formalism of the generalized geometry on T+T*. In particular we relate Hitchin's special Kaehler metrics on the spaces of even and odd pure spinors to the metric on the supergravity moduli space of internal metric and B-field fluctuations. We derive the N=1 vacuum conditions from this N=2 effective action, as well as from its N=1 truncation. We prove a direct correspondence between these conditions and an integrated version of the pure spinor equations characterizing the N=1 backgrounds at the ten dimensional level.

  12. Effects of the Positive Action Program on Indicators of Positive Youth Development Among Urban Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kendra M; Vuchinich, Samuel; Ji, Peter; DuBois, David L; Acock, Alan; Bavarian, Niloofar; Day, Joseph; Silverthorn, Naida; Flay, Brian R

    This study evaluated effects of Positive Action, a school-based social-emotional and character development (SECD) intervention, on indicators of positive youth development (PYD) among a sample of low-income, ethnic minority youth attending 14 urban schools. The study used a matched-pair, cluster-randomized controlled design at the school level. A multiple-measure self-report protocol assessed four key strengths and resources for PYD: self-concept, peer affiliations, ethics, and social skills. Students (n=1170) were assessed from grades 3 to 8, the duration of the intervention, with drop-outs and late entrants included in analyses. Growth curve analyses revealed evidence of favorable program effects on each of the four types of resources. The study contributes to PYD research by providing evidence for school-based interventions in low-income, urban contexts for ethnic minority youth.

  13. Effect of sampling frequency on the measurement of phase-locked action potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go eAshida

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Phase-locked spikes in various types of neurons encode temporal information. To quantify the degree of phase-locking, the metric called vector strength (VS has been most widely used. Since VS is derived from spike timing information, error in measurement of spike occurrence should result in errors in VS calculation. In electrophysiological experiments, the timing of an action potential is detected with finite temporal precision, which is determined by the sampling frequency. In order to evaluate the effects of the sampling frequency on the measurement of VS, we derive theoretical upper and lower bounds of VS from spikes collected with finite sampling rates. We next estimate errors in VS assuming random sampling effects, and show that our theoretical calculation agrees with data from electrophysiological recordings in vivo. Our results provide a practical guide for choosing the appropriate sampling frequency in measuring VS.

  14. Effects of staggered fermions and mixed actions on the scalar correlator

    CERN Document Server

    Prelovsek, S

    2006-01-01

    We provide the analytic predictions for the flavor non-singlet scalar correlator, which will enable determination of the scalar meson mass from the lattice scalar correlator. We consider simulations with 2+1 staggered sea quarks and staggered or chiral valence quarks. At small u/d masses the correlator is dominated by the bubble contribution, which is the intermediate state with two pseudoscalar mesons. We determine the bubble contribution within Staggered and Mixed Chiral Perturbation Theory. Its effective mass is smaller than the mass M_pi+M_eta, which is the lightest intermediate state in proper 2+1 QCD. The unphysical effective mass is a consequence of the taste breaking that makes possible the intermediate state with mass 2*M_pi. We find that the scalar correlator can be negative in the simulations with mixed quark actions if the sea and valence quark masses are tuned by matching the pion masses M_{val,val}=M_{pi_5}.

  15. Empowering America's Communities to Prepare for the Effects of Climate Change: Developing Actionable Climate Science Under the President's Climate Action Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, P. B.; Colohan, P.; Driggers, R.; Herring, D.; Laurier, F.; Petes, L.; Ruffo, S.; Tilmes, C.; Venkataraman, B.; Weaver, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Effective adaptation to impacts of climate change requires best-available information. To be most useful, this information should be easily found, well-documented, and translated into tools that decision-makers use and trust. To meet these needs, the President's Climate Action Plan includes efforts to develop "actionable climate science". The Climate Data Initiative (CDI) leverages the Federal Government's extensive, open data resources to stimulate innovation and private-sector entrepreneurship in support of actions to prepare for climate change. The Initiative forges commitments and partnerships from the private, NGO, academic, and public sectors to create data-driven tools. Open data from Federal agencies to support this innovation is available on Climate.Data.gov, initially focusing on coastal flooding but soon to expand to topics including food, energy, water, energy, transportation, and health. The Climate Resilience Toolkit (CRT) will facilitate access to data-driven resilience tools, services, and best practices, including those accessible through the CDI. The CRT will also include access to training and tutorials, case studies, engagement forums, and other information sources. The Climate Action Plan also calls for a public-private partnership on extreme weather risk, with the goal of generating improved assessments of risk from different types of extreme weather events, using methods and data that are transparent and accessible. Finally, the U.S. Global Change Research Program and associated agencies work to advance the science necessary to inform decisions and sustain assessments. Collectively, these efforts represent increased emphasis across the Federal Government on the importance of information to support climate resilience.

  16. Unintended consequences of management actions in salt pond restoration: cascading effects in trophic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, John Y.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Brand, Arriana; Graham, Tanya R.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Herzog, Mark; Topping, Brent R.; Shellenbarger, Gregory; Kuwabara, James S.; Mruz, Eric; Piotter, Sara L.; Athearn, Nicole D.

    2015-01-01

    Salt evaporation ponds have played an important role as habitat for migratory waterbirds across the world, however, efforts to restore and manage these habitats to maximize their conservation value has proven to be challenging. For example, salinity reduction has been a goal for restoring and managing former salt evaporation ponds to support waterbirds in the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Here, we describe a case study of unexpected consequences of a low-dissolved oxygen (DO) event on trophic interactions in a salt pond system following management actions to reduce salinity concentrations. We document the ramifications of an anoxic event in water quality including salinity, DO, and temperature, and in the response of the biota including prey fish biomass, numerical response by California Gulls (Larus californicus), and chick survival of Forster's Tern (Sterna forsteri). Management actions intended to protect receiving waters resulted in decreased DO concentrations that collapsed to zero for ≥ 4 consecutive days, resulting in an extensive fish kill. DO depletion likely resulted from an algal bloom that arose following transition of the pond system from high to low salinity as respiration and decomposition outpaced photosynthetic production. We measured a ≥ 6-fold increase in biomass of fish dropped on the levee by foraging avian predators compared with weeks prior to and following the low-DO event. California Gulls rapidly responded to the availability of aerobically-stressed and vulnerable fish and increased in abundance by two orders of magnitude. Mark-recapture analysis of 254 Forster's Tern chicks indicated that their survival declined substantially following the increase in gull abundance. Thus, management actions to reduce salinity concentrations resulted in cascading effects in trophic interactions that serves as a cautionary tale illustrating the importance of understanding the interaction of water quality

  17. Unintended consequences of management actions in salt pond restoration: cascading effects in trophic interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Y Takekawa

    Full Text Available Salt evaporation ponds have played an important role as habitat for migratory waterbirds across the world, however, efforts to restore and manage these habitats to maximize their conservation value has proven to be challenging. For example, salinity reduction has been a goal for restoring and managing former salt evaporation ponds to support waterbirds in the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Here, we describe a case study of unexpected consequences of a low-dissolved oxygen (DO event on trophic interactions in a salt pond system following management actions to reduce salinity concentrations. We document the ramifications of an anoxic event in water quality including salinity, DO, and temperature, and in the response of the biota including prey fish biomass, numerical response by California Gulls (Larus californicus, and chick survival of Forster's Tern (Sterna forsteri. Management actions intended to protect receiving waters resulted in decreased DO concentrations that collapsed to zero for ≥ 4 consecutive days, resulting in an extensive fish kill. DO depletion likely resulted from an algal bloom that arose following transition of the pond system from high to low salinity as respiration and decomposition outpaced photosynthetic production. We measured a ≥ 6-fold increase in biomass of fish dropped on the levee by foraging avian predators compared with weeks prior to and following the low-DO event. California Gulls rapidly responded to the availability of aerobically-stressed and vulnerable fish and increased in abundance by two orders of magnitude. Mark-recapture analysis of 254 Forster's Tern chicks indicated that their survival declined substantially following the increase in gull abundance. Thus, management actions to reduce salinity concentrations resulted in cascading effects in trophic interactions that serves as a cautionary tale illustrating the importance of understanding the interaction

  18. Multi-species occurrence models to evaluate the effects of conservation and management actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipkin, E.F.; Andrew, Royle J.; Dawson, D.K.; Bates, S.

    2010-01-01

    Conservation and management actions often have direct and indirect effects on a wide range of species. As such, it is important to evaluate the impacts that such actions may have on both target and non-target species within a region. Understanding how species richness and composition differ as a result of management treatments can help determine potential ecological consequences. Yet it is difficult to estimate richness because traditional sampling approaches detect species at variable rates and some species are never observed. We present a framework for assessing management actions on biodiversity using a multi-species hierarchical model that estimates individual species occurrences, while accounting for imperfect detection of species. Our model incorporates species-specific responses to management treatments and local vegetation characteristics and a hierarchical component that links species at a community-level. This allows for comprehensive inferences on the whole community or on assemblages of interest. Compared to traditional species models, occurrence estimates are improved for all species, even for those that are rarely observed, resulting in more precise estimates of species richness (including species that were unobserved during sampling). We demonstrate the utility of this approach for conservation through an analysis comparing bird communities in two geographically similar study areas: one in which white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) densities have been regulated through hunting and one in which deer densities have gone unregulated. Although our results indicate that species and assemblage richness were similar in the two study areas, point-level richness was significantly influenced by local vegetation characteristics, a result that would have been underestimated had we not accounted for variability in species detection.

  19. Carbon Monoxide Effects onHuman Ventricle Action PotentialAssessed by Mathematical Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz eTrenor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO that is produced in a number of different mammalian tissues is now known to have significant effects on the cardiovascular system. These include: i vasodilation, ii changes in heart rate and strength of contractions and iii modulation of autonomic nervous system input to both the pacemaker and the working myocardium. Excessive CO in the environment is toxic and can initiate or mediate life threatening cardiac rhythm disturbances. Recent reports link these ventricular arrhythmias to an increase in the slowly inactivating, or ‘late’ component of the Na+ current in the mammalian heart.The main goal of this paper is to explore the basis of this pro-arrhythmic capability of CO by incorporating recently reported changes in CO-induced ion channel activity and intracellular signalling pathways in the mammalian heart. To do this, a quite well-documented mathematical model of the action potential and intracellular calcium transient in the human ventricular myocyte has been employed. In silico iterations based on this model provide a useful first step in illustrating the cellular electrophysiological consequences of CO that have been reported from mammalian heart experiments. Specifically, when the Grandi et al. model of the human ventricular action potential is utilized, and after the Na+ and Ca2+ currents in a single myocyte are modified based on the experimental literature, early after-depolarization (EAD rhythm disturbances appear, and important elements of the underlying causes of these EADs are revealed/illustrated. Our modified mathematical model of the human ventricular action potential also provides a convenient digital platform for designing future experimental work and relating these changes in cellular cardiac electrophysiology to emerging clinical and epidemiological data on CO toxicity.

  20. Motor facilitation while observing hand actions: specificity of the effect and role of observer's orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Fumiko; Kleiner-Fisman, Galit; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2002-03-01

    Action observation enhances cortico-spinal excitability. Here we tested the specificity of this effect and the role played by the orientation of the observer. Ten normal subjects observed video clips of right hand performing three different finger movements (thumb ab-/adduction, index ab-/adduction, index extens-/flexion) in two different orientations (Away, i.e., natural hand-orientation facing out from the observer; or Toward, i.e., unnatural hand-orientation facing toward the observer). Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were recorded from the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscles. Movement direction of the index finger was recorded using force transducers. Facilitation of MEP size was significantly greater for APB during observation of thumb movements and for FDI during observation of index finger movements. Facilitation of MEP size was significantly greater when the hand presented on screen was facing out from and corresponding to that of the observer (Away orientation). The direction of the index finger movement evoked by TMS shifted toward extension/flexion versus ab-/adduction matching the observed movement. Our results give further evidence that observation of a movement enhances motor output to the muscles involved in the movement and facilitates the observed action. In addition, we provide novel evidence about the high degree of specificity of this observation-induced motor cortical modulation. The degree of modulation depends on hand orientation. The modulation is maximal when the observed action corresponds to the orientation of the observer.

  1. Hamilton-Jacobi method and effective actions of D-brane and M-brane in supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Matsuo E-mail: machan@het.phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tsuchiya, Asato E-mail: tsuchiya@het.phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2003-11-03

    We show that the effective actions of D-brane and M-brane are solutions to the Hamilton-Jacobi (H-J) equations in supergravities. This fact means that these effective actions are on-shell actions in supergravities. These solutions to the H-J equations reproduce the supergravity solutions that represent D-branes in a B{sub 2} field, M2 branes and the M2-M5 bound states. The effective actions in these solutions are those of a probe D-brane and a probe M-brane. Our findings can be applied to the study of the gauge/gravity correspondence, especially the holographic renormalization group, and a search for new solutions of supergravity.

  2. Hamilton-Jacobi method and effective actions of D-brane and M-brane in supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Matsuo; Tsuchiya, Asato

    2003-11-01

    We show that the effective actions of D-brane and M-brane are solutions to the Hamilton-Jacobi (H-J) equations in supergravities. This fact means that these effective actions are on-shell actions in supergravities. These solutions to the H-J equations reproduce the supergravity solutions that represent D-branes in a B2 field, M2 branes and the M2-M5 bound states. The effective actions in these solutions are those of a probe D-brane and a probe M-brane. Our findings can be applied to the study of the gauge/gravity correspondence, especially the holographic renormalization group, and a search for new solutions of supergravity.

  3. Effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen on Inflammatory Response to Wound and Trauma: Possible Mechanism of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noori S. Al-Waili

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in expanding the clinical applications for HBO2 (hyperbaric oxygen therapy into new medical and surgical fields. The pathophysiology of response towards wounds, infection, trauma, or surgery involves various chemical mediators that include cytokines, prostaglandins (PGs, and nitric oxide (NO. The beneficial role played by HBO2 in wound healing, carbon monoxide poisoning, decompression sickness, and other indications is well documented. However, the exact mechanism of action is still poorly understood. This review addresses the effects of HBO2 on PGs, NO, and cytokines involved in wound pathophysiology and inflammation in particular. The results of this review indicate that HBO2 has important effects on the biology of cytokines and other mediators of inflammation. HBO2 causes cytokine down-regulation and growth factor up-regulation. HBO2 transiently suppresses stimulus-induced proinflammatory cytokine production and affects the liberation of TNFα (tumor necrosis factor alpha and endothelins. VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor levels are significantly increased with HBO2, whereas the value of PGE2 and COX-2 mRNA are markedly reduced. The effect of HBO2 on NO production is not well established and more studies are required. In conclusion, cytokines, PGs, and NO may play a major role in the mechanism of action of HBO2 and further research could pave the way for new clinical applications for HBO2 to be established. It could be proposed that chronic wounds persist due to an uncontrolled pathological inflammatory response in the wound bed and that HBO2 enhances wound healing by damping pathological inflammation (anti-inflammatory effects; this hypothetical proposal remains to be substantiated with experimental results.

  4. The ERP Effects of Combined Cognitive Training on Intention-Based and Stimulus-Based Actions in Older Chinese Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ya-Nan; Zhu, Xinyi; Li, Juan; Fu, Jiang-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Age-related decreases in action are caused by neuromuscular weakness and cognitive decline. Although physical interventions have been reported to have beneficial effects on cognitive function in older adults, whether cognitive training improves action-related function remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of combined cognitive training on intention-based and stimulus-based actions in older adults using event-related potentials (ERPs). A total of 26 healthy older adults (16 in the training group and 10 in the control group) participated in the study. The training group received 16 sessions of cognitive training, including eight sessions of executive function training and eight sessions of memory strategy training. Before and after training, both groups of participants underwent cognitive assessments and ERP recordings during both the acquisition and test phases with a motor cognitive paradigm. During the acquisition phase, subjects were asked to press one of two keys, either using a self-selected (intention-based) method or based on the preceding stimulus (stimulus-based). During the test phase, subjects were asked to respond to the pre-cues with either congruent or incongruent tasks. Using ERP indices-including readiness potential, P3 and contingent negative variation to identify motor preparation, stimulus processing and interference effect, respectively-we revealed the effects of training on both intention-based and stimulus-based actions. The correlations were also computed between the improved cognitive performance and the ERP amplitudes. It was shown that the improved executive function might extend substantial benefits to both actions, whereas associative memory may be specifically related to the bidirectional action-effect association of intention-based action, although the training effect of memory was absent during the insufficient training hours. In sum, the present study provided empirical evidence demonstrating that action could

  5. The ERP Effects of Combined Cognitive Training on Intention-based and Stimulus-based Actions in Older Chinese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Nan Niu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Age-related decreases in action are caused by neuromuscular weakness and cognitive decline. Although physical interventions have been reported to have beneficial effects on cognitive function in older adults, whether cognitive training improves action-related function remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of combined cognitive training on intention-based and stimulus-based actions in older adults using event-related potentials (ERPs. A total of 26 healthy older adults (16 in the training group and 10 in the control group participated in the study. The training group received 16 sessions of cognitive training, including 8 sessions of executive function training and 8 sessions of memory strategy training. Before and after training, both groups of participants underwent cognitive assessments and ERP recordings during both the acquisition and test phases with a motor cognitive paradigm. During the acquisition phase, subjects were asked to press one of two keys, either using a self-selected (intention-based method or based on the preceding stimulus (stimulus-based. During the test phase, subjects were asked to respond to the pre-cues with either congruent or incongruent tasks. Using ERP indices—including readiness potential, P3 and contingent negative variation to identify motor preparation, stimulus processing and interference effect, respectively—we revealed the effects of training on both intention-based and stimulus-based actions. The correlations were also computed between the improved cognitive performance and the ERP amplitudes. It was shown that the improved executive function might extend substantial benefits to both actions, whereas associative memory may be specifically related to the bidirectional action-effect association of intention-based action, although the training effect of memory was absent during the insufficient training hours. In sum, the present study provided empirical evidence demonstrating that

  6. Sleep-Promoting Effects and Possible Mechanisms of Action Associated with a Standardized Rice Bran Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyejin; Yoon, Minseok; Um, Min Young; Lee, Jaekwang; Jung, Jonghoon; Lee, Changho; Kim, Yun-Tai; Kwon, Sangoh; Kim, Boknam; Cho, Suengmok

    2017-01-01

    Natural sleep aids are becoming more popular due to the widespread occurrence of sleep disorders. The objective of this study was to assess the sleep-promoting effects of rice bran—a product that is considered as a functional ingredient. To evaluate the sleep-promoting effects of a standardized rice bran supplement (RBS), we employed a pentobarbital-induced sleep test and conducted analyses of sleep architecture. In addition, the effect of RBS on a caffeine-induced sleep disturbance was investigated. Oral administration of RBS (500 and 1000 mg/kg) produced a significant decrease in sleep latency and increase in sleep duration in pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice. Moreover, both RBS (1000 mg/kg) and doxepin hydrochloride (histamine H1 receptor antagonist, 30 mg/kg) counteracted a caffeine-induced sleep disturbance in mice. In terms of sleep phases, RBS (500 mg/kg) promoted non-rapid eye movement sleep for the first 3 h following its administration. Lastly, we unveiled a possible mechanism for RBS action as the hypnotic effect of RBS was blocked by a histamine H1 receptor agonist. The present study revealed sleep-promoting effects of RBS using various animal assays. Such effects seem to be mediated through the histaminergic system. Our findings suggest that RBS may be a promising natural aid for relieving sleep problems. PMID:28524102

  7. Action Emulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.N. van Eijck (Jan); J. Ruan; T. Sadzik

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe effects of public announcements, private communications, deceptive messages to groups, and so on, can all be captured by a general mechanism of updating multi-agent models with update action models, now in widespread use. There is a natural extension of the definition of

  8. Functional foods effective for hepatitis C: Identification of oligomeric proanthocyanidin and its action mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yo-ichi; Ishida; Masahiko; Takeshita; Hiroaki; Kataoka

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus(HCV)is a major cause of viral hepatitis and currently infects approximately 170 million people worldwide.An infection by HCV causes high rates of chronic hepatitis(>75%)and progresses to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma ultimately.HCV can be eliminated by a combination of pegylatedα-interferon and the broad-spectrum antiviral drug ribavirin;however,this treatment is still associated with poor efficacy and tolerability and is often accompanied by serious side-effects.While some novel direct-actingantivirals against HCV have been developed recently,high medical costs limit the access to the therapy in cost-sensitive countries.To search for new natural anti-HCV agents,we screened local agricultural products for their suppressive activities against HCV replication using the HCV replicon cell system in vitro.We found a potent inhibitor of HCV RNA expression in the extracts of blueberry leaves and then identified oligomeric proanthocyanidin as the active ingredient.Further investigations into the action mechanism of oligomeric proanthocyanidin suggested that it is an inhibitor of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins(hn RNPs)such as hn RNP A2/B1.In this review,we presented an overview of functional foods and ingredients efficient for HCV infection,the chemical structural characteristics of oligomeric proanthocyanidin,and its action mechanism.

  9. Enforcement actions and their effectiveness in securities regulation:Empirical evidence from management earnings forecasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunling Song; Xinwei Ji

    2012-01-01

    Due to resource constraints,securities regulators cannot find or punish all firms that have conducted irregular or even illegal activities(hereafter referred to as fraud).Those who study securities regulations can only find the instances of fraud that have been punished,not those that have not been punished,and it is these unknown cases that would make the best control sample for studies of enforcement action criteria.China’s mandatory management earnings forecasts solve this sampling problem.In the A-share market,firms that have not forecasted as mandated are likely in a position to be punished by securities regulators or are attempting to escape punishment,and their identification allows researchers to build suitable study and control samples when examining securities regulations.Our results indicate that enforcement actions taken by securities regulators are selective.The probability that a firm will be punished for irregular management forecasting is significantly related to proxies for survival rates.Specifically,fraudulent firms with lower return on assets(ROAs) or higher cash flow risk are more likely to be punished.Further analysis shows that selective enforcement of regulations has had little positive effect on the quality of listed firms’ management forecasts.

  10. Effect of shear connectors on local buckling and composite action in steel concrete composite walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai, E-mail: kai-zh@purdue.edu [School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Varma, Amit H., E-mail: ahvarma@purdue.edu [School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Malushte, Sanjeev R., E-mail: smalusht@bechtel.com [Bechtel Power Corporation, Frederick, MD (United States); Gallocher, Stewart, E-mail: stewart.gallocher@steelbricks.com [Modular Walling Systems Ltd., Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Steel concrete composite (SC) walls are being used for the third generation nuclear power plants, and also being considered for small modular reactors. SC walls consist of thick concrete walls with exterior steel faceplates serving as reinforcement. These steel faceplates are anchored to the concrete infill using shear connectors, for example, headed steel studs. The steel faceplate thickness (t{sub p}) and yield stress (F{sub y}), and the shear connector spacing (s), stiffness (k{sub s}), and strength (Q{sub n}) determine: (a) the level of composite action between the steel plates and the concrete infill, (b) the development length of steel faceplates, and (c) the local buckling of the steel faceplates. Thus, the shear connectors have a significant influence on the behavior of composite SC walls, and should be designed accordingly. This paper presents the effects of shear connector design on the level of composite action and development length of steel faceplates in SC walls. The maximum steel plate slenderness, i.e., ratio of shear connector spacing-to-plate thickness (s/t{sub p}) ratio to prevent local buckling before yielding is also developed based on the existing experimental database and additional numerical analysis.

  11. Enforcement actions and their effectiveness in securities regulation: Empirical evidence from management earnings forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunling Song

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to resource constraints, securities regulators cannot find or punish all firms that have conducted irregular or even illegal activities (hereafter referred to as fraud. Those who study securities regulations can only find the instances of fraud that have been punished, not those that have not been punished, and it is these unknown cases that would make the best control sample for studies of enforcement action criteria. China’s mandatory management earnings forecasts solve this sampling problem. In the A-share market, firms that have not forecasted as mandated are likely in a position to be punished by securities regulators or are attempting to escape punishment, and their identification allows researchers to build suitable study and control samples when examining securities regulations. Our results indicate that enforcement actions taken by securities regulators are selective. The probability that a firm will be punished for irregular management forecasting is significantly related to proxies for survival rates. Specifically, fraudulent firms with lower return on assets (ROAs or higher cash flow risk are more likely to be punished. Further analysis shows that selective enforcement of regulations has had little positive effect on the quality of listed firms’ management forecasts.

  12. Omega-3 fatty acids and metabolic syndrome: effects and emerging mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudyal, Hemant; Panchal, Sunil K; Diwan, Vishal; Brown, Lindsay

    2011-10-01

    Epidemiological, human, animal, and cell culture studies show that n-3 fatty acids, especially α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), reduce the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. EPA and DHA, rather than ALA, have been the focus of research on the n-3 fatty acids, probably due to the relatively inefficient conversion of ALA to EPA and DHA in rodents and humans. This review will assess our current understanding of the effects and potential mechanisms of actions of individual n-3 fatty acids on multiple risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Evidence for pharmacological responses and the mechanism of action of each of the n-3 fatty acid trio will be discussed for the major risk factors of metabolic syndrome, especially adiposity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and diabetes, hypertension, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Metabolism of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids as well as the interactions of n-3 fatty acids with nutrients, gene expression, and disease states will be addressed to provide a rationale for the use of n-3 fatty acids to reduce the risk factors of metabolic syndrome.

  13. Differential effects of forward and backward masks on the relationship between perception and action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deplancke, A; Madelain, L; Coello, Y

    2016-03-01

    A recent series of experiments has shown that the effects of near-threshold stimuli on perceptual and motor responses are highly dependent on experimental conditions. In particular, motor influences of near-threshold distractors were observed when using low-contrast unmasked stimuli and high-contrast masked stimuli although only the latter affected motor responses in the absence of stimulus awareness. These results are compatible with neurophysiological models of visual masking, suggesting that early neural responses to a visual stimulus can be decomposed in feedforward activations to-and feedback activations from-higher visual areas, correlating respectively with the actual presence of the stimulus and its conscious perception. We tested the compatibility between these neurophysiological models and the behavioural data obtained in near-threshold experiments. We recorded fast reaching movements directed to a highly visible target followed by a report of the presence of a near-threshold distractor presented either at low contrast without mask or at high contrast with a backward or forward mask. Analysis of hand trajectories revealed that deviations toward the distractor were observed in the no-mask condition when the distractor was present and reported, and when it was present but not reported in the backward and forward mask conditions, although the effect was weaker in the latter condition. These data reveal that the presence or absence of perception-action dissociations in behavioural studies are well accounted for by neurophysiological models of visual masking and that behavioural effects of near-threshold distractors cannot result merely from on a dichotomic visual system for perception and action.

  14. Protective action of low-intensity laser radiation relative to the toxic effect of metals (experimental study in vitro)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejneka, S. Y.

    1997-12-01

    The study of a possible cytotoxic effect of different doses of low-insensitive laser radiation and protective action of low-intensive laser radiation relative to the toxic effect of metals was carried out by means of the alternative method of investigation in vitro on cell cultura Hela. It was established that the investigated doses of low-intensive laser radiation had not produced any toxic effect on cell culture Hela, so the mentioned doses were not cytotoxic. It was revealed that laser radiation reduced the level of the cytotoxic effect of the studied metal salts on the cell culture, and possessed the protective action against the toxic effect of metals. This action has a clear-cut dose- related character.

  15. Magnetic Back Action Effect of Magnetic Sensors for eLISA/NGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, I.; Diaz-Aguiló, M.; Gibert, F.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.

    2013-01-01

    The fluxgate magnetometers used in LISA Pathfinder mission are able to perform very low noise measurements at milli-Hertz frequency, however they need to be kept somehow away from the Test Masses (TMs) due to the quantity of ferromagnetic material contained in the fluxgate's core, which constitutes a potential source of disturbance to the performance. As a result, the estimation of the magnetic field and gradient in the TMs is very problematic, despite the excellent quality of the readout data. The design of a magnetic diagnostic measuring system able to deal with the magnetic constraints for eLISA/NGO will imply the magnetic characterization of the sensors in order to estimate the magnetic back action effect on their environment. The magnetic impact caused by the magnetometers also depends on the noise reduction techniques used in the signal conditioning circuit, which is being studied to develop criteria for the best choice of magnetic sensors for eLISA/NGO.

  16. Two-particle irreducible effective actions versus resummation: analytic properties and self-consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Approximations based on two-particle irreducible (2PI) effective actions (also known as $\\Phi$-derivable, Cornwall-Jackiw-Tomboulis or Luttinger-Ward functionals depending on context) have been widely used in condensed matter and non-equilibrium quantum/statistical field theory because this formalism gives a robust, self-consistent, non-perturbative and systematically improvable approach which avoids problems with secular time evolution. The strengths of 2PI approximations are often described in terms of a selective resummation of Feynman diagrams to infinite order. However, the Feynman diagram series is asymptotic and summation is at best a dangerous procedure. Here we show that, at least in the context of a toy model where exact results are available, the true strength of 2PI approximations derives from their self-consistency rather than any resummation. This self-consistency allows truncated 2PI approximations to capture the branch points of physical amplitudes where adjustments of coupling constants can t...

  17. String states, loops and effective actions in noncommutative field theory and matrix models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold C. Steinacker

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Refining previous work by Iso, Kawai and Kitazawa, we discuss bi-local string states as a tool for loop computations in noncommutative field theory and matrix models. Defined in terms of coherent states, they exhibit the stringy features of noncommutative field theory. This leads to a closed form for the 1-loop effective action in position space, capturing the long-range non-local UV/IR mixing for scalar fields. The formalism applies to generic fuzzy spaces. The non-locality is tamed in the maximally supersymmetric IKKT or IIB model, where it gives rise to supergravity. The linearized supergravity interactions are obtained directly in position space at one loop using string states on generic noncommutative branes.

  18. String states, loops and effective actions in noncommutative field theory and matrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinacker, Harold C., E-mail: harold.steinacker@univie.ac.at

    2016-09-15

    Refining previous work by Iso, Kawai and Kitazawa, we discuss bi-local string states as a tool for loop computations in noncommutative field theory and matrix models. Defined in terms of coherent states, they exhibit the stringy features of noncommutative field theory. This leads to a closed form for the 1-loop effective action in position space, capturing the long-range non-local UV/IR mixing for scalar fields. The formalism applies to generic fuzzy spaces. The non-locality is tamed in the maximally supersymmetric IKKT or IIB model, where it gives rise to supergravity. The linearized supergravity interactions are obtained directly in position space at one loop using string states on generic noncommutative branes.

  19. The effect of animation on learning action symbols by individuals with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Kazuko; Inoue, Tomoyoshi; Yamana, Yuko; Hayashi, Humirhiro

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether participants with intellectual impairments could benefit from the movement associated with animated pictures while they were learning symbol names. Sixteen school students, whose linguistic-developmental age ranged from 38?91 months, participated in the experiment. They were taught 16 static visual symbols and the corresponding action words (naming task) in two sessions conducted one week apart. In the experimental condition, animation was employed to facilitate comprehension, whereas no animation was used in the control condition. Enhancement of learning was shown in the experimental condition, suggesting that the participants benefited from animated symbols. Furthermore, it was found that the lower the linguistic developmental age, the more effective the animated cue was in learning static visual symbols.

  20. Gauge invariance and finite temperature effective actions of Chern-Simons gauge theories with fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Cabra, D C; Rossini, L; Schaposnik, F A; Fradkin, Eduardo

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the behavior of theories of fermions coupled to Chern-Simons gauge fields with a non-abelian gauge group in three dimensions and at finite temperature. Using non-perturbative arguments and gauge invariance, and in contradiction with perturbative results, we show that the coefficient of the Chern-Simons term of the effective actions for the gauge fields at finite temperature can be {\\it at most} an integer function of the temperature. This is in a sense a generalized no-renormalization theorem. We also discuss the case of abelian theories and give indications that a similar condition should hold there too. We discuss consequences of our results to the thermodynamics of anyon superfluids and fractional quantum Hall systems.

  1. Biological actions and molecular effects of resveratrol, pterostilbene, and 3′-hydroxypterostilbene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Yun Tsai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stilbenes are a class of polyphenolic compounds, naturally found in a wide variety of dietary sources such as grapes, berries, peanuts, red wine, and some medicinal plants. There are several well-known stilbenes including trans-resveratrol, pterostilbene, and 3′-hydroxypterostilbene. The core chemical structure of stilbene compounds is 1,2-diphenylethylene. Recently, stilbenes have attracted extensive attention and interest due to their wide range of health-beneficial effects such as anti-inflammation, -carcinogenic, -diabetes, and -dyslipidemia activities. Moreover, accumulating in vitro and in vivo studies have reported that stilbene compounds act as inducers of multiple cell-death pathways such as apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and autophagy for chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents in several types of cancer cells. The aim of this review is to highlight recent molecular findings and biological actions of trans-resveratrol, pterostilbene, and 3′-hydroxypterostilbene.

  2. Effective action of heterotic compactification on K3 with non-trivial gauge bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schasny, Martin

    2012-10-15

    In this thesis we study the heterotic string compactified on K3 with non-trivial gauge bundles. We focus on two backgrounds, the well-known standard embedding and abelian line bundles. Using a Kaluza-Klein reduction, the six-dimensional effective action is computed up to terms of order {alpha}'{sup 2} with special attention on the hypermultiplet sector. We compute the moduli dependent couplings of the matter fields and analyze the geometry of the hyperscalar sigma model. Moreover, we prove the consistency with six-dimensional supergravity and derive the appropriate D-term scalar potential. For the line bundle backgrounds we show that the gauge flux stabilizes some geometrical moduli and renders some abelian vector multiplets massive.

  3. Effect of protein synthesis inhibitors on the trophic action of the nerve stump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, K; Higashimori, E; Uchida, K; Satoh, S

    1983-06-01

    We report that protein synthesis inhibitors exert an inhibitory effect on the trophic action of the nerve stump. The sciatic nerve innervating the extensor digitorum longus muscles of mice was cut either as close to, or as far from, the muscle as possible. Denervation changes in the muscle were evaluated using the resting membrane potential and dose-response curves obtained by plotting acetylcholine-induced contractures. Actinomycin D (2 micrograms/kg, i.p.), ethidium bromide (10 micrograms/kg, i.p.), cycloheximide (1 or 5 mg/kg, i.p.), or chloramphenicol (100 mg/kg, p.o.) administration was immediately after neurotomy and continued daily until the day preceding muscle removal. Although denervation changes occurred significantly later in muscles with a long rather than a short nerve stump, the administrated antibiotics, excluding cycloheximide, accelerated the manifestation of denervation changes in muscles with long nerve stumps without affecting those in muscles with short nerve stumps.

  4. Ecosystem health of the Great Barrier Reef: Time for effective management action based on evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Jon; Pearson, Richard G.

    2016-12-01

    The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is a World Heritage site off the north-eastern coast of Australia. The GBR is worth A 15-20 billion/year to the Australian economy and provides approximately 64,000 full time jobs. Many of the species and ecosystems of the GBR are in poor condition and continue to decline. The principal causes of the decline are catchment pollutant runoff associated with agricultural and urban land uses, climate change impacts and the effects of fishing. Many important ecosystems of the GBR region are not included inside the boundaries of the World Heritage Area. The current management regime for catchment pollutant runoff and climate change is clearly inadequate to prevent further decline. We propose a refocus of management on a "Greater GBR" (containing not only the major ecosystems and species of the GBR, but also its catchment) and on a set of management actions to halt the decline of the GBR. Proposed actions include: (1) Strengthen management in the areas of the Greater GBR where ecosystems are in good condition, with Torres Strait, northern Cape York and Hervey Bay being the systems with highest current integrity; (2) Investigate methods of cross-boundary management to achieve simultaneous cost-effective terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystem protection in the Greater GBR; (3) Develop a detailed, comprehensive, costed water quality management plan for the Greater GBR; (4) Use the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act and the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act to regulate catchment activities that lead to damage to the Greater GBR, in conjunction with the relevant Queensland legislation; (5) Fund catchment and coastal management to the required level to solve pollution issues for the Greater GBR by 2025, before climate change impacts on Greater GBR ecosystems become overwhelming; (6) Continue enforcement of the zoning plan; (7) Australia to show commitment to protecting the Greater GBR through greenhouse gas emissions

  5. Effect of selected anti-inflammatory drugs on the lethal actions of Leiurus quinquestriatus venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Abdoon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The cumulative actions of scorpion neurotoxins are complex and may be traced to activation of different ion channels with subsequent release of various transmitters and modulators including inflammatory mediators. This could lead to various pathological manifestations such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, and multiple organ failure (MOF. Several approaches have been advocated to treat the multitude of scorpion-venom-elicited pathological changes. However, few have tried to combat the venom-induced effects on the inflammatory process, which manifest as ARDS, SIDS and MOF. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the capability of inhibitors of different steps of the inflammatory sequence of events in scorpion envenomation to ameliorate the detrimental action of the venom and prolong survival of mice injected with Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus (LQQ venom. Animals were divided into groups (n = 10 and given montelukast (10 or 20 mg.kg-1, orally, hydrocortisone (5 or 10 mg.kg-1, intravenously or indomethacin (10 or 20 mg kg-1, intravenously. Then, all animals were subcutaneously injected with either 0.25 or 0.3 mg.kg-1 LQQ venom. Signs and symptoms of envenomation were recorded and survival percentages after 24 hours as well as survival time were determined in each group. To analyze data, we utilized Covariance Wilcoxon survival statistics and survival distribution curves. In general, when compared to venom alone, administration of montelukast (p<0.001, hydrocortisone (p<0.05 and indomethacin (p<0.05 prolonged survival time and increased the percentage of surviving animals per group, with montelukast exhibiting the greatest protecting power. Thus, anti-inflammatory drugs may play an important role in protection against the lethal effects of scorpion venoms.

  6. Interceptor effect of C60 fullerene on the in vitro action of aromatic drug molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skamrova, Galyna B; Laponogov, Ivan; Buchelnikov, Anatoly S; Shckorbatov, Yuriy G; Prylutska, Svitlana V; Ritter, Uwe; Prylutskyy, Yuriy I; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2014-07-01

    C60 fullerenes are spherical molecules composed purely of carbon atoms. They inspire a particularly strong scientific interest because of their specific physico-chemical properties and potential medical and nanotechnological applications. In this work we are focusing on studying the influence of the pristine C60 fullerene on biological activity of some aromatic drug molecules in human buccal epithelial cells. Assessment of the heterochromatin structure in the cell nucleus as well as the barrier function of the cell membrane was performed. The methods of cell microelectrophoresis and atomic force microscopy were also applied. A concentration-dependent restoration of the functional activity of the cellular nucleus after exposure to DNA-binding drugs (doxorubicin, proflavine and ethidium bromide) has been observed in human buccal epithelial cells upon addition of C60 fullerene at a concentration of ~10(-5 )M. The results were shown to follow the framework of interceptor/protector action theory, assuming that non-covalent complexation between C60 fullerene and the drugs (i.e., hetero-association) is the major process responsible for the observed biological effects. An independent confirmation of this hypothesis was obtained via investigation of the cellular response of buccal epithelium to the coadministration of the aromatic drugs and caffeine, and it is based on the well-established role of hetero-association in drug-caffeine systems. The results indicate that C60 fullerene may reverse the effects caused by the aromatic drugs, thereby pointing out the potential possibility of the use of aromatic drugs in combination with C60 fullerene for regulation of their medico-biological action.

  7. Effects of covert subject actions on percent body fat by air-displacement plethsymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegenkamp, Michelle H; Clark, R Randall; Schoeller, Dale A; Landry, Greg L

    2011-07-01

    Air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) is used for estimation of body composition, however, some individuals, such as athletes in weight classification sports, may use covert methods during ADP testing to alter their apparent percent body fat. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of covert subject actions on percent body fat measured by ADP. Subjects underwent body composition analysis in the Bod Pod following the standard procedure using the manufacturer's guidelines. The subjects then underwent 8 more measurements while performing the following intentional manipulations: 4 breathing patterns altering lung volume, foot movement to disrupt air, hand cupping to trap air, and heat and cold exposure before entering the chamber. Increasing and decreasing lung volume during thoracic volume measurement and during body density measurement altered the percent body fat assessment (p < 0.001). High lung volume during thoracic gas measures overestimated fat by 3.7 ± 2.1 percentage points. Lowered lung volume during body volume measures overestimated body fat by an additional 2.2 ± 2.1 percentage points. The heat and cold exposure, tapping, and cupping treatments provided similar estimates of percent body fat when compared with the standard condition. These results demonstrate the subjects were able to covertly change their estimated ADP body composition value by altering breathing when compared with the standard condition. We recommend that sports conditioning coaches, athletic trainers, and technicians administering ADP should be aware of the potential effects of these covert actions. The individual responsible for administering ADP should remain vigilant during testing to detect deliberate altered breathing patterns by athletes in an effort to gain a competitive advantage by manipulating their body composition assessment.

  8. Effects of noribogaine on the development of tolerance to antinociceptive action of morphine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, H N; Cao, Y J

    1997-10-17

    The effects of noribogaine, a metabolite of ibogaine, on the development of tolerance to the antinociception action of morphine was determined in male Swiss-Webster mice. Ibogaine is an alkaloid isolated from the bark of the African shrub, Tabernanthe iboga. Morphine tolerance in mice was developed by two different methods. Mice were rendered tolerant to morphine either by subcutaneous implantation of a pellet containing 25 mg morphine free base for 4 days or by injecting morphine (20 mg/kg, s.c.) twice a day for 4 days. Placebo pellet implanted mice or vehicle injected mice served as controls. To determine the effect of intraperitoneally administered noribogaine on tolerance development, the drug was injected in the appropriate dose twice a day. In pellet implanted mice, a dose of 20 mg/kg of noribogaine attenuated the tolerance to morphine whereas lower doses had no effect. Similarly, in mice given multiple injections of morphine, noribogaine attenuated tolerance development at 20 and 40 mg/kg doses. Previous studies from this laboratory had shown that ibogaine at 40 and 80 mg/kg doses inhibited tolerance to morphine. Because noribogaine could attenuate morphine tolerance at lower doses than ibogaine, it is concluded that the attenuating effect of ibogaine on morphine tolerance may be mediated by its conversion to noribogaine, a more active metabolite.

  9. Effects of lysophosphatidic acid on human colon cancer cells and its mechanisms of action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Sun; Juan Ren; Qing Zhu; Fan-Zhong Kong; Lei Wu; Bo-Rong Pan

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) on proliferation, adhesion, migration, and apoptosisin the human colon cancer cell line, SW480, and its mechanisms of action. METHODS: Methyl tetrazolium assay was used to assess cell proliferation. Flow cytometry was employed to detect cell apoptosis. Cell migration was measured by using a Boyden transwell migration chamber. Cell adhesion assay was performed in 96-well plates according to protocol.RESULTS: LPA significantly stimulated SW480 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner compared with the control group (P < 0.05) while the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor,PD98059, significantly blocked the LPA stimulation effect on proliferation. LPA also significantly stimulated adhesion and migration of SW480 cells in a dosedependent manner (P < 0.05). Rho kinase inhibitor,Y-27632, significantly inhibited the up-regulatory effect of LPA on adhesion and migration (P < 0.05). LPA significantly protected cells from apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic drugs, cisplatin and 5-FU (P < 0.05),but the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor,LY294002, significantly blocked the protective effect of LPA on apoptosis.CONCLUSION: LPA stimulated proliferation, adhesion,migration of SW480 cells, and protected from apoptosis.The Ras/Raf-MAPK, G12/13-Rho-RhoA and PI3KAKT/ PKB signal pathways may be involved.

  10. Antispasmodic Effects and Action Mechanism of Essential Oil of Chrysactinia mexicana A. Gray on Rabbit Ileum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Zavala-Mendoza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Chrysactinia mexicana A. Gray (C. mexicana plant is used in folk medicine to treat fever and rheumatism; it is used as a diuretic, antispasmodic; and it is used for its aphrodisiac properties. This study investigates the effects of the essential oil of C. mexicana (EOCM on the contractility of rabbit ileum and the mechanisms of action involved. Muscle contractility studies in vitro in an organ bath to evaluate the response to EOCM were performed in the rabbit ileum. EOCM (1–100 µg·mL−1 reduced the amplitude and area under the curve of spontaneous contractions of the ileum. The contractions induced by carbachol 1 µM, potassium chloride (KCl 60 mM or Bay K8644 1 µM were reduced by EOCM (30 µg·mL−1. Apamin 1 µM and charybdotoxin 0.01 µM decreased the inhibition induced by EOCM. The d-cAMP 1 µM decreased the inhibition induced by EOCM. l-NNA 10 µM, Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS 1 µM, d,l-propargylglycine 2 mM, or aminooxyacetic acid hemihydrochloride 2 mM did not modify the EOCM effect. In conclusion, EOCM induces an antispasmodic effect and could be used in the treatment of intestinal spasms or diarrhea processes. This effect would be mediated by Ca2+, Ca2+-activated K+ channels and cAMP.

  11. Auxiliary field loop expansion of the effective action for a class of stochastic partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Fred; Dawson, John F.

    2016-02-01

    We present an alternative to the perturbative (in coupling constant) diagrammatic approach for studying stochastic dynamics of a class of reaction diffusion systems. Our approach is based on an auxiliary field loop expansion for the path integral representation for the generating functional of the noise induced correlation functions of the fields describing these systems. The systems we consider include Langevin systems describable by the set of self interacting classical fields ϕi(x , t) in the presence of external noise ηi(x , t) , namely (∂t - ν∇2) ϕ - F [ ϕ ] = η, as well as chemical reaction annihilation processes obtained by applying the many-body approach of Doi-Peliti to the Master Equation formulation of these problems. We consider two different effective actions, one based on the Onsager-Machlup (OM) approach, and the other due to Janssen-deGenneris based on the Martin-Siggia-Rose (MSR) response function approach. For the simple models we consider, we determine an analytic expression for the Energy landscape (effective potential) in both formalisms and show how to obtain the more physical effective potential of the Onsager-Machlup approach from the MSR effective potential in leading order in the auxiliary field loop expansion. For the KPZ equation we find that our approximation, which is non-perturbative and obeys broken symmetry Ward identities, does not lead to the appearance of a fluctuation induced symmetry breakdown. This contradicts the results of earlier studies.

  12. Action-perception coupling in pianists: learned mappings or spatial musical association of response codes (SMARC) effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Lauren; Verdonschot, Rinus G; Nasralla, Patrick; Lanipekun, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The principle of common coding suggests that a joint representation is formed when actions are repeatedly paired with a specific perceptual event. Musicians are occupationally specialized with regard to the coupling between actions and their auditory effects. In the present study, we employed a novel paradigm to demonstrate automatic action-effect associations in pianists. Pianists and nonmusicians pressed keys according to aurally presented number sequences. Numbers were presented at pitches that were neutral, congruent, or incongruent with respect to pitches that would normally be produced by such actions. Response time differences were seen between congruent and incongruent sequences in pianists alone. A second experiment was conducted to determine whether these effects could be attributed to the existence of previously documented spatial/pitch compatibility effects. In a "stretched" version of the task, the pitch distance over which the numbers were presented was enlarged to a range that could not be produced by the hand span used in Experiment 1. The finding of a larger response time difference between congruent and incongruent trials in the original, standard, version compared with the stretched version, in pianists, but not in nonmusicians, indicates that the effects obtained are, at least partially, attributable to learned action effects.

  13. QED effective action for an O(2)xO(3) symmetric field in the full mass range

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadiniaz, N; Raya, A; Schubert, C

    2013-01-01

    An interesting class of background field configurations in QED are the O(2)xO(3) symmetric fields. Those backgrounds have some instanton-like properties and yield a one-loop effective action that is highly nontrivial but amenable to numerical calculation, for both scalar and spinor QED. Here we use the recently developed "partial-wave-cutoff method" for a numerical analysis of both effective actions in the full mass range. In particular, at large mass we are able to match the asymptotic behavior of the physically renormalized effective action against the leading two mass levels of the inverse mass (or heat kernel) expansion. At small mass we obtain good numerical results even in the massless case for the appropriately (unphysically) renormalized effective action after the removal of the chiral anomaly term through a small radial cutoff factor. In particular, we show that the effective action after this removal remains finite in the massless limit, which also provides indirect support for M. Fry's hypothesis t...

  14. Effects of terpineol on the compound action potential of the rat sciatic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Moreira

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Terpineol, a volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity, is widely used in the perfumery industry. It is an important chemical constituent of the essential oil of many plants with widespread applications in folk medicine and in aromatherapy. The effects of terpineol on the compound action potential (CAP of rat sciatic nerve were studied. Terpineol induced a dose-dependent blockade of the CAP. At 100 µM, terpineol had no demonstrable effect. At 300 µM terpineol, peak-to-peak amplitude and conduction velocity of CAP were significantly reduced at the end of 180-min exposure of the nerve to the drug, from 3.28 ± 0.22 mV and 33.5 ± 7.05 m/s, respectively, to 1.91 ± 0.51 mV and 26.2 ± 4.55 m/s. At 600 µM, terpineol significantly reduced peak-to-peak amplitude and conduction velocity from 2.97 ± 0.55 mV and 32.8 ± 3.91 m/s to 0.24 ± 0.23 mV and 2.72 ± 2.72 m/s, respectively (N = 5. All these effects developed slowly and were reversible upon 180-min washout.

  15. Study of the action of calcitonin by its effects on lead-induced hypercalcemia. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmage, R.V.; VanderWiel, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    Intravenous (i.v.) injection of lead acetate produces an immediate elevation in total plasma calcium and phosphate levels. This is due to the formation of calcium-phosphate compounds which can be removed by centrifugation at 25,000 x g. For this study, the effect of salmon calcitonin (CT) on these lead-induced plasma changes was studied. Intact male rats were injected i.v. with lead acetate 10 to 30 mg/kg. CT (0.1 to 0.2 mU/g) injected 30 min prior to lead modified the lead-induced plasma changes as follows: the concentration of lead remaining in plasma was statistically reduced. This was accompanied by a decrease in the amount of colloidal calcium-phosphate removed by ultracentrifugation and a corresponding decrease in the lead-induced elevation of total plasma calcium and phosphate levels. This action of CT was still effective in acutely nephrectomized rats. However, a 15-day pretreatment with a diphosphonate abolished the hypocalcemic effect of CT and also abolished the ability of CT to affect the lead-induced plasma changes. Finally, CT was ineffective if injected in as short a time period as 30 min after lead injection. It is concluded from these studs that CT causes a rapid sequestering of lead from plasma into specific sites in bone.

  16. Bioactive effects of quercetin in the central nervous system: Focusing on the mechanisms of actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganthy, Natarajan; Devi, Kasi Pandima; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Braidy, Nady; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    Quercetin, a ubiquitous flavonoid that is widely distributed in plants is classified as a cognitive enhancer in traditional and oriental medicine. The protective effects of quercetin for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and cerebrovascular diseases have been demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. The free radical scavenging activity of quercetin has been well-documented, wherein quercetin has been observed to exhibit protective effects against oxidative stress mediated neuronal damage by modulating the expression of NRF-2 dependent antioxidant responsive elements, and attenuation of neuroinflammation by suppressing NF-κB signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT-1). Several in vitro and in vivo studies have also shown that quercetin destabilizes and enhances the clearance of abnormal protein such as beta- amyloid peptide and hyperphosphorlyated tau, the key pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Quercetin enhances neurogenesis and neuronal longevity by modulating a broad number of kinase signaling cascades such as phophoinositide 3- kinase (P13-kinase), AKT/PKB tyrosine kinase and Protein kinase C (PKC). Quercetin has also been well reported for its ability to reverse cognitive impairment and memory enhancement during aging. The current review focuses on summarizing the recent findings on the neuroprotective effect of quercetin, its mechanism of action and its possible roles in the prevention of neurological disorders.

  17. Infrared divergences and harmonic anomalies in the two-loop superstring effective action

    CERN Document Server

    Pioline, Boris

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the pertubative contributions to the $D^4 R^4$ and $D^6 R^4$ couplings in the low-energy effective action of type II string theory compactified on a torus $T^d$, with particular emphasis on two-loop corrections. In general, it is necessary to introduce an infrared cut-off $\\Lambda$ to separate local interactions from non-local effects due to the exchange of massless states. We identify the degenerations of the genus-two Riemann surface which are responsible for power-like dependence on $\\Lambda$, and give an explicit prescription for extracting the $\\Lambda$-independent effective couplings. These renormalized couplings are then shown to be eigenmodes of the Laplace operator with respect to the torus moduli, up to computable anomalous source terms arising in the presence of logarithmic divergences, in precise agreement with predictions from U-duality. Our results for the two-loop $D^6 R^4$ contribution also probe essential properties of the Kawazumi-Zhang invariant

  18. The action of mimetic peptides on connexins protects fibroblasts from the negative effects of ischemia reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley J. Glass

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Connexins have been proposed as a target for therapeutic treatment of a variety of conditions. The main approaches have been by antisense or small peptides specific against connexins. Some of these peptides enhance communication while others interfere with connexin binding partners or bind to the intracellular and extracellular loops of connexins. Here, we explored the mechanism of action of a connexin mimetic peptide by evaluating its effect on gap junction channels, connexin protein levels and hemichannel activity in fibroblast cells under normal conditions and following ischemia reperfusion injury which elevates Cx43 levels, increases hemichannel activity and causes cell death. Our results showed that the effects of the mimetic peptide were concentration-dependent. High concentrations (100-300 μM significantly reduced Cx43 protein levels and GJIC within 2 h, while these effects did not appear until 6 h when using lower concentrations (10-30 μM. Cell death can be reduced when hemichannel opening and GJIC were minimised.

  19. Bactericidal Effects and Mechanism of Action of Olanexidine Gluconate, a New Antiseptic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagi, Akifumi; Iwata, Koushi; Nii, Takuya; Nakata, Hikaru; Tsubotani, Yoshie; Inoue, Yasuhide

    2015-08-01

    Olanexidine gluconate [1-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)-5-octylbiguanide gluconate] (development code OPB-2045G) is a new monobiguanide compound with bactericidal activity. In this study, we assessed its spectrum of bactericidal activity and mechanism of action. The minimal bactericidal concentrations of the compound for 30-, 60-, and 180-s exposures were determined with the microdilution method using a neutralizer against 320 bacterial strains from culture collections and clinical isolates. Based on the results, the estimated bactericidal olanexidine concentrations with 180-s exposures were 869 μg/ml for Gram-positive cocci (155 strains), 109 μg/ml for Gram-positive bacilli (29 strains), and 434 μg/ml for Gram-negative bacteria (136 strains). Olanexidine was active against a wide range of bacteria, especially Gram-positive cocci, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and had a spectrum of bactericidal activity comparable to that of commercial antiseptics, such as chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine. In vitro experiments exploring its mechanism of action indicated that olanexidine (i) interacts with the bacterial surface molecules, such as lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid, (ii) disrupts the cell membranes of liposomes, which are artificial bacterial membrane models, (iii) enhances the membrane permeability of Escherichia coli, (iv) disrupts the membrane integrity of S. aureus, and (v) denatures proteins at relatively high concentrations (≥160 μg/ml). These results indicate that olanexidine probably binds to the cell membrane, disrupts membrane integrity, and its bacteriostatic and bactericidal effects are caused by irreversible leakage of intracellular components. At relatively high concentrations, olanexidine aggregates cells by denaturing proteins. This mechanism differs slightly from that of a similar biguanide compound, chlorhexidine.

  20. Multinational corporations and health care in the United States and Latin America: strategies, actions, and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasso-Aguilar, Rebeca; Waitzkin, Howard; Landwehr, Angela

    2004-01-01

    In this article we analyze the corporate dominance of health care in the United States and the dynamics that have motivated the international expansion of multinational health care corporations, especially to Latin America. We identify the strategies, actions, and effects of multinational corporations in health care delivery and public health policies. Our methods have included systematic bibliographical research and in-depth interviews in the United States, Mexico, and Brazil. Influenced by public policy makers in the United States, such organizations as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization have advocated policies that encourage reduction and privatization of health care and public health services previously provided in the public sector. Multinational managed care organizations have entered managed care markets in several Latin American countries at the same time as they were withdrawing from managed care activities in Medicaid and Medicare within the United States. Corporate strategies have culminated in a marked expansion of corporations' access to social security and related public sector funds for the support of privatized health services. International financial institutions and multinational corporations have influenced reforms that, while favorable to corporate interests, have worsened access to needed services and have strained the remaining public sector institutions. A theoretical approach to these problems emphasizes the falling rate of profit as an economic motivation of corporate actions, silent reform, and the subordination of polity to economy. Praxis to address these problems involves opposition to policies that enhance corporate interests while reducing public sector services, as well as alternative models that emphasize a strengthened public sector

  1. Action Schools! BC implementation: from efficacy to effectiveness to scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Heather A; Macdonald, Heather M; Nettlefold, Lindsay; Masse, Louise C; Day, Meghan; Naylor, Patti-Jean

    2015-02-01

    To describe Action Schools! BC (AS! BC) from efficacy to scale-up. Education and health system stakeholders and children in grades 4-6 from elementary schools in British Columbia, Canada. At the provincial level, the AS! BC model reflected socioecological theory and a partnership approach to social change. Knowledge translation and exchange were embedded as a foundational element. At the school level, AS! BC is a comprehensive school health-based model providing teachers and schools with training and resources to integrate physical activity (PA) and healthy eating (HE) into the school environment. Our research team partnered with key community and government stakeholders to deliver and evaluate AS! BC over efficacy, effectiveness and implementation trials. On the basis of significant increases in PA, cardiovascular fitness, bone and HE in AS! BC schools during efficacy trials, the BC government supported a provincial scale-up. Since its inception, the AS! BC Support Team and >225 trained regional trainers have delivered 4677 teacher-focused workshops (training approximately 81,000 teachers), reaching approximately 500,000 students. After scale-up, PA delivery was replicated but the magnitude of change appeared less. One (HE) and 4 (PA) years after scale-up, trained AS! BC teachers provided more PA and HE opportunities for students even in the context of supportive provincial policies. Whole school models like AS! BC can enhance children's PA and health when implemented in partnership with key stakeholders. At the school level, adequately trained and resourced teachers and supportive school policies promoted successful scale-up and sustained implementation. At the provincial level, multisectoral partnerships and embedded knowledge exchange mechanisms influenced the context for action at the provincial and school level, and were core elements of successful implementation. Clinical Trials Registry NCT01412203. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For

  2. Unexpected events induce motor slowing via a brain mechanism for action-stopping with global suppressive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Jan R; Aron, Adam R

    2013-11-20

    When an unexpected event occurs in everyday life (e.g., a car honking), one experiences a slowing down of ongoing action (e.g., of walking into the street). Motor slowing following unexpected events is a ubiquitous phenomenon, both in laboratory experiments as well as such everyday situations, yet the underlying mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that unexpected events recruit the same inhibition network in the brain as does complete cancellation of an action (i.e., action-stopping). Using electroencephalography and independent component analysis in humans, we show that a brain signature of successful outright action-stopping also exhibits activity following unexpected events, and more so in blocks with greater motor slowing. Further, using transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure corticospinal excitability, we show that an unexpected event has a global motor suppressive effect, just like outright action-stopping. Thus, unexpected events recruit a common mechanism with outright action-stopping, moreover with global suppressive effects. These findings imply that we can now leverage the considerable extant knowledge of the neural architecture and functional properties of the stopping system to better understand the processing of unexpected events, including perhaps how they induce distraction via global suppression.

  3. Effect of action observation therapy on daily activities and motor recovery in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Hong Zhu

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Action observation therapy significantly improves upper extremity motor function and performance of activities of daily living, and alleviates upper limb spasticity in patients with stroke.

  4. 21 CFR 25.60 - Environmental effects abroad of major agency actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... action calls for: (1) An EIS; (2) A bilateral or multilateral environmental study; or (3) A concise.... (2) Coordinate all communications with foreign governments concerning environmental agreements and...

  5. Effects and mechanisms of action of sildenafil citrate in human chorionic arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Tadhg

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Sildenafil citrate, a specific phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, is increasingly used for pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy. Sildenafil is also emerging as a potential candidate for the treatment of intra-uterine growth retardation and for premature labor. Its effects in the feto-placental circulation are not known. Our objectives were to determine whether phosphodiesterase-5 is present in the human feto-placental circulation, and to characterize the effects and mechanisms of action of sildenafil citrate in this circulation. Study Design Ex vivo human chorionic plate arterial rings were used in all experiments. The presence of phosphodiesterase-5 in the feto-placental circulation was determined by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. In a subsequent series of pharmacologic studies, the effects of sildenafil citrate in pre-constricted chorionic plate arterial rings were determined. Additional studies examined the role of cGMP and nitric oxide in mediating the effects of sildenafil. Results Phosphodiesterase-5 mRNA and protein was demonstrated in human chorionic plate arteries. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated phosphodiesterase-5 within the arterial muscle layer. Sildenafil citrate produced dose dependent vasodilatation at concentrations at and greater than 10 nM. Both the direct cGMP inhibitor methylene blue and the cGMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS significantly attenuated the vasodilation produced by sildenafil citrate. Inhibition of NO production with L-NAME did not attenuate the vasodilator effects of sildenafil. In contrast, sildenafil citrate significantly enhanced the vasodilation produced by the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. Conclusion Phosphodiesterase-5 is present in the feto-placental circulation. Sildenafil citrate vasodilates the feto-placental circulation via a cGMP dependent mechanism involving increased responsiveness to NO.

  6. Effects and mechanisms of action of sildenafil citrate in human chorionic arteries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, Chrisen H

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Sildenafil citrate, a specific phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, is increasingly used for pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy. Sildenafil is also emerging as a potential candidate for the treatment of intra-uterine growth retardation and for premature labor. Its effects in the feto-placental circulation are not known. Our objectives were to determine whether phosphodiesterase-5 is present in the human feto-placental circulation, and to characterize the effects and mechanisms of action of sildenafil citrate in this circulation. STUDY DESIGN: Ex vivo human chorionic plate arterial rings were used in all experiments. The presence of phosphodiesterase-5 in the feto-placental circulation was determined by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. In a subsequent series of pharmacologic studies, the effects of sildenafil citrate in pre-constricted chorionic plate arterial rings were determined. Additional studies examined the role of cGMP and nitric oxide in mediating the effects of sildenafil. RESULTS: Phosphodiesterase-5 mRNA and protein was demonstrated in human chorionic plate arteries. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated phosphodiesterase-5 within the arterial muscle layer. Sildenafil citrate produced dose dependent vasodilatation at concentrations at and greater than 10 nM. Both the direct cGMP inhibitor methylene blue and the cGMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS significantly attenuated the vasodilation produced by sildenafil citrate. Inhibition of NO production with L-NAME did not attenuate the vasodilator effects of sildenafil. In contrast, sildenafil citrate significantly enhanced the vasodilation produced by the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. CONCLUSION: Phosphodiesterase-5 is present in the feto-placental circulation. Sildenafil citrate vasodilates the feto-placental circulation via a cGMP dependent mechanism involving increased responsiveness to NO.

  7. Biological actions of silver nanoparticles embedded in titanium controlled by micro-galvanic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Xuanyong; Meng, Fanhao; Chu, Paul K

    2011-01-01

    Titanium embedded with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) using a single step silver plasma immersion ion implantation (Ag-PIII) demonstrate micro-galvanic effects that give rise to both controlled antibacterial activity and excellent compatibility with osteoblasts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that nanoparticles with average sizes of about 5 nm and 8 nm are formed homogeneously on the titanium surface after undergoing Ag-PIII for 0.5 h and 1 h, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that those nanoparticles are metallic silver produced on and underneath the titanium surface via a local nucleation process from the solid solution of α-Ti(Ag). The Ag-PIII samples inhibit the growth of both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli while enhancing proliferation of the osteoblast-like cell line MG63. Electrochemical polarization and Zeta potential measurements demonstrate that the low surface toxicity and good cytocompatibility are related to the micro-galvanic effect between the Ag NPs and titanium matrix. Our results show that the physico-chemical properties of the Ag NPs are important in the control of the cytotoxicity and this study opens a new window for the design of nanostructured surfaces on which the biological actions of the Ag NPs can be accurately tailored.

  8. Designing Effective Natural Hazards Preparedness Communications: Factors that Influence Perceptions and Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Parodi, G.; Fischhoff, B.

    2012-12-01

    Even though most people believe that natural hazards preparation is important for mitigating damage to their homes and basic survival in the aftermath of a disaster, few actually disaster-proof their homes, create plans, or obtain supplies recommended by agencies such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Several observational studies suggest that socio-demographic characteristics such as income and psychological characteristics such as self-efficacy affect whether or not an individual takes action to prepare for a natural hazard. These studies, however, only suggest that these characteristics may play a role. There has been little research that systematically investigates how these characteristics play a role in people's perceptions of recommended preparatory activities and decisions to perform them. Therefore, in Study 1, we explore people's perceptions of natural hazards preparedness measures on four dimensions: time, cost, helpfulness, and sense of preparedness. We further investigate if these responses vary by the socio-demographic and psychological characteristics of self-efficacy, knowledge, and income level. In Study 2, we experimentally test whether people's sense of self-efficacy, as it relates to natural hazards, can be manipulated through exposure to an "easy-and-effective" versus a "hard-and-effective" set of preparation measures. Our findings have implications for the design of natural hazards communication materials for the general public.

  9. Two-particle irreducible effective actions versus resummation: Analytic properties and self-consistency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Michael, E-mail: michael.brown6@my.jcu.edu.au; Whittingham, Ian, E-mail: ian.whittingham@jcu.edu.au

    2015-11-15

    Approximations based on two-particle irreducible (2PI) effective actions (also known as Φ-derivable, Cornwall–Jackiw–Tomboulis or Luttinger–Ward functionals depending on context) have been widely used in condensed matter and non-equilibrium quantum/statistical field theory because this formalism gives a robust, self-consistent, non-perturbative and systematically improvable approach which avoids problems with secular time evolution. The strengths of 2PI approximations are often described in terms of a selective resummation of Feynman diagrams to infinite order. However, the Feynman diagram series is asymptotic and summation is at best a dangerous procedure. Here we show that, at least in the context of a toy model where exact results are available, the true strength of 2PI approximations derives from their self-consistency rather than any resummation. This self-consistency allows truncated 2PI approximations to capture the branch points of physical amplitudes where adjustments of coupling constants can trigger an instability of the vacuum. This, in effect, turns Dyson's argument for the failure of perturbation theory on its head. As a result we find that 2PI approximations perform better than Padé approximation and are competitive with Borel–Padé resummation. Finally, we introduce a hybrid 2PI–Padé method.

  10. Effect of hypoxia on specific dynamic action and postprandial cardiovascular physiology in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, Erika J; Farrell, Anthony P

    2014-05-01

    Fish routinely encounter hypoxic environments, which may have detrimental effects on digestion and performance. The present study measured oxygen consumption (MO2), gastrointestinal blood flow (GBF), cardiac output (Vb) and heart rate (f(H)) in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss at 10°C-11.5°C while exposed to a 1.5-h step-wise hypoxia treatment (80%, 60% and 40% saturation=16.7, 12.6 and 8.4 kPa, respectively), which began 4 h after being fed 1% of their body mass. GBF and f(H) significantly decreased by 41 and 25%-29%, respectively, at the most severe hypoxia step (40% saturation), while MO2 and Vb were maintained throughout the entire hypoxia exposure. Thus, GBF and f(H) were more sensitive to hypoxia than MO2 or Vb in digesting rainbow trout. Subsequent to the hypoxic exposure, the fish were returned to normoxia and monitored for a total of 50h after feeding. While the magnitude of SDA was unaffected, peak postprandial MO2 was reduced by 17%, and the duration of specific dynamic action (SDA) was prolonged by 6h in hypoxia-treated fish when compared to control fish. In conclusion, digestive performance was compromised both during and after the hypoxic exposure, which could lead to negative effects on growth.

  11. ANTINUTRITIONAL FACTORS IN SORGHUM: CHEMISTRY, MODE OF ACTION AND EFFECTS ON LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.B. ETUK

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Sorghum basically contains two major anti-nutritional factors; tannin, a polyphenolic compound located in the grain and, dhurrin a cyanogenic glucoside located mainly in the aerial shoot and sprouted seeds. Tannins are high in sorghum with brown pericarp and no testa and very low in unpigmented grains. The main anti-nutritional effects of tannins are: reduction in voluntary feed intake due to reduced palatability, diminished digestibility and utilisation of nutrients, adverse effects upon metabolism and toxicity. The level of tannins present in sorghum seems to be the predominant factor that influences its nutritional value. Drying, soaking, grinding and pelleting appear to reduce tannin content in feedstuffs while diet supplementation with methyl group donors like choline and methionine reduce the problems associated with tannins in livestock. Dhurrin, on enzyme action readily yields hydrogen cyanide (HCN. The quantity of HCN in sorghum varies with cultivar and the growth condition but diminishes with age. Excess cyanide ion can quickly produce anoxia of the central nervous system through inactivating the cytochrome oxidase system and death can result within a few seconds. Making fodder into hay or silage however, destroys the poison.

  12. A Proinflammatory Effect of the β-Glucan from Pleurotus cornucopiae Mushroom on Macrophage Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichiro Minato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available PCPS from P. citrinopileatus mushroom extract is a β-1,6-glucan possessing a proinflammatory effect on innate immune cells. The PCPS stimulated THP-1 macrophages to secrete significant levels of TNF. Moreover, the mRNA expressions of TNF and IL-1β were significantly enhanced by PCPS treatment. However, the PCPS did not induce to express both IL-12 and IL-10 mRNA in the macrophages. Next, the P. cornucopiae extract (containing mainly PCPS treatment against mice showed significant increases in TNF and IL-1β mRNA expressions in the peritoneal macrophages of them. In this study, the expression levels of IFNγ mRNA in the spleen were almost the same between the extract- (PCPS- treated group and control group. However, the expression of IL-4 mRNA showed a lower level in the extract-treated group than that in the control. Our results suggested that the PCPS could induce proinflammatory action in the immune response. In addition, the proinflammatory effect of the PCPS on THP-1 was enhanced by 5′-GMP-Na, while it was reduced by vitamin D2. These two compounds are majorly contained in the P. citrinopileatus mushroom. Therefore, these results suggested that the P. citrinopileatus mushroom might contain other immune regulative compounds, such as vitamin D2, as well as PCPS.

  13. Androgen actions in mouse wound healing: Minimal in vivo effects of local antiandrogen delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwei; Simanainen, Ulla; Cheer, Kenny; Suarez, Francia G; Gao, Yan Ru; Li, Zhe; Handelsman, David; Maitz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this work were to define the role of androgens in female wound healing and to develop and characterize a novel wound dressing with antiandrogens. Androgens retard wound healing in males, but their role in female wound healing has not been established. To understand androgen receptor (AR)-mediated androgen actions in male and female wound healing, we utilized the global AR knockout (ARKO) mouse model, with a mutated AR deleting the second zinc finger to disrupt DNA binding and transcriptional activation. AR inactivation enhanced wound healing rate in males by increasing re-epithelialization and collagen deposition even when wound contraction was eliminated. Cell proliferation and migration in ARKO male fibroblasts was significantly increased compared with wild-type (WT) fibroblasts. However, ARKO females showed a similar healing rate compared to WT females. To exploit local antiandrogen effects in wound healing, while minimizing off-target systemic effects, we developed a novel electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold wound dressing material for sustained local antiandrogen delivery. Using the antiandrogen hydroxyl flutamide (HF) at 1, 5, and 10 mg/mL in PCL scaffolds, controlled HF delivery over 21 days significantly enhanced in vitro cell proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts and human keratinocytes. HF-PCL scaffolds also promoted in vivo wound healing in mice compared with open wounds but not to PCL scaffolds. © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society.

  14. Keldysh effective action theory for universal physics in spin-(1)/(2) Kondo dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Sergey; Grifoni, Milena

    2013-03-01

    We present a theory for the Kondo spin-(1)/(2) effect in strongly correlated quantum dots. The theory is applicable at any temperature and voltage. It is based on a quadratic Keldysh effective action parametrized by a universal function. We provide a general analytical form for the tunneling density of states through this universal function for which we propose a simple microscopic model. We apply our theory to the highly asymmetric Anderson model with U=∞ and describe its strong-coupling limit, weak-coupling limit, and crossover region within a single analytical expression. We compare our results with a numerical renormalization group in equilibrium and with a real-time renormalization group out of equilibrium and show that the universal shapes of the linear and differential conductance obtained in our theory and in these theories are very close to each other in a wide range of temperatures and voltages. In particular, as in the real-time renormalization group, we predict that at the Kondo voltage the differential conductance is equal to 2/3 of its maximum.

  15. Two-particle irreducible effective actions versus resummation: Analytic properties and self-consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Brown

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Approximations based on two-particle irreducible (2PI effective actions (also known as Φ-derivable, Cornwall–Jackiw–Tomboulis or Luttinger–Ward functionals depending on context have been widely used in condensed matter and non-equilibrium quantum/statistical field theory because this formalism gives a robust, self-consistent, non-perturbative and systematically improvable approach which avoids problems with secular time evolution. The strengths of 2PI approximations are often described in terms of a selective resummation of Feynman diagrams to infinite order. However, the Feynman diagram series is asymptotic and summation is at best a dangerous procedure. Here we show that, at least in the context of a toy model where exact results are available, the true strength of 2PI approximations derives from their self-consistency rather than any resummation. This self-consistency allows truncated 2PI approximations to capture the branch points of physical amplitudes where adjustments of coupling constants can trigger an instability of the vacuum. This, in effect, turns Dyson's argument for the failure of perturbation theory on its head. As a result we find that 2PI approximations perform better than Padé approximation and are competitive with Borel–Padé resummation. Finally, we introduce a hybrid 2PI–Padé method.

  16. The 2PI effective action at four loop order in $\\varphi^4$ theory

    CERN Document Server

    Carrington, M E; Pickering, D

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that perturbative pressure calculations show poor convergence. Calculations using a two particle irreducible (2PI) effective action show improved convergence at the 3 loop level, but no calculations have been done at 4 loops. We consider the 2PI effective theory for a symmetric scalar theory with quartic coupling in 4-dimensions. We calculate the pressure and two different non-perturbative vertices as functions of coupling and temperature. Our results show that the 4 loop contribution can become larger than the 3 loop term when the coupling is large. This indicates a breakdown of the 2PI approach, and the need for higher order $n$PI approximations. In addition, our results demonstrate the renormalizability of 2PI calculations at the 4 loop level. This is interesting because the counterterm structure of the 2PI theory at 4 loops is different from the structure at $n\\le 3$ loops. Two vertex counterterms are required at the 4 loop level, but not at lower loop order. This unique feature of the 2P...

  17. Effects of melatonin on pethidine-induced physical dependence and its antioxidative action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shu-hui; LI Xiao-hui

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of melatonin on pethidine-induced physical dependence and its antioxidative action. Methods A trauma-pain model was established in Wistar rats by combining right limb amputation with 50 ℃ tail-flick test. The contents of MDA and the activity of the total superoxide dismutase(SOD) in the brain tissue of trauma-pain rats were detected by thiobarbituric acid method and the xanthine oxidase method. A physical dependence model in mice was reproduced by subcutaneous injection of pethidine and the withdrawal syndromes were induced by intraperitoneal injection of naloxone. Results The contents of MDA enhanced, but the activity of SOD decreased greatly in brain tissues postinjury in rats. Melatonin (30, 60,120 mg·kg-1) i. p. reduced the contents of MDA and enhanced the activity of SOD dose-depen-dently. Melatonin alone showed no withdrawal syndrome when it was given until the dosage of 840 mg· kg-1. Moreover, Melatonin (5, 15, 20 mg·kg-1)obviously inhibited the withdrawal jumpings of mice in pethidine-treated groups dose-dependently (P<0.01 ), the jumping rates of mice were decreased 61.4%, 72.8 %, 84.8 %, respectively. Conclusions The present results indicated that melatonin has good antioxidatire effects on the trauma rats. In addiction, melatonin might inhibit withdrawal syndromes in pethidine-dependent mice.

  18. Action-Specific Effects in a Social Context: Others' Abilities Influence Perceived Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Jessica K.; Sugovic, Mila; Taylor, J. Eric T.

    2012-01-01

    According to the action-specific account of perception, perceivers see the environment relative to their ability to perform the intended action. For example, in a modified version of the computer game Pong, balls that were easier to block looked to be moving slower than balls that were more difficult to block (Witt & Sugovic, 2010). It is unknown,…

  19. Effects of Brief Imitative Experience on EEG Desynchronization during Action Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Peter J.; Bouquet, Cedric A.; Shipley, Thomas F.; Young, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    There is a good deal of evidence that observing the actions of other people is associated with activation of the observer's motor system, which may reflect involvement of the mirror neuron system (MNS) in certain aspects of action processing in humans. Furthermore, variation in the extent of this activation appears to be partly dependent on…

  20. The management of resources: temporal effects of different types of actions on performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bridoux, F.; Smith, K.G.; Grimm, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    This article contributes to the understanding of competitive dynamics and resource management by studying empirically the element of time in the relationship between resource management actions and firm performance. It shows that four types of actions identified on the basis of the literature on com

  1. Naming Action in Japanese: Effects of Semantic Similarity and Grammatical Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Noriko; Vinson, David P.; Vigliocco, Gabriella; Watanabe, Masumi; Arciuli, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether the semantic similarity and grammatical class of distracter words affects the naming of pictured actions (verbs) in Japanese. Three experiments used the picture-word interference paradigm with participants naming picturable actions while ignoring distracters. In all three experiments, we manipulated the semantic…

  2. Effect of thermal acclimation on action potentials and sarcolemmal K+ channels from Pacific bluefin tuna cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, G L J; Lipnick, M S; Block, B A

    2009-08-01

    To sustain cardiac muscle contractility relatively independent of temperature, some fish species are capable of temporarily altering excitation-contraction coupling processes to meet the demands of their environment. The Pacific bluefin tuna, Thunnus orientalis, is a partially endothermic fish that inhabits a wide range of thermal niches. The present study examined the effects of temperature and thermal acclimation on sarcolemmal K(+) currents and their role in action potential (AP) generation in bluefin tuna cardiomyocytes. Atrial and ventricular myocytes were enzymatically isolated from cold (14 degrees C)- and warm (24 degrees C)-acclimated bluefin tuna. APs and current-voltage relations of K(+) channels were measured using the whole cell current and voltage clamp techniques, respectively. Data were collected either at the cardiomyocytes' respective acclimation temperature of 14 or 24 degrees C or at a common test temperature of 19 degrees C (to reveal the effects of acclimation). AP duration (APD) was prolonged in cold-acclimated (CA) cardiomyocytes tested at 14 degrees C compared with 19 degrees C and in warm-acclimated (WA) cardiomyocytes tested at 19 degrees C compared with 24 degrees C. This effect was mirrored by a decrease in the density of the delayed-rectifier current (I(Kr)), whereas the density of the background inward-rectifier current (I(K1)) was unchanged. When CA and WA cardiomyocytes were tested at a common temperature of 19 degrees C, no significant effects of temperature acclimation on AP shape or duration were observed, whereas I(Kr) density was markedly increased in CA cardiomyocytes. I(K1) density was unaffected in CA ventricular myocytes but was significantly reduced in CA atrial myocytes, resulting in a depolarization of atrial resting membrane potential. Our results indicate the bluefin AP is relatively short compared with other teleosts, which may allow the bluefin heart to function at cold temperatures without the necessity for thermal

  3. Modulatory Effects and Action Mechanisms of Tryptanthrin on Murine Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hoi-Ling Chan; Hon-Yan Yip; Nai-Ki Mak; Kwok-Nam Leung

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia is the disorder of hematopoietic cell development and is characterized by an uncoupling of cell proliferation and differentiation. There is a pressing need for the development of novel tactics for leukemia therapy as conventional treatments often have severe adverse side effects. Tryptanthrin (6,12-dihydro-6,12-dioxoindolo-(2,1-b)-quinazoline) is a naturally-occurring, weakly basic alkaloid isolated from the dried roots of medicinal indigo plants (Ban-Lan-Gen). It has been reported to have various biological and pharmacological activities, including anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects. However, its modulatory effects and action mechanisms on myeloid cells remain poorly understood. In this study, tryptanthrin was shown to suppress the proliferation of the murine myeloid leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also significantly reduced the growth of WEHI-3B JCS cells in vivo in syngeneic BALB/c mice. However, it exhibited no significant direct cytotoxicity on normal murine peritoneal macrophages. Flow cytometric analysis showed an obvious cell cycle arrest of the tryptanthrin-treated WEHI-3B JCS cells at the G0/G1 phase. The expression of cyclin D2,D3, Cdk 2, 4 and 6 genes in WEHI-3B JCS cells was found to be down-regulated at 24 h as measured by RT-PCR. Morphological and functional studies revealed that tryptanthrin could induce differentiation in WEHI-3B JCS cells, as shown by the increases in vacuolation, cellular granularity and NBT-reducing activity in tryptanthrin-treated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that tryptanthrin might exert its anti-tumor effect on the murine myelomonocytic leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells by causing cell cycle arrest and by triggering cell differentiation. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2009;6(5):335-342.

  4. Symmetry improvement of 3PI effective actions for O (N ) scalar field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael J.; Whittingham, Ian B.

    2015-04-01

    N-particle irreducible effective actions (nPIEA) are a powerful tool for extracting nonperturbative and nonequilibrium physics from quantum field theories. Unfortunately, practical truncations of nPIEA can unphysically violate symmetries. Pilaftsis and Teresi (PT) addressed this by introducing a "symmetry improvement" scheme in the context of the 2PIEA for an O (2) scalar theory, ensuring that the Goldstone boson is massless in the broken symmetry phase [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. We extend this idea by introducing a symmetry improved 3PIEA for O (N ) theories, for which the basic variables are the one-, two- and three-point correlation functions. This requires the imposition of a Ward identity involving the three-point function. We find that the method leads to an infinity of physically distinct schemes, though a field theoretic analogue of d'Alembert's principle is used to single out a unique scheme. The standard equivalence hierarchy of nPIEA no longer holds with symmetry improvement, and we investigate the difference between the symmetry improved 3PIEA and 2PIEA. We present renormalized equations of motion and counterterms for two- and three-loop truncations of the effective action, though we leave their numerical solution to future work. We solve the Hartree-Fock approximation and find that our method achieves a middle ground between the unimproved 2PIEA and PT methods. The phase transition predicted by our method is weakly first order and the Goldstone theorem is satisfied, while the PT method correctly predicts a second-order phase transition. In contrast, the unimproved 2PIEA predicts a strong first-order transition with large violations of the Goldstone theorem. We also show that, in contrast to PT, the two-loop truncation of the symmetry improved 3PIEA does not predict the correct Higgs decay rate, although the three-loop truncation does, at least to leading order. These results suggest that symmetry improvement should not

  5. Effect and Functional Mechanism of the Action of Exogenous Gibberellin on Flowering of Peach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Li-jun; JIN Liang; YANG Chun-qin; LI Tian-hong

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the effect of gibberellin and its possible mechanism of action on peach flower formation. At flower induction, 100 mg L-1 of gibberellic acid 3 (GA3) was sprayed on the leaves of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch.] cv. Bayuecui. Using anatomy, immunohistochemistry, and semi-quantitation, the in situ distribution of GAs and the expression of the key genes involved in peach flower formation in the apical meristem were studied during flowering differentiation. The results showed that induction of flowering in the Bayuecui peach occurred prior to 10 July in Beijing, China. Flower induction and further differentiation of the peach flower organs were significantly inhibited by leaf-spraying of GA3 at a concentration of 100 mg L-1 during the induction stage. The flowering rate was only 11.67% after treatment. The distribution of GA1 in the apical meristem varied during the process of flower bud differentiation. From 13 June to 25 July, the GA1 signal from control plants was detected mainly in the vascular bundles at the base of the flower buds. No GA1 signal was detected in the apical meristem. After treatment with GA3, the distribution was similar to that of the control from 13 June to 3 July. On 13 July, a GA1 signal was detected in the apical meristem accompanied by an increase in the GA1 signal in the vascular bundles at the base of the flower buds. The GAI signal weakened significantly in both the vascular bundles and the apical meristem on 25 July. The expression of the genes PpLEAFY and MADS6 in flower buds could be detected only on 10 October in the GA3-treated plants. The critical period for flower induction of Bayuecui peach in Beijing was in early July, during which time, leaf-spraying with 100 mg L-1 GA3 could effectively inhibit flower induction and further differentiation of the flower buds. GA1 in the gibberellin family was the suppressor for flower induction in peach. Its action was affected by the stage of flower bud

  6. EFFECTS OF CONCENTRIC AND ECCENTRIC MUSCLE ACTIONS ON SERUM MYOSTATIN AND FOLLISTATIN-LIKE RELATED GENE LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemuel Taylor

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study determined the effects of concentric and eccentric muscle actions on the contents of serum myostatin and follistatin-like related gene (FLRG. Eight untrained males performed one exercise bout with each leg, separated by three weeks. One bout consisted of 7 sets of 10 repetitions of eccentric muscle actions of the knee extensors at 150% of the concentric 1-RM while the other bout consisted of 7 sets of 10 repetitions of concentric muscle actions at 75% 1-RM. The legs used and the bouts performed were randomized. Five days prior to each exercise bout, baseline measurements were taken for muscle strength. For both bouts, a venous blood sample was obtained immediately prior to exercise and again at 6, 24, and 48 hr post-exercise. Data were analyzed with 2 X 4 (bout x test ANOVA (p < 0.05. Increases in serum myostatin and FLRG occurred with each exercise bout and, excluding 48 hr post-exercise, were significantly correlated to one another (p < 0.05. After eccentric exercise, peak increases of 68% and 50% (p < 0.05 were observed for myostatin and FLRG, respectively. Similar increases of 54% and 44% (p < 0.05 were observed after concentric muscle actions. There was no significant difference in expression of myostatin or FLRG as a function of muscle action type. Our results suggest that a single bout of exercise with either eccentric or concentric muscle actions appear to elicit a similar increase in serum myostatin and FLRG. Therefore, the type of muscle action may not be as much a mitigating factor for increasing serum myostatin and FLRG rather than the muscle action per se.

  7. Effects of estragole on the compound action potential of the rat sciatic nerve

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    J.H. Leal-Cardoso

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Estragole, a relatively nontoxic terpenoid ether, is an important constituent of many essential oils with widespread applications in folk medicine and aromatherapy and known to have potent local anesthetic activity. We investigated the effects of estragole on the compound action potential (CAP of the rat sciatic nerve. The experiments were carried out on sciatic nerves dissected from Wistar rats. Nerves, mounted in a moist chamber, were stimulated at a frequency of 0.2 Hz, with electric pulses of 50-100-µs duration at 10-20 V, and evoked CAP were monitored on an oscilloscope and recorded on a computer. CAP control parameters were: peak-to-peak amplitude (PPA, 9.9 ± 0.55 mV (N = 15, conduction velocity, 92.2 ± 4.36 m/s (N = 15, chronaxy, 45.6 ± 3.74 µs (N = 5, and rheobase, 3.9 ± 0.78 V (N = 5. Estragole induced a dose-dependent blockade of the CAP. At 0.6 mM, estragole had no demonstrable effect. At 2.0 and 6.0 mM estragole, PPA was significantly reduced at the end of 180-min exposure of the nerve to the drug to 85.6 ± 3.96 and 13.04 ± 1.80% of control, respectively. At 4.0 mM, estragole significantly altered PPA, conduction velocity, chronaxy, and rheobase (P <= 0.05, ANOVA; N = 5 to 49.3 ± 6.21 and 77.7 ± 3.84, 125.9 ± 10.43 and 116.7 ± 4.59%, of control, respectively. All of these effects developed slowly and were reversible upon a 300-min wash-out. The data show that estragole dose-dependently blocks nerve excitability.

  8. Clinical Effect and Action Mechanism of Weicao Capsule(威草胶囊)In Treating Gout

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG En-feng; XIANG Qiong; REN Kai-ming; HU Jia-cai; WU Fan; GONG Mei-fang; ZHANG Hong; BI Hui-min

    2008-01-01

    Obiective:To study the therapeutic effect of Weicao Capsule(威草胶囊,WCC)on gout.Methods:Two hundred gout patients were assigned to two groups.The treated group was groups were given the respective treatments orally 3 times a day,2 capsules each time with 2 weeks as one course and all patients received 2 successive courses of treatment.Changes of blood β2-microglobulin(β2-M),hemoglobin(Hb),24 h urinary protein(24 h UP),pH value of urine and blood uric acid(BUA)as well as kidney function were observed.Results:After treatment,IeveI of β2-M got lowered significantly,Hb and 24 h UP,blood urea nitrogen,serum creatinine and the clearance rate of creatinine,as well as blood lipids all improved obviously in the treated group(all P<0.01),while these parameters remained unchanged in the control group (P>0.05).The pH value of urine was improved in both groups showing an insignificant difference between them(P>0.05).BUA was decreased in both groups with a decrease to a larger extent in the treated group(P<0.01).The total effective rate was 87% in the treated group,which was superior to that in the control group(62%,P<0.05).Conclusion:WCC has a favorable therapeutic effect on gout and its mechanism of action for improving renal function and reducing urinary protein could be related with the lowering of blood β2-M,BUA and lipids.

  9. Bulk Surfaces Coated with Triangular Silver Nanoplates: Antibacterial Action Based on Silver Release and Photo-Thermal Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnese D’Agostino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A layer of silver nanoplates, specifically synthesized with the desired localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR features, was grafted on amino-functionalized bulk glass surfaces to impart a double antibacterial action: (i the well-known, long-term antibacterial effect based on the release of Ag+; (ii an “on demand” action which can be switched on by the use of photo-thermal properties of silver nano-objects. Irradiation of these samples with a laser having a wavelength falling into the so called “therapeutic window” of the near infrared region allows the reinforcement, in the timescale of minutes, of the classical antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles. We demonstrate how using the two actions allows for almost complete elimination of the population of two bacterial strains of representative Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  10. Effect of the combined action of Faradaic currents and mobility differences in ac electro-osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A.; Ramos, A.; García-Sánchez, P.; Castellanos, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we extend previous analyses of ac electro-osmosis to account for the combined action of two experimentally relevant effects: (i) Faradaic currents from electrochemical reactions at the electrodes and (ii) differences in ion mobilities of the electrolyte. In previous works, the ac electro-osmotic motion has been analyzed theoretically under the assumption that only forces in the diffuse (Debye) layer are relevant. Here, we first show that if the ion mobilities of a 1-1 aqueous solution are different, the charged zone expands from the Debye layer to include the diffusion layer. We later include the Faradaic currents and, as an attempt to explore both factors simultaneously, we perform a thin-layer, low-frequency, linear analysis of the system. Finally, the model is applied to the case of an electrolyte actuated by a traveling-wave signal. A steady liquid motion in opposite direction to the applied signal is predicted for some ranges of the parameters. This could serve as a partial explanation for the observed flow reversal in some experiments.

  11. Effects of diphosphonic acid on ilmenorutile collecting property and research of action mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of several collectors and their dosage on pure ilmenorutile at different pH values were studied and the collecting strength of several representative collectors was investigated. The experimental results indicate that diphosphonic acid is a good collector for ilmenorutile and the recovery of ilmenorutile ranges from 90.87% to 91.70% when the pulp pH value is 2.0-4.0 and the dosage is 75mg/L. Thesequence of collecting ability for several collectors is as follows: diphosphonic acid > TF279 > cyclic alkyl hydroximic acid > benzyl arsenic acid > salicylic hydroximic acid > alkyl hydroximic acid. Meanwhile, IAS (infrared absorption spectrum) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) were used to detect and analyze the action mechanism of diphosphonic acid on ilmenorutile. IAS results showed that the characterid between wave numeber and cm, and diphosphonic acid had adsorbed on the surface of ilmenorutile. XPS results indicated that the binding energy of P2P peak of ilmenorutile had changed 0.45eV after treated by diphosphonic acid. This proves that the adsorption is mainly chemical adsorption.

  12. Effective Actions, Radii and Electromagnetic Polarizabilities of Hadrons in QCD String Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kruglov, S I

    2001-01-01

    A nonperturbative approach to QCD describing confinement and chiral symmetry breaking is discussed. It is based on the path integral representation of Green's function of quarks and leads to the QCD string theory. The effective actions for mesons and baryons in the external uniform static electromagnetic fields are obtained. The area law of the Wilson loop integral, the approximation of the Nambu-Goto straight-line string, and the asymmetric quark-diquark structure of nucleons are used to simplify the problem. The spin-orbit and spin-spin interactions of quarks are treated as a perturbation. Using the virial theorem we estimate the mean radii of hadrons in terms of the string tension and the Airy function zeros. On the basis of the perturbation theory in small external electromagnetic fields we derive the electromagnetic polarizabilities of nucleons. The electric and diamagnetic polarizabilities of a proton are $\\bar{\\alpha}_p= 10\\times 10^{-4} fm^3$, $\\beta_p^{dia}=-8\\times 10^{-4} fm^3$ and for a neutron we...

  13. Effects of stochastic channel gating and distribution on the cardiac action potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Mathieu; de Lange, Enno; Kucera, Jan P

    2011-07-21

    Ion channels exhibit stochastic conformational changes determining their gating behavior. In addition, the process of protein turnover leads to a natural variability of the number of membrane and gap junctional channels. Nevertheless, in computational models, these two aspects are scarcely considered and their impacts are largely unknown. We investigated the effects of stochastic current fluctuations and channel distributions on action potential duration (APD), intercellular conduction delays (ICDs) and conduction blocks using a modified ventricular cell model (Rudy et al.) with Markovian formulations of the principal ion currents (to simulate their stochastic open-close gating behavior) and with channel counts drawn from Poisson distributions (to simulate their natural variability). In single cells, APD variability (coefficient of variation: 1.6% at BCL=1000ms) was essentially caused by stochastic channel gating of I(Ks), persistent I(Na) and I(Ca,L). In cell strands, ICD variability induced by stochastic channel gating and Poissonian channel distributions was low under normal conditions. Nonetheless, at low intercellular coupling levels, Poissonian gap junctional channel distribution resulted in a large ICD variability (coefficient of variation >20%), highly heterogeneous conduction patterns and conduction blocks. Therefore, the stochastic behavior of current fluctuations and channel distributions can contribute to the heterogeneity of conduction patterns and to conduction block, as observed previously in experiments in cardiac tissue with altered intercellular coupling.

  14. Is India's policy framework geared for effective action on avoidable blindness from diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani M Gaiha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The growing burden of avoidable blindness caused by diabetic retinopathy (DR needs an effective and holistic policy that reflects mechanisms for early detection and treatment of DR to reduce the risk of blindness. Materials and Methods: We performed a comprehensive health policy review to highlight the existing systemic issues that enable policy translation and to assess whether India's policy architecture is geared to address the mounting challenge of DR. We used a keyword-based Internet search for documents available in the last 15 years. Two reviewers independently assessed retrieved policies and extracted contextual and program-oriented information and components delineated in national policy documents. Using a “descriptive analytical” method, the results were collated and summarized as per themes to present status quo, gaps, and recommendations for the future. Results: Lack of focus on building sustainable synergies that require well laid out mechanisms for collaboration within and outside the health sector and poor convergence between national health programs appears to be the weakest links across policy documents. Conclusions: To reasonably address the issues of consistency, comprehensiveness, clarity, context, connectedness, and sustainability, policies will have to rely more strongly on evidence from operational research to support decisions. There is a need to involve multiple stakeholders from multiple sectors, recognize contributions from not-for-profit sector and private health service providers, and finally bring about a nuanced holistic perspective that has a voice with implementable multiple sector actions.

  15. Immunomodulatory effects of fluoxetine: A new potential pharmacological action for a classic antidepressant drug?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rosso, María Emilia; Palumbo, María Laura; Genaro, Ana María

    2016-07-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are frequently used antidepressants. In particular, fluoxetine is usually chosen for the treatment of the symptoms of depression, obsessive-compulsive, panic attack and bulimia nervosa. Antidepressant therapy has been associated with immune dysfunction. However, there is contradictory evidence about the effect of fluoxetine on the immune system. Experimental findings indicate that lymphocytes express the serotonin transporter. Moreover it has been shown that fluoxetine is able to modulate the immune function through a serotonin-dependent pathway and through a novel independent mechanism. In addition, several studies have shown that fluoxetine can alter tumor cell viability. Thus, it was recently demonstrated in vivo that chronic fluoxetine treatment inhibits tumor growth by increasing antitumor T-cell activity. Here we briefly review some of the literature referring to how fluoxetine is able to modify, for better or worse, the functionality of the immune system. These results of our analysis point to the relevance of the novel pharmacological action of this drug as an immunomodulator helping to treat several pathologies in which immune deficiency and/or deregulation is present.

  16. Effects of the bleaching sequence on the optical brighteners action in eucalyptus kraft pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Manfredi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During the bleaching process the pulp is treated with chemical reagents that can be retained in the pulp and interfere in the action of the optical brighteners. Different bleaching sequences can produce pulps at the same brightness but with different potential to whiteness increase when treated with optical brighteners. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the bleaching sequence on the efficiency of disulphonated and tetrasulphonated optical brighteners. Eucalyptus kraft pulp was bleached using four different bleaching sequences. For each pulp three brightness targets were aimeds. For each bleaching sequence mathematical model was generated for predicting the final pulp whiteness according to the initial brightness and the optical brightener charge applied. The presence of organochlorine residues in the pulp reduced the effectiveness of the optical brighteners. Therefore, bleaching sequences that use low chlorine dioxide charge favors for greater gains in whiteness with the application of optical brighteners. The replacement of the final chlorine dioxide bleaching stage with a hydrogen peroxide one in the sequence increased the efficiency of the optical brightening agents.

  17. Effect of meal size on the specific dynamic action of the juvenile snakehead (Channa argus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Wen; Huang, Qingda; Zhang, Yurong; Luo, Yiping

    2012-04-01

    The effect of meal size on the specific dynamic action (SDA) of the juvenile snakehead (Channa argus) was assessed at 25 °C. The fish were fed with test diets at meal sizes of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5% body mass and the postprandial oxygen consumption rate was determined at 1-h intervals until it returned to the pre-prandial level. The peak metabolic rate increased from 237.4 to 283.2 mg O(2) kg(-1) h(-1) as the relative meal size increased from 0.5% to 3% and leveled off at 4% and 5%. Factorial metabolic scope increased from 1.53 to 1.99 and SDA duration increased from 11.7 to 32.3h as the relative meal size increased from 0.5% to 5%. The relationship between SDA duration (D) and relative meal size (M) was described as: D=4.28 M+10.62 (r(2)=0.752, Psnakehead may adopt different feeding strategies when taking in different amounts of food.

  18. The anti-melanogenic effect of pycnogenol by its anti-oxidative actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, You Jung; Kang, Ki Sung; Yokozawa, Takako

    2008-07-01

    Pycnogenol is a natural plant extract from pine bark that contains compounds that have anti-oxidative, free-radical scavenging properties. In this work, utilizing cultured B16 melanoma cells (B16 cells), pycnogenol was investigated for its ability to inhibit tyrosinase activity and melanin biosynthesis. We also examined the anti-oxidative power of pycnogenol by measuring its suppressive effect against peroxynitrite (ONOO-), superoxide (.O2), nitric oxide (NO.), and hydroxyl radical (.OH)-scavenging activities using an electron spin resonance spectrometer. Results show that pycnogenol had a strong anti-tyrosinase activity and suppressed melanin biosynthesis. Further, our results showed that through its anti-oxidative properties, pycnogenol suppressed .O2) NO., ONOO-, and .OH in in vitro assays, and reactive species, ONOO-, .O2, and NO., while up-regulating the reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio in B16 cells. Based on the findings, we propose that pycnogenol exerts anti-melanogenic activity via its anti-oxidative actions.

  19. Symmetry improvement of 3PI effective actions for O(N) scalar field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    [Abridged] n-Particle Irreducible Effective Actions ($n$PIEA) are a powerful tool for extracting non-perturbative and non-equilibrium physics from quantum field theories. Unfortunately, practical truncations of $n$PIEA can unphysically violate symmetries. Pilaftsis and Teresi (PT) addressed this by introducing a "symmetry improvement" scheme in the context of the 2PIEA for an O(2) scalar theory, ensuring that the Goldstone boson is massless in the broken symmetry phase [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nuc.Phys. B 874, 2 (2013), pp. 594--619]. We extend this by introducing a symmetry improved 3PIEA for O(N) theories, for which the basic variables are the 1-, 2- and 3-point correlation functions. This requires the imposition of a Ward identity involving the 3-point function. The method leads to an infinity of physically distinct schemes, though an analogue of d'Alembert's principle is used to single out a unique scheme. The standard equivalence hierarchy of $n$PIEA no longer holds with symmetry improvement and we i...

  20. Effects of Action Video Game on Attention Distribution: A Cognitive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuemin; Yan, Bin; Shu, Hua

    Based on the previous researches, Flanker compatibility effect paradigm was applied to explore the degree where people process the visual information presented on to-be-ignored locations. In present study, this paradigm was used to investigate attention distribution of Video Game Players (VGPs) and Non Video Game Players (NVGPs). The results suggested, under low perceptual load, VGPs tried to focus their attention on the task at-hand whereas the NVGPs tried to explore the adjacent locations with the left-over resources from the research task; however, under high perceptual load, the players would process the visual information at the adjacent locations of the target with the left-over resources, because they had comparatively greater attention capability, whereas the non-players focused their attention on the target locations to finish the search task. To conclude, the present study suggested that action video game play could not only enhance the attention capacity but also cause a different way of attention distribution in different perceptual load situations.

  1. Mechanisms of action underlying the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of propolis: a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio A. R. Araujo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Many biological properties have been attributed to various types of propolis, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antitumor, wound healing, and immunomodulatory activities. This article reviewed studies published that investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of propolis of different origins and/or its isolated components, focusing on the mechanisms of action underlying this activity and also addressing some aspects of immunomodulatory effects. The search was performed of the following databases: PubMed, Science Direct, HighWire Press, Scielo, Google Academics, Research Gate and ISI Web of Knowledgement. The anti-inflammatory activity was associated with propolis or compounds such as polyphenols (flavonoids, phenolic acids and their esters, terpenoids, steroids and amino acids. CAPE is the most studied compounds. The main mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory activity of propolis included the inhibition of cyclooxygenase and consequent inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis, free radical scavenging, inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis, reduction in the concentration of inflammatory cytokines and immunosuppressive activity. Propolis was found to exert an anti-inflammatory activity in vivo and in vitro models of acute and chronic inflammation and others studies, indicating its promising potential as anti-inflammatory agent of natural origin and as a source of chemical compounds for the development of new drugs.

  2. Low-Energy Brane-World Effective Actions and Partial Supersymmetry Breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Matthias

    2003-03-18

    As part of a programme for the general study of the low-energy implications of supersymmetry breaking in brane-world scenarios, we study the nonlinear realization of supersymmetry which occurs when breaking N = 2 to N = 1 supergravity. We consider three explicit realizations of this supersymmetry breaking pattern, which correspond to breaking by one brane, by one antibrane or by two (or more) parallel branes. We derive the minimal field content, the effective action and supersymmetry transformation rules for the resulting N = 1 theory perturbatively in powers of {kappa} = 1/M{sub Planck}. We show that the way the massive gravitino and spin-1 fields assemble into N = 1 multiplets implies the existence of direct brane-brane contact interactions at order {Omicron}({kappa}). This result is contrary to the {Omicron}({kappa}{sup 2}) predicted by the sequestering scenario but in agreement with recent work of Anisimov et al. Our low-energy approach is model independent and is a first step towards determining the low-energy implications of more realistic brane models which completely break all supersymmetries.

  3. Effect of visual field presentation on action planning (estimating reach) in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbard, Carl; Cordova, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors examined the effects of target information presented in different visual fields (lower, upper, central) on estimates of reach via use of motor imagery in children (5-11 years old) and young adults. Results indicated an advantage for estimating reach movements for targets placed in lower visual field (LoVF), with all groups having greater difficulty in the upper visual field (UpVF) condition, especially 5- and 7-year-olds. Complementing these results was an overall age-related increase in accuracy. Based in part on the equivalence hypothesis suggesting that motor imagery and motor planning and execution are similar, the findings support previous work of executed behaviors showing that there is a LoVF bias for motor skill actions of the hand. Given that previous research hints that the UpVF may be bias for visuospatial (perceptual) qualities, research in that area and its association with visuomotor processing (LoVF) should be considered.

  4. Effective lattice action for the configurations smeared by the Wilson flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kagimura, Aya; Yamamura, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a trajectory for the Wilson flow in the theory space. For this purpose, we determine the coefficient of the plaquette and rectangular terms in the action for the configurations defined by the solution of the Wilson flow. The demon method regarded as one of the inverse Monte Carlo methods is used for the determination of them. Starting from the conventional Wilson plaquette action of quenched QCD, we find that the coefficient of the plaquette grows while that of the rectangular tends to negative with the development of the flow as the known improved actions. We also find that the trajectory forms a straight line in the two-coupling theory space.

  5. Intracellular recordings of action potentials by an extracellular nanoscale field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaojie; Gao, Ruixuan; Xie, Ping; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Qing, Quan; Choe, Hwan Sung; Tian, Bozhi; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Lieber, Charles M.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to make electrical measurements inside cells has led to many important advances in electrophysiology. The patch clamp technique, in which a glass micropipette filled with electrolyte is inserted into a cell, offers both high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution. Ideally, the micropipette should be as small as possible to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the invasiveness of the measurement, but the overall performance of the technique depends on the impedance of the interface between the micropipette and the cell interior, which limits how small the micropipette can be. Techniques that involve inserting metal or carbon microelectrodes into cells are subject to similar constraints. Field-effect transistors (FETs) can also record electric potentials inside cells, and because their performance does not depend on impedance, they can be made much smaller than micropipettes and microelectrodes. Moreover, FET arrays are better suited for multiplexed measurements. Previously, we have demonstrated FET-based intracellular recording with kinked nanowire structures, but the kink configuration and device design places limits on the probe size and the potential for multiplexing. Here, we report a new approach in which a SiO2 nanotube is synthetically integrated on top of a nanoscale FET. This nanotube penetrates the cell membrane, bringing the cell cytosol into contact with the FET, which is then able to record the intracellular transmembrane potential. Simulations show that the bandwidth of this branched intracellular nanotube FET (BIT-FET) is high enough for it to record fast action potentials even when the nanotube diameter is decreased to 3 nm, a length scale well below that accessible with other methods. Studies of cardiomyocyte cells demonstrate that when phospholipid-modified BIT-FETs are brought close to cells, the nanotubes can spontaneously penetrate the cell membrane to allow the full-amplitude intracellular action potential to be

  6. One-loop and D-instanton corrections to the effective action of open string models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Maximilian

    2009-07-02

    Methods for the calculation of certain corrections to effective actions, which comprehend the low-energy physics of string compactifications with open strings, are explained. First the shape of such actions is describes and some examples for compactifications are presented, especially a type I string model to which a dual model on the base of the heterotic string is known. Then corrections on the gauge coupling constant and on the gauge-kinetic function are discussed. general procedures for their calculation are sketched and applied to some models. The explicitly determinded corrections depend non-holomorphically on the moduli of the compactification manifold. It is explained that this is not in disagreement on the holomorphy of the gauge-kinetic function and how the latter can be extracted from the calculated results. Next D-instantons and their influence on the low-energy action are detailedly analyzed, whereby the zero modes of the instantons and global Abelian symmetries play a central role. A formula for the caclulation of scattering matrix elements in instanton sectors is given. It is to be expected that the considered instantons contribute to the superpotential of the low-energy action. However from the formula it becomes not immediately clear, how far this is possible. The mentioned formula seems to lead to expressions, which are in disagreement to the holomorphy of the superpotential. It is shown that non-holomorphic terms partly simplify, partly are so composed that the result is in accordance with the holomorphy of the superpotential. The D-instanton calculus is then used in order to derive the ADS superpotential, which is known from field theory. That this is possible is to be considered as successful test of the instanton calculus. D-instanton corrections to the gauge-kinetic functions are considered. S duality between the type I and the heterotic string is used in order to determine how the structure of the zero modes of the relevant instantons looks

  7. Effective school actions for mitigating seasonal influenza outbreaks in Niigata, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, Koshu; Seki, Nao; Tanabe, Naohito; Saito, Reiko; Sasaki, Asami; Sasaki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Japan has implemented various school actions during seasonal influenza outbreaks since the 1950's under the School Health Law. However, the effective duration, extent, and timing of closures remain unresolved. We conducted a retrospective study on the relationship between elementary class closures and influenza outbreak control during four consecutive influenza seasons from the 2004-2005 to 2007-2008 school years in Joetsu, Niigata, Japan. Among a total of 1,061 classes of 72 schools, 624 cases of influenza outbreaks were documented among 61 schools. Class closures were carried out in a total of 62 cases in response to influenza outbreak, which was defined as a student absentee rate of greater than 10% due to influenza or influenza-like illness. Of these cases, two-day class closures were conducted the day after reaching a 10% student absentee rate in 28 cases and other types of closures were initiated in 34 cases. A markedly higher number of outbreak cases ended within one week for two-day class closures compared to the other types of closures (82.1% vs. 20.6%, respectively). The significant association between two-day class closures and interruption of an outbreak within one week was confirmed using a multivariable model adjusted for the season, grade, day of the week of an outbreak start, and absentee rate on the day of an outbreak start (OR, 3.18; 95% CI, 1.12-9.07; p = 0.030). Our results suggest that a two-day class closure carried out the day after reaching a 10% absentee rate is an effective approach for mitigating influenza outbreaks in elementary schools.

  8. Melatonin nephroprotective action in Zucker diabetic fatty rats involves its inhibitory effect on NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiarska, Katarzyna; Dzik, Jolanta M; Labudda, Mateusz; Focht, Dorota; Sierakowski, Bartosz; Owczarek, Aleksandra; Komorowski, Lukasz; Bielecki, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Excessive activity of NADPH oxidase (Nox) is considered to be of importance for the progress of diabetic nephropathy. The aim of the study was to elucidate the effect of melatonin, known for its nephroprotective properties, on Nox activity under diabetic conditions. The experiments were performed on three groups of animals: (i) untreated lean (?/+) Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats; (ii) untreated obese diabetic (fa/fa) ZDF rats; and (iii) ZDF fa/fa rats treated with melatonin (20 mg/L) in drinking water. Urinary albumin excretion was measured weekly. After 4 wk of the treatment, the following parameters were determined in kidney cortex: Nox activity, expression of subunits of the enzyme, their phosphorylation and subcellular distribution. Histological studies were also performed. Compared to ?/+ controls, ZDF fa/fa rats exhibited increased renal Nox activity, augmented expression of Nox4 and p47(phox) subunits, elevated level of p47(phox) phosphorylation, and enlarged phospho-p47(phox) and p67(phox) content in membrane. Melatonin administration to ZDF fa/fa rats resulted in the improvement of renal functions, as manifested by considerable attenuation of albuminuria and some amelioration of structural abnormalities. The treatment turned out to nearly normalize Nox activity, which was accompanied by considerably lowered expression and diminished membrane distribution of regulatory subunits, that is, phospho-p47(phox) and p67(phox) . Thus, it is concluded that: (i) melatonin beneficial action against diabetic nephropathy involves attenuation of the excessive activity of Nox; and (ii) the mechanism of melatonin inhibitory effect on Nox is based on the mitigation of expression and membrane translocation of its regulatory subunits.

  9. Time for actions in lucid dreams: effects of task modality, length, and complexity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erlacher, Daniel; Schädlich, Melanie; Stumbrys, Tadas; Schredl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    .... The question if actions in dreams take the same time as in wakefulness can be tested by using lucid dreams where the dreamer is able to mark time intervals with prearranged eye movements that can...

  10. Time for actions in lucid dreams: effects of task modality, length, and complexity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erlacher, Daniel; Schädlich, Melanie; Stumbrys, Tadas; Schredl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    .... The question if actions in dreams take the same time as in wakefulness can be tested by using lucid dreams where the dreamer is able to mark time intervals with prearranged eye movements that can...

  11. Preevaluation of the effectiveness of geothermodynamic action on the oil reserviors of western Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyadkon, Yu.D.; Boguslavskii, E.I.; Malofeev, G.V.; Teslyuk, E.V.; Vashurkin, A.T.; Weinblatt, A.B.

    1980-01-01

    A preevaluation for the increase in crude yield and the economic efficiency of goethermodynamic action has been identified as a result of analyzing the hot flooding conditions of oil reserviors in western Siberian fields using petrogeothermal resources.

  12. Effect of metal complexation to anti-inflammatory over the action against oxidative and free radicals: ketoprofen action; Efeito da complexacao de metais aos antiinflamatorios na acao contra agentes oxidativos e radicais livres: acao do cetoprofeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manente, Francine Alessandra; Mello, Lucas Rosolen de Almeida; Vellosa, Jose Carlos Rebuglio [UEPG, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Departamento de Analises Clinicas eToxicologicas, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Khalil, Omar Arafat Kdudsi [IFG, Instituto Federal de Goias, Campus de Formosa, Formosa - GO (Brazil); Carvalho, Claudio Teodoro de [UFGD, Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados, Faculdade de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologias, Dourados-MS (Brazil); Bannach, Gilbert [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho, Faculdade de Ciencias de Bauru, Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Free radicals are highly reactive species generated in living organisms for the purpose of protection. However, in some circumstances, they are responsible for the occurrence or aggravation of tissue damage. Many anti-inflammatory drugs have a direct effect on free radicals and not radical reactive species, which contributes to its actions against inflammation. Ketoprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent that generates free radicals by photo irradiation and has an important hemolytic effect with that. The complexation of metals to different drugs has been used as a strategy to improve the pharmacological action of different molecules and reduce their side effects. This paper presents the results of ketoprofen and their metallic complexes action on erythrocytes and free radicals. It was observed that the cerium enhances the scavenger properties of ketoprofen on free radicals, while copper enhances its action over non-radical oxidants. Copper also reduced the hemolytic effect presented by ketoprofen meanwhile its cerium derivative maintained it. (author)

  13. The effect of approach/avoidance training on alcohol consumption is mediated by change in alcohol action tendency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M Sharbanee

    Full Text Available Training people to respond to alcohol images by making avoidance joystick movements can affect subsequent alcohol consumption, and has shown initial efficacy as a treatment adjunct. However, the mechanisms that underlie the training's efficacy are unknown. The present study aimed to determine 1 whether the training's effect is mediated by a change in action tendency or a change in selective attention, and 2 whether the training's effect is moderated by individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC. Three groups of social drinkers (total N = 74 completed either approach-alcohol training, avoid-alcohol training or a sham-training on the Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT. Participants' WMC was assessed prior to training, while their alcohol-related action tendency and selective attention were assessed before and after the training on the recently developed Selective-Attention/Action Tendency Task (SA/ATT, before finally completing an alcohol taste-test. There was no significant main effect of approach/avoidance training on alcohol consumption during the taste-test. However, there was a significant indirect effect of training on alcohol consumption mediated by a change in action tendency, but no indirect effect mediated by a change in selective attention. There was inconsistent evidence of WMC moderating training efficacy, with moderation found only for the effect of approach-alcohol training on the AAT but not on the SA/ATT. Thus approach/avoidance training affects alcohol consumption specifically by changing the underlying action tendency. Multiple training sessions may be required in order to observe more substantive changes in drinking behaviour.

  14. Maggot therapy´s modes of action : effect of maggot secretions on microbiological, haematological and immunological processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, Maartje Jeriena Adriana van der

    2009-01-01

    The work described in this thesis focussed on the modes of action of maggot therapy in chronic wounds, especially related to the inflammatory phase of wound healing. For this purpose, the effect of maggot excretions and/or secretions on microbiological, haematological and immunological processes was

  15. Escalation of Commitment to an Ineffective Course of Action: The Effect of Feedback Having Negative Implications for Self-Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockner, Joel; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examines entrapment, the process by which organizational decision makers escalate commitment to an ineffective course of action to justify allocation of previous resources. Two laboratory experiments exploring individuals' perceptions of entrapment and its effect on their self identity are described. Also discusses practical theoretical…

  16. The Development of Psychological Capacity for Action : The Empowering Effect of a Microfinance Programme on Women in Sri Lanka

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Nina

    This work examines the effect of a microfinance intervention on psychological empowerment among women in the North of Sri Lanka. Psychological empowerment is defined as personal (personal control beliefs) and social (social networks) capacity for action. The intervention included relevant skills

  17. The Development of Psychological Capacity for Action : The Empowering Effect of a Microfinance Programme on Women in Sri Lanka

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the effect of a microfinance intervention on psychological empowerment among women in the North of Sri Lanka. Psychological empowerment is defined as personal (personal control beliefs) and social (social networks) capacity for action. The intervention included relevant skills tra

  18. Health Effects of Bioactive Components in Plant Foods; Results and Opinion of the EU-COST926 Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, R.; Piskula, M.; Bovy, A.G.; Dekker, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the main results of EU-action: “COST 926: Impact of new technologies on the health benefits and safety of bioactive plant compounds”. The bioavailability and the effects on gene expression of various bioactive components in plant foods are described in relation with their implicat

  19. Effect of cholic acid and its keto derivatives on the analgesic action of lidocaine and associated biochemical parameters in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posa, Mihalj; Kevresan, Slavko; Mikov, Momir; Cirin-Novta, Vera; Kuhajda, Ksenija

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the structure and concentration of cholic acid and its keto derivatives on the local analgesic action of lidocaine in rats, measured by an analgesimetric method. The increase in bile acid concentrations in the administered lidocaine solution increased the duration of local anesthesia. It was found that the introduction of keto groups into the cholic acid molecule yielded derivatives with lower promotory action, i.e. decreased the duration of local anesthesia. The biochemical parameters investigated indicated that the keto derivatives of cholic acid exhibited no toxicity compared to that of cholic acid itself.

  20. The effectiveness of a pictorial asthma action plan for improving asthma control and the quality of life in illiterate women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pur Ozyigit, Leyla; Ozcelik, Bahar; Ozcan Ciloglu, Seda; Erkan, Feyza

    2014-05-01

    Written asthma action plans are an important part of asthma management, but cannot be used for illiterate people. The aim of this study was to establish the effectiveness of a pictorial asthma action plan on asthma control, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and asthma morbidity in a population of illiterate women with asthma. Forty illiterate women with moderate-severe persistent asthma were assigned alternatively to receive either asthma education alone (control group) or asthma education and a pictorial asthma action plan (study group). Asthma control was assessed using the asthma control test (ACT), HRQoL was assessed using the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and the frequency of non-scheduled hospital or emergency visits was monitored. Thirty-four patients completed the study. The ACT and SGRQ scores of both groups improved at every follow-up time point compared with baseline (p plan can be a helpful tool for self-medication.

  1. Effects of in-season plyometric training within soccer practice on explosive actions of young players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, César; Malatesta, Davide

    2009-12-01

    In soccer, explosive actions such as jumping, sprinting, and changes of direction are essential to optimal performance not only in adults, but also in children's games. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the influence of a short-term plyometric training within regular soccer practice on explosive actions of early pubertal soccer players during the in-season. Fourteen children (13.3 +/- 0.6 years) were selected as the training group (TG) and 11 children (13.1 +/- 0.6 years) were defined as the control group (CG). All children were playing in the same league and trained twice per week for 90 minutes with the same soccer drills. The TG followed an 8-week plyometric program (i.e., jumping, hurdling, bouncing, skipping, and footwork) implemented as a substitute for some soccer drills to obtain the same session duration as CG. At baseline and after training, explosive actions were assessed with the following 6 tests: 10-meter sprint, agility test, 3 vertical jump tests (squat jump [SJ], countermovement jump [CMJ], contact test [CT] and multiple 5 bounds test [MB5]). Plyometric training was associated with significant decreases in 10-m sprint time (-2.1%) and agility test time (-9.6%) and significant increases in jump height for the CMJ (+7.9%) and CT (+10.9%). No significant changes in explosive actions after the 8-week period were recorded for the CG. The current study demonstrated that a plyometric program within regular soccer practice improved explosive actions of young players compared to conventional soccer training only. Therefore, the short-term plyometric program had a beneficial impact on explosive actions, such as sprinting, change of direction, and jumping, which are important determinants of match-winning actions in soccer performance.

  2. Time for actions in lucid dreams: Effects of task modality, length, and complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eErlacher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between time in dreams and real time has intrigued scientists for centuries. The question if actions in dreams take the same time as in wakefulness can be tested by using lucid dreams where the dreamer is able to mark time intervals with prearranged eye movements that can be objectively identified in EOG recordings. Previous research showed an equivalence of time for counting in lucid dreams and in wakefulness (Erlacher & Schredl, 2004; LaBerge, 1985, but Erlacher and Schredl (2004 found that performing squats required about 40 % more time in lucid dreams than in the waking state. To find out if the task modality, the task length, or the task complexity results in prolonged times in lucid dreams, an experiment with three different conditions was conducted.In the first condition, five proficient lucid dreamers spent one to three non-consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. Participants counted to 10, 20 and 30 in wakefulness and in their lucid dreams. Lucidity and task intervals were time stamped with left-right-left-right eye movements. The same procedure was used for the second condition where eight lucid dreamers had to walk 10, 20 or 30 steps. In the third condition, eight lucid dreamers performed a gymnastics routine, which in the waking state lasted the same time as walking 10 steps.Again, we found that performing a motor task in a lucid dream requires more time than in wakefulness. Longer durations in the dream state were present for all three tasks, but significant differences were found only for the tasks with motor activity (walking and gymnastics. However, no difference was found for relative times (no disproportional time effects and a more complex motor task did not result in more prolonged times. Longer durations in lucid dreams might be related to the lack of muscular feedback or slower neural processing during REM sleep. Future studies should explore factors that might be associated with prolonged durations.

  3. Time for actions in lucid dreams: effects of task modality, length, and complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlacher, Daniel; Schädlich, Melanie; Stumbrys, Tadas; Schredl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between time in dreams and real time has intrigued scientists for centuries. The question if actions in dreams take the same time as in wakefulness can be tested by using lucid dreams where the dreamer is able to mark time intervals with prearranged eye movements that can be objectively identified in EOG recordings. Previous research showed an equivalence of time for counting in lucid dreams and in wakefulness (LaBerge, 1985; Erlacher and Schredl, 2004), but Erlacher and Schredl (2004) found that performing squats required about 40% more time in lucid dreams than in the waking state. To find out if the task modality, the task length, or the task complexity results in prolonged times in lucid dreams, an experiment with three different conditions was conducted. In the first condition, five proficient lucid dreamers spent one to three non-consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. Participants counted to 10, 20, and 30 in wakefulness and in their lucid dreams. Lucidity and task intervals were time stamped with left-right-left-right eye movements. The same procedure was used for the second condition where eight lucid dreamers had to walk 10, 20, or 30 steps. In the third condition, eight lucid dreamers performed a gymnastics routine, which in the waking state lasted the same time as walking 10 steps. Again, we found that performing a motor task in a lucid dream requires more time than in wakefulness. Longer durations in the dream state were present for all three tasks, but significant differences were found only for the tasks with motor activity (walking and gymnastics). However, no difference was found for relative times (no disproportional time effects) and a more complex motor task did not result in more prolonged times. Longer durations in lucid dreams might be related to the lack of muscular feedback or slower neural processing during REM sleep. Future studies should explore factors that might be associated with prolonged durations.

  4. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2016-01-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca2+ entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca2+ buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca2+-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca2+ elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377724

  5. Introducing Actions into Qualitative Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    include the effects of actions to form action-augmented envisionments . The action-augmented envisionment incorporates both the effects of an agent’s...procedure generation than any previous representation . This paper defines action- augmented envisionments and an algorithm for directly computing...Moving actions into the physics . The next section introduces a new representation, the action-augmented envisionment (or .fie), which inte- grates the

  6. Cosmological perturbation spectra from SL(4,R)-invariant effective actions

    CERN Document Server

    Bridgman, H A; Bridgman, Helen A.; Wands, David

    2000-01-01

    We investigate four-dimensional cosmological vacuum solutions derived from aneffective action invariant under global SL(n,R) transformations. We find thegeneral solutions for linear axion field perturbations about homogeneousdilaton-moduli-vacuum solutions for an SL(4,R)-invariant action and find thespectrum of super-horizon perturbations resulting from vacuum fluctuations in apre big bang scenario. We show that for SL(n,R)-invariant actions with n>3there exists a regime of parameter space of non-zero measure where all theaxion field spectra have positive spectral tilt, as required if light axionfields are to provide a seed for anisotropies in the microwave background andlarge-scale structure in the universe.

  7. The effect of action observation training on knee joint function and gait ability in total knee replacement patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong Doo; Song, Hyun Seung; Kim, Jin Young

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate that effect of action observation training (AOT) on knee joint function and balance in total knee replacement (TKR) patients. The subjects consisted of eighteen post-TKR patients. All participants underwent conventional physical therapy. In addition, patients in the AOT group (n= 9) were asked to observe video clips showing daily actions and to imitate them afterward. Patients in the control group (n= 9) were asked to execute the same actions as patients in the AOT group. Outcome measures Western Ontario and Mc-Master Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) included pain, stiffness, function and Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. After intervention, patients in the AOT group score better than patients in the control group. After TUG test, patients in the AOT group and control group were no significant difference between two groups. In addition to conventional physical therapy, AOT is effective in the rehabilitation of post-TKR patients. Action observation training is considered conducive to improving knee functions and ameliorating pain and stiffness, of patients who underwent TKR.

  8. Combined effects of estrogenic chemicals with the same mode of action using an estrogen receptor binding bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong; Li, Na; Ma, Mei; Wang, Zijian

    2014-11-01

    The increasing amounts of various estrogenic chemicals coexisting in the aquatic environment may pose environmental risks. While the concept of estradiol equivalent (EEQ) has been frequently applied in studying estrogenic mixtures, few experiments have been done to prove its reliability. In this study, the reliability of EEQ and the related model concentration addition (CA) was verified based on the two-hybrid recombinant yeast bioassay when all mixture components had the same mode of action and target of action. Our results showed that the measured estrogenic effects could be well predicted by CA and EEQ for all laboratory-made mixtures using two designs, despite the varying estrogenic activity, concentration levels and ratios of the test chemicals. This suggests that when an appropriate endpoint and its relevant bioassay are chosen, CA should be valid and the application of EEQ in predicting the effect of non-equi-effect mixtures is feasible.

  9. Effect of hydrochlorothiazide on the anticonvulsant action of antiepileptic drugs against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukawski, Krzysztof; Swiderska, Grażyna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), a thiazide-type diuretic and an antihypertensive drug, on the anticonvulsant activity of numerous antiepileptic drugs (AEDs: carbamazepine--CBZ, phenytoin--PHT, valproate--VPA, phenobarbital--PB, oxcarbazepine--OXC, lamotrigine--LTG and topiramate--TPM). The effects of HCTZ and AEDs on convulsions were examined in the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) test in mice. Additionally, adverse effects of combined treatment with HCTZ and the AEDs in the passive avoidance task and chimney test were assessed. All drugs were injected intraperitoneally (ip) at single doses. The data obtained indicate that HCTZ (100 mg ip) enhanced the anticonvulsant action of CBZ, decreasing its ED(50) value from 11.9 to 7.7 mg/kg (p anticonvulsant potency. Acute HCTZ may positively influence the anticonvulsant action of CBZ in epileptic patients.

  10. Rest and action tremor in Parkinson's disease: effects of Deep Brain Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Tjitske; Wentink, E.C.

    2010-01-01

    One of the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson’s disease is rest tremor. While rest tremor generally disappears during sleep and voluntary movement, action tremor may be triggered by voluntary movement, and may even be more disabling than rest tremor. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic

  11. Reinvigorating International Climate Policy: A Comprehensive Framework for Effective Nonstate Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, Sander; Asselt, van Harro; Hale, Thomas; Hoehne, N.E.

    2015-01-01

    As countries negotiate a new climate agreement for the United Nations climate conference in December 2015, a groundswell of climate actions is emerging as cities, regions, businesses and civil society groups act on mitigation and adaptation, independently, with each other and with national governmen

  12. Striving for the moral self : The effects of recalling past moral actions on future moral behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordan, J.; Mullen, E.; Murnighan, J.K.

    People's desires to see themselves as moral actors can contribute to their striving for and achievement of a sense of self-completeness. The authors use self-completion theory to predict (and show) that recalling one's own (im)moral behavior leads to compensatory rather than consistent moral action

  13. Feature activation during word recognition: Action, visual, and associative-semantic priming effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam Jia Yoong, K.; Dijkstra, A.F.J.; Rüschemeyer, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Embodied theories of language postulate that language meaning is stored in modality-specific brain areas generally involved in perception and action in the real world. However, the temporal dynamics of the interaction between modality-specific information and lexical-semantic processing remain

  14. Striving for the moral self : The effects of recalling past moral actions on future moral behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordan, J.; Mullen, E.; Murnighan, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    People's desires to see themselves as moral actors can contribute to their striving for and achievement of a sense of self-completeness. The authors use self-completion theory to predict (and show) that recalling one's own (im)moral behavior leads to compensatory rather than consistent moral action

  15. Rest and action tremor in Parkinson's disease: effects of Deep Brain Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, T.; Wentink, E.C.

    2010-01-01

    One of the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson’s disease is rest tremor. While rest tremor generally disappears during sleep and voluntary movement, action tremor may be triggered by voluntary movement, and may even be more disabling than rest tremor. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucle

  16. An integrated approach for prospectively investigating a mode-of-action for rodent liver effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBaron, Matthew J., E-mail: MJLeBaron@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Geter, David R., E-mail: dave.geter@gmail.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Rasoulpour, Reza J. [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Gollapudi, B. Bhaskar, E-mail: BBGollapudi@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Thomas, Johnson, E-mail: JThomas4@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Murray, Jennifer, E-mail: AMurray@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Kan, H. Lynn, E-mail: HLKan@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Wood, Amanda J., E-mail: AJWood@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Elcombe, Cliff, E-mail: CliffElcombe@cxrbiosciences.com [CXR Biosciences, 2 James Lindsay Place, Dundee Technopole, Dundee, DD1 5JJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Vardy, Audrey, E-mail: audrey_vardy@europe.bd.com [CXR Biosciences, 2 James Lindsay Place, Dundee Technopole, Dundee, DD1 5JJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); McEwan, Jillian, E-mail: jillian.mcewan@rtmcewan.co.uk [CXR Biosciences, 2 James Lindsay Place, Dundee Technopole, Dundee, DD1 5JJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Terry, Claire, E-mail: CTerry@dow.com [Dow AgroSciences, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Billington, Richard, E-mail: RBillington@dow.com [Dow AgroSciences, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    Registration of new plant protection products (e.g., herbicide, insecticide, or fungicide) requires comprehensive mammalian toxicity evaluation including carcinogenicity studies in two species. The outcome of the carcinogenicity testing has a significant bearing on the overall human health risk assessment of the substance and, consequently, approved uses for different crops across geographies. In order to understand the relevance of a specific tumor finding to human health, a systematic, transparent, and hypothesis-driven mode of action (MoA) investigation is, appropriately, an expectation by the regulatory agencies. Here, we describe a novel approach of prospectively generating the MoA data by implementing additional end points to the standard guideline toxicity studies with sulfoxaflor, a molecule in development. This proactive MoA approach results in a more robust integration of molecular with apical end points while minimizing animal use. Sulfoxaflor, a molecule targeting sap-feeding insects, induced liver effects (increased liver weight due to hepatocellular hypertrophy) in an initial palatability probe study for selecting doses for subsequent repeat-dose dietary studies. This finding triggered the inclusion of dose-response investigations of the potential key events for rodent liver carcinogenesis, concurrent with the hazard assessment studies. As predicted, sulfoxaflor induced liver tumors in rats and mice in the bioassays. The MoA data available by the time of the carcinogenicity finding supported the conclusion that the carcinogenic potential of sulfoxaflor was due to CAR/PXR nuclear receptor activation with subsequent hepatocellular proliferation. This MoA was not considered to be relevant to humans as sulfoxaflor is unlikely to induce hepatocellular proliferation in humans and therefore would not be a human liver carcinogen. - Highlights: • We prospectively generated MoA data into standard guideline toxicity studies. • A proactive MoA approach

  17. Effects of preparatory and action planning instructions on situation-specific and general fruit and snack intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Gert-Jan; Nguyen, Minh Hao; Rhodes, Ryan E; van Osch, Liesbeth

    2017-01-01

    Evidence to date suggests heterogeneity in the effects of implementation intentions on health behaviour, including diet. Additional variables and study designs may impact on their effectiveness. Preparatory action, such as making sure fruits are available for consumption, may be an important additional variable. Likewise, most implementation intention research has focused on changes in general intake, yet implementation intention instructions typically require participants to consider behaviour in specific situations. Little is known on how implementation intentions impact situation-specific intake. The present study sought to add to the evidence base by comparing (1) the effects of action planning instructions versus preparatory planning instructions on (2) both situation-specific (as formulated in the implementation intention instruction) and general intake of fruits and in-between meal snack intake frequency. Fruit intake was assessed in average pieces per day, whereas snacking intake was assessed as average frequency in days per week. Using non-probability sampling, 243 undergraduate students who intended to have a healthy diet were randomized to either a standard information control condition, an action planning condition, or a preparatory planning condition. Planning manipulations were based on previous work. Two weeks later, general and situation-specific intake was assessed again in 181 participants. Data were analysed using 2 (time) x 3 (conditions) analyses of variance. Results showed that both planning manipulations were successful in decreasing snack intake frequency in the specified situation, with larger effect sizes for the action planning condition than for the preparatory planning condition. No effects were found on general snack intake frequency or fruit intake. Future planning interventions should more explicitly compare changes in situational and general intake, as well as simultaneously assessed decreases in unhealthy intake and increases in

  18. Over 10 dB Net Coding Gain Based on 20% Overhead Hard Decision Forward Error Correction in 100G Optical Communication Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bomin; Larsen, Knud J.; Zibar, Darko;

    2011-01-01

    We propose a product code with shortened BCH component codes for 100G optical communication systems. Simulation result shows that 10 dB net coding gain is promising at post- FEC BER of 1E-15.......We propose a product code with shortened BCH component codes for 100G optical communication systems. Simulation result shows that 10 dB net coding gain is promising at post- FEC BER of 1E-15....

  19. 17 CFR 240.15d-17 - Reports of asset-backed issuers on Form 10-D (§ 249.312 of this chapter).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reports of asset-backed issuers on Form 10-D (§ 249.312 of this chapter). 240.15d-17 Section 240.15d-17 Commodity and Securities... Reports of asset-backed issuers on Form 10-D (§ 249.312 of this chapter). Every asset-backed issuer...

  20. 17 CFR 240.13a-17 - Reports of asset-backed issuers on Form 10-D (§ 249.312 of this chapter).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reports of asset-backed issuers on Form 10-D (§ 249.312 of this chapter). 240.13a-17 Section 240.13a-17 Commodity and Securities... Reports of asset-backed issuers on Form 10-D (§ 249.312 of this chapter). Every asset-backed issuer...

  1. Induced parity-odd effective action for a Dirac field on S2×S1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosco, C. D.; Schaposnik, F. A.

    2017-05-01

    We evaluate the parity-odd part of the effective action due to massive Dirac fermions on a S2×S1 manifold, minimally coupled to an external Abelian gauge field. We do that for a special class of gauge-field configurations, which is especially suitable to the study of the behavior of the fermionic determinant under large gauge field configurations, which are allowed by the space-time geometry.

  2. A survey of the effective factors in students' adherence to university dress code policy, using the theory of reasoned action

    OpenAIRE

    MOHAMMAD HOSSEIN KAVEH; LEILA MORADI; MARYAM HESAMPOUR; JAFAR HASAN ZADEH

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Recognizing the determinants of behavior plays a major role in identification and application of effective strategies for encouraging individuals to follow the intended pattern of behavior. The present study aimed to analyze the university students’ behaviors regarding the amenability to dress code, using the theory of reasoned action (TRA). Methods: In this cross sectional study, 472 students were selected through multi-stage random sampling. The data were ...

  3. Effects of nerve growth factor on the action potential duration and repolarizing currents in a rabbit model of myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Jian-Cheng; Gao, Jin-Lao; Wang, Xue-Ping; Fang, Zhou; Fu, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Mei-Yan; Lin, Min; Xue, Qiao; Li, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on the action potential and potassium currents of non-infarcted myocardium in the myocardial infarcted rabbit model. Methods Rabbits with occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery were prepared and allowed to recover for eight weeks (healed myocardial infarction, HMI). During ligation surgery of the left coronary artery, a polyethylene tube was placed near the left stellate ganglion in the subcutis of the neck f...

  4. Computational modeling of voltage-gated Ca channels inhibition: identification of different effects on uterine and cardiac action potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing Chiu eTong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The uterus and heart share the important physiological feature whereby contractile activation of the muscle tissue is regulated by the generation of periodic, spontaneous electrical action potentials (APs. Preterm birth arising from premature uterine contractions is a major complication of pregnancy and there remains a need to pursue avenues of research that facilitate the use of drugs, tocolytics, to limit these inappropriate contractions without deleterious actions on cardiac electrical excitation. A novel approach is to make use of mathematical models of uterine and cardiac APs, which incorporate many ionic currents contributing to the AP forms, and test the cell-specific responses to interventions. We have used three such models – of uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC, cardiac sinoatrial node cells (SAN and ventricular cells – to investigate the relative effects of reducing two important voltage-gated Ca currents – the L-type (ICaL and T-type (ICaT Ca currents. Reduction of ICaL (10% alone, or ICaT (40% alone, blunted USMC APs with little effect on ventricular APs and only mild effects on SAN activity. Larger reductions in either current further attenuated the USMC APs but with also greater effects on SAN APs. Encouragingly, a combination of ICaL and ICaT reduction did blunt USMC APs as intended with little detriment to APs of either cardiac cell type. Subsequent overlapping maps of ICaL and ICaT inhibition profiles from each model revealed a range of combined reductions of ICaL and ICaT over which an appreciable diminution of USMC APs could be achieved with no deleterious action on cardiac SAN or ventricular APs. This novel approach illustrates the potential for computational biology to inform us of possible uterine and cardiac cell-specific mechanisms. Incorporating such computational approaches in future studies directed at designing new, or repurposing existing, tocolytics will be beneficial for establishing a desired uterine

  5. A frame-dependent gravitational effective action mimics a cosmological constant, but modifies the black hole horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    A frame dependent effective action motivated by the postulates of three-space general coordinate invariance and Weyl scaling invariance exactly mimics a cosmological constant in Robertson-Walker spacetimes. However, in a static spherically symmetric Schwarzschild-like geometry it modifies the black hole horizon structure within microscopic distances of the nominal horizon, in such a way that $g_{00}$ never vanishes. This could have important implications for the black hole "information paradox".

  6. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Jeff; Skalski, J. R.; Teel, D. J.; Brewer, Taylor; Bryson, Amanda J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Kuligowski, D. R.; Whitesel, T.; Mallette, Christine

    2013-11-30

    The study reported herein was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), University of Washington (UW), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The goal of the study was to evaluate the ecological benefits of restoration actions for juvenile salmon in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; rkm 0–234).

  7. Policies, Actions and Effects for China s Forestry Response to Global Climate Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Climate change is a great concern of various countries, the public and science community, and forest plays an important role in mitigating climate change. The paper made a comprehensive analysis regarding the policy selections of China to promote forestry response to the global climate change, and elaborated the concrete actions and achievements in this regard. Policy selections include: 1) Reinforce tree planting and afforestation, increase the forested area and enhance the capacity of carbon sequestration...

  8. Time for actions in lucid dreams: effects of task modality, length, and complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel eErlacher; Melanie eSchädlich; Tadas eStumbrys; Michael eSchredl

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between time in dreams and real time has intrigued scientists for centuries. The question if actions in dreams take the same time as in wakefulness can be tested by using lucid dreams where the dreamer is able to mark time intervals with prearranged eye movements that can be objectively identified in EOG recordings. Previous research showed an equivalence of time for counting in lucid dreams and in wakefulness (Erlacher & Schredl, 2004; LaBerge, 1985), but Erlacher and Schred...

  9. Time for actions in lucid dreams: effects of task modality, length, and complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Erlacher, Daniel; Schädlich, Melanie; Stumbrys, Tadas; Schredl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between time in dreams and real time has intrigued scientists for centuries. The question if actions in dreams take the same time as in wakefulness can be tested by using lucid dreams where the dreamer is able to mark time intervals with prearranged eye movements that can be objectively identified in EOG recordings. Previous research showed an equivalence of time for counting in lucid dreams and in wakefulness (LaBerge, 1985; Erlacher and Schredl, 2004), but Erlacher and Schr...

  10. The effect of action video game experience on task-switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C.Shawn; Sugarman, Michael A.; Medford, Katherine; Klobusicky, Elizabeth; Daphne Bavelier

    2012-01-01

    There is now a substantial body of work demonstrating that action video game experience results in enhancements in a wide variety of perceptual skills. More recently, several groups have also demonstrated improvements in abilities that are more cognitive in nature, in particular, the ability to efficiently switch between tasks. In a series of four experiments, we add to this body of work, demonstrating that the action video game player advantage is not exclusively due to an ability to map manual responses onto arbitrary buttons, but rather generalizes to vocal responses, is not restricted to tasks that are perceptual in nature (e.g. respond to a physical dimension of the stimulus such as its color), but generalizes to more cognitive tasks (e.g. is a number odd or even), and is present whether the switch requires a goal-switch or only a motor switch. Finally, a training study establishes that the relationship between the reduction in switch cost and action game playing is causal. PMID:22393270

  11. The effect of action video game experience on task-switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C Shawn; Sugarman, Michael A; Medford, Katherine; Klobusicky, Elizabeth; Daphne Bavelier

    2012-05-01

    There is now a substantial body of work demonstrating that action video game experience results in enhancements in a wide variety of perceptual skills. More recently, several groups have also demonstrated improvements in abilities that are more cognitive in nature, in particular, the ability to efficiently switch between tasks. In a series of four experiments, we add to this body of work, demonstrating that the action video game player advantage is not exclusively due to an ability to map manual responses onto arbitrary buttons, but rather generalizes to vocal responses, is not restricted to tasks that are perceptual in nature (e.g. respond to a physical dimension of the stimulus such as its color), but generalizes to more cognitive tasks (e.g. is a number odd or even), and is present whether the switch requires a goal-switch or only a motor switch. Finally, a training study establishes that the relationship between the reduction in switch cost and action game playing is causal.

  12. Combination effect of ultrasound and shake as a mechanical action for textile cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Keiko; Harayama, Kokoro; Handa, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    The ultrasonic cleaning of artificially soiled fabrics with and without shake was carried out in an aqueous anionic surfactant solution. The polyester, cotton and polyester/cotton (65/35) fabrics were soiled with oleic acid or carbon black as a model soil, and cleaned together with their original fabrics with applying ultrasound for 5min. The detergency and the soil redeposition were determined from the change in the Kubelka-Munk function of the soiled and original fabric surfaces due to the cleaning. For any fabric, the removal of oleic acid and carbon black from the soiled fabric and their redeposition onto the original fabric increased with increasing electric power consumption of ultrasound. When ultrasound and shake were applied at the same time, the detergency further increased for any electric power consumption. The maximum detergency obtained with combination of ultrasound 340W and shake 160spm was compared with detergency obtained with Wascator, a horizontal axis drum type washer. It was found that the ultrasound/shake combination cleaning enabled efficient removal of both soils from any fabric and the detergency of the polyester fabrics was comparable to that with Wascator. The mechanical action during the washing was evaluated by two mechanical action test pieces commercially available, which indicated that the ultrasound/shake combination cleaning provided gentle mechanical action to the fabric in comparison with the drum type washer. The SEM observations showed the damage of the fabric and fiber surfaces was negligibly small after the ultrasound/shake combination washing.

  13. The Effects of Action and Violence in Television Programs on the Social Behavior and Imaginative Play of Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston-Stein, Aletha; And Others

    The independent contributions of action and violence in television programs to children's attention and social behavior were investigated. Pairs of preschool children were assigned to one of four television conditions (1) high action-high violence, (2) high action-low violence, (3) low action-low violence, or (4) no television. Action was defined…

  14. The Effects of Action and Violence in Television Programs on the Social Behavior and Imaginative Play of Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston-Stein, Aletha; And Others

    The independent contributions of action and violence in television programs to children's attention and social behavior were investigated. Pairs of preschool children were assigned to one of four television conditions (1) high action-high violence, (2) high action-low violence, (3) low action-low violence, or (4) no television. Action was defined…

  15. Differential Cross Sections for the H + D2 → HD(v' = 3, j' = 4-10) + D Reaction above the Conical Intersection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Sneha, Mahima; Bouakline, Foudhil; Althorpe, Stuart C; Zare, Richard N

    2015-12-17

    We report rovibrationally selected differential cross sections (DCSs) of the benchmark reaction H + D2 → HD(v' = 3, j' = 4-10) + D at a collision energy of 3.26 eV, which exceeds the conical intersection of the H3 potential energy surface at 2.74 eV. We use the PHOTOLOC technique in which a fluorine excimer laser at 157.64 nm photodissociates hydrogen bromide (HBr) molecules to generate fast H atoms and the HD product is detected in a state-specific manner by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. Fully converged quantum wave packet calculations were performed for this reaction at this high collision energy without inclusion of the geometric phase (GP) effect, which takes into account coupling to the first excited state of the H3 potential energy surface. Multimodal structures can be observed in most of the DCSs up to j' = 10, which is predicted by theory and also well-reproduced by experiment. The theoretically calculated DCSs are in good overall agreement with the experimental measurements, which indicates that the GP effect is not large enough that its existence can be verified experimentally at this collision energy.

  16. Transforming Conflict into Effective Action: A Case Study on the Effects of Anthropogenic Sound on Marine Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Jill K.

    Like many wicked environmental problems of our time, marine sound and its potential effects on marine mammals is characterized by high levels of scientific uncertainty, diversified values across many stakeholder groups, political and regulatory complexities, and a continually evolving ecological and social environment. Further, the history of conflict and the relationships between major actors has rooted the issue firmly in identity conflict where prejudices lead to avoidance of working together. What results is continuing controversy, failed management decisions, litigation and an increasing frustration by all parties on why a better solution cannot be found. Ultimately, the intractability of the issue is not about the science, nor will the science ever tame the issue on its own. Rather, the issue is intractable because of the conflict between people about the most appropriate path forward. It is then imperative to understand, address, and transform this conflict in order to move off the decision carousel toward improved conservation outcomes and sustainable decisions for all. This research used an explanatory case study approach to quantitatively and qualitatively investigate the context and reasoning underlying conflict on this issue. Three methods were used in order to triangulate the data, and thus add rigor, including: (1) a document review of 230 publications: (2) exploratory interviews with 10 collaborative action experts and semi-structured interviews with 58 marine mammals and sound stakeholders; and (3) participant review of selected analyses. Data elucidate how different stakeholder groups define the problem and potential solutions, how they see their role and view the role of other stakeholders, specific experiences that increased or decrease conflict, and design preferences for a collaborative effort. These data are combined with conflict transformation principles to provide recommendations for a collaborative, transformative framework designed to

  17. Action physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  18. Anticonvulsive and convulsive effects of lidocaine: comparison with those of phenytoin, and implications for mechanism of action concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, W E; Javid, M J

    1988-09-01

    The anticonvulsive action of lidocaine was tested in mice against a series of convulsants, and its profile of action compared with that of phenytoin. Both agents antagonized seizures induced by ouabain or glutamate (injected i.c.b.), effects attributable to reduction of the sodium conductance of neuronal membranes. Lidocaine and phenytoin were relatively ineffective against convulsants that act on synaptic chloride channels via the GABA-ionophore receptor complex. At higher dose levels, both lidocaine and phenytoin are excitatory within limited ranges. Lidocaine-induced seizures were potentiated by phenytoin, and antagonized by chlordiazepoxide, phenobarbital, valproate, trimethadione and muscimol, but not by ethosuximide. This profile of action is similar to that of bicuculline, suggesting that lidocaine may bind to the GABA recognition site and to another site in the GABA-ionophore receptor complex. Phenytoin-induced excitation was antagonized by chlordiazepoxide, less effectively by phenobarbital or trimethadione, only minimally by valproate, and not by trimethadione or muscimol. Phenytoin is known to bind to picrotoxin and benzodiazepine receptor sites; these findings suggest that it may be excitatory at one or both of these sites.

  19. A3 Adenosine Receptor Allosteric Modulator Induces an Anti-Inflammatory Effect: In Vivo Studies and Molecular Mechanism of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira Cohen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR is overexpressed in inflammatory cells and in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of individuals with inflammatory conditions. Agonists to the A3AR are known to induce specific anti-inflammatory effects upon chronic treatment. LUF6000 is an allosteric compound known to modulate the A3AR and render the endogenous ligand adenosine to bind to the receptor with higher affinity. The advantage of allosteric modulators is their capability to target specifically areas where adenosine levels are increased such as inflammatory and tumor sites, whereas normal body cells and tissues are refractory to the allosteric modulators due to low adenosine levels. LUF6000 administration induced anti-inflammatory effect in 3 experimental animal models of rat adjuvant induced arthritis, monoiodoacetate induced osteoarthritis, and concanavalin A induced liver inflammation in mice. The molecular mechanism of action points to deregulation of signaling proteins including PI3K, IKK, IκB, Jak-2, and STAT-1, resulting in decreased levels of NF-κB, known to mediate inflammatory effects. Moreover, LUF6000 induced a slight stimulatory effect on the number of normal white blood cells and neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effect of LUF6000, mechanism of action, and the differential effects on inflammatory and normal cells position this allosteric modulator as an attractive and unique drug candidate.

  20. DAPs: Deep Action Proposals for Action Understanding

    KAUST Repository

    Escorcia, Victor

    2016-09-17

    Object proposals have contributed significantly to recent advances in object understanding in images. Inspired by the success of this approach, we introduce Deep Action Proposals (DAPs), an effective and efficient algorithm for generating temporal action proposals from long videos. We show how to take advantage of the vast capacity of deep learning models and memory cells to retrieve from untrimmed videos temporal segments, which are likely to contain actions. A comprehensive evaluation indicates that our approach outperforms previous work on a large scale action benchmark, runs at 134 FPS making it practical for large-scale scenarios, and exhibits an appealing ability to generalize, i.e. to retrieve good quality temporal proposals of actions unseen in training.